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Sample records for ciliary beat frequency

  1. Automatic analysis of ciliary beat frequency using optical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figl, Michael; Lechner, Manuel; Werther, Tobias; Horak, Fritz; Hummel, Johann; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) can be a useful parameter for diagnosis of several diseases, as e.g. primary ciliary dyskinesia. (PCD). CBF computation is usually done using manual evaluation of high speed video sequences, a tedious, observer dependent, and not very accurate procedure. We used the OpenCV's pyramidal implementation of the Lukas-Kanade algorithm for optical flow computation and applied this to certain objects to follow the movements. The objects were chosen by their contrast applying the corner detection by Shi and Tomasi. Discrimination between background/noise and cilia by a frequency histogram allowed to compute the CBF. Frequency analysis was done using the Fourier transform in matlab. The correct number of Fourier summands was found by the slope in an approximation curve. The method showed to be usable to distinguish between healthy and diseased samples. However there remain difficulties in automatically identifying the cilia, and also in finding enough high contrast cilia in the image. Furthermore the some of the higher contrast cilia are lost (and sometimes found) by the method, an easy way to distinguish the correct sub-path of a point's path have yet to be found in the case where the slope methods doesn't work.

  2. Reduction of ciliary beat frequency in vitro by sputum from patients with bronchiectasis: a serine proteinase effect.

    OpenAIRE

    Smallman, L A; Hill, S. L.; Stockley, R A

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the effect of adding elastase positive sputum from six patients with purulent bronchiectasis on the ciliary beat frequency of nasal epithelium from normal subjects. Control studies of cilia suspended in tissue culture medium showed little change in ciliary beat frequency over six hours. Cilia incubated in elastase positive secretions, however, showed a considerable decrease in ciliary beat frequency over the period, falling from a mean of 13 X 40 beats/second to 6 X 78 beats/...

  3. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: evaluation using cilia beat frequency assessment via spectral analysis of digital microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Olm, Mary A. K.; Kögler, João E.; Macchione, Mariangela; Shoemark, Amelia; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Rodrigues, Joaquim C.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) measurements provide valuable information for diagnosing of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). We developed a system for measuring CBF, used it in association with electron microscopy to diagnose PCD, and then analyzed characteristics of PCD patients.1 The CBF measurement system was based on power spectra measured through digital imaging. Twenty-four patients suspected of having PCD (age 1–19 yr) were selected from a group of 75 children and adolescents with pneumo...

  4. Analysis of ependymal ciliary beat pattern and beat frequency using high speed imaging: comparison with the photomultiplier and photodiode methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Callaghan Chris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare beat frequency measurements of ependymal cilia made by digital high speed imaging to those obtained using the photomultiplier and modified photodiode techniques. Using high speed video analysis the relationship of the power and recover strokes was also determined. Methods Ciliated strips of ependyma attached to slices from the brain of Wistar rats were incubated at 30°C and observed using a ×50 water immersion lens. Ciliary beat frequency was measured using each of the three techniques: the high speed video, photodiode and photomultiplier. Readings were repeated after 30 minutes incubation at 37°C. Ependymal cilia were observed in slow motion and the precise movement of cilia during the recovery stroke relative to the path travelled during the power stroke was measured. Results The mean (95% confidence intervals beat frequencies determined by the high speed video, photomultiplier and photodiode at 30°C were 27.7 (26.6 to 28.8, 25.5 (24.4 to 26.6 and 20.8 (20.4 to 21.3 Hz, respectively. The mean (95% confidence intervals beat frequencies determined by the high speed video, photomultiplier and photodiode at 37°C were 36.4 (34 to 39.5, 38.4 (36.8 to 39.9 and 18.8 (16.9 to 20.5 Hz. The inter and intra observer reliability for measurement of ciliary beat frequency was 3.8% and 1%, respectively. Ependymal cilia were observed to move in a planar fashion during the power and recovery strokes with a maximum deviation to the right of the midline of 12.1(11.8 to 13.0° during the power stroke and 12.6(11.6 to 13.6° to the left of the midline during the recovery stroke. Conclusion The photodiode technique greatly underestimates ciliary beat frequency and should not be used to measure ependymal ciliary beat frequency at the temperatures studied. Ciliary beat frequency from the high speed video and photomultiplier techniques cannot be used interchangeably. Ependymal cilia had minimal deviation to

  5. Optimal ciliary beating patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilfan, Andrej; Osterman, Natan

    2011-11-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of single or collective biological cilia. We define the efficiency of a single cilium as Q2 / P , where Q is the volume flow rate of the pumped fluid and P is the dissipated power. For ciliary arrays, we define it as (ρQ) 2 / (ρP) , with ρ denoting the surface density of cilia. We then numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. For a single cilium optimization leads to curly, somewhat counterintuitive patterns. But when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal waves lead to a significantly higher efficiency than synchronous beating. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible optimum.

  6. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph C.; Su, Erica; Badger, Christopher; Coughlan, Carolyn A.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Ciliated epithelial cells populate up to 80% of the surface area of the human airway and are responsible for mucociliary transport, which is the key protective mechanism that provides the first line of defense in the respiratory tract. Cilia beat in a rhythmic pattern and may be easily affected by allergens, pollutants, and pathogens, altering ciliary beat frequency (CBF) subsequently. Diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and primary ciliary dyskinesia may also decrease CBF. CBF is therefore a critical component of respiratory health. The current clinical method of measuring CBF is phase-contrast microscopy, which involves a tissue biopsy obtained via brushing of the nasal cavity. While this method is minimally invasive, the tissue sample must be oriented to display its profile view, making the visualization of a single layer of cilia challenging. In addition, the conventional method requires subjective analysis of CBF, e.g., manually counting by visual inspection. On the contrary, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to study the retina in ophthalmology as well as vasculature in cardiology, and offers higher resolution than conventional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Based on this technology, our lab specifically developed an ultra-high resolution OCT system to image the microstructure of the ciliated epithelial cells. Doppler analysis was also performed to determine CBF. Lastly, we also developed a program that utilizes fast Fourier transform to determine CBF under phase-contrast microscopy, providing a more objective method compared to the current method.

  7. The Role of Ion Channels to Regulate Airway Ciliary Beat Frequency During Allergic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joskova, M; Sutovska, M; Durdik, P; Koniar, D; Hargas, L; Banovcin, P; Hrianka, M; Khazaei, V; Pappova, L; Franova, S

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of mucus is a hallmark of asthma. The aim of this study was to identify potentially effective therapies for removing excess mucus. The role of voltage-gated (Kir 6.1, KCa 1.1) and store-operated ion channels (SOC, CRAC) in respiratory cilia, relating to the tracheal ciliary beat frequency (CBF), was compared under the physiological and allergic airway conditions. Ex vivo experiments were designed to test the local effects of Kir 6.1, KCa 1.1 and CRAC ion channel modulators in a concentration-dependent manner on the CBF. Cilia, obtained with the brushing method, were monitored by a high-speed video camera and analyzed with ciliary analysis software. In natural conditions, a Kir 6.1 opener accelerated CBF, while CRAC blocker slowed it in a concentration-dependent manner. In allergic inflammation, the effect of Kir 6.1 opener was insignificant, with a tendency to decrease CBF. A cilio-inhibitory effect of a CRAC blocker, while gently reduced by allergic inflammation, remained significant. A KCa 1.1 opener turned out to significantly enhance the CBF under the allergic OVA-sensitized conditions. We conclude that optimally attuned concentration of KCa 1.1 openers or special types of bimodal SOC channel blockers, potentially given by inhalation, might benefit asthma. PMID:27369295

  8. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: evaluation using cilia beat frequency assessment via spectral analysis of digital microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögler, João E.; Macchione, Mariangela; Shoemark, Amelia; Saldiva, Paulo H. N.; Rodrigues, Joaquim C.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) measurements provide valuable information for diagnosing of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). We developed a system for measuring CBF, used it in association with electron microscopy to diagnose PCD, and then analyzed characteristics of PCD patients.1 The CBF measurement system was based on power spectra measured through digital imaging. Twenty-four patients suspected of having PCD (age 1–19 yr) were selected from a group of 75 children and adolescents with pneumopathies of unknown causes. Ten healthy, nonsmoking volunteers (age ≥17 yr) served as a control group. Nasal brush samples were collected, and CBF and electron microscopy were performed. PCD was diagnosed in 12 patients: 5 had radial spoke defects, 3 showed absent central microtubule pairs with transposition, 2 had outer dynein arm defects, 1 had a shortened outer dynein arm, and 1 had a normal ultrastructure. Previous studies have reported that the most common cilia defects are in the dynein arm. As expected, the mean CBF was higher in the control group (P < 0.001) and patients with normal ultrastructure (P < 0.002), than in those diagnosed with cilia ultrastructural defects (i.e., PCD patients). An obstructive ventilatory pattern was observed in 70% of the PCD patients who underwent pulmonary function tests. All PCD patients presented bronchial wall thickening on chest computed tomography scans. The protocol and diagnostic techniques employed allowed us to diagnose PCD in 16% of patients in this study. PMID:21551013

  9. Effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate on tracheal ciliary beating frequency in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is one of the emerging persistent organic pollutants, ubiquitously found in the global environment, even in human serum. PFOS has been reported to perturb Ca2+ homeostasis in Paramecium, cardiomyocytes and neurons. Since ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in the trachea is known to be increased by cytoplasmic Ca2+ elevation, the effects of PFOS on CBF were evaluated in a slice preparation using video-enhanced contrast microscopy. PFOS increased CBF by 11% (P 2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in mouse tracheal ciliary cells. In Ca2+-free solution, PFOS at 100 μM failed to increase CBF (0.96-fold of vehicle control). The addition of Gd3+ (1 μM), a store-operated Ca2+ channel blocker, did not prevent the increase in CBF (1.09-fold (P + concentration (50 mM), which causes depolarization of the plasma membrane potential and a transient increase in [Ca2+]i, increased CBF by 20% (P 2+ channels (VDCCs) in stimulation of CBF. Nifedipine (30 μM), a selective VDCC blocker, antagonized the effects of high K+ (0.92-fold of high K+ solution) and PFOS (0.96-fold of vehicle control) on CBF. In cells from peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-null mice, PFOS still increased CBF (1.12-fold (P 2+ through VDCC

  10. Histamine Stimulates Ciliary Beat Frequency via the H2 Receptor in the Protochordate Botryllus schlosseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, Francesca; Franchi, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Histamine is a biogenic molecule that plays a role in many physiological pathways via binding to a specific receptor. Histaminergic receptors belong to the large family of seven-transmembrane α-helix domain receptors classified in mammals into four distinct classes: H1, H2, H3, and H4. Despite being widely studied in vertebrates, few data are available on the invertebrate receptors, with only predicted H1 and H2 sequences for nonchordate deuterostomes. Here, we report the first characterized transcript sequence for an H2 receptor from the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, describing the localization of both transcript and protein during blastogenic development through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Its phylogenetic relationships with deuterostome orthologous proteins are reported, its role in ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in cultured stigma cells of the branchial basket is outlined, and the effects of histamine and its receptor agonists and antagonists are analyzed. In the presence of increasing concentrations of histamine in the medium, CBF increases similarly to the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit. In contrast, ranitidine, which is an inhibitor of the H2 receptor, causes a significant inhibition of CBF, similar to that observed after preincubation with the specific anti-BsHRH2 or the anti-human HRH2 antibody. In cells bordering the branchial basket stigmata, both antibodies colocalize in the proximal region of the ciliary plasmalemma, and histamine is present inside vesicles of the apical region, thus supporting the hypothesis of a histamine-binding H2 receptor control of the pharyngeal mucociliary transport similar to that of the upper respiratory tract and middle ear in mammals. PMID:27139577

  11. Immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of muco-ciliary transport: effect of mucus depth at various amounts of cilia beat frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmardan, M. M.; Sedaghat, M. H.; Norouzi, M.; Nazari, M.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation based on immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method has been employed to study 2D muco-ciliary transport problem. The periciliary liquid (PCL) and mucus layers in this study are considered as the Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid respectively. An Oldroyd-B model is used as the constitutive equations of mucus layer. To simulate accurate effects of the cilia and PCL-mucus interface on the fluid, immersed boundary method is used. Numerical simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of mucus depth on the muco-ciliary clearance at various values of cilia beat frequencies. Our results show that, by increasing mucus depth, which results from air pollution and smoking, mean mucus velocity decreases. But it can be completely modified by increasing cilia beat frequency and the cilia beat frequency has great effect on the muco-ciliary clearance.

  12. Ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels is facilitated by ciliary beating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, J; Himmerkus, N; Holland, N; Sartoris, F J; Bleich, M; Tresguerres, M

    2016-08-01

    The excretion of nitrogenous waste products in the form of ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4 (+)) is a fundamental process in aquatic organisms. For mytilid bivalves, little is known about the mechanisms and sites of excretion. This study investigated the localization and the mechanisms of ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels. An Rh protein was found to be abundantly expressed in the apical cell membrane of the plicate organ, which was previously described as a solely respiratory organ. The Rh protein was also expressed in the gill, although at significantly lower concentrations, but was not detectable in mussel kidney. Furthermore, NH3/NH4 (+) was not enriched in the urine, suggesting that kidneys are not involved in active NH3/NH4 (+) excretion. Exposure to elevated seawater pH of 8.5 transiently reduced NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates, but they returned to control values following 24 h acclimation. These mussels had increased abundance of V-type H(+)-ATPase in the apical membranes of plicate organ cells; however, NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates were not affected by the V-type H(+)-ATPase specific inhibitor concanamycin A (100 nmol l(-1)). In contrast, inhibition of ciliary beating with dopamine and increased seawater viscosity significantly reduced NH3 excretion rates under control pH (8.0). These results suggest that NH3/NH4 (+) excretion in mytilid mussels takes place by passive NH3 diffusion across respiratory epithelia via the Rh protein, facilitated by the water current produced for filter feeding, which prevents accumulation of NH3 in the boundary layer. This mechanism would be energy efficient for sessile organisms, as they already generate water currents for filter feeding. PMID:27489216

  13. Finding the ciliary beating pattern with optimal efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Osterman, Natan

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of biological cilia acting individually or collectively and numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. Maximizing the efficiency of a single cilium leads to curly, often symmetric and somewhat counterintuitive patterns. But when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal coordination is essential for efficient pumping and the highest efficiency is achieved with antiplectic waves. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible op...

  14. Control of ventricular ciliary beating by the Melanin Concentrating Hormone-expressing neurons of the lateral hypothalamus : a functional imaging survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-LouisNahon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic peptide Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH is known to control a large number of brain functions in mammals such as food intake and metabolism, stress response, anxiety, sleep/wake cycle, memory and reward. Based on neuroanatomical and electrophysiological studies these functions were attributed to neuronal circuits expressing MCHR1, the single MCH receptor in rodents. In complement to our recently published work (Conductier et al. 2013 we provided here new data regarding the action of MCH on ependymocytes in the mouse brain. First, we establish that MCHR1 mRNA is expressed in the ependymal cells of the third ventricle epithelium. Second, we demonstated a tonic control of MCH-expressing neurons on ependymal cilia beat frequency using in vitro optogenics. Finally, we performed in vivo measurements of CSF flow using fluorescent micro-beads in wild-type and MCHR1 knockout mice. Collectively, our results demonstrated that MCH-expressing neurons modulate ciliary beating of ependymal cells at the third ventricle and could contribute to maintain cerebro-spinal fluid homeostasis.

  15. Testing the Beat Frequency Model of Horizontal Branch Qpos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Paul

    The beat frequency modulated accretion (BFMA) model requires strong correlations in the horizontal branch quasiperiodic oscillations (HBO) and low frequency noise (LFN) amplitudes on time scales HBO and LFN amplitude predicted by the BFMA model and constrain some of the free observable parameters in the model. Any HBO model must account for these properties.

  16. Gimme the beat: assessment of low frequency beat noise for drilling rig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilawchuk, Steven; Froment, Patrick [aci Acoustical Consultants Inc. (Canada)], email: stevenb@aciacoustical.com, email: patrickf@aciacoustical.com

    2011-07-01

    The concern of an Alberta resident over the noise level from a drilling rig led to a low frequency noise impact assessment being done by an acoustic consulting firm. This paper describes the investigation that was conducted to determine the low frequency noise source, evaluate its sound emission levels and spectra, and propose mitigation options. Noise measurements were made over several days, with a sound level meter and additionally, a weather monitoring station was also used. Analysis showed low frequency tonal noise at the residential location, resulting in an overall sound level exceeding the permissible sound level imposed by the Alberta noise regulating bodies. Moreover, a beat phenomenon was observed, and after detailed investigation of possible sources, it was established that shale shakers were responsible for the low frequency noise and the beat phenomenon, a fact verified by beat theory. Due to the temporary nature of the drilling rig's operation, no thorough mitigation options could be proposed but a simple stop gap solution for the shale shakers allowed the reduction of low frequency tonal noise.

  17. Digital Processing of Beat Note Signals from Optical Frequency Synthesizers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížek, Martin; Šmíd, Radek; Buchta, Zdeněk; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    Gothenburg: Chalmers University of Technology, 2012, s. 409-411. [European frequency and time forum 2012. Gothenburg (SE), 23.04.2012-27.04.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P819; GA ČR GAP102/10/1813; GA ČR(CZ) GPP102/12/P962; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : digital processing of beat note signals * femtosecond optical frequency comb * digital servo-loop techniques * digital signal processing Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  18. Robust estimation of the motile cilia beating frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meste, O; Brau, F; Guyon, A

    2015-10-01

    The estimation of the cilia beating frequency (CBF) is of great interest in understanding how the CBF modulates liquid fluxes and how it is controlled by the ciliated cell intra- and/or extracellular medium composition in physiological processes. Motion artifacts and camera defaults may hinder the computation of the frequency variations during long-lasting experiments. We have developed a new analysis approach consisting of a preliminary corrective step (removal of a grid pattern on the image sequence and shift compensation), followed by a harmonic model of the observed cilia using a maximum likelihood estimator framework. It is shown that a more accurate estimation of the frequency can be obtained by averaging the squared Fourier transform of individual pixels followed by a particular summation over the different frequencies, namely the compressed spectrum. Robustness of the proposed method over traditional approaches is shown by several examples and simulations. The method is then applied to images of samples containing ciliated ependymal cells located in the third cerebral ventricle of mouse brains, showing that even small variations in CBF in response to changes in the amount of oxygenation, pH or glucose were clearly visible in the computed frequencies. As a conclusion, this method reveals a fine metabolic tuning of the cilia beating in ependimocytes lining the third cerebral ventricle. Such regulations are likely to participate in homeostatic mechanisms regulating CSF movements and brain energy supply. PMID:26215519

  19. Functional optical coherence tomography for high-resolution mapping of cilia beat frequency in the mouse oviduct in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Burton, Jason C.; Behringer, Richard R.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-02-01

    Since mouse is a superior model for genetic analysis of human disorders, reproductive studies in mice have significant implications on further understanding of fertility and infertility in humans. Fertilized oocytes are transported through the reproductive tract by motile cilia lining the lumen of the oviduct as well as by oviduct contractions. While the role of cilia is well recognized, ciliary dynamics in the oviduct is not well understood, largely owing to the lack of live imaging approaches. Here, we report in vivo micro-scale mapping of cilia and cilia beat frequency (CBF) in the mouse oviduct using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This functional imaging method is based on spectral analysis of the OCT speckle variations produced by the beat of cilia in the oviduct, which does not require exogenous contrast agents. Animal procedures similar to the ones used for production of transgenic mice are utilized to expose the reproductive organs for imaging in anesthetized females. In this paper, we first present in vivo structural imaging of the mouse oviduct capturing the oocyte and the preimplantation embryo and then show the result of depth-resolved high-resolution CBF mapping in the ampulla of the live mouse. These data indicate that this structural and functional OCT imaging approach can be a useful tool for a variety of live investigations of mammalian reproduction and infertility.

  20. Beat frequency stabilization between two HCN lasers by phase locked loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency stabilization circuit using a phase locked loop (PLL) was developed to stabilize a beat frequency of HCN laser interferometer in the JFT-2M tokamak. The application of this frequency stabilization circuit is to observe waves and density fluctuations in plasmas by laser scattering measurement. The frequency resolution of PLL is less than 10 kHz. The lock range obtained experimentally is about 1 MHz and its value is high enough to stabilize the beat frequency between two HCN lasers. The present PLL circuit can be applied to the scattering experiment in JFT-2M. (author)

  1. Evidence for two extremes of ciliary motor response in a single swimming microorganism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ilyong; Powers, Thomas R; Valles, James M

    2014-01-01

    Because arrays of motile cilia drive fluids for a range of processes, the versatile mechano-chemical mechanism coordinating them has been under scrutiny. The protist Paramecium presents opportunities to compare how groups of cilia perform two distinct functions, swimming propulsion and nutrient uptake. We present how the body cilia responsible for propulsion and the oral-groove cilia responsible for nutrient uptake respond to changes in their mechanical environment accomplished by varying the fluid viscosity over a factor of 7. Analysis with a phenomenological model of trajectories of swimmers made neutrally buoyant with magnetic forces combined with high-speed imaging of ciliary beating reveal that the body cilia exert a nearly constant propulsive force primarily by reducing their beat frequency as viscosity increases. By contrast, the oral-groove cilia beat at a nearly constant frequency. The existence of two extremes of motor response in a unicellular organism prompts unique investigations of factors controlling ciliary beating. PMID:24411242

  2. Changing Frequency Separation of Kilohertz Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in the Sonic-Point Beat-Frequency Model

    CERN Document Server

    Lamb, F K; Lamb, Frederick K.

    2000-01-01

    Previous work on the sonic-point beat-frequency (SPBF) model of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the X-ray flux from neutron stars in low-mass binary systems has shown that it naturally explains many properties of these QPOs. These include the existence of just two principal QPOs in a given source, the commensurability of the frequency separation \\Dnu\\ of the two kilohertz QPOs and the spin frequency \

  3. Beating frequency and amplitude modulation of the piano tone due to coupling of tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartling, Bo

    2005-04-01

    The influence on a piano tone from weak coexcitation of damped adjacent tones due to coupling via the bridge is studied. The frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound resulting from coexcitation of one strong and one or two weak tones is analyzed. One weak tone causes frequency and amplitude modulation of the sound, and two weak tones produce beating frequency and amplitude modulation, where the beatings of the two modulations are of opposite phase. By digital recording of the sound of piano tones, the appearance of these phenomena is verified. The audibility of the observed frequency and amplitude modulation is discussed in terms of previously determined detection thresholds. The beating character of both frequency and amplitude modulations, however, distinguishes the phenomena from those previously studied and prompts further psychoacoustic investigations. It is shown that detuning of unison strings may significantly increase the frequency deviation of the frequency modulation in conjunction with affected amplitude modulation. The modulatory effects of coupling to adjacent tones therefore may possibly be utilized in the tuning process. A coupling of tones analogous to the situation in a piano may arise in other stringed musical instruments transferring string vibrations to a soundboard via a bridge. .

  4. Beyond the mucus escalator: Complex ciliary hydrodynamics in disease and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Janna; Guo, Hanliang; John, Dabiri; Kanso, Eva; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures lining external and internal body surfaces where they interact with fluids. The main function of motile cilia is often described as that of a ``mucus escalator'', i.e., a homogeneous ciliary carpet moving along layer of mucus along the surface to transport food, germ cells, debris, or pathogens. Accordingly, the performance of ciliary systems is usually measured in terms of a single metric, transport velocity, or its presumed proxy, ciliary beat frequency. We challenge this simple view through the observation that both healthy and diseased biological systems exhibit a variety of cilia morphologies, beat patterns, and arrangements, resulting in complex flow patterns and transport phenomena that cannot be reduced to a single parameter. Here we present two case studies. In one system, the ciliated surface creates two distinct flow regimes for first trapping and then sheltering potential symbiont bacteria for further biochemical screening. In the other system, chronic disease induces a misalignment of ciliary beat, leading to a pathological transition from uniform mucus transport to a pattern of stagnation and circulation. These studies suggest that (a), we need to develop a wider range of metrics for describing ciliary transport in biological and clinical contexts, and (b), engineered ciliated systems exploiting a variety of design parameters could provide novel ways of manipulating fluids at the microscale.

  5. Pulsed Frequency Shifted Feedback Laser for Accurate Long Distance Measurements: Beat Order Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Pique, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    Long-distance measurements (10 m - 1000 m) with an accuracy of 10-7 is a challenge for many applications. We show that it is achievable with Frequency Shifted Feedback (FSF) laser interferometry technique, provided that the determination of the radio frequency beat order be made without ambiguity and on a time scale compatible with atmospheric applications. Using the pulsed-FSF laser that we developed for laser guide star application, we propose and test, up to 240 m, a simple method for measuring the beat order in real time. The moving-comb and Yatsenko models are also discussed. The first of these models fails to interpret our long-distance interferometry results. We show that the accuracy of long-distance measurements depends primarily on the stabilization of the acoustic frequency of the modulator.

  6. Enhanced speed in fluorescence imaging using beat frequency multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Hideharu; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Wang, Yisen; Hamad, Syed; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence imaging using radiofrequency-tagged emission (FIRE) is an emerging technique that enables higher imaging speed (namely, temporal resolution) in fluorescence microscopy compared to conventional fluorescence imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy and wide-field microscopy. It works based on the principle that it uses multiple intensity-modulated fields in an interferometric setup as excitation fields and applies frequency-division multiplexing to fluorescence signals. Unfortunately, despite its high potential, FIRE has limited imaging speed due to two practical limitations: signal bandwidth and signal detection efficiency. The signal bandwidth is limited by that of an acousto-optic deflector (AOD) employed in the setup, which is typically 100-200 MHz for the spectral range of fluorescence excitation (400-600 nm). The signal detection efficiency is limited by poor spatial mode-matching between two interfering fields to produce a modulated excitation field. Here we present a method to overcome these limitations and thus to achieve higher imaging speed than the prior version of FIRE. Our method achieves an increase in signal bandwidth by a factor of two and nearly optimal mode matching, which enables the imaging speed limited by the lifetime of the target fluorophore rather than the imaging system itself. The higher bandwidth and better signal detection efficiency work synergistically because higher bandwidth requires higher signal levels to avoid the contribution of shot noise and amplifier noise to the fluorescence signal. Due to its unprecedentedly high-speed performance, our method has a wide variety of applications in cancer detection, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine.

  7. Coherent laser control in attosecond sum-frequency polarization beats using twin noisy driving fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the phase-conjugate polarization interference between two-pathway excitations, we obtained an analytic closed form for the second-order or fourth-order Markovian stochastic correlation of the V three-level sum-frequency polarization beat (SFPB) in attosecond scale. Novel interferometric oscillatory behavior is exposed in terms of radiation-radiation, radiation-matter, and matter-matter polarization beats. The phase-coherent control of the light beams in the SFPB is subtle. When the laser has broadband linewidth, the homodyne detected SFPB signal shows resonant-nonresonant cross correlation, a drastic difference for three Markovian stochastic fields, and the autocorrelation of the SFPB exhibits hybrid radiation-matter detuning terahertz damping oscillation. As an attosecond ultrafast modulation process, it can be extended intrinsically to any sum frequency of energy levels. It has been also found that the asymmetric behaviors of the polarization beat signals due to the unbalanced controllable dispersion effects between the two arms of interferometer do not affect the overall accuracy in case using the SFPB to measure the Doppler-free energy-level sum of two excited states

  8. Ciliary kinematics of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in Complex Fluids: Role of viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Qin, Boyang; Arratia, Paulo

    2014-11-01

    The motility behavior of microorganisms can be significantly affected by the rheology of their fluidic environment. Guided by our experiments on the swimming gait of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in viscoelastic fluids, we focus on ciliary waveforms in Newtonian fluids and systematically study the effect of increasing viscosity. We find that the beat frequency as well as the wave speed are both strongly influenced by fluid viscosity. Interestingly, ciliary waveforms at low viscosity show a larger influence of the cell body than waveforms at higher viscosity. We use slender body theory and principal component analysis to elucidate the role of fluid viscosity in regulating the kinematics of the swimming process.

  9. Generation of Electron Bunches at Low Repetition Rates Using a Beat-Frequency Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poelker, Matt; Grames, Joseph; Hansknecht, John; Kazimi, Reza; Musson, John

    2007-05-01

    Even at a continuous wave facility such as CEBAF at Jefferson Lab, an electron beam with long time intervals (tens of ns) between individual bunches can be useful, for example to isolate sources of background via time of flight detection or to measure the energy of neutral particles that cannot be separated with a magnetic field. This paper describes a demonstrated method to quickly and easily deliver bunches with repetition rates of 20 to 100 MHz corresponding to time intervals between 10 to 50 ns (respectively). This is accomplished by changing the ON/OFF frequency of the RF-pulsed drive laser by a small amount (f/f < 20%), resulting in a bunch frequency equal to the beat frequency between the radio frequencies of the drive laser and the photoinjector chopper system.

  10. Efficiency of dispersive wave generation from a dual-frequency beat signal

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Genty, G; Murdoch, S G

    2016-01-01

    The emission of dispersive waves (DWs) by temporal solitons can be described as a cascaded four-wave mixing process triggered by a pair of monochromatic continuous waves (CWs). We report experimental and numerical results demonstrating that the efficiency of this process is strongly and non-trivially affected by the frequency detuning of the CW pump lasers. We explain our results by showing that individual cycles of the input dual-frequency beat signal can evolve as higher-order solitons whose temporal compression and soliton fission govern the DW efficiency. Analytical predictions based on the detuning dependence of the soliton order are shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental and numerical observations.

  11. Fast phase stabilization of a low frequency beat note for atom interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, E; Horne, R A; Sackett, C A

    2016-06-01

    Atom interferometry experiments rely on the ability to obtain a stable signal that corresponds to an atomic phase. For interferometers that use laser beams to manipulate the atoms, noise in the lasers can lead to errors in the atomic measurement. In particular, it is often necessary to actively stabilize the optical phase between two frequency components of the beams. Typically this is achieved using a time-domain measurement of a beat note between the two frequencies. This becomes challenging when the frequency difference is small and the phase measurement must be made quickly. The method presented here instead uses a spatial interference detection to rapidly measure the optical phase for arbitrary frequency differences. A feedback system operating at a bandwidth of about 10 MHz could then correct the phase in about 3 μs. This time is short enough that the phase correction could be applied at the start of a laser pulse without appreciably degrading the fidelity of the atom interferometer operation. The phase stabilization system was demonstrated in a simple atom interferometer measurement of the (87)Rb recoil frequency. PMID:27370424

  12. Fast phase stabilization of a low frequency beat note for atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, E.; Horne, R. A.; Sackett, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    Atom interferometry experiments rely on the ability to obtain a stable signal that corresponds to an atomic phase. For interferometers that use laser beams to manipulate the atoms, noise in the lasers can lead to errors in the atomic measurement. In particular, it is often necessary to actively stabilize the optical phase between two frequency components of the beams. Typically this is achieved using a time-domain measurement of a beat note between the two frequencies. This becomes challenging when the frequency difference is small and the phase measurement must be made quickly. The method presented here instead uses a spatial interference detection to rapidly measure the optical phase for arbitrary frequency differences. A feedback system operating at a bandwidth of about 10 MHz could then correct the phase in about 3 μs. This time is short enough that the phase correction could be applied at the start of a laser pulse without appreciably degrading the fidelity of the atom interferometer operation. The phase stabilization system was demonstrated in a simple atom interferometer measurement of the 87Rb recoil frequency.

  13. Digital approach to stabilizing optical frequency combs and beat notes of CW lasers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížek, Martin; Číp, Ondřej; Šmíd, Radek; Hrabina, Jan; Mikel, Břetislav; Lazar, Josef

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2013, 89161H:1-6. ISSN 0277-786X. [International Symposium on Precision Mechanical Measurements /6./. Guiyang (CN), 10.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P819; GA MPO FR-TI2/705; GA MPO FR-TI1/241; GA TA ČR TA01010995; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03010663; GA MV VG20132015124; GA MŠk EE2.4.31.0016; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03010835 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Optical frequency combs * Digital signal processing * Software-defined radio * Beat note * Stabilization Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  14. On the Magnetospheric Beat-Frequency and Lense-Thirring Interpretations of the Horizontal Branch Oscillation in the Z Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Psaltis, D; Homan, J; Jonker, P G; Van der Klis, M; Miller, M C; Lamb, F K; Kuulkers, E; Van Paradijs, J; Lewin, W H G; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Wijnands, Rudy; Homan, Jeroen; Jonker, Peter G.; Klis, Michiel van der; Lamb, Frederick K.; Kuulkers, Erik; Paradijs, Jan van; Lewin, Walter H.G.

    1999-01-01

    We study the horizontal branch oscillations (HBO) and the two simultaneous kilohertz QPOs comparing their properties in five Z sources with the predictions of the magnetospheric beat-frequency and Lense-Thirring precession models. We find that the variation of the HBO frequency with accretion rate predicted by the magnetospheric beat-frequency model for a purely dipolar stellar magnetic field and a radiation-pressure-dominated inner accretion disk agrees well with the observed variation. This model implies that the neutron stars in the Z sources are near magnetic spin equilibrium, that their magnetic field strengths are ~10^9-10^10 G, and that the critical fastness parameter for these sources is >0.8. If the frequency of the upper kilohertz QPO is an orbital frequency in the accretion disk, the magnetospheric beat-frequency model requires that a small fraction of the gas in the disk does not couple strongly to the stellar magnetic field at 3-4 stellar radii but instead drifts slowly inward in nearly circular ...

  15. Self-heterodyne mixing method of two inter-mode beat frequencies for frequency stabilization of a three-mode He-Ne laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongmin Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a robust self-heterodyne mixing method of two inter-mode beat frequencies suitable for frequency stabilization of a three longitudinal-mode (3-mode He-Ne laser at 633 nm. A high-contrast frequency discrimination signal with a broad locking range of 244 MHz is obtained by using a self-heterodyned double balanced mixer operating at the inter-mode beat frequency of 607 MHz. We show that the central-mode frequency of the 3-mode He-Ne laser could be stabilized to the center of the gain profile with a frequency fluctuation less than ± 5 MHz for more than 12 h.

  16. Fiber optic laser light scattering measurement of ciliary function of the fallopian tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Sheridan A.; Lim, Kap; Lee, Wylie I.

    1990-07-01

    A fiber-optic laser light-scattering system (FLS) for measuring ciliary function was evaluated by means of three sets of in vitro experiments. First, FLS performance was compared to that of a previously proven benchtop laser system (BLS). Using tissue excised from rabbit fallopian tubes, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) of each sample was measured with FLS and BLS. Paired CBF measurements showed excellent correlation between the two systems (r =0.93). Second, the FLS was used to evaluate the dependency of CBF on temperature (T) by using tissue sampies of rabbit oviductal fimbna. Regression analysis of CBF vs T showed a linear relationship over the range of 18-37°C for both individual samples (r =0.98) and pooled data from all experiments (r = 0.84). Fmally, the relalionship between CBF and ciliary ovum transport rate (TR) was tested by using T to modulate CBF of rabbit fimbria, in vitro. The relationship was linear over the range of CBF from 10 to 30 Hz (r2 = 0.83). At 37°C, CBF = 31+/-1 Hz, and TR = O.12+/-.02 mm/sec. equal to ovum transport rate in situ. The FLS is a valuable tool for characterizing ciliary activity and thus ovum transport function. Owing to the fact that ciliary dyskinesia resulting from disease of the fallopian tube is associated with infeitility, the FLS may be useful to acquire data important to the clinical evaluation of fallopian tube function and female infertility.

  17. Birefringence-induced frequency beating in high-finesse cavities by continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    By analyzing the decaying intensity, leaking out a high-finesse cavity previously "filled" by a cw laser source (using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique), we observed frequency beating between what we think are two orthogonal eigenpolarization states of the intracavity electromagnetic field. The time decay (ring down) is analyzed by varying the angle of the polarization analyzer located in front of the detector. A full modeling of the observed signal is proposed. It is based on the Jones matrix formalism required for modeling the cavity behavior following a rotated phase shifter. The full transfer function is first established in the frequency domain, and then Fourier transformed to recover the temporal response. The same optical cavity, i.e., constituted of the same set of mirrors, is used at two different wavelengths (˜800 and ˜880 nm). It demonstrates the differences in behavior between a high-finesse cavity (˜400 000 ) and a lower finesse cavity (˜50 000 ). Beating frequency, characteristics time, and beat amplitude are mainly discussed versus the analyzer angle. A cavity birefringence of ˜1.6 ×10-5 rad, resulting from the mirror birefringence is suggested. If the current analysis is in agreement with pulsed CRDS experiments (polarimetry) obtained in an isotropic moderate-finesse cavity, it differs from a recent work report on a high-finesse cavity associated with a source mode locking [Phys. Rev. A 85, 013837 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.013837].

  18. Comment on "Human Time-Frequency Acuity Beats the Fourier Uncertainty Principle"

    OpenAIRE

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Spanner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the initial article [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 044301 (2013), arXiv:1208.4611] it was claimed that human hearing can beat the Fourier uncertainty principle. In this Comment, we demonstrate that the experiment designed and implemented in the original article was ill-chosen to test Fourier uncertainty in human hearing.

  19. Metal particulate matter components affect gene expression and beat frequency of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Donald W; Cascio, Wayne E; Brackhan, Joseph A; Devlin, Robert B

    2004-05-01

    Soluble particulate matter (PM) components (e.g., metals) have the potential to be absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to the heart where they might induce the expression of inflammatory cytokines and remodel electrical properties. We exposed cultured rat ventricular myocytes to similar concentrations of two metals [zinc (Zn) and vanadium (V)] found commonly in PM and measured changes in spontaneous beat rate. We found statistically significant reductions in spontaneous beat rate after both short-term (4-hr) and long-term (24-hr) exposures, with a more substantial effect seen with Zn. We also measured the expression of genes associated with inflammation and a number of sarcolemmal proteins associated with electrical impulse conduction. Exposure to Zn or V (6.25-50 microM) for 6 hr produced significant increases in IL-6, IL-1 alpha, heat shock protein 70, and connexin 43 (Cx43). After 24 hr exposure, Zn induced significant changes in the gene expression of Kv4.2 and KvLQt (potassium channel proteins), the alpha 1 subunit of the L-type calcium channel, and Cx43, as well as IL-6 and IL-1 alpha. In contrast, V produced a greater effect on Cx43 and affected only one ion channel (KvLQT1). These results show that exposure of rat cardiac myocytes to noncytotoxic concentrations of Zn and V alter spontaneous beat rate as well as the expression of ion channels and sarcolemmal proteins relevant to electrical remodeling and slowing of spontaneous beat rate, with Zn producing a more profound effect. As such, these data suggest that the cardiac effects of PM are largely determined by the relative metal composition of particles. PMID:15159208

  20. Superresolved optical imaging through higher-order spatial frequency harmonic generation without beating the diffraction limit of light

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhixiang; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a method to achieve superresolved optical imaging without beating the diffraction limit of light. This is achieved by magnifying the ideal optical image of the object through higher-order spatial frequency generation while keeping the size of the effective point spread function of the optical imaging system unchanged. A proof-of-principle experiment was demonstrated in a modified $4f$-imaging system, where the spatial frequency of a two-line source was doubled or tripled on the confocal Fourier plane of the $4f$-imaging system through a light pulse storage and retrieval process based on the electromagnetically induced transparency effect in a Pr$^{3+}$:$\\rm Y_2SiO_5$ crystal, and an originally unresolvable image of the two line sources in the conventional $4f$-imaging system became resolvable with the spatial frequency doubling or tripling. Our results offer an original way towards improving optical imaging resolution without beating the diffraction limit of light, which is totally different from ...

  1. Fish and robots swimming together in a water tunnel: robot color and tail-beat frequency influence fish behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polverino, Giovanni; Phamduy, Paul; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of integrating bioinspired robots in groups of live social animals may constitute a valuable tool to study the basis of social behavior and uncover the fundamental determinants of animal functions and dysfunctions. In this study, we investigate the interactions between individual golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) and robotic fish swimming together in a water tunnel at constant flow velocity. The robotic fish is designed to mimic its live counterpart in the aspect ratio, body shape, dimension, and locomotory pattern. Fish positional preference with respect to the robot is experimentally analyzed as the robot's color pattern and tail-beat frequency are varied. Behavioral observations are corroborated by particle image velocimetry studies aimed at investigating the flow structure behind the robotic fish. Experimental results show that the time spent by golden shiners in the vicinity of the bioinspired robotic fish is the highest when the robot mimics their natural color pattern and beats its tail at the same frequency. In these conditions, fish tend to swim at the same depth of the robotic fish, where the wake from the robotic fish is stronger and hydrodynamic return is most likely to be effective. PMID:24204882

  2. Fish and robots swimming together in a water tunnel: robot color and tail-beat frequency influence fish behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Polverino

    Full Text Available The possibility of integrating bioinspired robots in groups of live social animals may constitute a valuable tool to study the basis of social behavior and uncover the fundamental determinants of animal functions and dysfunctions. In this study, we investigate the interactions between individual golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas and robotic fish swimming together in a water tunnel at constant flow velocity. The robotic fish is designed to mimic its live counterpart in the aspect ratio, body shape, dimension, and locomotory pattern. Fish positional preference with respect to the robot is experimentally analyzed as the robot's color pattern and tail-beat frequency are varied. Behavioral observations are corroborated by particle image velocimetry studies aimed at investigating the flow structure behind the robotic fish. Experimental results show that the time spent by golden shiners in the vicinity of the bioinspired robotic fish is the highest when the robot mimics their natural color pattern and beats its tail at the same frequency. In these conditions, fish tend to swim at the same depth of the robotic fish, where the wake from the robotic fish is stronger and hydrodynamic return is most likely to be effective.

  3. Stroma cell-derived factor-1α signaling enhances calcium transients and beating frequency in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ielham Hadad

    Full Text Available Stroma cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α is a cardioprotective chemokine, acting through its G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4. In experimental acute myocardial infarction, administration of SDF-1α induces an early improvement of systolic function which is difficult to explain solely by an anti-apoptotic and angiogenic effect. We wondered whether SDF-1α signaling might have direct effects on calcium transients and beating frequency.Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were culture-expanded and characterized by immunofluorescence staining. Calcium sparks were studied by fluorescence microscopy after calcium loading with the Fluo-4 acetoxymethyl ester sensor. The cardiomyocyte enriched cellular suspension expressed troponin I and CXCR4 but was vimentin negative. Addition of SDF-1α in the medium increased cytoplasmic calcium release. The calcium response was completely abolished by using a neutralizing anti-CXCR4 antibody and partially suppressed and delayed by preincubation with an inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R blocker, but not with a ryanodine receptor (RyR antagonist. Calcium fluxes induced by caffeine, a RyR agonist, were decreased by an IP3R blocker. Treatment with forskolin or SDF-1α increased cardiomyocyte beating frequency and their effects were additive. In vivo, treatment with SDF-1α increased left ventricular dP/dtmax.These results suggest that in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling increases calcium transients in an IP3-gated fashion leading to a positive chronotropic and inotropic effect.

  4. Energy savings in sea bass swimming in a school: measurements of tail beat frequency and oxygen consumption at different swimming speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskin, J; Steffensen, JF

    1998-01-01

    Tail beat frequency of sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) (23.5 ± 0·5 cm, LT), swimming at the front of a school was significantly higher than when swimming at the rear, for all water velocities tested from 14·8 to 32 cm s-1. The logarithm of oxygen consumption rate, and the tail beat frequency of...... solitary swimming sea bass (28·8 ± 0·4 cm, LT), were each correlated linearly with swimming speed, and also with one another. The tail beat frequency of individual fish was 9-14% lower when at the rear of a school than when at the front, corresponding to a 9-23% reduction in oxygen consumption rate....

  5. Multi-input multi-output frequency-modulated continuous wave synthetic aperture radar system using beat-frequency division waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attention has been paid to lightweight, cost-effective frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in recent years. Though FMCW SAR can operate at high altitude, it is still impracticable for wide swath or high Doppler bandwidth remote sensing because of the dramatic losses of range resolution and processing gain. Moreover, the system sampling rate is too high for real-time processing. All these restrictions caused by the bandwidth loss of the dechirp operation can be relieved by expanding the system sweep cycle. However, the broadening of the sweep cycle decreases the system pulse repetition frequency with azimuth ambiguity, which can be suppressed by exploiting the spatial diversity of multi-input multi-output (MIMO) systems. This paper reports a MIMO-FMCW SAR system using beat-frequency division waveforms. There is a small frequency interval and a large overlap (in frequency) between the orthogonal waveforms. As the frequency interval is much smaller than the signal bandwidth, the echoes that come from different transmitters can be separated by bandpass filtering with little intrapulse interference. Consequently, the applications of FMCW SAR systems can be extended for wider swath or higher Doppler bandwidth remote sensing. Theoretical analysis and simulation results illustrate the feasibility of this system. (paper)

  6. LRRC6 mutation causes primary ciliary dyskinesia with dynein arm defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Horani

    Full Text Available Despite recent progress in defining the ciliome, the genetic basis for many cases of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD remains elusive. We evaluated five children from two unrelated, consanguineous Palestinian families who had PCD with typical clinical features, reduced nasal nitric oxide concentrations, and absent dynein arms. Linkage analyses revealed a single common homozygous region on chromosome 8 and one candidate was conserved in organisms with motile cilia. Sequencing revealed a single novel mutation in LRRC6 (Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 6 that fit the model of autosomal recessive genetic transmission, leading to a change of a highly conserved amino acid from aspartic acid to histidine (Asp146His. LRRC6 was localized to the cytoplasm and was up-regulated during ciliogenesis in human airway epithelial cells in a Foxj1-dependent fashion. Nasal epithelial cells isolated from affected individuals and shRNA-mediated silencing in human airway epithelial cells, showed reduced LRRC6 expression, absent dynein arms, and slowed cilia beat frequency. Dynein arm proteins were either absent or mislocalized to the cytoplasm in airway epithelial cells from a primary ciliary dyskinesia subject. These findings suggest that LRRC6 plays a role in dynein arm assembly or trafficking and when mutated leads to primary ciliary dyskinesia with laterality defects.

  7. Pseudotumor of Ciliary Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Varghese

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital pseudotumor is a benign disease involving the orbital structures. Pseudotumor of the ciliary body is rare. We present a case of a 27-year-old male who presented with gradual visual loss, pain, and redness in his left eye. On examination he was found to have a yellowish white mass at the periphery of anterior chamber in his left eye and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM revealed a ciliary body mass in the same eye. He was treated with systemic steroids, which was tapered over a period of 8 weeks. His symptoms improved and the ciliary body mass disappeared with no recurrence over the next 6 months. UBM is an important diagnostic tool for diagnosing ciliary body mass. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment with systemic steroids may help resolve pseudotumor of the ciliary body.

  8. [A case of primary ciliary dyskinesia who had been treated as asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoki, Koa; Fujisawa, Takao; Masuda, Sawako; Usui, Satoko; Ito, Hiroaki; Nagao, Mizuho; Terada, Akihiko; Iguchi, Kousei; Ogawa, Satoru; Nakatani, Kaname; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2010-07-01

    We report a case of 18-old girl with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) who had been diagnosed as asthma. Since birth, she had presented with unexplained productive cough, sputum, rhinorrhea, and stridor with situs solitus. Her familial history was negative for PCD. At 2 years of age, ciliary beat frequency and beat pattern were normal. She was diagnosed as rhinosinusitis, chronic secretory otitis media. At 3 years of age, she was diagnosed as asthma because of wheezing not associated with respiratory infection. Various asthma medications were then administered, including DSCG, inhaled corticosteroids, and salmeterol, but varying responses to the treatment were noted. Spirometry revealed persistent severe small airway obstruction. Beta2 agonist reversibility was recognized by impulse oscillation system, not with FEV1. At age of 18, chest CT disclosed bronchiectasis, and nasal nitric oxide concentration was very low, 98 ppb and a diagnostic approach for PCD was performed. Electron microscopic analysis of nasal cilia demonstrated defects of the outer and inner dynein arms, and the diagnosis of PCD was made. Mutations in DNAH1 and DNAI1 genes were found. The diagnosis of PCD is often difficult in the absence of situs inversus totalis. Recurrent wheeze with chronic rhinosinusitis, chronic otitis media, and brochiectasis may warrant detailed investigations for PCD, especially with nasal NO measurement. PMID:20703071

  9. Loss-of-Function GAS8 Mutations Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Disrupt the Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Olbrich, Heike; Cremers, Carolin; Loges, Niki T.; Werner, Claudius; Nielsen, Kim G.; Marthin, June K.; Philipsen, Maria; Wallmeier, Julia; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Edelbusch, Christine; Dougherty, Gerard W.; Schwartz, Oliver; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine

    2015-01-01

    Multiciliated epithelial cells protect the upper and lower airways from chronic bacterial infections by moving mucus and debris outward. Congenital disorders of ciliary beating, referred to as primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), are characterized by deficient mucociliary clearance and severe, recurrent respiratory infections. Numerous genetic defects, most of which can be detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are so far known to cause different abnormalities of the ciliary axoneme...

  10. Modeling pharmacological clock and memory patterns of interval timing in a striatal beat-frequency model with realistic, noisy neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorinel A. Oprisan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In most species, the capability of perceiving and using the passage of time in the seconds-to-minutes range (interval timing is not only accurate but also scalar: errors in time estimation are linearly related to the estimated duration. The ubiquity of scalar timing extends over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, in mammals, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, scalar change in the perceived time (clock pattern, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in perceived time (memory pattern. How do these properties emerge from unreliable, noisy neurons firing in the milliseconds range? Neurobiological information relative to the brain circuits involved in interval timing provide support for an Striatal Beat Frequency (SBF model, in which time is coded by the coincidental activation of striatal spiny neurons by cortical neural oscillators. While biologically plausible, the impracticality of perfect oscillators, or their lack thereof, questions this mechanism in a brain with noisy neurons. We explored the computational mechanisms required for the clock and memory patterns in an SBF model with biophysically realistic and noisy Morris-Lecar neurons (SBF-ML. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing frequency of cortical oscillators, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that our SBF-ML model can reproduce the pharmacological clock and memory patterns observed in the literature. Numerical results also indicate that parameter variability (noise – which is ubiquitous in the form of small fluctuations in the intrinsic frequencies of neural oscillators within and between trails, and in the errors in recording/retrieving stored information related to criterion time – seems to be critical for the time-scale invariance of the clock and memory patterns.

  11. Features of amplitude and Doppler frequency variation of ELF/VLF waves generated by "beat-wave" HF heating at high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, E. D.; Shumilov, O. I.; Kasatkina, E. A.; Gomonov, A. D.

    2014-07-01

    Observations of extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) radio waves generated by a "beat-wave" (BW) high frequency (~ 4.04-4.9 MHz) ionospheric heating are presented. ELF waves were registered with the ELF receiver located at Lovozero (68°N, 35°E), 660 km east from the European Incoherent Scatter Tromso heating facility (69.6°N, 19.2°E). Frequency shifts between the generated beat-wave and received ELF waves were detected in all sessions. It is shown that the amplitudes of ELF waves depend on the auroral electrojet current strength. Our results showing a strong dependence of ELF signal intensities on the substorm development seem to support the conclusion that electrojet currents may affect the BW generation of ELF/VLF waves.

  12. Impact of reperfusion therapy and infarct localization on frequency of premature ventricular beats in acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Horvat

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine the impact of infarct localization and types of reperfusion therapy on the frequency of ventricular premature beats (VPBs in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF. Methods A total of 705 patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI were divided according to the infarct localization (anteroseptal, anterolateral, inferior and posterior and reperfusion therapy (fibrinolysis or percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting into two groups: LVEF45% was a control group. The occurrence of VPBs10 per hour defined as a significant. Results In patients with fibrinolysis therapy and LVEF<45% significant number of VPBs were in anteroseptal (p=0.017, anterolateral (p<0.001 and posterior AMI (p<0.001, but in patients with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI and LVEF<45% significant number of VPBs were only in anteroseptal AMI (p=0.001 localization. Conclusion In patients with reduced ejection fraction in AMI, treatment with PCI method has a better antiarrhythmic effect compared to fibrinolysis treatment.

  13. Partition of aerobic and anaerobic swimming costs and their correlation to tail-beat frequency and burst activity in Sparus aurata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    until fatigue at 10°C. The anaerobic swimming cost was measured as the excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) following each swimming speed. To determine tail-beat frequency, amplitude and burst and coast behaviour, the peduncle position was determined at 25 s·' by video tracking. The data showed...... EPOC and both the burst frequency (bursts min·') and burst distance (percentage burst distance) were found to predict EPOC by linear regressions. The low temperature used in the present study resulted in a prolonged recovery time, which increased with the anaerobic contribution to 10 hours after...

  14. CFAP54 is required for proper ciliary motility and assembly of the central pair apparatus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Casey W; Craige, Branch; Kroeger, Tiffany V; Finn, Rozzy; Wyatt, Todd A; Sisson, Joseph H; Pavlik, Jacqueline A; Strittmatter, Lara; Hendricks, Gregory M; Witman, George B; Lee, Lance

    2015-09-15

    Motile cilia and flagella play critical roles in fluid clearance and cell motility, and dysfunction commonly results in the pediatric syndrome primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). CFAP221, also known as PCDP1, is required for ciliary and flagellar function in mice and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, where it localizes to the C1d projection of the central microtubule apparatus and functions in a complex that regulates flagellar motility in a calcium-dependent manner. We demonstrate that the genes encoding the mouse homologues of the other C. reinhardtii C1d complex members are primarily expressed in motile ciliated tissues, suggesting a conserved function in mammalian motile cilia. The requirement for one of these C1d complex members, CFAP54, was identified in a mouse line with a gene-trapped allele. Homozygous mice have PCD characterized by hydrocephalus, male infertility, and mucus accumulation. The infertility results from defects in spermatogenesis. Motile cilia have a structural defect in the C1d projection, indicating that the C1d assembly mechanism requires CFAP54. This structural defect results in decreased ciliary beat frequency and perturbed cilia-driven flow. This study identifies a critical role for CFAP54 in proper assembly and function of mammalian cilia and flagella and establishes the gene-trapped allele as a new model of PCD. PMID:26224312

  15. Extremely short distributed Bragg reflector fibre lasers with sub-kilohertz linewidth and ultra-low polarization beat frequency for sensing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the fabrication, characterization and application of extremely short linear-cavity distributed Bragg reflector fibre lasers (DBR-FLs) written in commercial erbium-doped fibres. The DBR-FL has a total length of 7 mm, of which the nominal cavity is 0.4 mm in length, making it the shortest DBR-FL being reported. Two distinct spectral properties are observed: ultra-narrow linewidth and ultra-low polarization beat frequency, which are measured to be 0.22 kHz and 18.9 MHz, respectively. For the former, the FLs find applications in high sensitivity interferometric sensing, optical frequency metrology and coherent optical communications, whereas for the latter, such a low beat frequency is beneficial to the construction of low-cost and simple demodulator electronics for sensor signal demodulation. The relative intensity noise measurement showed that the relaxation oscillation frequency and relative peak are 120 kHz and −75 dB Hz−1, respectively. The FL exhibited low-noise characteristics, with an intensity noise of −107 dB Hz−1 at 1 MHz. We demonstrate the use of these extremely short FLs in the construction of an efficiently pumped and serially multiplexed FL sensor array suitable for practical sensing applications. Two array configurations were tested, namely with individual FLs fabricated in short sections of EDF and connected via passive fibres and with all FLs fabricated along a single EDF

  16. Computational modelling elucidates the mechanism of ciliary regulation in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hundhausen Christian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciliary dysfunction leads to a number of human pathologies, including primary ciliary dyskinesia, nephronophthisis, situs inversus pathology or infertility. The mechanism of cilia beating regulation is complex and despite extensive experimental characterization remains poorly understood. We develop a detailed systems model for calcium, membrane potential and cyclic nucleotide-dependent ciliary motility regulation. Results The model describes the intimate relationship between calcium and potassium ionic concentrations inside and outside of cilia with membrane voltage and, for the first time, describes a novel type of ciliary excitability which plays the major role in ciliary movement regulation. Our model describes a mechanism that allows ciliary excitation to be robust over a wide physiological range of extracellular ionic concentrations. The model predicts the existence of several dynamic modes of ciliary regulation, such as the generation of intraciliary Ca2+ spike with amplitude proportional to the degree of membrane depolarization, the ability to maintain stable oscillations, monostable multivibrator regimes, all of which are initiated by variability in ionic concentrations that translate into altered membrane voltage. Conclusions Computational investigation of the model offers several new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ciliary pathologies. According to our analysis, the reported dynamic regulatory modes can be a physiological reaction to alterations in the extracellular environment. However, modification of the dynamic modes, as a result of genetic mutations or environmental conditions, can cause a life threatening pathology.

  17. Beat Dreams?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Two of the founding members of the Beat Generation of the 1950s wrote dream books with almost identical titles: Jack Kerouac's Book of Dreams (1961) and William Burroughs' My Education: A Book of Dreams (1995). This paper queries the function of such dream books, both from a perspective of seeing...... dream writing as a confessional genre, and from the perspective of didacticism implicit in sharing one's dream life with one's readers. What role does memory, politics, fantasies and reality play in communicating with and via dreams?...

  18. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona; Leigh, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessive genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia with chronic otosinopulmonary disease and organ laterality defects in ∼50% of cases. The prevalence of PCD is difficult to determine. Recent diagnostic advances through measurement of nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing has allowed rigorous diagnoses and determination of a robust clinical phenotype, which includes neonatal respiratory distress, daily nasal congestion, and wet cough starting early in life, along with organ laterality defects. There is early onset of lung disease in PCD with abnormal airflow mechanics and radiographic abnormalities detected in infancy and early childhood. PMID:27514592

  19. Primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Jason; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Noone, Peadar G

    2015-04-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cilia structure, function, and biogenesis leading to chronic infections of the respiratory tract, fertility problems, and disorders of organ laterality. The diagnosis can be challenging, using traditional tools such as characteristic clinical features, ciliary function, and ultrastructural defects and newer screening tools such as nasal nitric oxide levels and genetic testing add to the diagnostic algorithm. There are 32 known PCD-causing genes, and in the future, comprehensive genetic testing may screen young infants before developing symptoms, thus improving survival. Therapies include surveillance of pulmonary function and microbiology, in addition to airway clearance, antibiotics, and early referral to bronchiectasis centers. As with cystic fibrosis (CF), standardized care at specialized centers using a multidisciplinary approach likely improves outcomes. In conjunction with the CF foundation, the PCD foundation, with experienced investigators and clinicians, is developing a network of PCD clinical centers to coordinate the effort in North America and Europe. As the network grows, clinical care and knowledge will improve. PMID:25826585

  20. Psychophysiological reactivity to auditory Binaural Beats stimulation in the alpha and theta EEG brain-wave frequency bands: A randomized, double–blind and placebo–controlled study in human healthy young adult subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Pfaff, Hans Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Psicología, Departamento de Psicología Biológica y de la Salud. Fecha de lectura: 25-06-2014 Binaural beats are an acoustical illusion of the perception of a “virtual” third tone, fluctuating (i.e. beating) in its volume evoked by two carrier–sinusoids of same amplitudes, but slightly different frequencies f1 and f2, presented by stereo-headphones. Although this illusion was discovered as early as 1839 ...

  1. Losing the beat: deficits in temporal coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Caroline; Lidji, Pascale; Peretz, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Tapping or clapping to an auditory beat, an easy task for most individuals, reveals precise temporal synchronization with auditory patterns such as music, even in the presence of temporal fluctuations. Most models of beat-tracking rely on the theoretical concept of pulse: a perceived regular beat generated by an internal oscillation that forms the foundation of entrainment abilities. Although tapping to the beat is a natural sensorimotor activity for most individuals, not everyone can track an auditory beat. Recently, the case of Mathieu was documented (Phillips-Silver et al. 2011 Neuropsychologia 49, 961–969. (doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2011.02.002)). Mathieu presented himself as having difficulty following a beat and exhibited synchronization failures. We examined beat-tracking in normal control participants, Mathieu, and a second beat-deaf individual, who tapped with an auditory metronome in which unpredictable perturbations were introduced to disrupt entrainment. Both beat-deaf cases exhibited failures in error correction in response to the perturbation task while exhibiting normal spontaneous motor tempi (in the absence of an auditory stimulus), supporting a deficit specific to perception–action coupling. A damped harmonic oscillator model was applied to the temporal adaptation responses; the model's parameters of relaxation time and endogenous frequency accounted for differences between the beat-deaf cases as well as the control group individuals. PMID:25385783

  2. Losing the beat: deficits in temporal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Caroline; Lidji, Pascale; Peretz, Isabelle

    2014-12-19

    Tapping or clapping to an auditory beat, an easy task for most individuals, reveals precise temporal synchronization with auditory patterns such as music, even in the presence of temporal fluctuations. Most models of beat-tracking rely on the theoretical concept of pulse: a perceived regular beat generated by an internal oscillation that forms the foundation of entrainment abilities. Although tapping to the beat is a natural sensorimotor activity for most individuals, not everyone can track an auditory beat. Recently, the case of Mathieu was documented (Phillips-Silver et al. 2011 Neuropsychologia 49, 961-969. (doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2011.02.002)). Mathieu presented himself as having difficulty following a beat and exhibited synchronization failures. We examined beat-tracking in normal control participants, Mathieu, and a second beat-deaf individual, who tapped with an auditory metronome in which unpredictable perturbations were introduced to disrupt entrainment. Both beat-deaf cases exhibited failures in error correction in response to the perturbation task while exhibiting normal spontaneous motor tempi (in the absence of an auditory stimulus), supporting a deficit specific to perception-action coupling. A damped harmonic oscillator model was applied to the temporal adaptation responses; the model's parameters of relaxation time and endogenous frequency accounted for differences between the beat-deaf cases as well as the control group individuals. PMID:25385783

  3. Coordinated Beating of Algal Flagella is Mediated by Basal Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Kirsty Y.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In a great many of the contexts in which groups of cilia or flagella are found they exhibit synchronized behavior. This includes phase-locking, as seen in $Chlamydomonas$ flagella, and metachronal wave formation in the ciliary arrays of $Paramecium$ or in the respiratory cilia of higher organisms. Since the observations by Gray and Rothschild of phase synchrony of nearby swimming spermatozoa, it has been a working hypothesis that synchrony arises from hydrodynamic interactions between beating...

  4. Association between frequency of atrial and ventricular ectopic beats and biventricular pacing percentage and outcomes in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin H; Mittal, Suneet; Ruwald, Anne-Christine;

    2014-01-01

    -defibrillator device with data available on biventricular pacing percentage and pre-implantation 24-h Holter recordings were included. Using logistic regression, we estimated the influence of ectopic beats on the percentage of biventricular pacing. Reverse remodeling was measured as reductions in atrial and left...... ventricular end-systolic volumes (LVESV) at 1 year. Cox models were used to assess the influence of ectopic beats on the outcomes of heart failure (HF) or death, ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTAs), and death. RESULTS: In the pre-implantation Holter recording, ectopic beats accounted for a mean 3.2 ± 5.5% of...

  5. Elastic interactions synchronize beating in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ohad; Safran, Samuel A

    2016-07-13

    Motivated by recent experimental results, we study theoretically the synchronization of the beating phase and frequency of two nearby cardiomyocyte cells. Each cell is represented as an oscillating force dipole in an infinite, viscoelastic medium and the propagation of the elastic signal within the medium is predicted. We examine the steady-state beating of two nearby cells, and show that elastic interactions result in forces that synchronize the phase and frequency of beating in a manner that depends on their mutual orientation. The theory predicts both in-phase and anti-phase steady-state beating depending on the relative cell orientations, as well as how synchronized beating varies with substrate elasticity and the inter-cell distance. These results suggest how mechanics plays a role in cardiac efficiency, and may be relevant for the design of cardiomyocyte based micro devices and other biomedical applications. PMID:27352146

  6. Visualizing acoustical beats with a smartphones

    CERN Document Server

    Giménez, Marcos H; Castro-Palacio, Juan C; Gómez-Tejedor, José A; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new Physics laboratory experiment on Acoustics beats is presented. We have designed a simple experimental setup to study superposition of sound waves of slightly different frequencies (acoustic beat). The microphone of a smartphone is used to capture the sound waves emitted by two equidistant speakers from the mobile which are at the same time connected to two AC generators. The smartphone is used as a measuring instrument. By means of a simple and free AndroidTM application, the sound level (in dB) as a function of time is measured and exported to a .csv format file. Applying common graphing analysis and a fitting procedure, the frequency of the beat is obtained. The beat frequencies as obtained from the smartphone data are compared with the difference of the frequencies set at the AC generator. A very good agreement is obtained being the percentage discrepancies within 1 %.

  7. Discussion on Improving the Light Beat-Frequency Methods Measuring the Speed of Light%光拍频法测光速实验的改进方法探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志军

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the speed of light with light beat-frequency method is one accomplished by measuring the speed of light beat-frequency and then indicating the speed of light indirectly. This article analyzes the principle and procedure of this method in detail. Adhere strictly to the principle of measuring the speed of light with light beat-frequency methods, it proposes some scientific and reasonable opinion based on studying the main problems and difficulties in the experiment.%光拍频法测光速是一种通过测量光拍的速度进而间接测量光速的方法。详细分析光拍频法测光速实验的实验原理和过程,在对实验方法中主要面临的问题和困难进行分析的基础上,忠实原有实验原理,提出了较为科学合理的实验改进意见和构想。

  8. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes.

  9. Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Christopher E.

    2002-04-01

    Among all the advanced accelerator concepts that use lasers as the power source, most of the effort to date has been with the idea of using a laser pulse to excite a accelerating mode in a plasma. Within this area, there are a variety of approaches for creating the accelerating mode, as indicated by the other talks in this session. What is common to these approaches is the physics of how a laser pulse pushes on plasma electrons to organize electron-density perturbations, the sources of the ultra-high (> GeV/M) accelerating gradients. It is the "ponderomotive force", proportional to the local gradient of the of the laser intensity, that pushes plasma electrons forward (on the leading edge of the pulse) and backwards (on the trailing edge) which leads to harmonic motion of the electrons. As the laser pulse moves through the plasma at group velocity Vg c, the oscillating electrons show up macroscopically as a plasma mode or wave with frequency w equal to the plasma frequency and k = w/Vg. For short laser pulses, this is the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) concept. Closely related is the Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration (PBWA) concept. Here, the laser pulse that perturbs the plasma is composed of two closely-spaced frequencies that "beat", i.e., periodically constructively and destructively interfere, forming an electromagnetic beat wave. One can visualize this as a train of short pulses. If this beating frequency is set to the plasma frequency, then each pulse in the train will reinforce the density perturbation caused by the previous pulse. The principal advantage of multiple pulses driving up the plasma wave as opposed to a single pulse is in efficiency, allowing for the production of relatively large diameter (more 1-D like) accelerating modes. In this talk I will discuss past, current and planned PBWA experiments which are taking place at UCLA, RAL in England, and LULI in France.

  10. Reversal of Dilated Cardiomyopathy After Successful Radio-Frequency Ablation of Frequent Atrial Premature Beats, a New Cause for Arrhythmia-Induced Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Louis Vervueren, MD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Incessant atrial premature beats as a potential cause for tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy was suspected in a patient presenting with dilated non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and severely altered left ventricular ejection fraction. The elimination of a left atrial focus by percutaneous RF ablation led to normalization of the clinical status, of atrial and ventricular dimensions and left ventricular systolic function.

  11. Optical Beat-Wave Experiment on CTIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert; Hwang, David; Liu, Fei; Zhu, Ben; Evans, Russell

    2009-11-01

    By launching intense electromagnetic waves at differing frequencies, a wave at the beat (difference) frequency can be created within a region of plasma. The beat wave is efficiently damped, and electron current generated, if the beat frequency is close to local plasma frequency, and if phase velocity is close to electron thermal velocity. Beat-wave acceleration of plasma electrons was previously demonstrated at low plasma density [1]. At the higher densities of the CTIX compact-toroid accelerator, plasma frequencies are such that CO2 lasers (f 30 THz) are a cost-effective driver. An experiment is being prepared to test beat-wave current drive using two TEA CO2 lasers on CTIX. The experiment will test models of wave mixing, quasilinear modification of the velocity distribution, and amplification of seed current by plasma kinetic effects. An application of the methods developed may be standoff current generation in a target plasma. Experimental issues to be addressed include: precisely-timed production of the compressed, target plasma; grating tuning of the CO2 lasers for frequency selection; high-peak-power, simultaneous operation of TEA lasers, design of optics; optical and plasma diagnostics. Initial results will be presented.[4pt] [1] Rogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., Phys. Rev. Lett. v68 p3877 (1992).

  12. Nonlinear amplitude dynamics in flagellar beating

    CERN Document Server

    Oriola, David; Casademunt, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The physical basis of flagellar and ciliary beating is a major problem in biology which is still far from completely understood. The fundamental cytoskeleton structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, a cylindrical array of microtubule doublets connected by passive crosslinkers and dynein motor proteins. The complex interplay of these elements leads to the generation of self-organized bending waves. Although many mathematical models have been proposed to understand this process, few attempts have been made to assess the role of dyneins on the nonlinear nature of the axoneme. Here, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of flagella by considering an axonemal sliding control mechanism for dynein activity. This approach unveils the nonlinear selection of the oscillation amplitudes, which are typically either missed or prescribed in mathematical models. The explicit set of nonlinear equations are derived and solved numerically. Our analysis reveals the spatiotemporal dynamics of dynein populations and flagell...

  13. Selective particle capture by asynchronously beating cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Selective particle filtration is fundamental in many engineering and biological systems. For example, many aquatic microorganisms use filter feeding to capture food particles from the surrounding fluid, using motile cilia. One of the capture strategies is to use the same cilia to generate feeding currents and to intercept particles when the particles are on the downstream side of the cilia. Here, we develop a 3D computational model of ciliary bands interacting with flow suspended particles and calculate particle trajectories for a range of particle sizes. Consistent with experimental observations, we find optimal particle sizes that maximize capture rate. The optimal size depends nonlinearly on cilia spacing and cilia coordination, synchronous vs. asynchronous. These parameters affect the cilia-generated flow field, which in turn affects particle trajectories. The low capture rate of smaller particles is due to the particles' inability to cross the flow streamlines of neighboring cilia. Meanwhile, large particles have difficulty entering the sub-ciliary region once advected downstream, also resulting in low capture rates. The optimal range of particle sizes is enhanced when cilia beat asynchronously. These findings have potentially important implications on the design and use of biomimetic cilia in processes such as particle sorting in microfluidic devices.

  14. Mutations in ZMYND10, a gene essential for proper axonemal assembly of inner and outer dynein arms in humans and flies, cause primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Daniel J; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Shoemark, Amelia;

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a ciliopathy characterized by airway disease, infertility, and laterality defects, often caused by dual loss of the inner dynein arms (IDAs) and outer dynein arms (ODAs), which power cilia and flagella beating. Using whole-exome and candidate-gene Sanger resequ...

  15. Odor detection in Manduca sexta is optimized when odor stimuli are pulsed at a frequency matching the wing beat during flight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C Daly

    Full Text Available Sensory systems sample the external world actively, within the context of self-motion induced disturbances. Mammals sample olfactory cues within the context of respiratory cycles and have adapted to process olfactory information within the time frame of a single sniff cycle. In plume tracking insects, it remains unknown whether olfactory processing is adapted to wing beating, which causes similar physical effects as sniffing. To explore this we first characterized the physical properties of our odor delivery system using hotwire anemometry and photo ionization detection, which confirmed that odor stimuli were temporally structured. Electroantennograms confirmed that pulse trains were tracked physiologically. Next, we quantified odor detection in moths in a series of psychophysical experiments to determine whether pulsing odor affected acuity. Moths were first conditioned to respond to a target odorant using Pavlovian olfactory conditioning. At 24 and 48 h after conditioning, moths were tested with a dilution series of the conditioned odor. On separate days odor was presented either continuously or as 20 Hz pulse trains to simulate wing beating effects. We varied pulse train duty cycle, olfactometer outflow velocity, pulsing method, and odor. Results of these studies, established that detection was enhanced when odors were pulsed. Higher velocity and briefer pulses also enhanced detection. Post hoc analysis indicated enhanced detection was the result of a significantly lower behavioral response to blank stimuli when presented as pulse trains. Since blank responses are a measure of false positive responses, this suggests that the olfactory system makes fewer errors (i.e. is more reliable when odors are experienced as pulse trains. We therefore postulate that the olfactory system of Manduca sexta may have evolved mechanisms to enhance odor detection during flight, where the effects of wing beating represent the norm. This system may even exploit

  16. Rat ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, P.; Sendtner, M.; Meyer, Michael; Thoenen, Hans

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the rat ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene and the regulation of CNTF mRNA levels in cultured glial cells were investigated. The rat mRNA is encoded by a simple two-exon transcription unit. Sequence analysis of the region upstream of the transcription start-site did not reveal a typical TATA-box consensus sequence. Low levels of CNTF mRNA were detected in cultured Schwann cells, and CNTF mRNA was not increased by a variety of treatments. Three-week-old astrocyte-enriched...

  17. Ciliary ultrastructure of polyplacophorans (Mollusca, Amphineura, Polyplacophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, K; Schander, C

    2001-01-01

    This study is part of a series of papers aiming to investigate the phylogenetic significance of ciliary ultrastructure among molluscs and to test the hypothesis of a relationship between Xenoturbella and the molluscs. The ultrastructure of the ciliary apparatus on the gills of the polyplacophorans Leptochiton asellus and Tonicella rubra was studied. The gill cilia of the two species are similar in shape. The free part of the cilium is long with a slender distal part. There are two ciliary rootlets. One of them is short, broad and placed on the anterior face of the basal body. The other rootlet is conical and has a vertical orientation. Among the mollusca, two ciliary rootlets in the ciliary apparatus of multiciliate ectodermal cells have only been reported from the Chaetodermomorpha and Neomeniomorpha. This character state is likely plesiomorphic for the Mollusca and indicates a basal (nonderived) position of these taxa among the molluscs. No possible synapomorphic character with Xenoturbella bocki was found. PMID:11686414

  18. The impact of binaural beats on creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan A. Reedijk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Human creativity relies on a multitude of cognitive processes, some of which are influenced by the neurotransmitter dopamine. This suggests that creativity could be enhanced by interventions that either modulate the production or transmission of dopamine directly, or affect dopamine-driven processes. In the current study we hypothesized that creativity can be influenced by means of binaural beats, an auditory illusion that is considered a form of cognitive entrainment that operates through stimulating neuronal phase locking. We aimed to investigate whether binaural beats affect creative performance at all, whether they affect divergent thinking, convergent thinking, or both, and whether possible effects may be mediated by the individual striatal dopamine level. Binaural beats were presented at alpha and gamma frequency. Participants completed a divergent and a convergent thinking task to assess two important functions of creativity, and filled out the Positive And Negative Affect Scale – mood State questionnaire (PANAS-S and affect grid to measure current mood. Dopamine levels in the striatum were estimated using spontaneous eye blink rates (EBRs. Results showed that binaural beats, regardless of the presented frequency, can affect divergent but not convergent thinking. Individuals with low EBRs mostly benefitted from alpha binaural beat stimulation, while individuals with high EBR were unaffected or even impaired by both alpha and gamma binaural beats. This suggests that binaural beats, and possibly other forms of cognitive entrainment, are not suited for a one-size-fits-all approach, and that individual cognitive-control systems need to be taken into account when studying cognitive enhancement methods.

  19. Wearable Beat to Beat Blood Pressure Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A key component of NASA's human exploration programs is a system that monitors the health of the crew during space missions. The wearable beat-to-beat blood...

  20. CCDC39 is required for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex and for normal ciliary motility in humans and dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merveille, Anne-Christine; Davis, Erica E; Becker-Heck, Anita;

    2011-01-01

    -assembly factors of axonemal dyneins, but these mutations account for only about 50% of cases of PCD. We exploited the unique properties of dog populations to positionally clone a new PCD gene, CCDC39. We found that loss-of-function mutations in the human ortholog underlie a substantial fraction of PCD cases with...... axonemal disorganization and abnormal ciliary beating. Functional analyses indicated that CCDC39 localizes to ciliary axonemes and is essential for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex....

  1. Research progress of airway ciliary function and related respiratory diseases%气道纤毛功能及相关呼吸系统疾病研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯宇; 李庆云; 刘嘉琳; 万欢英

    2010-01-01

    The normal mucociliary clearance system (MCC) requires not only mucus with optimum of viscoelastic and thickness, but also enough cilia with structural integrity and sufficient cilia beat frequency(CBF). Abnormality of ciliary structure and function, CBF or surface properties of mucus was found in several respiratory diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, primary ciliary dyskinesia,cystic fibrosis,etc. Which implies the MCC should be new area for research on treatment of respiratory diseases. The review will focus on the research progress of airway ciliary function and related respiratory diseases.%正常的黏液纤毛清除功能要求黏液具有最佳的黏弹性和厚度,而足够数量、结构完整和一定摆动频率的纤毛则更重要.由于慢性阻塞性肺疾病,原发性纤毛运动障碍、囊性纤维化等多种疾病均存在纤毛结构和功能异常或纤毛周围的黏液流变学特征改变,因此气道黏液纤毛清除功能成为探索相关治疗的新领域之一.本文就影响纤毛结构及运动的因素及相关的呼吸系统疾病的研究进展作综述.

  2. Off beat: pluralizing rhythm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Hoogstad; B. Stougaard Pedersen

    2013-01-01

    Off Beat: Pluralizing Rhythm draws attention to rhythm as a tool for analyzing various cultural objects. In fields as diverse as music, culture, nature, and economy, rhythm can be seen as a phenomenon that both connects and divides. It suggests a certain measure with which people, practices, and cul

  3. Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae decreases cilia beating via protein kinase C epsilon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Kristina L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae infection of the nasal epithelium has long been associated with observations of decreased nasal ciliary beat frequency (CBF and injury to the ciliated epithelium. Previously, we have reported that several agents that slow CBF also have the effect of activating protein kinase C epsilon (PKCϵ activity in bronchial epithelial cells. The subsequent auto-downregulation of PKCϵ or the direct inhibition of PKCϵ leads to the specific detachment of the ciliated cells. METHODS: Primary cultures of ciliated bovine bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to filtered conditioned media supernatants from non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi cultures. CBF and motile points were measured and PKCϵ activity assayed. Results NTHi supernatant exposure significantly and rapidly decreased CBF in a dose-dependent manner within 10 minutes of exposure. After 3 hours of exposure, the number of motile ciliated cells significantly decreased. Direct measurement of PKCϵ activity revealed a dose-dependent activation of PKCϵ in response to NTHi supernatant exposure. Both CBF and PKCϵ activity changes were only observed in fresh NTHi culture supernatant and not observed in exposures to heat-inactivated or frozen supernatants. Conclusions Our results suggest that CBF slowing observed in response to NTHi is consistent with the stimulated activation of PKCϵ. Ciliated cell detachment is associated with PKCϵ autodownregulation.

  4. Investigation of beat-waves generation with high efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for generating high power beating radio-frequency wave with high conversion efficiency is proposed. Based on Cherenkov radiation, two longitudinal resonant modes are excited simultaneously and interacted with intense electron beam synchronously. An experiment was carried out and beat-waves with an average power of about 2.3 GW, frequencies of 9.29 GHz and 10.31 GHz, and efficiency of about 40% were obtained. Through controlling the electron energy, the amplitude proportions of the two resonant modes are altered, and different beat-wave patterns are formed

  5. Analysis of Axonemal Assembly During Ciliary Regeneration in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Emily L; Sale, Winfield S; Alford, Lea M

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an outstanding model genetic organism for study of assembly of cilia. Here, methods are described for synchronization of ciliary regeneration in Chlamydomonas to analyze the sequence in which ciliary proteins assemble. In addition, the methods described allow analysis of the mechanisms involved in regulation of ciliary length, the proteins required for ciliary assembly, and the temporal expression of genes encoding ciliary proteins. Ultimately, these methods can contribute to discovery of conserved genes that when defective lead to abnormal ciliary assembly and human disease. PMID:27514926

  6. Modeling of Nonlinear Beat Signals of TAE's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Berk, Herbert; Breizman, Boris; Zheng, Linjin

    2012-03-01

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod reveal Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) together with signals at various beat frequencies, including those at twice the mode frequency. The beat frequencies are sidebands driven by quadratic nonlinear terms in the MHD equations. These nonlinear sidebands have not yet been quantified by any existing codes. We extend the AEGIS code to capture nonlinear effects by treating the nonlinear terms as a driving source in the linear MHD solver. Our goal is to compute the spatial structure of the sidebands for realistic geometry and q-profile, which can be directly compared with experiment in order to interpret the phase contrast imaging diagnostic measurements and to enable the quantitative determination of the Alfven wave amplitude in the plasma core

  7. 基于摆频控制的鱼群自主游动数值模拟研究%Numerical simulating of self-propelled bionic fish swimming based on tail-beat frequency control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亮

    2013-01-01

    A novel numerical method used to simulate the self-propelled fish swimming is proposed.The self-propelled state is obtained by controlling the tail-beat frequency,so the novel method is called frequency control method (FCM).The governing equation of the FCM is derived from the approximate relation between the self-propelled swimming speed and the tail-beat frequency and the Newton's second law.The new method is validated by comparing the results obtained by the FCM with those achieved by the conventional speed control method (SCM,the swimming speed of SCM is determined by the Newton's second law).Both results are consistent with each other.In addition,the convergence rate of the FCM is also discussed and the optimal parameter is suggested.Finally,a fish school consisting of three self-propelled bionic fishes as a basic element,at Re=5000,have been numerically investigated.It is revealed that the energy consumption decreases 19% and the Froude efficiency increases 36% in average,respectively.%本文提出了一种通过控制仿生鱼摆频来达到自主推进状态的数值模拟新方法(简称摆频控制法),并利用自主游动速度与摆频之间的近似关系以及牛顿第二定律推导出了摆频的控制方程.通过与传统的速度控制法(仿生鱼的自主游动速度由牛顿第二定律确定)的比较,验证了该方法的可靠性,并对影响该方法收敛速度的敏感因子进行了讨论,给出了最优参数,并通过模拟三条仿生鱼组成的鱼群基本单位在Re=5000时的自主游动,证明了摆频控制方法在鱼群自主游动数值模拟中的有效性.结果表明,鱼群整体平均节能约19%,推进效率平均提高了约36%.

  8. Acoustical sensing of cardiomyocyte cluster beating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •An example of the application of QCM-D to live cell studies. •Detection of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte cluster beating. •Clusters were studied in a thin liquid film and in a large liquid volume. •The QCM-D beating profile provides an individual fingerprint of the hPS-CMCs. -- Abstract: Spontaneously beating human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes clusters (CMCs) represent an excellent in vitro tool for studies of human cardiomyocyte function and for pharmacological cardiac safety assessment. Such testing typically requires highly trained operators, precision plating, or large cell quantities, and there is a demand for real-time, label-free monitoring of small cell quantities, especially rare cells and tissue-like structures. Array formats based on sensing of electrical or optical properties of cells are being developed and in use by the pharmaceutical industry. A potential alternative to these techniques is represented by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique, which is an acoustic surface sensitive technique that measures changes in mass and viscoelastic properties close to the sensor surface (from nm to μm). There is an increasing number of studies where QCM-D has successfully been applied to monitor properties of cells and cellular processes. In the present study, we show that spontaneous beating of CMCs on QCM-D sensors can be clearly detected, both in the frequency and the dissipation signals. Beating rates in the range of 66–168 bpm for CMCs were detected and confirmed by simultaneous light microscopy. The QCM-D beating profile was found to provide individual fingerprints of the hPS-CMCs. The presented results point towards acoustical assays for evaluation cardiotoxicity

  9. beat a dead horse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕浙

    2005-01-01

    beat a dead horse的字面意思为“鞭打死马”。“鞭打死马”有什么作用?毫无疑问,一点意义也没有。因此,该习语的意思相当于中文的“徒劳,白费力气,白费口舌”。如:

  10. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: clinical and genetic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D’Auria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a rare, genetically heterogeneous disease, characterized by ciliary disfunction and impaired mucociliary clearance, resulting in a range of clinical manifestations such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, chronic rhino-sinusitis, chronic otitis media, situs viscerum inversus in almost 40-50% of cases and male infertility. The triad situs viscerum inversus, bronchiectasis and sinusitis is known as Kartagener syndrome. Up to now little is known about genetic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of primary motile ciliary diseases in children: for this reason, diagnosis is generally delayed and almost all treatments for PCD are not based on randomized studies but extrapolated from cystic fibrosis guidelines. The aim of this review is to propose to pediatricians a summary of current clinical and diagnostic evidence to obtain better knoledwge of this condition. The earlier diagnosis and the right treatment are both crucial to improve the prognosis of PCD.

  11. Mechanical communication in cardiac cell synchronized beating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsan, Ido; Drori, Stavit; Lewis, Yair E.; Cohen, Shlomi; Tzlil, Shelly

    2016-05-01

    Cell-cell communication, which enables cells to coordinate their activity and is essential for growth, development and function, is usually ascribed a chemical or electrical origin. However, cells can exert forces and respond to environment elasticity and to mechanical deformations created by their neighbours. The extent to which this mechanosensing ability facilitates intercellular communication remains unclear. Here we demonstrate mechanical communication between cells directly for the first time, providing evidence for a long-range interaction that induces long-lasting alterations in interacting cells. We show that an isolated cardiac cell can be trained to beat at a given frequency by mechanically stimulating the underlying substrate. Deformations are induced using an oscillatory mechanical probe that mimics the deformations generated by a beating neighbouring cardiac cell. Unlike electrical field stimulation, the probe-induced beating rate is maintained by the cell for an hour after the stimulation stops, implying that long-term modifications occur within the cell. These long-term alterations provide a mechanism for cells that communicate mechanically to be less variable in their electromechanical delay. Mechanical coupling between cells therefore ensures that the final outcome of action potential pacing is synchronized beating. We further show that the contractile machinery is essential for mechanical communication.

  12. CCDC151 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disruption of the outer dynein arm docking complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjeij, Rim; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Watson, Christopher M;

    2014-01-01

    disorder of ciliary and flagellar dysmotility characterized by chronic upper and lower respiratory infections and defects in laterality. Here, by combined high-throughput mapping and sequencing, we identified CCDC151 loss-of-function mutations in five affected individuals from three independent families...... whose cilia showed a complete loss of ODAs and severely impaired ciliary beating. Consistent with the laterality defects observed in these individuals, we found Ccdc151 expressed in vertebrate left-right organizers. Homozygous zebrafish ccdc151(ts272a) and mouse Ccdc151(Snbl) mutants display a spectrum...... of situs defects associated with complex heart defects. We demonstrate that CCDC151 encodes an axonemal coiled coil protein, mutations in which abolish assembly of CCDC151 into respiratory cilia and cause a failure in axonemal assembly of the ODA component DNAH5 and the ODA-DC-associated components...

  13. Beat wave development work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first phase of experiments on beat wave acceleration have been completed at UCLA. Here we examined the suitability of a theta pinch as a plasma source. The beatwave was excited to amplitudes providing GeV/m-scale accelerating fields. However, trapped magnetic fields within the theta-pinch plasma hindered the injection of test particles. Optical diagnostics were developed to measure the accelerating gradient-length product which was found to be around 3 MeV. Future plans are also discussed. copyright 1989 American Institute of Physics

  14. Direct visualization of mechanical beats by means of an oscillating smartphone

    CERN Document Server

    Giménez, Marcos H; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    The resonance phenomenon is widely known from Physics courses. Qualitatively speaking, it takes place in a driven oscillating system whenever the driven frequency approaches the natural frequency. It is when the amplitude of the oscillations become maximal. Very closely related to this phenomenon, there is another which is very surprising too. It takes place when the driven and natural frequencies of the system are slightly different and interfere constructively and destructively, forming the so called beats. The frequency of the beats is just the difference of the interfering waves frequencies. Beats are very noticeable in acoustic systems. We all have probably perceived them in the form of periodic ups and downs in the sound intensity volume. There are several works in this journal on visualizing the beats in acoustic systems. For instance, the microphone and the speaker of two mobile devices were used in previous work to analyze the acoustic beat produced by two signals of close frequencies. The formation ...

  15. Clinical genetics and pathobiology of ciliary chondrodysplasias

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidts, M.

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary chondrodysplasias represent a heterogenous group of rare, nearly exclusively autosomal recessively inherited developmental conditions. While the skeletal phenotype, mainly affecting limbs, ribs and sometimes the craniofacial skeleton, is predominant, extraskeletal disease affecting the kidneys, liver, heart, eyes and other organs and tissues is observed inconsistently. Significant lethality, resulting from cardiorespiratory failure due to thoracic constriction as well as from renal an...

  16. Fourier analysis of wing beat signals: assessing the effects of genetic alterations of flight muscle structure in Diptera.

    OpenAIRE

    Hyatt, C J; Maughan, D W

    1994-01-01

    A method for determining and analyzing the wing beat frequency in Diptera is presented. This method uses an optical tachometer to measure Diptera wing movement during flight. The resulting signal from the optical measurement is analyzed using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique, and the dominant frequency peak in the Fourier spectrum is selected as the wing beat frequency. Also described is a method for determining quantitatively the degree of variability of the wing beat frequency about...

  17. Robust inter-beat interval estimation in cardiac vibration signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable and accurate estimation of instantaneous frequencies of physiological rhythms, such as heart rate, is critical for many healthcare applications. Robust estimation is especially challenging when novel unobtrusive sensors are used for continuous health monitoring in uncontrolled environments, because these sensors can create significant amounts of potentially unreliable data. We propose a new flexible algorithm for the robust estimation of local (beat-to-beat) intervals from cardiac vibration signals, specifically ballistocardiograms (BCGs), recorded by an unobtrusive bed-mounted sensor. This sensor allows the measurement of motions of the body which are caused by cardiac activity. Our method requires neither a training phase nor any prior knowledge about the morphology of the heart beats in the analyzed waveforms. Instead, three short-time estimators are combined using a Bayesian approach to continuously estimate the inter-beat intervals. We have validated our method on over-night BCG recordings from 33 subjects (8 normal, 25 insomniacs). On this dataset, containing approximately one million heart beats, our method achieved a mean beat-to-beat interval error of 0.78% with a coverage of 72.69%. (paper)

  18. Modulation of attosecond beating in resonant two-photon ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Galán, Álvaro J; Martín, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the photoelectron attosecond beating at the basis of RABBIT (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating By Interference of Two-photon transitions) in the presence of autoionizing states. We show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, its sidebands exhibit a peaked phase shift as well as a modulation of the beating frequency itself. Furthermore, the beating between two resonant paths persists even when the pump and the probe pulses do not overlap, thus providing a sensitive non-holographic interferometric means to reconstruct coherent metastable wave packets. We characterize these phenomena quantitatively with a general finite-pulse analytical model that accounts for the effect of both intermediate and final resonances on two-photon processes, at a negligible computational cost. The model predictions are in excellent agreement with those of accurate ab initio calculations for the helium atom in the region of the N=2 doubly excited states.

  19. Beat-Frequency/Microsphere Medical Ultrasonic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Pretlow, Robert A., III

    1995-01-01

    Medical ultrasonic imaging system designed to provide quantitative data on various flows of blood in chambers, blood vessels, muscles, and tissues of heart. Sensitive enough to yield readings on flows of blood in heart even when microspheres used as ultrasonic contrast agents injected far from heart and diluted by circulation of blood elsewhere in body.

  20. Photoreceptor Sensory Cilium: Traversing the Ciliary Gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are antenna-like extensions of the plasma membrane found in nearly all cell types. In the retina of the eye, photoreceptors develop unique sensory cilia. Not much was known about the mechanisms underlying the formation and function of photoreceptor cilia, largely because of technical limitations and the specific structural and functional modifications that cannot be modeled in vitro. With recent advances in microscopy techniques and molecular and biochemical approaches, we are now beginning to understand the molecular basis of photoreceptor ciliary architecture, ciliary function and its involvement in human diseases. Here, I will discuss the studies that have revealed new knowledge of how photoreceptor cilia regulate their identity and function while coping with high metabolic and trafficking demands associated with processing light signal. PMID:26501325

  1. Photoreceptor Sensory Cilium: Traversing the Ciliary Gate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Khanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cilia are antenna-like extensions of the plasma membrane found in nearly all cell types. In the retina of the eye, photoreceptors develop unique sensory cilia. Not much was known about the mechanisms underlying the formation and function of photoreceptor cilia, largely because of technical limitations and the specific structural and functional modifications that cannot be modeled in vitro. With recent advances in microscopy techniques and molecular and biochemical approaches, we are now beginning to understand the molecular basis of photoreceptor ciliary architecture, ciliary function and its involvement in human diseases. Here, I will discuss the studies that have revealed new knowledge of how photoreceptor cilia regulate their identity and function while coping with high metabolic and trafficking demands associated with processing light signal.

  2. Asymmetric wavefront aberrations and pupillary shapes induced by electrical stimulation of ciliary nerve in cats measured with compact wavefront aberrometer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Miyagawa

    Full Text Available To investigate the changes in the wavefront aberrations and pupillary shape in response to electrical stimulation of the branches of the ciliary nerves in cats. Seven eyes of seven cats were studied under general anesthesia. Trains of monophasic pulses (current, 0.1 to 1.0 mA; duration, 0.5 ms/phase; frequency, 5 to 40 Hz were applied to the lateral or medial branch of the short ciliary nerve near the posterior pole of the eye. A pair of electrodes was hooked onto one or both branch of the short ciliary nerve. The electrodes were placed about 5 mm from the scleral surface. The wavefront aberrations were recorded continuously for 2 seconds before, 8 seconds during, and for 20 seconds after the electrical stimulation. The pupillary images were simultaneously recorded during the stimulation period. Both the wavefront aberrations and the pupillary images were obtained 10 times/sec with a custom-built wavefront aberrometer. The maximum accommodative amplitude was 1.19 diopters (D produced by electrical stimulation of the short ciliary nerves. The latency of the accommodative changes was very short, and the accommodative level gradually increased up to 4 seconds and reached a plateau. When only one branch of the ciliary nerve was stimulated, the pupil dilated asymmetrically, and the oblique astigmatism and one of the asymmetrical wavefront terms was also altered. Our results showed that the wavefront aberrations and pupillary dilations can be measured simultaneously and serially with a compact wavefront aberrometer. The asymmetric pupil dilation and asymmetric changes of the wavefront aberrations suggest that each branch of the ciliary nerve innervates specific segments of the ciliary muscle and dilator muscle of the pupil.

  3. Intraocular electro-optic lens with ciliary muscle controlled accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doornaert, Dries; Glorieux, Christ; De Gersem, Herbert; Puers, Robert; Spileers, Werner; Blanckaert, Johan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a concept is proposed of an intraocular lens implant with electro-optic accommodation of a variable-focus hybrid liquid-crystal-based lens. The dioptric strength of the lens is electronically controlled by a signal that is derived from the change of inductance of a sensing coil due to a marker implanted in the nearby contracting or decontracting ciliary muscle. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are reported on the dependency of the frequency of a Colpitts oscillator circuit on the location of a nearby conductive marker. A concept is also reported on the use as an electro-optic lens of a device based on a liquid crystal in planar alignment, which is held between a flat and a curved window coated with optically transparent and electrically conductive layers. PMID:24110406

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor is an endogenous pyrogen.

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, L; Zhang, X. X.; Rupp, R G; Wolff, S. M.; Dinarello, C A

    1993-01-01

    Fever is initiated by the action of polypeptide cytokines called endogenous pyrogens, which are produced by the host during inflammation, trauma, or infection and which elevate the thermoregulatory set point in the hypothalamus. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) supports the differentiation and survival of central and peripheral neurons. We describe the activity of CNTF as intrinsically pyrogenic in the rabbit. CNTF induced a monophasic fever which rose rapidly (within the first 12 min) foll...

  5. Diagnostic methods in primary ciliary dyskinesia

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Jane S; Paff, Tamara; Goggin, Patricia; Haarman, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing primary ciliary dyskinesia is difficult. With no reference standard, a combination of tests is needed; most tests require expensive equipment and specialist scientists. We review the advances in diagnostic testing over the past hundred years, with emphasis on recent advances. We particularly focus on use of high-speed video analysis, transmission electron microscopy, nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing. We discuss the international efforts that are in place to advance the eviden...

  6. Diagnostic Methods in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Jane S; Paff, Tamara; Goggin, Patricia; Haarman, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosing primary ciliary dyskinesia is difficult. With no reference standard, a combination of tests is needed; most tests require expensive equipment and specialist scientists. We review the advances in diagnostic testing over the past hundred years, with emphasis on recent advances. We particularly focus on use of high-speed video analysis, transmission electron microscopy, nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing. We discuss the international efforts that are in place to advance the evidence base for diagnostic tests. PMID:26362507

  7. Gated entry into the ciliary compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Daisuke; Verhey, Kristen J

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella play important roles in cell motility and cell signaling. These functions require that the cilium establishes and maintains a unique lipid and protein composition. Recent work indicates that a specialized region at the base of the cilium, the transition zone, serves as both a barrier to entry and a gate for passage of select components. For at least some cytosolic proteins, the barrier and gate functions are provided by a ciliary pore complex (CPC) that shares molecular and mechanistic properties with nuclear gating. Specifically, nucleoporins of the CPC limit the diffusional entry of cytosolic proteins in a size-dependent manner and enable the active transport of large molecules and complexes via targeting signals, importins, and the small G protein Ran. For membrane proteins, the septin protein SEPT2 is part of the barrier to entry whereas the gating function is carried out and/or regulated by proteins associated with ciliary diseases (ciliopathies) such as nephronophthisis, Meckel–Gruber syndrome and Joubert syndrome. Here, we discuss the evidence behind these models of ciliary gating as well as the similarities to and differences from nuclear gating. PMID:26472341

  8. Cellular Mechanisms of Ciliary Length Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Keeling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved, membrane-bound, microtubule-based organelles on the surface of most eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, cell mobility, and tissue homeostasis. Defects in ciliary structure or function are associated with multiple human disorders called ciliopathies. These diseases affect diverse tissues, including, but not limited to the eyes, kidneys, brain, and lungs. Many processes must be coordinated simultaneously in order to initiate ciliogenesis. These include cell cycle, vesicular trafficking, and axonemal extension. Centrioles play a central role in both cell cycle progression and ciliogenesis, making the transition between basal bodies and mitotic spindle organizers integral to both processes. The maturation of centrioles involves a functional shift from cell division toward cilium nucleation which takes place concurrently with its migration and fusion to the plasma membrane. Several proteinaceous structures of the distal appendages in mother centrioles are required for this docking process. Ciliary assembly and maintenance requires a precise balance between two indispensable processes; so called assembly and disassembly. The interplay between them determines the length of the resulting cilia. These processes require a highly conserved transport system to provide the necessary substances at the tips of the cilia and to recycle ciliary turnover products to the base using a based microtubule intraflagellar transport (IFT system. In this review; we discuss the stages of ciliogenesis as well as mechanisms controlling the lengths of assembled cilia.

  9. Efficiency optimization and symmetry-breaking in a model of ciliary locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Michelin, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    A variety of swimming microorganisms, called ciliates, exploit the bending of a large number of small and densely-packed organelles, termed cilia, in order to propel themselves in a viscous fluid. We consider a spherical envelope model for such ciliary locomotion where the dynamics of the individual cilia are replaced by that of a continuous overlaying surface allowed to deform tangentially to itself. Employing a variational approach, we determine numerically the time-periodic deformation of such surface which leads to low-Reynolds locomotion with minimum rate of energy dissipation (maximum efficiency). Employing both Lagrangian and Eulerian points of views, we show that in the optimal swimming stroke, individual cilia display weak asymmetric beating, but that a significant symmetry-breaking occurs at the organism level, with the whole surface deforming in a wave-like fashion reminiscent of metachronal waves of biological cilia. This wave motion is analyzed using a formal modal decomposition, is found to occu...

  10. Ciliary metachronal wave propagation on the compliant surface of Paramecium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narematsu, Naoki; Quek, Raymond; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2015-12-01

    Ciliary movements in protozoa exhibit metachronal wave-like coordination, in which a constant phase difference is maintained between adjacent cilia. It is at present generally thought that metachronal waves require hydrodynamic coupling between adjacent cilia and the extracellular fluid. To test this hypothesis, we aspirated a Paramecium cell using a micropipette which completely sealed the surface of the cell such that no fluid could pass through the micropipette. Thus, the anterior and the posterior regions of the cell were hydrodynamically decoupled. Nevertheless, we still observed that metachronal waves continued to propagate from the anterior to the posterior ends of the cell, suggesting that in addition to hydrodynamic coupling, there are other mechanisms that can also transmit the metachronal waves. Such transmission was also observed in computational modeling where the fluid was fully decoupled between two partitions of a beating ciliary array. We also imposed cyclic stretching on the surface of live Paramecium cells and found that metachronal waves persisted in the presence of cyclic stretching. This demonstrated that, in addition to hydrodynamic coupling, a compliant substrate can also play a critical role in mediating the propagation of metachronal waves. PMID:26616106

  11. Modification of the algorithm for beat tracking of a musical melody

    OpenAIRE

    Khachai, M. Y.; Kobylkin, K. S.; Khachai, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    A new efficient modification of the known heuristic algorithm for real-time beat tracking is proposed. An improved formula for updating the relative frequencies of time intervals between adjacent onsets is used in the modification. The algorithm has shown good performance on the MIREX Beat Tracking test base. © 2013 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.

  12. The Pediatric Choroidal and Ciliary Body Melanoma Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Jamal, Rana'a T; Cassoux, Nathalie; Desjardins, Laurence;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To collect comprehensive data on choroidal and ciliary body melanoma (CCBM) in children and to validate hypotheses regarding pediatric CCBM: children younger than 18 years, males, and those without ciliary body involvement (CBI) have more favorable survival prognosis than young adults 18...

  13. Beat Subterranean: Tactics of Assemblage and Worldmaking in Beat Generation Writing

    OpenAIRE

    Fazzino, Jimmy Michael

    2012-01-01

    My dissertation argues that the core beat trope of the subterranean can be developed as a productive means of literary analysis. I show that beat writers conceive of themselves and their work as existing within vast "underground" networks of radical and avant-garde art and literature, and by locating the beats within such assemblages, the subterranean offers, above all, a model for reconceptualizing beat geography. While the Beat Generation has been regarded as quintessentially American, beat...

  14. Artificial ciliary bundles with nano fiber tip links

    CERN Document Server

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensory ciliary bundles in fishes are the inspiration for carefully engineered artificial flow sensors. We report the development of a new class of ultrasensitive MEMS flow sensors that mimic the intricate morphology of the ciliary bundles, including the stereocilia, tip links, and the cupula, and thereby achieve threshold detection limits that match the biological example. An artificial ciliary bundle is achieved by fabricating closely-spaced arrays of polymer micro-pillars with gradiating heights. Tip links that form the fundamental sensing elements are realized through electrospinning aligned PVDF piezoelectric nano-fibers that link the distal tips of the polymer cilia. An optimized synthesis of hyaluronic acid-methacrylic anhydride hydrogel that results in properties close to the biological cupula, together with drop-casting method are used to form the artificial cupula that encapsulates the ciliary bundle. In testing, fluid drag force causes the ciliary bundle to slide, stretching the flexible nan...

  15. Phase Shifting and the Beating of Complex Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    2011-01-01

    At the introductory level, the demonstration and analysis of sound beating is usually limited to the superposition of two purely sinusoidal waves with equal amplitudes and very similar frequencies. Under such conditions, an observer hears the periodic variation of the loudness of a sound with an unchanging timbre. On the other hand, when complex…

  16. Doppler Beats or Interference Fringes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Paul S.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the following: another version of Doppler beats; alternate proof of spin-1 sin-1/2 problems; some mechanisms related to Dirac's strings; Doppler redshift in oblique approach of source and observer; undergraduate experiment on noise thermometry; use of the time evolution operator; resolution of an entropy maximization controversy;…

  17. Ciliary abnormalities in senescent human fibroblasts impair proliferative capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Loretta; Prosser, Suzanna L; Cuffe, Sandra; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells senesce in culture after a finite number of divisions indefinitely arresting their proliferation. DNA damage and senescence increase the cellular number of centrosomes, the 2 microtubule organizing centers that ensure bipolar mitotic spindles. Centrosomes also provide the basal body from which primary cilia extend to sense and transduce various extracellular signals, notably Hedgehog. Primary cilium formation is facilitated by cellular quiescence a temporary cell cycle exit, but the impact of senescence on cilia is unknown. We found that senescent human fibroblasts have increased frequency and length of primary cilia. Levels of the negative ciliary regulator CP110 were reduced in senescent cells, as were levels of key elements of the Hedgehog pathway. Hedgehog inhibition reduced proliferation in young cells with increased cilium length accompanying cell cycle arrest suggesting a regulatory function for Hedgehog in primary ciliation. Depletion of CP110 in young cell populations increased ciliation frequencies and reduced cell proliferation. These data suggest that primary cilia are potentially novel determinants of the reduced cellular proliferation that initiates senescence. PMID:25486364

  18. Ciliary abnormalities in senescent human fibroblasts impair proliferative capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Loretta; Prosser, Suzanna L; Cuffe, Sandra; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells senesce in culture after a finite number of divisions indefinitely arresting their proliferation. DNA damage and senescence increase the cellular number of centrosomes, the 2 microtubule organizing centers that ensure bipolar mitotic spindles. Centrosomes also provide the basal body from which primary cilia extend to sense and transduce various extracellular signals, notably Hedgehog. Primary cilium formation is facilitated by cellular quiescence a temporary cell cycle exit, but the impact of senescence on cilia is unknown. We found that senescent human fibroblasts have increased frequency and length of primary cilia. Levels of the negative ciliary regulator CP110 were reduced in senescent cells, as were levels of key elements of the Hedgehog pathway. Hedgehog inhibition reduced proliferation in young cells with increased cilium length accompanying cell cycle arrest suggesting a regulatory function for Hedgehog in primary ciliation. Depletion of CP110 in young cell populations increased ciliation frequencies and reduced cell proliferation. These data suggest that primary cilia are potentially novel determinants of the reduced cellular proliferation that initiates senescence. PMID:25486364

  19. Musicians' Perception of Beat in Monotonic Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Assesses musicians' perceptions of beat in monotonic stimuli and attempts to define empirically the range of perceived beat tempo in music. Subjects performed a metric pulse in response to periodic stimulus tones. Results indicate a relatively narrow range within which beats are perceived by trained musicians. (LS)

  20. Stark quantum beat spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derive analytical expressions for Stark quantum beat signals of polyatomic molecules and discuss them with regard to molecular and geometrical parameters. The general treatment is specified for near prolate asymmetric rotor molecules and a method for determining rotational constants and all components of the dipole moment of electronically excited polyatomic molecules is presented. The method is tested and illustrated for the vibrationless S1 state of deuterated propynal (HCtriple bondCCDO, Cs symmetry) and its lowest frequency non-totally symmetric state 121. The results of the vibrationless state are compared with structural data reported in the literature. For the 121 state we obtain A=1.5004(43) cm-1, B=0.16131(34) cm-1, C=0.14623(34) cm-1, and the components of the electric dipole moment in the molecular plane μa=-0.88(2) D, μb=1.03(2) D. Furthermore, it is shown that the modulation depth of Stark quantum beat signals can be utilized to quantify the contribution of the individual components of the transition moment to the total emission. (orig.)

  1. On ciliary pumping and sieving in bryozoans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Riisgård, H. U.

    2002-01-01

    result of water currents driven out between tentacles by the water pumping lateral cilia, is characterised by nearly parabolic profiles with highest velocity along the centreline of the lophophore. In intact animals, the centreline velocity first increases from its value at the inlet to a maximal value...... relation between velocity distribution in the lophophore and variation of pumping rate along tentacles. Typical variations are given and compared to those obtained by a more accurate two-dimensional numerical solution. Based on observed velocity distributions in the lophophore, particle tracks and tentacle...... in the absence of a particle. This is hypothesised to stimulate the sensing mechanism triggering observed flicks. The energy cost of pumping is estimated at 1 to 4% of the metabolic power of a "standard" zooid. Keywords: Feeding in bryozoans; Flow in lophophore; Ciliary sieving; Particle retention...

  2. On ciliary pumping and sieving in bryozoans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Riisgård, H. U.

    result of water currents driven out between tentacles by the water pumping lateral cilia, is characterised by nearly parabolic profiles with highest velocity along the centreline of the lophophore. In intact animals, the centreline velocity first increases from its value at the inlet to a maximal value...... relation between velocity distribution in the lophophore and variation of pumping rate along tentacles. Typical variations are given and compared to those obtained by a more accurate two-dimensional numerical solution. Based on observed velocity distributions in the lophophore, particle tracks and tentacle...... in the absence of a particle. This is hypothesised to stimulate the sensing mechanism triggering observed flicks. The energy cost of pumping is estimated at 1 to 4% of the metabolic power of a "standard" zooid. Keywords: Feeding in bryozoans; Flow in lophophore; Ciliary sieving; Particle retention...

  3. Electrical Brain Responses to Beat Irregularities in Two Cases of Beat Deafness

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias, Brian; Lidji, Pascale; Honing, Henkjan; Palmer, Caroline; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Beat deafness, a recently documented form of congenital amusia, provides a unique window into functional specialization of neural circuitry for the processing of musical stimuli: Beat-deaf individuals exhibit deficits that are specific to the detection of a regular beat in music and the ability to move along with a beat. Studies on the neural underpinnings of beat processing in the general population suggest that the auditory system is capable of pre-attentively generating a predictive model ...

  4. Simple non-invasive analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes beating in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Sýkorová, Dominika; Karas, Pavel; Kudová, Jana; Kohút, Lukáš; Binó, Lucia; Večeřa, Josef; Víteček, Jan; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of digital video output enables the non-invasive screening of various active biological processes. For the monitoring and computing of the beating parameters of cardiomyocytes in vitro, CB Analyser (cardiomyocyte beating analyser) software was developed. This software is based on image analysis of the video recording of beating cardiomyocytes. CB Analyser was tested using cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells at different stages of cardiomyogenesis. We observed that during differentiation (from day 18), the beat peak width decreased, which corresponded to the increased speed of an individual pulse. However, the beating frequency did not change. Further, the effects of epinephrine modulating mature cardiomyocyte functions were tested to validate the CB Analyser analysis. In conclusion, data show that CB Analyser is a useful tool for evaluating the functions of both developing and mature cardiomyocytes under various conditions in vitro.

  5. Feedback in a cavity QED system for control of quantum beats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimmarusti A.D.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Conditional measurements on the undriven mode of a two-mode cavity QED system prepare a coherent superposition of ground states which generate quantum beats. The continuous system drive induces decoherence through the phase interruptions from Rayleigh scattering, which manifests as a decrease of the beat amplitude and an increase of the frequency of oscillation. We report recent experiments that implement a simple feedback mechanism to protect the quantum beat. We continuously drive the system until a photon is detected, heralding the presence of a coherent superposition. We then turn off the drive and let the superposition evolve in the dark, protecting it against decoherence. At a later time we reinstate the drive to measure the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the beats. The amplitude can increase by more than fifty percent, while the frequency is unchanged by the feedback.

  6. Beating phantasies: Mourned and unmourned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinucci, Giuseppina

    2016-06-01

    This paper intends to explore the organizing function and fate of sado-masochistic phantasies in their fixed form, in the psychic life of patients who have suffered early traumas, due to environmental vicissitudes and maternal psychopathology. The theoretical starting point is provided by the Novicks' research into transitory and permanent beating phantasies in adult and child patients, their onset and their psychic function, based on an examination of Freud's paper 'A child is being beaten'. In this text Freud achieves an unprecedented syncretism, locating the phantasy at the intersection between the oedipal complex, which is a vertical structure organizing sexual and generational differences, and the fraternal dimension, which is horizontal and organizes the lateral relationship with that similar but different other who is the sibling. Reporting in some detail material from the analyses of two young women, whose clinical presentation and early traumas show some similarities, the author puts in the context of the analytic work the emerging of the sado-masochistic phantasies, emphasizing their use and function in the transference-countertransference interplay. The beating phantasies shore up a precarious sense of self, threatened with psychic depletion and death, in identification with the absent mother of early infancy. An overly close relationship with a sibling, experienced as a narcissistic double, compounds the clinical picture, to establish the triangle formed by the parent(s) and two children which features in the beating phantasy. Finally, the author explores the contribution of ameliorating factors, such as alternative identificatory figures, constitutional endowment and capacity for sublimation, to account for the different fate of the fixed beating phantasies. PMID:26602362

  7. Abstract Possible: The Birmingham Beat

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Aeron; Salinas, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Gruppeutstilling. Samarbeidspartner: Alejandra Salinas. ABSTRACT YOUR SHIT IS Video loop and billboard. Eastside Projects, Birmingham UK Abstract Possible: The Birmingham Beat Curated by Maria Lind 6 October - 1 December 2012. Invited artists: José León Cerrillo, Zachary Formwalt, Goldin+Senneby, Wade Guyton, Yelena Popova, Alejandra Salinas and Aeron Bergman. Visningssted: Eastside Projects, Birmingham, UK. Se også: http://eastsideprojects.org/past/abstract-possible

  8. Diagnosis by ultrastructural study of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melgarejo-Moreno P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD, also known as ciliary immotility (SIC syndrome is an inherited disorder that includes a group of diseases in which respiratory cilia are immobile, ciliary movement is dyskinetic and ineffective or no cilia . The aim of this study is to determine the ciliary ultrastructure in patients with suspected DCP. Method: In 8 patients with suspected DCP nasal mucosa biopsy is performed with endoscopy at the inferior turbinate in the middle third by the ENT service under local anesthesia. Results: Of the 8 cases studied in 2 cases no ciliary ultrastructural level defects were found. In two cases with abnormal ciliary ultrastructure is present Kartagener syndrome. In a case no cilia were observed in the nasal mucosa. Discussion: The DCP and SIC are synonymous terms from clinical and pathogenetic view: immobility and dyskinesia lead to an absence of mucociliary transport, stasis of respiratory secretions with their consequences: chronic infections of lower respiratory tract and from birth . The most common ultrastructural defect is the total or partial absence of dynein. Conclusions: The ultrastructural study allows the diagnosis of PCD because genetic diagnosis is complicated and therefore get an early diagnosis of this condition which serves to improve the morbidity and mortality of these patients.

  9. Quantum-beat Auger spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Song Bin

    2015-01-01

    The concept of nonlinear quantum-beat pump-probe Auger spectroscopy is introduced by discussing a relatively simple four-level model system. We consider a coherent wave packet involving two low-lying states that was prepared by an appropriate pump pulse. This wave packet is subsequently probed by a weak, time-delayed probe pulse with nearly resonant coupling to a core-excited state of the atomic or molecular system. The resonant Auger spectra are then studied as a function of the duration of the probe pulse and the time delay. With a bandwidth of the probe pulse approaching the energy spread of the wave packet, the Auger yields and spectra show quantum beats as a function of pump-probe delay. An analytic theory for the quantum-beat Auger spectroscopy will be presented, which allows for the reconstruction of the wave packet by analyzing the delaydependent Auger spectra. The possibility of extending this method to a more complex manifold of electronic and vibrational energy levels is also discussed.

  10. Ciliary and non-ciliary expression and function of PACRG during vertebrate development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thumberger Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Park2-co-regulated gene (PACRG is evolutionarily highly conserved from green algae to mammals. In Chlamydomonas and trypanosomes, the PACRG protein associates with flagella. Loss of PACRG results in shortened or absent flagella. In mouse the PACRG protein is required for spermatogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to analyze (1 the expression patterns of PACRG during vertebrate embryogenesis, and (2 whether the PACRG protein was required for left-right (LR axis specification through cilia-driven leftward flow in Xenopus laevis. Methods PACRG cDNAs were cloned and expression was analyzed during early embryonic development of Xenopus, mouse, rabbit and zebrafish. Antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO mediated gene knockdown was applied in Xenopus to investigate LR development at the level of tissue morphology, leftward flow and asymmetric marker gene expression, using timelapse videography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and whole-mount in situ hybridization. Results were statistically evaluated using Wilcoxon paired and χ2 tests. Results PACRG mRNA expression was found in cells and tissues harboring cilia throughout the vertebrates. Highly localized expression was also detected in the brain. During early development, PACRG was specifically localized to epithelia where leftward flow arises, that is, the gastrocoel roof plate (GRP in Xenopus, the posterior notochord (PNC in mammals and Kupffer’s vesicle (KV in zebrafish. Besides its association with ciliary axonemes, subcellular localization of PACRG protein was found around the nucleus and in a spotty pattern in the cytoplasm. A green fluorescent protein (GFP fusion construct preferentially labeled cilia, rendering PACRG a versatile marker for live imaging. Loss-of-function in the frog resulted dose dependently in LR, neural tube closure and gastrulation defects, representing ciliary and non-ciliary functions of PACRG. Conclusions The PACRG protein is a novel

  11. Theory of beat wave excitation in an inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of beat wave excitation in a slightly inhomogeneous plasma is presented. While the theory is general it applies directly to the experiments performed in Alaska by the ionospheric heating facilities HIPAS [High Power Auroral Simulation, Radio Sci. 25, 1269 (1990)] and HAARP [High Frequency Active Auroral Research Project, Geophys. Res. Lett. 25, 257 (1998)]. A ray tracing (WKB) formalism appropriate for computations is developed. The computational implementation of this formalism and extensive results will be presented in a follow up to this paper. Also the beat wave excitation of upper-hybrid waves is investigated analytically. The complicated trajectories of these waves in the plasma are described. When this beat wave reaches the plasma wave resonance it can, in the HIPAS-HAARP experiments, attain nonlinear amplitude. The electrostatic upper-hybrid waves are trapped around the density maximum of the ionosphere. This trapping is investigated in detail. Beat wave pumping of the trapped modes is possible using HAARP and HIPAS or with split beams from HAARP

  12. A high-density EEG investigation into steady state binaural beat stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Goodin

    Full Text Available Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz or Beta (16 Hz frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others.

  13. A high-density EEG investigation into steady state binaural beat stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carey, Anne-Marie; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation altered vigilance or cortical frequencies and if personality traits were involved. Thirty-one participants were played binaural beat stimuli designed to elicit a response at either the Theta (7 Hz) or Beta (16 Hz) frequency bands while undertaking a zero-back vigilance task. EEG was recorded from a high-density electrode cap. No significant differences were found in vigilance or cortical frequency power during binaural beat stimulation compared to a white noise control period. Furthermore, no significant relationships were detected between the above and the Big Five personality traits. This suggests a short presentation of steady state binaural beats are not sufficient to alter vigilance or entrain cortical frequencies at the two bands examined and that certain personality traits were not more susceptible than others. PMID:22496862

  14. Wing-beat coupling between flying locust pairs: preferred phase and lift enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camhi; Sumbre; Wendler

    1995-01-01

    Pairs of locusts flying in tandem in a wind tunnel are known to couple their wing-beats intermittently. The rhythmically oscillating air flow from the front locust's wing-beat, detected by the rear individual, appears to convey the timing information for coupling. Three predictions of this arrangement were tested quantitatively in this study. (1) Given that the oscillating air flow has a wavelength of 7.5 cm, placing the rear locust 7.5 or 15 cm behind the front one should produce the same phase of coupling, whereas placing it at an intermediate distance of 11 cm should produce an opposite phase. (2) At any distance, the preferred phase at which wing-beat coupling occurs should depend, in part, on the difference in the wing-beat frequencies of the two locusts just before the coupling began. (3) At the moment that the wing-beats of the two locusts become coupled, a change should be observed consistently in the wing-beat frequency of the rear individual only. Each of these three predictions was fulfilled. We also recorded the instantaneous lift of the rear locust by tethering it to a laser torque meter. Lift varied with the phase of the wing-beats between the two locusts. For a given distance between the two locusts, lift was greater by a mean of 16 % of the locust's body mass at those phases where coupling most commonly occurred than at opposite phases. This lift effect was seen even if the wing-beats of the two locusts drifted through these preferred phases without actually coupling. These results are discussed in terms of a possible energetic advantage conferred to the rear locust by flying in tandem and by coupling its flight rhythm to the leader's wing-beat. PMID:9318863

  15. Progressive hemifacial atrophy with ciliary body atrophy and ocular hypotony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ashwini Kini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive hemifacial atrophy (PHA is a disease of unknown etiology affecting one-half of the face. Ocular involvement is uncommon. Atrophy of iris is rare, with only a few cases of partial atrophy being reported in the literature. We report a case of total atrophy of iris and ciliary body with associated ocular hypotony in a 16-year-old girl with PHA. We believe this is the first reported case of complete atrophy of iris and ciliary body in PHA. Ocular hypotony in PHA was thought to be due to intra-ocular inflammation. However in our case it appears to be secondary to severe atrophy of the ciliary body.

  16. Angioleiomyoma of the Ciliary Body:A Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Yan; Zhongyao Wu; Yongping Li; Guanguang Feng; Hao Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To report a rare case of angioleiomyoma of the ciliary body Methods :The clinical manifestation, imaging findings, histopathologic characteristics were analyzed in a 32-year-old male patient with angioleiomyoma of the ciliary body. Results:The tumor was removed intact with local resection. Histopathologic examination revealed that the tumor was full of vessels and it was composed of spindle cells with abundant cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical studies showed positive for SMA and Desmin and negative for S100 and HMB-45. Conclusions: Angioleiomyoma of the ciliary body is a rare tumor that can be successfully treated with local surgical resection in this area. It needs to be differentiated from other tumors, especially malignant melanoma. Eye Science 2004;20:19-22.

  17. Conservation of ciliary proteins in plants with no cilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodges Matthew E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cilia are complex, highly conserved microtubule-based organelles with a broad phylogenetic distribution. Cilia were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and many proteins involved in cilia function have been conserved through eukaryotic diversification. However, cilia have also been lost multiple times in different lineages, with at least two losses occurring within the land plants. Whereas all non-seed plants produce cilia for motility of male gametes, some gymnosperms and all angiosperms lack cilia. During these evolutionary losses, proteins with ancestral ciliary functions may be lost or co-opted into different functions. Results Here we identify a core set of proteins with an inferred ciliary function that are conserved in ciliated eukaryotic species. We interrogate this genomic dataset to identify proteins with a predicted ancestral ciliary role that have been maintained in non-ciliated land plants. In support of our prediction, we demonstrate that several of these proteins have a flagellar localisation in protozoan trypanosomes. The phylogenetic distribution of these genes within the land plants indicates evolutionary scenarios of either sub- or neo-functionalisation and expression data analysis shows that these genes are highly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen cells. Conclusions A large number of proteins possess a phylogenetic ciliary profile indicative of ciliary function. Remarkably, many genes with an ancestral ciliary role are maintained in non-ciliated land plants. These proteins have been co-opted to perform novel functions, most likely before the loss of cilia, some of which appear related to the formation of the male gametes.

  18. Terahertz beat oscillation of plasmonic electrons interacting with femtosecond light pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinping; He, Jianfang; Wang, Yimeng; Liu, Feifei

    2016-01-01

    Plasmon resonance in nanostructured metals is in essence collective oscillation of free electrons, which is driven by optical electric fields and oscillates at nearly the same frequency as the excitation photons. This is the basic physics for the currently extensively interested topics in optical metamaterials, optical switching, and logic optical “circuits” with potential applications in optical communication and optical computation. We present here an interference effect between photons and plasmon electrons, which is observed as multi-cycle beat-oscillation. The beat frequency is in the range of 3~4 THz, which is equal to the difference between optical frequency of the photons and oscillation frequency of the plasmon electrons. Such beat oscillation evolves in a time scale of more than 1 ps, which is much longer than the optical pulse length, implying interaction between photons and pure damping plasmon-electrons. The discovered mechanisms might be important for exploring new approaches for THz generation.

  19. Possible instabilities in the beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the concept of the beat wave accelerator is studied with emphasis put on the plasma physics. An important effect is the relativistic nature of the electrons oscillating in the electric field of the beat wave. Various instabilities are presented which could limit the overall efficiency of the accelerating process. (author)

  20. 5 Ways to Beat Pre-performance Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Cuts? 5 Ways to Beat Pre-performance Nerves KidsHealth > For Teens > 5 Ways to Beat Pre- ... nervios anticipatorios 5 Ways to Beat Pre-performance Nerves Lots of people stress out about talking in ...

  1. The accommodative ciliary muscle function is preserved in older humans

    OpenAIRE

    Tabernero, Juan; Chirre, Emmanuel; Hervella, Lucia; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Presbyopia, the loss of the eye’s accommodation capability, affects all humans aged above 45–50 years old. The two main reasons for this to happen are a hardening of the crystalline lens and a reduction of the ciliary muscle functionality with age. While there seems to be at least some partial accommodating functionality of the ciliary muscle at early presbyopic ages, it is not yet clear whether the muscle is still active at more advanced ages. Previous techniques used to visualize the accomm...

  2. Emergence of Synchronized Beating during the Regrowth of Eukaryotic Flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan

    2011-09-01

    A fundamental issue in the biology of eukaryotic flagella is the origin of synchronized beating observed in tissues and organisms containing multiple flagella. Recent studies of the biflagellate unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provided the first evidence that the interflagellar coupling responsible for synchronization is of hydrodynamic origin. To investigate this mechanism in detail, we study here synchronization in Chlamydomonas as its flagella slowly regrow after mechanically induced self-scission. The duration of synchronized intervals is found to be strongly dependent on flagellar length. Analysis within a stochastic model of coupled phase oscillators is used to extract the length dependence of the interflagellar coupling and the intrinsic beat frequencies of the two flagella. Physical and biological considerations that may explain these results are proposed.

  3. Sideband and quantum-beat measurements with sup(129m)Te and 57Co sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sideband intensities and quantum beats were measured for recoillessly emitted gamma rays as a function of the vibration frequency of quartz crystals on which sources of sup(129m)Te and 57Co were deposited. At most frequencies a low degree of coherence of the vibrations of the source nuclei was observed. (Auth.)

  4. Beats and expansion of two-component Bose–Einstein condensates in the Thomas–Fermi limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unique feature of multi-component Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) is the possibility of beating frequencies in collective oscillations. We analytically determine this beating frequency for the two-component BEC in one-dimension. We also show that the Thomas–Fermi approximation, where the quantum pressure is neglected, describes well the expansion of the two-component condensate released from an harmonic trap. (paper)

  5. The accommodative ciliary muscle function is preserved in older humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, Juan; Chirre, Emmanuel; Hervella, Lucia; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Presbyopia, the loss of the eye's accommodation capability, affects all humans aged above 45-50 years old. The two main reasons for this to happen are a hardening of the crystalline lens and a reduction of the ciliary muscle functionality with age. While there seems to be at least some partial accommodating functionality of the ciliary muscle at early presbyopic ages, it is not yet clear whether the muscle is still active at more advanced ages. Previous techniques used to visualize the accommodation mechanism of the ciliary muscle are complicated to apply in the older subjects, as they typically require fixation stability during long measurement times and/or to have an ultrasound probe directly in contact with the eye. Instead, we used our own developed method based on high-speed recording of lens wobbling to study the ciliary muscle activity in a small group of pseudophakic subjects (around 80 years old). There was a significant activity of the muscle, clearly able to contract under binocular stimulation of accommodation. This supports a purely lenticular-based theory of presbyopia and it might stimulate the search for new solutions to presbyopia by making use of the remaining contraction force still presented in the aging eye. PMID:27151778

  6. Electrical Brain Responses to Beat Irregularities in Two Cases of Beat Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Brian; Lidji, Pascale; Honing, Henkjan; Palmer, Caroline; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Beat deafness, a recently documented form of congenital amusia, provides a unique window into functional specialization of neural circuitry for the processing of musical stimuli: Beat-deaf individuals exhibit deficits that are specific to the detection of a regular beat in music and the ability to move along with a beat. Studies on the neural underpinnings of beat processing in the general population suggest that the auditory system is capable of pre-attentively generating a predictive model of upcoming sounds in a rhythmic pattern, subserved largely within auditory cortex and reflected in mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3 event-related potential (ERP) components. The current study examined these neural correlates of beat perception in two beat-deaf individuals, Mathieu and Marjorie, and a group of control participants under conditions in which auditory stimuli were either attended or ignored. Compared to control participants, Mathieu demonstrated reduced behavioral sensitivity to beat omissions in metrical patterns, and Marjorie showed a bias to identify irregular patterns as regular. ERP responses to beat omissions reveal an intact pre-attentive system for processing beat irregularities in cases of beat deafness, reflected in the MMN component, and provide partial support for abnormalities in later cognitive stages of beat processing, reflected in an unreliable P3b component exhibited by Mathieu-but not Marjorie-compared to control participants. P3 abnormalities observed in the current study resemble P3 abnormalities exhibited by individuals with pitch-based amusia, and are consistent with attention or auditory-motor coupling accounts of deficits in beat perception. PMID:26941591

  7. Electrical brain responses to beat irregularities in two cases of beat deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian eMathias

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Beat deafness, a recently documented form of congenital amusia, provides a unique window into functional specialization of neural circuitry for the processing of musical stimuli: Beat-deaf individuals exhibit deficits that are specific to the detection of a regular beat in music and the ability to move along with a beat. Studies on the neural underpinnings of beat processing in the general population suggest that the auditory system is capable of pre-attentively generating a predictive model of upcoming sounds in a rhythmic pattern, subserved largely within auditory cortex and reflected in mismatch negativity (MMN and P3 event-related potential (ERP components. The current study examined these neural correlates of beat perception in two beat-deaf individuals, Mathieu and Marjorie, and a group of control participants under conditions in which auditory stimuli were either attended or ignored. Compared to control participants, Mathieu demonstrated reduced behavioral sensitivity to beat omissions in metrical patterns, and Marjorie showed a bias to identify irregular patterns as regular. ERP responses to beat omissions reveal an intact pre-attentive system for processing beat irregularities in cases of beat deafness, reflected in the MMN component, and provide partial support for abnormalities in later cognitive stages of beat processing, reflected in an unreliable P3b component exhibited by Mathieu – but not Marjorie – compared to control participants. P3 abnormalities observed in the current study resemble P3 abnormalities exhibited by individuals with pitch-based amusia, and are consistent with attention or auditory-motor coupling accounts of deficits in beat perception.

  8. Recent results on the beat wave acceleration of externally injected electrons on a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) two laser beams of slightly different frequencies resonantly beat in a plasma in such a way that their frequency and wavenumber differences correspond to the plasma wave frequency and wavenumber. The amplitude-modulated electromagnetic wave envelope of the laser pulse exerts a periodic nonlinear force on the plasma electrons, causing them to bunch. The resulting space-charge wave can have a phase velocity nearly equal to the speed of light. If an electron bunch is injected with a velocity close to this it can be trapped and accelerated. The UCLA program investigating PBWA has found that tunnel or multi-photon ionized plasmas a re homogeneous enough for coherent macroscopic acceleration. The laser pulse should be short, and the peak laser intensity should be such that Iλ2 ∼ 2 x 1016 W/cm2 μm2 in order to get substantial beat wave amplitudes. tab., 3 refs

  9. Beating diffraction limit in an absorptive superlens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Chan, Che Ting

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that a slab with both permittivity and permeability equals -1+i δ can achieve super resolution and its mechanism can be understood with the idea of complementary material. In practice, meta-materials are always absorptive and the absorption sets an upper limit for the image resolution. Here, we study the image formation of stratified complementary slabs in the time domain. Instead of only one slab of super lens, we consider a stack of AB structured complementary slabs, where A is a super lens and B is normal material. We show that the superlens stack can beat the diffraction limit even in the presence of loss if the source has a time-dependent intensity profile. We derived a general analytical expression for the group velocity of an arbitrary k component including evanescent waves near frequency where ``complementary'' is satisfied and the analytical results can explain the super solution in the presence of loss. And our results shows that, with a Gaussian shaped pulse illumination, the image resolution can be improved by about 45% relative to harmonic illumination for the same system.

  10. Ciliary photoreceptors in the cerebral eyes of a protostome larva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passamaneck Yale J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eyes in bilaterian metazoans have been described as being composed of either ciliary or rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Phylogenetic distribution, as well as distinct morphologies and characteristic deployment of different photopigments (ciliary vs. rhabdomeric opsins and transduction pathways argue for the co-existence of both of these two photoreceptor types in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Both receptor types exist throughout the Bilateria, but only vertebrates are thought to use ciliary photoreceptors for directional light detection in cerebral eyes, while all other invertebrate bilaterians studied utilize rhabdomeric photoreceptors for this purpose. In protostomes, ciliary photoreceptors that express c-opsin have been described only from a non-visual deep-brain photoreceptor. Their homology with vertebrate rods and cones of the human eye has been hypothesized to represent a unique functional transition from non-visual to visual roles in the vertebrate lineage. Results To test the hypothesis that protostome cerebral eyes employ exclusively rhabdomeric photoreceptors, we investigated the ultrastructure of the larval eyes in the brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. We show that these pigment-cup eyes consist of a lens cell and a shading pigment cell, both of which are putative photoreceptors, deploying a modified, enlarged cilium for light perception, and have axonal connections to the larval brain. Our investigation of the gene expression patterns of c-opsin, Pax6 and otx in these eyes confirms that the larval eye spots of brachiopods are cerebral eyes that deploy ciliary type photoreceptors for directional light detection. Interestingly, c-opsin is also expressed during early embryogenesis in all potential apical neural cells, becoming restricted to the anterior neuroectoderm, before expression is initiated in the photoreceptor cells of the eyes. Coincident with the expression of c-opsin in the presumptive neuroectoderm

  11. On the beating of reinforcement pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Hiltunen, Eero

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to gain a better understanding of the effect of reinforcement pulp beating on the strength of mechanical pulp-dominated paper. The main purpose of reinforcement pulp beating is to improve the runnability of paper. The first objective of this study was to maximize the runnability related strength properties by beating. It was assumed that the flaw-resisting ability of paper correlates with the runnability of the dry paper web. In-plane fracture properties were assumed ...

  12. Possible parametric instabilities of beat waves in a transversely magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of an external magnetic field on the various possible parametric instabilities of the longitudinal beat wave at the difference frequency of two incident laser beams in a hot plasma has been thoeretically investigated. The kinetic equation is employed to obtain the nonlinear response of the magnetized electrons due to the nonlinear coupling of the beat wave with the low-frequency electrostatic plasma modes. It is noted that the growth rates of the three-wave and the four-wave parametric instabilities can be influenced by the external transverse magnetic field. (author). 20 refs, 3 figs

  13. Hybrid dead-beat observers for a class of nonlinear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Karafyllis, Iasson

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the reduced-order or full-order, dead-beat observer problem for a class of nonlinear systems, linear in the unmeasured states. A novel hybrid observer design strategy is proposed, with the help of the notion of strong observability in finite time. The proposed methodology is applied to a batch reactor, for which a hybrid dead-beat observer is obtained in the absence of the precise measurements of the concentration variables. Moreover, the observer is used for the estimation of the frequency of a sinusoidal signal. The results show that accurate estimations can be provided even if the signal is corrupted by high frequency noise.

  14. High Blood Pressure: Keep the Beat Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Keep the Beat Recipes Past Issues / Fall 2011 ... National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute To Improve Blood Pressure, Try the DASH Diet If you're one ...

  15. Beating Depression …Help Is Available

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Beating Depression …Help Is Available Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... treatments are available from your physician. Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  16. Heart Beat Classification Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Khazaee

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel system to classify three types of electrocardiogram beats, namely normal beats and two manifestations of heart arrhythmia. This system includes three main modules: a feature extraction module, a classifier module, and an optimization module. In the feature extraction module, a proper set combining the shape features and timing features is proposed as the efficient characteristic of the patterns. In the classifier module, a multi-class support vector machine (SVM)-b...

  17. Up to date on primary ciliary dyskinesia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Massimo; Di Cicco, Maria; Piras, Martina; Cangiotti, Angela M; Saggese, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a congenital, clinically and ultrastructurally heterogeneous disease due to abnormal structure and/or function of cilia, with impaired mucociliary transport leading to several respiratory disorders. PCD can be diagnosed by the combination of thorough clinical examination with functional and ultrastructural analysis of the cilia. This paper shows progresses in PCD diagnosis obtained by ciliogenesis in culture evaluation of ciliated respiratory cells and by genetic analysis of mutations in candidate genes. Moreover, since to date no specific treatments are available to correct the ciliary dysfunction, the paper shows the proper therapeutical approach by the use of respiratory physiotherapy and regular exercise to favour airways clearance, by antibiotics administration to control acute airway infections. Macrolides administration as antiinflammatory option is suggested. PMID:23973004

  18. [A rare case of primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintela, Cátia; Meireles, Cláudia; Bettencourt, Maria João; Ribeirinho, Augusto; Bentes, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive disease with a clinical history of upper and lowers respiratory infections, rhinosinusitis and bronquitis associated with complete or partial situs inversus. The authors present a 78 -year -old male caucasian patient with rhinosinusitis, lower respiratory tract infection and dyspnea, chronic otitis with hearing deficit and infertility followed in Gastroenterology for dyspepsia and constipation. The radiological studies revealed agenesis of right frontal sinus; bronchial wall thickening; bronchiectasis; cecum and ascending colon located on the left and small bowel occupies right side of abdomen. He had no immunodeficiency, allergies, cystic fibrosis and others. We concluded primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy. For the rarity of this case we decided to present it. PMID:19145394

  19. Proarrhythmic electrical remodelling is associated with increased beat-to-beat variability of repolarisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Oros, Avram; Schoenmakers, Marieke; van Opstal, Jurren M; Maas, Joep N; Beekman, Jet D M; Vos, Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Acquired long-QT syndrome in combination with increased beat-to-beat variability of repolarisation duration (BVR) is associated with lethal torsades de pointes arrhythmias (TdP) in dogs with remodelled heart after atrioventricular block (AVB). We evaluated the relative contributions of bradycardi...

  20. Systemic administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor induces cachexia in rodents.

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, J T; Seniuk, N A; Richardson, P.M.; Gauldie, J; Roder, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has previously been shown to promote the survival of several classes of neurons and glial. We report here that in addition to its effects on the nervous system, CNTF can induce potent effects in extra-neural tissues. Implantation of C6 glioma cells engineered to secrete CNTF either subcutaneously or into the peritoneal cavity of adult mice, or systemic injections of purified rat or human recombinant CNTF, resulted in a rapid syndrome of weight loss resulting...

  1. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor Regulation of Adult Forebrain Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nancy; Batt, Myra K.; Cronier, Brigitte A.; Jackson, Michele C.; Bruno Garza, Jennifer L; Trinh, Dennis S.; Mason, Carter O.; Spearry, Rachel P.; Bhattacharya, Shayon; Robitz, Rachel; Nakafuku, Masato; MacLennan, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Appropriately targeted manipulation of endogenous neural stem progenitor (NSP) cells may contribute to therapies for trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. A prerequisite to such therapies is a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating adult NSP cells in vivo. Indirect data suggest that endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptor signaling may inhibit neuronal differentiation of NSP cells. We challenged subventricular zone (SVZ) cells in vivo with low concentrations...

  2. Effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on motoneuron survival

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Stöckli, Kurt A.; Kreutzberg, Georg W.; Thoenen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the extensive degeneration of motoneurons in the rat facial nucleus after transection of the facial nerve in newborn rats can be prevented by local ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration. CNTF differs distinctly from known neurotrophic molecules such as NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in both its molecular characteristics (CNTF is a cytosolic rather than a secretory molecule) and its broad spectrum of biological activities. CNTF is expressed selectively by Schwann cell...

  3. Meiotic chromosome behaviour in Cenchrus ciliaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Visser

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A basic chromosome number of x = 9 has been confirmed for Cenchrus ciliaris L. Polyploidy is common and levels vary from tetraploid to hexaploid. Aneuploidv is reported for a single specimen, where two chromosomes of a single genome were lost. Various meiotic irregularities were observed. The highest incidence of meiotic abnormalities was observed in the pentaploid specimens. This was attributed to their uneven polyploid level All specimens varied from segmental alloploid to alloploid.

  4. Myristoylated CIL-7 regulates ciliary extracellular vesicle biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Julie E; Silva, Malan; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Hellen, Elizabeth; Kern, Andrew D; Hall, David H; Barr, Maureen M

    2015-08-01

    The cilium both releases and binds to extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs may be used by cells as a form of intercellular communication and mediate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. The mammalian polycystins (PCs) localize to cilia, as well as to urinary EVs released from renal epithelial cells. PC ciliary trafficking defects may be an underlying cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and ciliary-EV interactions have been proposed to play a central role in the biology of PKD. In Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals, PC1 and PC2 act in the same genetic pathway, act in a sensory capacity, localize to cilia, and are contained in secreted EVs, suggesting ancient conservation. However, the relationship between cilia and EVs and the mechanisms generating PC-containing EVs remain an enigma. In a forward genetic screen for regulators of C. elegans PKD-2 ciliary localization, we identified CIL-7, a myristoylated protein that regulates EV biogenesis. Loss of CIL-7 results in male mating behavioral defects, excessive accumulation of EVs in the lumen of the cephalic sensory organ, and failure to release PKD-2::GFP-containing EVs to the environment. Fatty acylation, such as myristoylation and palmitoylation, targets proteins to cilia and flagella. The CIL-7 myristoylation motif is essential for CIL-7 function and for targeting CIL-7 to EVs. C. elegans is a powerful model with which to study ciliary EV biogenesis in vivo and identify cis-targeting motifs such as myristoylation that are necessary for EV-cargo association and function. PMID:26041936

  5. Photosynthesis of Digitaria ciliaris during repeated soil drought and rewatering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YaYong Luo; XueYong Zhao; JingHui Zhang; YuLin Li; XiaoAn Zuo; DianChao Sun

    2015-01-01

    The ability of psammophyte photosynthesis to withstand and recover from severe droughts is crucial for vegetation sta-bility in semi-arid sandy lands. The responses of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence of an annual grass, Digitaria ciliaris, were measured through three soil drought and rewatering cycles. Results showed that the net photosynthesis rate (Pn) decreased by 92%, 95%, and 63%at end of the three drought periods, respectively, water use efficiency (WUE) de-creased by 67%, 54%, and 48%, while the constant intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) increased by 1.08, 0.88, and 0.45 times. During those three cycles, the trapping probability with no dark adaptation (Fv′/Fm′) decreased by 55%, 51%, and 9%, the electron transport per cross section (ET0′/CS0′) decreased by 63%, 42%, and 18%, and the dissipation per cross section (DI0′/CS0′) increased by 97%, 96%, and 21%. These results indicated that D. ciliaris was subjected to photoinhi-bition and some non-stomatal limitation of photosynthesis under drought. However, after four days of rewatering, its photosynthetic characteristics were restored to control values. This capability to recover from drought may contribute to making the plant's use of water as efficient as possible. Furthermore, the photosynthesis decreased more slowly in the subsequent drought cycles than in the first cycle, allowing D. ciliaris to enhance its future drought tolerance after drought hardening. Thus, it acclimatizes itself to repeated soil drought.

  6. Measuring Neural Entrainment to Beat and Meter in Infants: Effects of Music Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirelli, Laura K.; Spinelli, Christina; Nozaradan, Sylvie; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers often engage in musical interactions with their infants. For example, parents across cultures sing lullabies and playsongs to their infants from birth. Behavioral studies indicate that infants not only extract beat information, but also group these beats into metrical hierarchies by as early as 6 months of age. However, it is not known how this is accomplished in the infant brain. An EEG frequency-tagging approach has been used successfully with adults to measure neural entrainment to auditory rhythms. The current study is the first to use this technique with infants in order to investigate how infants' brains encode rhythms. Furthermore, we examine how infant and parent music background is associated with individual differences in rhythm encoding. In Experiment 1, EEG was recorded while 7-month-old infants listened to an ambiguous rhythmic pattern that could be perceived to be in two different meters. In Experiment 2, EEG was recorded while 15-month-old infants listened to a rhythmic pattern with an unambiguous meter. In both age groups, information about music background (parent music training, infant music classes, hours of music listening) was collected. Both age groups showed clear EEG responses frequency-locked to the rhythms, at frequencies corresponding to both beat and meter. For the younger infants (Experiment 1), the amplitudes at duple meter frequencies were selectively enhanced for infants enrolled in music classes compared to those who had not engaged in such classes. For the older infants (Experiment 2), amplitudes at beat and meter frequencies were larger for infants with musically-trained compared to musically-untrained parents. These results suggest that the frequency-tagging method is sensitive to individual differences in beat and meter processing in infancy and could be used to track developmental changes. PMID:27252619

  7. Wavelength of ocean waves and surf beat at duck from array measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Menon, H.B.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Jog, P.D.; Almeida, A.M.

    Wavelength of ocean waves and surf beat (infra gravity waves) has for the first time been computed as a function of frequency from different combinations of non-collinear 3-gauge arrays. Data at the 15-gauge polygonal array at 8 m depth at Duck...

  8. Mutations in GAS8, a Gene Encoding a Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex Subunit, Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia with Axonemal Disorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanson, Ludovic; Thomas, Lucie; Copin, Bruno; Coste, André; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Montantin, Guy; Collot, Nathalie; Tissier, Sylvie; Papon, Jean-François; Clement, Annick; Louis, Bruno; Escudier, Estelle; Amselem, Serge; Legendre, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by chronic respiratory infections of the upper and lower airways, hypofertility, and, in approximately half of the cases, situs inversus. This complex phenotype results from defects in motile cilia and sperm flagella. Among the numerous genes involved in PCD, very few-including CCDC39 and CCDC40-carry mutations that lead to a disorganization of ciliary axonemes with microtubule misalignment. Focusing on this particular phenotype, we identified bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in GAS8, a gene that encodes a subunit of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) orthologous to DRC4 of the flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Unlike the majority of PCD patients, individuals with GAS8 mutations have motile cilia, which, as documented by high-speed videomicroscopy, display a subtle beating pattern defect characterized by slightly reduced bending amplitude. Immunofluorescence studies performed on patients' respiratory cilia revealed that GAS8 is not required for the proper expression of CCDC39 and CCDC40. Rather, mutations in GAS8 affect the subcellular localization of another N-DRC subunit called DRC3. Overall, this study, which identifies GAS8 as a PCD gene, unveils the key importance of the corresponding protein in N-DRC integrity and in the proper alignment of axonemal microtubules in humans. PMID:27120127

  9. Short-term beat-to-beat variability of the QT interval is increased and correlates with parameters of left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Andrea; Baczkó, István; Nagy, Viktória; Gavallér, Henriette; Csanády, Miklós; Forster, Tamás; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Lengyel, Csaba; Sepp, Róbert

    2015-09-01

    Stratification models for the prediction of sudden cardiac death (SCD) are inappropriate in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We investigated conventional electrocardiogram (ECG) repolarization parameters and the beat-to-beat short-term QT interval variability (QT-STV), a new parameter of proarrhythmic risk, in 37 patients with HCM (21 males, average age 48 ± 15 years). Resting ECGs were recorded for 5 min and the frequency corrected QT interval (QTc), QT dispersion (QTd), beat-to-beat short-term variability of QT interval (QT-STV), and the duration of terminal part of T waves (Tpeak-Tend) were calculated. While all repolarization parameters were significantly increased in patients with HCM compared with the controls (QTc, 488 ± 61 vs. 434 ± 23 ms, p < 0.0001; QT-STV, 4.5 ± 2 vs. 3.2 ± 1 ms, p = 0.0002; Tpeak-Tend duration, 107 ± 27 vs. 91 ± 10 ms, p = 0.0015; QTd, 47 ± 17 vs. 34 ± 9 ms, p = 0.0002), QT-STV had the highest relative increase (+41%). QT-STV also showed the best correlation with indices of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, i.e., maximal LV wall thickness normalized for body surface area (BSA; r = 0.461, p = 0.004) or LV mass (determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging) normalized for BSA (r = 0.455, p = 0.015). In summary, beat-to-beat QT-STV showed the most marked increase in patients with HCM and may represent a novel marker that merits further testing for increased SCD risk in HCM. PMID:26313025

  10. Numerical modeling of surf beat generated by moving breakpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    As an important hydrodynamic phenomenon in the nearshore zone, the cross-shore surf beat is numerically studied in this paper with a fully nonlinear Boussinesq-type model, which resolves the primary wave motion as well as the long waves. Compared with the classical Boussinesq equations, the equations adopted here allow for improved linear dispersion characteristics. Wave breaking and run-up in the swash zone are included in the numerical model. Mutual interactions between short waves and long waves are inherent in the model. The numerical study of long waves is based on bichromatic wave groups with a wide range of mean frequencies, group frequencies and modulation rates. The cross-shore variation in the amplitudes of short waves and long waves is investigated. The model results are compared with laboratory experiments from the literature and good agreement is found.

  11. Finger-to-Beat Coordination Skill of Non-dancers, Street Dancers, and the World Champion of a Street-Dance Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akito; Fujii, Shinya; Okano, Masahiro; Kudo, Kazutoshi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of body movements to a musical beat is a common feature of many dance styles. However, the auditory–motor coordination skills of dancers remain largely uninvestigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the auditory–motor coordination skills of non-dancers, street dancers, and the winner of a celebrated international street dance competition, while coordinating their rhythmic finger movements to a beat. The beat rate of a metronome increased from 1.0 to 3.7 Hz. The participants were asked to either flex or extend their index fingers on the beat in each condition. Under the extend-on-the-beat condition, both the dancers and non-dancers showed a spontaneous transition from the extend-on-the-beat to the flex-on-the-beat or to a phase wandering pattern. However, the critical frequency at which the transition occurred was significantly higher in the dancers (3.3 Hz) than in the non-dancers (2.6 Hz). Under the flex-on-the-beat condition, the dancers were able to maintain their coordination pattern more stably at high beat rates compared to the non-dancers. Furthermore, the world champion matched the timing of movement peak velocity to the beat across the different beat rates. This may give a sense of unity between the movement and the beat for the audience because the peak velocity of the rhythmic movement works as a temporal cue for the audiovisual synchrony perception. These results suggest that the skills of accomplished dancers lie in their small finger movements and that the sensorimotor learning of street dance is characterized by a stabilization of the coordination patterns, including the inhibition of an unintentional transition to other coordination patterns. PMID:27148148

  12. Finger-to-Beat Coordination Skill of Non-dancers, Street Dancers, and the World Champion of a Street-Dance Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akito; Fujii, Shinya; Okano, Masahiro; Kudo, Kazutoshi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of body movements to a musical beat is a common feature of many dance styles. However, the auditory-motor coordination skills of dancers remain largely uninvestigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the auditory-motor coordination skills of non-dancers, street dancers, and the winner of a celebrated international street dance competition, while coordinating their rhythmic finger movements to a beat. The beat rate of a metronome increased from 1.0 to 3.7 Hz. The participants were asked to either flex or extend their index fingers on the beat in each condition. Under the extend-on-the-beat condition, both the dancers and non-dancers showed a spontaneous transition from the extend-on-the-beat to the flex-on-the-beat or to a phase wandering pattern. However, the critical frequency at which the transition occurred was significantly higher in the dancers (3.3 Hz) than in the non-dancers (2.6 Hz). Under the flex-on-the-beat condition, the dancers were able to maintain their coordination pattern more stably at high beat rates compared to the non-dancers. Furthermore, the world champion matched the timing of movement peak velocity to the beat across the different beat rates. This may give a sense of unity between the movement and the beat for the audience because the peak velocity of the rhythmic movement works as a temporal cue for the audiovisual synchrony perception. These results suggest that the skills of accomplished dancers lie in their small finger movements and that the sensorimotor learning of street dance is characterized by a stabilization of the coordination patterns, including the inhibition of an unintentional transition to other coordination patterns. PMID:27148148

  13. Beat Noise Limitation in Coherent Time-Spreading OCDMA Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ken-ichi; Kitayama; Koji; Mutsushima

    2003-01-01

    The BER performance of the coherent time-spreading OCDMA network is analyzed by considering the MAI and beat noises as well as the other additive noises. The influence and solution for the beat noise issue are discussed.

  14. Beating and insulting children as a risk for adult cancer, cardiac disease and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Michael E; Alkhalaf, Ahmed M; Whalley, Ben

    2013-12-01

    The use of physical punishment for children is associated with poor psychological and behavioral outcomes, but the causal pathway is controversial, and the effects on later physical health unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of asthma, cancer, and cardiac patients (150 in each category, 75 male) recruited from outpatient clinics and 250 healthy controls (125 male). All participants were 40-60 years old and citizens of Saudi Arabia, where the use of beating and insults is an acceptable parenting style. Demographic data and recalled frequency of beatings and insults as a child were assessed on an 8-point scale. Beating and insults were highly correlated (ρ = 0.846). Propensity score matching was used to control for demographic differences between the disease and healthy groups. After controlling for differences, more frequent beating (once or more per month) and insults were associated with a significantly increased risk for cancer (RR = 1.7), cardiac disease (RR = 1.3) and asthma (RR = 1.6), with evidence of increased risk for cancer and asthma with beating frequency of once every 6 months or more. Our results show that a threatening parenting style of beating and insults is associated with increased risk for somatic disease, possibly because this form of parenting induces stress. Our findings are consistent with previous research showing that child abuse and other early life stressors adversely affect adult somatic health, but provide evidence that the pathogenic effects occur also with chronic minor stress. A stress-inducing parenting style, even when normative, has long term adverse health consequences. PMID:23054177

  15. Heat Beats Cold for Treating Jellyfish Stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158584.html Heat Beats Cold for Treating Jellyfish Stings Evidence favors hot water or hot packs to ease pain ... 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If you're unlucky enough to suffer a jellyfish sting, new research says that heat is better than cold for easing the pain. ...

  16. THz radiation by beating Langmuir waves

    CERN Document Server

    Son, S; Park, J Y

    2013-01-01

    An intense terahertz (THz) radiation generated by the beating of two Langmuir waves, which are excited by the forward Raman scattering, is analyzed theoretically. The radiation energy per shot can be as high as 0.1 J, with the duration of 10 pico-second. Appropriate plasma density and the laser characteristics are examined.

  17. Quantum beats of the rigid rotor

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalski, K.; Rembieliński, J.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics is investigated of a free particle on a sphere (rigid rotor or rotator) that is initially in a coherent state. The instability of coherent states with respect to the free evolution leads to nontrivial time-development of averages of observables representing the position of a particle on a sphere that can be interpreted as quantum beats.

  18. Beat gestures modulate auditory integration in speech perception

    OpenAIRE

    Biau, Emmanuel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador, 1970-

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous beat gestures are an integral part of the paralinguistic context during face-to-face conversations. Here we investigated the time course of beat-speech integration in speech perception by measuring ERPs evoked by words pronounced with or without an accompanying beat gesture, while participants watched a spoken discourse. Words accompanied by beats elicited a positive shift in ERPs at an early sensory stage (before 100 ms) and at a later time window coinciding with the auditory com...

  19. Discinesia ciliar primária Primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ WELLINGTON ALVES DOS SANTOS

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Discinesia ciliar primária é uma doença autossômica recessiva caracterizada pela história de infecções repetidas do trato respiratório superior e inferior, otite média, bronquite e rinossinusite, associada a situs inversus na metade dos casos. O diagnóstico é estabelecido pela análise ciliar ultra-estrutural de espécimes respiratórios, após a exclusão inicial de outras doenças, como fibrose cística, deficiência de alfa-1-antitripsina, imunodeficiências (IgG, neutrófilos e complemento e síndrome de Young. O propósito deste artigo é revisar os achados clínicos, o diagnóstico e o manejo da discinesia ciliar primária, incluindo um fluxograma diagnóstico.Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a history of recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections with chronic otitis media, bronchitis and rhinosinusitis, associated with situs inversus in 50% of cases. The diagnosis is established by ciliary ultrastructural analysis of respiratory specimens, after ruling out some disorders as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1 anti-trypsin deficiency, immune deficiencies (IgG, neutrophils and complement and Young's syndrome. The purpose of this paper is to review the clinical features, diagnosis and management of primary ciliary dyskinesia, including a diagnostic algorithm.

  20. Cardiac beat-to-beat alternations driven by unusual spiral waves

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Yun; Woo, Sung-Jae; Hwang, Seong-min; Hong, Jin Hee; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2007-01-01

    Alternans, a beat-to-beat temporal alternation in the sequence of heartbeats, is a known precursor of the development of cardiac fibrillation, leading to sudden cardiac death. The equally important precursor of cardiac arrhythmias is the rotating spiral wave of electro-mechanical activity, or reentry, on the heart tissue. Here, we show that these two seemingly different phenomena can have a remarkable relationship. In well controlled in vitro tissue cultures, isotropic populations of rat vent...

  1. Left ventricular beat to beat performance in atrial fibrillation: dependence on contractility, preload, and afterload

    OpenAIRE

    Muntinga, H; Gosselink, A; Blanksma, P; De Kam, P J; van der Wall, E; Crijns, H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess independent determinants of beat to beat variation in left ventricular performance during atrial fibrillation.
DESIGN—Prospective study.
SETTING—University hospital.
PATIENTS—Seven patients with chronic non-valvar atrial fibrillation.
INTERVENTIONS—Invasive and non-invasive haemodynamic variables were assessed using a non-imaging computerised nuclear probe, a balloon tipped flow directed catheter, and a non-invasive fingertip blood pressure measurement system linked to a p...

  2. Sideband and quantum-beat measurements with sup(129m)Te and /sup 57/Co sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voorthuysen, E.H. du Marchie van; Zhang, G.L.; Waard, H. de (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands))

    1983-12-01

    Sideband intensities and quantum beats were measured for recoillessly emitted gamma rays as a function of the vibration frequency of quartz crystals on which sources of sup(129m)Te and /sup 57/Co were deposited. At most frequencies a low degree of coherence of the vibrations of the source nuclei was observed.

  3. Beat Gestures Modulate Auditory Integration in Speech Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biau, Emmanuel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous beat gestures are an integral part of the paralinguistic context during face-to-face conversations. Here we investigated the time course of beat-speech integration in speech perception by measuring ERPs evoked by words pronounced with or without an accompanying beat gesture, while participants watched a spoken discourse. Words…

  4. Biometry of the ciliary muscle during dynamic accommodation assessed with OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Hernandez, Victor; de Freitas, Carolina; Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the structural changes of the ciliary muscle with age and how it may contribute to presbyopia. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to perform ciliary muscle biometry at different age and accommodative states with low resolution and speed. Dynamic imaging and accurate biometry of the ciliary muscle requires high-speed, high-resolution and correction of the OCT image distortions. We integrate an existing custom-made Spectral Domain OCT (SD-OCT) platform working at 840nm for biometry of the human eye with a SD-OCT system working at 1325nm that enables high-speed and high-resolution transscleral imaging of the ciliary muscle dynamically during accommodation and we developed an algorithm to provide corrected thickness measurements of the ciliary muscle.

  5. Oligodendroglioma of the ciliary body: a unique case report and the review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, there is no report in the international literature of an oligodendroglioma of the ciliary body, nor is there an analysis of the possible origins of this lesion. Here we report on a 52-year-old man admitted to our hospital with a ciliary body tumor revealed by clinical examination and ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies. Following enucleation, pathological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed. Postoperative histopathological staining results included OLIGO-2(+) and GFAP(-), leading to a pathological diagnosis of oligodendroglioma of the ciliary body in the right eye (WHO grade II). Since malignant gliomas derive from transformed neural stem cells, the presence of oligodendroglioma in the ciliary body supports the hypothesis that gliomas can occur wherever neural stem cells exist. Tumors of the ciliary body derived from oligodendrocytes are difficult to diagnose; pathological analyses are essential

  6. Finger beat-to-beat blood pressure responses to successive hand elevations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raamat, R; Jagomägi, K; Talts, J; Mäger, I

    2009-06-01

    We investigated finger beat-to-beat blood pressure responses to a series of successive hand elevations in 14 normal volunteers. By passive elevation of the hand by 40 cm and lowering it again after a minute, calibrated hydrostatic pressure changes were induced in the finger arteries of the subjects. Three successive procedures with a 2-min interval between them were performed. Transitions between positions were completed smoothly over a 10-s period. Non-invasive beat-to-beat mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the finger arteries was measured by applying the servo-oscillometric physiograph (University of Tartu, Estonia). A good agreement between the evoked MAP changes during all the three hand elevations (-31.2, -30.4 and -30.0 mmHg, respectively) and the calculated hydrostatic pressure change (-31.0 mmHg) was obtained. The height difference of approximately 40 cm and rate of 4-5 cm/s can be recommended for the hand elevation test, greater postural changes and higher rates may diminish agreement between the measured blood pressure response and the corresponding hydrostatic pressure change. The applied hydrostatic test may be helpful for assessing the accuracy of beat-to-beat finger blood pressure measurement. PMID:19027338

  7. Detrended fluctuation analysis of non-stationary cardiac beat-to-beat interval of sick infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Massaro, An N.; Al-Shargabi, Tareq; Niforatos Andescavage, Nickie; Chang, Taeun; Glass, Penny; du Plessis, Adre J.

    2014-11-01

    We performed detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of cardiac beat-to-beat intervals (RRis) collected from sick newborn infants over 1-4 day periods. We calculated four different metrics from the DFA fluctuation function: the DFA exponents αL (>40 beats up to one-fourth of the record length), αs (15-30 beats), root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuation on a short-time scale (20-50 beats), and RMS fluctuation on a long-time scale (110-150 beats). Except αL , all metrics clearly distinguished two groups of newborn infants (favourable vs. adverse) with well-characterized outcomes. However, the RMS fluctuations distinguished the two groups more consistently over time compared to αS . Furthermore, RMS distinguished the RRi of the two groups earlier compared to the DFA exponent. In all the three measures, the favourable outcome group displayed higher values, indicating a higher magnitude of (auto-)correlation and variability, thus normal physiology, compared to the adverse outcome group.

  8. Unraveling the nature of coherent beatings in chlorosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dostál, Jakub [Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Mančal, Tomáš; Pšenčík, Jakub [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Vácha, František [Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Zigmantas, Donatas, E-mail: donatas.zigmantas@chemphys.lu.se [Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-03-21

    Coherent two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy at 80 K was used to study chlorosomes isolated from green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. Two distinct processes in the evolution of the 2D spectrum are observed. The first being exciton diffusion, seen in the change of the spectral shape occurring on a 100-fs timescale, and the second being vibrational coherences, realized through coherent beatings with frequencies of 91 and 145 cm{sup −1} that are dephased during the first 1.2 ps. The distribution of the oscillation amplitude in the 2D spectra is independent of the evolution of the 2D spectral shape. This implies that the diffusion energy transfer process does not transfer coherences within the chlorosome. Remarkably, the oscillatory pattern observed in the negative regions of the 2D spectrum (dominated by the excited state absorption) is a mirror image of the oscillations found in the positive part (originating from the stimulated emission and ground state bleach). This observation is surprising since it is expected that coherences in the electronic ground and excited states are generated with the same probability and the latter dephase faster in the presence of fast diffusion. Moreover, the relative amplitude of coherent beatings is rather high compared to non-oscillatory signal despite the reported low values of the Huang-Rhys factors. The origin of these effects is discussed in terms of the vibronic and Herzberg-Teller couplings.

  9. QRS template matching for recognition of ventricular ectopic beats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasteva, Vessela; Jekova, Irena

    2007-12-01

    We propose a quasi real-time method for discrimination of ventricular ectopic beats from both supraventricular and paced beats in the electrocardiogram (ECG). The heartbeat waveforms were evaluated within a fixed-length window around the fiducial points (100 ms before, 450 ms after). Our algorithm was designed to operate with minimal expert intervention and we define that the operator is required only to initially select up to three 'normal' heartbeats (the most frequently seen supraventricular or paced complexes). These were named original QRS templates and their copies were substituted continuously throughout the ECG analysis to capture slight variations in the heartbeat waveforms of the patient's sustained rhythm. The method is based on matching of the evaluated heartbeat with the QRS templates by a complex set of ECG descriptors, including maximal cross-correlation, area difference and frequency spectrum difference. Temporal features were added by analyzing the R-R intervals. The classification criteria were trained by statistical assessment of the ECG descriptors calculated for all heartbeats in MIT-BIH Supraventricular Arrhythmia Database. The performance of the classifiers was tested on the independent MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database. The achieved unbiased accuracy is represented by sensitivity of 98.4% and specificity of 98.86%, both being competitive to other published studies. The provided computationally efficient techniques enable the fast post-recording analysis of lengthy Holter-monitor ECG recordings, as well as they can serve as a quasi real-time detection method embedded into surface ECG monitors. PMID:17805974

  10. Small displacement measurements with subatomic resolution by beat frequency measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Číp, Ondřej; Petrů, František; Buchta, Zdeněk; Lazar, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 7 (2007), s. 2005-2013. ISSN 0957-0233 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB200650503; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA ČR GA102/07/1179; GA MPO FT-TA3/133 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : high-resolution interferometry * nanometrology Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.297, year: 2007

  11. Algorithm for identifying and separating beats from arterial pulse records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentinuzzi Max E

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This project was designed as an epidemiological aid-selecting tool for a small country health center with the general objective of screening out possible coronary patients. Peripheral artery function can be non-invasively evaluated by impedance plethysmography. Changes in these vessels appear as good predictors of future coronary behavior. Impedance plethysmography detects volume variations after simple occlusive maneuvers that may show indicative modifications in arterial/venous responses. Averaging of a series of pulses is needed and this, in turn, requires proper determination of the beginning and end of each beat. Thus, the objective here is to describe an algorithm to identify and separate out beats from a plethysmographic record. A secondary objective was to compare the output given by human operators against the algorithm. Methods The identification algorithm detected the beat's onset and end on the basis of the maximum rising phase, the choice of possible ventricular systolic starting points considering cardiac frequency, and the adjustment of some tolerance values to optimize the behavior. Out of 800 patients in the study, 40 occlusive records (supradiastolic- subsystolic were randomly selected without any preliminary diagnosis. Radial impedance plethysmographic pulse and standard ECG were recorded digitizing and storing the data. Cardiac frequency was estimated with the Power Density Function and, thereafter, the signal was derived twice, followed by binarization of the first derivative and rectification of the second derivative. The product of the two latter results led to a weighing signal from which the cycles' onsets and ends were established. Weighed and frequency filters are needed along with the pre-establishment of their respective tolerances. Out of the 40 records, 30 seconds strands were randomly chosen to be analyzed by the algorithm and by two operators. Sensitivity and accuracy were calculated by means

  12. Beat that Word: How Listeners Integrate Beat Gesture and Focus in Multimodal Speech Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Diana; Chu, Mingyuan; Wang, Lin; Özyürek, Asli; Hagoort, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Communication is facilitated when listeners allocate their attention to important information (focus) in the message, a process called "information structure." Linguistic cues like the preceding context and pitch accent help listeners to identify focused information. In multimodal communication, relevant information can be emphasized by nonverbal cues like beat gestures, which represent rhythmic nonmeaningful hand movements. Recent studies have found that linguistic and nonverbal attention cues are integrated independently in single sentences. However, it is possible that these two cues interact when information is embedded in context, because context allows listeners to predict what information is important. In an ERP study, we tested this hypothesis and asked listeners to view videos capturing a dialogue. In the critical sentence, focused and nonfocused words were accompanied by beat gestures, grooming hand movements, or no gestures. ERP results showed that focused words are processed more attentively than nonfocused words as reflected in an N1 and P300 component. Hand movements also captured attention and elicited a P300 component. Importantly, beat gesture and focus interacted in a late time window of 600-900 msec relative to target word onset, giving rise to a late positivity when nonfocused words were accompanied by beat gestures. Our results show that listeners integrate beat gesture with the focus of the message and that integration costs arise when beat gesture falls on nonfocused information. This suggests that beat gestures fulfill a unique focusing function in multimodal discourse processing and that they have to be integrated with the information structure of the message. PMID:27027421

  13. Heart Beat Classification Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khazaee

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel system to classify three types of electrocardiogram beats, namely normal beats and two manifestations of heart arrhythmia. This system includes three main modules: a feature extraction module, a classifier module, and an optimization module. In the feature extraction module, a proper set combining the shape features and timing features is proposed as the efficient characteristic of the patterns. In the classifier module, a multi-class support vector machine (SVM-based classifier is proposed. For the optimization module, a particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed to search for the best value of the SVM parameters and upstream by looking for the best subset of features that feed the classifier. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has very high recognition accuracy. This high efficiency is achieved with only little features, which have been selected using particle swarm optimizer.

  14. Semiconductor optical amplifier-based heterodyning detection for resolving optical terahertz beat-tone signals from passively mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An all-optical heterodyne approach based on a room-temperature controlled semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) for measuring the frequency and linewidth of the terahertz beat-tone signal from a passively mode-locked laser is proposed. Under the injection of two external cavity lasers, the SOA acts as a local oscillator at their detuning frequency and also as an optical frequency mixer whose inputs are the self-modulated spectrum of the device under test and the two laser beams. Frequency and linewidth of the intermediate frequency signal (and therefore, the beat-tone signal) are resolved by using a photodiode and an electrical spectrum analyzer.

  15. Robotic Catheters for Beating Heart Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kesner, Samuel Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Compliant and flexible cardiac catheters provide direct access to the inside of the heart via the vascular system without requiring clinicians to stop the heart or open the chest. However, the fast motion of the intracardiac structures makes it difficult to modify and repair the cardiac tissue in a controlled and safe manner. In addition, rigid robotic tools for beating heart surgery require the chest to be opened and the heart exposed, making the procedures highly invasive. The novel robot...

  16. Newborn infants detect the beat in music

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, I.; Háden, G.P.; Ladinig, O.; Sziller, I.; Honing, H.

    2009-01-01

    To shed light on how humans can learn to understand music, we need to discover what the perceptual capabilities with which infants are born. Beat induction, the detection of a regular pulse in an auditory signal, is considered a fundamental human trait that, arguably, played a decisive role in the origin of music. Theorists are divided on the issue whether this ability is innate or learned. We show that newborn infants develop expectation for the onset of rhythmic cycles (the downbeat), even ...

  17. Expression of nitric oxide synthase and guanylate cyclase in the human ciliary body and trabecular meshwork

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ren-yi; MA Ning

    2012-01-01

    Background The role played by the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the aqueous humor dynamics is still unclear.This study was designed to investigate the expression and distribution of NO synthase (NOS) isoforms and guanylate cyclase (GC) in human ciliary body,trabecular meshwork and the Schlemm's canal.Methods Twelve eyes after corneal transplantation were used.Expression of three NOS isoforms (i.e.neuronal NOS (nNOS),inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS)) and GC were assessed in 10 eyes by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal or polyclonal antibody of NOS and GC.Ciliary bodies were dissected free and the total proteins were extracted.Western blotting was performed to confirm the protein expression of 3 NOS isoforms and GC.Results Expression of 3 NOS isoforms and GC were observed in the ciliary epithelium,ciliary muscle,trabecular meshwork and the endothelium of the Schlemm's canal.Immunoreactivity of nNOS was detected mainly along the apical cytoplasmic junction of the non-pigmented epithelium (NPE) and pigmented epithelial (PE) cells.Protein expressions of 3 NOS isoforms and GC were confirmed in isolated human ciliary body by Western blotting.Conclusions The expression of NOS isoforms and GC in human ciliary body suggest the possible involvement of NO and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP,cGMP) signaling pathway in the ciliary body,and may play a role in both processes of aqueous humor formation and drainage.

  18. Beat-to-beat left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation: radionuclide assessment with the computerized nuclear probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is wide beat-to-beat variability in cycle length and left ventricular performance in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this study, left ventricular ejection fraction and relative left ventricular volumes were evaluated on a beat-to-beat basis with the computerized nuclear probe, an instrument with sufficiently high sensitivity to allow continuous evaluation of the radionuclide time-activity curve. Of 18 patients with atrial fibrillation, 5 had mitral stenosis, 6 had mitral regurgitation, and 7 had coronary artery disease. Fifty consecutive beats were analyzed in each patient. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction ranged from 17 to 51%. There was substantial beat-to-beat variation in cycle length and left ventricular ejection fraction in all patients, including those with marked left ventricular dysfunction. In 14 patients who also underwent multiple gated cardiac blood pool imaging, there was an excellent correlation between mean ejection fraction derived from the nuclear probe and gated ejection fraction obtained by gamma camera imaging (r . 0.90). Based on beat-to-beat analysis, left ventricular function was dependent on relative end-diastolic volume and multiple preceding cycle lengths, but not preceding end-systolic volumes. This study demonstrates that a single value for left ventricular ejection fraction does not adequately characterize left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, both the mean beat-to-beat and the gated ejection fraction may underestimate left ventricular performance at rest in such patients

  19. Genotypic Variation for Salinity Tolerance in Cenchrus ciliaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dakheel, Abdullah J.; Hussain, M. Iftikhar

    2016-01-01

    Scarcity of irrigation water and increasing soil salinization has threatened the sustainability of forage production in arid and semi-arid region around the globe. Introduction of salt-tolerant perennial species is a promising alternative to overcome forage deficit to meet future livestock needs in salt-affected areas. This study presents the results of a salinity tolerance screening trial which was carried out in plastic pots buried in the open field for 160 buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L.) accessions for three consecutive years (2003–2005). The plastic pots were filled with sand, organic, and peat moss mix and were irrigated with four different quality water (EC 0, 10, 15, and 20 dS m−1). The results indicate that the average annual dry weights (DW) were in the range from 122.5 to 148.9 g/pot in control; 96.4–133.8 g/pot at 10 dS m−1; 65.6–80.4 g/pot at 15 dS m−1, and 55.4–65.6 g/pot at 20 dS m−1. The highest DW (148.9 g/pot) was found with accession 49 and the lowest with accession 23. Principle component analysis shows that PC-1 contributed 81.8% of the total variability, while PC-2 depicted 11.7% of the total variation among C. ciliaris accessions for DW. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that a number of accessions collected from diverse regions could be grouped into a single cluster. Accessions 3, 133, 159, 30, 23, 142, 141, 95, 49, 129, 124, and 127 were stable, salt tolerant, and produced good dry biomass yield. These accessions demonstrate sufficient salinity tolerance potential for promotion in marginal lands to enhance farm productivity and reduce rural poverty. PMID:27516762

  20. Genotypic Variation for Salinity Tolerance in Cenchrus ciliaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dakheel, Abdullah J; Hussain, M Iftikhar

    2016-01-01

    Scarcity of irrigation water and increasing soil salinization has threatened the sustainability of forage production in arid and semi-arid region around the globe. Introduction of salt-tolerant perennial species is a promising alternative to overcome forage deficit to meet future livestock needs in salt-affected areas. This study presents the results of a salinity tolerance screening trial which was carried out in plastic pots buried in the open field for 160 buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L.) accessions for three consecutive years (2003-2005). The plastic pots were filled with sand, organic, and peat moss mix and were irrigated with four different quality water (EC 0, 10, 15, and 20 dS m(-1)). The results indicate that the average annual dry weights (DW) were in the range from 122.5 to 148.9 g/pot in control; 96.4-133.8 g/pot at 10 dS m(-1); 65.6-80.4 g/pot at 15 dS m(-1), and 55.4-65.6 g/pot at 20 dS m(-1). The highest DW (148.9 g/pot) was found with accession 49 and the lowest with accession 23. Principle component analysis shows that PC-1 contributed 81.8% of the total variability, while PC-2 depicted 11.7% of the total variation among C. ciliaris accessions for DW. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that a number of accessions collected from diverse regions could be grouped into a single cluster. Accessions 3, 133, 159, 30, 23, 142, 141, 95, 49, 129, 124, and 127 were stable, salt tolerant, and produced good dry biomass yield. These accessions demonstrate sufficient salinity tolerance potential for promotion in marginal lands to enhance farm productivity and reduce rural poverty. PMID:27516762

  1. The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT): a battery for assessing beat perception and production and their dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Shinya; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT), a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: (1) music tapping test (MTT), (2) beat saliency test (BST), (3) beat interval test (BIT), and (4) beat finding and interval test (BFIT). MTT measures the degree of tapping synchronization with the beat of music, whereas BST, BIT, and BFIT measure perception and production thresholds via psychophysical adaptive stair-case methods. We administered the H-BAT on thirty individuals and investigated the performance distribution across these individuals in each subtest. There was a wide distribution in individual abilities to tap in synchrony with the beat of music during the MTT. The degree of synchronization consistency was negatively correlated with thresholds in the BST, BIT, and BFIT: a lower degree of synchronization was associated with higher perception and production thresholds. H-BAT can be a useful tool in determining an individual's ability to perceive and produce a beat within a single session. PMID:24324421

  2. The Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT: A Battery for Assessing Beat Perception and Production and their Dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried Schlaug

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Humans have the abilities to perceive, produce, and synchronize with a musical beat, yet there are widespread individual differences. To investigate these abilities and to determine if a dissociation between beat perception and production exists, we developed the Harvard Beat Assessment Test (H-BAT, a new battery that assesses beat perception and production abilities. H-BAT consists of four subtests: 1 music tapping test (MTT, 2 beat saliency test (BST, 3 beat interval test (BIT, and 4 beat finding and interval test (BFIT. MTT measures the degree of tapping synchronization with the beat of music, whereas BST, BIT, and BFIT measure perception and production thresholds via psychophysical adaptive stair-case methods. We administered the H-BAT on thirty individuals and investigated the performance distribution across these individuals in each subtest. There was a wide distribution in individual abilities to tap in synchrony with the beat of music during the MTT. The degree of synchronization consistency was negatively correlated with thresholds in the BST, BIT, and BFIT: a lower degree of synchronization was associated with higher perception and production thresholds. H-BAT can be a useful tool in determining an individual’s ability to perceive and produce a beat within a single session.

  3. Examination of Periodic Disturbance Current Control Method: Controlling the Beat Phenomenon of DC Voltage Pulsation in Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motor Drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobari, Kazuaki; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Iwaji, Yoshitaka; Kaneko, Daigo; Uematsu, Hajime; Okubo, Tomofumi

    We propose a new beatless control mechanism for permanent-magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) drives. In drive systems, the three-phase voltage source induces a ripple component whose frequency is six times that of the voltage source frequency in the DC voltage. Therefore, if the motor frequency becomes six times the voltage frequency, a beat phenomenon, which causes an increase in the motor current ripple is observed. We analyze the beat phenomenon which causes current ripples and propose a method based on periodic disturbance current regulation, i.e., beatless control. We carry out time-domain simulation and various experiments and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  4. Aerobic fitness in children and young adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Astrid Hellerup; Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although aerobic fitness is regarded as an overall prognostic measure of morbidity and mortality, its evaluation in the chronic progressive sinopulmonary disease primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) has been infrequently and inconsistently reported. Here we assessed peak oxygen uptake (VO...

  5. Adenoma of nonpigmented epithelium in ciliary body:literature review and case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Adenomas of the nonpigmented ciliary epithelium (NPCE) are often clinically indistinguishable from amelanotic malignant melanomas of the ciliary body or metastatic carcinomas. This paper reports a case study of a distinctive variant of adenoma of the NPCE, which clinically appears as epiretinal membrane in the macular region. Histopathologic studies have revealed this is an adenoma of the NPCE. Identification of this clinic feature is important because it will miss the diagnosis of the adenoma of the NPCE. In this case study, B-scan ultrasonography as well as computerized tomography (CT) has been used to provide help in diagnosing the ciliary body tumor. Because of their anterior location in the ciliary body, partial lamellar sclerouvectomy is an effective method of treatment.

  6. Simultaneous sinus and lung infections in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Aanaes, Kasper;

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The sinuses should be considered as a bacterial reservoir and a target for surgery and antibiotic treatment in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The observed decrease in serum precipitating antibodies (precipitins) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa may indicate a beneficial...

  7. Attosecond Quantum-Beat Spectroscopy in Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Shivaram, Niranjan; Timmers, Henry; Sandhu, Arvinder

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of electron wavepackets determines the course of many physical and chemical phenomena and attosecond spectroscopy aims to measure and control such dynamics in real-time. Here, we investigate radial electron wavepacket motion in Helium by using an XUV attosecond pulse train to prepare a coherent superposition of excited states and a delayed femtosecond IR pulse to ionize them. Quantum beat signals observed in the high resolution photoelectron spectrogram allow us to follow the field-free evolution of the bound electron wavepacket and determine the time-dependent ionization dynamics of the low-lying 2p state.

  8. Ciliary neurotrophic factor prevents retrograde neuronal death in the adult central nervous system.

    OpenAIRE

    Clatterbuck, R E; Price, D L; Koliatsos, V E

    1993-01-01

    The neurocytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was described originally as an activity that supports the survival of neurons of the chicken ciliary ganglia in vitro. The widespread expression of CNTF and its principal binding protein, CNTF receptor alpha, in the central and peripheral nervous systems suggests a broader trophic role for this peptide. In the present study, we report that CNTF prevents axotomy-induced cell death of neurons in the anteroventral and anterodorsal thalamic nuc...

  9. Transition fibre protein FBF1 is required for the ciliary entry of assembled intraflagellar transport complexes

    OpenAIRE

    WEI, QING; Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Zeng; Harris, Peter C.; Torres, Vicente E.; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Sensory organelle cilia play critical roles in mammalian embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia. Yet how this large complex passes through the size-dependent barrier at the ciliary base remains enigmatic. Here we report that FBF1, a highly conserved transition fibre protein, is required for the ciliary import of assembled IFT particles at the cilia base. We cloned dyf-19, the C. elegans homol...

  10. Beats on the Table: Beat Writing in the Chicago Review and Big Table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap van der Bent

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false NL X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Kleine literaire tijdschriften, zogenaamde little magazines, hebben een belangrijke rol gespeeld bij de doorbraak, in de loop van de jaren vijftig, van de Amerikaanse Beat Generation. Aangezien grotere uitgeverijen en de gevestigde tijdschriften lange tijd terugschrokken voor de zowel inhoudelijk als formeel van de norm afwijkende uitingen van de Beats, verscheen hun werk aanvankelijk vooral in kleinere tijdschriften als de twee waaraan in dit artikel aandacht wordt besteed: de Chicago Review en Big Table. Aan de hand van een beschrijving van de inhoud van deze twee tijdschriften wordt geprobeerd duidelijk te maken hoe het werk van de Beat Generation zich in deze tijdschriften gaandeweg een eigen plaats verwierf. Speciale aandacht wordt besteed aan de rol van de redacteuren Irving Rosenthal en Paul Carroll; door zijn uitgekiende strategie om voor het omstreden werk van Beat-auteur William S. Burroughs geleidelijk een steeds grotere plaats in te ruimen, bepaalde vooral Rosenthal het veranderende karakter van de Chicago Review. De veranderingen bij dat tijdschrift verliepen niet zonder slag of stoot en waren voor de eigenaar ervan, de University of Chicago, op een gegeven moment aanleiding om de Chicago Review aan censuur te onderwerpen. Ook deze censuur en de reactie erop, de oprichting van Big Table, worden in het artikel belicht.

  11. Roles of paroxetine and corticosterone on adult mammalian ciliary body cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; LAU Benson WM; YAU Suk-yu; LI Suk-yee; LEUNG Nelson; WANG Ning-li; TANG Siu-wa; LEE Tatia MC; SO Kwok-fai

    2010-01-01

    Background The neurogenesis in retina of adult mammals is generally abolished, and this renders the retina lack of regenerative capacity.Despite this, there is a small population of nestin-positive cells in the ciliary epithelium which retains neurogenic potential.The present study aimed at investigating the effect of two drugs, corticosterone and paroxetine, on the cell proliferation of the ciliary body.Methods Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were given vehicle, corticosterone, paroxetine, or both corticosterone and paroxetine treatment for 14 days.Cell proliferation in the ciliary body was quantified using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry.Co-labelling of BrdU and stem cell marker was used to phenotype the BrdU immunoreactive cells.Results Corticosterone treatment suppressed while paroxetine treatment increased the cell proliferation of the ciliary body.Co-labelling with cell markers revealed that the BrdU positive cells also showed nestin expression but not glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP).Conclusions The results illustrate that proliferation of retinal progenitor cells situated in ciliary body are subjected to regulation by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and corticosteroid, which is similar to our previous findings in neurogenic regions in central nervous system (CNS).Paroxetine treatment could reverse the suppressive effect of corticosterone on ciliary body cell proliferation.This provides information for future investigation of retinal stem cell biology and potential treatment of retinal degenerative diseases.

  12. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico F. Galati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D. Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs.

  13. The chemical composition of Galactic beat Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtyukh, V.; Lemasle, B.; Chekhonadskikh, F.; Bono, G.; Matsunaga, N.; Yushchenko, A.; Anderson, R. I.; Belik, S.; da Silva, R.; Inno, L.

    2016-08-01

    We determine the metallicity and detailed chemical abundances (α, iron-peak and neutron-capture elements) for the almost complete (18/24) sample of Galactic double mode Cepheids (also called beat Cepheids). Double mode Cepheids are Cepheids that pulsate in two modes simultaneously. We calibrate a new relation between their metallicity and their period ratio P1/P0. This linear relation allows to determine the metallicity of bimodal Cepheids with an accuracy of 0.03 dex in the range of [Fe/H] from +0.2 to -0.5 dex. By extrapolating the relation to Magellanic Clouds beat Cepheids, we provide their metallicity distribution function. Moreover, by using this relation, we also provide the first metallicity estimate for two double-mode F/1O Cepheids located in and beyond the Galactic bulge. Finally, we report the discovery of a super-Lithium rich double mode Cepheid V371 Per which has a Lithium abundance of logA(Li) = 3.54 ± 0.09 dex. Along with V1033 Cyg (which is an ordinary classical Cepheid), it is the second known Cepheid of such type in the Galaxy.

  14. Force-inhibiting effect of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A inhibitors on bovine ciliary muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    石田, 美織

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary muscle is a smooth muscle characterized by a rapid response to muscarinic receptor stimulation and sustained contraction. Although it is evident that these contractions are Ca(2+)-dependent, detailed molecular mechanisms are still unknown. In order to elucidate the role of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in ciliary muscle contraction, we examined the effects of okadaic acid and other PP2A inhibitors on contractions induced by carbachol (CCh) and ionomycin in bovine ciliary muscl...

  15. Time-domain analysis of beat-to-beat variability of repolarization morphology in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burattini, L; Zareba, W

    1999-01-01

    There is growing evidence that beat-to-beat changes in ventricular repolarization contribute to increased vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. Beat-to-beat repolarization variability is usually measured in the electrocardiogram (ECG) by tracking consecutive QT or RT intervals. However, these measurements strongly depend on the accurate identification of T-wave endpoints, and they do not reflect changes in repolarization morphology. In this article, we propose a new computerized time-domain method to measure beat-to-beat variability of repolarization morphology without the need to identify T-wave endpoints. The repolarization correlation index (RCI) is computed for each beat to determine the difference between the morphology of repolarization within a heart-rate dependent repolarization window compared to a template (median) repolarization morphology. The repolarization variability index (RVI) describes the mean value of repolarization correlation in a studied ECG recording. To validate our method, we analyzed repolarization variability in 128-beat segments from Holter ECG recordings of 42 ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) patients compared to 36 healthy subjects. The ICM patients had significantly higher values of RVI than healthy subjects (in lead X: 0.045 +/- 0.035 vs. 0.024 +/- 0.010, respectively; P 0.044). No significant correlation was found between the RVI values and the magnitude of heart rate, heart rate variability, QTc interval duration, or ejection fraction in studied ICM patients. In conclusion, our time-domain method, based on computation of repolarization correlation indices for consecutive beats, provides a new approach to quantify beat-to-beat variability of repolarization morphology without the need to identify T-wave endpoints. PMID:10688321

  16. An efficient method of addressing ectopic beats: new insight into data preprocessing of heart rate variability analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng WEN; Fang-tian HE

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is affected by ectopic beats.An efficient method was proposed to deal with the ectopic beats.The method was based on trend correlation of the heart timing signal.Predictor of R-R interval (RRI) value at ectopic beat time was constructed by the weight calculation and the slope estimation of preceding normal RRI.The type of ectopic beat was detected and replaced by the predictor of RRI.The performance of the simulated signal after ectopic correction was tested by the standard value using power spectrum density (PSD) estimation,whereas the results of clinical data with ectopic beats were compared with the adjacent ectopic-free data.The result showed the frequency indexes after ectopy corrected had less error than other methods with the test of simulated signal and clinical data.It indicated our method could improve the PSD estimation in HRV analysis.The method had advantages of high accuracy and real time properties to recover the sinus node modulation.

  17. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  18. Beat Perception and Sociability: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Beat perception in music has been proposed to be a human universal that may have its origins in adaptive processes involving temporal entrainment such as social communication and interaction. We examined beat perception skills in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic, neurodevelopmental disorder. Musical interest and hypersociability are two prominent aspects of the WS phenotype although actual musical and social skills are variable. On a group level, beat and meter perception skills were poorer in WS than in age-matched peers though there was significant individual variability. Cognitive ability, sound processing style, and musical training predicted beat and meter perception performance in WS. Moreover, we found significant relationships between beat and meter perception and adaptive communication and socialization skills in WS. Results have implications for understanding the role of predictive timing in both music and social interactions in the general population, and suggest music as a promising avenue for addressing social communication difficulties in WS. PMID:27378982

  19. Laser beat wave resonant terahertz generation in a magnetized plasma channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhasin, Lalita; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Kumar, Pawan, E-mail: kumarpawan-30@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Raj Kumar Goel Institute of Technology, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh 201003 (India)

    2016-02-15

    Resonant excitation of terahertz (THz) radiation by nonlinear mixing of two lasers in a ripple-free self created plasma channel is investigated. The channel has a transverse static magnetic field and supports a THz X-mode with phase velocity close to the speed of light in vacuum when the frequency of the mode is close to plasma frequency on the channel axis and its value decreases with the intensity of lasers. The THz is resonantly driven by the laser beat wave ponderomotive force. The THz amplitude scales almost three half power of the intensity of lasers as the width of the THz eigen mode shrinks with laser intensity.

  20. PICADAR: a diagnostic predictive tool for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, Laura; Dimitrov, Borislav D.; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Hogg, Claire; Carroll, Mary; Evans, Hazel J.; Goutaki, Myrofora; Harris, Amanda; Packham, Samantha; Walker, Woolf T.

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) are nonspecific and guidance on whom to refer for testing is limited. Diagnostic tests for PCD are highly specialised, requiring expensive equipment and experienced PCD scientists. This study aims to develop a practical clinical diagnostic tool to identify patients requiring testing. Patients consecutively referred for testing were studied. Information readily obtained from patient history was correlated with diagnostic outcome. Using logistic regression, the predictive performance of the best model was tested by receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. The model was simplified into a practical tool (PICADAR) and externally validated in a second diagnostic centre. Of 641 referrals with a definitive diagnostic outcome, 75 (12%) were positive. PICADAR applies to patients with persistent wet cough and has seven predictive parameters: full-term gestation, neonatal chest symptoms, neonatal intensive care admittance, chronic rhinitis, ear symptoms, situs inversus and congenital cardiac defect. Sensitivity and specificity of the tool were 0.90 and 0.75 for a cut-off score of 5 points. Area under the curve for the internally and externally validated tool was 0.91 and 0.87, respectively. PICADAR represents a simple diagnostic clinical prediction rule with good accuracy and validity, ready for testing in respiratory centres referring to PCD centres. PMID:26917608

  1. Genetics, diagnosis, and future treatment strategies for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, M. Leigh Anne; Noone, Peadar G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disorder resulting in chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease. While PCD is estimated to occur in 1 in 20,000 individuals, fewer than 1,000 patients in the US have a well-established diagnosis. Areas Covered We provide an overview of the clinical manifestations of PCD, describe the evolution of diagnostic methods, and critique the literature on management of PCD. Expert Opinion Although interest in clinical studies in non-CF bronchiectasis has increased in recent years, some of whom enroll patients with PCD, the literature regarding therapy for PCD as a distinct entity is lacking, as the numbers are small, and there have been no sub-analyses published. However, with improved screening and diagnostic methods, the development of clinical and research consortiums, and actively enrolling registries of PCD patients, the environment is conducive to perform longitudinal studies of disease course and therapeutic studies to alter that course. PMID:26998415

  2. Evaluation of the beat-to-beat detection accuracy of PulseOn wearable optical heart rate monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Jakub; Tarniceriu, Adrian; Renevey, Philippe; Bertschi, Mattia; Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) provides significant information about the health status of an individual. Optical heart rate monitoring is a comfortable alternative to ECG based heart rate monitoring. However, most available optical heart rate monitoring devices do not supply beat-to-beat detection accuracy required by proper HRV analysis. We evaluate the beat-to-beat detection accuracy of a recent wrist-worn optical heart rate monitoring device, PulseOn (PO). Ten subjects (8 male and 2 female; 35.9±10.3 years old) participated in the study. HRV was recorded with PO and Firstbeat Bodyguard 2 (BG2) device, which was used as an ECG based reference. HRV was recorded during sleep. As compared to BG2, PO detected on average 99.57% of the heartbeats (0.43% of beats missed) and had 0.72% extra beat detection rate, with 5.94 ms mean absolute error (MAE) in beat-to-beat intervals (RRI) as compared to the ECG based RRI BG2. Mean RMSSD difference between PO and BG2 derived HRV was 3.1 ms. Therefore, PO provides an accurate method for long term HRV monitoring during sleep. PMID:26738173

  3. Mode beating and heterodyning of monolithically integrated semiconductor ring lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chiyu

    Monolithically integrated semiconductor ring lasers (SRLs) are attractive optical sources for optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs) because they do not require any feedback elements, do not have parts exposed to external ambient, and can operate in a traveling-wave mode. They are promising candidates for wavelength filtering, unidirectional traveling-wave operation, and multiplexing/demultiplexing applications. Ring lasers can also be used as ultrashort pulse generators using various mode-locking schemes and as active gyro components. However, the SRL is a very complicated dynamic system, which requires more investigations to understand the performance regarding details of the design and fabrication. As a part of NASA-supported project "Monolithically Integrated Semiconductor Ring Laser Gyro for Space Applications", this dissertation research was focused on design and characterization of a novel monolithically integrated rotation sensor based on two large-size independent SRLs. Numerical modeling based on the beam propagation method (BPM) was used to design the fabrication parameters for the single-mode ridge-waveguide ring cavity and directional coupler waveguides. The mode internal coupling in single lateral-mode laser diodes with InGaAs/GaAs material system was investigated by optical experiments and numerical modeling. To gain the understanding of the SRL performance, optical and electrical characterization was performed on fabricated SRLs. Particular emphasis was placed on the study of optical and radio frequency (RF) beating spectra of longitudinal modes of ring lasers. RF measurements provide high accuracy in the diagnosis of laser oscillation parameters by purely electronic means, particularly in the measurement of the group index and its dependence on current and temperature. Theoretical analysis based on the effective index method provides good agreement between the experimental data and numerical calculations. Finally, optical heterodyning spectra

  4. Arf4 is required for Mammalian development but dispensable for ciliary assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Follit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The primary cilium is a sensory organelle, defects in which cause a wide range of human diseases including retinal degeneration, polycystic kidney disease and birth defects. The sensory functions of cilia require specific receptors to be targeted to the ciliary subdomain of the plasma membrane. Arf4 has been proposed to sort cargo destined for the cilium at the Golgi complex and deemed a key regulator of ciliary protein trafficking. In this work, we show that Arf4 binds to the ciliary targeting sequence (CTS of fibrocystin. Knockdown of Arf4 indicates that it is not absolutely required for trafficking of the fibrocystin CTS to cilia as steady-state CTS levels are unaffected. However, we did observe a delay in delivery of newly synthesized CTS from the Golgi complex to the cilium when Arf4 was reduced. Arf4 mutant mice are embryonic lethal and die at mid-gestation shortly after node formation. Nodal cilia appeared normal and functioned properly to break left-right symmetry in Arf4 mutant embryos. At this stage of development Arf4 expression is highest in the visceral endoderm but we did not detect cilia on these cells. In the visceral endoderm, the lack of Arf4 caused defects in cell structure and apical protein localization. This work suggests that while Arf4 is not required for ciliary assembly, it is important for the efficient transport of fibrocystin to cilia, and also plays critical roles in non-ciliary processes.

  5. Transition fibre protein FBF1 is required for the ciliary entry of assembled intraflagellar transport complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qing; Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Zeng; Harris, Peter C; Torres, Vicente E; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Sensory organelle cilia have critical roles in mammalian embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia. Yet, how this large complex passes through the size-dependent barrier at the ciliary base remains enigmatic. Here we report that FBF1, a highly conserved transition fibre protein, is required for the ciliary import of assembled IFT particles at the ciliary base. We cloned dyf-19, the Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of human FBF1, in a whole-genome screen for ciliogenesis mutants. DYF-19 localizes specifically to transition fibres and interacts directly with the IFT-B component DYF-11/IFT54. Although not a structural component of transition fibres, DYF-19 is required for the transit of assembled IFT particles through the ciliary base. Furthermore, we found that human FBF1 shares conserved localization and function with its worm counterpart. We conclude that FBF1 is a key functional transition fibre component that actively facilitates the ciliary entry of assembled IFT machinery. PMID:24231678

  6. Energetics of synchronized states in three-dimensional beating flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettot, Clément; Lauga, Eric

    2011-12-01

    During collective locomotion, beating flagella of spermatozoa interact hydrodynamically and are observed experimentally to synchronize. G. I. Taylor used a small-amplitude two-dimensional sheet model to show that the rate at which swimmers do work against the fluid is minimal for in-phase beating. We use a semianalytical approach based on hydrodynamic reflections to extend these results to the small-amplitude three-dimensional beating of infinite flagellar filaments. We first consider a configuration of two parallel filaments. In the case where the beating of both flagella occurs in the same plane as that defined by their axis, in-phase beating is found to lead to an overall minimum of energy dissipation, while opposite-phase leads to a maximum. If we allow the orientation of the beating planes to vary, we find that the minimum of energy dissipation is obtained for either the in-phase or opposite-phase conformation, in a manner that depends on the flagella orientation and their relative distance. We further characterize numerically the set of optimal relative orientations. Quantitatively analogous results are obtained using a simple model based on the beating of two spheres interacting hydrodynamically in the far field. Exploiting the linearity of Stokes equation, we then extend our results to the case of three beating flagella in an aligned and triangular conformation. Consistent with Taylor’s two-dimensional work, our results suggest that, from a hydrodynamic standpoint, it is more energetically favorable for spermatozoa with three-dimensional flagella to swim close to each other and with synchronized, parallel, in-phase beating.

  7. Long beating wavelength in the Schwarz-Hora effect

    CERN Document Server

    Morokov, Y N

    1997-01-01

    Thirty years ago, H.Schwarz has attempted to modulate an electron beam with optical frequency. When a 50-keV electron beam crossed a thin crystalline dielectric film illuminated with laser light, electrons produced the electron-diffraction pattern not only at a fluorescent target but also at a nonfluorescent target. In the latter case the pattern was of the same color as the laser light (the Schwarz-Hora effect). This effect was discussed extensively in the early 1970s. However, since 1972 no reports on the results of further attempts to repeat those experiments in other groups have appeared, while the failures of the initial such attempts have been explained by Schwarz. The analysis of the literature shows there are several unresolved up to now contradictions between the theory and the Schwarz experiments. In this work we consider the interpretation of the long-wavelength spatial beating of the Schwarz-Hora radiation. A more accurate expression for the spatial period has been obtained, taking into account th...

  8. 25-Gauge pars plana vitrectomy for ciliary block (malignant) glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Wei, Wenbin; Li, Yanlong; Hui, Xiaoying; Han, Xiaodong; Shi, Xiaobo

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of 25-ga pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and 25-ga PPV combined with phacoemulsification surgery for managing ciliary block (malignant) glaucoma. The medical records of 11 eyes, in nine consecutive patients with malignant glaucoma were retrospectively reviewed to determine the efficacy of 25-ga PPV for alleviating this disease. All phakic eyes underwent phacoemulsification surgery during vitrectomy. Control of intraocular pressure (IOP), pre- and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and development of intra- and postoperative complications were evaluated during follow-up. Malignant glaucoma was promptly resolved, and recurrence was not observed during a mean follow-up period of 12.7 ± 3.2 (range 6-18) months. The mean IOP decreased from 35.9 ± 2.9 mmHg, preoperatively, to 16.0 ± 1.4 mmHg, measured at last visit (P = 0.013). Although IOP control was achieved in all eyes after surgery, two eyes required long-term topical antiglaucoma medication. The mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution BCVA improved from +0.69 ± 0.11, preoperatively, to +0.29 ± 0.07, postoperatively (P = 0.027). No severe intraoperative complications were observed. Postoperative complications mostly occurred during the first week after surgery, including transient corneal edema and Descemet's membrane folds in three eyes, fibrotic exudation in 2, local iris posterior synechia in 1, and transient hypotony in 1, which were resolved spontaneously or with medication. The 25-ga PPV procedure seems to be safe and effective for treating malignant glaucoma. Combined vitrectomy with phacoemulsification surgery and a staged surgical approach may improve the success rate. PMID:25062710

  9. Beliefs about wife beating: an exploratory study with Lebanese students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Nadine; Chang, Doris F; Ginges, Jeremy

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in understanding the sociocultural contexts and risk factors for domestic violence in the Arab world. This study provides an analysis of the religious, legal, and familial contexts of domestic violence in Lebanon and assesses contemporary attitudes toward women and wife beating in a sample of 206 Lebanese university students. Gender, patriarchal attitudes, religion, childhood experiences with family violence, and mother's employment status were investigated as predictors of attitudes toward wife beating. Consistent with feminist theories of wife abuse, gender and attitudes toward women's roles emerged as the strongest predictors of beliefs about wife beating. PMID:20445079

  10. Quantum beats in fluorescence for multi-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For Λ-type three-level atomic systems we have clarified using diagram that (1) it is impossible to observe quantum beats due to the ground state sublevels by measuring the time dependence of the fluorescence intensity, and (2) why it is physically possible to observe and how we can observe quantum beats in the ground state sublevels by using fluorescence. Generalization of the results shows that we can determine from which state (the ground state or the excited state) the quantum beats are originated. Analytical result is shown for four-level atomic systems.

  11. Modulational instability in the beat-wave generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupling of a large amplitude plasmon, generated by the beat-wave process, to ion acoustic waves may lead to modulational or decay instabilities, which are investigated. A general dispersion relation obtainable from Zakharov equations predicts large growth rates (∼ ωsub(pi) for short wavelength modulations. To avoid these, extremely short pulse lengths are required in the beat-wave experiments. Due to the very long wavelength of the beat-plasmon, the decay instability is not likely below the keV-temperatures. (author)

  12. Brachytherapy, A viable option of globe salvage in treatment of large ciliary body melanocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh P Shanmugam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of large histopathologically proven melanocytoma of the ciliary body in a 15-year-old male, presented with rapid extraocular growth following incisional biopsy with scleral patch graft. We chose brachytherapy with Ruthenium 106 plaque over enucleation as the later was refused by the parents. The initial apical height of the tumor was 14.2 mm on ultrasonography. Two weeks after brachytherapy, the mass regressed to a size of 8.1 mm and 1 year later to 6.7 mm. This is the first case report showing the response of brachytherapy to ciliary body melanocytoma, which results in ocular and visual acuity salvation with considerable decreased in size of the tumor. The authors conclude that brachytherapy is an option in the management of non-resectable melanocytoma of the ciliary body.

  13. Quantitative optical coherence tomography imaging of intermediate flow defect phenotypes in ciliary physiology and pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Gamm, Ute A.; Jonas, Stephan; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-03-01

    Cilia-driven fluid flow is a critical yet poorly understood aspect of pulmonary physiology. Here, we demonstrate that optical coherence tomography-based particle tracking velocimetry can be used to quantify subtle variability in cilia-driven flow performance in Xenopus, an important animal model of ciliary biology. Changes in flow performance were quantified in the setting of normal development, as well as in response to three types of perturbations: mechanical (increased fluid viscosity), pharmacological (disrupted serotonin signaling), and genetic (diminished ciliary motor protein expression). Of note, we demonstrate decreased flow secondary to gene knockdown of kif3a, a protein involved in ciliogenesis, as well as a dose-response decrease in flow secondary to knockdown of dnah9, an important ciliary motor protein.

  14. "'Jackin’ for Beats'": DJing for Citation Critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Craig

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A challenge in teaching English composition is helping students envision plagiarism as “borrowing” – showing love to author(s and/or text(s that further their argument(s, versus “stealing” – biting someone’s style and words. Alastair Pennycook (1996 and Sarah Wakefield (2006 have contributed pieces to the elaborate plagiarism/citation puzzle, while Houston Baker situated the hip-hop DJ in seminal text Black Studies, Rap and the Academy (1993. Merging these moments introduces critical questions: Did Diddy invent “the remix” or become the illest beat-biter ever? How did DJ/Producers Pete Rock and Large Professor pay homage to previous musical genres to further hip-hop remix production without just taking 4-8 bar samples, copying sources and claiming unethical ownership? And how can this discussion provide students a window into citation conversations? This article will remix these “texts” to introduce the idea of DJ Rhetoric to discuss plagiarism. Through the lens of the hip-hop DJ in writing classrooms, one can foster an appreciation of the difference between “love and theft” in student citation. This article will couple examples from hip-hop music/culture while simultaneously remixing interviews from various hip-hop DJ/producers to help answer these difficult questions.

  15. Feathering collisions in beating reed simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Tamara; Abel, Jonathan S.; Smith, Julius O.

    2003-10-01

    Pressure controlled valves are the primary sound production mechanisms for woodwind and brass musical instruments, as well as for many bioacoustic vocal systems such as the larynx and syrinx (the vocal organ in birds). During sound production, air flow sets a reed or membrane into motion creating a variable height in the valve channel and, potentially, periodically closing the channel completely. Depending on how this event is handled, an abrupt termination of air flow between open and closed states can cause undesirable discontinuities and inaccuracies in a discrete-time simulation-particularly at relatively low audio sampling rates. A solution was developed by re-examining the behavior of the differential equation governing volume flow through a pressure-controlled valve, paying particular attention to this rather troublesome transition. A closed-form solution for the time evolution of volume flow is given and used to derive an update for volume flow. The result is a smoother, more accurate, and nearly alias-free transition from open to closed. ``Feathered collisions'' of this nature can refine the sound quality produced by the numerical simulation of beating reeds, such as in clarinets, at typical audio sampling rates.

  16. Mercury Beating Heart: Modifications to the Classical Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdoski, Metodija; Mirceski, Valentin; Petrusevski, Vladimir M.; Demiri, Sani

    2007-01-01

    The mercury beating heart (MBH) is a commonly performed experiment, which is based on varying oxidizing agents and substituting other metals for iron. Various modified versions of the classical demonstration of the experiment are presented.

  17. "Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Keep the Beat": Healthy Blood Pressure Helps Prevent Heart Disease Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Your ... a condition that also increases the chance of heart disease and stroke. High blood pressure is especially common ...

  18. Race May Influence Risk for Irregular Heart Beat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158687.html Race May Influence Risk for Irregular Heart Beat Whites ... between the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation and race, a new study says. Whites with heart failure ...

  19. Coupling Between Pecking and Heart Beat in Pigeons

    OpenAIRE

    Delius, Juan; Lindenblatt, Ulrike; Lombardi, Celia

    1986-01-01

    The electrocardiogram of pigeons was recorded while they pecked an impact transducer under operant control according to a variable ratio schedule. An analysis of the records in terms of crossaverages between heart beats and pecks. the quasi-equivalents of crosscorrelation functions, revealed that pecks and heart beats tend to coincide temporally at above chance levels according to patterns that vary from individual to individual pigeon. The mechanisms and the functions of the coupling are dis...

  20. Membrane carbonic anhydrase (IV) and ciliary epithelium. Carbonic anhydrase activity is present in the basolateral membranes of the non-pigmented ciliary epithelium of rabbit eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H; Murakami, M; Wynns, G C; Conroy, C W; Mead, A; Maren, T H; Sears, M L

    1996-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) lower intraocular pressure by reducing aqueous flow. It has been thought that this pharmacologic reduction of aqueous flow is mediated by the ciliary epithelium, but it is not known whether this cellular action is effected by inhibition of the membranal (CA IV) and/or cytosolic (CA II) carbonic anhydrases of the ciliary epithelium. The isolated ciliary epithelial bilayer maintains its anatomic and functional polarity and generates a transepithelial potential difference (TEP) in an Ussing type chamber. Depletion of HCO3-, accomplished either with an HCO3(-)-free solution bathing the epithelial bilayer, or, with addition of freely permeant CAIs to HCO3(-)-containing media, (from either the PE or NPE side of the bilayer) depolarizes the preparation. Addition of CAIs to an HCO3(-)-depleted preparation has no further effect, indicating the specific action of the CAIs. The CAI, 2-p-NH2 benzenesulfonamido-1,3,4,-thiadiazole-5-SO2NH2, linked to polybutadiene maleic acid yields an impermeant polymer of 20000 Da with no loss of activity. At 45 microM this impermeant polymer caused a 60% increase in the SCC, seen only when the compound was applied to the NPE side of the bilayer. This latter result indicates an effect from inhibition of CA IV in the basolateral membranes of the NPE. Thus there are probably two different cellular actions of CAIs upon the ciliary epithelium to reduce aqueous inflow, cytoplasmic and membranal. The action of NPE basolateral membranal CA IV is probably linked to the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger. PMID:8795459

  1. Cavity length dependence of mode beating in passively Q-switched Nd-solid state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.; Wanke, Michael; Bossert, David

    2013-03-01

    The temporal intensity profile of pulse(s) from passively Q-switched and passively Q-switched mode locked (QSML) solid-state lasers is known to be dependent on cavity length. In this work, the pulse width, modulation depth, and beat frequencies of a Nd:Cr:GSGG laser using a Cr+4:YAG passive Q-switch are investigated as function cavity length. Measured temporal widths are linearly correlated with cavity length but generally 3-5 ns larger than theoretical predictions. Some cavity lengths exhibit pulse profiles with no modulation while other lengths exhibit complete amplitude modulation. The observed beat frequencies at certain cavity lengths cannot be accounted for with passively QSML models in which the pulse train repetition rate is τRT-1, τRT= round-trip time. They can be explained, however, by including coupled cavity mode-locking effects. A theoretical model developed for a two section coupled cavity semiconductor laser is adapted to a solid-state laser to interpret measured beat frequencies. We also numerically evaluate the temporal criterion required to achieve temporally smooth Q-switched pulses, versus cavity length and pump rate. We show that in flash lamp pumped systems, the difference in buildup time between longitudinal modes is largely dependent on the pump rate. In applications where short pulse delay is important, the pumping rate may limit the ability to achieve temporally smooth pulses in passively Q-switched lasers. Simulations support trends in experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Beat-to-beat analysis method for magnetocardiographic recordings during interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multichannel magnetocardiography (MCG) during exercise testing has been shown to detect myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease. Previous studies on exercise MCG have focused on one or few time intervals during the recovery period and only a fragment of the data available has been utilized. We present a method for beat-to-beat analysis and parametrization of the MCG signal. The method can be used for studying and quantifying the changes induced in the MCG by interventions. We test the method with data recorded in bicycle exercise testing in healthy volunteers and patients with coronary artery disease. Information in all cardiac cycles recorded during the recovery period of exercise MCG testing is, for the first time, utilized in the signal analysis. Exercise-induced myocardial ischaemia was detected by heart rate adjustment of change in magnetic field map orientation. In addition to the ST segment, the T wave in the MCG was also found to provide information related to myocardial ischaemia. The method of analysis efficiently utilizes the spatial and temporal properties of multichannel MCG mapping, providing a new tool for detecting and quantifying fast phenomena during interventional MCG studies. The method can also be applied to an on-line analysis of MCG data. (author)

  3. Beat-to-beat evaluation of left ventricular ejection in cardiac arrhythmias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional multi-gated cardiac blood pool studies suffer from two kinds of superimpositions: the spatial overlapping of various heart chambers and the temporal superimposition of a large number of cardiac cycles. The first problem can be partially solved by first pass techniques or by emission tomography. For the second one, which is specially critical arrhythmias, the single probe device (''nuclear stethoscope'') represents an original solution. Patients with normal cardiac rythm and patients presenting various kinds of cardiac rythm alterations were examined using a commercial ''nuclear stethoscope''. Some characteristic results achieved in these cases, were presented. For blood pool labeling, 20 mCi of 99mTc albumin was injected. The single probe detector was then positioned over the left ventricular area. The beat-to-beat left ventricular activity curve was then recorded for several minutes on paper in the same time as the E.C.G. signal. In cases with irregular cardiac rythm, the multigated techniques yield an average value of left ventricular ejection. Due to the relatively constant duration of systole, the superimposition of cycles may be valid during contration: differences mainly appear during diastole. But, as it could be demonstrated using the ''nuclear stethoscope'', individual cycles can show a large variability of ejection and average ejection fraction is only a very partial aspect of the real cardiac function

  4. Beat-to-beat analysis method for magnetocardiographic recordings during interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takala, P. [Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, FIN-02015 HUT (Finland)]|[BioMag Laboratory, Medical Engineering Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00029 HUCH (Finland). E-mail: panu.takala@hut.fi; Montonen, J.; Nenonen, J.; Katila, T. [Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, FIN-02015 HUT (Finland); BioMag Laboratory, Medical Engineering Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00029 HUCH (Finland); Haenninen, H.; Maekijaervi, M.; Toivonen, L. [BioMag Laboratory, Medical Engineering Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00029 HUCH (Finland); Division of Cardiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00029 HUCH (Finland)

    2001-04-01

    Multichannel magnetocardiography (MCG) during exercise testing has been shown to detect myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease. Previous studies on exercise MCG have focused on one or few time intervals during the recovery period and only a fragment of the data available has been utilized. We present a method for beat-to-beat analysis and parametrization of the MCG signal. The method can be used for studying and quantifying the changes induced in the MCG by interventions. We test the method with data recorded in bicycle exercise testing in healthy volunteers and patients with coronary artery disease. Information in all cardiac cycles recorded during the recovery period of exercise MCG testing is, for the first time, utilized in the signal analysis. Exercise-induced myocardial ischaemia was detected by heart rate adjustment of change in magnetic field map orientation. In addition to the ST segment, the T wave in the MCG was also found to provide information related to myocardial ischaemia. The method of analysis efficiently utilizes the spatial and temporal properties of multichannel MCG mapping, providing a new tool for detecting and quantifying fast phenomena during interventional MCG studies. The method can also be applied to an on-line analysis of MCG data. (author)

  5. Beat-to-beat assessment of left ventricular ejection in atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beat-to-beat left ventricular ejection was evaluated in a group of 20 patients with chronic atrial fibrillation using a computerized single probe detector. The reference group consisted of 10 patients with sinus rhythm. For each patient 30 successive cardiac cycles were analyzed and the relative variations of four parameters were assessed: R-R interval, diastolic and systolic time intervals, and ejection amplitude, corresponding to the left ventricular stroke volume. The mean variations were respectively 3.4%, 10.4%, 8.4%, and 11.8% in patients with sinus rhythm, and 21.9%, 37.9%, 10.6% and 30.5% in patients with artrial fibrillation. This demonstrates that changes in ejection are mainly related to the duration of the filling phase, with nearly constant systolic times. Correlations between R-R intervals and systolic ejection amplitudes were highly significant (P<0.001) in patients with atrial fibrillation in 85% of cases. This information complements the average ejection fraction obtained from multiple cycle superimposition. (orig.)

  6. Observation of Atom-Wave Beats Using a Kerr Modulator for Atom Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décamps, B; Gillot, J; Vigué, J; Gauguet, A; Büchner, M

    2016-02-01

    A phase modulation puts the atom in a coherent superposition of quantum states with different kinetic energies. We have detected the interference of such modulated waves at the output of our atom interferometer, and we have observed beats at the difference of the modulation frequencies and its harmonics, in good agreement with theory. The phase modulations were produced by a Kerr phase modulator, i.e., by the propagation of the atom wave in a time-dependent electric field. An extension of this technique to electron interferometry should open the way to very high temporal resolution in electron microscopy. PMID:26894710

  7. [Non-heart-beating donors are ineligible].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, W

    2016-02-01

    The death of the donor is a mandatory prerequisite for organ transplantation (dead donor rule) worldwide. It is a medical, legal and ethical consensus to accept the concept of brain death, as first proposed in 1968 by the ad hoc committee of the Harvard Medical School, as a certain criterion of death. In isolated cases where the diagnosis of brain death was claimed to be wrong, it could be demonstrated that the diagnostic procedure for brain death had not been correctly performed. In March 2014 a joint statement by the German neuromedical societies emphasized that 1) the diagnosis of brain death is one of the safest diagnoses in medicine if performed according to accepted medical standards and criteria and 2) the concept of non-heart-beating donors (NHBD, i. e. organ donation after an arbitrarily defined duration of circulatory and cardiac arrest) practiced in some European countries must be absolutely rejected because it implicates a high risk of diagnostic error. According to the current literature it is unclear at what time cardiac and circulatory arrest is irreversible and leads to irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain including the brainstem, even though clinical signs of cessation of brain functions are always found after 10 min. Furthermore, is it often an arbitrary decision to exactly define the duration of cardiac arrest if continuous echocardiographic monitoring has not been carried out from the very beginning. Last but not least there are ethical concerns against the concept of NHBD because it might influence therapeutic efforts to resuscitate a patient with cardiac arrest. Therefore, the German Medical Council (BÄK) has repeatedly rejected the concept of NHBD for organ transplantation since 1995. PMID:26830897

  8. Intermode beating mode-locking technique for O-band mixed-cascaded Raman fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhengqian; Zhong, Min; Xiong, Fengfu; Wu, Duanduan; Huang, Yizhong; Li, Yingyue; Le, Lili; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2015-02-15

    A novel intermode beating mode-locking (IBML) technique combined with a cascaded Raman process is proposed to mode-lock an O-band two-cascaded Raman fiber laser. Using a 980-m-long phosphosilicate fiber pumped by a 1064 nm laser, the second-order Raman oscillation at 1319 nm is generated by the mixed-cascaded Raman shifts of P2O5 and SiO2. By precisely matching the intermode beating frequencies of the 1064 nm pump laser and the second-order Raman cavity frequency, harmonic mode-locking at 1319 nm is initiated. The dynamic process of the IBML operation in the cascaded Raman laser is experimentally investigated. The 131st-order harmonic mode-locking with a repetition rate of 27.247 MHz is very stable with the radio-frequency (RF) signal-to-noise ratio of >56  dB and the RF supermode-suppression ratio of >43  dB. The mode-locked pulses with the square profile are confirmed as the noise-like pulses by an autocorrelator. The IBML technique, in combination with the cascaded Raman process, could offer an exciting new prospect for obtaining simple, compact, and arbitrary-wavelength mode-locked laser sources. PMID:25680135

  9. A Case of Incomplete Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Associated with Short Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Makino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, incomplete central retinal artery occlusion associated with short posterior ciliary artery occlusion is extremely rare. Herein, we describe a case of a 62-year-old man who was referred to our hospital with of transient blindness in his right eye. At initial examination, the patient’s best-corrected visual acuity was 18/20 in the right eye. Fundus examination showed multiple soft exudates around the optic disc and mild macular retinal edema in his right eye; however, a cherry red spot on the macula was not detected. Fluorescein angiography revealed delayed dye inflow into the nasal choroidal hemisphere that is supplied by the short posterior ciliary artery. The following day, the patient’s visual acuity improved to 20/20. Soft exudates around the optic disc increased during observation and gradually disappeared. His hemodynamic parameters revealed subclavian steal syndrome as examined by cervical ultrasonography and digital subtraction angiography. We speculate that his transient blindness was due to ophthalmic artery spasms. In this particular case, spasms of the ophthalmic artery and occlusion of the short posterior ciliary artery occurred simultaneously. As the short posterior ciliary artery branches from the ophthalmic artery, the anatomical location of the lesion might be near the branching of both arteries.

  10. Characterization of a putative acetylcholine receptor in chick ciliary ganglion neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies to the main immunogenic region on the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptors in muscle and electric organ recognize membrane components in chick brain and ciliary ganglia that are candidates for the neuronal receptor. The component in chick brain has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. It specifically binds nicotine but not alpha-bungarotoxin, and can be affinity labeled with (3H)bromoacetylcholine. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is concentrated in synaptic membrane, and can be modulated by exposure of the cells to cholinergic ligands in culture. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is an integral membrane component that binds concanavalin A, and it is distinct from the alpha-bungarotoxin binding component. The acetylcholine receptor function in these neurons can be locked by affinity alkylation with bromoacetylcholine, indicating similarity in this respect to receptors from muscle and electric organ. Antisera raised against the partially purified component from chick brain also block receptor function on ciliary ganglion neurons. The subcellular distribution of the ganglion component in culture is assessed, and it is shown that approximately 2/3 of the cross-reacting components are intracellular; the majority of these seem not to be destined for insertion into the plasma membrane

  11. ZMYND10 is mutated in primary ciliary dyskinesia and interacts with LRRC6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zariwala, Maimoona A; Gee, Heon Yung; Kurkowiak, Małgorzata;

    2013-01-01

    Defects of motile cilia cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), characterized by recurrent respiratory infections and male infertility. Using whole-exome resequencing and high-throughput mutation analysis, we identified recessive biallelic mutations in ZMYND10 in 14 families and mutations in the...

  12. Multicenter analysis of body mass index, lung function, and sputum microbiology in primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglione, Marco; Bush, Andrew; Nielsen, Kim G;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No studies longitudinally, simultaneously assessed body mass index (BMI) and spirometry in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). METHODS: We determined BMI and spirometry in 158 PCD children and adolescents from London, UK (n = 75), Naples, Italy (n = 23) and Copenhagen, Denmark (n = 60) ...

  13. Ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity during manual tracking of a moving visual target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domkin, Dmitry; Forsman, Mikael; Richter, Hans O

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown an association of visual demands during near work and increased activity of the trapezius muscle. Those studies were conducted under stationary postural conditions with fixed gaze and artificial visual load. The present study investigated the relationship between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity across individuals during performance of a natural dynamic motor task under free gaze conditions. Participants (N=11) tracked a moving visual target with a digital pen on a computer screen. Tracking performance, eye refraction and trapezius muscle activity were continuously measured. Ciliary muscle contraction force was computed from eye accommodative response. There was a significant Pearson correlation between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity on the tracking side (0.78, p<0.01) and passive side (0.64, p<0.05). The study supports the hypothesis that high visual demands, leading to an increased ciliary muscle contraction during continuous eye-hand coordination, may increase trapezius muscle tension and thus contribute to the development of musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder area. Further experimental studies are required to clarify whether the relationship is valid within each individual or may represent a general personal trait, when individuals with higher eye accommodative response tend to have higher trapezius muscle activity. PMID:26746010

  14. Continued administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor protects mice from inflammatory pathology in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Cognet, Isabelle;

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. We show that daily administration (days 8 to 24) of murine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a neurotrophic factor that has been described as a...

  15. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Spencer P. [New York University-Polytechnic School of Engineering, 5 Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HF heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave approach

  16. Local excision of ciliary body tumors:a long-term prospective cohort study in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Wen-bin; YANG Wen-li; HU Shi-min; LI Bin

    2008-01-01

    Background Ciliary body tumors are usually difficult to diagnose and treat in early stages.However,treatment of such tumors has trended toward ocular conservation instead of enucleation.Local excision of ciliary body tumors has become effective with the development of the modern vitrectomy,but long-term outcomes are still not clear.Therefore,we reported the outcome of locally excised ciliary body tumors after long-term follow-up.Methods Twenty-two patients (22 eyes),who had been diagnosed with ciliary body tumors in Beijing Tongren Hospital from January 1996 to June 2001,were enrolled in this prospective cohort study.Localized lamellar sclera-ciliary excisions were performed.In some cases,vitrectomies,scleral graft transplantations,and further excisions of the anterior choroid were performed.Diagnoses were confirmed by histopathologic examination.Patients were followed from five to eleven years after surgery.Their visual acuity,intraocular pressure and local recurrence were recorded with descriptive percentages.Results After surgery,all patients maintained normal eyeball appearances.Six patients maintained circular pupils.The final best corrected visual acuities (BCVA) varied from 0.02-1.00,including 18 patients (81.82%) who had BCVA equal to or better than that before surgery.Fifteen patients (68.18%) had BCVA better than 0.3.Only two patients had intraocular pressure (IOP) of less than 10 mmHg and the other patients maintained normal IOP.Nine cases (40.91%) were given confirmed diagnosis of malignant melanoma,four (18.18%) of melanocytoma,six (27.27%) of nonpigmented ciliary epithelial adenoma,two (9.09%) of neurofibroma,and one (4.55%) of neurinoma.Twenty patients (90.91%) had no recurrence during the follow-up period.In one case melanocytoma recurred seven years after surgery and enucleation was performed.One patient,whose operation removed a malignant melanoma with a diameter of 16 mm,died of hepatic metastasis five years after the operation.Conclusion For

  17. Growth of the crabgrass species Digitaria ciliaris and Digitaria nuda Crescimento das espécies de capim-colchão Digitaria ciliaris e Digitaria nuda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Souza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research paper was to compare the growth of D. ciliaris and D. nuda crabgrass species under non-competitive conditions. To this end, two experiments were conducted, one from March - July 2010 and the other from February - June 2011. The experimental design of both trials was completely randomized making a factorial (2 seasons x 2 species crabgrass x 12 evaluation periods with four replications. Assessments began at 15 days after sowing (DAS, and repeated weekly until 92 DAS. The variables evaluated were total dry matter (roots+leaves+stems, leaf area, leaf number and tiller. The results were submitted to analysis of variance and the absolute growth rate, relative growth rate and leaf area ratio were calculated using the means, which were adjusted regression models. The crabgrass species were significantly different in leaf area, leaf number, tiller number and dry matter per plant. D. ciliaris for all variables was statistically higher than D. nuda. Regarding the speed at which the growth of the species occurred, the absolute growth rate and relative growth rate of D. ciliaris was also greater than D. nuda. In addition, D. ciliaris also had a lower leaf area ratio indicating greater efficiency in converting light energy into carbohydrates. It can be concluded that D. ciliaris has a higher growth rate in conditions where there is no limitation of nutrients and water availability in relation to D. nuda, mainly due to D. ciliaris have greater leaf area, number of leaves and dry matter accumulation per plant.O objetivo da presente pesquisa foi comparar o crescimento das espécies de capim colchão D. ciliaris e D. nuda, em condições não-competitivas. Para isso, foram conduzidos dois experimentos, um de março a julho de 2010 e outro de fevereiro a junho de 2011. O delineamento experimental de ambos os ensaios foi inteiramente casualizado, perfazendo um esquema fatorial (2 épocas x 2 espécies de capim colchão x 12 períodos de

  18. Observation of Quantum Beating from Two Coupled Parametric Six-Wave Mixing Signals in Rb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chang-Jun; HE Jun-Fang; ZHAI Xue-Jun; XUE Bing

    2008-01-01

    Two processes of coupled difference-frequency axially phase-matched parametric six-wave mixing are carried out in Rb vapour by two-photon excitation using fs laser pulses, and parametric six-wave mixing signals in the infrared and near infrared regime are detected. The infrared parametric six-wave mixing signals are up-converted into the visible spectral range by sum-frequency mixing with the pump laser in a LiI03 crystal. Moreover, quantum beating at 608cm-1, corresponding to the 7s - 5d energy difference in Rb, is observed from the sum-frequency signal at 495 nm. As a result, we obtain modulated light signals in the visible, near infrared and infrared spectral ranges, and study the interference between 7s and 5d states of Rb.

  19. High frequency ultrasound imaging in pupillary block glaucoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Aslanides, I M; Libre, P E; Silverman, R H; Reinstein, D Z; Lazzaro, D R; Rondeau, M J; Harmon, G K; Coleman, D J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The diagnosis of pupillary block glaucoma requires sufficient clarity of the ocular media. This is particularly important for assessment of both the presence and patency of an iridotomy, and the determination of central anterior chamber depth. METHODS--High frequency ultrasonography was used in three patients with suspected pupillary block to determine iris configuration, posterior chamber volume, and ciliary body conformation. RESULTS--All patients demonstrated high frequency ult...

  20. The Complex of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor-Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Up-Regulates Connexin43 and Intercellular Coupling in Astrocytes via the Janus Tyrosine Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription PathwayD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Ozog, Mark A.; Bernier, Suzanne M; Bates, Dave C.; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Lo, Cecilia W.; Naus, Christian C.G.

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines regulate numerous cell processes, including connexin expression and gap junctional coupling. In this study, we examined the effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on connexin43 (Cx43) expression and intercellular coupling in astrocytes. Murine cortical astrocytes matured in vitro were treated with CNTF (20 ng/ml), soluble ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α (CNTFRα) (200 ng/ml), or CNTF-CNTFRα. Although CNTF and CNTFRα alone had no effect on Cx43 expression, the heterodimer...

  1. Beat & beyond : memoir, myth and visual arts in women of the beat generation = Más allá del "Beat": memoria, mito y arte visual en las mujeres de la generación beat

    OpenAIRE

    Encarnación Pinedo, Estíbaliz

    2016-01-01

    El objetivo de esta tesis doctoral es revaluar el trabajo de las mujeres de la Generación Beat dentro de un discurso artístico y literario post(Beat) o más allá de lo “Beat.” El capítulo dos, en el que se analizan once memorias, se centra en el dilema entre lo personal y lo literario y sirve para delinear el contexto socio-político y artístico en el que las autoras escribieron. A través del análisis de temas comunes a las distintas memorias (la escritura, los roles de género, y la conexión co...

  2. Continuing studies of the plasma beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a proposal for the release of third year funds for the ''Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator'' program (PBWA) at UCLA under the direction of Professor C. Joshi. This report is also a summary of progress on this project since March 1990; i.e., the date of the last report to the DOE. Once again we note that although the program is for historical reasons called the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator Program, our group is active in all areas of applications of lasers and plasmas in future high energy accelerators. These are as follows: heat gradient plasma structures; excited by plasma beat wave technique; laser wake field technique; and plasma wake field technique. Development of a photoinjector-driven, 20 MeV linac; and theoretical studies of the plasma lens and use of plasmas at the final focus

  3. On readout of vibrational qubits using quantum beats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Readout of the final states of qubits is a crucial step towards implementing quantum computation in experiment. Although not scalable to large numbers of qubits per molecule, computational studies show that molecular vibrations could provide a significant (factor 2–5 in the literature) increase in the number of qubits compared to two-level systems. In this theoretical work, we explore the process of readout from vibrational qubits in thiophosgene molecule, SCCl2, using quantum beat oscillations. The quantum beats are measured by first exciting the superposition of the qubit-encoding vibrational states to the electronically excited readout state with variable time-delay pulses. The resulting oscillation of population of the readout state is then detected as a function of time delay. In principle, fitting the quantum beat signal by an analytical expression should allow extracting the values of probability amplitudes and the relative phases of the vibrational qubit states. However, we found that if this procedure is implemented using the standard analytic expression for quantum beats, a non-negligible phase error is obtained. We discuss the origin and properties of this phase error, and propose a new analytical expression to correct the phase error. The corrected expression fits the quantum beat signal very accurately, which may permit reading out the final state of vibrational qubits in experiments by combining the analytic fitting expression with numerical modelling of the readout process. The new expression is also useful as a simple model for fitting any quantum beat experiments where more accurate phase information is desired

  4. Effect of cAMP on short-circuit current in isolated human ciliary body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ren-yi; MA Ning; HU Qian-qian

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) could activate chloride channels in bovine ciliary body and trigger an increase in the ionic current (short-circuit current,Isc) across the ciliary processes in pigs.The purpose of this study was to investigate how cAMP modulates Isc in isolated human ciliary processes and the possible involvement of chloride transport across the tissue in cAMP-induced Isc change.Methods In an Ussing-type chamber system,the Isc changes induced by the cAMP analogue 8-bromo-cAMP and an adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin in isolated human ciliary processes were assessed.The involvement of Cl-component in the bath solution was investigated.The effect of Cl-channel (10 μmol/L niflumic acid and 1 mmol/L 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS)),K+ channel (10 mmol/L tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA)),or Na+ channel blockers (1 mmol/L amiloride) on 8-bromo-cAMP-induced Isc change was also studied.Results Dose-dependently,8-bromo-cAMP (10 nmol/L-30 μmol/L) or forskolin (10 nmol/L-3 μmol/L) increased Isc across the ciliary processes with an increase in negative potential difference on the non-pigmented epithelium (NPE) side of the tissue.Isc increase induced by 8-bromo-cAMP was more pronounced when the drug was applied on the NPE side than on the pigmented epithelium side.When the tissue was bathed in low Cl-solutions,the Isc increase was significantly inhibited.Finally,niflumic acid and DIDS,but not TEA or amiloride,significantly prevented the Isc increase induced by 8-bromo-cAMP.Conclusions cAMP stimulates stroma-to-aqueous anionic transport in isolated human ciliary processes.Chloride is likely to be among the ions,the transportation of which across the tissue is triggered by cAMP,suggesting the potential role of cAMP in the process of aqueous humor formation in human eyes.

  5. The load-response of the flagellar beat

    CERN Document Server

    Klindt, Gary S; Wanger, Christian; Friedrich, Benjamin M

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella exhibit regular bending waves that perform mechanical work on the surrounding fluid, to propel cellular swimmers and pump fluids inside organisms. Here, we quantify a force-velocity relationship of the beating flagellum, by exposing flagellated \\emph{Chlamydomonas} cells to controlled microfluidic flows. A simple theory of flagellar limit-cycle oscillations, calibrated by measurements in the absence of flow, reproduces this relationship quantitatively. We derive a link between the chemo-mechanical efficiency of the flagellar beat and its ability to synchronize to oscillatory flows.

  6. Can We Learn to Beat the Best Stock

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, A; Gogan, V; 10.1613/jair.1336

    2011-01-01

    A novel algorithm for actively trading stocks is presented. While traditional expert advice and "universal" algorithms (as well as standard technical trading heuristics) attempt to predict winners or trends, our approach relies on predictable statistical relations between all pairs of stocks in the market. Our empirical results on historical markets provide strong evidence that this type of technical trading can "beat the market" and moreover, can beat the best stock in the market. In doing so we utilize a new idea for smoothing critical parameters in the context of expert learning.

  7. Bardet–Biedl syndrome proteins 1 and 3 regulate the ciliary trafficking of polycystic kidney disease 1 protein

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Xuefeng; Driscoll, Kaitlin; Yao, Gang; Raed, Anas; Wu, Maoqing; Beales, Philip L.; Zhou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are two genetically distinct ciliopathies but share common phenotypes such as renal cysts. Seven BBS proteins form a complex called the BBSome which is localized at the basal body or ciliary axoneme and regulates the ciliary entry or flagellar exit of several signaling molecules. Here, we demonstrate that, unlike the seven-span somatostatin receptor 3 or the leptin receptor that interacts with all subunits of...

  8. Renin-angiotensin system expression and secretory function in cultured human ciliary body non-pigmented epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Cullinane, A B; Leung, P S; Ortego, J.; Coca-Prados, M; Harvey, B J

    2002-01-01

    Background: Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components have been identified in human ciliary body and aqueous humour, pointing to a role for the RAS in the regulation of aqueous humour dynamics. Here, the authors examine the functional expression of a RAS and the effects of angiotensin II (AII) on a signal transduction pathway and ion secretion mechanism in cultured human ciliary body non-pigmented epithelium (HNPE).

  9. Voltage-gated potassium channel Kvl.3 in rabbit ciliary epithelium regulates the membrane potential via coupling intracellular calcium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-feng; ZHUO Ye-hong; BI Wei-na; BAI Yu-jing; LI Yan-na; WANG Zhi-jian

    2008-01-01

    Background The cell layer of the ciliary epithelium is responsible for aqueous humor secretion and maintenance.Ion channels play an important role in these processes.The main aim of this study was to determine whether the well-characterized members of the Kvl family (Kv1.3) contribute to the Kv currents in ciliary epithelium.Methods New Zealand White rabbits were maintained in a 12 hours light/dark cycle.Ciliary epithelium samples were isolated from the rabbits.We used Western blotting and immunocytochemistry to identify the expression and location of a voltage-gated potassium channel Kvl.3 in ciliary body epithelium.Membrane potential change after adding of Kv1.3 inhibitor margatoxin (MgTX) was observed with a fluorescence method.Results Western blotting and immunocytochemical studies showed that the Kv1.3 protein expressed in pigment ciliary epithelium and nonpigment ciliary epithelium,however it seemed to express more in the apical membrane of the nonpigmented epithelial cells.One nmol/L margatoxin,a specific inhibitor of Kv1.3 channels caused depolarization of the cultured nonpigmented epithelium (NPE) membrane potential.The cytosotic calcium increased after NPE cell depolarization,this increase of cytosolic calcium was partially blocked by 12.5 μmol/L dantrolene and 10 μmol/L nifedipine.These observations suggest that Kv1.3 channels modulate ciliary epithelium potential and effect calcium dependent mechanisms.Conclusion Kv1.3 channels contribute to K+ efflux at the membrane of rabbit ciliary epithelium.

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Inhibition of Rat Ependymal Cilia Is Attenuated by Antipneumolysin Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Hirst, Robert A; Mohammed, Bashir J.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Andrew, Peter W.; O'Callaghan, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Ciliated ependymal cells line the ventricular surfaces and aqueducts of the brain. In ex vivo experiments, pneumolysin caused rapid inhibition of the ependymal ciliary beat frequency and caused ependymal cell disruption. Wild-type pneumococci and pneumococci deficient in pneumolysin caused ciliary slowing, but penicillin lysis of wild-type, not pneumolysin-deficient, pneumococci increased the extent of ciliary inhibition. This effect was abolished by antipneumolysin antibody. Ependymal ciliar...

  11. High-power, mid-infrared, picosecond pulses generated by compression of a CO2 laser beat-wave in GaAs

    CERN Document Server

    Pigeon, J J; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the generation of a train of ~ 2 ps, 10 um laser pulses via multiple four-wave mixing and compression of an infrared laser beat-wave propagating in the negative group velocity dispersion region of bulk GaAs and a combination of GaAs and NaCl. The use of a 200 ps, 106 GHz beat-wave, produced by combining laser pulses amplified on the 10P(20) and 10P(16) transition of a CO2 laser, provides a novel method for generating high-power, picosecond, mid-IR laser pulses at a high repetition rate. By using 165 and 882 GHz beat-waves we show that cascaded phase-mismatched difference frequency generation plays a significant role in the four-wave mixing process in GaAs.

  12. Downstream collecting in ciliary suspension feeders: the catch-up principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Nielsen, Claus; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    2000-01-01

    Based on observations of feeding structures and currents in the polychaete Spirorbis tridentatus, the entoproct Loxosoma pectinaricola and the cycliophore Symbion pandora, which all possess compound cilia, it is hypothesized that their capture mechanism is based on the catch-up principle. According...... to this principle, the compound cilia constitute the pump which generates a flow with suspended particles that enters the ciliary region. In this region the same cilia, during their power stroke, catch up with suspended particles and transfer the particles to a food groove, or a mouth cavity. In the...... the ciliary bands of some rotifers and of the various types of trochophora larvae of annelids, molluscs and entoprocts, it is hypothesized that the feeding mechanisms of these organisms are based on the catch-up principle....

  13. Ciliary and mucus-net filter feeding, with special reference to fluid mechanical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.B.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Møhlenberg, F.;

    1984-01-01

    Filter characteristics were determined and compared in ciliary and mucus-net filter feeders. The ciliary feeders include the polychaete Sabella penicillus, the brachiopod Terebratulina retusa, the marine bivalves Monia squama, Cardium glaucum, and Petricola pholadiformis, and the freshwater...... bivalves Dreissena polymorpha, Unio pictorum and Anodonta cygnea. The mucus-net feeders are the polychaete Chaetopterus variopedatus, the gastropod Crepidula fornicata and the ascidians Styela clava, Ciona intestinalis, Ascidia virginea, A. obliqua and A. mentula. Efficiencies of particle retention as a...... function of particle size was determined by counting of particles in samples of inhalant and exhalant water. The lower threshold for efficient particle retention varied from .apprx. 6 .mu.m in T. retuso to .apprx. 1 .mu.m in D. polymorpha. Mucus nets efficiently retained particles down to 1-2 .mu.m. Filter...

  14. Conditional, genetic disruption of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptors reveals a role in adult motor neuron survival

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nancy; Robitz, Rachel; Zurbrugg, Rebekah J; Karpman, Adam M; Mahler, Ashley M.; Cronier, Samantha A.; Vesey, Rachel; Spearry, Rachel P.; Zolotukhin, Sergei; MacLennan, A. John

    2008-01-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptor signaling can promote motor neuron (MN) survival in the adult. If so, proper targeting of this signaling may selectively counteract the effects of adult MN diseases. However, direct evidence for CNTF receptor involvement in adult MN survival is lacking, presumably because the unconditional blockade of the mouse CNTF receptor in vivo [through genetic disruption of the essential CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene]...

  15. Circulating levels of ciliary neurotrophic factor in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Akahori, Yoichiro; Takamoto, Norio; Masumoto,Akio; Inoue,Seiji; Nakatsukasa, Hideki; MASUYAMA, HISASHI; Hiramatsu,Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to decrease food intake in mouse models of obesity and to improve insulin sensitivity. It is well known that tight regulation of glucose metabolism is essential for successful gestational outcomes (e.g. fetal growth), and that abnormal insulin resistance is associated with preeclampsia (PE). To investigate the possibility that CNTF might be involved in the regulation of insulin resistance during pregnancy, circulating levels of CNTF w...

  16. Ciliary neurotrophic factor has intrinsic and extrinsic roles in regulating B cell differentiation and bone structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Askmyr; White, Kirby E; Tanja Jovic; King, Hannah A.; Quach, Julie M.; Maluenda, Ana C.; Baker, Emma K; Smeets, Monique F.; Walkley, Carl R.; Purton, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    The gp130 receptor and its binding partners play a central role in cytokine signalling. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of the cytokines that signals through the gp130 receptor complex. CNTF has previously been shown to be a negative regulator of trabecular bone remodelling and important for motor neuron development. Since haematopoietic cell maintenance and differentiation is dependent on the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, where cells of the osteoblastic lineage are important r...

  17. Expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor and its receptor in experimental obstructive nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Byoung-Seung; Choi, Jae-Youn; Cha, Jung-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is well known as a growth/survival factor of neuronal tissue. We investigated the expression of CNTF and its specific receptor alpha (CNTFRα) in a unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model. Complete UUO was produced by left ureteral ligation in Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were sacrificed on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after UUO. The kidneys were fixed, and processed for both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. CNTF immunoreactivity in ...

  18. Perivascular Cells Increase Expression of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Following Partial Denervation of the Rat Neurohypophysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, David; SunRhodes, Neil; Watt, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was investigated immunocytochemically during the axonal degeneration and collateral axonal sprouting response that follows partial denervation of the rat neurohypophysis. A significant increase in the number of CNTF-immunoreactive (CNTF-ir) cells was observed in the neurohypophysis of partially denervated animals compared to age-matched sham-operated controls by 5 days post-denervation, remaining elevated throughout the 30 day post denervat...

  19. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Induction by Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor in Donor Human Corneal Endothelium in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Shay-Whey M.; Guo, Yan; Bernstein, Steve L.; Waschek, James A.; Liu, Xiuhuai; Symes, Aviva J

    2007-01-01

    After peripheral nerve axotomy, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) gene expression is upregulated in neurons, whereas ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) accumulates extracellularly at the lesion site. Although CNTF-induced VIP gene expression has been reported in cultured sympathetic neurons and neuroblastoma cells, it still remains to be determined if CNTF and VIP play interrelated roles in nerve injury. The corneal endothelium, like sympathetic neurons, derives from the neural crest. Previ...

  20. Ciliary neurotrophic factor coordinately activates transcription of neuropeptide genes in a neuroblastoma cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Symes, A.J.; Rao, M S; Lewis, S. E.; Landis, S C; Hyman, S E; Fink, J S

    1993-01-01

    Differentiation factors have been identified that influence the phenotype of sympathetic neurons by altering expression of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms through which such factors act would be facilitated by the availability of a neuronal cell line that responds to these factors in a fashion similar to sympathetic neurons. We have identified a human neuroblastoma cell line, NBFL, that responds to the differentiation factor ciliary neu...

  1. Crystal structure of dimeric human ciliary neurotrophic factor determined by MAD phasing.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, N. Q.; Panayotatos, N; Hendrickson, W A

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes the survival and differentiation of developing motor neurons and is a potential therapeutic for treating neurodegeneration and nerve injury. The crystal structure of human CNTF has been determined at 2.4 A resolution using multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing from a single Yb3+ ions. The structure reveals that CNTF is dimeric, with a novel anti-parallel arrangement of the subunits, not previously observed for other cytokines. Each su...

  2. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Protects Striatal Neurons against Excitotoxicity by Enhancing Glial Glutamate Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Beurrier, Corinne; Faideau, Mathilde; Bennouar, Khaled-Ezaheir; Escartin, Carole; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Bonvento, Gilles; Gubellini, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs) could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA) was significantly reduced (by ∼75%) in CNTF-treated anima...

  3. Ciliary neurotrophic factor prevents the degeneration of motor neurons in mouse mutant progressive motor neuronopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Stöckli, Kurt A.; Thoenen, Hans; Schmalbruch, H.; Carroll, P.; Kreutzberg, Georg W.

    2010-01-01

    CILIARY neurotrophic factor (CNTF) supports the survival of embryonic motor neurons in vitro and in vivo and prevents lesion-mediated degeneration of rat motor neuron~ during early post-natal stages. Here we report that CNTF greatly reduces all the functional and morphological changes in pmnlpmn mice5, an autosomal recessive mutant leading to progressive caudo-cranial motor neuron degeneration. The first manifestations of progressive motor neuronopathy in homozygous pmnl pmn mice become appar...

  4. Continued Administration of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Protects Mice from Inflammatory Pathology in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Cognet, Isabelle; Bourbonniere, Lyne; Zehntner, Simone; Guilhot, Florence; Herman, Alexandra; Guay-Giroux, Angélique; Antel, Jack P.; Owens, Trevor; Gauchat, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. We show that daily administration (days 8 to 24) of murine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a neurotrophic factor that has been described as a survival and differentiation factor for neurons and oligodendrocytes, significantly ameliorates the clinical course of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. In the acute phase of experimental autoimmune en...

  5. The relationship between ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) genotype and motor unit physiology: preliminary studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrell Robert; Hurley Ben; Roth Stephen; Stashuk Daniel; Ling Shari; Conwit Robin A; Metter E Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is important for neuronal and muscle development, and genetic variation in the CNTF gene has been associated with muscle strength. The effect of CNTF on nerve development suggests that CNTF genotype may be associated with force production via its influence on motor unit size and firing patterns. The purpose of this study is to examine whether CNTF genotype differentially affects motor unit activation in the vastus medialis with increasing...

  6. Ciliary neurotrophic factor corrects obesity and diabetes associated with leptin deficiency and resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Gloaguen, Isabelle; Costa, Patrizia; Demartis, Anna; Lazzaro, Domenico; Di Marco, Annalise; Graziani, Rita; Paonessa, Giacomo; Chen, Fang; Rosenblum, Charles I.; Van der Ploeg, Lex H. T.; Cortese, Riccardo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Laufer, Ralph

    1997-01-01

    Receptor subunits for the neurocytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) share sequence similarity with the receptor for leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine involved in body weight homeostasis. We report here that CNTF and leptin activate a similar pattern of STAT factors in neuronal cells, and that mRNAs for CNTF receptor subunits, similarly to the mRNA of leptin receptor, are localized in mouse hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of energy balance. Systemic administration of ...

  7. Sox10 regulates ciliary neurotrophic factor gene expression in Schwann cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Wiese, Stefan; Funk, Natalja; Chittka, Alexandra; Rossoll, Wilfried; Bömmel, Heike; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Wegner, Michael; Sendtner, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (Cntf) plays an essential role in postnatal maintenance of spinal motoneurons. Whereas the expression of this neurotrophic factor is low during embryonic development, it is highly up-regulated after birth in myelinating Schwann cells of rodents. To characterize the underlying transcriptional mechanisms, we have analyzed and compared the effects of various glial transcription factors. In contrast to Pit-1, Oct-1, Unc-86 homology region (POU) domain class 3, transcri...

  8. Ciliary neurotrophic factor prevents degeneration of adult rat substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    T. Hagg; Varon, S

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effects of recombinant human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) for injured dopaminergic neurons of the adult rat substantia nigra compacta. Fourteen days after a unilateral transection of the nigrostriatal pathway two-thirds of the neurons (identified by retrograde labeling) had degenerated. In sharp contrast, 73% (a few cases, > 90%) of this cell loss was prevented by continuous infusion of CNTF close to the injured neurons. However, CNTF did not pre...

  9. Identification of Ciliary and Ciliopathy Genes in Caenorhabditis Elegans through Comparative Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Nansheng; Mah, Allan; Oliver E Blacque; Chu, Jeffrey; Phgora, Kiran; Bakhoum, Mathieu W.; Newbury, C. Rebecca Hunt; Khattra, Jaswinder; Chan, Susanna; Efimenko, Evgheni; Johnsen, Robert; Phirke, Prasad; Swoboda, Peter; Marra, Marco; Moerman, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Background The recent availability of genome sequences of multiple related Caenorhabditis species has made it possible to identify, using comparative genomics, similarly transcribed genes in Caenorhabditis elegans and its sister species. Taking this approach, we have identified numerous novel ciliary genes in C. elegans, some of which may be orthologs of unidentified human ciliopathy genes. Results By screening for genes possessing canonical X-box sequences in promoters of three Caenorhabditi...

  10. The isolated ciliary bilayer is useful for studies of aqueous humor formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, M L; Yamada, E.; Cummins, D; Mori, N; Mead, A.; Murakami, M.

    1991-01-01

    An intact ciliary epithelial bilayer has been isolated from the rabbit eye by perfusion, microsurgical dissection, and recovery techniques. Vital subcellular organelles and intercellular junctions of this epithelial bilayer preparation are very well preserved. The total electrical resistance of the epithelial bilayer is 350 ohms, and the transepithelial potential is 650 microV, nonpigmented epithelium side negative. The electrical resistance is reduced by 0.2 mM EGTA and the transepithelial p...

  11. Rootletin organizes the ciliary rootlet to achieve neuron sensory function in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jieyan V.; Kao, Ling-Rong; Jana, Swadhin C.; Sivan-Loukianova, Elena; Mendonça, Susana; Cabrera, Oscar A.; Singh, Priyanka; Cabernard, Clemens; Eberl, Daniel F.; Bettencourt-Dias, Monica; Timothy L. Megraw

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are essential for cell signaling and sensory perception. In many cell types, a cytoskeletal structure called the ciliary rootlet links the cilium to the cell body. Previous studies indicated that rootlets support the long-term stability of some cilia. Here we report that Drosophila melanogaster Rootletin (Root), the sole orthologue of the mammalian paralogs Rootletin and C-Nap1, assembles into rootlets of diverse lengths among sensory neuron subtypes. Root mutant neurons lack rootlets a...

  12. Using Science and Much More to Beat the Flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The Beat the Flood challenge involves designing and building a model flood-proof home, which is then tested in "flood" conditions. It is set on the fictitious Watu Island. The children form teams, with each team member being assigned a responsibility for the duration of the task--team leader, chief recorder, and resource manager. This…

  13. Beat-wave accelerator studies at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study carried out in 1982-83 at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory to examine how one might use the beat-wave principle to construct a useful high energy accelerator is reviewed, and comments are made on later developments. A number of problems are evident to which solutions cannot at present be foreseen. (author)

  14. Perceptions of Conducting: Accuracy in Detecting Modulated Beat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittin, Ruth V.

    1992-01-01

    Presents findings of a study of viewers' ability to detect changes in conducting beat patterns. Reports that music education majors were significantly better able to detect tempo decreases than increases and better able than nonmajors to detect decreases. Indicates that nonmajors were better able than majors to identify tempo increases. (SG)

  15. Beam cooling by using laser-undulator beat wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-Hamiltonian manipulation of internal structure of phase space of charged particle beams can result in much faster cooling than the conventional stochastic cooling. The longitudinal emittance reduction is accomplished by the ponderomotive force of the beat between the undulator and the laser adjusted appropriate in its broadband spectrum through feedback at each turn. (author)

  16. Efficiency of brainwave entrainment by binaural beats in reducing anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alipoor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety is a fundamental phenomenon that is a common symptom in all mental disorders. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of brainwave entrainment on anxiety reduction using binaural beats. Methods: In this experimental double-blind study, 30 employees were selected from an engineering research firm through random sampling and replacement and divided into two groups: control group and experimental group. All participants completed the Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Then, the experimental group listened to binaural beats which was recorded on a non-vocal piece of music for 4 weeks, 3 sessions each week. Each session lasted about 20 minutes. At the same time, the control group listened to the background music without any entrainment sound. At the end, both groups completed the anxiety questionnaire and the anxiety scores of both groups obtained before and after intervention were analyzed by ANCOVA. Results: The findings showed that the brainwave entrainment using binaural beats led to the significant reduction of state anxiety (P<0.001 and trait anxiety (P<0.018. Conclusion: Brainwave entrainment using binaural beats is an effective factor in decreasing state and trait anxiety; so, it can be used to reduce anxiety in mental health centers.

  17. Reduced Order Dead-Beat Observers for a Bioreactor

    CERN Document Server

    Karafyllis, Iasson

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the strong observability property and the reduced-order dead-beat observer design problem for a continuous bioreactor. New relationships between coexistence and strong observability, and checkable sufficient conditions for strong observability, are established for a chemostat with two competing microbial species. Furthermore, the dynamic output feedback stabilization problem is solved for the case of one species.

  18. HEATR2 plays a conserved role in assembly of the ciliary motile apparatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine P Diggle

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cilia are highly conserved microtubule-based structures that perform a variety of sensory and motility functions during development and adult homeostasis. In humans, defects specifically affecting motile cilia lead to chronic airway infections, infertility and laterality defects in the genetically heterogeneous disorder Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD. Using the comparatively simple Drosophila system, in which mechanosensory neurons possess modified motile cilia, we employed a recently elucidated cilia transcriptional RFX-FOX code to identify novel PCD candidate genes. Here, we report characterization of CG31320/HEATR2, which plays a conserved critical role in forming the axonemal dynein arms required for ciliary motility in both flies and humans. Inner and outer arm dyneins are absent from axonemes of CG31320 mutant flies and from PCD individuals with a novel splice-acceptor HEATR2 mutation. Functional conservation of closely arranged RFX-FOX binding sites upstream of HEATR2 orthologues may drive higher cytoplasmic expression of HEATR2 during early motile ciliogenesis. Immunoprecipitation reveals HEATR2 interacts with DNAI2, but not HSP70 or HSP90, distinguishing it from the client/chaperone functions described for other cytoplasmic proteins required for dynein arm assembly such as DNAAF1-4. These data implicate CG31320/HEATR2 in a growing intracellular pre-assembly and transport network that is necessary to deliver functional dynein machinery to the ciliary compartment for integration into the motile axoneme.

  19. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-07-15

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  20. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanru Zhang; Hui Zhang; Kaka Katiella; Wenhua Huang

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune re-jection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regenera-tion. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anasto-mosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone.

  1. Ruthenium-106 brachytherapy, local resection and pars plana vitrectomy for a ciliary body melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This case report deals with brachytherapy, subsequent local resection and pars plana vitrectomy for a large ciliary body melanoma. In 1990 a 6 mm high ciliary body melanoma was treated with Ruthenium 106. In spite of early regression of the tumour infiltrating the choroid the remaining ciliary body melanoma was removed by local resection with simultaneous cataract surgery and anterior vitrectomy. 6 months later a focal PVR retinal detachment at the site of the scar of the Ruthenium-106 plaque developed and was treated by vitrectomy, membrane peeling and SF-6 gas tamponade. After 1 year of follow up the retina remained reattached, the tumor had regressed to a chorioatrophic scar. Internal examination could not reveal any sign of metastasis, visual acuity was 1/36 due to a maculopathy. Regarding to our knowledge of cell biology development of metastasis is a much more complex procedure than pure mechanical dissemination of tumor cells. In our opinion cataract or even vitreoretinal surgery may be justified in case of a necrotic tumor. (authors)

  2. Long-term clearance from small airways in subjects with ciliary dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjelte Lena

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate if long-term clearance from small airways is dependent on normal ciliary function. Six young adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD inhaled 111 Indium labelled Teflon particles of 4.2 μm geometric and 6.2 μm aerodynamic diameter with an extremely slow inhalation flow, 0.05 L/s. The inhalation method deposits particles mainly in the small conducting airways. Lung retention was measured immediately after inhalation and at four occasions up to 21 days after inhalation. Results were compared with data from ten healthy controls. For additional comparison three of the PCD subjects also inhaled the test particles with normal inhalation flow, 0.5 L/s, providing a more central deposition. The lung retention at 24 h in % of lung deposition (Ret24 was higher (p 24 with slow inhalation flow was 73.9 ± 1.9 % compared to 68.9 ± 7.5 % with normal inhalation flow in the three PCD subjects exposed twice. During day 7–21 the three PCD subjects exposed twice cleared 9 % with normal flow, probably representing predominantly alveolar clearance, compared to 19 % with slow inhalation flow, probably representing mainly small airway clearance. This study shows that despite ciliary dysfunction, clearance continues in the small airways beyond 24 h. There are apparently additional clearance mechanisms present in the small airways.

  3. Factors associated with wife beating in Egypt: Analysis of two surveys (1995 and 2005)

    OpenAIRE

    Dhaher Enas; Labeeb Shokria; Mikolajczyk Rafael T; Akmatov Manas K; Khan Md Mobarak

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Wife beating is an important public health problem in many developing countries. We assessed the rates of wife beating and examined factors associated with wife beating in 1995 and 2005 in Egypt. Methods We used data from two Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted in Egypt in 1995 and 2005 using multistage household sampling. Data related to wife beating included information from 7122 women in 1995 and 5612 women in 2005. Logistic regression was used to analyze fac...

  4. Finding the beat: a neural perspective across humans and non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Hugo; Grahn, Jessica; Trainor, Laurel; Rohrmeier, Martin; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2015-01-01

    Humans possess an ability to perceive and synchronize movements to the beat in music (‘beat perception and synchronization’), and recent neuroscientific data have offered new insights into this beat-finding capacity at multiple neural levels. Here, we review and compare behavioural and neural data on temporal and sequential processing during beat perception and entrainment tasks in macaques (including direct neural recording and local field potential (LFP)) and humans (including fMRI, EEG and...

  5. Correlations in heart beat data as quantitative characterization of heart pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correlation between heart pathology and statistical properties of heart beat data has been studied. It is shown that heart beat data has different scaling behavior for healthy and disease cases. Possibilities to develop new monitoring technique based on the permanent control of the correlations in heart beat data are discussed. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  6. 76 FR 14737 - Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Request for Grant Proposals: One Beat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) Request for Grant Proposals: One Beat Announcement Type... opportunities. One Beat is a programmatic refinement of the existing Fiscal Year 2010 Cultural Visitors program..., professional enrichment, and artistic production. By concentrating on music, One Beat seeks to combine...

  7. Poor synchronization to the beat may result from deficient auditory-motor mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowiński, Jakub; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Moving to the beat of music is natural and spontaneous for humans. Yet some individuals, so-called 'beat deaf', may differ from the majority by being unable to synchronize their movements to musical beat. This condition was recently described in Mathieu (Phillips-Silver et al. (2011). Neuropsychologia, 49, 961-969), a beat-deaf individual, showing inaccurate motor synchronization to the beat accompanied by poor beat perception, with spared pitch processing. It has been suggested that beat deafness is the outcome of impoverished beat perception. Deficient synchronization to the beat, however, may also result from inaccurate mapping of the perceived beat to movement. To test this possibility, we asked 99 non-musicians to synchronize with musical and non-musical stimuli via hand tapping. Ten among them who revealed particularly poor synchronization were submitted to a thorough assessment of motor synchronization to various pacing stimuli and of beat perception. Four participants showed poor synchronization in absence of poor pitch perception; moreover, among them, two individuals were unable to synchronize to music, in spite of unimpaired detection of small durational deviations in musical and non-musical sequences, and normal rhythm discrimination. This mismatch of perception and action points toward disrupted auditory-motor mapping as the key impairment accounting for poor synchronization to the beat. PMID:23838002

  8. Glucagon Increases Beating Rate but Not Contractility in Rat Right Atrium. Comparison with Isoproterenol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Merino

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the chronotropic and inotropic responses to glucagon in spontaneously beating isolated right atria of rat heart. For comparison, we also investigated the effects resulting from stimulating β-adrenoceptors with isoproterenol in this tissue. Isoproterenol increased both atrial frequency and contractility but glucagon only enhanced atrial rate. The transcript levels of glucagon receptors were about three times higher in sinoatrial node than in the atrial myocardium. Chronotropic responses to glucagon and isoproterenol were blunted by the funny current (If inhibitor ZD 7288. Inhibitors of protein kinase A, H-89 and KT-5720 reduced the chronotropic response to glucagon but not to isoproterenol. Inhibition of ryanodine receptors and calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (important regulators of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release, with ruthenium red and KN-62 respectively, failed to alter chronotropic responses of either glucagon or isoproterenol. Non selective inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE with 3-isobutylmethylxantine or selective inhibition of PDE3 or PDE4 with cilostamide or rolipram respectively did not affect chronotropic effects of glucagon or isoproterenol. Our results indicate that glucagon increases beating rate but not contractility in rat right atria which could be a consequence of lower levels of glucagon receptors in atrial myocardium than in sinoatrial node. Chronotropic responses to glucagon or isoproterenol are mediated by If current but not by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release, neither are regulated by PDE activity.

  9. Fetal beat detection in abdominal ECG recordings: global and time adaptive approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method for location of fetal QRS in maternal abdominal ECG recordings. This method’s initial, global approach was proposed in the context of the 2013 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge where it was tested on the 447 four channel one-minute recordings. The first step is filtering to eliminate baseline wander and high frequency noise. Upon detection, maternal QRS is removed on each channel using a filter applied to the other three channels. Next we locate fetal QRS on each channel and select the channel with the best set of detections. The method was awarded the third-best score in the Challenge event 1 with 278.755 (beats/minute) and the fourth-best score on event 2 with 28.201 ms. The 5 min long recordings of the Abdominal and Direct Fetal ECG Database were used to further test the method. This database contains five recordings obtained from women in labor. Results in these longer recordings were not satisfactory. This appears to be particularly the case in recordings with a more clearly non-stationary nature. In a new approach to our method, some changes are introduced. Two features are updated over time: the filter used to eliminate maternal QRS and the channel used to detect fetal beats. These changes significantly improved the QRS detection performance on longer recordings, but the scores on the 1 minute Challenge recordings were degraded. (paper)

  10. Use of seismocardiogram for the beat-to-beat assessment of the Pulse Transit Time: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzo, Marco; Vaini, Emanuele; Lombardi, Prospero

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new methodology for the estimation of Pulse Transit Time, PTT, based on the use of the seismocardiogram for the identification of the aortic valve opening, AO. This method has been implemented to obtain a first description of the AO-derived PTT beat-to-beat variability at rest and during the recovery after a cycloergometer exercise at 25W and 100W, its relation with systolic blood pressure, S(BP), and its difference with respect to variability of the Pulse Arrival Time, PAT (i.e. the BP transit time estimated by considering the ECG R peak instead of AO as proximal site). Our preliminary data indicate that 1) the fast components of the PTT variability are only marginally influenced by respiration; 2) only the slower components of the PTT variability are correlated with systolic BP; 3) major differences exist in the dynamics of PTT and PAT, being PAT variability significantly larger and importantly influenced by the beat-to-beat changes occurring in the Pre Ejection Period. PMID:26737949

  11. A review of beat-to-beat vectorcardiographic (VCG) parameters for analyzing repolarization variability in ECG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Muhammad A; Abbott, Derek

    2016-02-01

    Elevated ventricular repolarization lability is believed to be linked to the risk of ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. However, ventricular repolarization is a complex electrical phenomenon, and abnormalities in ventricular repolarization are not completely understood. To evaluate repolarization lability, vectorcardiography (VCG) is an alternative approach where the electrocardiographic (ECG) signal can be considered as possessing both magnitude and direction. Recent research has shown that VCG is advantageous over ECG signal analysis for identification of repolarization abnormality. One of the key reasons is that the VCG approach does not rely on exact identification of the T-wave offset, which improves the reproducibility of the VCG technique. However, beat-to-beat variability in VCG is an emerging area for the investigation of repolarization abnormality though not yet fully realized. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to explore the techniques, findings, and efficacy of beat-to-beat VCG parameters for analyzing repolarization lability, which may have potential utility for further study. PMID:25992510

  12. Beat-to-beat systolic time-interval measurement from heart sounds and ECG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systolic time intervals are highly correlated to fundamental cardiac functions. Several studies have shown that these measurements have significant diagnostic and prognostic value in heart failure condition and are adequate for long-term patient follow-up and disease management. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using heart sound (HS) to accurately measure the opening and closing moments of the aortic heart valve. These moments are crucial to define the main systolic timings of the heart cycle, i.e. pre-ejection period (PEP) and left ventricular ejection time (LVET). We introduce an algorithm for automatic extraction of PEP and LVET using HS and electrocardiogram. PEP is estimated with a Bayesian approach using the signal's instantaneous amplitude and patient-specific time intervals between atrio-ventricular valve closure and aortic valve opening. As for LVET, since the aortic valve closure corresponds to the start of the S2 HS component, we base LVET estimation on the detection of the S2 onset. A comparative assessment of the main systolic time intervals is performed using synchronous signal acquisitions of the current gold standard in cardiac time-interval measurement, i.e. echocardiography, and HS. The algorithms were evaluated on a healthy population, as well as on a group of subjects with different cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In the healthy group, from a set of 942 heartbeats, the proposed algorithm achieved 7.66 ± 5.92 ms absolute PEP estimation error. For LVET, the absolute estimation error was 11.39 ± 8.98 ms. For the CVD population, 404 beats were used, leading to 11.86 ± 8.30 and 17.51 ± 17.21 ms absolute PEP and LVET errors, respectively. The results achieved in this study suggest that HS can be used to accurately estimate LVET and PEP. (paper)

  13. Suppression of decay instability of the non-resonant beat wave excited by two counter-propagating x-mode lasers in magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kanika; Sajal, Vivek; Kumar, Ravindra; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2016-01-01

    The decay instability of non-resonant beat mode is investigated in homogeneous, hot, and collision less plasma having transverse static magnetic field. Two counter-propagating X-mode lasers with frequency difference ω1˜ω2≥2 ωp and wave numbers k→ 1 and k→ 2 drive a non-resonant space charge beat wave at phase matching conditions of frequency ω0=ω1˜ω2 and wave numbers k→ 0=k→ 1+k→ 2 . The driven beat wave acts as a pump for decay instability and parametrically excites a pair of lower hybrid wave (ω,k → ) and sideband upper hybrid wave (ω3,k→ 3) propagating in sideward direction so that momentum remains conserved. The sideband wave couples with the driver beat wave to exert ponderomotive force on plasma electrons at frequency ω=ω0+ω3 . The oscillatory motion of plasma electrons due to ponderomotive force and lower hybrid wave causes density perturbation in plasma, which couples with oscillating beat mode by feedback mechanism and gives rise to a sideband wave at resonance. The maximum growth rate is achieved at scattering angels θs˜30 ° and θs˜150 ° . The growth rate becomes half by changing applied magnetic field from ˜90 T to ˜270 T . The suppression of decay instability can be beneficial for parametric excitation of fast plasma wave (coupled with slow plasma wave) by two counter-propagating lasers for electron acceleration.

  14. Statistics of quantum beats in the time dependence of the neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopets, G.A.; Prokopets, A.G. [National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Physics and Mathematics Department, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2011-12-15

    The numerical calculations of the delay time distributions for the neutron scattering have been carried out. The scattering of the short wave packet of neutrons with the broad energy interval 500-800 keV by {sup 58}Ni nuclei has been studied. The decay curves and average times of the compound scattering were found as for the forward scattering as for the specific spin-parity states. The time oscillations of the decay curves were identified as quantum beats that were caused by the interference of the excited resonance set. The statistical analysis of the frequency spectra of the decay curves oscillations has been carried out. The behavior of the examined statistical observables turns out to be close to the Poisson law. (orig.)

  15. Statistics of quantum beats in the time dependence of the neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numerical calculations of the delay time distributions for the neutron scattering have been carried out. The scattering of the short wave packet of neutrons with the broad energy interval 500-800 keV by 58Ni nuclei has been studied. The decay curves and average times of the compound scattering were found as for the forward scattering as for the specific spin-parity states. The time oscillations of the decay curves were identified as quantum beats that were caused by the interference of the excited resonance set. The statistical analysis of the frequency spectra of the decay curves oscillations has been carried out. The behavior of the examined statistical observables turns out to be close to the Poisson law. (orig.)

  16. Does Corporate Governance Matter in Meeting and Beating Analysts’ Forecasts

    OpenAIRE

    Soumaya Ben Malek Maztoul

    2014-01-01

    Meeting and beating analysts’ forecast has received substantial attention, most of studies investigate twoprinciples problems: the valuation and value relevance of meeting and tools used to achieve benchmarks. Thisresearch is different, we investigate whether internal corporate governance impacts on meeting and beatinganalysts’ forecasts and consistently do it, we also examine if these attributes alleviate opportunistic behavior.This paper contributes to the growing literature on earnings ben...

  17. Robotic Motion Compensation for Beating Heart Intracardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Howe, Robert D.; Yuen, Shelten G.; Kettler, Daniel T.; Notovny, Paul M.; Plowes, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    3D ultrasound imaging has enabled minimally invasive, beating heart intracardiac procedures. However, rapid heart motion poses a serious challenge to the surgeon that is compounded by significant time delays and noise in 3D ultrasound. This paper investigates the concept of using a one-degree-of-freedom motion compensation system to synchronize with tissue motions that may be approximated by 1D motion models. We characterize the motion of the mitral valve annulus and show that it is well appr...

  18. A waveguide polarization toolset design based on mode beating

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchings, D.C.; Holmes, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    A toolset of waveguide elements is examined, which can be combined to produce polarization functional devices in a single contiguous waveguide. In particular, waveguide implementations of an optical isolator and a polarization modulator are discussed. The waveguide elements, i.e., quasi-phase-matched nonreciprocal polarization mode converter, reciprocal polarization mode converter (R-PMC), and a differential phase shifter, are all based on mode beating. A universal 3-dB R-PMC specification is...

  19. Observation of chaotic beats in a driven memristive Chua's circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Ahamed, A. Ishaq; Srinivasan, K.; Murali, K.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a time varying resistive circuit realising the action of an active three segment piecewise linear flux controlled memristor is proposed. Using this as the nonlinearity, a driven Chua's circuit is implemented. The phenomenon of chaotic beats in this circuit is observed for a suitable choice of parameters. The memristor acts as a chaotically time varying resistor (CTVR), switching between a less conductive OFF state and a more conductive ON state. This chaotic switching is govern...

  20. Beat-Event Detection in Action Movie Franchises

    OpenAIRE

    Potapov, Danila; Douze, Matthijs; Revaud, Jerome; Harchaoui, Zaid; Schmid, Cordelia

    2015-01-01

    While important advances were recently made towards temporally localizing and recognizing specific human actions or activities in videos, efficient detection and classification of long video chunks belonging to semantically defined categories such as "pursuit" or "romance" remains challenging.We introduce a new dataset, Action Movie Franchises, consisting of a collection of Hollywood action movie franchises. We define 11 non-exclusive semantic categories - called beat-categories - that are br...

  1. Both ciliary and non-ciliary functions of Foxj1a confer Wnt/β-catenin signaling in zebrafish left-right patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is implicated in left-right (LR axis determination; however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Prompted by our recent discovery that Wnt signaling regulates ciliogenesis in the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV via Foxj1a, a ciliogenic transcription factor, we decided to elucidate functions of Foxj1a in Wnt-regulated LR pattern formation. We showed that targeted injection of wnt8a mRNA into a single cell at the 128-cell stage is sufficient to induce ectopic foxj1a expression and ectopic cilia. By interrogating the transcription circuit of foxj1a regulation, we found that both Lef1 and Tcf7 bind to a consensus element in the foxj1a promoter region. Depletion of Lef1 and Tcf7 inhibits foxj1a transcription in the dorsal forerunner cells, downregulates cilia length and number in KV, and randomizes LR asymmetry. Targeted overexpression of a constitutively active form of Lef1 also induced an ectopic protrusion that contains ectopic transcripts for sox17, foxj1a, and charon, and ectopic monocilia. Further genetic studies using this ectopic expression platform revealed two distinct functions of Foxj1a; mediating Wnt-governed monocilia length elongation as well as charon transcription. The novel Foxj1a-charon regulation is conserved in KV, and importantly, it is independent of the canonical role of Foxj1a in the biosynthesis of motile cilia. Together with the known function of motile cilia movement in generating asymmetric expression of charon, our data put forward a hypothesis that Foxj1a confers both ciliary and non-ciliary functions of Wnt signaling, which converge on charon to regulate LR pattern formation.

  2. Both ciliary and non-ciliary functions of Foxj1a confer Wnt/β-catenin signaling in zebrafish left-right patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Xu, Xiaolei; Lin, Xueying

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is implicated in left-right (LR) axis determination; however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Prompted by our recent discovery that Wnt signaling regulates ciliogenesis in the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV) via Foxj1a, a ciliogenic transcription factor, we decided to elucidate functions of Foxj1a in Wnt-regulated LR pattern formation. We showed that targeted injection of wnt8a mRNA into a single cell at the 128-cell stage is sufficient to induce ectopic foxj1a expression and ectopic cilia. By interrogating the transcription circuit of foxj1a regulation, we found that both Lef1 and Tcf7 bind to a consensus element in the foxj1a promoter region. Depletion of Lef1 and Tcf7 inhibits foxj1a transcription in the dorsal forerunner cells, downregulates cilia length and number in KV, and randomizes LR asymmetry. Targeted overexpression of a constitutively active form of Lef1 also induced an ectopic protrusion that contains ectopic transcripts for sox17, foxj1a, and charon, and ectopic monocilia. Further genetic studies using this ectopic expression platform revealed two distinct functions of Foxj1a; mediating Wnt-governed monocilia length elongation as well as charon transcription. The novel Foxj1a-charon regulation is conserved in KV, and importantly, it is independent of the canonical role of Foxj1a in the biosynthesis of motile cilia. Together with the known function of motile cilia movement in generating asymmetric expression of charon, our data put forward a hypothesis that Foxj1a confers both ciliary and non-ciliary functions of Wnt signaling, which converge on charon to regulate LR pattern formation. PMID:26432885

  3. Neuroblastoma cells contain a trophic factor sharing biological and molecular properties with ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Heymanns, J.; Unsicker, K

    1987-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a protein supporting the in vitro survival of a characteristic spectrum of embryonic chicken and rat peripheral neurons. High-speed supernatants of extracts from two neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines--the mouse C 1300 N2a and the human IMR 32--mimic the effects of CNTF on identical target neurons. Promotion of survival is dose-dependent with an ED50 of 80 micrograms (IMR 32) and 140 micrograms (C 1300 N2a) of protein per ml and saturable at plateau values for...

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor induces cholinergic differentiation of rat sympathetic neurons in culture

    OpenAIRE

    S. Saadat; Sendtner, Michael; H. Rohrer(Universität Mainz, Germany)

    1989-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) influences the levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in cultures of dissociated sympathetic neurons from newborn rats. In the presence of CNTF both the total and specific activity of ChAT was increased 7 d after culture by 15- and 18-fold, respectively, as compared to cultures kept in the absence of CNTF. Between 3 and 21 d in culture in the presence of CNTF the total ChAT activity increased by a factor of greater than 100....

  5. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) prevents the degeneration of motor neurons after axotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Kreutzberg, Georg W.; Thoenen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The period of natural cell death in the development of rodent motor neurons is followed by a period of sensitivity to axonal injury1-3. In the rat this early postnatal period of vulnerability coincides with that of very low ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) levels in the sciatic nerve before CNTF increases to the high, adult levels4. The developmental time course of CNTF expression, its regional tissue distribution and its cytosolic localization (as suggested by its primary structure)4*5 fav...

  6. Localization of the gene for the ciliary neutrotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR) to human chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, D.H.; Jones, C.; Patterson, D. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Denver, CO (United States) Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, CO (United States)); Britt, D.E.; Jackson, C.L. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to be important for the survival of motor neurons and has shown activity in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). CNTF therefore holds promise as a treatment for ALS, and it and its receptor (CNTFR) are candidates for a gene involved in familial ALS. The CNTFR gene was mapped to chromosome 9 by PCR on a panel of human/CHO somatic cell hybrids and localized to 9p13 by PCR on a panel of radiation hybrids. 18 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. The primary cilium as a cellular receiver: organizing ciliary GPCR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgendorf, Keren I; Johnson, Carl T; Jackson, Peter K

    2016-04-01

    The primary cilium is an antenna-like cellular protrusion mediating sensory and neuroendocrine signaling. Its localization within tissue architecture and a growing list of cilia-localized receptors, in particular G-protein-coupled receptors, determine a host of crucial physiologies, which are disrupted in human ciliopathies. Here, we discuss recent advances in the identification and characterization of ciliary signaling components and pathways. Recent studies have highlighted the unique signaling environment of the primary cilium and we are just beginning to understand how this design allows for highly amplified and regulated signaling. PMID:26926036

  8. Changes in the number of chick ciliary ganglion neuron processes with time in cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the shape of chick ciliary ganglion neurons dissociated from embryonic day 8 or 9 ganglia and maintained in vitro. Most of the neurons were multipolar during the first three days after plating, with an average of 6.0 processes extending directly from the cell body. The neurons became unipolar with time. The remaining primary process accounted for greater than 90% of the total neuritic arbor. This striking change in morphology was not due to the select...

  9. Spin wave non-reciprocity and beating in permalloy by the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the propagation characteristics of spin wave modes in a permalloy stripe by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect techniques. We observed a beating interference pattern in the time domain under the influence of an electrical square pulse excitation at the centre of the stripe. We also probed the non-reciprocal behaviour of propagating spin waves with a dependence on the external magnetic field. Spatial dependence studies showed that localized edge mode spin waves have a lower frequency than the spin waves at the centre of the stripe, due to the varying magnetization vector across the width of the stripe. (paper)

  10. Clinical value of measurement of pulmonary radioaerosol mucociliary clearance in the work up of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Mathias; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Mortensen, Jann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to evaluate and define the general clinical applicability and impact of pulmonary radioaerosol mucociliary clearance (PRMC) on the work up of patients suspected of having primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In addition, we wanted to evaluate the accuracy of the reference values...... primarily to results from nasal ciliary function testing, to electron microscopic (EM) examination of the ultrastructure of the cilia, and to the final clinical diagnosis. RESULTS: Of the 239 patients, 27 ended up with a final clinical diagnosis of definitive PCD. No patients with a PRMC test that was...... from updated data....

  11. Ultrastructural pathology of primary ciliary dyskinesia: report about 125 cases in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theegarten Dirk

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a rare genetically induced disorder of cilia inducing mainly respiratory diseases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis of ciliary ultrastructure is classically used for diagnosis. We report our experience of TEM investigations in a large series of patients. Methods TEM analysis performed of 742 biopsies from patients with suspected PCD was reviewed retrospectively. Ultrastructural defects were analysized further in 125 cases with changes typical for PCD. Results In 18.1% of patients diagnosis of PCD was made because of morphological alterations, in 68.2% secondary changes were seen. In 13.7% material was not feasible for analysis. Mostly defects of dynein arms were detected in PCD (96.8%. In particular defects of the inner arms (51.2% and combined dynein defects (37.6% were found. Total loss of dynein arms was dominant. Only in 3.2% deficiencies of central structures were found alone. Associated situs inversus or dextracardia was reported clinically in 21.4%. Conclusions TEM analysis is possible in most patients and a useful tool for diagnosis of PCD. Functional and genetic analysis should be done additionally. Registers should be installed to collect all available informations and push further research.

  12. Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion Caused by Hyaluronic Acid Injections Into the Forehead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiu Zhuo; Hu, Jun Yan; Wu, Peng Sen; Yu, Sheng Bo; Kikkawa, Don O.; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although cosmetic facial soft tissue fillers are generally safe and effective, improper injections can lead to devastating and irreversible consequences. We represent the first known case of posterior ciliary artery occlusion caused by hyaluronic acid. A 41-year-old female presented with right visual loss 7 hours after receiving cosmetic hyaluronic acid injections into her forehead. Examination revealed no light perception in the right eye and multiple dark ischemic area of injection over the forehead and nose. The right fundus revealed a pink retina with optic nerve edema. Fluorescein angiogram showed several filling defects in the choroidal circulation and late hyperfluorescence in the choroid. A right posterior ciliary artery occlusion and embolic occlusion of facial artery braches was diagnosed. With hyaluronidase injection, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, oral aspirin, oral acetazolamide and dexamethasone venotransfuse treatment, the patient's forehead and nasal skin improved and vision recovered to hand movements. With proper technique, vascular occlusion is rare following facial filler injection. Vision consequences can be severe if filler emboli enter the ocular circulation. Physicians should be aware of this potential side effect, recognize its presentation, and be knowledgeable of effective management. PMID:26986163

  13. Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion Caused by Hyaluronic Acid Injections Into the Forehead: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiu Zhuo; Hu, Jun Yan; Wu, Peng Sen; Yu, Sheng Bo; Kikkawa, Don O; Lu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Although cosmetic facial soft tissue fillers are generally safe and effective, improper injections can lead to devastating and irreversible consequences. We represent the first known case of posterior ciliary artery occlusion caused by hyaluronic acid. A 41-year-old female presented with right visual loss 7 hours after receiving cosmetic hyaluronic acid injections into her forehead. Examination revealed no light perception in the right eye and multiple dark ischemic area of injection over the forehead and nose. The right fundus revealed a pink retina with optic nerve edema. Fluorescein angiogram showed several filling defects in the choroidal circulation and late hyperfluorescence in the choroid. A right posterior ciliary artery occlusion and embolic occlusion of facial artery braches was diagnosed. With hyaluronidase injection, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, oral aspirin, oral acetazolamide and dexamethasone venotransfuse treatment, the patient's forehead and nasal skin improved and vision recovered to hand movements. With proper technique, vascular occlusion is rare following facial filler injection. Vision consequences can be severe if filler emboli enter the ocular circulation. Physicians should be aware of this potential side effect, recognize its presentation, and be knowledgeable of effective management. PMID:26986163

  14. Convergent evolution of RFX transcription factors and ciliary genes predated the origin of metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Nansheng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intraflagellar transport (IFT genes, which are critical for the development and function of cilia and flagella in metazoans, are tightly regulated by the Regulatory Factor X (RFX transcription factors (TFs. However, how and when their evolutionary relationship was established remains unknown. Results We have identified evidence suggesting that RFX TFs and IFT genes evolved independently and their evolution converged before the first appearance of metazoans. Both ciliary genes and RFX TFs exist in all metazoans as well as some unicellular eukaryotes. However, while RFX TFs and IFT genes are found simultaneously in all sequenced metazoan genomes, RFX TFs do not co-exist with IFT genes in most pre-metazoans and thus do not regulate them in these organisms. For example, neither the budding yeast nor the fission yeast possesses cilia although both have well-defined RFX TFs. Conversely, most unicellular eukaryotes, including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, have typical cilia and well conserved IFT genes but lack RFX TFs. Outside of metazoans, RFX TFs and IFT genes co-exist only in choanoflagellates including M. brevicollis, and only one fungus Allomyces macrogynus of the 51 sequenced fungus genomes. M. brevicollis has two putative RFX genes and a full complement of ciliary genes. Conclusions The evolution of RFX TFs and IFT genes were independent in pre-metazoans. We propose that their convergence in evolution, or the acquired transcriptional regulation of IFT genes by RFX TFs, played a pivotal role in the establishment of metazoan.

  15. Ciliary IFT80 balances canonical versus non-canonical hedgehog signalling for osteoblast differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xue; Cao, Jay; He, Xiaoning; Serra, Rosa; Qu, Jun; Cao, Xu; Yang, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) are required for hedgehog (Hh) signalling transduction that is essential for bone development, however, how IFT proteins regulate Hh signalling in osteoblasts (OBs) remains unclear. Here we show that deletion of ciliary IFT80 in OB precursor cells (OPC) in mice results in growth retardation and markedly decreased bone mass with impaired OB differentiation. Loss of IFT80 blocks canonical Hh–Gli signalling via disrupting Smo ciliary localization, but elevates non-canonical Hh–Gαi–RhoA–stress fibre signalling by increasing Smo and Gαi binding. Inhibition of RhoA and ROCK activity partially restores osteogenic differentiation of IFT80-deficient OPCs by inhibiting non-canonical Hh–RhoA–Cofilin/MLC2 signalling. Cytochalasin D, an actin destabilizer, dramatically restores OB differentiation of IFT80-deficient OPCs by disrupting actin stress fibres and promoting cilia formation and Hh–Gli signalling. These findings reveal that IFT80 is required for OB differentiation by balancing between canonical Hh–Gli and non-canonical Hh–Gαi–RhoA pathways and highlight IFT80 as a therapeutic target for craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. PMID:26996322

  16. Genotypic variation in response to salinity in a new sexual germplasm of Cenchrus ciliaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Mariana; Tommasino, Exequiel; Griffa, Sabrina; Ribotta, Andrea; Colomba, Eliana López; Carloni, Edgardo; Grunberg, Karina

    2016-05-01

    As part of a breeding program for new salt-tolerant sexual genotypes of Cenchrus ciliaris L., here we evaluated the salt-stress response of two new sexual hybrids, obtained by controlled crosses, at seedling and germination stages. A seedling hydroponic experiment with 300 mM NaCl was performed and physiological variables and growth components were evaluated. While salt-treated sexual material did not show a decrease in productivity with respect to control plants, a differential response in some physiological characteristics was observed. Sexual hybrid 1-9-1 did not suffer oxidative damage and its proline content did not differ from that of control treatment. By contrast, sexual hybrid 1-7-11 suffered oxidative damage and accumulated proline, maintaining its growth under saline stress. At the germination stage, sexual hybrid 1-9-1 presented the highest Germination Rate Index at the maximum NaCl concentration assayed, suggesting an ecological advantage in this genotype. These new sexual resources are promising maternal parental with differential response to salt and could be incorporated in a breeding program of C. ciliaris in the search of new genotypes tolerant to salinity. PMID:26906150

  17. C2 Domains as Protein-Protein Interaction Modules in the Ciliary Transition Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Remans

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RPGR-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1 is mutated in the eye disease Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA and its structural homolog, RPGRIP1-like (RPGRIP1L, is mutated in many different ciliopathies. Both are multidomain proteins that are predicted to interact with retinitis pigmentosa G-protein regulator (RPGR. RPGR is mutated in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and is located in photoreceptors and primary cilia. We solved the crystal structure of the complex between the RPGR-interacting domain (RID of RPGRIP1 and RPGR and demonstrate that RPGRIP1L binds to RPGR similarly. RPGRIP1 binding to RPGR affects the interaction with PDEδ, the cargo shuttling factor for prenylated ciliary proteins. RPGRIP1-RID is a C2 domain with a canonical β sandwich structure that does not bind Ca2+ and/or phospholipids and thus constitutes a unique type of protein-protein interaction module. Judging from the large number of C2 domains in most of the ciliary transition zone proteins identified thus far, the structure presented here seems to constitute a cilia-specific module that is present in multiprotein transition zone complexes.

  18. Characterization of specific binding sites for PAF in the iris and ciliary body of rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protective effect exerted by BN 52021 a specific PAF-receptor antagonist in experimentally induced ocular inflammatory disorders led us to investigate the possible presence of specific receptors for PAF in rabbit iris and ciliary body. Two classes of PAF binding sites were found in isolated iris and ciliary process of pigmented rabbit eyes: a high affinity site Kd1 congruent to 4.9 +/- 0.47 nM, Bmax1 congruent to 3.17 +/- 0.50 pmoles/mg protein, a low affinity sites Kd2 congruent to 11.6 +/- 0.33 nM, Bmax2 congruent to 12.46 +/- 2.3 pmoles/mg protein for iris. The specific binding was not affected by lyso-PAF the biologically inactive precursor and metabolite of PAF, up to 10(-6) M; inhibition by unlabelled PAF demonstrated a biphasic curve partially antagonized by BN 52021. The present results demonstrate the presence of specific binding sites for PAF in rabbit eyes which could mediate the action of this mediator in eye inflammatory processes and explain the protective effect observed with BN 52021

  19. Is the Blazhko effect the beating of a near-resonant double-mode pulsation?

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, Paul H

    2014-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that the Blazhko Effect may result from a near-resonant type of double-mode pulsation, where two periodic oscillations with slightly different frequencies gradually slip in phase by one pulsation cycle every Blazhko cycle, producing a beat frequency type of modulation. One of the oscillations is strongly non-sinusoidal while the other is not. This paper extends previous work on this hypothesis by developing a simple model that can accurately reproduce several important features found in Kepler data for RR Lyr, including the pulsation waveform, the upper and lower Blazhko envelope functions and the motion, disappearance and reappearance of the bump feature. This model is consistent with the fact that the triplet peaks in the spectra for most RR Lyrae stars have a larger peak on the higher frequency side. The current model is related to the hybrid mode model described in a previous paper. The motion and disappearance of the bump feature are shown to be an illusion, just an artifact of ...

  20. Simple signal-to-signal beat interference cancellation receiver based on balanced detection for a single-sideband optical OFDM signal with a reduced guard band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianxin

    2013-11-01

    A simple signal-to-signal beat interference cancellation receiver based on balanced detection (ICRBD) with an interleaver, a 2×2 three-decibel optical coupler, and a balanced photodiode pair is proposed for a single-sideband optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (SSB-OOFDM) signal with a reduced guard band (GB). Simulation demonstration of the ICRBD for a 40 Gbit/s 16-QAM SSB-OOFDM signal with a reduced GB was achieved successfully. PMID:24177087

  1. Dynamic curvature regulation accounts for the symmetric and asymmetric beats of Chlamydomonas flagella

    CERN Document Server

    Sartori, Pablo; Scholich, Andre; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2015-01-01

    Axonemal dyneins are the molecular motors responsible for the beating of cilia and flagella. These motors generate sliding forces between adjacent microtubule doublets within the axoneme, the motile cytoskeletal structure inside the flagellum. To create regular, oscillatory beating patterns, the activities of the axonemal dyneins must be coordinated both spatially and temporally. It is thought that coordination is mediated by stresses or strains that build up within the moving axoneme, but it is not known which components of stress or strain are involved, nor how they feed back on the dyneins. To answer this question, we used isolated, reactivate axonemes of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas as a model system. We derived a theory for beat regulation in a two-dimensional model of the axoneme. We then tested the theory by measuring the beat waveforms of wild type axonemes, which have asymmetric beats, and mutant axonemes, in which the beat is nearly symmetric, using high-precision spatial and temporal imaging....

  2. Individual differences in beat perception affect gait responses to low- and high-groove music.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ann eLeow

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Slowed gait in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients can be improved when patients synchronize footsteps to isochronous metronome cues, but limited retention of such improvements suggest that permanent cueing regimes are needed for long-term improvements. If so, music might make permanent cueing regimes more pleasant, improving adherence; however, music cueing requires patients to synchronize movements to the beat, which might be difficult for PD patients who tend to show weak beat perception. One solution may be to use high groove music, which has high beat salience that may facilitate synchronization, and affective properties which may improve motivation to move. As a first step in understanding how beat perception affects gait in complex neurological disorders, we examined how beat perception ability affected gait in neurotypical adults. Synchronization performance and gait parameters were assessed as healthy young adults with strong or weak beat perception synchronized to low groove music, high groove music, and metronome cues. High groove music was predicted to elicit better synchronization than low groove music, due to its higher beat salience. Two musical tempi, or rates, were used: (1 preferred tempo: beat rate matched to preferred step rate and (2 faster tempo: beat rate adjusted to 22.5% faster than preferred step rate. For both strong and weak beat-perceivers, synchronization performance was best with metronome cues, followed by high groove music, and worst with low groove music. In addition, high groove music elicited longer and faster steps than low groove music, both at preferred tempo and at faster tempo. Low groove music was particularly detrimental to gait in weak beat-perceivers, who showed slower and shorter steps compared to uncued walking. The findings show that individual differences in beat perception affect gait when synchronizing footsteps to music, and have implications for using music in gait rehabilitation.

  3. Individual differences in beat perception affect gait responses to low- and high-groove music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Li-Ann; Parrott, Taylor; Grahn, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    Slowed gait in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) can be improved when patients synchronize footsteps to isochronous metronome cues, but limited retention of such improvements suggest that permanent cueing regimes are needed for long-term improvements. If so, music might make permanent cueing regimes more pleasant, improving adherence; however, music cueing requires patients to synchronize movements to the "beat," which might be difficult for patients with PD who tend to show weak beat perception. One solution may be to use high-groove music, which has high beat salience that may facilitate synchronization, and affective properties, which may improve motivation to move. As a first step to understanding how beat perception affects gait in complex neurological disorders, we examined how beat perception ability affected gait in neurotypical adults. Synchronization performance and gait parameters were assessed as healthy young adults with strong or weak beat perception synchronized to low-groove music, high-groove music, and metronome cues. High-groove music was predicted to elicit better synchronization than low-groove music, due to its higher beat salience. Two musical tempi, or rates, were used: (1) preferred tempo: beat rate matched to preferred step rate and (2) faster tempo: beat rate adjusted to 22.5% faster than preferred step rate. For both strong and weak beat-perceivers, synchronization performance was best with metronome cues, followed by high-groove music, and worst with low-groove music. In addition, high-groove music elicited longer and faster steps than low-groove music, both at preferred tempo and at faster tempo. Low-groove music was particularly detrimental to gait in weak beat-perceivers, who showed slower and shorter steps compared to uncued walking. The findings show that individual differences in beat perception affect gait when synchronizing footsteps to music, and have implications for using music in gait rehabilitation. PMID:25374521

  4. A High-Density EEG Investigation into Steady State Binaural Beat Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Goodin, Peter; Ciorciari, Joseph; Baker, Kate; Carrey, Anne-Marie; Harper, Michelle; Kaufman, Jordy

    2012-01-01

    Binaural beats are an auditory phenomenon that has been suggested to alter physiological and cognitive processes including vigilance and brainwave entrainment. Some personality traits measured by the NEO Five Factor Model have been found to alter entrainment using pulsing light stimuli, but as yet no studies have examined if this occurs using steady state presentation of binaural beats for a relatively short presentation of two minutes. This study aimed to examine if binaural beat stimulation...

  5. Matrix Organisation : The design of cross-beat teamwork in newsrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Grubenmann, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Confronted by increased internal and external complexity, traditional forms of newswork have reached their limits. Journalistic start-ups, such as Quartz and NZZ.at, form emerging editorial teams around "obsessions" or "phenomena" to gain cross-beat perspectives of complex issues such as climate change, the financial crisis or the refugee crisis. Legacy media experimenting with cross-beat newswork see themselves confronted by challenges arising predominantly from beat structures. Consequently...

  6. Different Rebellions--The and the Angry Beat Generation Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧国芳

    2012-01-01

    The Beat Generation (BG) and the Angry Man (AYM) both emerged after the Second World War. Thus, the misunderstanding of the two has existed for a long time. Large quantities of people called the BG the American Angry Young Man. Undoubtedly, the two resembled each other to some extent. However, the BG and the AYM can't be treated alike, for their differences far outweighed their similarities. This paper aims to analyze their differences in many aspects like the national environment and their memberships, which consequently led to other differences such as the differences in essences, features, influence and finale.

  7. Beating of Coupled Ultraviolet Light Modes in Zinc Oxide Nanoresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, M.; Feneberg, M.; Prinz, G. M.; Reiser, A.; Röder, T.; Thonke, K.; Sauer, R.

    2009-02-01

    Periodic spatial intensity modulations of near-band-gap luminescence light at 3.36 eV photon energy are reported in nanometer-sized resonators of single zinc oxide nanorods. These modulations are observed when the luminescence light, due to excitonic recombination, is excited by a focused low-energy electron beam scanned along the rods. The acceleration energy of only 2 keV allows for a spatial resolution of a few ten nanometers. Numerical calculations based on the theory of dielectric cylindrical waveguides are performed identifying the intensity modulations as beating patterns of coupled TE01 and TM01 modes in the nanoresonator.

  8. Space-Time Localization and Registration on the Beating Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Nathan A.; Waugh, Kevin; Liu, Tian Yu Tommy; Zenati, Marco A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for localizing a miniature epicardial crawling robot, HeartLander, on the beating heart using only 6-degree-of-freedom position measurements from an electromagnetic position tracker and a dynamic surface model of the heart. Using only this information, motion and observation models of the system are developed such that a particle filter can accurately estimate not only the location of the robot on the surface of the heart, but also the pose of the heart in the ...

  9. Modulation of attosecond beating by resonant two-photon transition

    CERN Document Server

    Galán, Álvaro Jiménez; Martín, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical model that characterizes two-photon transitions in the presence of autoionising states. We applied this model to interpret resonant RABITT spectra, and show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, the phase of the sideband beating significantly varies with photon energy. This phase variation is generally very different from the $\\pi$ jump observed in previous works, in which the direct path contribution was negligible. We illustrate the possible phase profiles arising in resonant two-photon transitions with an intuitive geometrical representation.

  10. Modulation of Attosecond Beating by Resonant Two-Photon Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez Galán, Álvaro; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    We present an analytical model that characterizes two-photon transitions in the presence of autoionising states. We applied this model to interpret resonant RABITT spectra, and show that, as a harmonic traverses a resonance, the phase of the sideband beating significantly varies with photon energy. This phase variation is generally very different from the π jump observed in previous works, in which the direct path contribution was negligible. We illustrate the possible phase profiles arising in resonant two-photon transitions with an intuitive geometrical representation.

  11. Can compressed sensing beat the Nyquist sampling rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Yaroslavsky, L

    2015-01-01

    Data saving capability of "Compressed sensing (sampling)" in signal discretization is disputed and found to be far below the theoretical upper bound defined by the signal sparsity. On a simple and intuitive example, it is demonstrated that, in a realistic scenario for signals that are believed to be sparse, one can achieve a substantially larger saving than compressing sensing can. It is also shown that frequent assertions in the literature that "Compressed sensing" can beat the Nyquist sampling approach are misleading substitution of terms and are rooted in misinterpretation of the sampling theory.

  12. Run to the Beat: Sport and music for the masses

    OpenAIRE

    Karageorghis, CI

    2013-01-01

    Run to the Beat is a half marathon event that is accompanied by live and pre-recorded music. The author was involved with the event as the lead consultant in the period 2007-2010. This case study examines the genesis of the event, the science on which it was predicated and how it was received by participating runners and the media. The primary driver for the event was the 2007 ban on personal listening devices by the International Amateur Athletics Federation, which outraged recreational runn...

  13. Enhanced Timing Abilities in Percussionists Generalize to Rhythms Without a Musical Beat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cameron

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to entrain movements to music is arguably universal, but it is unclear how specialized training may influence this. Previous research suggests that percussionists have superior temporal precision in perception and production tasks. Such superiority may be limited to temporal sequences that resemble real music or, alternatively, may generalize to musically implausible sequences. To test this, percussionists and nonpercussionists completed two tasks that used rhythmic sequences varying in musical plausibility. In the beat tapping task, participants tapped with the beat of a rhythmic sequence over 3 stages: finding the beat (as an initial sequence played, continuation of the beat (as a second sequence was introduced and played simultaneously, and switching to a second beat (the initial sequence finished, leaving only the second. The metres of the two sequences were either congruent or incongruent, as were their tempi (minimum inter-onset intervals. In the rhythm reproduction task, participants reproduced rhythms of four types, ranging from high to low musical plausibility: Metric simple rhythms induced a strong sense of the beat, metric complex rhythms induced a weaker sense of the beat, nonmetric rhythms had no beat, and jittered nonmetric rhythms also had no beat as well as low temporal predictability. For both tasks, percussionists performed more accurately than nonpercussionists. In addition, both groups were better with musically plausible than implausible conditions. Overall, the percussionists’ superior abilities to entrain to, and reproduce, rhythms generalized to musically implausible sequences.

  14. Enhanced timing abilities in percussionists generalize to rhythms without a musical beat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J.; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to entrain movements to music is arguably universal, but it is unclear how specialized training may influence this. Previous research suggests that percussionists have superior temporal precision in perception and production tasks. Such superiority may be limited to temporal sequences that resemble real music or, alternatively, may generalize to musically implausible sequences. To test this, percussionists and nonpercussionists completed two tasks that used rhythmic sequences varying in musical plausibility. In the beat tapping task, participants tapped with the beat of a rhythmic sequence over 3 stages: finding the beat (as an initial sequence played), continuation of the beat (as a second sequence was introduced and played simultaneously), and switching to a second beat (the initial sequence finished, leaving only the second). The meters of the two sequences were either congruent or incongruent, as were their tempi (minimum inter-onset intervals). In the rhythm reproduction task, participants reproduced rhythms of four types, ranging from high to low musical plausibility: Metric simple rhythms induced a strong sense of the beat, metric complex rhythms induced a weaker sense of the beat, nonmetric rhythms had no beat, and jittered nonmetric rhythms also had no beat as well as low temporal predictability. For both tasks, percussionists performed more accurately than nonpercussionists. In addition, both groups were better with musically plausible than implausible conditions. Overall, the percussionists' superior abilities to entrain to, and reproduce, rhythms generalized to musically implausible sequences. PMID:25540617

  15. Regulation of protein phosphorylation of the intermediate-sized filament vimentin in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intermediate-sized filaments of vimentin-type (Mr = 57,000) have been identified biochemically and immunochemically as a major cytoskeleton component in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye. When human or rabbit ciliary processes, or cultured ciliary epithelial-derived cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing [32P]orthophosphate and any of the following agents: 1) beta-adrenergic agonists (isoproterenol or epinephrine), 2) direct activators of adenylate cyclase (cholera toxin or forskolin), 3) analogs of cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP), or 4) prostaglandin E1, the phosphorylation of vimentin was significantly enhanced. The maximal enhancement ranged, in vivo and in vitro, from about 3-fold in human to 5-fold in rabbit, with either 1 mM 8-Br-cAMP or 0.1 microM forskolin. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-vimentin, allowed the localization of vimentin filaments in cultured ciliary epithelial cells. Treatment of these cells in culture with the catecholamine hormone, isoproterenol (1 microM), resulted in a profound reorganization of vimentin filaments. This may be correlated with the enhanced levels of phosphorylated vimentin observed upon increasing cellular cyclic AMP

  16. Codon optimization and factorial screening for enhanced soluble expression of human ciliary neurotrophic factor in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Itkonen, Jaakko M; Urtti, Arto; Bird, Louise E.; Sarkhel, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Neurotrophic factors influence survival, differentiation, proliferation and death of neuronal cells within the central nervous system. Human ciliary neurotrophic factor (hCNTF) has neuroprotective properties and is also known to influence energy balance. Consequently, hCNTF has potential therapeutic applications in neurodegenerative, obesity and diabetes relat...

  17. Efficient heart beat detection using embedded system electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Oh, Sechang; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2014-04-01

    The present day bio-technical field concentrates on developing various types of innovative ambulatory and wearable devices to monitor several bio-physical, physio-pathological, bio-electrical and bio-potential factors to assess a human body's health condition without intruding quotidian activities. One of the most important aspects of this evolving technology is monitoring heart beat rate and electrocardiogram (ECG) from which many other subsidiary results can be derived. Conventionally, the devices and systems consumes a lot of power since the acquired signals are always processed on the receiver end. Because of this back end processing, the unprocessed raw data is transmitted resulting in usage of more power, memory and processing time. This paper proposes an innovative technique where the acquired signals are processed by a microcontroller in the front end of the module and just the processed signal is then transmitted wirelessly to the display unit. Therefore, power consumption is considerably reduced and clearer data analysis is performed within the module. This also avoids the need for the user to be educated about usage of the device and signal/system analysis, since only the number of heart beats will displayed at the user end. Additionally, the proposed concept also eradicates the other disadvantages like obtrusiveness, high power consumption and size. To demonstrate the above said factors, a commercial controller board was used to extend the monitoring method by using the saved ECG data from a computer.

  18. Stimulated Brillouin side-scattering of the beat wave excited by two counter-propagating X-mode lasers in magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Kanika; Sajal, Vivek, E-mail: vsajal@rediffmail.com; Kumar, Ravindra; Sharma, Navneet K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science and Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Noida 201307, Uttar Pradesh (India); Baliyan, Sweta [Department of Physics, Maitreyi College, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110021 (India)

    2015-06-15

    The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of nonresonant beat mode in the presence of static magnetic field is investigated in a plasma. Two counter-propagating lasers of frequencies (ω{sub 1} and ω{sub 2}) and wave vectors (k{sub 1} and k{sub 2}) drive a nonresonant space charge beat mode at the phase matching condition of frequency ω{sub 0}≈ω{sub 1}∼ω{sub 2} and wave number k{sup →}{sub 0}≈k{sup →}{sub 1}+k{sup →}{sub 2}. The driver wave parametrically excites a pair of ion acoustic wave (ω,k{sup →}) and a sideband electromagnetic wave (ω{sub 3},k{sup →}{sub 3}). The beat wave couples with the sideband electromagnetic wave to exert a nonlinear ponderomotive force at the frequency of ion acoustic wave. Density perturbations due to ion acoustic wave and ponderomotive force couple with the oscillatory motion of plasma electron due to velocity of beat wave to give rise to a nonlinear current (by feedback mechanism) responsible for the growth of sideband wave at resonance. The growth rate of SBS was reduced (from ∼10{sup 12}s{sup −1} to 10{sup 10}s{sup −1}) by applying a transverse static magnetic field ∼90 T. The present study can be useful for the excitation of fast plasma waves (for the purpose of electron acceleration) by two counter-propagating laser beams.

  19. The role of the basal ganglia in beat perception: neuroimaging and neuropsychological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Jessica A

    2009-07-01

    Perception of musical rhythms is culturally universal. Despite this special status, relatively little is known about the neurobiology of rhythm perception, particularly with respect to beat processing. Findings are presented here from a series of studies that have specifically examined the neural basis of beat perception, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and studying patients with Parkinson's disease. fMRI data indicate that novel beat-based sequences robustly activate the basal ganglia when compared to irregular, nonbeat sequences. Furthermore, although most healthy participants find it much easier to discriminate changes in beat-based sequences compared to irregular sequences, Parkinson's disease patients fail to show the same degree of benefit. Taken together, these data suggest that the basal ganglia are performing a crucial function in beat processing. The results of an additional fMRI study indicate that the role of the basal ganglia is strongly linked to internal generation of the beat. Basal ganglia activity is greater when participants listen to rhythms in which internal generation of the beat is required, as opposed to rhythms with strongly externally cued beats. Functional connectivity between part of the basal ganglia (the putamen) and cortical motor areas (premotor and supplementary motor areas) is also higher during perception of beat rhythms compared to nonbeat rhythms. Increased connectivity between cortical motor and auditory areas is found in those with musical training. The findings from these converging methods strongly implicate the basal ganglia in processing a regular beat, particularly when internal generation of the beat is required. PMID:19673753

  20. The behaviour of both Listeria monocytogenes and rat ciliated ependymal cells is altered during their co-culture

    OpenAIRE

    Fadaee-Shohada, Mina J.; Hirst, Robert A; Andrew Rutman; Roberts, Ian S.; Chris O'Callaghan; Andrew, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ciliated ependymal cells line the cerebral ventricles and aqueducts separating the infected CSF from the brain parenchyma in meningitis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Investigation of the interaction of Listeria monocytogenes with cultured rat brain ependymal cells showed that certain strains reduced the beat frequency of the cilia but all the strains studied significantly reduced the ciliary beat amplitude (the linear distance travelled by the tip of each cilium per beat cycle). CONCLUSION...

  1. Proton-beam irradiated epithelioid cell melanoma of the ciliary body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A malignant ciliary body melanoma received proton-beam irradiation. After an apparent failure of the tumor to respond, the eye was enucleated. A predominantly epithelioid cell tumor appeared viable by light microscopy, and a low degree of mitotic activity persisted, despite therapy. The tumor cells, however, displayed degenerative changes ultrastructurally, presumably results of the radiotherapy. These consisted of numerous cytoskeletal filaments, lipid vacuoles, prominent phagolysosomes, and nuclear convolutions and fragmentations. The mitochondria were fewer in number in the present tumor than typically encountered in epithelioid cells. A rare leptomeric structure was discovered, probably an organizational modification of the cytoplasmic filaments. The tumor's capillaries showed radiation-induced changes in terms of thickened basement membranes and perivascular fibrin deposition. The foregoing features are indicative of cellular and metabolic injury from the radiotherapy, but these were evidently not sufficiently injurious to sterilize the tumor

  2. Choice of nasal nitric oxide technique as first-line test for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, J K; Nielsen, K G

    2011-01-01

    Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) has a well-known potential as an indirect discriminative marker between patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and healthy subjects, but real-life experience and usefulness in young children is sparsely reported. Three nNO sampling methods were examined and compared...... as first-line tests for PCD. Healthy subjects, confirmed PCDs, consecutive referrals with PCD-like symptoms and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) had nNO sampled during breath hold (BH-nNO), oral exhalation against resistance (OE-R-nNO) and tidal breathing (TB-nNO) aiming to expand age range into...... infancy. 282 subjects, 117 consecutive referrals, 59 PCDs, 49 CF patients and 57 healthy subjects, were included. All methods separated significantly between PCD and non-PCD, including CF with reliability, in ranking order BH-nNO>OE-R-nNO>TB-nNO. Acceptability in children ranked in reverse order. A...

  3. The presence of synaptic and chromosome disjunction mutants in Cenchrus ciliaris (Poaceae: Paniceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Visser

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic mutants are present in  Cenchrus ciliaris L This species, due to the presence of linear bivalents and occasion­al trivalents and quadrivalents, is an intermediate desynaptic species. In addition, geographical distribution and environmental factors, such as high temperatures and low humidity, could also have had an influence on the desynapsis observed.The disjunction of chromosomes during anaphase I was mostly abnormal in this desynaptic species. Precocious disjunction of chromosomes into chromatids occurred during anaphase I Due to the high incidence of this chromosome abnormality, a mutant gene,  'pc'  responsible for the disjunction of chromosomes, must be present. The absence of cytokinesis in one specimen indicates a recessive mutant gene,  'va' to be active in this species.

  4. The isolated ciliary bilayer is useful for studies of aqueous humor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, M L; Yamada, E; Cummins, D; Mori, N; Mead, A; Murakami, M

    1991-01-01

    An intact ciliary epithelial bilayer has been isolated from the rabbit eye by perfusion, microsurgical dissection, and recovery techniques. Vital subcellular organelles and intercellular junctions of this epithelial bilayer preparation are very well preserved. The total electrical resistance of the epithelial bilayer is 350 ohms, and the transepithelial potential is 650 microV, nonpigmented epithelium side negative. The electrical resistance is reduced by 0.2 mM EGTA and the transepithelial potential reduced by 0.1 mM ouabain. Bicarbonate depletion at a constant pH of 7.4 rapidly and significantly reduces the transepithelial potential. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors decrease transmembrane potential by as much as 30%. These morphologic and physiologic experiments authenticate the validity of this bilayered epithelial preparation for future use in detailed studies of the mechanism of aqueous humor formation. PMID:1808804

  5. Beat sampling accuracy in estimating spruce spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae) populations and injury on juniper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, Paula M; Hardin, Mark R

    2004-08-01

    The use of a standardized beat sampling method for estimating spruce spider mite, Oligonychus ununguis (Jacobi) (Acari: Tetranychidae), densities on a widely used evergreen ornamental plant species, Juniperus chinensis variety 'Sargentii' A. Henry (Cupressaceae), was examined. There was a significant positive relationship between total spruce spider mite densities and spider mite densities from beat sampling on juniper. The slope and intercept of the relationship may be used by pest managers to predict total spider mite densities on plants from beat sample counts. Beat sampling dramatically underestimates the total number of spider mites on a foliage sample. The relationships between spruce spider mite feeding injury and spider mite density estimates from beat sampling juniper foliage and total spider mite counts on foliage were also examined. There was a significant positive relationship between spruce spider mite density as estimated from beat sampling and injury to the plants. There was a similar positive relationship between the total number of spruce spider mites and injury to the plants, suggesting that a pest manager could use beat sampling counts to estimate plant injury and related thresholds. These findings have important implications to decision-making for spruce spider mite control, especially as it relates to threshold levels and determining rates of predator releases. Further assessment of the effectiveness of beat and other sampling methods across multiple spider mite- host plant associations needs to be examined to enable pest managers to select sampling plans that are feasible and reliable. PMID:15384359

  6. 77 FR 17060 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge... years, announces the launch of the Beat Down Blood Pressure Video Challenge. This challenge is an open... consumer e-health tools to manage high blood pressure. Health care providers are also encouraged to...

  7. 77 FR 19015 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Beat Down Blood Pressure Challenge... Health and Human Services (HHS) published a notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 17060) announcing requirements and registration for a Beat Down Blood Pressure Video Challenge. This challenge will not be...

  8. Keeping the Beat: A Large Sample Study of Bouncing and Clapping to Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchant, Pauline; Vuvan, Dominique T.; Peretz, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of humans move in time with a musical beat. This behaviour has been mostly studied through finger-tapping synchronization. Here, we evaluate naturalistic synchronization responses to music–bouncing and clapping–in 100 university students. Their ability to match the period of their bounces and claps to those of a metronome and musical clips varying in beat saliency was assessed. In general, clapping was better synchronized with the beat than bouncing, suggesting that the choice of a specific movement type is an important factor to consider in the study of sensorimotor synchronization processes. Performance improved as a function of beat saliency, indicating that beat abstraction plays a significant role in synchronization. Fourteen percent of the population exhibited marked difficulties with matching the beat. Yet, at a group level, poor synchronizers showed similar sensitivity to movement type and beat saliency as normal synchronizers. These results suggest the presence of quantitative rather than qualitative variations when losing the beat. PMID:27471854

  9. Beat processing is pre-attentive for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents: an ERP study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur L Bouwer

    Full Text Available The perception of a regular beat is fundamental to music processing. Here we examine whether the detection of a regular beat is pre-attentive for metrically simple, acoustically varying stimuli using the mismatch negativity (MMN, an ERP response elicited by violations of acoustic regularity irrespective of whether subjects are attending to the stimuli. Both musicians and non-musicians were presented with a varying rhythm with a clear accent structure in which occasionally a sound was omitted. We compared the MMN response to the omission of identical sounds in different metrical positions. Most importantly, we found that omissions in strong metrical positions, on the beat, elicited higher amplitude MMN responses than omissions in weak metrical positions, not on the beat. This suggests that the detection of a beat is pre-attentive when highly beat inducing stimuli are used. No effects of musical expertise were found. Our results suggest that for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents beat processing does not require attention or musical expertise. In addition, we discuss how the use of acoustically varying stimuli may influence ERP results when studying beat processing.

  10. Beat processing is pre-attentive for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, Fleur L; Van Zuijen, Titia L; Honing, Henkjan

    2014-01-01

    The perception of a regular beat is fundamental to music processing. Here we examine whether the detection of a regular beat is pre-attentive for metrically simple, acoustically varying stimuli using the mismatch negativity (MMN), an ERP response elicited by violations of acoustic regularity irrespective of whether subjects are attending to the stimuli. Both musicians and non-musicians were presented with a varying rhythm with a clear accent structure in which occasionally a sound was omitted. We compared the MMN response to the omission of identical sounds in different metrical positions. Most importantly, we found that omissions in strong metrical positions, on the beat, elicited higher amplitude MMN responses than omissions in weak metrical positions, not on the beat. This suggests that the detection of a beat is pre-attentive when highly beat inducing stimuli are used. No effects of musical expertise were found. Our results suggest that for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents beat processing does not require attention or musical expertise. In addition, we discuss how the use of acoustically varying stimuli may influence ERP results when studying beat processing. PMID:24870123

  11. Beat processing is pre-attentive for metrically simple rhythms with clear accents: An ERP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.L. Bouwer; T.L. van Zuijen; H. Honing

    2014-01-01

    The perception of a regular beat is fundamental to music processing. Here we examine whether the detection of a regular beat is pre-attentive for metrically simple, acoustically varying stimuli using the mismatch negativity (MMN), an ERP response elicited by violations of acoustic regularity irrespe

  12. Effects of ouabain and furosemide on transepithelial electrical parameters of the isolated shark ciliary epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederholt, M; Zadunaisky, J A

    1987-08-01

    Sections of the ciliary epithelium of adult sharks (Squalus acanthias) were mounted in Ussing-type chambers (area 0.2 cm2) for measurements of transepithelial potential difference (PD), short circuit current (SCC) and calculation of transepithelial resistance (R). In 15 preparations PD was aqueous side negative (-0.51 +/- 0.12 mV; SCC 18.3 +/- 2.5 microA cm-2; R 30.7 +/- 3.1 Ohm cm2). However, in 15 other preparations incubated in identical Ringer's solution PD was aqueous side positive (0.53 +/- 0.09 mV; SCC -19.6 +/- 2.3 microA cm-2; R 27.9 +/- 2.8 Ohm cm2). 10(-5) M ouabain or 10(-4) M furosemide were applied either to the aqueous or blood side of the isolated ciliary epithelium at transepithelial negative or positive PD. When the transepithelial PD was positive on the aqueous side ouabain decreased PD and SCC within 15 to 45 min. When the spontaneous PD was negative both PD and SCC decreased when ouabain was applied to the blood side. When the drug was given to the aqueous side a biphasic response (first stimulation, then inhibition) of PD and SCC was observed. Furosemide when given to the blood side (with aqueous side PD positive) or to the aqueous side (with aqueous side PD negative) decreased PD and SCC. However, a transient stimulation of both electrical parameters was observed when furosemide was applied to either the blood side (with aqueous side PD negative) or to the aqueous side (with aqueous side PD positive). The polarity and magnitude of PD and SCC probably depend on the relative activity of sodium and chloride pumps across the cell membranes of the non-pigmented and/or pigmented cell layer. However, additional transport mechanisms cannot be excluded. PMID:3038770

  13. DNAH6 and Its Interactions with PCD Genes in Heterotaxy and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Yagi, Hisato; Onuoha, Ezenwa Obi; Damerla, Rama Rao; Francis, Richard; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Tariq, Muhammad; King, Stephen M; Hendricks, Gregory; Cui, Cheng; Saydmohammed, Manush; Lee, Dong Min; Zahid, Maliha; Sami, Iman; Leatherbury, Linda; Pazour, Gregory J; Ware, Stephanie M; Nakanishi, Toshio; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Tsang, Michael; Lo, Cecilia W

    2016-02-01

    Heterotaxy, a birth defect involving left-right patterning defects, and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a sinopulmonary disease with dyskinetic/immotile cilia in the airway are seemingly disparate diseases. However, they have an overlapping genetic etiology involving mutations in cilia genes, a reflection of the common requirement for motile cilia in left-right patterning and airway clearance. While PCD is a monogenic recessive disorder, heterotaxy has a more complex, largely non-monogenic etiology. In this study, we show mutations in the novel dynein gene DNAH6 can cause heterotaxy and ciliary dysfunction similar to PCD. We provide the first evidence that trans-heterozygous interactions between DNAH6 and other PCD genes potentially can cause heterotaxy. DNAH6 was initially identified as a candidate heterotaxy/PCD gene by filtering exome-sequencing data from 25 heterotaxy patients stratified by whether they have airway motile cilia defects. dnah6 morpholino knockdown in zebrafish disrupted motile cilia in Kupffer's vesicle required for left-right patterning and caused heterotaxy with abnormal cardiac/gut looping. Similarly DNAH6 shRNA knockdown disrupted motile cilia in human and mouse respiratory epithelia. Notably a heterotaxy patient harboring heterozygous DNAH6 mutation was identified to also carry a rare heterozygous PCD-causing DNAI1 mutation, suggesting a DNAH6/DNAI1 trans-heterozygous interaction. Furthermore, sequencing of 149 additional heterotaxy patients showed 5 of 6 patients with heterozygous DNAH6 mutations also had heterozygous mutations in DNAH5 or other PCD genes. We functionally assayed for DNAH6/DNAH5 and DNAH6/DNAI1 trans-heterozygous interactions using subthreshold double-morpholino knockdown in zebrafish and showed this caused heterotaxy. Similarly, subthreshold siRNA knockdown of Dnah6 in heterozygous Dnah5 or Dnai1 mutant mouse respiratory epithelia disrupted motile cilia function. Together, these findings support an oligogenic disease

  14. The steady-state response of the cerebral cortex to the beat of music reflects both the comprehension of music and attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eMeltzer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The brain's analyses of speech and music share a range of neural resources and mechanisms. Music displays a temporal structure of complexity similar to that of speech, unfolds over comparable timescales, and elicits cognitive demands in tasks involving comprehension and attention. During speech processing, synchronized neural activity of the cerebral cortex in the delta and theta frequency bands tracks the envelope of a speech signal, and this neural activity is modulated by high-level cortical functions such as speech comprehension and attention. It remains unclear, however, whether the cortex also responds to the natural rhythmic structure of music and how the response, if present, is influenced by higher cognitive processes. Here we employ electroencephalography (EEG to show that the cortex responds to the beat of music and that this steady-state response reflects musical comprehension and attention. We show that the cortical response to the beat is weaker when subjects listen to a familiar tune than when they listen to an unfamiliar, nonsensical musical piece. Furthermore, we show that in a task of intermodal attention there is a larger neural response at the beat frequency when subjects attend to a musical stimulus than when they ignore the auditory signal and instead focus on a visual one. Our findings may be applied in clinical assessments of auditory processing and music cognition as well as in the construction of auditory brain-machine interfaces.

  15. Amusic does not mean unmusical: beat perception and synchronization ability despite pitch deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Silver, Jessica; Toiviainen, Petri; Gosselin, Nathalie; Peretz, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Pitch deafness, the most commonly known form of congenital amusia, refers to a severe deficit in musical pitch processing (i.e., melody discrimination and recognition) that can leave time processing--including rhythm, metre, and "feeling the beat"--preserved. In Experiment 1, we show that by presenting musical excerpts in nonpitched drum timbres, rather than pitched piano tones, amusics show normal metre recognition. Experiment 2 reveals that body movement influences amusics' interpretation of the beat of an ambiguous drum rhythm. Experiment 3 and a subsequent exploratory study show an ability to synchronize movement to the beat of popular dance music and potential for improvement when given a modest amount of practice. Together the present results are consistent with the idea that rhythm and beat processing are spared in pitch deafness--that is, being pitch-deaf does not mean one is beat-deaf. In the context of drum music especially, amusics can be musical. PMID:24344816

  16. A new beat interference cancellation receiver with 3×3 optical coupler for the SSB-OOFDM signal with reduced guard band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Ma, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to implement beat interference cancellation receiver (BICR) for single-sideband optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (SSB-OOFDM) signal, which improves the spectral efficiency (SE) by reducing the guard band (GB) between the optical carrier and the OOFDM signal while mitigating the impact of signal-signal beat interference (SSBI). This BICR structure is relatively simple using only an optical interleaver (IL), a 3×3 optical coupler (OC) and three photodiodes (PDs). A system simulation for the 40 Gbit/s 16-QAM SSB-OOFDM signal with the reduced GB is carried out to prove the feasibility of this new scheme. The simulation results show that our proposed BICR has a better performance to suppress SSBI and a higher SE than the conventional direct-detection receiver (CDDR) according to the EVMs and the constellations.

  17. Dual-etalon cavity ring-down frequency-comb spectroscopy with broad band light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    In an embodiment, a dual-etalon cavity-ring-down frequency-comb spectrometer system is described. A broad band light source is split into two beams. One beam travels through a first etalon and a sample under test, while the other beam travels through a second etalon, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges ("FSR") of the two etalons are not identical, the interference pattern at the detector will consist of a series of beat frequencies. By monitoring these beat frequencies, optical frequencies where light is absorbed may be determined.

  18. Synchronization using environmental coupling in mercury beating heart oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Tanu; Montoya, Fernando; Rivera, M.; Tajima, Shunsuke; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Parmananda, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report synchronization of Mercury Beating Heart (MBH) oscillators using the environmental coupling mechanism. This mechanism involves interaction of the oscillators with a common medium/environment such that the oscillators do not interact among themselves. In the present work, we chose a modified MBH system as the common environment. In the absence of coupling, this modified system does not exhibit self sustained oscillations. It was observed that, as a result of the coupling of the MBH oscillators with this common environment, the electrical and the mechanical activities of both the oscillators synchronized simultaneously. Experimental results indicate the emergence of both lag and the complete synchronization in the MBH oscillators. Simulations of the phase oscillators were carried out in order to better understand the experimental observations.

  19. The quantum beat principles and applications of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Major, F

    2007-01-01

    This work attempts to convey a broad understanding of the physical principles underlying the workings of these quantum-based atomic clocks, with introductory chapters placing them in context with the early development of mechanical clocks and the introduction of electronic time-keeping as embodied in the quartz-controlled clocks. While the book makes no pretense at being a history of atomic clocks, it nevertheless takes a historical perspective in its treatment of the subject. Intended for nonspecialists with some knowledge of physics or engineering, The Quantum Beat covers a wide range of salient topics relevant to atomic clocks, treated in a broad intuitive manner with a minimum of mathematical formalism. Detailed descriptions are given of the design principles of the rubidium, cesium, hydrogen maser, and mercury ion standards; the revolutionary changes that the advent of the laser has made possible, such as laser cooling, optical pumping, the formation of "optical molasses," and the cesium "fountain" stand...

  20. Mapping of Human Heart Beat Dynamics by Atomic Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, A.; Bison, G.; Wynands, R.

    2005-05-01

    Stimulated by recent progress in laser-based optical magnetometry and in developments of powerful signal denoising techniques we initiated the development of a low-cost laser-driven optically pumped magnetometer (OPM) for biomagnetic applications. The OPM uses optically pumped cesium atoms in glass cells of a few cm3. Its sensitivity (<70 fT in 1 Hz bandwidth), bandwidth (140 Hz), and spatial resolution (cm) were optimized for the two-dimensional mapping of the magnetic field produced above the chest by the beating human heart. Signal averaging using an electrocardiographic signal as a reference and gradiometric detection reduces residual noise significantly so that the dynamics of the heart field can be displayed a movie. We discuss the principle of the technique and give a status report on ongoing work towards the development of a multichannel device.

  1. Ion channels and beating heart: the players and the music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Antzelevitch

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Soft gentle music accompanies us throughout our lifetime; it is the music of our heart beating. Although at times it is questionable as to who serves as conductor of the orchestra, there is little doubt that our ion channels are the main players. Whenever one of them plays too loudly, too softly or simply off key, disharmony results, sometimes leading to total disruption of the rate and rhythm. Ion channels can disrupt the music of our heart by different mechanisms. Sometimes their function is correct, but their expression is altered by underlying cardiac diseases (i.e. heart failure; sometimes the defect is in their structure, because of an underlying genetic defect, and in this case a channelopathy is present.

  2. Impact Analysis of Narrow Loom Beat-up Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurudeen A. Raji

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study considers the impulse-momentum method for the analysis of the narrow loom with impulsive force and discontinuous velocities. The system equation of motion is analyzed to determine the main body velocities used for the system variables without introducing rotational coordinates or the turning effect of the system follower on the beater. Discontinuities in the velocity are observed when an impact force results from the beat-up action of the beater on the weft-yarn. Formulation between the velocity jump and displacement is presented for the system response. The impact phenomenon is characterized by the rise in the system velocity resulting from the vibration propagation through the system. The velocity is observed to increase as the system displacement response increases. This is typical of a high speed mechanism of this type mostly used in the textile industry if not controlled.

  3. Banding and Step-Stair Artifacts on the Cardiac-CT Caused By Pseudo-Ectopic Beats

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Amolak; Sethi, Yash; Watkins, Sonya; Youtsey, Angela; Thomas, Angie

    2009-01-01

    Step-stair and banding artifacts may result from irregular ventricular rhythm caused by atrial fibrillation or premature ectopic ventricular contractions. In the case reported here, severe banding and misalignment artifacts occurred due to electrocardiographic noise mimicking ectopic beats. Severe EKG noise or pseudo-ectopic beats may cause rare but serious artifacts during cardiac-CT acquisition. Vendor-provided software for correcting ectopic beats can be used to remove pseudo-ectopic beats...

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor activates leptin-like pathways and reduces body fat, without cachexia or rebound weight gain, even in leptin-resistant obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, P. D.; Anderson, K. D.; Sleeman, M. W.; Wong, V.; Tan, J.; Hijarunguru, A.; Corcoran, T L; Murray, J. D.; Thabet, K. E.; Yancopoulos, G D; Wiegand, S J

    2001-01-01

    Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) was first characterized as a trophic factor for motor neurons in the ciliary ganglion and spinal cord, leading to its evaluation in humans suffering from motor neuron disease. In these trials, CNTF caused unexpected and substantial weight loss, raising concerns that it might produce cachectic-like effects. Countering this possibility was the suggestion that CNTF was working via a leptin-like mechanism to cause weight loss, based on the find...

  5. Differences between the neurogenic and proliferative abilities of Müller glia with stem cell characteristics and the ciliary epithelium from the adult human eye

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Bhairavi; Jayaram, Hari; Singhal, Shweta; Jones, Megan F; Limb, G. Astrid

    2011-01-01

    Much controversy has arisen on the nature and sources of stem cells in the adult human retina. Whilst ciliary epithelium has been thought to constitute a source of neural stem cells, a population of Müller glia in the neural retina has also been shown to exhibit neurogenic characteristics. This study aimed to compare the neurogenic and proliferative abilities between these two major cell populations. It also examined whether differences exist between the pigmented and non-pigmented ciliary ep...

  6. Beat wave excitation of electron plasma wave by relativistic cross focusing of cosh-Gaussian laser beams in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvinder; Gupta, Naveen

    2015-06-01

    A scheme for beat wave excitation of electron plasma wave (EPW) is proposed by relativistic cross-focusing of two coaxial Cosh-Gaussian (ChG) laser beams in an under dense plasma. The plasma wave is generated on account of beating of two coaxial laser beams of frequencies ω1 and ω2 . The mechanism for laser produced nonlinearity is assumed to be relativistic nonlinearity in electron mass. Following moment theory approach in Wentzel Kramers Brillouin (W.K.B) approximation, the coupled differential equations governing the evolution of spot size of laser beams with distance of propagation have been derived. The relativistic nonlinearity depends not only on the intensity of first laser beam but also on the intensity of second laser beam. Therefore, propagation dynamics of one laser beam affect that of second beam and hence cross-focusing of the two laser beams takes place. Due to non uniform intensity distribution of pump laser beams, the background electron concentration gets modified. The amplitude of EPW, which depends on the background electron concentration, thus gets nonlinearly coupled with the laser beams. The effects of relativistic electron mass nonlinearity and the cross-focusing of pump beams on excitation of EPW have been incorporated. Numerical simulations have been carried out to investigate the effect of laser as well as plasma parameters on cross-focusing of laser beams and further its effect on power of excited EPW.

  7. RPGR-containing protein complexes in syndromic and non-syndromic retinal degeneration due to ciliary dysfunction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carlos A. Murga-Zamalloa; Anand Swaroop; Hemant Khanna

    2009-12-01

    Dysfunction of primary cilia due to mutations in cilia-centrosomal proteins is associated with pleiotropic disorders. The primary (or sensory) cilium of photoreceptors mediates polarized trafficking of proteins for efficient phototransduction. Retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) is a cilia-centrosomal protein mutated in >70% of X-linked RP cases and 10%–20% of simplex RP males. Accumulating evidence indicates that RPGR may facilitate the orchestration of multiple ciliary protein complexes. Disruption of these complexes due to mutations in component proteins is an underlying cause of associated photoreceptor degeneration. Here, we highlight the recent developments in understanding the mechanism of cilia-dependent photoreceptor degeneration due to mutations in RPGR and RPGR-interacting proteins in severe genetic diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), Joubert syndrome, and Senior–Loken syndrome, and explore the physiological relevance of photoreceptor ciliary protein complexes.

  8. The interplay between RPGR, PDEδ and Arl2/3 regulate the ciliary targeting of farnesylated cargo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätzlich, Denise; Vetter, Ingrid; Gotthardt, Katja; Miertzschke, Mandy; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Ismail, Shehab

    2013-01-01

    Defects in primary cilia result in human diseases known as ciliopathies. The retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR), mutated in the most severe form of the eye disease, is located at the transition zone of the ciliary organelle. The RPGR-interacting partner PDEδ is involved in trafficking of farnesylated ciliary cargo, but the significance of this interaction is unknown. The crystal structure of the propeller domain of RPGR shows the location of patient mutations and how they perturb the structure. The RPGR·PDEδ complex structure shows PDEδ on a highly conserved surface patch of RPGR. Biochemical experiments and structural considerations show that RPGR can bind with high affinity to cargo-loaded PDEδ and exposes the Arl2/Arl3-binding site on PDEδ. On the basis of these results, we propose a model where RPGR is acting as a scaffold protein recruiting cargo-loaded PDEδ and Arl3 to release lipidated cargo into cilia. PMID:23559067

  9. Real-Time Analysis of Beats in Music for Entertainment Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Der Lin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The dancing actions for entertainment robots are usually designed in advance and saved in a database according to the beats and rhythm of the given music. This research is devoted to developing a real-time algorithm that can detect the primary information of the music needed for the actions of entertainment robots. The computation of the proposed algorithm is very efficient and can satisfy the requirement of real-time processing by a digital signal controller. The digitized music signal is first normalized to make the algorithm robust for miscellaneous music volume. Next, the primary features of the beat for the music are extracted. Based on the extracted features, the algorithm will then identify the occurrence of beats in the music through the use of an optimized classifier. From the accumulated information of the timing for the beats, the algorithm can provide the predicted timing information of the next beat through regression analysis. The type and tempo of the given music can also be derived thereafter. The entertainment robot can thus move or dance according to the information derived by the algorithm. A graphical user interface (GUI program in LabVIEW is also utilized to observe and verify the analysis results. In this study, the ratio for correct beat detection is greater than 90%. The prediction ratio for the correct timing of beats is over 80%, and it is 100% correct for both music type and music tempo.

  10. Ascorbate blocks endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-mediated vasodilatation in the bovine ciliary vascular bed and rat mesentery

    OpenAIRE

    McNeish, Alister J.; Wilson, William S; Martin, William

    2002-01-01

    The effects of ascorbate were assessed on vasodilatation mediated by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in the ciliary vascular bed of the bovine isolated perfused eye and in the rat isolated perfused mesenteric arterial bed.In the bovine eye, EDHF-mediated vasodilator responses induced by acetylcholine or bradykinin were powerfully blocked when ascorbate (50 μM) was included in the perfusion medium for at least 120 min; with acetylcholine a normally-masked muscarinic vasoconst...

  11. Effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor on retrograde cell reaction after facial nerve crush in young adults rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gispen, W.H.; Ulenkate, H.J.L.M.; Jennekens, F.G.I.

    1996-01-01

    Locally applied ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has a powerful effect on retrograde axonal reaction following facial nerve crush in neonatal rats. We examined whether it also exerts a strong effect on retrograde axonal reaction in young adult rats when administered subcutaneously. The dose was 1 mg/kg body weight, three times a week, similar to that used in a previous experiment in which CNTF was reported to have an effect. We studied changes in the morphology of the motor nerve cell bodie...

  12. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) for human retinal degeneration: Phase I trial of CNTF delivered by encapsulated cell intraocular implants

    OpenAIRE

    Sieving, Paul A.; Caruso, Rafael C.; Tao, Weng; Coleman, Hanna R.; Thompson, Darby J. S.; Fullmer, Keri R.; Bush, Ronald A.

    2006-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are agents with a promising ability to retard progression of neurodegenerative diseases and are effective in slowing photoreceptor degeneration in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. Here we report a human clinical trial of a neurotrophic factor for retinal neurodegeneration. In this Phase I safety trial, human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was delivered by cells transfected with the human CNTF gene and sequestered within capsules that were surgically implanted in...

  13. Effect of Locally Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Survival of Transected and Repaired Adult Sheep Facial Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid Al Abri; Arif Ali Kolethekkat; Kelleher, Michael O.; Lynn M. Myles; Michael A. Glasby

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to determine whether the administration of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) at the site of repaired facial nerve enhances regeneration in the adult sheep model. Methods: Ten adult sheep were divided into 2 groups: control and study group (CNTF group). In the CNTF group, the buccal branch of the facial nerve was transected and then repaired by epineural sutures. CNTF was injected over the left depressor labii maxillaris muscle in the vicinity of the transected and repaired ner...

  14. Use of suppression subtractive hybridization to identify genes regulated by ciliary neurotrophic factor in postnatal retinal explants

    OpenAIRE

    Roger, Jérôme; Goureau, Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The retinal progenitors are multipotential, and the decision taken by a progenitor to differentiate along a particular path depends on both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a member of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) family, added to rat postnatal retinal progenitors inhibits rod photoreceptor cell differentiation, promotes Müller glia genesis and enhances the expression of bipolar neuron markers. We hypothesized that those transcripts regulated ...

  15. Opposite effects of a high-fat diet and calorie restriction on ciliary neurotrophic factor signalling in the mouse hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    AntonioGiordano; SaverioCinti

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse hypothalamus, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is mainly expressed by ependymal cells and tanycytes of the ependymal layer covering the third ventricle. Since exogenously administered CNTF causes reduced food intake and weight loss, we tested whether endogenous CNTF might be involved in energy balance regulation. We thus evaluated CNTF production and responsiveness in the hypothalamus of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), of ob/ob obese mice, and of mice fed a calorie restriction ...

  16. Ciliary neurotrophic factor cell-based delivery prevents synaptic impairment and improves memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The development of novel therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) represents one of the biggest unmet medical needs today. Application of neurotrophic factors able to modulate neuronal survival and synaptic connectivity is a promising therapeutic approach for AD. We aimed to determine whether the loco-regional delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) could prevent amyloid-beta oligomer-induced synaptic damages and associated cognitive impairments that typify AD. To ensure lo...

  17. gp130 signaling in proopiomelanocortin neurons mediates the acute anorectic response to centrally applied ciliary neurotrophic factor

    OpenAIRE

    Janoschek, Ruth; Plum, Leona; Koch, Linda; Münzberg, Heike; Diano, Sabrina; Shanabrough, Marya; Müller, Werner; Horvath, Tamas L.; Brüning, Jens C.

    2006-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) exerts anorectic effects by overcoming leptin resistance via activation of hypothalamic neurons. However, the exact site of CNTF action in the hypothalamus has not yet been identified. Using Cre-loxP-mediated recombination in vivo, we have selectively ablated the common cytokine signaling chain gp130, which is required for functional CNTF signaling, in proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons. POMC-specific gp130 knockout mice exhibit unaltered numbers ...

  18. Expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and its tripartite receptor complex by cells of the human optic nerve head

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaochun; Clark, Abbot F.; Wordinger, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes gene expression, cell survival and differentiation in various types of peripheral and central neurons, glia and nonneural cells. The level of CNTF rises rapidly upon injury to neural tissue, suggesting that CNTF exerts its cytoprotective effects after release from cells via mechanisms induced by cell injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if cells in the optic nerve head express CNTF and its tripartite receptor complex. Methods W...

  19. Opposite effects of a high-fat diet and calorie restriction on ciliary neurotrophic factor signaling in the mouse hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Mondini, Eleonora; Smorlesi, Arianna; Frontini, Andrea; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse hypothalamus, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is mainly expressed by ependymal cells and tanycytes of the ependymal layer covering the third ventricle. Since exogenously administered CNTF causes reduced food intake and weight loss, we tested whether endogenous CNTF might be involved in energy balance regulation. We thus evaluated CNTF production and responsiveness in the hypothalamus of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), of ob/ob obese mice, and of mice fed a calorie restriction ...

  20. Synthesis and localization of ciliary neurotrophic factor in the sciatic nerve of the adult rat after lesion and during regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Stöckli, K. A.; Thoenen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is expressed in high quantities in Schwann cells of peripheral nerves during postnatal development of the rat. The absence of a hydrophobic leader sequence and the immunohistochemical localization of CNTF within the cytoplasm of these cells indicate that the factor might not be available to responsive neurons under physiological conditions. However, CNTF supports the survival of a variety of embryonic neurons, including spinal motoneurons in culture. Moreove...

  1. Long-term lentiviral-mediated expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor in the striatum of Huntington's disease transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zala, Diana; Bensadoun, Jean-Charles; Pereira de Almeida, Luis; Leavitt, Blair R.; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Aebischer, Patrick; Hayden, Michael R; Déglon, Nicole

    2004-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to prevent behavioral deficits and striatal degeneration in neurotoxic models of Huntington's disease (HD), but its effect in a genetic model has not been evaluated. Lentiviral vectors expressing the human CNTF or LacZ reporter gene were therefore injected in the striatum of wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice expressing full-length huntingtin with 72 CAG repeats (YAC72). Behavioral analysis showed increased locomotor activity in 5- to 6-month-...

  2. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Stimulates Muscle Glucose Uptake by a PI3-Kinase–Dependent Pathway That Is Impaired With Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, Gregory R.; Watt, Matthew J.; Ernst, Matthias; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) reverses muscle insulin resistance by increasing fatty acid oxidation through gp130-LIF receptor signaling to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). CNTF also increases Akt signaling in neurons and adipocytes. Because both Akt and AMPK regulate glucose uptake, we investigated muscle glucose uptake in response to CNTF signaling in lean and obese mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mice were injected intraperitoneally with saline or CNTF, and blood g...

  3. Identification of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) residues essential for leukemia inhibitory factor receptor binding and generation of CNTF receptor antagonists.

    OpenAIRE

    Di Marco, A; Gloaguen, I; Graziani, R; Paonessa, G; Saggio, I; Hudson, K R; Laufer, R

    1996-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) drives the sequential assembly of a receptor complex containing the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and the signal transducers gp130 and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-beta (LIFR). The D1 structural motif, located at the beginning of the D-helix of human CNTF, contains two amino acid residues, F152 and K155, which are conserved among all cytokines that signal through LIFR. The functional importance of these residues was assessed by ...

  4. Identification of the probable site of synthesis of butyrylcholinesterase in the superior cervical and ciliary ganglia of the cat.

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, E; Koelle, G B

    1983-01-01

    The source of butyrylcholinesterase (acylcholine acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.8) in the ganglion cells of the cat superior cervical and ciliary ganglia has been elusive, inasmuch as the enzyme is present in high concentrations in the neuropil, where it is confined largely to the dendritic and perikaryonal plasma membranes, but appears to be absent from the perikarya. In the present study, ganglionic butyrylcholinesterase was near-totally inactivated by the injection of tetramonoisopropyl pyyrophos...

  5. Ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes motor reinnervation of the musculocutaneous nerve in an experimental model of end-to-side neurorrhaphy

    OpenAIRE

    Čelakovský Pavel; Stejskal Lubomír; Raška Otakar; Klusáková Ilona; Dubový Petr; Haninec Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It is difficult to repair nerve if proximal stump is unavailable or autogenous nerve grafts are insufficient for reconstructing extensive nerve damage. Therefore, alternative methods have been developed, including lateral anastomosis based on axons' ability to send out collateral sprouts into denervated nerve. The different capacity of a sensory or motor axon to send a sprout is controversial and may be controlled by cytokines and/or neurotrophic factors like ciliary neuro...

  6. Disentangling beat perception from sequential learning and examining the influence of attention and musical abilities on ERP responses to rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwer, Fleur L; Werner, Carola M; Knetemann, Myrthe; Honing, Henkjan

    2016-05-01

    Beat perception is the ability to perceive temporal regularity in musical rhythm. When a beat is perceived, predictions about upcoming events can be generated. These predictions can influence processing of subsequent rhythmic events. However, statistical learning of the order of sounds in a sequence can also affect processing of rhythmic events and must be differentiated from beat perception. In the current study, using EEG, we examined the effects of attention and musical abilities on beat perception. To ensure we measured beat perception and not absolute perception of temporal intervals, we used alternating loud and soft tones to create a rhythm with two hierarchical metrical levels. To control for sequential learning of the order of the different sounds, we used temporally regular (isochronous) and jittered rhythmic sequences. The order of sounds was identical in both conditions, but only the regular condition allowed for the perception of a beat. Unexpected intensity decrements were introduced on the beat and offbeat. In the regular condition, both beat perception and sequential learning were expected to enhance detection of these deviants on the beat. In the jittered condition, only sequential learning was expected to affect processing of the deviants. ERP responses to deviants were larger on the beat than offbeat in both conditions. Importantly, this difference was larger in the regular condition than in the jittered condition, suggesting that beat perception influenced responses to rhythmic events in addition to sequential learning. The influence of beat perception was present both with and without attention directed at the rhythm. Moreover, beat perception as measured with ERPs correlated with musical abilities, but only when attention was directed at the stimuli. Our study shows that beat perception is possible when attention is not directed at a rhythm. In addition, our results suggest that attention may mediate the influence of musical abilities on beat

  7. The evolutionary neuroscience of musical beat perception: the Action Simulation for Auditory Prediction (ASAP hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddh D. Patel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Every human culture has some form of music with a beat: a perceived periodic pulse that structures the perception of musical rhythm and which serves as a framework for synchronized movement to music. What are the neural mechanisms of musical beat perception, and how did they evolve? One view, which dates back to Darwin and implicitly informs some current models of beat perception, is that the relevant neural mechanisms are relatively general and are widespread among animal species. On the basis of recent neural and cross-species data on musical beat processing, this paper argues for a different view. Here we argue that beat perception is a complex brain function involving temporally-precise communication between auditory regions and motor planning regions of the cortex (even in the absence of overt movement. More specifically, we propose that simulation of periodic movement in motor planning regions provides a neural signal that helps the auditory system predict the timing of upcoming beats. This action simulation for auditory prediction (ASAP hypothesis leads to testable predictions. We further suggest that ASAP relies on dorsal auditory pathway connections between auditory regions and motor planning regions via the parietal cortex, and suggest that these connections may be stronger in humans than in nonhuman primates due to the evolution of vocal learning in our lineage. This suggestion motivates cross-species research to determine which species are capable of human-like beat perception, i.e., beat perception that involves accurate temporal prediction of beat times across a fairly broad range of tempi.

  8. Interpretation of Normal and Pathological ECG Beats using Multiresolution Wavelet Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhada S.Ardhapurkar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Discrete wavelet transform has great capability to analyse the temporal and spectral properties of non stationary signal like ECG. In this paper, we have developed and evaluated a robust algorithm using multiresolution analysis based on the discrete wavelet transform (DWT for twelve-lead electrocardiogram (ECG temporal feature extraction. In the first step, ECG was denoised considerably by employing kernel density estimation on subband coefficients then QRS complexes were detected. Further, by selecting appropriate coefficients and applying wave segmentation strategy P and T wave peaks were detected. Finally, the determination of P and T wave onsets and ends was performed. The novelty of this approach lies in detection of different morphologies in ECG wave with few decision rules. We have evaluated the algorithm on normal and abnormal beats from various manually annotated databases from physiobank having different sampling frequencies. The QRS detector obtained a sensitivity of 99.5% and a positive predictivity of 98.9% over the first lead of the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database.

  9. TMEM107 recruits ciliopathy proteins to subdomains of the ciliary transition zone and causes Joubert syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambacher, Nils J; Bruel, Ange-Line; van Dam, Teunis J P; Szymańska, Katarzyna; Slaats, Gisela G; Kuhns, Stefanie; McManus, Gavin J; Kennedy, Julie E; Gaff, Karl; Wu, Ka Man; van der Lee, Robin; Burglen, Lydie; Doummar, Diane; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Faivre, Laurence; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Saunier, Sophie; Curd, Alistair; Peckham, Michelle; Giles, Rachel H; Johnson, Colin A; Huynen, Martijn A; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Blacque, Oliver E

    2016-01-01

    The transition zone (TZ) ciliary subcompartment is thought to control cilium composition and signalling by facilitating a protein diffusion barrier at the ciliary base. TZ defects cause ciliopathies such as Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS), nephronophthisis (NPHP) and Joubert syndrome (JBTS). However, the molecular composition and mechanisms underpinning TZ organization and barrier regulation are poorly understood. To uncover candidate TZ genes, we employed bioinformatics (coexpression and co-evolution) and identified TMEM107 as a TZ protein mutated in oral-facial-digital syndrome and JBTS patients. Mechanistic studies in Caenorhabditis elegans showed that TMEM-107 controls ciliary composition and functions redundantly with NPHP-4 to regulate cilium integrity, TZ docking and assembly of membrane to microtubule Y-link connectors. Furthermore, nematode TMEM-107 occupies an intermediate layer of the TZ-localized MKS module by organizing recruitment of the ciliopathy proteins MKS-1, TMEM-231 (JBTS20) and JBTS-14 (TMEM237). Finally, MKS module membrane proteins are immobile and super-resolution microscopy in worms and mammalian cells reveals periodic localizations within the TZ. This work expands the MKS module of ciliopathy-causing TZ proteins associated with diffusion barrier formation and provides insight into TZ subdomain architecture. PMID:26595381

  10. Sonic Hedgehog dependent phosphorylation by CK1α and GRK2 is required for ciliary accumulation and activation of smoothened.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbin Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling regulates embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the GPCR-like protein Smoothened (Smo, but how vertebrate Smo is activated remains poorly understood. In Drosophila, Hh dependent phosphorylation activates Smo. Whether this is also the case in vertebrates is unclear, owing to the marked sequence divergence between vertebrate and Drosophila Smo (dSmo and the involvement of primary cilia in vertebrate Hh signaling. Here we demonstrate that mammalian Smo (mSmo is activated through multi-site phosphorylation of its carboxyl-terminal tail by CK1α and GRK2. Phosphorylation of mSmo induces its active conformation and simultaneously promotes its ciliary accumulation. We demonstrate that graded Hh signals induce increasing levels of mSmo phosphorylation that fine-tune its ciliary localization, conformation, and activity. We show that mSmo phosphorylation is induced by its agonists and oncogenic mutations but is blocked by its antagonist cyclopamine, and efficient mSmo phosphorylation depends on the kinesin-II ciliary motor. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Hh signaling recruits CK1α to initiate mSmo phosphorylation, and phosphorylation further increases the binding of CK1α and GRK2 to mSmo, forming a positive feedback loop that amplifies and/or sustains mSmo phosphorylation. Hence, despite divergence in their primary sequences and their subcellular trafficking, mSmo and dSmo employ analogous mechanisms for their activation.

  11. Quantum beat and entanglement of multi-qubits interacting with a common reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The qubits can be entangled when they interact with a common Ohmic reservoir. We analyze how the reservoir-induced entanglement of qubits can be observed as the beat signal in the decay curve of the macroscopic polarization. The origin of this effect is the Lamb phase shift on the qubit array. We quantify the amount of the reservoir-induced entanglement and show how to experimentally evaluate it from the decay curve of the macroscopic polarization. We discuss how the beat signal can be discriminated from the other kinds of beat signals. We also show that our analysis can be used to estimate the reservoir characteristics

  12. Activating and Relaxing Music Entrains the Speed of Beat Synchronized Walking

    OpenAIRE

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musi...

  13. Quantum beats in the field ionization of Rydberg atoms in the presence of magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoric, Vincent C.; Hastings, Hannah; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-05-01

    By exciting a coherent superposition and varying its phase evolution, quantum beats in the selective field ionization of Rydberg atoms have been observed. Here, we present a study exploring the effect of electric and magnetic fields on quantum beats. Beginning with a single excited state, a coherent superposition is created by a short electric field pulse in the presence of a static magnetic field. The resulting quantum beats are then observed in the field ionization spectrum. Additionally, millimeter-wave spectroscopy is used to probe the state populations in this superposition. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1205895 and No. 1205897.

  14. Viscosity and not biological mechanisms often controls the effects of temperature on ciliary activity and swimming velocity of small aquatic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Riisgård, H. U.

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that temperature-dependent viscosity of the ambient water controls or strongly affects bio-mechanical activity such as beat frequency of water-pumping cilia in mussels and ascidians, swimming velocity of sperm cells, ciliates and small (micro- and meso-scale) aquatic...... organisms using cilia or small appendages for propulsion. Here we summarize results from the literature and from own studies on bio-mechanical activities in response to changing temperature or manipulated viscosity at constant temperature, both having the same change in kinematic viscosity. The survey is...... used to assess to what extent the response is purely physical/mechanical or biological. We argue that a power-law dependence of bio-mechanical activity (a) on kinematic viscosity (ν), i.e. a ~ ν^−m, should be applied to available data. Based on a general close matching of the response data to power-law...

  15. OFD1, as a Ciliary Protein, Exhibits Neuroprotective Function in Photoreceptor Degeneration Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    Full Text Available Ofd1 is a newly identified causative gene for Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, a photoreceptor degenerative disease. This study aimed to examine Ofd1 localization in retina and further to investigate its function in photoreceptor degeneration models. Ofd1 localization in rat retina was examined using immunofluorescence. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU-induced rats and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats were used as photoreceptor degeneration models. The expression pattern of Ofd1, other ciliary associated genes and Wnt signaling pathway genes were examined in rat models. Furthermore, pEGFP-Ofd1-CDS and pSUPER-Ofd1-shRNA were constructed to overexpress and knockdown the expression level in 661W and R28 cells. MNU was also used to induce cell death. Cilia formation was observed using immunocytochemistry (ICC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS were detected using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA assay. Apoptosis genes expression was examined using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Ofd1 localized to outer segments of rat retina photoreceptors. Ofd1 and other ciliary proteins expression levels increased from the 1st and 4th postnatal weeks and decreased until the 6th week in the RCS rats, while their expression consistently decreased from the 1st and 7th day in the MNU rats. Moreover, Wnt signaling pathway proteins expression was significantly up-regulated in both rat models. Knockdown of Ofd1 expression resulted in a smaller population, shorter length of cell cilia, and lower cell viability. Ofd1 overexpression partially attenuated MNU toxic effects by reducing ROS levels and mitigating apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating Ofd1 localization and its function in rat retina and in retinal degeneration rat models. Ofd1 plays a role in controlling photoreceptor cilium length and number. Importantly, it demonstrates a neuroprotective function by protecting the photoreceptor

  16. Recent invasion of buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris of a natural protected area from the southern Sonoran Desert Invasión reciente de zacate buffel (Cenchrus ciliaris en un área natural protegida del desierto sonorense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick De la Barrera

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Centro Ecológico de Sonora is a natural protected area where the natural vegetation remained undisturbed at least until 1997. Since then, Cenchrus ciliaris has become a prominent element of the vegetation because of disturbance. Climate, soil properties, population structure and biological activity for C. ciliaris were studied to gain understanding of the ecological mechanisms that favored the invasion by this exotic grass. Mean air temperature and annual rainfall were 24.8°C and 302 mm. The soil was a loamy-sand that was poor in most nutrients, but particularly rich in phosphorus. Pennisetum ciliare was the most abundant species at the Centro Ecológico, representing over one third of total plant ground cover. Basal area for individual plants ranged from less than 1 cm² to almost 1 m². Living leaves per plant increased with precipitation, peaking at 199 leaves in March 2005, and no living leaves were found after 103 days without rain. The environmental conditions prevalent at Centro Ecológico are very favorable for C. ciliaris, whose establishment was apparently triggered by a major disturbance caused by the development of housing projects.El Centro Ecológico de Sonora es un área natural protegida donde la vegetación autóctona permaneció sin disturbios por lo menos hasta 1997. Desde entonces, Cenchrus ciliaris se ha convertido en un elemento prominente de la vegetación. Se estudiaron el clima, las propiedades del suelo, la estructura de la población y la actividad biológica de C. ciliaris, como una aproximación al entendimiento de los mecanismos ecológicos que favorecieron la invasión por este pasto exótico. La temperatura media del aire y la precipitación anual fueron de 24.8 °C y 302 mm. El suelo fue una arena limosa pobre en minerales, pero particularmente rica en fósforo. Cenchrus ciliaris fue la especie herbácea más abundante en el Centro Ecológico, representando más de un tercio de la cobertura vegetal. El

  17. Readout for intersatellite laser interferometry: Measuring low frequency phase fluctuations of high-frequency signals with microradian precision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerberding, Oliver; Diekmann, Christian; Kullmann, Joachim;

    2015-01-01

    Precision phase readout of optical beat note signals is one of the core techniques required for inter-satellite laser interferometry. Future space based gravitational wave detectors like eLISA require such a readout over a wide range of MHz frequencies, due to orbit induced Doppler shifts, with a...

  18. Electronic frequency modulation for the increase of maximum measurable velocity in a heterodyne laser interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Zeeman-type He-Ne laser is frequently used as a heterodyne laser due to the simple construction and the small loss of a light. However, the low beat frequency of the Zeeman-type laser limits the maximum measurable velocity. In this article, an electronic frequency modulation algorithm is proposed to overcome the drawback of the low velocity measurement capability by increasing the beat frequency electronically. The brief analysis, the measurement scheme of the proposed algorithm, and the experimental results are presented. It is demonstrated that the proposed algorithm is proven to enhance the maximum measurable velocity

  19. Does Corporate Governance Matter in Meeting and Beating Analysts’ Forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Ben Malek Maztoul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meeting and beating analysts’ forecast has received substantial attention, most of studies investigate twoprinciples problems: the valuation and value relevance of meeting and tools used to achieve benchmarks. Thisresearch is different, we investigate whether internal corporate governance impacts on meeting and beatinganalysts’ forecasts and consistently do it, we also examine if these attributes alleviate opportunistic behavior.This paper contributes to the growing literature on earnings benchmarks, it targets to be more specified thanprevious ones by considering governance attributes without an index. Using a logistic regression models, wedocument that ‘small’ institutional investors and incentive compensation incite managers to meet analysts’forecasts contrarily to debt and board activity. We find that consistently meeting is harder to realize and affectedby governance attributes. Moreover, results indicate that stock options are associated with opportunisticmanagerial activities while institutional ownership temperate it.This study is important for investors who must be more attentive about financial signals like meeting analysts’forecasts that may be affected by opportunistic managerial behavior. Furthermore, findings indicate thatregulation affect this tendency which reveal the importance of regulators in increasing the transparency offinancial market.

  20. Non-heart-beating organ donation in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, P M; Sepe, V

    2011-06-01

    In 2007 the non-heart-beating organ donation (NHBD) "Programma Alba" (Sunrise Programme) started in Pavia, Italy. The initial plan was to cut down waiting list for kidney transplantation, while its final aim is to shorten organ transplantation waiting lists. When compared to European countries and the USA, the Italian NHBD program has taken longer to get established. Initially Italian physicians were not entirely aware of the NHBD organ viability for transplantation, furthermore ethical issues and the need to regulate medical requirements to Italian law slowed down the NHBD program. In particular, Italian legislation provides for death ascertainment after irreversible cardiac arrest, 20-minute flat electrocardiogram. This no-touch period is longer when compared to worldwide legislation, and organ viability has been a main concern for Italian transplant doctors over the years. However, recent data let up to 40-minute warm ischemia time to preserve organ viability; this has encouraged Pavia's group to establish the NHBD "Programma Alba". It was designed according to Italian legislation from death diagnosis to graft placement, from this perspective must the significant role of the Transplant coordinator be recognized. Since 2007 seven kidneys have been gathered from seven NHBD. Of these, six NHBD kidneys have been transplanted. Currently, four patients are out of dialysis. This report is a detailed description of NHBD "Programma Alba" and its preliminary results. PMID:21617625

  1. Coordinated Beating of Algal Flagella is Mediated by Basal Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    Cilia or flagella often exhibit synchronized behavior. This includes phase-locking, as seen in Chlamydomonas, and metachronal wave formation in the respiratory cilia of higher organisms. Since the observations by Gray and Rothschild of phase synchrony of nearby swimming spermatozoa, it has been a working hypothesis that synchrony arises from hydrodynamic interactions between beating filaments. Recent work on the dynamics of physically separated pairs of flagella isolated from the multicellular alga Volvox has shown that hydrodynamic coupling alone is sufficient for synchrony. However, the situation is more complex when considering multiple flagella on a single cell. We suggest that a mechanism, internal to the cell, provides an additional flagellar coupling. For instance, flagella of Chlamydomonas mutants deficient in filamentary connections between basal bodies are found to display markedly different synchronization from the wildtype. Diverse flagellar coordination strategies found in quadri-, octo- and hexadecaflagellates reveal further evidence that intracellular couplings between flagellar basal bodies compete with hydrodynamic interactions to determine the precise form of flagellar synchronization in unicellular algae.

  2. Fast beating null strip during the reflection of pulsed Gaussian beams incident at the Rayleigh angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, Nico F

    2006-12-22

    It is well known that harmonic bounded Gaussian beams undergo a transformation into two bounded beams upon reflection on a solid immersed in a liquid. The effect is known as the Schoch effect and can be found at the Rayleigh angle for thick plates and at the different Lamb angles for thin plates. Here, a study is made on the effect of pulsed Gaussian beams reflected on solids. It is found experimentally that the Rayleigh wave phenomenon still generates two reflected bounded beams, whereas Lamb wave phenomena do not generate this effect. This fact may be explained intuitively by realizing that the Rayleigh phenomenon is a coincidental phenomenon that is generated in situ, whereas the Lamb wave phenomenon is a non-coincidental phenomenon that is generated only after incident sound is influenced by both sides of a thin plate. Another explanation is the fact that Rayleigh waves are not dispersive, whereas stimulation and propagation of Lamb waves is frequency dependent. A pulse contains many frequencies and therefore only a fraction of the incident pulse is transformed into a Lamb wave. In this paper, numerical simulations are performed that show that actually the Schoch effect does occur neither for Rayleigh waves, nor for Lamb waves. As a matter of fact, a pulse, incident at the Rayleigh angle, generates two reflected lobes with a null zone of a different kind. The null zone is beating several times during the passage of each pulse. This results in a 'null zone' having a lower mean intensity than any of the two lobes, still less outspoken than for the case of harmonic incident bounded beams. This effect does only occur for Rayleigh wave generation and is much less outspoken for Lamb wave generation. PMID:16815510

  3. Ciliary neurotrophic factor has intrinsic and extrinsic roles in regulating B cell differentiation and bone structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askmyr, Maria; White, Kirby E; Jovic, Tanja; King, Hannah A; Quach, Julie M; Maluenda, Ana C; Baker, Emma K; Smeets, Monique F; Walkley, Carl R; Purton, Louise E

    2015-01-01

    The gp130 receptor and its binding partners play a central role in cytokine signalling. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of the cytokines that signals through the gp130 receptor complex. CNTF has previously been shown to be a negative regulator of trabecular bone remodelling and important for motor neuron development. Since haematopoietic cell maintenance and differentiation is dependent on the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, where cells of the osteoblastic lineage are important regulators, we hypothesised that CNTF may also have important roles in regulating haematopoiesis. Analysis of haematopoietic parameters in male and female Cntf(-/-) mice at 12 and 24 weeks of age revealed altered B lymphopoiesis. Strikingly, the B lymphocyte phenotype differed based on sex, age and also the BM microenvironment in which the B cells develop. When BM cells from wildtype mice were transplanted into Cntf(-/-) mice, there were minimal effects on B lymphopoiesis or bone parameters. However, when Cntf(-/-) BM cells were transplanted into a wildtype BM microenvironment, there were changes in both haematopoiesis and bone parameters. Our data reveal that haematopoietic cell-derived CNTF has roles in regulating BM B cell lymphopoiesis and both trabecular and cortical bone, the latter in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:26487326

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor protects striatal neurons against excitotoxicity by enhancing glial glutamate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Beurrier

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA was significantly reduced (by approximately 75% in CNTF-treated animals. In striatal slices, acute QA application dramatically inhibited corticostriatal field potentials (FPs, whose recovery was significantly higher in CNTF rats compared to controls (approximately 40% vs. approximately 7%, confirming an enhanced resistance to excitotoxicity. The GT inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate greatly reduced FP recovery in CNTF rats, supporting the role of GT in CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from striatal medium spiny neurons showed no alteration of basic properties of striatal glutamatergic transmission in CNTF animals, but the increased effect of a low-affinity competitive glutamate receptor antagonist (gamma-D-glutamylglycine also suggested an enhanced GT function. These data strongly support our hypothesis that CNTF is neuroprotective via an increased function of glial GTs, and further confirms the therapeutic potential of CNTF for the clinical treatment of progressive neurodegenerative diseases involving glutamate overflow.

  5. Brain Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF and hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacher Claire-Marie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play an important role in energy-balance regulation. Notably leptin, an adipocyte-secreted cytokine, regulates the activity of hypothalamic neurons that are involved in the modulation of appetite. Leptin decreases appetite and stimulates weight loss in rodents. Unfortunately, numerous forms of obesity in humans seem to be resistant to leptin action. The ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a neurocytokine that belongs to the same family as leptin and that was originally characterized as a neurotrophic factor that promotes the survival of a broad spectrum of neuronal cell types and that enhances neurogenesis in adult rodents. It presents the advantage of stimulating weight loss in humans, despite the leptin resistance. Moreover, the weight loss persists several weeks after the cessation of treatment. Hence, CNTF has been considered as a promising therapeutic tool for the treatment of obesity and has prompted intense research aimed at identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its potent anorexigenic properties. It has been found that CNTF shares signaling pathways with leptin and is expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, a key hypothalamic region controlling food intake. Endogenous CNTF may also participate in the control of energy balance. Indeed, its expression in the ARC is inversely correlated to body weight in rats fed a high-sucrose diet. Thus hypothalamic CNTF may act, in some individuals, as a protective factor against weight gain during hypercaloric diet and could account for individual differences in the susceptibility to obesity.

  6. Stigmasterol Tetracosanoate, a New Stigmasterol Ester from the Egyptian Blepharis ciliaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shanawany, M A; Sayed, H M; Ibrahim, S R M; Fayed, M A A

    2015-07-01

    A new stigmasterol ester: stigmasterol tetracosanoate (3), along with 7 compounds: β-sitosterol (1), stigmasterol (2), (2S,3S,4R)-2[(2'R)-2'-(hydroxyeicosanoyl amino) octadecane-1,3,4-triol (4), apigenin (5), β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranose (7), and apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (8) were isolated from Blepharis ciliaris aerial parts. Compounds 1, 2, and 5-7 are reported here for the first time from the plant and 4 for the first time from the family. GCMS analysis revealed the presence of 45 fatty acids, 53 hydrocarbons, and 24 sterols. The different fractions exhibited mild cytotoxic in brine shrimp assay and anti-hyperglycaemic activities. The EtOAc fraction and TME (total MeOH extract) showed weak anti-malarial activity against P. falciparum. The CHCl3 fraction gave potent -anti-inflammatory activity compared with indomethacin. PMID:24992497

  7. Peripheral sensory processing in mammalian gravity receptors - Observations of ciliary tuft configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Donovan, Kathleen; Rogers, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to study dynamic polarizations of clustered cells of the anterior part of rat saccular macula and to shed light on the possible roles of two types of hair cells integrated into the same neural circuitry: those with short stereocilia and long kinocilium (ss/lk), and those with long stereocilia and still longer kinocilium (ls/lk). It was found that the ss/lk-type cells could be further subdivided into two types, whereas the ls/lk cells consisted of four major kinds. It was also found that the kinocilium was most often fixed in a recovery stroke position (curved basally, and the upper portion projected back over the tuft) and that the kinocilia were not aligned in parallel in any given part of a macula, even though each cilium pointed in the proper direction relative to the striola line. The possibility of a relationship between the ciliary tuft morphology and the function of the hair cell of which it is a part is discussed.

  8. Circulating levels of ciliary neurotrophic factor in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akahori,Yoichiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF has been shown to decrease food intake in mouse models of obesity and to improve insulin sensitivity. It is well known that tight regulation of glucose metabolism is essential for successful gestational outcomes (e.g. fetal growth, and that abnormal insulin resistance is associated with preeclampsia (PE. To investigate the possibility that CNTF might be involved in the regulation of insulin resistance during pregnancy, circulating levels of CNTF were assessed in non-pregnant, normal pregnant, postpartum, and pregnant women with PE. Sera from healthy non-pregnant women (n10, pregnant women (n30:1st trimester;n10, 2nd trimester n10;3rd trimester;n10, postpartum women (n10, and patients with PE (n11 were studied with Western blotting. Circulating CNTF was detected by Western blotting, and the levels of CNTF in pregnant women were decreased as compared with those in non-pregnant women, and tended to decrease as pregnancy progressed. A significant decrease was found in PE as compared with normal pregnancy. Circulating CNTF might be associated with physiological and abnormal insulin resistance during pregnancy.

  9. Ciliary body and choroidal melanomas treated by proton beam irradiation. Histopathologic study of eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton beam irradiation resulted in clinical and/or histopathological regression of large ciliary body and choroidal melanomas in three eyes. Enucleations were performed 6 1/2 weeks, five months, and 11 months after irradiation for angle-closure glaucoma from total retinal detachment, increase in retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma, respectively. A direct relationship was found between the length of the interval from irradiation to enucleation and the degree of histologic changes. Vascular changes in the tumors included endothelial cell swelling and decreased lumen size, basement membrane thickening, collapse of sinusoidal vessels, and thrombosis of vessels. Although apparently unaltered tumor cells remained, degenerative changes occurred in some melanoma cells, including lipid vacuoles in cytoplasm, pyknotic nuclei, and balloon cell formation. Patchy areas of necrosis and proteinaceous exudate were present. Pigment-laden macrophages were found near tumor vessels and all had a substantial chronic inflammatory infiltrate. The effect of proton beam irradiation on tumor vessels probably plays an important role in uveal melanoma regression

  10. Beat synchronization predicts neural speech encoding and reading readiness in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff Carr, Kali; White-Schwoch, Travis; Tierney, Adam T; Strait, Dana L; Kraus, Nina

    2014-10-01

    Temporal cues are important for discerning word boundaries and syllable segments in speech; their perception facilitates language acquisition and development. Beat synchronization and neural encoding of speech reflect precision in processing temporal cues and have been linked to reading skills. In poor readers, diminished neural precision may contribute to rhythmic and phonological deficits. Here we establish links between beat synchronization and speech processing in children who have not yet begun to read: preschoolers who can entrain to an external beat have more faithful neural encoding of temporal modulations in speech and score higher on tests of early language skills. In summary, we propose precise neural encoding of temporal modulations as a key mechanism underlying reading acquisition. Because beat synchronization abilities emerge at an early age, these findings may inform strategies for early detection of and intervention for language-based learning disabilities. PMID:25246562

  11. Observation of Quantum Beat in Rb by Parametric Four-Wave Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chang-Jun; HE Jun-Fang; XUE Bing; ZHAI Xue-Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Two coupled parametric four-wave-mixing processes in Rb atoms are studied using perturbation theory, which reveals clear evidence of the appearance of quantum beat at 608cm-1, corresponding to the energy difference of the 7s - 5d states of Rb atoms, in the parametric four-wave-mixing signals. A pump-probe technique is utilized to observe the quantum beat. Time-varying characteristics of the quantum beat are investigated using time-dependent Fourier transform. The results show that the time-varying characteristics of the quantum beat not only offers a sensitive detecting method for observing the decay of atomic wave packets, but also provides a potential tool for monitoring the dissociation of molecules.

  12. The Effect of Dopaminergic Medication on Beat-Based Auditory Timing in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Daniel J; Pickett, Kristen A; Earhart, Gammon M; Grahn, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) adversely affects timing abilities. Beat-based timing is a mechanism that times events relative to a regular interval, such as the "beat" in musical rhythm, and is impaired in PD. It is unknown if dopaminergic medication influences beat-based timing in PD. Here, we tested beat-based timing over two sessions in participants with PD (OFF then ON dopaminergic medication) and in unmedicated control participants. People with PD and control participants completed two tasks. The first was a discrimination task in which participants compared two rhythms and determined whether they were the same or different. Rhythms either had a beat structure (metric simple rhythms) or did not (metric complex rhythms), as in previous studies. Discrimination accuracy was analyzed to test for the effects of beat structure, as well as differences between participants with PD and controls, and effects of medication (PD group only). The second task was the Beat Alignment Test (BAT), in which participants listened to music with regular tones superimposed, and responded as to whether the tones were "ON" or "OFF" the beat of the music. Accuracy was analyzed to test for differences between participants with PD and controls, and for an effect of medication in patients. Both patients and controls discriminated metric simple rhythms better than metric complex rhythms. Controls also improved at the discrimination task in the second vs. first session, whereas people with PD did not. For participants with PD, the difference in performance between metric simple and metric complex rhythms was greater (sensitivity to changes in simple rhythms increased and sensitivity to changes in complex rhythms decreased) when ON vs. OFF medication. Performance also worsened with disease severity. For the BAT, no group differences or effects of medication were found. Overall, these findings suggest that timing is impaired in PD, and that dopaminergic medication influences beat-based and non-beat

  13. The Effect of Dopaminergic Medication on Beat-Based Auditory Timing in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cameron

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD adversely affects timing abilities. Beat-based timing is a mechanism that times events relative to a regular interval, such as the ‘beat’ in musical rhythm, and is impaired in PD. It is unknown if dopaminergic medication influences beat-based timing in PD. Here we tested beat-based timing over two sessions in participants with PD (OFF then ON dopaminergic medication, and unmedicated control participants. People with PD and control participants completed two tasks. The first was a discrimination task in which participants compared two rhythms and determined whether they were the same or different. Rhythms either had a beat structure (metric simple rhythms, or did not (metric complex rhythms, as in previous studies. Discrimination accuracy was analyzed to test for the effects of beat structure, as well as differences between participants with PD and controls, and effects of medication (PD group only. The second task was the Beat Alignment Test (BAT, in which participants listened to music with regular tones superimposed, and responded as to whether the tones were ‘on’ or ‘off’ the beat of the music. Accuracy was analyzed to test for differences between participants with PD and controls, and for an effect of medication in patients.Both patients and controls discriminated metric simple rhythms better than metric complex rhythms. Controls also improved at the discrimination task in the second vs. first session, whereas people with PD did not. For participants with PD, the difference in performance between metric simple and metric complex rhythms was greater (sensitivity to changes in simple rhythms increased and sensitivity to changes in complex rhythms decreased when ON vs. OFF medication. Performance also worsened with disease severity. For the Beat Alignment Test, no group differences or effects of medication were found. Overall, these findings suggest that timing is impaired in PD, and that dopaminergic

  14. Look at the Beat, Feel the Meter:Top-down Effects of Meter Induction on Auditory and Visual Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eCelma-Miralles

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated top-down effects on meter induction in the auditory modality. However, little is known about these effects in the visual domain, especially without the involvement of motor acts such as tapping. In the present study, we aim to assess whether the projection of meter on auditory beats is also present in the visual domain. We asked sixteen musicians to internally project binary (i.e. a strong-weak pattern and ternary (i.e. a strong-weak-weak pattern meter onto separate, but analogue, visual and auditory isochronous stimuli. Participants were presented with sequences of tones or blinking circular shapes (i.e. flashes at 2.4 Hz while their electrophysiological responses were recorded. A frequency analysis of the elicited steady-state evoked potentials allowed us to compare the frequencies of the beat (2.4 Hz, its first harmonic (4.8 Hz, the binary subharmonic (1.2 Hz, and ternary subharmonic (0.8 Hz within and across modalities. Taking the amplitude spectra into account, we observed an enhancement of the amplitude at 0.8 Hz in the ternary condition for both modalities, suggesting meter induction across modalities. There was an interaction between modality and voltage at 2.4 and 4.8 Hz. Looking at the power spectra, we also observed significant differences from zero in the auditory, but not in the visual, binary condition at 1.2 Hz. These findings suggest that meter processing is modulated by top-down mechanisms that interact with our perception of rhythmic events and that such modulation can also be found in the visual domain. The reported cross-modal effects of meter may shed light on the origins of our timing mechanisms, partially developed in primates and allowing humans to synchronize across modalities accurately.

  15. Look at the Beat, Feel the Meter: Top-Down Effects of Meter Induction on Auditory and Visual Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celma-Miralles, Alexandre; de Menezes, Robert F; Toro, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated top-down effects on meter induction in the auditory modality. However, little is known about these effects in the visual domain, especially without the involvement of motor acts such as tapping. In the present study, we aim to assess whether the projection of meter on auditory beats is also present in the visual domain. We asked 16 musicians to internally project binary (i.e., a strong-weak pattern) and ternary (i.e., a strong-weak-weak pattern) meter onto separate, but analog, visual and auditory isochronous stimuli. Participants were presented with sequences of tones or blinking circular shapes (i.e., flashes) at 2.4 Hz while their electrophysiological responses were recorded. A frequency analysis of the elicited steady-state evoked potentials allowed us to compare the frequencies of the beat (2.4 Hz), its first harmonic (4.8 Hz), the binary subharmonic (1.2 Hz), and the ternary subharmonic (0.8 Hz) within and across modalities. Taking the amplitude spectra into account, we observed an enhancement of the amplitude at 0.8 Hz in the ternary condition for both modalities, suggesting meter induction across modalities. There was an interaction between modality and voltage at 2.4 and 4.8 Hz. Looking at the power spectra, we also observed significant differences from zero in the auditory, but not in the visual, binary condition at 1.2 Hz. These findings suggest that meter processing is modulated by top-down mechanisms that interact with our perception of rhythmic events and that such modulation can also be found in the visual domain. The reported cross-modal effects of meter may shed light on the origins of our timing mechanisms, partially developed in primates and allowing humans to synchronize across modalities accurately. PMID:27047358

  16. Look at the Beat, Feel the Meter: Top–Down Effects of Meter Induction on Auditory and Visual Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celma-Miralles, Alexandre; de Menezes, Robert F.; Toro, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated top–down effects on meter induction in the auditory modality. However, little is known about these effects in the visual domain, especially without the involvement of motor acts such as tapping. In the present study, we aim to assess whether the projection of meter on auditory beats is also present in the visual domain. We asked 16 musicians to internally project binary (i.e., a strong-weak pattern) and ternary (i.e., a strong-weak-weak pattern) meter onto separate, but analog, visual and auditory isochronous stimuli. Participants were presented with sequences of tones or blinking circular shapes (i.e., flashes) at 2.4 Hz while their electrophysiological responses were recorded. A frequency analysis of the elicited steady-state evoked potentials allowed us to compare the frequencies of the beat (2.4 Hz), its first harmonic (4.8 Hz), the binary subharmonic (1.2 Hz), and the ternary subharmonic (0.8 Hz) within and across modalities. Taking the amplitude spectra into account, we observed an enhancement of the amplitude at 0.8 Hz in the ternary condition for both modalities, suggesting meter induction across modalities. There was an interaction between modality and voltage at 2.4 and 4.8 Hz. Looking at the power spectra, we also observed significant differences from zero in the auditory, but not in the visual, binary condition at 1.2 Hz. These findings suggest that meter processing is modulated by top–down mechanisms that interact with our perception of rhythmic events and that such modulation can also be found in the visual domain. The reported cross-modal effects of meter may shed light on the origins of our timing mechanisms, partially developed in primates and allowing humans to synchronize across modalities accurately. PMID:27047358

  17. A rare case of respiratory disorders associated with two autosomal recessive diseases and male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Mendeluk, Gabriela Ruth; Costa, Sergio López; Scigliano, Sergio; Menga, Guillermo; Demiceu, Sergio; Palaoro, Luis Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The study of nasal ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and ultrastructure may contribute to the understanding of pathognomonic cases of male infertility associated with defects in sperm motility. This study was designed to report a particular case of male infertility, characterized by the association of two respiratory autosomal recessive genetic diseases (alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency [AAT-D] and primary ciliary dyskinesia [PCD]). A 39-year-old patient with complete sperm immotility, AAT-D, and br...

  18. GENERAL: Stochastic Alternating Dynamics for Synchronous EAD-Like Beating Rhythms in Cultured Cardiac Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Hui-Min; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Ding, Xue-Li; Yang, Ming-Hao; Gu, Hua-Guang; Ren, Wei

    2009-11-01

    Dissolved cardiac myocytes can couple together and generate synchronous beatings in culture. We observed a synchronized early after-depolarization(EAD)-like rhythm in cultured cardiac myocytes and reproduced the experimental observation in a network mathematical model whose dynamics are close to a Hopf bifurcation. The mechanism for this EAD-like rhythm is attributed to noised-induced stochastic alternatings between the focus and the limit cycle. These results provide novel understandings for pathological heart rhythms like the early immature beatings.

  19. ECG Morphological Variability in Beat Space for Risk Stratification After Acute Coronary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yun; Syed, Zeeshan; Scirica, Benjamin M.; Morrow, David A; Guttag, John V.; Stultz, Collin M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Identification of patients who are at high risk of adverse cardiovascular events after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a major challenge in clinical cardiology. We hypothesized that quantifying variability in electrocardiogram (ECG) morphology may improve risk stratification post‐ACS. Methods and Results: We developed a new metric to quantify beat‐to‐beat morphologic changes in the ECG: morphologic variability in beat space (MVB), and compared our metric to published ECG ...

  20. Research on Surimi Beat Break Parameters and Shaping Process for Simulation Products of Shelled Shrimps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the production process of simulation products of shelled shrimps. Through the determination experiment of gel strength, the process parameter, the optimal period of beat break, is drawn in white silver carp surimi beat break which is suitable for simulation shelled shrimps. Using CATIA V5 R16, reverse design and manufacture of simulation shelled shrimps mould die is completed.

  1. Quasi-phase-matching of high-order-harmonic generation using multimode polarization beating

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Lewis Z.; O'Keeffe, Kevin; Hooker, Simon M.

    2013-01-01

    The generalization of quasi-phase-matching using polarization beating and of multimode quasi-phase-matching (MMQPM) for the generation of high-order harmonics is explored, and a method for achieving polarization beating is proposed. If two (and in principle more) modes of a waveguide are excited, modulation of the intensity, phase, and/or polarization of the guided radiation will be achieved. By appropriately matching the period of this modulation to the coherence length, quasi-phase-matching...

  2. Ultrarelativistic effects on parametric instabilities of beat waves in a transversely magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of relativistic effects on the parametric instabilities of large amplitude beat waves in a transversely magnetized plasma has been investigated. The relativistic Vlasov equation in gyrokinetic variables has been employed to find the nonlinear response of the plasma electrons. It is noticed that the extreme relativistic consideration does not have any significant effects on the various parametric instabilities of the beat waves in the plasma. (author). 11 refs

  3. Simulation of Ectopic Pacemakers in the Heart: Multiple Ectopic Beats Generated by Reentry inside Fibrotic Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Gouvêa de Barros; Rodrigo Weber dos Santos; Marcelo Lobosco; Sergio Alonso

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of nonconducting media, mimicking cardiac fibrosis, in two models of cardiac tissue produces the formation of ectopic beats. The fraction of nonconducting media in comparison with the fraction of healthy myocytes and the topological distribution of cells determines the probability of ectopic beat generation. First, a detailed subcellular microscopic model that accounts for the microstructure of the cardiac tissue is constructed and employed for the numerical simulation of action...

  4. A Kinematic Approach for Efficient and Robust Simulation of the Cardiac Beating Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Ijiri, Takashi; Ashihara, Takashi; Umetani, Nobuyuki; Igarashi, Takeo; Haraguchi, Ryo; Yokota, Hideo; Nakazawa, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulation techniques for cardiac beating motions potentially have many applications and a broad audience. However, most existing methods require enormous computational costs and often show unstable behavior for extreme parameter sets, which interrupts smooth simulation study and make it difficult to apply them to interactive applications. To address this issue, we present an efficient and robust framework for simulating the cardiac beating motion. The global cardiac motion is genera...

  5. Individual Differences in Beat Perception Affect Gait Responses to Low- and High-Groove Music

    OpenAIRE

    Leow, Li-Ann; Parrott, Taylor; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    Slowed gait in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can be improved when patients synchronize footsteps to isochronous metronome cues, but limited retention of such improvements suggest that permanent cueing regimes are needed for long-term improvements. If so, music might make permanent cueing regimes more pleasant, improving adherence; however, music cueing requires patients to synchronize movements to the “beat,” which might be difficult for patients with PD who tend to show weak beat pe...

  6. Finding the beat: a neural perspective across humans and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Hugo; Grahn, Jessica; Trainor, Laurel; Rohrmeier, Martin; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2015-03-19

    Humans possess an ability to perceive and synchronize movements to the beat in music ('beat perception and synchronization'), and recent neuroscientific data have offered new insights into this beat-finding capacity at multiple neural levels. Here, we review and compare behavioural and neural data on temporal and sequential processing during beat perception and entrainment tasks in macaques (including direct neural recording and local field potential (LFP)) and humans (including fMRI, EEG and MEG). These abilities rest upon a distributed set of circuits that include the motor cortico-basal-ganglia-thalamo-cortical (mCBGT) circuit, where the supplementary motor cortex (SMA) and the putamen are critical cortical and subcortical nodes, respectively. In addition, a cortical loop between motor and auditory areas, connected through delta and beta oscillatory activity, is deeply involved in these behaviours, with motor regions providing the predictive timing needed for the perception of, and entrainment to, musical rhythms. The neural discharge rate and the LFP oscillatory activity in the gamma- and beta-bands in the putamen and SMA of monkeys are tuned to the duration of intervals produced during a beat synchronization-continuation task (SCT). Hence, the tempo during beat synchronization is represented by different interval-tuned cells that are activated depending on the produced interval. In addition, cells in these areas are tuned to the serial-order elements of the SCT. Thus, the underpinnings of beat synchronization are intrinsically linked to the dynamics of cell populations tuned for duration and serial order throughout the mCBGT. We suggest that a cross-species comparison of behaviours and the neural circuits supporting them sets the stage for a new generation of neurally grounded computational models for beat perception and synchronization. PMID:25646516

  7. Individual differences in beat perception affect gait responses to low- and high-groove music.

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Ann eLeow; Taylor eParrott; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    Slowed gait in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients can be improved when patients synchronize footsteps to isochronous metronome cues, but limited retention of such improvements suggest that permanent cueing regimes are needed for long-term improvements. If so, music might make permanent cueing regimes more pleasant, improving adherence; however, music cueing requires patients to synchronize movements to the beat, which might be difficult for PD patients who tend to show weak beat perception. On...

  8. Stochastic Alternating Dynamics for Synchronous EAD-Like Beating Rhythms in Cultured Cardiac Myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ning; ZHANG Hui-Min; LIU Zhi-Qiang; DING Xue-Li; YANG Ming-Hao; GU Hua-Guang; REN Wei

    2009-01-01

    Dissolved cardiac myocytes can couple together and generate synchronous beatings in culture. We observed a synchronized early after-depolarization(EAD)-like rhythm in cultured cardiac myocytes and reproduced the experimental observation in a network mathematical model whose dynamics are close to a Hopf bifurcation. The mechanism for this EAD-like rhythm is attributed to noised-induced stochastic alternatings between the focus and the limit cycle. These results provide novel understandings for pathological heart rhythms like the early immature beatings.

  9. Exploring how musical rhythm entrains brain activity with electroencephalogram frequency-tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaradan, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perceive a regular beat in music and synchronize to this beat is a widespread human skill. Fundamental to musical behaviour, beat and meter refer to the perception of periodicities while listening to musical rhythms and often involve spontaneous entrainment to move on these periodicities. Here, we present a novel experimental approach inspired by the frequency-tagging approach to understand the perception and production of rhythmic inputs. This approach is illustrated here by recording the human electroencephalogram responses at beat and meter frequencies elicited in various contexts: mental imagery of meter, spontaneous induction of a beat from rhythmic patterns, multisensory integration and sensorimotor synchronization. Collectively, our observations support the view that entrainment and resonance phenomena subtend the processing of musical rhythms in the human brain. More generally, they highlight the potential of this approach to help us understand the link between the phenomenology of musical beat and meter and the bias towards periodicities arising under certain circumstances in the nervous system. Entrainment to music provides a highly valuable framework to explore general entrainment mechanisms as embodied in the human brain. PMID:25385771

  10. THE ANALYSIS OF HEART FREQUENCY OF HORSES UNDER LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mlyneková

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In our work we analysed the heart frequency of 11 warmblood horses on the load regulator of motion. The test lasted 3 weeks with gradual increase of load. The load was applied only in a step with gradual increase of time of load in up-sloping direction. The mean values of heart frequency of tested horses were within 61 beats/min. At the evaluation of maximum value of heart frequency we detected its twofold increase in comparison with mean values. The maximum rate of heart frequency under load was at the level of 147 beats/min. Detected values were not statistically significant which confirms that the load on tested horses was not causing any physiological changes.

  11. 铷原子中参量六波混频和量子拍的研究%Parametric Six-Wave Mixing and Quantum Beatings in Rb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱长军; 薛兵; 翟学军; 贺俊芳

    2009-01-01

    在铷原子中实现了轴向相位匹配的参量六波混频,并探测到位于红外光谱区的六波混频信号.六波混频信号与泵浦激光进行和频,产生了位于可见光范围内的可调谐的和频信号,并从和频信号中观察到频率为608 cm-1的量子拍.结果表明,六波混频信号中的量子拍能够用于研究原子和分子的相干特性.%Axially phase-matched parametric six-wave mixing was achieved in Rb and the parametric six-wave mixing signals in the infrared range were detected. Tunable signals in the visible range were produced by sum-frequency mixing of the pump laser and the parametric six-wave mixing signals in the infrared range. And, quantum beating at a frequency of 608 cm-1 was observed from the sum-frequency signal, indicating that the coherent properties of atoms and molecules can be studied by means of quantum beating recovered from parametric six-wave mixing signals.

  12. Parametric excitation of fast upper hybrid waves by non-resonant beating of counter-propagating X-mode lasers in a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generation of fast and slow upper hybrid waves by two plasmon decay of non-resonant beating mode of two counter-propagating X-mode lasers is modelled in magnetized plasma. Two counter-propagating lasers having frequencies and wave-vectors (ω1,k1) and (ω2,k2), respectively, generate a non resonant beat wave at frequency difference ω0≈ω1∼ω2 and wave number k→0≈k→1+k→2 which parametrically excites a pair of copropagating fast and slow upper hybrid waves at ω0≈2ωh+(3k12vth2/ωh)  (1−ωh/ω1) where ωh and vth are the upper hybrid frequency and electron thermal speed, respectively. The fast upper hybrid wave can be utilized for electron acceleration because its phase velocity is close to c. The growth rate of decay process is Γ∼ωp/10 at scattering angle θs∼5π/6 and magnetic field ∼90  T, which is one order higher as compared to the growth rate of Raman process. The growth rate can be further enhanced (∼20%) by increasing the magnetic field ∼450 T

  13. The relationship between ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF genotype and motor unit physiology: preliminary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrell Robert

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is important for neuronal and muscle development, and genetic variation in the CNTF gene has been associated with muscle strength. The effect of CNTF on nerve development suggests that CNTF genotype may be associated with force production via its influence on motor unit size and firing patterns. The purpose of this study is to examine whether CNTF genotype differentially affects motor unit activation in the vastus medialis with increasing isometric force during knee extension. Results Sixty-nine healthy subjects were genotyped for the presence of the G and A (null alleles in the CNTF gene (n = 57 G/G, 12 G/A. They were tested using a dynamometer during submaximal isometric knee extension contractions that were from 10–50% of their maximal strength. During the contractions, the vastus medialis was studied using surface and intramuscular electromyography with spiked triggered averaging to assess surface-detected motor unit potential (SMUP area and mean firing rates (mFR from identified motor units. CNTF genotyping was performed using standard PCR techniques from DNA obtained from leucocytes of whole blood samples. The CNTF G/A genotype was associated with smaller SMUP area motor units and lower mFR at higher force levels, and fewer but larger units at lower force levels than G/G homozygotes. The two groups used motor units with different size and activation characteristics with increasing force generation. While G/G subjects tended to utilize larger motor units with increasing force, G/A subjects showed relatively less increase in size by using relatively larger units at lower force levels. At higher force levels, G/A subjects were able to generate more force per motor unit size suggesting more efficient motor unit function with increasing muscle force. Conclusion Differential motor unit responses were observed between CNTF genotypes at force levels utilized in daily activities.

  14. Gene expression and functional annotation of the human ciliary body epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F Janssen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The ciliary body (CB of the human eye consists of the non-pigmented (NPE and pigmented (PE neuro-epithelia. We investigated the gene expression of NPE and PE, to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the most important functions of the CB. We also developed molecular signatures for the NPE and PE and studied possible new clues for glaucoma. METHODS: We isolated NPE and PE cells from seven healthy human donor eyes using laser dissection microscopy. Next, we performed RNA isolation, amplification, labeling and hybridization against 44×k Agilent microarrays. For microarray conformations, we used a literature study, RT-PCRs, and immunohistochemical stainings. We analyzed the gene expression data with R and with the knowledge database Ingenuity. RESULTS: The gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the NPE and PE were highly similar. We found that the most important functionalities of the NPE and PE were related to developmental processes, neural nature of the tissue, endocrine and metabolic signaling, and immunological functions. In total 1576 genes differed statistically significantly between NPE and PE. From these genes, at least 3 were cell-specific for the NPE and 143 for the PE. Finally, we observed high expression in the (NPE of 35 genes previously implicated in molecular mechanisms related to glaucoma. CONCLUSION: Our gene expression analysis suggested that the NPE and PE of the CB were quite similar. Nonetheless, cell-type specific differences were found. The molecular machineries of the human NPE and PE are involved in a range of neuro-endocrinological, developmental and immunological functions, and perhaps glaucoma.

  15. Extracting fetal heart beats from maternal abdominal recordings: selection of the optimal principal components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents a systematic comparison of different approaches to the automated selection of the principal components (PC) which optimise the detection of maternal and fetal heart beats from non-invasive maternal abdominal recordings. A public database of 75 4-channel non-invasive maternal abdominal recordings was used for training the algorithm. Four methods were developed and assessed to determine the optimal PC: (1) power spectral distribution, (2) root mean square, (3) sample entropy, and (4) QRS template. The sensitivity of the performance of the algorithm to large-amplitude noise removal (by wavelet de-noising) and maternal beat cancellation methods were also assessed. The accuracy of maternal and fetal beat detection was assessed against reference annotations and quantified using the detection accuracy score F1 [2*PPV*Se / (PPV + Se)], sensitivity (Se), and positive predictive value (PPV). The best performing implementation was assessed on a test dataset of 100 recordings and the agreement between the computed and the reference fetal heart rate (fHR) and fetal RR (fRR) time series quantified. The best performance for detecting maternal beats (F1 99.3%, Se 99.0%, PPV 99.7%) was obtained when using the QRS template method to select the optimal maternal PC and applying wavelet de-noising. The best performance for detecting fetal beats (F1 89.8%, Se 89.3%, PPV 90.5%) was obtained when the optimal fetal PC was selected using the sample entropy method and utilising a fixed-length time window for the cancellation of the maternal beats. The performance on the test dataset was 142.7 beats2/min2 for fHR and 19.9 ms for fRR, ranking respectively 14 and 17 (out of 29) when compared to the other algorithms presented at the Physionet Challenge 2013. (paper)

  16. Mutations in DNAJB13, Encoding an HSP40 Family Member, Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Male Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khouri, Elma; Thomas, Lucie; Jeanson, Ludovic; Bequignon, Emilie; Vallette, Benoit; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Montantin, Guy; Copin, Bruno; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Blanchon, Sylvain; Papon, Jean François; Lorès, Patrick; Yuan, Li; Collot, Nathalie; Tissier, Sylvie; Faucon, Catherine; Gacon, Gérard; Patrat, Catherine; Wolf, Jean Philippe; Dulioust, Emmanuel; Crestani, Bruno; Escudier, Estelle; Coste, André; Legendre, Marie; Touré, Aminata; Amselem, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal-recessive disease due to functional or ultra-structural defects of motile cilia. Affected individuals display recurrent respiratory-tract infections; most males are infertile as a result of sperm flagellar dysfunction. The great majority of the PCD-associated genes identified so far encode either components of dynein arms (DAs), which are multiprotein-ATPase complexes essential for ciliary motility, or proteins involved in DA assembly. To identify the molecular basis of a PCD phenotype characterized by central complex (CC) defects but normal DA structure, a phenotype found in ∼15% of cases, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a male individual with PCD and unexplained CC defects. This analysis, combined with whole-genome SNP genotyping, identified a homozygous mutation in DNAJB13 (c.833T>G), a gene encoding a HSP40 co-chaperone whose ortholog in the flagellated alga Chlamydomonas localizes to the radial spokes. In vitro studies showed that this missense substitution (p.Met278Arg), which involves a highly conserved residue of several HSP40 family members, leads to protein instability and triggers proteasomal degradation, a result confirmed by the absence of endogenous DNAJB13 in cilia and sperm from this individual. Subsequent DNAJB13 analyses identified another homozygous mutation in a second family; the study of DNAJB13 transcripts obtained from airway cells showed that this mutation (c.68+1G>C) results in a splicing defect consistent with a loss-of-function mutation. Overall, this study, which establishes mutations in DNAJB13 as a cause of PCD, unveils the key role played by DNAJB13 in the proper formation and function of ciliary and flagellar axonemes in humans. PMID:27486783

  17. The role of hair cells, cilia and ciliary motility in otolith formation in the zebrafish otic vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stooke-Vaughan, Georgina A; Huang, Peng; Hammond, Katherine L; Schier, Alexander F; Whitfield, Tanya T

    2012-05-01

    Otoliths are biomineralised structures required for the sensation of gravity, linear acceleration and sound in the zebrafish ear. Otolith precursor particles, initially distributed throughout the otic vesicle lumen, become tethered to the tips of hair cell kinocilia (tether cilia) at the otic vesicle poles, forming two otoliths. We have used high-speed video microscopy to investigate the role of cilia and ciliary motility in otolith formation. In wild-type ears, groups of motile cilia are present at the otic vesicle poles, surrounding the immotile tether cilia. A few motile cilia are also found on the medial wall, but most cilia (92-98%) in the otic vesicle are immotile. In mutants with defective cilia (iguana) or ciliary motility (lrrc50), otoliths are frequently ectopic, untethered or fused. Nevertheless, neither cilia nor ciliary motility are absolutely required for otolith tethering: a mutant that lacks cilia completely (MZovl) is still capable of tethering otoliths at the otic vesicle poles. In embryos with attenuated Notch signalling [mindbomb mutant or Su(H) morphant], supernumerary hair cells develop and otolith precursor particles bind to the tips of all kinocilia, or bind directly to the hair cells' apical surface if cilia are absent [MZovl injected with a Su(H)1+2 morpholino]. However, if the first hair cells are missing (atoh1b morphant), otolith formation is severely disrupted and delayed. Our data support a model in which hair cells produce an otolith precursor-binding factor, normally localised to tether cell kinocilia. We also show that embryonic movement plays a minor role in the formation of normal otoliths. PMID:22461562

  18. Soliton radiation beat analysis of optical pulses generated from two continuous-wave lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a fibre-based approach for generation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) with the aim of calibration of astronomical spectrographs in the low and medium-resolution range. This approach includes two steps: in the first step, an appropriate state of optical pulses is generated and subsequently moulded in the second step delivering the desired OFC. More precisely, the first step is realised by injection of two continuous-wave (CW) lasers into a conventional single-mode fibre, whereas the second step generates a broad OFC by using the optical solitons generated in step one as initial condition. We investigate the conversion of a bichromatic input wave produced by two initial CW lasers into a train of optical solitons, which happens in the fibre used as step one. Especially, we are interested in the soliton content of the pulses created in this fibre. For that, we study different initial conditions (a single cosine-hump, an Akhmediev breather, and a deeply modulated bichromatic wave) by means of soliton radiation beat analysis and compare the results to draw conclusion about the soliton content of the state generated in the first step. In case of a deeply modulated bichromatic wave, we observed the formation of a collective soliton crystal for low input powers and the appearance of separated solitons for high input powers. An intermediate state showing the features of both, the soliton crystal and the separated solitons, turned out to be most suitable for the generation of OFC for the purpose of calibration of astronomical spectrographs

  19. Soliton radiation beat analysis of optical pulses generated from two continuous-wave lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajnulina, M.; Giannone, D.; Haynes, R.; Roth, M. M. [innoFSPEC-VKS, Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Böhm, M. [innoFSPEC-InFaSe, University of Potsdam, Am Mühlenberg 3, 14476 Golm (Germany); Blow, K. [Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Rieznik, A. A. [Instituto Tecnologico de Buenos Aires and CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    We propose a fibre-based approach for generation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) with the aim of calibration of astronomical spectrographs in the low and medium-resolution range. This approach includes two steps: in the first step, an appropriate state of optical pulses is generated and subsequently moulded in the second step delivering the desired OFC. More precisely, the first step is realised by injection of two continuous-wave (CW) lasers into a conventional single-mode fibre, whereas the second step generates a broad OFC by using the optical solitons generated in step one as initial condition. We investigate the conversion of a bichromatic input wave produced by two initial CW lasers into a train of optical solitons, which happens in the fibre used as step one. Especially, we are interested in the soliton content of the pulses created in this fibre. For that, we study different initial conditions (a single cosine-hump, an Akhmediev breather, and a deeply modulated bichromatic wave) by means of soliton radiation beat analysis and compare the results to draw conclusion about the soliton content of the state generated in the first step. In case of a deeply modulated bichromatic wave, we observed the formation of a collective soliton crystal for low input powers and the appearance of separated solitons for high input powers. An intermediate state showing the features of both, the soliton crystal and the separated solitons, turned out to be most suitable for the generation of OFC for the purpose of calibration of astronomical spectrographs.

  20. Soliton radiation beat analysis of optical pulses generated from two continuous-wave lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajnulina, M; Böhm, M; Blow, K; Rieznik, A A; Giannone, D; Haynes, R; Roth, M M

    2015-10-01

    We propose a fibre-based approach for generation of optical frequency combs (OFCs) with the aim of calibration of astronomical spectrographs in the low and medium-resolution range. This approach includes two steps: in the first step, an appropriate state of optical pulses is generated and subsequently moulded in the second step delivering the desired OFC. More precisely, the first step is realised by injection of two continuous-wave (CW) lasers into a conventional single-mode fibre, whereas the second step generates a broad OFC by using the optical solitons generated in step one as initial condition. We investigate the conversion of a bichromatic input wave produced by two initial CW lasers into a train of optical solitons, which happens in the fibre used as step one. Especially, we are interested in the soliton content of the pulses created in this fibre. For that, we study different initial conditions (a single cosine-hump, an Akhmediev breather, and a deeply modulated bichromatic wave) by means of soliton radiation beat analysis and compare the results to draw conclusion about the soliton content of the state generated in the first step. In case of a deeply modulated bichromatic wave, we observed the formation of a collective soliton crystal for low input powers and the appearance of separated solitons for high input powers. An intermediate state showing the features of both, the soliton crystal and the separated solitons, turned out to be most suitable for the generation of OFC for the purpose of calibration of astronomical spectrographs. PMID:26520070

  1. Energy harvesting from the tail beating of a carangiform swimmer using ionic polymer-metal composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Youngsu; Verotti, Matteo; Walcott, Horace; Peterson, Sean D; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we study energy harvesting from the beating of a biomimetic fish tail using ionic polymer-metal composites. The design of the biomimetic tail is based on carangiform swimmers and is specifically inspired by the morphology of the heterocercal tail of thresher sharks. The tail is constituted of a soft silicone matrix molded in the form of the heterocercal tail and reinforced by a steel beam of rectangular cross section. We propose a modeling framework for the underwater vibration of the biomimetic tail, wherein the tail is assimilated to a cantilever beam with rectangular cross section and heterogeneous physical properties. We focus on base excitation in the form of a superimposed rotation about a fixed axis and we consider the regime of moderately large-amplitude vibrations. In this context, the effect of the encompassing fluid is described through a hydrodynamic function, which accounts for inertial, viscous and convective phenomena. The model is validated through experiments in which the base excitation is systematically varied and the motion of selected points on the biomimetic tail tracked in time. The feasibility of harvesting energy from an ionic polymer-metal composite attached to the vibrating structure is experimentally and theoretically assessed. The response of the transducer is described using a black-box model, where the voltage output is controlled by the rate of change of the mean curvature. Experiments are performed to elucidate the impact of the shunting resistance, the frequency of the base excitation and the placement of the ionic polymer-metal composite on energy harvesting from the considered biomimetic tail. PMID:23793023

  2. The Cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) Activates Hypothalamic Urocortin-Expressing Neurons Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Purser, Matthew J.; Dalvi, Prasad S.; Wang, Zi C.; Belsham, Denise D.

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces neurogenesis, reduces feeding, and induces weight loss. However, the central mechanisms by which CNTF acts are vague. We employed the mHypoE-20/2 line that endogenously expresses the CNTF receptor to examine the direct effects of CNTF on mRNA levels of urocortin-1, urocortin-2, agouti-related peptide, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotensin. We found that treatment of 10 ng/ml CNTF significantly increased only urocortin-1 mRNA by 1.84-fold...

  3. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium increases the intracellular free calcium concentration in rat cortical neurons

    OpenAIRE

    SUN, MEIQUN; Liu, Hongli; MIN, SHENGPING; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is involved in the activation of astrocytes. A previous study showed that CNTF-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) contributed to the increase of the calcium current and the elevation of corresponding ion channels in cortical neurons. On this basis, it is reasonable to assume that CNTF-ACM may increase the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in neurons. In the present study, the effects of CNTF-ACM on [Ca2+]i in rat cortical neuron...

  4. Rat ciliary neurothrophic factor (CNTF): gene structure and regulation of mRNA levels in glial cell cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Patrick; Sendtner, Michael; Meyer, Michael; Thoenen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the rat ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene and the regulation ofCNTF mRNA levels in cultured glial cells were investigated. The rat mRNA is encoded by a simple two-exon transcription unit. Sequence analysis of the region upstream of the transcription start-site did not reveal a typical TATA-box consensus sequence. Low levels of CNTF mRNA were detected in cultured Schwann cells, and CNTF mRNA was not increased by a variety of treatments. Three-week-old astrocyteenriched c...

  5. Suppression of IκBα increases the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in human ciliary muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Chi; Xiao, Jian-Hui; Zhuo, Ye-hong; Guo, Hui; Peng, Wei; Ge, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose An increase of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) has been found to improve outflow through the uveoscleral pathway. This experiment was designed to test whether reduction of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B alpha (IκBα) levels could enhance MMP-2 expression in human ciliary muscle (HCM) cells in vitro. Methods The small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B (IκBα) was transfected into HCM cells. The mRNA and protein levels of IκBα, nuclear factor-ka...

  6. 基于高斯低通滤波的音乐节拍提取%Music Beat Extraction Based on Low-Pass Gaussian Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡建建; 曾培峰; 唐莉萍; 臧珠萍

    2011-01-01

    A music beat extraction method based on low-pass Gaussian filter is proposed. And musical energy extraction is applied to calculate the energy envelop. Also denoise is archived by data addition in spatial domain. The quantity of data is reduced also in addition. Then, a low-pass Gaussian filter is formed to depress high frequency components and increase the prominence of low-frequency tempo information.Finally, the beat of music signal is located by peak detection calculation. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is capable of extracting music beat with high accuracy and it is practicable to real-time applications.%提出一种基于高斯低通滤波的节拍提取算法,对音乐信号进行能量分析,确定信号的能量包络.在获得能量包络基础上,采用叠加分析的方法,实现在减少有待分析数据量的同时,消除信号的噪声.然后,应用高斯窗函数构造一个低通滤波器,对压缩后的信号数据进行低通滤波处理,滤除音乐信号中不能决定节拍信息的高频部分.最后,通过峰值检测的方法确定音乐信号的节拍.实验结果表明,本文所采用的方法提取结果准确,且实用性强.

  7. A case report of primary ciliary dyskinesia, laterality defects and developmental delay caused by the co-existence of a single gene and chromosome disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian P

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by abnormal ciliary motion and impaired mucociliary clearance, leading to recurrent respiratory infections, sinusitis, otitis media and male infertility. Some patients also have laterality defects. We recently reported the identification of three disease-causing PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population; RSPH4A, DYX1C1 and CCNO. We have since assessed an additional Irish Traveller family with a complex phenotype involving PCD who did not have any of the previously identified PCD mutations.

  8. 'Confessing out the soul to conform to the rhythm of thought': a reading of Allen Ginsberg’s Beat poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kruger

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Much critical writing about the Beat Movement has focused on the strong interrelationship between the literary and social discourses within and around the movement. However, the study of Beat literature also necessitates an awareness of its position within the literary discourse of the twentieth century. Beat writing may be seen as standing in the unstable, shifting territory between two equally unstable, shifting literary movements: modernism and postmodernism. Beat poetry pits itself against high modernism and the New Critical tradition, draws upon some aspects of early avant-garde modernism, and simultaneously remoulds these aspects into what may be regarded as the beginnings of postmodernism in the USA. This article presents a reading of Allen Ginsberg’s Beat poetry against this literary-historical background. A brief general overview of some of the key characteristics of Beat poetry is given, followed by a discussion of a number of Beat poems, organised around some salient features of Ginsberg’s Beat poetry that may be linked to Beat poetry’s position in the transition from modernism to postmodernism.

  9. Independent Control of the Static and Dynamic Components of the Chlamydomonas Flagellar Beat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Veikko F; Sartori, Pablo; Friedrich, Benjamin M; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-04-25

    When the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii swims, it uses the breaststroke beat of its two flagella to pull itself forward [1]. The flagellar waveform can be decomposed into a static component, corresponding to an asymmetric time-averaged shape, and a dynamic component, corresponding to the time-varying wave [2]. Extreme lightening conditions photoshock the cell, converting the breaststroke beat into a symmetric sperm-like beat, which causes a reversal of the direction of swimming [3]. Waveform conversion is achieved by a reduction in magnitude of the static component, whereas the dynamic component remains unchanged [2]. The coupling between static and dynamic components, however, is poorly understood, and it is not known whether the static component requires the dynamic component or whether it can exist independently. We used isolated and reactivated axonemes [4] to investigate the relation between the two beat components. We discovered that, when reactivated in the presence of low ATP concentrations, axonemes displayed the static beat component in absence of the dynamic component. Furthermore, we found that the amplitudes of the two components depend on ATP in qualitatively different ways. These results show that the decomposition into static and dynamic components is not just a mathematical concept but that the two components can independently control different aspects of cell motility: the static component controls swimming direction, whereas the dynamic component provides propulsion. PMID:27040779

  10. 4D ultrasound and 3D MRI registration of beating heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realize intra-cardiac surgery without cardio-pulmonary bypass, a medical imaging technique with both high image quality and data acquisition rate that is fast enough to follow heart beat movements is required. In this research, we proposed a method that utilized the image quality of MRI and the speed of ultrasound. We developed a 4D image reconstruction method using image registration of 3D MRI and 4D ultrasound images. The registration method consists of rigid registration between 3D MRI and 3D ultrasound with the same heart beat phase, and non-rigid registration between 3D ultrasound images from different heart beat phases. Non-rigid registration was performed with B-spline based registration using variable spring model. In phantom experiment using balloon phantom, registration accuracy was less than 2 mm for total heart volume variation range of 10%. We applied our registration method on 3D MRI and 4D ultrasound images of a volunteer's beating heart data and confirmed through visual observation that heart beat pattern was well reproduced. (orig.)

  11. Soda-anthraquinone pulping of palm oil empty fruit bunches and beating of the resulting pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, L; Serrano, L; Rodríguez, A; Sánchez, R

    2009-02-01

    The influence of soda-anthraquinone pulping variables (temperature, time and soda concentration) and beating (number of PFI beating revolution) of palm oil empty fruit bunches (EFB) on the resulting paper sheets was studied, with a view to identifying the optimum operating conditions. Equations were derived that reproduced the properties of the paper sheets with errors less than 10-12% in 90-95% of cases. An optimum compromise was found as regards operating conditions (15% soda, 170 degrees C, 70 min and 2400 number of PFI beating revolutions) that provided paper properties departing by less than 12% from their optimum values (59.63 Nm/g tensile index, 4.48% stretch, 4.17 kN/g burst index and 7.20 m Nm(2)/g tear index), and a beating grade of 47.5 degrees SR, acceptable to obtain paper sheets. Because these conditions involve a lower soda, temperature, time and beating than those required to maximize the studied paper properties, they can save chemical reagents, energy and immobilized capital for industrial facilities. On the other hand, the stretch properties of these pulp beaten are higher than those of others non-wood pulps, as wheat straw and olive wood. PMID:18815028

  12. Measurements of beat wave accelerated electrons in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrons are accelerated by large amplitude electron plasma waves driven by counter-propagating microwaves with a difference frequency approximately equal to the electron plasma frequency. Energetic electrons are observed only when the phase velocity of the wave is in the range 3ve ph e (vph was varied 2ve ph e), where ve is the electron thermal velocity, (kTe/me)1/2. As the phase velocity increases, fewer electrons are accelerated to higher velocities. The measured current contained in these accelerated electrons has the power dependence predicted by theory, but the magnitude is lower than predicted

  13. Chloral hydrate alters the organization of the ciliary basal apparatus and cell organelles in sea urchin embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, A.; Schatten, H.; Mitchell, K. D.; Crosser, M.; Taylor, M.

    1998-01-01

    The mitotic inhibitor, chloral hydrate, induces ciliary loss in the early embryo phase of Lytechinus pictus. It causes a breakdown of cilia at the junction of the cilium and the basal body known as the basal plate. This leaves the plasma membrane temporarily unsealed. The basal apparatus accessory structures, consisting of the basal body, basal foot, basal foot cap, striated side arm, and striated rootlet, are either misaligned or disintegrated by treatment with chloral hydrate. Furthermore, microtubules which are associated with the basal apparatus are disassembled. Mitochondria accumulate at the base of cilia - underneath the plasma membrane - and show alterations in their structural organization. The accumulation of mitochondria is observed in 40% of all electron micrograph sections while 60% show the areas mostly devoid of mitochondria. The microvilli surrounding a cilium and striated rootlet remain intact in the presence of chloral hydrate. These results suggest that deciliation in early sea urchin embryos by chloral hydrate is caused by combined effects on the ciliary membrane and on microtubules in the cilia. Furthermore, it is suggested that chloral hydrate can serve as a tool to explore the cytoskeletal mechanisms that are involved in cilia motility in the developing sea urchin embryo.

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans ciliary protein NPHP-8, the homologue of human RPGRIP1L, is required for ciliogenesis and chemosensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Zhang, Mingshu; Xia, Zhiping; Xu, Pingyong; Chen, Liangyi; Xu, Tao

    2011-07-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is the most frequent genetic cause of end-stage renal failure in children and young adults. NPHP8/RPGRIP1L is a novel ciliary gene that, when mutated, in addition to causing NPHP, also causes Joubert syndrome (JBTS) and Meckel syndrome (MKS). The exact function of NPHP8 and how defects in NPHP8 lead to human diseases are poorly understood. Here, we studied the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog nphp-8 (C09G5.8) and explored the possible function of NPHP-8 in ciliated sensory neurons. We determined the gene structure of nphp-8 through rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) analysis and discovered an X-box motif that had been previously overlooked. Moreover, NPHP-8 co-localized with NPHP-4 at the transition zone at the base of cilia. Mutation of nphp-8 led to abnormal dye filling (Dyf) and shorter cilia lengths in a subset of ciliary neurons. In addition, chemotaxis to several volatile attractants was significantly impaired in nphp-8 mutants. Our data suggest that NPHP-8/RPGRIP1L plays an important role in cilia formation and cilia-mediated chemosensation in a cell type-specific manner. PMID:21689635

  15. Wavelet Entropy as a Measure of Ventricular Beat Suppression from the Electrocardiogram in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Langley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel method of quantifying the effectiveness of the suppression of ventricular activity from electrocardiograms (ECGs in atrial fibrillation is proposed. The temporal distribution of the energy of wavelet coefficients is quantified by wavelet entropy at each ventricular beat. More effective ventricular activity suppression yields increased entropies at scales dominated by the ventricular and atrial components of the ECG. Two studies are undertaken to demonstrate the efficacy of the method: first, using synthesised ECGs with controlled levels of residual ventricular activity, and second, using patient recordings with ventricular activity suppressed by an average beat template subtraction algorithm. In both cases wavelet entropy is shown to be a good measure of the effectiveness of ventricular beat suppression.

  16. RULE BASED CLASSIFICATION OF ISCHEMIC ECG BEATS USING ANT-MINER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Murugan,

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial ischemia is the most common cardiac disease and is characterized by a high risk of sudden cardiac death. The accurate ischemic episode detection, where a sequence of cardiac beats is assessed, is based on the correct detection of ischemic beats. In this paper, a data mining approach, association rule based classification using Ant-Miner algorithm is proposed for automatic detection of ischemic ECG beats. The proposed work has two steps: initially the noise is removed and the features are extracted from the ECG signals. With these features, the Ant-Miner is applied to extract the rules. European Society of Cardiology ST-T database of ECGbeats is used to analyze the performance of our proposed method with the existing. The greater accuracy of the proposed method shows its high performance than the existing.

  17. Beta beat correction and improvement in Indus-2 storage ring performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The periodicity restoration or the beta beat correction is an important step to enhance the operational performance of any storage ring in terms of the better injection efficiency and improved beam lifetime etc. A method of linear beam optics from closed orbit has been used for the beta beat correction in Indus-2 store ring, where 26 power supplies driving the 72 quadrupoles are used as a degree of freedoms. In this method, the measured response matrix is fitted to the theoretical orbit response matrix and deviations of the quadrupole strengths are determined. Correction of these deviation in strengths are applied in the operating machine through the power supplies driving the quadrupoles. We will discuss the method used for the beta beat correction in Indus-2 storage ring and will present the effects of the correction on the injection efficiency and beam lifetime. (author)

  18. On the Interaction of Two Beating Electrostatic Waves with Plasma Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malá, Z.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the interaction of particles with two beating plasma waves. We follow the instructional article by Ott and Dum. According to them, the sum of wave actions during the interaction is constant, supposing the effect of trapped particles on the beat can be neglected. In the present paper, this problem is solved more generally, just for the case of trapped and also untrapped particles in the wave. Our study shows that the sum of wave actions is constant also in the case when the influence of the trapped particles on the amplitudes of two waves was considered. On the contrary this conclusion is not valid if it is supposed that two original waves are amplitude modulated e.g. by the influence of the interaction of the beat with particles.

  19. A novel type of self-beating cardiomyocytes in adult mouse ventricles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to investigate the presence of resident heart cells that are distinct from terminally-differentiated cardiomyocytes. Adult mouse heart was coronary perfused with collagenase, and ventricles were excised and further digested. After spinning cardiomyocyte-containing fractions down, the supernatant fraction was collected and cultured without adding any chemicals. Two to five days after plating, some of rounded cells adhered to the culture dish, gradually changed their shape and then started self-beating. These self-beating cells did not appreciably proliferate but underwent a further morphological maturation process to form highly branched shapes with many projections. These cells were mostly multinucleated, well sarcomeric-organized and expressed cardiac marker proteins, defined as atypically-shaped cardiomyocytes (ACMs). Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ACMs exhibited spontaneous action potentials arising from the preceding slow diastolic depolarization. We thus found a novel type of resident heart cells in adult cardiac ventricles that spontaneously develop into self-beating cardiomyocytes.

  20. Probing an Excited-State Atomic Transition Using Hyperfine Quantum Beat Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to observe the dynamics of an excited-state transition in a room temperature atomic vapor using hyperfine quantum beats. Our experiment using cesium atoms consists of a pulsed excitation of the D2 transition, and continuous-wave driving of an excited-state transition from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state to the 7S$_{1/2}$ state. We observe quantum beats in the fluorescence from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state which are modified by the driving of the excited-state transition. The Fourier spectrum of the beat signal yields evidence of Autler-Townes splitting of the 6P$_{3/2}$, F = 5 hyperfine level and Rabi oscillations on the excited-state transition. A detailed model provides qualitative agreement with the data, giving insight to the physical processes involved.

  1. Modulational instability and its consequences for the beat-wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modulational instability caused by the coupling of a Langmuir wave to the ion motion is investigated in the domain of large v/sub L//V/sub te/>1 ratios, where v/sub L/ and v/sub t//sub e/ denote the pump Langmuir-wave quiver velocity and the electron thermal velocity, respectively. A convenient approximate expression for the growth rate is given for v/sub L//v/sub te/<50(A/Z)/sup 1/6/. The limitation of the beat plasmon growth due to the modulational instability is studied in the context of plasma beat wave experiments and the maximum beat plasmon amplitude is determined numerically

  2. Action of Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Mouse Dorsal Vagal Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzacqua, Martina; Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Acciarini, Samantha; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces weight loss in obese rodents and humans through activation of the hypothalamic Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF also affects the brainstem centers involved in feeding and energy balance regulation. To this end, wild-type and leptin-deficient (ob/ob and db/db) obese mice were acutely treated with intraperitoneal recombinant CNTF. Coronal brainstem sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of STAT3, STAT1, STAT5 phosphorylation and c-Fos. In wild-type mice, CNTF treatment for 45 min induced STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 phosphorylation in neurons as well as glial cells of the area postrema; here, the majority of CNTF-responsive cells activated multiple STAT isoforms, and a significant proportion of CNTF-responsive glial cells bore the immaturity and plasticity markers nestin and vimentin. After 120 min CNTF treatment, c-Fos expression was intense in glial cells and weak in neurons of the area postrema, it was intense in several neurons of the rostral and caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS), and weak in some cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. In the ob/ob and db/db mice, Jak-STAT activation and c-Fos expression were similar to those induced in wild-type mouse brainstem. Treatment with CNTF (120 min, to induce c-Fos expression) and leptin (25 min, to induce STAT3 phosphorylation) demonstrated the co-localization of the two transcription factors in a small neuron population in the caudal NTS portion. Finally, weak immunohistochemical CNTF staining, detected in funiculus separans, and meningeal glial cells, matched the modest amount of CNTF found by RT-qPCR in micropunched area postrema tissue, which in contrast exhibited a very high amount of CNTF receptor. Collectively, the present findings show that the area postrema and the NTS exhibit high, distinctive responsiveness to circulating

  3. Action of Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Mouse Dorsal Vagal Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzacqua, Martina; Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Acciarini, Samantha; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces weight loss in obese rodents and humans through activation of the hypothalamic Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF also affects the brainstem centers involved in feeding and energy balance regulation. To this end, wild-type and leptin-deficient (ob/ob and db/db) obese mice were acutely treated with intraperitoneal recombinant CNTF. Coronal brainstem sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of STAT3, STAT1, STAT5 phosphorylation and c-Fos. In wild-type mice, CNTF treatment for 45 min induced STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 phosphorylation in neurons as well as glial cells of the area postrema; here, the majority of CNTF-responsive cells activated multiple STAT isoforms, and a significant proportion of CNTF-responsive glial cells bore the immaturity and plasticity markers nestin and vimentin. After 120 min CNTF treatment, c-Fos expression was intense in glial cells and weak in neurons of the area postrema, it was intense in several neurons of the rostral and caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS), and weak in some cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. In the ob/ob and db/db mice, Jak-STAT activation and c-Fos expression were similar to those induced in wild-type mouse brainstem. Treatment with CNTF (120 min, to induce c-Fos expression) and leptin (25 min, to induce STAT3 phosphorylation) demonstrated the co-localization of the two transcription factors in a small neuron population in the caudal NTS portion. Finally, weak immunohistochemical CNTF staining, detected in funiculus separans, and meningeal glial cells, matched the modest amount of CNTF found by RT-qPCR in micropunched area postrema tissue, which in contrast exhibited a very high amount of CNTF receptor. Collectively, the present findings show that the area postrema and the NTS exhibit high, distinctive responsiveness to circulating

  4. Cross-Cultural Influences on Rhythm Processing: Reproduction, Discrimination, and Beat Tapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cameron

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The structures of musical rhythm differ between cultures, despite the fact that the ability to synchronize one’s movements to musical rhythms appears to be universal. To measure the influence of culture on rhythm processing, we tested East African and North American adults on the perception, production, and beat tapping of rhythms derived from East African and Western music. To assess rhythm perception, participants identified whether pairs of rhythms were same or different. To assess rhythm production, participants reproduced rhythms after hearing them. To assess beat tapping, participants tapped the beat along with repeated rhythms. We expected that performance in all three tasks would be influenced both by the culture of the participant and by the culture of the rhythm. Specifically, we predicted that a participant’s ability to discriminate, reproduce, and accurately tap the beat would be better for rhythms from their own culture than for rhythms from another culture. In the rhythm discrimination task, there were no differences in discriminating culturally familiar and unfamiliar rhythms. In the rhythm reproduction task, both groups reproduced East African rhythms more accurately than Western rhythms, but East African participants also showed an effect of cultural familiarity, leading to a significant interaction. In the beat tapping task, participants in both groups tapped the beat more accurately for culturally familiar than unfamiliar rhythms. The results demonstrate that culture does influence the processing of musical rhythm. In terms of the function of musical rhythm, our results are consistent with theories that musical rhythm enables synchronization. Musical rhythm may foster musical cultural identity by enabling within-group synchronization to music, perhaps supporting social cohesion.

  5. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Leman

    Full Text Available Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is 'activating' in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is 'relaxing' in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation.

  6. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is 'activating' in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is 'relaxing' in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation. PMID:23874469

  7. Pulse compression by parametric beating with a prepared Raman coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a general analysis for the interaction of a probe-laser radiation with a coherently prepared molecular Raman medium. We describe a general formalism that includes dispersive effects, such as group velocity and group-velocity dispersion (GVD). When dispersion is negligible, the analysis is especially simple and insightful. We show that molecular oscillations result in a modulated instantaneous susceptibility of the medium. The effect of the time-varying susceptibility on a probe-laser pulse is twofold: the output frequency becomes modulated because of the time-varying phase velocity, and the pulse shape becomes deformed because of the time-varying group velocity. We identify two mechanisms for pulse compression: (1) Frequency chirping with subsequent pulse compression by normal linear GVD (possibly in the same medium) and (2) Compression due to the time-varying group velocity. We analyze various aspects of pulse compression in the coherent Raman medium and derive conservation relations for this process. When we consider a probe-laser pulse that is much shorter than the molecular oscillation period, we observe frequency chirping, compression, or stretching of this pulse, depending on its relative timing with respect to the molecular oscillations. Based on our analysis, we propose a method for selective compression or frequency conversion of single ultrashort pulses

  8. Off-momentum beta-beat correction in the RHIC proton run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; White, S.

    2012-05-20

    In this article, we will review the techniques to measure the off-momentum {beta}-beat and the correction algorithms with the chromatic arc sextupoles in RHIC. We will focus on the measurement and correction of the off-momentum {beta}*-beat at the interaction points. The off-momentum {beta}* is measured with the quadrupole strength change and a high resolution phase lock loop tune meter. The results of off-momentum {beta}* correction performed in a dedicated beam experiment in the 2012 RHIC 250 GeV polarized proton run are presented.

  9. Model for hydrodynamic synchronization of beating cilia in a viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Thomas; Fu, Henry

    2010-03-01

    The synchronization of beating flagella or cilia is important for swimming microorganisms such as Chlamydomonas as well as transport processes such as the clearing of foreign bodies from the airway. Many of these situations involve Newtonian fluids, but some such as the airway involve viscoelastic fluids. A hypothesis currently under intense investigation is that hydrodynamic interactions between nearby beating cilia lead to synchronization. Theoretical studies of simple models consisting of orbiting spheres in Newtonian liquids show that the spheres lock phases when they are subject to suitable normal forces. This talk describes a theoretical study of how synchronization arises in viscoelastic fluids.

  10. Terahertz generation by beating two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma is discussed theoretically. The critical angle between the two Langmuir waves and the critical wave-length (wave vector) of Langmuir waves for generating THz radiation are obtained analytically. Furthermore, the maximum radiation energy is obtained. We find that the critical angle, the critical wave-length, and the generated radiation energy strongly depend on plasma temperature and wave-length of the Langmuir waves. That is, the THz radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma can be controlled by adjusting the plasma temperature and the Langmuir wave-length

  11. Terahertz generation by beating two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qiao, Xin; Cheng, Li-Hong; Tang, Rong-An; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui, E-mail: xuejk@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Atomic & Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronics Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma is discussed theoretically. The critical angle between the two Langmuir waves and the critical wave-length (wave vector) of Langmuir waves for generating THz radiation are obtained analytically. Furthermore, the maximum radiation energy is obtained. We find that the critical angle, the critical wave-length, and the generated radiation energy strongly depend on plasma temperature and wave-length of the Langmuir waves. That is, the THz radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma can be controlled by adjusting the plasma temperature and the Langmuir wave-length.

  12. Active Faraday optical frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We propose the mechanism of active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate active Faraday optical frequency standards based on 852 nm narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standards is determined by the cesium 6 $^{2}S_{1/2}$ $F$ = 4 to 6 $^{2}P_{3/2}$ $F'$ = 4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 996(26) Hz, which is 5.3 $\\times$ 10$^{3}$ times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852 nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 $\\upmu$W. The active Faraday optical frequency standards reported here have advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for...

  13. PWM Switching Frequency Effects on Eddy Current Sensors for Magnetically Suspended Flywheel Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Ralph; Lebron, Ramon; Dever, Timothy P.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2003-01-01

    A flywheel magnetic bearing (MB) pulse width modulated power amplifier (PWM) configuration is selected to minimize noise generated by the PWMs in the flywheel position sensor system. Two types of noise are addressed: beat frequency noise caused by variations in PWM switching frequencies, and demodulation noise caused by demodulation of high order harmonics of the switching voltage into the MB control band. Beat frequency noise is eliminated by synchronizing the PWM switch frequencies, and demodulation noise is minimized by selection of a switching frequency which does not have harmonics at the carrier frequency of the sensor. The recommended MB PWM system has five synchronized PWMs switching at a non-integer harmonic of the sensor carrier.

  14. A conserved role for Notch in priming the cellular response to Shh through ciliary localisation of the key Shh transducer, Smoothened

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stasiulewicz, Magdalena; Gray, Shona; Mastromina, Ioanna;

    2015-01-01

    , we show Notch activity promotes longer primary cilia both in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, these Notch-regulated effects are Shh-independent. These data identify Notch signalling as a novel modulator of Shh signalling which acts mechanistically via regulation of ciliary localisation of key...

  15. Ciliary neurotrophic factor activates NF-κB to enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics and prevent neuropathy in sensory neurons of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Ali; Roy Chowdhury, Subir K.; Smith, Darrel R.; Balakrishnan, Savitha; Tessler, Lori; Martens, Corina; Morrow, Dwane; Schartner, Emily; Frizzi, Katie E.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Fernyhough, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes causes mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neurons that may contribute to peripheral neuropathy. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes sensory neuron survival and axon regeneration and prevents axonal dwindling, nerve conduction deficits and thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic rats. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF protects sensory neuron function during diabetes through normalization of impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics. In addition, we investigated whether th...

  16. Intravitreal injection of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) causes peripheral remodeling and does not prevent photoreceptor loss in canine RPGR mutant retina

    OpenAIRE

    Beltran, William A.; Wen, Rong; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2007-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) rescues photoreceptors in several animal models of retinal degeneration and is currently being evaluated as a potential treatment for retinitis pigmentosa in humans. This study was conducted to test whether CNTF prevents photoreceptor cell loss in XLPRA2, an early onset canine model of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa caused by a frameshift mutation in RPGR exon ORF15.

  17. Mnemonic Effect of Iconic Gesture and Beat Gesture in Adults and Children: Is Meaning in Gesture Important for Memory Recall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Wing Chee; Chen-Hui, Colin Sim; Wei-Shan, Julie Low

    2012-01-01

    Abundant research has shown that encoding meaningful gesture, such as an iconic gesture, enhances memory. This paper asked whether gesture needs to carry meaning to improve memory recall by comparing the mnemonic effect of meaningful (i.e., iconic gestures) and nonmeaningful gestures (i.e., beat gestures). Beat gestures involve simple motoric…

  18. Discinesia ciliar primária: quando o pediatra deve suspeitar e como diagnosticar? Primary ciliary dyskinesia: when the pediatrician must suspect and how to do the diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne K. Olm

    2007-12-01

    from secondary ciliary defects and to describe the clinical features, screening and diagnostic laboratorial tests, and the clinical management of this disorder. DATA SOURCES: A bibliographical search was obtained from Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases, from 1980 to 2007. DATA SYNTHESIS: PCD is an autossomic recessive disorder with abnormal structure and/or function of the cilia, leading to reduced mucociliary clearance. The clinical manifestations include upper and lower respiratory tracts, with recurrent ear, sinus and lung infections that may progress to bronchiectasis. Situs inversus and male infertility are other clinical features of this disorder. PCD should be suspected by pediatricians in the following clinical situations: full term neonates with respiratory distress without apparent causes, presence of dextrocardia, infants with chronic cough and/or recurrent upper airways infections in the absence of immunodeficiency and cystic fibrosis, children with atypical asthma and bronchiectasis without a definitive cause. The diagnostic screening tests are the saccharine and nasal nitric oxide tests. Functional and ultrastructural evaluations demand an electronic microscopic analysis and the observation of the frequency and the pattern of the ciliary movement. CONCLUSIONS: Although the prevalence of PCD is low, the difficulties in establishing the diagnosis due to the complex investigations demanded and the unfamiliarity of the disease by physicians lead to underdiagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment of PCD are essential to reduce the morbidity and to avoid complications.

  19. Accuracy and repeatability of direct ciliary sulcus diameter measurements by full-scale 50-megahertz ultrasound biomicroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI De-jiao; WANG Ning-li; CHEN Shu; LI Shu-ning; MU Da-peng; WANG Tao

    2009-01-01

    Background Phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) implantation has been a popular means for the treatment of high ametropia. Measurements of ciliary sulcus diameter is important for pIOL size determining. But till now, no perfect system can directly measure it. The present study was to evaluate the accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility of direct sulcus diameter measurements obtained by a full-scale 50-megahertz (MHz) ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM).Methods A fresh cadaver human eye with a scale marker inserted through the posterior chamber plane from 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock meridian and 30 randomly selected eyes from 30 normal subjects were scanned by full-scale 50-MHz UBM in horizontal meridional scan plane. The distance between the scales and the whole length of the marker inside the cadaver eye were measured by the same observer using the "built-in" measurement tools and the indicating error of instrument was calculated. Reproducibility of the measurement was evaluated in 30 eyes by 2 operators using Blander and Altman plot test. Repeatability was evaluated from 10 successive eyes randomly selected from the 30 eyes by one operator.Results On a scale of 1 mm, the greatest indicating error was 40 μm; the mean largest indicating error of 1 mm scale from the 10 images was (26±14) μm; on a scale of 11 mm, the greatest indicating error was 70 μo; the error rate was 0.64%. The mean length of the needle inside the eye of the 10 images was 11.05 mm, with the mean indicating error of 47 μm, the average error rate was 0.43%. For ciliary sulcus diameter measurements in vivo, the coefficient of variation was 0.38%; the coefficients of repeatability for intra-observer and inter-observer measurements were 1.99% and 2.55%, respectively. The limits of agreement for intra-observer and inter-observer measurement were-0.41 mm to 0.48 mm and -0.59 mm to 0.58 ram, respectively.Conclusion The full-scale 50-MHz UBM can be a high accuracy and good repeatability means for direct

  20. Precision Controlling of Frequency Difference for Elastic-Stress Birefringence He-Ne Dual-Frequency Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Lu-Fei; ZHANG Shu-Lian; GUO Hong; REN Zhou

    2007-01-01

    Birefringence-Zeeman dual frequency lasers are capable of producing frequency difference from several kilohertz to hundreds of megahertz, but the precision of giving and stabilizing of the beat frequency still needs improvement to the range of ±200 kHz. We design a new elastic force-exerting device comprised of the bottom part, two arms and two pieces of force-exerting sheets. The frequency difference smoothly tuning is realized with this device in a large range of 2 MHz to 20 MHz. Power-balance frequency stabilization system is used to investigate characters of the temperature, frequency difference and laser power. The precision of the frequency difference has reach up to JrlOO kHz after system temperature balance. Analyses of the laser frequency difference and power character are carried out.