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Sample records for cigs solar cell

  1. Degradation of CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Large scale commercial introduction of CIGS photovoltaics (PV) requires modules with low costs, high efficiencies and long and predictable lifetimes. Unfortunately,knowledge about the lifetime of CIGS PV is limited, which is reflected in the results of field studies: degradation rates varying from

  2. Degradation of CIGS solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Theelen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Large scale commercial introduction of CIGS photovoltaics (PV) requires modules with low costs, high efficiencies and long and predictable lifetimes. Unfortunately,knowledge about the lifetime of CIGS PV is limited, which is reflected in the results of field studies: degradation rates varying from 0% to about 4% per year have been observed. Since warrantees are given out that the modules will still yield 80% of their initial power after 20 years of field exposure, degradation rates are often ...

  3. TEMPERATUREEFFECT OFELECTRICALPROPERTIES OF CIGS SOLAR CELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ferouani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we are interested in studying the copper–indium–gallium–selenium (CIGS solar cells sandwiched between cadmium sulfide (CdS and ZnO as buffer layers, and Molybdenum (Mo. Thus, we report our simulation results using the capacitance simulator (SCAPS in terms of layer thickness, absorber layer band gap and operating temperature to find out the optimum choice. An efficiency of 20.61% (with Voc of 635.2mV, Jsc of 44.08 mA/cm2 and fill factor of 0.73 has been achieved with CdS used as buffer layer as the reference case. It is also found that the high efficiency CIGS cells with the low temperature were a very high efficiency conversion.

  4. Integration of Solar Cells on Top of CMOS Chips - Part II: CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Liu, Wei; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Sun, Yun; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the monolithic integration of deepsubmicrometer complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) microchips with copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells. Solar cells are manufactured directly on unpackaged CMOS chips. The microchips maintain comparable electronic performance,

  5. Se interlayer in CIGS absorption layer for solar cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Kyu; Sim, Jae-Kwan [Semiconductor Materials Process Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-Dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kissinger, N.J. Suthan [Department of General Studies, Physics Group, Jubail University College, Royal Commission for Jubail, Jubail 10074 (Saudi Arabia); Song, Il-Seok; Kim, Jin-Soo; Baek, Byung-Joon [Semiconductor Materials Process Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-Dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheul-Ro, E-mail: crlee7@jbnu.ac.kr [Semiconductor Materials Process Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-Dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Se interlayer is deposited between the CuGa and CuIn/In/Mo/STS stacked layer. • Both CIG precursor layers were selenized at 500 °C for 1 h. • SIMS depth profile shows that Ga distribution is uniform by Se interlayer. • The efficiency was improved for the CIGS solar cell by Se interlayer. - Abstract: A CIGS absorber layer with high gallium contents in the space-charge region can reduce the carrier recombination and improve the open circuit voltage V{sub oc}. Therefore, controlling Ga grading on top of CIGS thin film solar cells is the main objective of this experiment. To reduce Selenium (Se) vacancy, it is important that the diffusion of Ga elements into Se vacancy between Mo back contact and CIGS absorption layer would be controlled. In order to reduce Se vacancy and confirm Ga inter-diffusion, two CIGS solar cells were fabricated by converting CIG precursor with and without Se interlayer. The copper-indium metallic precursors were fabricated corresponding to the sequence CuIn/In/Mo/STS on stainless steel (STS) substrates by sequential direct current magnetron sputtering while Se layer was evaporated by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system to obtain a Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stack. CuGa precursor layer was also fabricated on the Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stack. Finally, both CuGa/Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS and CuGa/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stacks were selenized at 500 °C for 1 h. It was clearly observed from the secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) that there was a change between the fabricated CIGS absorption layers and the amount of Ga elements. Furthermore, the Ga elements gradually decreased from the top to the bottom layer of the CIGS absorption layer. We also discussed the effect of Se interlayer in the CIGS absorption layer and its influence on the solar cell’s performance.

  6. Temperature Effect of Electrical Properties of Cigs Solar Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we are interested in studying the copper–indium–gallium–selenium (CIGS) solar cells sandwiched between cadmium sulfide (CdS) and ZnO as buffer layers, and Molybdenum (Mo). Thus, we report our simulation results using the capacitance simulator (SCAPS) in terms of layer thickness, absorber layer band ...

  7. Electrical impact of MoSe2 on CIGS thin-film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kuo-Jui; Liu, Jing-Da; Hsieh, Hsing-Hua; Jiang, Ting-Shiuan

    2013-11-07

    The CIGS solar cell is one of the most promising photovoltaic devices due to the achievement of the highest conversion efficiency (>20%) among all thin-film solar cells. The CIGS cell has a glass/Mo/CIGS/CdS/TCO configuration, and the CIGS-Mo interface is a Schottky barrier to holes. During the sulfurization-after-selenization (SAS) CIGS formation process with H2Se gas, the Mo surface transforms naturally into MoSe2 at the CIGS-Mo interface. In this work, the electrical impact of MoSe2 on CIGS solar cells was investigated. Different CIGS-Mo interfaces were prepared with two CIGS processes. One is SAS, and the other is the sequential-sputtering-selenization CIGS process with Se gas. Formation of MoSe2 is hardly observed in the latter process. Samples were characterized by XRD, the van der Pauw method, reflectance, and visual inspection. Besides, Schottky barrier heights of cells were extracted from J-V-T measurements. For the first time, it was experimentally shown that the existence of thin MoSe2 film can decrease the apparent Schottky barrier height of CIGS solar cells. In addition, 1-dimensional numerical simulation showed that a larger barrier height affects both the fill factor and open-circuit voltage. Therefore, the formation of MoSe2 during the CIGS process should minimize the negative effect of Schottky barrier on solar-cell performances, especially with large Schottky barrier.

  8. Improving efficiency (optimization) of CIGS thin film solar cell using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Layers of this type of solar cell are: 1-TCO made of ZnO (zinc oxide) 2- CdS layer gate (cadmium sulphate) with impurities of n 3-CIGS absorber layer with the impurity of p, 4- 5 glass substrate molybdenum layer made of soda. Reduced thickness of the absorbent layer makes the back connection to be closer to the discharge ...

  9. Modeling and simulation of a dual-junction CIGS solar cell using Silvaco ATLAS

    OpenAIRE

    Fotis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The potential of designing a dual-junction Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS) photovoltaic cell is investigated in this thesis. Research into implementing a dual-junction solar cell, using a CIGS bottom cell and different thin-film designs as a top cell, was conducted in order to increase the current record efficiency of 20.3% for a single CIGS cell. This was accomplished through modeling and simulation using Silvaco ATLASTM, an ad...

  10. Modeling of optical losses in graphene contacted CIGS solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshmand, Mohammad; Zandi, M. Hossein

    2016-09-01

    For the first time, an optical model is applied to superstrate configuration of CdS/CIGS thin film solar cells with graphene front/back contact (FC/BC) to simulate the loss in current density and efficiency. Graphene shows to be a great candidate to replace with the metallic BC transparent conductive oxides as the front electrode. Our model is based on the refractive index and extinction coefficient and takes into account the reflection and absorption in interfaces and layer’s thickness, respectively. CIGS cells with graphene as front electrode have a lower current density and efficiency than the one with graphene BC. However, the bifacial configuration shows a higher current density and efficiency, mostly because of a higher transmission rate. The interference effect was observed in simulation of transmission rate of hybrid cells representing that graphene can cause multiple reflection. We simulated the device parameters versus the ZnO layer’s thickness, which is essential for high quality interfaces. However, the simulation results are also consistent when CdS thickness is replaced with inorganic ZnO.

  11. Invited Paper: CIGS-based thin film solar cells and modules: Unique material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Tokio

    2012-04-01

    Although CIGS solar cells consist of a polycrystalline thin film grown on a glass substrate, more than 20% conversion efficiency has been achieved. The efficiency has reached the same level as polycrystalline silicon solar cells. This high efficiency has not yet been observed in other thin film solar cells including thin film Si and CdTe. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms that allow CIGS solar cells to exhibit high conversion efficiencies. This paper discusses the origin of the high efficiency and demonstrates that it is caused by the unique material properties of CIGS films.

  12. Identifying parasitic current pathways in CIGS solar cells by modelling dark JV response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, B.L.; Smit, S.; Kniknie, B.J.; Bakkers, N.J.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of undetermined shunt pathways in CIGS solar cells can be severely limiting to the reproducibility of individual cell efficiency, both at lab-scale, and particularly in a roll-to-roll process. Here, a general model that describes the dark J-V characteristics of CIGS devices, accounting

  13. Graded Carrier Concentration Absorber Profile for High Efficiency CIGS Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Antonino Parisi; Riccardo Pernice; Vincenzo Rocca; Luciano Curcio; Salvatore Stivala; Cino, Alfonso C.; Giovanni Cipriani; Vincenzo Di Dio; Giuseppe Ricco Galluzzo; Rosario Miceli; Busacca, Alessandro C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an innovative CIGS-based solar cells model with a graded doping concentration absorber profile, capable of achieving high efficiency values. In detail, we start with an in-depth discussion concerning the parametrical study of conventional CIGS solar cells structures. We have used the wxAMPS software in order to numerically simulate cell electrical behaviour. By means of simulations, we have studied the variation of relevant physical and chemical parameters—characteristic of suc...

  14. Thin Film CIGS Solar Cells, Photovoltaic Modules, and the Problems of Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parisi, Antonino; Curcio, Luciano; Rocca, Vincenzo; Stivala, Salvatore; Cino, Alfonso C; Busacca, Alessandro C; Cipriani, Giovanni; La Cascia, Diego; Di Dio, Vincenzo; Miceli, Rosario; Ricco Galluzzo, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the results regarding a nonvacuum technique to fabricate CIGS thin films for solar cells by means of single-step electrodeposition, we focus on the methodological problems of modeling...

  15. All-Nonvacuum-Processed CIGS Solar Cells Using Scalable Ag NWs/AZO-Based Transparent Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingqing; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2016-07-06

    With record cell efficiency of 21.7%, CIGS solar cells have demonstrated to be a very promising photovoltaic (PV) technology. However, their market penetration has been limited due to the inherent high cost of the cells. In this work, to lower the cost of CIGS solar cells, all nonvacuum-processed CIGS solar cells were designed and developed. CIGS absorber was prepared by the annealing of electrodeposited metallic layers in a chalcogen atmosphere. Nonvacuum-deposited Ag nanowires (NWs)/AZO transparent electrodes (TEs) with good transmittance (92.0% at 550 nm) and high conductivity (sheet resistance of 20 Ω/□) were used to replace the vacuum-sputtered window layer. Additional thermal treatment after device preparation was conducted at 220 °C for a few of minutes to improve both the value and the uniformity of the efficiency of CIGS pixel cell on 5 × 5 cm substrate. The best performance of the all-nonvacuum-fabricated CIGS solar cells showed an efficiency of 14.05% with Jsc of 34.82 mA/cm(2), Voc of 0.58 V, and FF of 69.60%, respectively, which is comparable with the efficiency of 14.45% of a reference cell using a sputtered window layer.

  16. An optimized efficient dual junction InGaN/CIGS solar cell: A numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Bita; Naseri, Mosayeb

    2016-08-01

    The photovoltaic performance of an efficient double junction InGaN/CIGS solar cell including a CdS antireflector top cover layer is studied using Silvaco ATLAS software. In this study, to gain a desired structure, the different design parameters, including the CIGS various band gaps, the doping concentration and the thickness of CdS layer are optimized. The simulation indicates that under current matching condition, an optimum efficiency of 40.42% is achieved.

  17. Expanding Thermal Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition of ZnO:Al Layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing ZnO:Al on CIGS solar cell stacks, one should be aware that high substrate temperature processing (i.e., >200°C can damage the crucial underlying layers/interfaces (such as CIGS/CdS and CdS/i-ZnO. In this paper, the potential of adopting ETP-CVD ZnO:Al in CIGS solar cells is assessed: the effect of substrate temperature during film deposition on both the electrical properties of the ZnO:Al and the eventual performance of the CIGS solar cells was investigated. For ZnO:Al films grown using the high thermal budget (HTB condition, lower resistivities, ρ, were achievable (~5 × 10−4 Ω·cm than those grown using the low thermal budget (LTB conditions (~2 × 10−3 Ω·cm, whereas higher CIGS conversion efficiencies were obtained for the LTB condition (up to 10.9% than for the HTB condition (up to 9.0%. Whereas such temperature-dependence of CIGS device parameters has previously been linked with chemical migration between individual layers, we demonstrate that in this case it is primarily attributed to the prevalence of shunt currents.

  18. Parameters optimization of CIGS solar cell using 2D physical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Dabbabi

    Full Text Available In this study, the CIGS thin film solar cell has been investigated using the two-dimensional device simulator Silvaco-Atlas. Thickness and carrier concentration effects of the cell structure were studied to optimize the solar cell performances. Our results revealed high efficiency for a cell structure of 0.15 µm ZnO:Al, 0.06 µm i-ZnO, 0.04 µm CdS and 3 µm CIGS. The carrier concentration effects of the different layers were also studied revealing a better performance for CIGS doping concentration of 1018 cm−3. The optimized CIGS solar cell characteristics were a current density of short circuit Jsc = 38.75 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage V0C = 804.03 mV, a fill factor FF = 74.48% and an efficiency η = 23.20%. This result is in good agreement with experimental efficiencies found in literature. Keywords: CIGS solar cell, Electrical characteristics, Silvaco-Atlas software

  19. Low temperature deposition of bifacial CIGS solar cells on Al-doped Zinc Oxide back contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallari, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.cavallari@imem.cnr.it [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Mathematical, Physical and Computer Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Pattini, Francesco; Rampino, Stefano; Annoni, Filippo [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Barozzi, Mario [FBK—CMM—Micro Nano Facility, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Bronzoni, Matteo; Gilioli, Edmondo; Gombia, Enos [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Maragliano, Carlo [Solar Bankers LLC, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Mazzer, Massimo [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Pepponi, Giancarlo [FBK—CMM—Micro Nano Facility, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Spaggiari, Giulia; Fornari, Roberto [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Mathematical, Physical and Computer Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/a, 43124 Parma (Italy)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • AZO and CIGS were deposited by Low-Temperature Pulsed Electron Deposition (LT-PED). • CIGS/AZO contacts with ohmic behavior and resistance of 1.07 Ω cm{sup 2} were fabricated. • LT-PED deposition of AZO and CIGS prevents formation of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} interlayer. • CIGS-based bifacial solar cells with AZO back contact were realized. • Front PV efficiency of 9.3% and equivalent bifacial efficiency of 11.6% were achieved. - Abstract: We report on the fabrication and characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS)-based thin film bifacial solar cells using Al-doped ZnO (AZO) as cost-effective and non-toxic transparent back contact. We show that, by depositing both CIGS and AZO by Low Temperature Pulsed Electron Deposition at a maximum temperature of 250 °C, a good ohmic contact is formed between the two layers and good quality solar cells can be fabricated as a result. Photovoltaic efficiencies as high as 9.3% (front illumination), 5.1% (backside illumination) and 11.6% (bifacial illumination) have been obtained so far. These values are remarkably higher than those previously reported in the literature. We demonstrate that this improvement is ascribed to the low-temperature deposition process that avoids the formation of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the CIGS/AZO interface and favours the formation of a low-resistivity contact in agreement with device simulations.

  20. Graded Carrier Concentration Absorber Profile for High Efficiency CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Parisi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an innovative CIGS-based solar cells model with a graded doping concentration absorber profile, capable of achieving high efficiency values. In detail, we start with an in-depth discussion concerning the parametrical study of conventional CIGS solar cells structures. We have used the wxAMPS software in order to numerically simulate cell electrical behaviour. By means of simulations, we have studied the variation of relevant physical and chemical parameters—characteristic of such devices—with changing energy gap and doping density of the absorber layer. Our results show that, in uniform CIGS cell, the efficiency, the open circuit voltage, and short circuit current heavily depend on CIGS band gap. Our numerical analysis highlights that the band gap value of 1.40 eV is optimal, but both the presence of Molybdenum back contact and the high carrier recombination near the junction noticeably reduce the crucial electrical parameters. For the above-mentioned reasons, we have demonstrated that the efficiency obtained by conventional CIGS cells is lower if compared to the values reached by our proposed graded carrier concentration profile structures (up to 21%.

  1. Investigation of Some Transparent Metal Oxides as Damp Heat Protective Coating for CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F. J.; Yan, F.; Zaaunbrecher, B.; To, B.; Perkins, J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the protective effectiveness of some transparent metal oxides (TMO) on CIGS solar cell coupons against damp heat (DH) exposure at 85oC and 85% relative humidity (RH). Sputter-deposited bilayer ZnO (BZO) with up to 0.5-um Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer and 0.2-um bilayer InZnO were used as 'inherent' part of device structure on CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG. Sputter-deposited 0.2-um ZnSnO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) 0.1-um Al2O3 were used as overcoat on typical BZO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG solar cells. The results were all negative -- all TMO-coated CIGS cells exhibited substantial degradation in DH. Combining the optical photographs, PL and EL imaging, SEM surface micro-morphology, coupled with XRD, I-V and QE measurements, the causes of the device degradations are attributed to hydrolytic corrosion, flaking, micro-cracking, and delamination induced by the DH moisture. Mechanical stress and decrease in crystallinity (grain size effect) could be additional degrading factors for thicker AZO grown on CdS/CIGS.

  2. Thin film CIGS solar cells with a novel low cost process - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, A. N.; Romanyuk, Y.

    2010-01-15

    Novel manufacturing routes for efficient and low-cost Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (called CIGS) thin film solar cells are explored and patented. CIGS has proven its suitability for highly efficient and extremely stable solar cells. The low-cost methods allow impurity free material synthesis, fast large-area deposition, high material utilization and a very short energy payback time with drastically lower manufacturing costs. Two non-vacuum, solution-based approaches are investigated to deposit thin layers of CIGS. The first approach considers incorporation of copper into indium gallium selenide precursor layers by ion-exchange from aqueous or organic solutions. Organic solutions provide faster copper incorporation and do not corrode the metal back contact. Solar cells processed from selenized precursor films exhibit efficiencies of up to 4.1%. The second approach with paste coating of inorganic salt solution results in a solar cell efficiency of 4% (record 6.7%), where further improvements are hindered by the presence of the residual carbon layer. Using alternative organic binders, pre-deposited selenium layers, non-binder recipes helps to avoid the carbon layer although the obtained layers are inhomogeneous and contain impurity phases. A patent for the ion-exchange approach is pending, and the obtained research results on the paste coating approach will be scrutinized during new European FP7 project 'NOVA-CIGS'. (authors)

  3. Sodium-Doped Molybdenum Targets for Controllable Sodium Incorporation in CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, L. M.; Repins, I. L.; Glynn, S.; Carducci, M. D.; Honecker, D. M.; Pankow, J.; Young, M.; DeHart, C.; Sundaramoorthy, R.; Beall, C. L.; To, B.

    2011-07-01

    The efficiency of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells is enhanced when Na is incorporated in the CIGS absorber layer. This work examines Na incorporation in CIGS utilizing Na-doped Mo sputtered from targets made with sodium molybdate-doped (MONA) powder. Mo:Na films with varying thicknesses were sputtered onto Mo-coated borosilicate glass (BSG) or stainless steel substrates for CIGS solar cells. By use of this technique, the Na content of CIGS can be varied from near-zero to higher than that obtained from a soda-lime glass (SLG) substrate. Targets and deposition conditions are described. The doped Mo films are analyzed, and the resulting devices are compared to devices fabricated on Mo-coated SLG as well as Mo-coated BSG with NaF. Completed devices utilizing MONA exceeded 15.7% efficiency without anti-reflective coating, which was consistently higher than devices prepared with the NaF precursor. Strategies for minimizing adhesion difficulties are presented.

  4. Parameters optimization of CIGS solar cell using 2D physical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbabi, Samar; Nasr, Tarek Ben; Kamoun-Turki, Najoua

    In this study, the CIGS thin film solar cell has been investigated using the two-dimensional device simulator Silvaco-Atlas. Thickness and carrier concentration effects of the cell structure were studied to optimize the solar cell performances. Our results revealed high efficiency for a cell structure of 0.15 μm ZnO:Al, 0.06 μm i-ZnO, 0.04 μm CdS and 3 μm CIGS. The carrier concentration effects of the different layers were also studied revealing a better performance for CIGS doping concentration of 1018 cm-3. The optimized CIGS solar cell characteristics were a current density of short circuit Jsc = 38.75 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage V0C = 804.03 mV, a fill factor FF = 74.48% and an efficiency η = 23.20%. This result is in good agreement with experimental efficiencies found in literature.

  5. Fabrication of Thin Film CIGS Solar Cells for Space-Based Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyenhagen, Joel P.; Marciniak, M. A.; Lott, J. A.; Yeo, Y. K.; Kapur, V. K.; Senft, D. C.

    2003-03-01

    An innovative process developed by International Solar Electric Technology (ISET) was used to fabricate CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells on glass substrates. Key to the patented ISET process is the CIGS layer that is deposited in the form of a precursor metal oxide ink over Mo-coated glass. Solar cells of 0.084 cm2 were fabricated and measured under AM1.5 Global conditions with efficiencies up to 9.2between each process step using optical, electrical, and x-ray fluorescence techniques to improve process control. Variations in the reduction and selenization processes are measured on the completed solar cells using photoluminescence and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These results can improve the fabrication process to lower the production costs and realize U.S. Air Force spacecraft needs of larger power budgets with reduced system and launch costs.

  6. Expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition of ZnO:Al layers for CIGS solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, K; Williams, B. L.; Mittal, A.; Knoops, H. C. M.; Kniknie, B.J.; Bakker, N J; Kessels, W. M. M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD) has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing ZnO:Al on CIGS solar cell stacks, one should be aware that high substrate temperature processing (i.e., >200°C) can damage the crucial underlying layers/interfaces (such as CIGS/CdS and CdS/i-ZnO). In...

  7. Simulation approach for studying the performances of original superstrate CIGS thin films solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchama, I., E-mail: bouchama_idris@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire Procedes Materiaux et Energie solaire PROMES-CNRS, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, Technosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Laboratoire L.I.S., Universite Ferhat Abbas de Setif (Algeria); Djessas, K. [Laboratoire Procedes Materiaux et Energie solaire PROMES-CNRS, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, Technosud, 66100 Perpignan (France); Djahli, F. [Laboratoire L.I.S., Universite Ferhat Abbas de Setif (Algeria); Bouloufa, A. [Laboratoires C.C.N.S. et E. M., Universite Ferhat Abbas de Setif (Algeria)

    2011-08-31

    In this work, we report on the performances of superstrate Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin film solar cells with an alternative SLG/SnO{sub 2}:F/CIGS/In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/Zn structure using AMPS-1D (Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic structures) device simulator. An inverted surface layer, n-type CIGS layer, is inserted between the In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} buffer and CIGS absorber layers and the SnO{sub 2}:F layer is just a transparent conducting oxide (TCO). The simulation has been carried out by lighting through SnO{sub 2}:F. The obtained results show that the existence of so-called 'ordered defect compound' (ODC) layer in such a structure is the critical factor responsible for the optimization of the performances. Photovoltaic parameters were determined using the current density-voltage (J-V) curve. An optimal absorber and ODC layer thickness has been estimated, that improve significantly the devices efficiency exceeding 15% AM1.5 G. The variation of carrier density in In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} layer has an influence on the superstrate CIGS cells performances. Moreover, the quantum efficiency (Q.E.) characteristics display a maximum value of about 80% in the visible range.

  8. Effects of Voltage-Bias Annealing on Metastable Defect Populations in CIGS and CZTSe Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Steven P.; Johnston, Steve; Teeter, Glenn

    2016-11-21

    We report on voltage-bias annealing (VBA) experiments performed on CIGS and CZTSe solar cells. In these experiments, completed devices were annealed at moderate temperatures and subsequently quenched with continuously applied voltage bias. These treatments resulted in substantial reversible changes in device characteristics. Photovoltaic (PV) conversion efficiency of the CIGS device varied from below 3% to above 15%, with corresponding changes in CIGS hole density from ~1014 cm-3 to ~1017 cm-3. In the CZTSe device, open-circuit voltage varied from 289 meV to 446 meV, caused by an approximately factor of fifty change in the CZTSe hole density. We interpret these findings in terms of reversible changes to the metastable point-defect populations that control key properties in these materials. Implications for optimization of PV materials and connections to long-term stability of PV devices are discussed.

  9. CIGS2 Thin-Film Solar Cells on Flexible Foils for Space Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Ghongadi, Shantinath R.; Pandit, Mandar B.; Jahagirdar, Anant H.; Scheiman, David

    2002-01-01

    CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)S2 (CIGS2) thin-film solar cells are of interest for space power applications because of the near optimum bandgap for AM0 solar radiation in space. CIGS2 thin film solar cells on flexible stainless steel (SS) may be able to increase the specific power by an order of magnitude from the current level of 65 Wkg(sup -1). CIGS solar cells are superior to the conventional silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells in the space radiation environment. This paper presents research efforts for the development of CIGS2 thin-film solar cells on 127 micrometers and 20 micrometers thick, bright-annealed flexible SS foil for space power. A large-area, dual-chamber, inline thin film deposition system has been fabricated. The system is expected to provide thickness uniformity of plus or minus 2% over the central 5" width and plus or minus 3% over the central 6" width. During the next phase, facilities for processing larger cells will be acquired for selenization and sulfurization of metallic precursors and for heterojunction CdS layer deposition both on large area. Small area CIGS2 thin film solar cells are being prepared routinely. Cu-rich Cu-Ga/In layers were sputter-deposited on unheated Mo-coated SS foils from CuGa (22%) and In targets. Well-adherent, large-grain Cu-rich CIGS2 films were obtained by sulfurization in a Ar: H2S 1:0.04 mixture and argon flow rate of 650 sccm, at the maximum temperature of 475 C for 60 minutes with intermediate 30 minutes annealing step at 120 C. Samples were annealed at 500 C for 10 minutes without H2S gas flow. The intermediate 30 minutes annealing step at 120 C was changed to 135 C. p-type CIGS2 thin films were obtained by etching the Cu-rich layer segregated at the surface using dilute KCN solution. Solar cells were completed by deposition of CdS heterojunction partner layer by chemical bath deposition, transparent-conducting ZnO/ZnO: Al window bilayer by RF sputtering, and vacuum deposition of Ni/Al contact fingers through metal

  10. Characterization of Flexible CIGS Thin Film Solar Cells or Stainless Steel with Intrinsic ZnO Diffusion Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae-Woong; Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Jin Hyeok; Jeong, Chaehwan

    2016-05-01

    ZnO diffusion barrier layer was deposited by RF magnetron sputtering by using the same method as intrinsic ZnO layer. The CIGS solar cells were fabricated on stainless steel substrate. The 50-200 nm thin ZnO diffusion barriers effectively reduced the diffusion of Fe and Cr, from stainless steel substrates into the CIGS absorbers. The CIGS solar cells with ZnO diffusion barriers increased the J(sc) and FF, which resulted in an increase of cell efficiency from 5.9% up to 9.06%.

  11. Experimental studies of thin films deposition by magnetron sputtering method for CIGS solar cell fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gułkowski, Sławomir; Krawczak, Ewelina

    2017-10-01

    Among a variety of the thin film solar cell technologies of second generation, copper-indium-gallium-diselenide device (CIGS) with the latest highest lab cell efficiency record of 22.4 % seems to be the most promising for the power generation. This is partly due to the advantages of using low cost films of few microns thick not only as a metallic contacts but also as a main structure of the solar cell consisted of high quality semiconductor layers. This paper reports the experimental studies of the CIGS absorber formation on Soda Lime Glass substrate covered by thin molybdenum film as a back contact layer. All structures were deposited with the use of magnetron sputtering method only. Technological parameters of the deposition process such as deposition power, pressure and deposition time were optimized for each layer of the structure. Mo back contact was examined in terms of resistivity. EDS measurements were carried out to verify stoichiometric composition of CIGS absorber. Thin film of Al was used as a top contact in order to examine the quality of p-n junction. The I-V electrical characteristic of the p-n junction was analysed in terms of solar cell application.

  12. Experimental studies of thin films deposition by magnetron sputtering method for CIGS solar cell fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gułkowski Sławomir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Among a variety of the thin film solar cell technologies of second generation, copper-indium-gallium-diselenide device (CIGS with the latest highest lab cell efficiency record of 22.4 % seems to be the most promising for the power generation. This is partly due to the advantages of using low cost films of few microns thick not only as a metallic contacts but also as a main structure of the solar cell consisted of high quality semiconductor layers. This paper reports the experimental studies of the CIGS absorber formation on Soda Lime Glass substrate covered by thin molybdenum film as a back contact layer. All structures were deposited with the use of magnetron sputtering method only. Technological parameters of the deposition process such as deposition power, pressure and deposition time were optimized for each layer of the structure. Mo back contact was examined in terms of resistivity. EDS measurements were carried out to verify stoichiometric composition of CIGS absorber. Thin film of Al was used as a top contact in order to examine the quality of p-n junction. The I-V electrical characteristic of the p-n junction was analysed in terms of solar cell application.

  13. Air-annealing of Cu(In, Ga)Se2/CdS and performances of CIGS solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, X.; Zhu, H.; Liang, X.; Guo, Y.; Li, Z.; Mai, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the annealing treatment on Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS)/CdS interface in air is systematically investigated under different annealing temperatures from room temperature to 150 °C and different durations. It is found that when CIGS/CdS interface is annealed for a proper duration the corresponding CIGS thin film solar cells show enhanced open circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) as well as corresponding conversion efficiency. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) measurement results indicate that the CIGS thin film solar cells exhibit an increase in net defect density (NCV) and long lifetime for the carriers, respectively, after the annealing treatment of CIGS/CdS at a mediate annealing temperature here. Moreover, the net defect density of annealed solar cells at higher annealing temperatures for a long duration is reduced. All the variations in the solar cell performances, NCV and carrier lifetime would be related to the passivation of Se vacancies and InCu defects, surface (interface) states as well as positive interface discharges and Cu migration etc. A high efficiency CIGS solar cell of 14.4% is achieved. The optimized solar cell of 17.2% with a MgF2 anti-reflective layer has been obtained.

  14. Ecotoxicological assessment of solar cell leachates: Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells show higher activity than organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Wehrli, Bernhard [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of photovoltaics their potential environmental risks are poorly understood. Here, we compared ecotoxicological effects of two thin-film photovoltaics: established copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Leachates were produced by exposing photovoltaics to UV light, physical damage, and exposure to environmentally relevant model waters, representing mesotrophic lake water, acidic rain, and seawater. CIGS cell leachates contained 583 μg L{sup −1} molybdenum at lake water, whereas at acidic rain and seawater conditions, iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, silver, and tin were present up to 7219 μg L{sup −1}. From OPV, copper (14 μg L{sup −1}), zinc (87 μg L{sup −1}) and silver (78 μg L{sup −1}) leached. Zebrafish embryos were exposed until 120 h post-fertilization to these extracts. CIGS leachates produced under acidic rain, as well as CIGS and OPV leachates produced under seawater conditions resulted in a marked hatching delay and increase in heart edema. Depending on model water and solar cell, transcriptional alterations occurred in genes involved in oxidative stress (cat), hormonal activity (vtg1, ar), metallothionein (mt2), ER stress (bip, chop), and apoptosis (casp9). The effects were dependent on the concentrations of cationic metals in leachates. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid protected zebrafish embryos from morphological and molecular effects. Our study suggests that metals leaching from damaged CIGS cells, may pose a potential environmental risk. - Highlights: • Photovoltaics may be disposed in the environment after usage. • Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic (OPV) cells were compared. • Morphological and molecular effects were assessed in zebrafish embryos. • Environmental condition affected metal leaching and ecotoxicological activity. • Damaged CIGS cells pose higher risk to the environment than OPV cells.

  15. Structural, Electrical, and Optical Properties of ZnO Film Used as Buffer Layer for CIGS Thin-Film Solar Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Chang; Cha, Ji-Hyun; Jung, Duk-Young; Hong, Byungyou

    2016-05-01

    The CuIn(x)Ga(1-x)Se2 (CIGS) using the solution-based fabrication method is attractive for thin film solar cells because of its possibilities for large-area and low-cost production. ZnO films between transparent conductive oxide (TCO) and the CdS films can improve the performances of CIGS thin-film solar cells. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of ZnO film between TCO and CIGS layers in a solar cell (AZO/ZnO/CdS/CIGS/Mo), which were deposited at various thicknesses to investigate the role of the films in CIGS solar cells. It was confirmed that the conversion efficiency of a CIGS solar cell depends on the ZnO film. For a ZnO film thickness of 80 nm, the highest power conversion efficiency that a solar cell achieved was J(sc) of 18.73 mA/cm2.

  16. Ecotoxicological assessment of solar cell leachates: Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells show higher activity than organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Wehrli, Bernhard; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of photovoltaics their potential environmental risks are poorly understood. Here, we compared ecotoxicological effects of two thin-film photovoltaics: established copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Leachates were produced by exposing photovoltaics to UV light, physical damage, and exposure to environmentally relevant model waters, representing mesotrophic lake water, acidic rain, and seawater. CIGS cell leachates contained 583 μg L(-1) molybdenum at lake water, whereas at acidic rain and seawater conditions, iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, silver, and tin were present up to 7219 μg L(-1). From OPV, copper (14 μg L(-1)), zinc (87 μg L(-1)) and silver (78 μg L(-1)) leached. Zebrafish embryos were exposed until 120 h post-fertilization to these extracts. CIGS leachates produced under acidic rain, as well as CIGS and OPV leachates produced under seawater conditions resulted in a marked hatching delay and increase in heart edema. Depending on model water and solar cell, transcriptional alterations occurred in genes involved in oxidative stress (cat), hormonal activity (vtg1, ar), metallothionein (mt2), ER stress (bip, chop), and apoptosis (casp9). The effects were dependent on the concentrations of cationic metals in leachates. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid protected zebrafish embryos from morphological and molecular effects. Our study suggests that metals leaching from damaged CIGS cells, may pose a potential environmental risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    KAUST Repository

    Bailie, Colin D.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. A promising approach for upgrading the performance of an established low-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to deposit a high bandgap polycrystalline semiconductor on top to make a tandem solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and low-quality multicrystalline silicon (Si) to achieve solid-state polycrystalline tandem solar cells with a net improvement in efficiency over the bottom cell alone. This work paves the way for integrating perovskites into a low-cost and high-efficiency (>25%) tandem cell.

  18. Characterizing the effects of silver alloying in chalcopyrite CIGS solar cells with junction capacitance methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erslev, Peter T.; Hanket, Gregory M.; Shafarman, William N.; Cohen, J. David

    2009-04-01

    A variety of junction capacitance-based characterization methods were used to investigate alloys of Ag into Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 photovoltaic solar cells over a broad range of compositions. These alloys show encouraging trends of increasing VOC with increasing Ag content, opening the possibility of wide-gap cells for use in tandem device applications. Drive level capacitance profiling (DLCP) has shown very low free carrier concentrations for all Ag-alloyed devices, in some cases less than 1014 cm-3, which is roughly an order of magnitude lower than that of CIGS devices. Transient photocapacitance spectroscopy has revealed very steep Urbach edges, with energies between 10 meV and 20 meV, in the Ag-alloyed samples. This is in general lower than the Urbach edges measured for standard CIGS samples and suggests a significantly lower degree of structural disorder.

  19. Low temperature deposition of bifacial CIGS solar cells on Al-doped Zinc Oxide back contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Nicholas; Pattini, Francesco; Rampino, Stefano; Annoni, Filippo; Barozzi, Mario; Bronzoni, Matteo; Gilioli, Edmondo; Gombia, Enos; Maragliano, Carlo; Mazzer, Massimo; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Spaggiari, Giulia; Fornari, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS)-based thin film bifacial solar cells using Al-doped ZnO (AZO) as cost-effective and non-toxic transparent back contact. We show that, by depositing both CIGS and AZO by Low Temperature Pulsed Electron Deposition at a maximum temperature of 250 °C, a good ohmic contact is formed between the two layers and good quality solar cells can be fabricated as a result. Photovoltaic efficiencies as high as 9.3% (front illumination), 5.1% (backside illumination) and 11.6% (bifacial illumination) have been obtained so far. These values are remarkably higher than those previously reported in the literature. We demonstrate that this improvement is ascribed to the low-temperature deposition process that avoids the formation of Ga2O3 at the CIGS/AZO interface and favours the formation of a low-resistivity contact in agreement with device simulations.

  20. The effect of damp heat-illumination exposure on CIGS solar cells: A combined XRD and electrical characterization study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Hendrikx, R.; Barreau, N.; Steijvers, H.; Böttger, A.

    2016-01-01

    Unencapsulated CIGS solar cells were simultaneously exposed to damp heat and illumination. In-situ monitoring of their electrical parameters demonstrated a rapid decrease of the efficiency, mainly driven by changes in the series and shunt resistances. The non-degraded and degraded solar cells were

  1. Investigation of CIS/CIGS and CdTe solar cells scribing with high-power fibre short pulse lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Yves; Lotter, Erwin; Bermudez, Veronica; Bosio, Alessio; Salin, François; Hueske, Marc; Selleri, Stefano; Bertrand, Anthony; Duterte, Charles

    2012-06-01

    We present here some of the last results of the EUROPEAN project ALPINE. We present both the development of an adjustable fibre laser pulse source and scribing results on CdTe and CIGS solar cells. The scribing tests were performed at three different pulse durations: 400 fs, 8 ps and 250 ps. The results obtained with 250 ps are already very promising for P3 steps in both CdTe and CIGS solar cells. In both cases the results were validated electrically. In the case of P3 scribing for CIGS solar cells, shunt resistances as high as 125 kΩ.cm were obtained. Isolation resistances were higher than 1 MΩ.cm. The processing speed was 2 m/s.

  2. Sputtered molybdenum thin films and the application in CIGS solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D.; Zhu, H.; Liang, X.; Zhang, C.; Li, Z.; Xu, Y.; Chen, J.; Zhang, L.; Mai, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) thin films are prepared by magnetron sputtering with different discharge powers and working pressures for the application in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cells as back electrodes. Properties of these Mo thin films are systematically investigated. It is found that the dynamic deposition rate increases with the increasing discharge power while decreases with the increasing working pressure. The highest dynamic deposition rate of 15.1 nm m/min is achieved for the Mo thin film deposited at the discharge power of 1200 W and at the working pressure of 0.15 Pa. The achieved lowest resistivity of 3.7 × 10-5 Ω cm is attributed to the large grains in the compact thin film. The discharge power and working pressure have great influence on the sputtered Mo thin films. High efficiency of 12.5% was achieved for the Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cells with Mo electrodes prepared at 1200 W and low working pressures. By further optimizing material and device properties, the conversion efficiency has reached to 15.2%.

  3. Thin Film CIGS Solar Cells, Photovoltaic Modules, and the Problems of Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Parisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the results regarding a nonvacuum technique to fabricate CIGS thin films for solar cells by means of single-step electrodeposition, we focus on the methodological problems of modeling at cell structure and photovoltaic module levels. As a matter of fact, electrodeposition is known as a practical alternative to costly vacuum-based technologies for semiconductor processing in the photovoltaic device sector, but it can lead to quite different structural and electrical properties. For this reason, a greater effort is required to ensure that the perspectives of the electrical engineer and the material scientist are given an opportunity for a closer comparison and a common language. Derived parameters from ongoing experiments have been used for simulation with the different approaches, in order to develop a set of tools which can be used to put together modeling both at single cell structure and complete module levels.

  4. Electrodeposition of ZnO-doped films as window layer for Cd-free CIGS-based solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsin, Fabien; Vénérosy, Amélie; Hildebrandt, Thibaud; Hariskos, Dimitrios; Naghavi, Negar; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2016-02-01

    The Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cell technology has made a steady progress within the last decade reaching efficiency up to 22.3% on laboratory scale, thus overpassing the highest efficiency for polycrystalline silicon solar cells. High efficiency CIGS modules employ a so-called buffer layer of cadmium sulfide CdS deposited by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD), which presence and Cd-containing waste present some environmental concerns. A second potential bottleneck for CIGS technology is its window layer made of i-ZnO/ZnO:Al, which is deposited by sputtering requiring expensive vacuum equipment. A non-vacuum deposition of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) relying on simpler equipment with lower investment costs will be more economically attractive, and could increase competitiveness of CIGS-based modules with the mainstream silicon-based technologies. In the frame of Novazolar project, we have developed a low-cost aqueous solution photo assisted electrodeposition process of the ZnO-based window layer for high efficiency CIGS-based solar cells. The window layer deposition have been first optimized on classical CdS buffer layer leading to cells with efficiencies similar to those measured with the sputtered references on the same absorber (15%). The the optimized ZnO doped layer has been adapted to cadmium free devices where the CdS is replaced by chemical bath deposited zinc oxysulfide Zn(S,O) buffer layer. The effect of different growth parameters has been studied on CBD-Zn(S,O)-plated co-evaporated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 substrates provided by the Zentrum für Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW). This optimization of the electrodeposition of ZnO:Cl on CIGS/Zn(S,O) stacks led to record efficiency of 14%, while the reference cell with a sputtered (Zn,Mg)O/ZnO:Al window layer has an efficiency of 15.2%.

  5. Theoretical simulation of performances in CIGS thin-film solar cells with cadmium-free buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kang; Sun, Yulin; Zhou, Liyu; Wang, Fang; Wu, Fang

    2017-08-01

    Copper indium gallium selenium (CIGS) thin film solar cells have become one of the hottest topics in solar energy due to their high photoelectric transformation efficiency. To real applications, CIGS thin film is covered by the buffer layer and absorption layer. Traditionally, cadmium sulfide (CdS) is inserted into the middle of the window layer (ZnO) and absorption layer (CIGS) as a buffer layer. However, the application of the GIGS/CdS thin film solar cells has been limited because of the environmental pollution resulting from the toxic cadmium atom. Although zinc sulfide (ZnS) has been proposed to be one of the candidates, the performance of such battery cells has not been investigated. Here, in this paper, we systematically study the possibility of using zinc sulfide (ZnS) as a buffer layer. By including the effects of thickness, concentration of a buffer layer, intrinsic layer and the absorbing layer, we find that photoelectric transformation efficiency of ZnO/ZnS(n)/CIGS(i)/CIGS(p) solar cell is about 17.22%, which is qualified as a commercial solar cell. Moreover, we also find that the open-circuit voltage is ∼0.60 V, the short-circuit current is ∼36.99 mA/cm2 and the filled factor is ∼77.44%. Therefore, our results suggest that zinc sulfide may be the potential candidate of CdS as a buffer layer. Project supported by the NSF of Jiangsu Province (No. BK20131420), the Postgraduate Innovation Project of Jiangsu Province (No. KYLX15_0926), and the NJFU Outstanding Young Scholars Funding.

  6. Properties of Cd and Zn Partial Electrolyte Treated CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, K.; Hasoon, F. S.; Smith, S.; Mascarenhas, A.; Al-Thani, H.; Alleman, J.; Ullal, H. S.; Keane, J.; Johnson, P. K.; Sites, J. R.

    2002-05-01

    We study the influence of Cd partial baths on the photovoltaic properties of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) and CuIn-GaSSe2 (CIGSS) thin film absorbers. We find that efficient solar cells can be fabricated by this treatment, and we compare their properties with those containing CdS window layers grown by chemical bath deposition. The results suggest that Cd plays a dominant role in establishing efficient photovoltaic junctions in CuInSe2 alloys. Micron scale photoluminescence scans show non-uniformity along the length probed. Cd treatment quenches one of the luminescence transitions, which indicates a change in shallow acceptor level density. We present a model that helps to explain the evolution of photovoltaic action.

  7. CIGS Thin Film Solar Cells, phase 2 Uppsala University Final report 2006-01-01 - 2007-06-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edoff, Marika (Thin Film Solar Cell group, Dep. Technical Sciences, Uppsala Univ., P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)) (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The project CIGS Thin Film Solar Cells, phase 2 has been going on for 18,5 months and was interrupted in advance on the 14th of June, 2007. The decision to shorten the period was taken by the board of the Swedish Energy Agency the 14th of February. It was decided to reevaluate and re-direct the financial support to the group. A new project, CIGS Thin Film Solar Cells, phase 3, superseded this project and will go on for the initially planned project period (until 2009-12-31). During the project much of the focus has been on research on Cd-free buffer layers, with an emphasis on the interface properties between the CIGS and the buffer layer. (CIGS is a commonly used acronym for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}, which is the active absorption layer in this type of solar cells) The combination of high quality CIGS and the new buffer layers has been another field of interest. CIGS solar cell module development and computer modelling of solar cells and modules has been the third major research area. The results show that the group still holds a position as one of the leaders in the world in this field. The 18.5 % efficient Cd-free solar cell, which was obtained and independently confirmed is only one percent away from the world record and in addition it is Cd-free using a Zn(O,S) buffer layer (the world record from NREL contains Cd). By alloying ZnO with MgO instead of ZnS almost equally good results can be achieved. During the last half year an 18.1 % cell has been measured with a (Zn,Mg)O buffer layer. Solar cell module technology includes several research issues, both fundamental as e.g. modelling of cell voltage and losses as a function of distance from interconnect to interconnect, but also more development as e.g. encapsulation routines. The harsh environment test (damp heat test) run at 85 deg C and 85 % relative humidity for 1000 hours was passed for both a small (12.5x12.5 cm2) and a large (27.5x30 cm2) module within the degradation limits stated by the IEC standards, using

  8. A study on the optics of copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells with ultra-thin absorber layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, M.; Wachters, A.J.H.; Deelen, J. van; Mourad, M.C.D.; Buskens, P.J.P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of variation of the zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) layer thickness on the absorption characteristics of CIGS solar cells using a simulation program based on finite element method (FEM). We show that the absorption in the

  9. Improving Performance of CIGS Solar Cells by Annealing ITO Thin Films Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Lung Chuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Indium tin oxide (ITO thin films were grown on glass substrates by direct current (DC reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature. Annealing at the optimal temperature can considerably improve the composition, structure, optical properties, and electrical properties of the ITO film. An ITO sample with a favorable crystalline structure was obtained by annealing in fixed oxygen/argon ratio of 0.03 at 400°C for 30 min. The carrier concentration, mobility, resistivity, band gap, transmission in the visible-light region, and transmission in the near-IR regions of the ITO sample were -1.6E+20 cm−3, 2.7E+01 cm2/Vs, 1.4E-03 Ohm-cm, 3.2 eV, 89.1%, and 94.7%, respectively. Thus, annealing improved the average transmissions (400–1200 nm of the ITO film by 16.36%. Moreover, annealing a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS solar cell at 400°C for 30 min in air improved its efficiency by 18.75%. The characteristics of annealing ITO films importantly affect the structural, morphological, electrical, and optical properties of ITO films that are used in solar cells.

  10. Quantum and conversion efficiencies optimization of superstrate CIGS thin-films solar cells using In2Se3 buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchama, Idris; Boudour, Samah; Bouarissa, Nadir; Rouabah, Zahir

    2017-10-01

    In this present contribution, AMPS-1D device simulator is employed to study the performances of superstrate SLG/TCO/p-Cu(In,Ga)Se2(CIGS)/n-ODC/n-In2Se3/Metal thin film solar cells. The impact of the TCO and Metal work functions on the cell performance has been investigated. The combination of optical transparency and electrical property for TCO front contact layer is found to yield high efficiency. The obtained results show that the TCO work function should be large enough to achieve high conversion efficiency for superstrate CIGS solar cell. Nevertheless, it is desirable for Metal back contact layer to have low work function to prevent the effect of band bending in the n-In2Se3/Metal interface. Several TCOs materials and metals have been tested respectively as a front and back contact layers for superstrate CIGS solar cells. An efficiency of 20.18%, with Voc ≈ 0.71 V, Jsc ≈ 35.36 mA/cm2 and FF ≈ 80.42%, has been achieved with ZnSn2O3-based as TCO front contact layer. In the case of SnO2:F front contact and indium back contact layers, an efficiency of 16.31%, with Voc ≈ 0.64 V, Jsc ≈ 31.4 mA/cm2 and FF ≈ 79.4%, has been obtained. The present results of simulation suggest an improvement of superstrate CIGS solar cells efficiency for feasible fabrication.

  11. Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, David S.; Noufi, Rommel

    2015-06-09

    Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating a thin film device comprises: providing a semiconductor film comprising indium (In) and selenium (Se) upon a substrate; heating the substrate and the semiconductor film to a desired temperature; and performing a mass transport through vapor transport of a copper chloride vapor and se vapor to the semiconductor film within a reaction chamber.

  12. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ≥ 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ≥ 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of

  13. Investigation of the Effect of I-ZnO Window Layer on the Device Performance of the Cd-Free CIGS Based Solar Cells (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasoon, F. S.; al-Thani, H. A.; Li, X.; Kanevce, A.; Perkins, C.; Asher, S.

    2008-05-01

    This research work focuses on preparing Cd-free CIGS based solar cells with intrinsic high resistivity ZnO (I-ZnO) films deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique at different deposition substrate temperature and I-ZnO film thickness, and the effect of the prior treatment of CIGS films by ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) diluted solution on the device performance.

  14. Investigation of the Effect of I-ZnO Window Layer on the Device Performance of the Cd-Free CIGS Based Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasoon, F. S.; Al-Thani, H. A.; Li, X.; Kanevce, A.; Perkins, C.; Asher, S.

    2008-05-01

    This paper focuses on preparing Cd-free, CIGS-based solar cells with intrinsic high resistivity ZnO (I-ZnO) films deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique at different deposition substrate temperature and I-ZnO film thickness, and the effect of the prior treatment of CIGS films by ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) diluted solution on the device performance.

  15. Efficiency enhancement of CIGS compound solar cell fabricated using homomorphic thin Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} diffusion barrier formed on stainless steel substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Jae-Kwan; Lee, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Ahn, Haeng-Keun; Lee, Cheul-Ro, E-mail: crlee7@jbnu.ac.kr

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A chromium oxide layer is formed as diffusion barrier by thermal oxidation process on STS substrate. • A Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer effectively reduces impurities diffusion into the CIGS absorber layer. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer plays an important role in increasing the efficiency by reduction of impurity diffusion. - Abstract: It is known that the efficiency of flexible Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells fabricated on stainless-steel (STS) substrates deteriorates due to iron (Fe) and Cr impurities diffusing into the CIGS absorber layer. To overcome this problem, a nanoscale homomorphic chromium oxide layer was formed as a diffusion barrier by thermal oxidation on the surface of STS substrates for 1 min at 600 °C in oxygen atmosphere. By TEM and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), it was confirmed that the formed oxide layer on surface of STS substrates was a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. It was found that the formed homomorphic Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin layer of about 15 nm thickness was an effective diffusion barrier to reduce impurity diffusion into the CIGS layer by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). In contrast to the efficiency of CIGS solar cell without homomorphic Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} diffusion layer is 8.6%, whereas with diffusion barrier it increases to 10.6% because of impurities such as Fe and Cr from the STS substrate into the CIGS layer. It reveals that the layer formed on the surface of STS substrate by thermal oxidation process plays an important role in increasing the performance of CIGS solar cells.

  16. Flexible CIGS solar cells on large area polymer foils with in-line deposition methods and application of alternative back contacts - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, A. N.

    2009-08-15

    This illustrated report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the work performed within this project and also reports on synergies with other projects that helped to make a significant contribution to the development of CIGS thin film solar cells on flexible substrates such as polymer foils. The project's aims were to learn more about up-scaling issues and to demonstrate the abilities required for the processing of layers on large area polyimide foils for flexible CIGS solar cells. Custom-built evaporators that were designed and constructed in-house are described. A CIGS system for in-line deposition was also modified for roll-to-roll deposition and alternative electrical back contacts to conventional ones were evaluated on flexible polyimide foils. The objectives of the project and the results obtained are looked at and commented on in detail.

  17. The Effect of Sputtering Parameters on the Film Properties of Molybdenum Back Contact for CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-cheng Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (Mo thin films are widely used as a back contact for CIGS-based solar cells. This paper determines the optimal settings for the sputtering parameters for an Mo thin film prepared on soda lime glass substrates, using direct current (dc magnetron sputtering, with a metal Mo target, in an argon gas environment. A Taguchi method with an L9 orthogonal array, the signal-to-noise ratio, and an analysis of variances is used to determine the performance characteristics of the coating operation. The main sputtering parameters, such as working pressure (mTorr, dc power (W, and substrate temperature (°C, are optimized with respect to the structural features, surface morphology, and electrical properties of the Mo films. An adhesive tape test is performed on each film to determine the adhesion strength of the films. The experimental results show that the working pressure has the dominant effect on electrical resistivity and reflectance. The intensity of the main peak (110 for the Mo film increases and the full width at half maximum decreases gradually as the sputtering power is increased. Additionally, the application of an Mo bilayer demonstrates good adherence and low resistivity.

  18. Adhesion Improvement and Characterization of Magnetron Sputter Deposited Bilayer Molybdenum Thin Films for Rear Contact Application in CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (Mo thin films are widely used as rear electrodes in copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS solar cells. The challenge in Mo deposition by magnetron sputtering lies in simultaneously achieving good adhesion to the substrates while retaining the electrical and optical properties. Bilayer Mo films, comprising five different thickness ratios of a high pressure (HP deposited bottom layer and a low pressure (LP deposited top layer, were deposited on 40 cm × 30 cm soda-lime glass substrates by DC magnetron sputtering. We focus on understanding the effects of the individual layer properties on the resulting bilayer Mo films, such as microstructure, surface morphology, and surface oxidation. We show that the thickness of the bottom HP Mo layer plays a major role in determining the micromechanical and physical properties of the bilayer Mo stack. Our studies reveal that a thicker HP Mo bottom layer not only improves the adhesion of the bilayer Mo, but also helps to improve the film crystallinity along the preferred [110] direction. However, the surface roughness and the porosity of the bilayer Mo films are found to increase with increasing bottom layer thickness, which leads to lower optical reflectance and a higher probability for oxidation at the Mo surface.

  19. Zinc Sulfide Buffer Layer for CIGS Solar Cells Prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Wei You

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ZnS thin films were successfully synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD with starting materials of NH2-NH2, SC(NH22, and ZnSO4‧7H2O. ZnS thin films were deposited with different time on glass substrates by CBD at 80oC and pH=9. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, it is found that the ZnS thin films exhibit cubic polycrystalline phase. It was found that the optimum deposition time is 90 min for preparing ZnS thin film that is suitable as buffer layer for CuIn1-xGaxSe2 solar cells. The thin film deposited for 90 min has high transmittance up to 80% in the spectra range from 350 nm to 800 nm, and the optical band gap is about 3.59 eV.

  20. ZnO:Al Doping Level and Hydrogen Growth Ambient Effects on CIGS Solar Cell Performance: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duenow, J. N.; Gessert, T. A.; Wood, D. M.; Egaas, B.; Noufi, R.; Coutts,T. J.

    2008-05-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) cells require a highly conducting and transparent electrode for optimum device performance. ZnO:Al films grown from targets containing 2.0 wt.% Al2O3 are commonly used for this purpose. Maximum carrier mobilities of these films grown at room temperature are ~20-25 cm2V-1s-1. Therefore, relatively high carrier concentrations are required to achieve the desired conductivity, which leads to free carrier absorption in the near infrared (IR). Lightly doped films (0.05 - 0.2 wt.% Al2O3), which show less IR absorption, reach mobility values greater than 50 cm2V-1s-1 when deposited in H2 partial pressure. We incorporate these lightly doped ZnO:Al layers into CIGS PV cells produced at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Preliminary results show quantum efficiency values of these cells rival those of a past world-record cell produced at NREL that used 2.0 wt.% Al-doped ZnO films. The highest cell efficiency obtained in this trial was 18.1%.

  1. Optical Design of Textured Thin-Film CIGS Solar Cells with Nearly-Invisible Nanowire Assisted Front Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joop van Deelen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The conductivity of transparent front contacts can be improved by patterned metallic nanowires, albeit at the cost of optical loss. The associated optical penalty can be strongly reduced by texturization of the cell stack. Remarkably, the nanowires themselves are not textured and not covered in our design. This was shown by optical modeling where the width of the nanowire, the texture height and the texture period were varied in order to obtain a good insight into the general trends. The optical performance can be improved dramatically as the reflection, which is the largest optical loss, can be reduced by 95% of the original value. The spectra reveal absorption in the Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS layer of 95% and reflection below 2% over a large part of the spectrum. In essence, a virtually black CIGS cell stack can be achieved for textured cells with a metal nanogrid. Moreover, it turned out that the ratio between the width of the nanowire and the height of the texture is a critical parameter for optical losses.

  2. Physics-Based Compact Model for CIGS and CdTe Solar Cells: From Voltage-Dependent Carrier Collection to Light-Enhanced Reverse Breakdown: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xingshu; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Raguse, John; Garris, Rebekah; Deline, Chris; Silverman, Timothy

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we develop a physics-based compact model for copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) heterojunction solar cells that attributes the failure of superposition to voltage-dependent carrier collection in the absorber layer, and interprets light-enhanced reverse breakdown as a consequence of tunneling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction. The temperature dependence of the model is validated against both simulation and experimental data for the entire range of bias conditions. The model can be used to characterize device parameters, optimize new designs, and most importantly, predict performance and reliability of solar panels including the effects of self-heating and reverse breakdown due to partial-shading degradation.

  3. Predicted roles of defects on band offsets and energetics at CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se₂/CdS) solar cell interfaces and implications for improving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2014-09-07

    The laboratory performance of CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2) based solar cells (20.8% efficiency) makes them promising candidate photovoltaic devices. However, there remains little understanding of how defects at the CIGS/CdS interface affect the band offsets and interfacial energies, and hence the performance of manufactured devices. To determine these relationships, we use density functional theory with the B3PW91 hybrid functional that we validate to provide very accurate descriptions of the band gaps and band offsets. This confirms the weak dependence of band offsets on surface orientation observed experimentally. We predict that the conduction band offset (CBO) of perfect CuInSe2/CdS interface is large, 0.79 eV, which would dramatically degrade performance. Moreover we show that band gap widening induced by Ga adjusts only the valence band offset, and we find that Cd impurities do not significantly affect the CBO. Thus we show that Cu vacancies at the interface play the key role in enabling the tunability of CBO. We predict that Na further improves the CBO through electrostatically elevating the valence levels to decrease the CBO, explaining the observed essential role of Na for high performance. Moreover we find that K leads to a dramatic decrease in the CBO to 0.05 eV, much better than Na. We suggest that the efficiency of CIGS devices might be improved substantially by tuning the ratio of Na to K, with the improved phase stability of Na balancing phase instability from K. All these defects reduce interfacial stability slightly, but not significantly.

  4. CIGS cells with metallized front contact: Longer cells and higher efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Frijters, C.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the benefit of a patterned metallization on top of a transparent conductive oxide in CIGS thin-film solar panels. It was found that cells with a grid have a higher efficiency compared to cells with only a TCO. This was observed for all cell lengths used. Furthermore, metallic

  5. Investigation of an Electrochemical Method for Separation of Copper, Indium, and Gallium from Pretreated CIGS Solar Cell Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Anna M. K.; Björefors, Fredrik; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of the semiconductor material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is important to ensure a future supply of indium and gallium, which are relatively rare and therefore expensive elements. As a continuation of our previous work, where we recycled high purity selenium from CIGS waste materials, we now show that copper and indium can be recycled by electrodeposition from hydrochloric acid solutions of dissolved selenium-depleted material. Suitable potentials for the reduction of copper and indium were determined to be −0.5 V and −0.9 V (versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode), respectively, using cyclic voltammetry. Electrodeposition of first copper and then indium from a solution containing the dissolved residue from the selenium separation and ammonium chloride in 1 M HCl gave a copper yield of 100.1 ± 0.5% and an indium yield of 98.1 ± 2.5%. The separated copper and indium fractions contained no significant contamination of the other elements. Gallium remained in solution together with a small amount of indium after the separation of copper and indium and has to be recovered by an alternative method since electrowinning from the chloride-rich acid solution was not effective. PMID:26347901

  6. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-selenide (CIGS solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Burghoorn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed photons and, consequently, an increase in short-circuit current density (Jsc and cell efficiency. Through optical simulations, we recently obtained strong indications that texturing of the transparent conductor in copper indium gallium (di-selenide (CIGS solar cells is also optically advantageous. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the Jsc and efficiency of CIGS solar cells with an absorber layer thickness (dCIGS of 0.85 μm, 1.00 μm and 2.00 μm increase through application of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index that is sufficiently similar to AZO (nresist = 1.792 vs. nAZO = 1.913 at 633 nm to avoid large optical losses at the resist-AZO interface. On average, Jsc increases by 7.2%, which matches the average reduction in reflection of 7.0%. The average relative increase in efficiency is slightly lower (6.0%. No trend towards a larger relative increase in Jsc with decreasing dCIGS was observed. Ergo, the increase in Jsc can be fully explained by the reduction in reflection, and we did not observe any increase in Jsc based on an increased photon path length.

  7. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghoorn, M.; Kniknie, B.; Deelen, J. van; Ee, R. van [The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), De Rondom 1, 5612 AP, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Xu, M. [The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), De Rondom 1, 5612 AP, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Optics Group, Van der Waalsweg 8, 2628 CH, Delft (Netherlands); Vroon, Z. [The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), De Rondom 1, 5612 AP, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Zuyd Hogeschool, Nieuw Eyckholt 300, 6419 DJ, Heerlen (Netherlands); Belt, R. van de [Kriya Materials BV, Urmonderbaan 22, 6167 RD, Geleen (Netherlands); Buskens, P., E-mail: pascal.buskens@tno.nl, E-mail: buskens@dwi.rwth-aachen.de [The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), De Rondom 1, 5612 AP, Eindhoven (Netherlands); DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials, Forckenbeckstrasse 50, 52056, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed photons and, consequently, an increase in short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) and cell efficiency. Through optical simulations, we recently obtained strong indications that texturing of the transparent conductor in copper indium gallium (di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells is also optically advantageous. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the J{sub sc} and efficiency of CIGS solar cells with an absorber layer thickness (d{sub CIGS}) of 0.85 μm, 1.00 μm and 2.00 μm increase through application of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index that is sufficiently similar to AZO (n{sub resist} = 1.792 vs. n{sub AZO} = 1.913 at 633 nm) to avoid large optical losses at the resist-AZO interface. On average, J{sub sc} increases by 7.2%, which matches the average reduction in reflection of 7.0%. The average relative increase in efficiency is slightly lower (6.0%). No trend towards a larger relative increase in J{sub sc} with decreasing d{sub CIGS} was observed. Ergo, the increase in J{sub sc} can be fully explained by the reduction in reflection, and we did not observe any increase in J{sub sc} based on an increased photon path length.

  8. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghoorn, M.; Kniknie, B.; van Deelen, J.; Xu, M.; Vroon, Z.; van Ee, R.; van de Belt, R.; Buskens, P.

    2014-12-01

    Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed photons and, consequently, an increase in short-circuit current density (Jsc) and cell efficiency. Through optical simulations, we recently obtained strong indications that texturing of the transparent conductor in copper indium gallium (di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells is also optically advantageous. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the Jsc and efficiency of CIGS solar cells with an absorber layer thickness (dCIGS) of 0.85 μm, 1.00 μm and 2.00 μm increase through application of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index that is sufficiently similar to AZO (nresist = 1.792 vs. nAZO = 1.913 at 633 nm) to avoid large optical losses at the resist-AZO interface. On average, Jsc increases by 7.2%, which matches the average reduction in reflection of 7.0%. The average relative increase in efficiency is slightly lower (6.0%). No trend towards a larger relative increase in Jsc with decreasing dCIGS was observed. Ergo, the increase in Jsc can be fully explained by the reduction in reflection, and we did not observe any increase in Jsc based on an increased photon path length.

  9. Development of Electrodeposited CIGS Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-357

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neale, Nathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    At present, most PV materials are fabricated by vacuum technologies. Some of the many disadvantages of vacuum technology are complicated instrumentation, material waste, high cost of deposition per surface area, and instability of some compounds at the deposition temperature. Solution-based approaches for thin-film deposition on large areas are particularly desirable because of the low capital cost of the deposition equipment, relative simplicity of the processes, ease of doping, uniform deposition on a variety of substrates (including interior and exterior of tubes and various nonplanar devices), and potential compatibility with high-throughput (e.g., roll-to-roll) processing. Of the nonsilicon solar photovoltaic device modules that have been deployed to date, those based on the n-CdS/p-CdTe is a leading candidate. Two features in the optical characteristics of CdTe absorber are particularly attractive for photovoltaic conversion of sunlight; (a) its energy bandgap of 1.5 eV, which provides an optimal match with the solar spectrum and thus facilitates its efficient utilization and (b) the direct mode of the main optical transition which results in a large absorption coefficient and turn permits the use of thin layer (1-2 um) of active material. Thin films of CdTe required for these devices have been fabricated by a variety of methods (e.g., vapor transport deposition, vacuum deposition, screen printing and close-spaced sublimation). Electrodeposition is another candidate deserves more attention. This project will focus on delivering low-cost, high efficiency electrodeposited CdTe-based device.

  10. Monolithic two-terminal hybrid a-Si:H/CIGS tandem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanker, J.; Vroon, Z.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.

    2016-01-01

    Copper-indium-gallium-di-selenide (CIGS) is the present record holder in lab-scale thin-film photovoltaics (TFPV). One of the problems of this PV technology is the scarcity of indium. Multi-junction solar cells allow better spectral utilization of the light spectrum, while the required current

  11. Optical Design of Textured Thin-Film CIGS Solar Cells with Nearly-Invisible Nanowire Assisted Front Contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Omar, A.; Barink, M.

    2017-01-01

    The conductivity of transparent front contacts can be improved by patterned metallic nanowires, albeit at the cost of optical loss. The associated optical penalty can be strongly reduced by texturization of the cell stack. Remarkably, the nanowires themselves are not textured and not covered in our

  12. Comparative Study of Zn(O,S) Buffer Layers and CIGS Solar Cells Fabricated by CBD, ALD, and Sputtering: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, K.; Mann, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Pankow, J.; Li, J.; Scharf, J.; Mansfield, L. M.; Contreras, M. A.; Noufi, R.

    2012-06-01

    Zn(O,S) thin films were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD), atomic layer deposition, and sputtering. Composition of the films and band gap were measured and found to follow the trends described in the literature. CBD Zn(O,S) parameters were optimized and resulted in an 18.5% efficiency cell that did not require post annealing, light soaking, or an undoped ZnO layer. Promising results were obtained with sputtering. A 13% efficiency cell was obtained for a Zn(O,S) emitter layer deposited with 0.5%O2. With further optimization of process parameters and an analysis of the loss mechanisms, it should be possible to increase the efficiency.

  13. High throughput CIGS solar cell fabrication via ultra-thin absorber layer with optical confinement and (Cd, CBD)-free heterojunction partner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsillac, Sylvain [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    The main objective of this proposal was to use several pathways to reduce the production cost of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) PV modules and therefore the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with this technology. Three high cost drivers were identified, nominally: 1) Materials cost and availability; 2) Large scale uniformity; 3) Improved throughput These three cost drivers were targeted using the following pathways: 1) Reducing the thickness of the CIGS layer while enhancing materials quality; 2) Developing and applying enhanced in-situ metrology via real time spectroscopic ellipsometry; 3) Looking into alternative heterojunction partner, back contact and anti-reflection (AR) coating Eleven main Tasks were then defined to achieve these goals (5 in Phase 1 and 6 in Phase 2), with 11 Milestones and 2 Go/No-go decision points at the end of Phase 1. The key results are summarized below

  14. Surface microstructure evolution of highly transparent and conductive Al-doped ZnO thin films and its application in CIGS solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke; Liu, Jingjing; Jin, Ranran; Liu, Jingling; Liu, Xinsheng; Lu, Zhangbo; Liu, Ya; Liu, Xiaolan; Du, Zuliang

    2017-07-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) has attained intensive attention as being a very good transparent conducting oxide for photovoltaic applications. In this work, AZO films have been deposited on glass substrate by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The influences of substrate temperatures on morphological, structural, optical and electrical properties of AZO films were systematically investigated. The results indicate that all AZO films have the hexagonal structure with c-axis preferred orientation. Morphological and electrical measurements have revealed that the substrate temperatures have strong influence on the microstructure, optical and electrical properties of AZO films. The AZO film is highly transparent from ultraviolet up to near infrared range with highest average transparency exceeding 83%. The minimum resistivity is as low as 6.1 × 10-4 Ω cm. The carrier concentration and mobility are as high as 3.357 × 1020 cm-3 and 30.48 cm2/Vs, respectively. Finally, the performances of the AZO film are evaluated by its practical application in Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 (CIGS) photovoltaic device as a transparent electrode. Benefited from its highly transparent and conductive feature, the most efficient device reveals an efficiency of 7.8% with a short-circuit current density of 28.99 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 430 mV, and a fill factor of 62.44 under standard conditions.

  15. Nd:YAG laser annealing investigation of screen-printed CIGS layer on PET: Layer annealing method for photovoltaic cell fabrication process

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaggaf, Ahmed

    2014-06-01

    Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) ink was formulated from CIGS powder, polyvinyl butyral PVB, terpineol and polyester/polyamine co-polymeric dispersant KD-1. Thin films with different thicknesses were deposited on PET substrate using screen-printing followed by heat treatment using a Nd:YAG laser. The structure and morphology of the heated thin films were studied. The characterization of the CIGS powder, ink, and film was done using TGA, SEM, FIB, EDS, and XRD. TGA analysis shows that the CIGS ink is drying at 200 °C, which is well below the decomposition temperature of the PET substrate. It was observed by SEM that 20 pulses of 532nm and 60 mJ/cm2 Nd:YAG laser annealing causes atomic diffusion on the near surface area. Furthermore, FIB cross section images were utilized to monitor the effect of laser annealing in the depth of the layer. Laser annealing effects were compared to as deposited layer using XRD in reference to CIGS powder. The measurement shows that crystallinity of deposited CIGS is retained while EDS quantification and atomic ratio result in gradual loss of selenium as laser energy increases. The laser parameters were tuned in an effort to utilize laser annealing of screen-printed CIGS layer as a layer annealing method for solar cell fabrication process.

  16. Layer-by-Layer Nanoassembly of Copper Indium Gallium Selenium Nanoparticle Films for Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hemati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of CIGS nanoparticles interdigited with polymers have been fabricated through a cost-effective nonvacuum film deposition process called layer-by-layer (LbL nanoassembly. CIGS nanoparticles synthesized by heating copper chloride, indium chloride, gallium chloride, and selenium in oleylamine were dispersed in water, and desired surface charges were obtained through pH regulation and by coating the particles with polystyrene sulfonate (PSS. Raising the pH of the nanoparticle dispersion reduced the zeta-potential from +61 mV at pH 7 to −51 mV at pH 10.5. Coating the CIGS nanoparticles with PSS (CIGS-PSS produced a stable dispersion in water with −56.9 mV zeta-potential. Thin films of oppositely charged CIGS nanoparticles (CIGS/CIGS, CIGS nanoparticles and PSS (CIGS/PSS, and PSS-coated CIGS nanoparticles and polyethylenimine (CIGS-PSS/PEI were constructed through the LbL nanoassembly. Film thickness and resistivity of each bilayer of the films were measured, and photoelectric properties of the films were studied for solar cell applications. Solar cell devices fabricated with a 219 nm CIGS film, when illuminated by 50 W light-source, produced 0.7 V open circuit voltage and 0.3 mA/cm2 short circuit current density.

  17. Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells grown at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Zhu, H.; Zhang, L.; Guo, Y.; Niu, X.; Li, Z.; Chen, J.; Liu, Q.; Mai, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cells were grown on polyimide (PI) and soda lime glass (SLG) substrates at low substrate temperatures between 400 °C and 500 °C. Different material properties of the CIGS thin films and photovoltaic performances of the solar cells were systematically investigated. It is found that the (112), (220)/(204) and (116)/(312) peaks from X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns show double-peak patterns as the substrate temperature decreases. The CIGS thin films grown on both PI and SLG substrates shows layered structures. The bottom and surficial layers of CIGS thin films display small size polycrystalline grains while the middle layers show large size polycrystalline grains. Both types of CIGS thin film solar cells exhibit similar efficiencies while CIGS thin film solar cells grown on PI substrates show lower open circuit voltage and fill factor but higher short circuit current density, as compared to those of CIGS thin film solar cells on SLG substrates. The highest efficiency of 6.14% has been achieved for the CIGS thin film solar cells on PI with the structure of PI/Mo/CIGS/CdS/i-ZnO/ZnO:Al/Al grid here.

  18. Metal-assisted chemical etching of CIGS thin films for grain size analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Chaowei [Research and Development Centre, Hanergy Thin Film Power Group Limited, Chengdu (China); Loi, Huu-Ha; Duong, Anh; Parker, Magdalena [Failure Analysis Department, MiaSole Hi-Tech Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Grain size of the CIGS absorber is an important monitoring factor in the CIGS solar cell manufacturing. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis is commonly used to perform CIGS grain size analysis in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Although direct quantification on SEM image using the average grain intercept (AGI) method is faster and simpler than EBSD, it is hardly applicable on CIGS thin films. The challenge is that, not like polycrystalline silicon, to define grain boundaries by selective chemical etching is not easily realizable for the multi-component CIGS alloy. In this Letter, we present direct quantification of CIGS thin film grain size using the AGI method by developing metal-assisted wet chemical etching process to define CIGS grain boundaries. The calculated value is similar to EBSD result. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Development of Coring Procedures Applied to Si, CdTe, and CIGS Solar Panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, Helio R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Johnston, Steven [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); To, Bobby [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jiang, Chun Sheng [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Xiao, Chuanxiao [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hacke, Peter L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Moseley, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tynan, Gerald D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Al-Jassim, Mowafak M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dhere, N. G. [Florida Solar Energy Center

    2018-01-04

    Most of the research on the performance and degradation of photovoltaic modules is based on macroscale measurements of device parameters such as efficiency, fill factor, open-circuit voltage, and short-circuit current. Our goal is to develop the capabilities to allow us to study the degradation of these parameters in the micro- and nanometer scale and to relate our results to performance parameters. To achieve this objective, the first step is to be able to access small samples from specific areas of the solar panels without changing the properties of the material. In this paper, we describe two coring procedures that we developed and applied to Si, CIGS, and CdTe solar panels. In the first procedure, we cored full samples, whereas in the second we performed a partial coring that keeps the tempered glass intact. The cored samples were analyzed by different analytical techniques before and after coring, at the same locations, and no damage during the coring procedure was observed.

  20. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Kniknie, B.J.; Deelen, J. van; Xu, M.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Ee, R.J. van; Belt, R. van de; Buskens, P.J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed

  1. Highly efficient graphene-based Cu(In, Ga)Se₂ solar cells with large active area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ling; Zhang, Kang; Luo, Hailin; Cheng, Guanming; Ma, Xuhang; Xiong, Zhiyu; Xiao, Xudong

    2014-09-21

    Two-dimensional graphene has tremendous potential to be used as a transparent conducting electrode (TCE), owing to its high transparency and conductivity. To date graphene films have been applied to several kinds of solar cells except the Cu(In, Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) solar cell. In this work, we present a novel TCE structure consisting of a doped graphene film and a thin layer of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to replace the ZnO:Al (AZO) electrode for CIGS. By optimizing the contact between graphene and intrinsic ZnO (i-ZnO), a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 13.5% has been achieved, which is among the highest efficiencies of graphene-based solar cells ever reported and approaching those of AZO-based solar cells. Besides, the active area of our solar cells reaches 45 mm(2), much larger than other highly efficient graphene-based solar cells (>10%) reported so far. Moreover, compared with AZO-based CIGS solar cells, the total reflectance of the graphene-based CIGS solar cells is decreased and the quantum efficiency of the graphene-based CIGS is enhanced in the near infrared region (NIR), which strongly support graphene as a competitive candidate material for the TCE in the CIGS solar cell. Furthermore, the graphene/PMMA film can protect the solar cell from moisture, making the graphene-based solar cells much more stable than the AZO-based solar cells.

  2. Copper zinc tin sulfide-based thin film solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Beginning with an overview and historical background of Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide (CZTS) technology, subsequent chapters cover properties of CZTS thin films, different preparation methods of CZTS thin films, a comparative study of CZTS and CIGS solar cell, computational approach, and future applications of CZTS thin film solar modules to both ground-mount and rooftop installation. The semiconducting compound (CZTS) is made up earth-abundant, low-cost and non-toxic elements, which make it an ideal candidate to replace Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) and CdTe solar cells which face material scarcity and tox

  3. Chemical bath process for highly efficient Cd-free chalcopyrite thin-film-based solar cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ennaoui, A

    1999-01-01

      The highest efficiency for Cu(Ga,In)Se2 (CIGS) thin-film-based solar cells has been achieved with CdS buffer layers prepared by a solution growth method known as the chemical bath deposition (CBD...

  4. Inkjet printed Cu(In,Ga)S2 nanoparticles for low-cost solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Barbe, Jeremy

    2016-12-13

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin film solar cells were fabricated by direct inkjet printing of Cu(In,Ga)S2 (CIGS) nanoparticles followed by rapid thermal annealing under selenium vapor. Inkjet printing is a low-cost, low-waste, and flexible patterning method which can be used for deposition of solution-based or nanoparticle-based CIGS films with high throughput. XRD and Raman spectra indicate that no secondary phase is formed in the as-deposited CIGS film since quaternary chalcopyrite nanoparticles are used as the base solution for printing. Besides, CIGSe films with various Cu/(In + Ga) ratios could be obtained by finely tuning the composition of CIGS nanoparticles contained in the ink, which was found to strongly influence the devices performance and film morphology. To date, this is the first successful fabrication of a solar device by inkjet printing of CIGS nanoparticles.

  5. Employing Si solar cell technology to increase efficiency of ultra-thin Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermang, Bart; Wätjen, Jörn Timo; Fjällström, Viktor; Rostvall, Fredrik; Edoff, Marika; Kotipalli, Ratan; Henry, Frederic; Flandre, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Reducing absorber layer thickness below 500 nm in regular Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells decreases cell efficiency considerably, as both short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage are reduced because of incomplete absorption and high Mo/CIGS rear interface recombination. In this work, an innovative rear cell design is developed to avoid both effects: a highly reflective rear surface passivation layer with nano-sized local point contact openings is employed to enhance rear internal reflection and decrease the rear surface recombination velocity significantly, as compared with a standard Mo/CIGS rear interface. The formation of nano-sphere shaped precipitates in chemical bath deposition of CdS is used to generate nano-sized point contact openings. Evaporation of MgF2 coated with a thin atomic layer deposited Al2O3 layer, or direct current magnetron sputtering of Al2O3 are used as rear surface passivation layers. Rear internal reflection is enhanced substantially by the increased thickness of the passivation layer, and also the rear surface recombination velocity is reduced at the Al2O3/CIGS rear interface. (MgF2/)Al2O3 rear surface passivated ultra-thin CIGS solar cells are fabricated, showing an increase in short circuit current and open circuit voltage compared to unpassivated reference cells with equivalent CIGS thickness. Accordingly, average solar cell efficiencies of 13.5% are realized for 385 nm thick CIGS absorber layers, compared with 9.1% efficiency for the corresponding unpassivated reference cells. PMID:26300619

  6. CIGS thin films for photoelectrolytic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, R.; Miranda, M.; Pantoja, J. [CIE-UNAM, Morelos (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J. [CIE-UNAM, Morelos (Mexico)]|[IMP, Yucatan (Mexico). Programa de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Ductos

    2003-07-01

    A sustainable energy economy will depend in large part on hydrogen as an energy vector. Its big advantage is its zero emission when burning or oxidation in a fuel cell, which gains added relevance when the hydrogen is produced using renewable energy such as photoelectrochemical cells. High efficiencies in solar to electrical conversion have been shown for CIGS based solar cells. The CIGS film precursors were prepared by electrodeposition from an electrochemical bath using the potentiostatic method. The precursors underwent annealing in a selenium (Se) atmosphere at 550 degrees Celsius and later on, film composition was adjusted to stoichiometric by evaporating extra indium (In) and gallium (Ga) and annealing in an Se atmosphere. Techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDAX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and opto-electronic methods were used to characterize CIGS films. The electrochemical measurements were effected in a three electrode cell. The results obtained by XRD showed a hexagonal chalcopyrite structure for the polycrystalline films and the grain structure improved with post-deposition physical vapor deposition (PVD) composition adjustment and annealing. SEM and AFM yielded similar results. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Risk stratification of plasma cell neoplasm: insights from plasma cell-specific cytoplasmic immunoglobulin fluorescence in situ hybridization (cIg FISH) vs. conventional FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Henry; Yang, Hai-Su; Jagannath, Sundar; Stephenson, Christine F; Brenholz, Pauline; Mazumder, Amitabha; Chari, Ajai

    2012-10-01

    We directly compared the results of routine fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and plasma cell-specific cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) FISH from 75 paired samples for myeloma risk stratification. CIg FISH improves test specificity and sensitivity and tends to eliminate borderline results. It proves that most plasma cells (PCs) consistently carry the abnormality in myelomas with an IGH translocation, whereas routine FISH detects these cells only at variably low levels. Routine cytogenetic analysis of plasma cell neoplasms (PCNs) has a low sensitivity. Conventional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is not plasma cell (PC) specific and results are diluted by other cells in the sample. Although PC-specific FISH testing has been recommended for multiple myeloma (MM) risk stratification, eg, by combining cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) staining with FISH, the benefits of cIg FISH have never been directly demonstrated in a controlled study. Seventy-five samples from patients with PCNs were analyzed by concomitant conventional FISH and cIg FISH with probes for t(4;14), t(11;14), t(14;16), -13, 17p-, and +3. The results were compared for their reliability, specificity, and consistency. Apart from marginally improving detection threshold in samples with low PC burden, cIg FISH identified more abnormal cases (50 vs. 47 cases) and more chromosome abnormalities (113 vs. 103 events) than did conventional FISH. It differentiated del(13q) in myelodysplasia from MM. Remarkably, cIg FISH consistently identified a high percentage of abnormal PCs in all cases. It detected IGH translocation in 78% to 100% of PCs in all but 2 positive cases, whereas conventional FISH detected 0% to 46% in these cases (median, 91% vs. 9%). The abnormal cells found in patients with 17p- were 19% to 96% by cIg FISH vs. 0% to 13% by conventional FISH (median, 54% vs. 9%). Cases with insufficient PCs for cIg FISH had only normal conventional FISH results. CIg FISH improves reliability of

  8. Characterization of Damp-Heat Degradation of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cell Components and Devices by (Electrochemical) Impedance Spectroscopy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F. J. J.; Noufi, R.

    2011-09-01

    This work evaluated the capability of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (IS, or ECIS as used here) to monitor damp heat (DH) stability of contact materials, CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell components, and devices. Cell characteristics and its variation of the CIGS devices were also examined by the ECIS.

  9. Solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Moriaki; Hayashibara, Mitsuo

    1988-08-18

    Concerning the exsisting solar cell utilizing wavelength transition, the area of the solar cell element necessary for unit electric power output can be made small, but transition efficiency of the solar cell as a whole including a plastic plate with phosphor is not high. This invention concerns a solar cell which is appropriate for transferring the light within a wide spectrum range of the sunlight to electricilty efficiently, utilizes wavelength transition and has high efficiency per unit area. In other words, the solar cell of this invention has the feature of providing in parallel with a photoelectric transfer layer a layer of wavelength transitioning material (phosphor) which absorbs the light within the range of wavelength of low photoelectric transfer efficiency at the photoelectric transfer layer and emits the light within the range of wavelength in which the photoelectric transfer rate is high on the light incident side of the photoelectric transfer layer. (5 figs)

  10. Damp heat related degradation mechanisms within CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Graaf, F. de; Daume, F.; Barreau, N.; Vroon, Z.; Zeman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Degradation rates and mechanisms for molybdenum back contacts and ZnO:Al front contacts exposed to damp heat were obtained from literature and experiments. It was found that molybdenum back contacts with a higher density and covered by a MoSe2 film are more stable than their low density, bare

  11. Thin-film solar cells on perlite glass-ceramic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Stepan G.; Babayan, Virab H.; Musayelyan, Ashot S.; Harutyunyan, Levon A.; Zalesski, Valery B.; Kravchenko, Vladimir M.; Leonova, Tatyana R.; Polikanin, Alexander M.; Khodin, Alexander A.

    2013-06-01

    For the first time, thin-film CIGS solar cells have been fabricated by co-evaporation on specially developed non-conducting perlite (an aluminum potassium sodium silicate natural mineral of volcanic origin) glass-ceramic substrates to develop a fully integrated photovoltaic and building element. Such glass-ceramic material can meet the physical requirements to solar cells substrates as well as the cost goals. The preliminary data presented show that CIGS solar cells deposited on ceramic substrates can exhibit efficiency higher than 10%.

  12. Impact of atmospheric species on copper indium gallium selenide solar cell stability: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the measurement techniques and results of studies on the stability of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells and their individual layers in the presence of atmospheric species is presented: in these studies, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells, their molybdenum back contact, and their

  13. In-Situ Probing Plasmonic Energy Transfer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Solar Cells by Ultrabroadband Femtosecond Pump-Probe Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Shih-Chen; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Li, Jia-Xing; Yabushita, Atsushi; Tang, Shih-Han; Luo, Chih Wei; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2015-01-01

    ...) incorporation on plasmonic energy transfer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells by elaborately analyzing the lifetimes and zero moment for hot carrier relaxation with ultrabroadband femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy...

  14. Ionization effects on Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Shirou; Imaizumi, Mitsuru [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0031 (Japan); Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime [Institute of National Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Okuda, Shuichi [Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuenmachi, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Cu (In, Ga) Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells were irradiated with 60, 100, and 250 keV electrons to reveal the characteristics of radiation induced defects. Electrons with less than 200 keV energy cannot generate any displacement defects in CIGS materials. In addition, a low amount of the electrons can improve the roll-over behavior in current-voltage characteristics of CIGS solar cells. However, the deterioration of the electrical performance in CIGS solar cells irradiated with a high amount of electrons was observed. The deterioration rate on the cells irradiated with lower-energy electrons was higher than that induced by electrons with higher-energy. The degradation curve of J{sub SC} based on the ionizing dose estimated from the ionizing energy loss model does not depend on the energy of electrons. Therefore, it implies that the electrons can degrade CIGS solar cells due to the ionization effect. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. High-Efficiency Polycrystalline Thin Film Tandem Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Lukas; Abate, Antonio; Feurer, Thomas; Fu, Fan; Avancini, Enrico; Löckinger, Johannes; Reinhard, Patrick; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N

    2015-07-16

    A promising way to enhance the efficiency of CIGS solar cells is by combining them with perovskite solar cells in tandem devices. However, so far, such tandem devices had limited efficiency due to challenges in developing NIR-transparent perovskite top cells, which allow photons with energy below the perovskite band gap to be transmitted to the bottom cell. Here, a process for the fabrication of NIR-transparent perovskite solar cells is presented, which enables power conversion efficiencies up to 12.1% combined with an average sub-band gap transmission of 71% for photons with wavelength between 800 and 1000 nm. The combination of a NIR-transparent perovskite top cell with a CIGS bottom cell enabled a tandem device with 19.5% efficiency, which is the highest reported efficiency for a polycrystalline thin film tandem solar cell. Future developments of perovskite/CIGS tandem devices are discussed and prospects for devices with efficiency toward and above 27% are given.

  16. Ultrafast pump-probe reflectance spectroscopy: Why sodium makes Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells better

    KAUST Repository

    Eid, Jessica

    2015-04-14

    Although Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells have the highest efficiency of any thin-film solar cell, especially when sodium is incorporated, the fundamental device properties of ultrafast carrier transport and recombination in such cells remain not fully understood. Here, we explore the dynamics of charge carriers in CIGS absorber layers with varying concentrations of Na by femtosecond (fs) broadband pump-probe reflectance spectroscopy with 120 fs time resolution. By analyzing the time-resolved transient spectra in a different time domain, we show that a small amount of Na integrated by NaF deposition on top of sputtered Cu(In,Ga) prior to selenization forms CIGS, which induces slower recombination of the excited carriers. Here, we provide direct evidence for the elongation of carrier lifetimes by incorporating Na into CIGS.

  17. Analysis on the Performance of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS) Based Photovoltaic Thermal

    OpenAIRE

    Zulkepli Afzam; Yong Lim Wei; Taib Mohd Yusof; Azran Zafri; Basrawi Firdaus

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the efficiency improvement of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS) Photovoltaic (PV) and also solar thermal collector. Photovoltaic thermal (PV/T) can improve overall efficiency for PV and also solve the problem of limited roof space at urban area. Objective of this study is to clarify the effect of mass flow rate on the efficiency of the PV/T system. A CIGS solar cell is used with rated output power 65 W and 1.18 m2 of area. 4 set of experiments were carried out, which...

  18. Recycling of indium from CIGS photovoltaic cells: potential of combining acid-resistant nanofiltration with liquid-liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Yannick-Serge; Niewersch, Claudia; Lenz, Markus; Kül, Zöhre Zohra; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Schäffer, Andreas; Wintgens, Thomas

    2014-11-18

    Electronic consumer products such as smartphones, TV, computers, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells crucially depend on metals and metalloids. So-called "urban mining" considers them as secondary resources since they may contain precious elements at concentrations many times higher than their primary ores. Indium is of foremost interest being widely used, expensive, scarce and prone to supply risk. This study first investigated the capability of different nanofiltration membranes of extracting indium from copper-indium-gallium- selenide photovoltaic cell (CIGS) leachates under low pH conditions and low transmembrane pressure differences (98% by nanofiltration, separating it from parts of the Ag, Sb, Se, and Zn present. LLE using di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) extracted 97% of the indium from the retentates, separating it from all other elements except for Mo, Al, and Sn. Overall, 95% (2.4 g m(-2) CIGS) of the indium could be extracted to the D2EHPA phase. Simultaneously, by nanofiltration the consumption of D2EHPA was reduced by >60% due to the metal concentration in the reduced retentate volume. These results show clearly the potential for efficient scarce metal recovery from secondary resources. Furthermore, since nanofiltration was applicable at very low pH (≥ 0.6), it may be applied in hydrometallurgy typically using acidic conditions.

  19. Solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Yoshiyuki.

    1989-07-06

    In this invention, in a solar cell which has an electrode consisting of a superconductor, the superconductor electrode is partly or entirely covered with a metal or light reflecting material. In the above, the pattern on the substrate at the junction of the electrode and the semiconductor is the same as that of a comb-type electrode formed at the top of the semiconductor. By this, a solar cell was provided wherein a superconductive electrode which is not subject to degradation of the superconductive characteristics even in the light of high intensity, operating stably at high efficiency, indicating very high practical effect. In addition to the use of amorphous silicon as a semiconductor of the soalr cell, such other material as Si-single crystal, Ge and Ge/As can be used. For the superconductor electrode, such other material as YBaCuO can also be used. 2 figs.

  20. Device physics of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells for long-term operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishinaga, J.; Shibata, H.

    2017-02-01

    The degradation mechanism of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells on exposure to air has been investigated. Exposure to air at room temperature slightly reduces the conversion efficiency of CIGS solar cells, and the conversion efficiency decreases significantly under damp heat testing at 85 °C and 85% relative humidity due to low shunt resistance. On the other hand, shunt resistance increases after dry nitrogen heating. Therefore, oxygen and humidity should degenerate the solar cell performance. The low shunt resistance and conversion efficiency are completely recovered after removing the side edges of the CIGS solar cells by mechanical scribing. These results suggest that low-resistive layers are formed on the sidewalls of the solar cells during damp heat testing. The low-resistive layers on the sidewalls are identified to be molybdenum oxides and sodium molybdate by Auger electron spectroscopy. After etching the oxides on the sidewalls by alkaline solution, the saturation current density and ideality factor are confirmed to be improved. These results suggest that metal oxides on the sidewalls of CIGS solar cells may act as recombination centers.

  1. Solid-State Sensitized Heterojunction Solar Cells: Effect of Sensitizing Systems on Performance and Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Soo-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are considered as an emerging technology in order to replace conventional silicon solar cells or thin film solar cells such as amorphous silicon, CIGS, and CdTe. Liquid electrolytes containing iodide/triiodide redox couple have a durability problem due to the corrosion of metal contacts. In order to improve the long-term stability of DSC device it is important to find an alternate efficient redox couple. In search of ...

  2. Advanced CIGS Photovoltaic Technology: Annual Technical Report--Phase II, 15 November 2002--14 November 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahoy, A. E.; Chen, L.

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this subcontract is to develop and integrate the various pieces of new technology that EPV considers enabling for cost-effective production of CIGS modules. EPV has conducted research to help generate a technology base for production of CIGS PV modules using vacuum deposition of CIGS onto glass. This strategy is consistent with the observation that, despite there being several approaches to forming device-quality CIGS, vacuum deposition has maintained the world record for the highest-efficiency CIGS device. A record thin-film solar cell efficiency of 19.2% (with Ni-Al grid and MgF2 ARC) for a 0.41-cm2 device was achieved by NREL in 2003 using vacuum-deposited CIGS. The deposition employed four point sources and detection of the Cu-poor to Cu-rich transition for process control. To extend this type of processing to the realm of large-area substrates, EPV developed vacuum equipment designed for heating and coating 0.43-m2 moving substrates, with a projected further scale up to 0.79 m2. The substrates are typically low-cost, soda-lime glass, and the materials are supplied to the moving substrates using novel linear-source technology developed by EPV. The use of elemental selenium rather than toxic H2Se gas helps make for a safe manufacturing environment. These choices concerning film deposition, substrates, and source materials help to minimize the processing costs of CIGS.

  3. Synchrotron X-Ray Characterization of Alkali Elements at Grain Boundaries in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Bradley; Stuckelberger, Michael; Guthrey, Harvey; Chen, Lei; Lai, Barry; Maser, Jorg; Rose, Volker; Dynes, James J.; Shafarman, William; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Bertoni, Mariana I.

    2016-11-21

    It is well known that the addition of alkali elements such as Na and K during and after growth of Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) has beneficial effects on the electronic properties of bulk material, improving device performance significantly. While the device level effects have been measured and reported, a direct observations of the localization of Na including its chemical nature are missing, and the impact of Na on elemental and phase segregation during CIGS growth is not fully understood. We investigate these aspects to shine light on the role of Na in CIGS solar cells with the ultimate goal of increasing their conversion efficiency. Utilizing a suite of synchrotron based x-ray characterization techniques, we discuss the challenges and advantages of these techniques for investigating segregation of main constituents of CIGS, Na distribution, chemical bonding of Na, and collection efficiency in CIGS as well as their correlations.

  4. CIG-DB: the database for human or mouse immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes available for cancer studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furue Motoki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunoglobulin (IG or antibody and the T-cell receptor (TR are pivotal proteins in the immune system of higher organisms. In cancer immunotherapy, the immune responses mediated by tumor-epitope-binding IG or TR play important roles in anticancer effects. Although there are public databases specific for immunological genes, their contents have not been associated with clinical studies. Therefore, we developed an integrated database of IG/TR data reported in cancer studies (the Cancer-related Immunological Gene Database [CIG-DB]. Description This database is designed as a platform to explore public human and murine IG/TR genes sequenced in cancer studies. A total of 38,308 annotation entries for IG/TR proteins were collected from GenBank/DDBJ/EMBL and the Protein Data Bank, and 2,740 non-redundant corresponding MEDLINE references were appended. Next, we filtered the MEDLINE texts by MeSH terms, titles, and abstracts containing keywords related to cancer. After we performed a manual check, we classified the protein entries into two groups: 611 on cancer therapy (Group I and 1,470 on hematological tumors (Group II. Thus, a total of 2,081 cancer-related IG and TR entries were tabularized. To effectively classify future entries, we developed a computational method based on text mining and canonical discriminant analysis by parsing MeSH/title/abstract words. We performed a leave-one-out cross validation for the method, which showed high accuracy rates: 94.6% for IG references and 94.7% for TR references. We also collected 920 epitope sequences bound with IG/TR. The CIG-DB is equipped with search engines for amino acid sequences and MEDLINE references, sequence analysis tools, and a 3D viewer. This database is accessible without charge or registration at http://www.scchr-cigdb.jp/, and the search results are freely downloadable. Conclusions The CIG-DB serves as a bridge between immunological gene data and cancer studies, presenting

  5. Cu(In,Ga)Se2Solar Cells with Amorphous In2O3-Based Front Contact Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koida, Takashi; Ueno, Yuko; Nishinaga, Jiro; Higuchi, Hirohumi; Takahashi, Hideki; Iioka, Masayuki; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru

    2017-09-06

    Amorphous (a-) In 2 O 3 -based front contact layers composed of transparent conducting oxide (TCO) and transparent oxide semiconductor (TOS) layers were proved to be effective in enhancing the short-circuit current density (J sc ) of Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) solar cells with a glass/Mo/CIGS/CdS/TOS/TCO structure, while maintaining high fill factor (FF) and open-circuit voltage (V oc ). An n-type a-In-Ga-Zn-O layer was introduced between the CdS and TCO layers. Unlike unintentionally doped ZnO broadly used as TOS layers in CIGS solar cells, the grain-boundary(GB)-free amorphous structure of the a-In-Ga-Zn-O layers allowed high electron mobility with superior control over the carrier density (N). High FF and V oc values were achieved in solar cells containing a-In-Ga-Zn-O layers with N values broadly ranging from 2 × 10 15 to 3 × 10 18 cm -3 . The decrease in FF and V oc produced by the electronic inhomogeneity of solar cells was mitigated by controlling the series resistance within the TOS layer of CIGS solar cells. In addition, a-In 2 O 3 :H and a-In-Zn-O layers exhibited higher electron mobilities than the ZnO:Al layers conventionally used as TCO layers in CIGS solar cells. The In 2 O 3 -based layers exhibited lower free carrier absorption while maintaining similar sheet resistance than ZnO:Al. The TCO and TOS materials and their combinations did not significantly change the V oc of the CIGS solar cells and the mini-modules.

  6. Laser scribing integration of polycrystalline thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzi, Michele; Manilia, Filomena; Antezza, Roberto; Catellani, Cristina; Candiani, Alessandro; Coscelli, Enrico; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Selleri, Stefano; Menossi, Daniele; Bosio, Alessio

    2013-03-01

    The growing demand for high productivity in the thin-film photovoltaic module industry, together with the request for more and more efficient devices, needs high-performance laser-scribing. The results of scribing tests on CdTe and CIGS solar cells samples are here presented. A comparison between the scribes obtained with ns regime fiber lasers, and a ps regime diode pumped solid state laser will be also reported.

  7. Extending the Endurance, Missions and Capabilities of Most UAVs Using Advanced Flexible/Ridged Solar Cells and New High Power Density Batteries Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Amperes-Hour AM Air mass AM0 Air mass 0 AM1.5 Air mass 1.5 a-Si Amorphous Silicon C/E Capacity/Energy CdS Cadmium Sulfide CdTe Cadmium...polycrystalline cadmium telluride ( CdTe ) and CIGS flexible cells, the back contacts are applied to the p-type semiconductor in both superstrate and...monolithically integrated sub- module CIGS flexible solar cell is shown in Figure 28. Figure 28. Typical process flow for preparing a flexible CIGS

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Thin Film Solar Cell Made from CuIn0.75Ga0.25S2 Wurtzite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CuIn0.75Ga0.25S2 (CIGS thin film solar cells have been successfully fabricated using CIGS Wurtzite phase nanoparticles for the first time. The structure of the cell is Glass/Mo/CIGS/CdS/ZnO/ZnO:Al/Ag. The light absorption layer is made from CIGS Wurtzite phase nanoparticles that are formed from single-source precursors through a microwave irradiation. The Wurtzite phase nanoparticles were converted to Chalcopyrite phase film through a single-step annealing process in the presence of argon and sulfur at 450°C. The solar cell made from Wurtzite phase nanoparticles showed 1.6% efficiency and 0.42 fill factor.

  9. CIGS Material and Device Stability: A Processing Perspective (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, K.

    2012-03-01

    This is a general overview of CIGS material and device fundamentals. In the first part, the basic features of high efficiency CIGS absorbers and devices are described. In the second part, some examples of previous collaboration with Shell Solar CIGSS graded absorbers and devices are shown to illustrate how process information was used to correct deviations and improve the performance and stability.

  10. The optimization of a Mo bilayer and its application in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. C.; Sung, C. C.; Chen, J. H.; Huang, C. H.; Hsu, C. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) back contact films for Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells are deposited on soda-lime glass (SLG) substrates by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering with a Mo target in a pure Ar atmosphere. The effect of the DC power (in the range, 100-500 W) and the sputtering pressure (in the range, 0.2-1.8 Pa) on the morphology, the electrical resistivity, the optical reflectance and the adhesive properties of Mo films is determined. The optimum properties for the Mo bilayer are obtained. The quality of the SLG/Mo bilayers/CIGS samples that are selenized at 560 °C is confirmed to be dense and relatively smooth, with very good adherence. No cracking or peeling off is observed after selenization. The X-ray diffraction patterns for the CIGS absorbers film have a chalcopyrite crystal structure with a preferred orientation of (112), (204)/(220) and (312)/(116). The chemical composition of the Cu-In-Ga precursor films and CIGS absorbers are determined using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The secondary ion mass spectroscopy surface chemical analysis for the CIGS films shows that the Ga element moves away from the surface and accumulates at the bottom of the sample and Se diffuses into the Mo surface, which indicates the possible completion of selenization. The CIGS solar cells that are produced have a maximum photo-conversion efficiency of 12.83%.

  11. Progress in Polycrystalline Thin-Film Cu(In,GaSe2 Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udai P. Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For some time, the chalcopyrite semiconductor CuInSe2 and its alloy with Ga and/or S [Cu(InGaSe2 or Cu(InGa(Se,S2], commonly referred as CIGS, have been leading thin-film material candidates for incorporation in high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. CuInSe2-based solar cells have shown long-term stability and the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film solar cells, reaching 20%. A variety of methods have been reported to prepare CIGS thin film. Efficiency of solar cells depends upon the various deposition methods as they control optoelectronic properties of the layers and interfaces. CIGS thin film grown on glass or flexible (metal foil, polyimide substrates require p-type absorber layers of optimum optoelectronic properties and n-type wideband gap partner layers to form the p-n junction. Transparent conducting oxide and specific metal layers are used for front and back contacts. Progress made in the field of CIGS solar cell in recent years has been reviewed.

  12. DEGRADATION OF SOLAR CELLS PARAMETERS FABRICATED ON THE BASIS OF Cu(In,GaSe2 SEMICONDUCTOR SOLID SOLUTIONS UNDER ELECTRON IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mudryi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycrystalline Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS thin films were grown on molybdenum-coated soda-lime glass substrates by co-evaporation of the elements Cu, In, Ga and Se from independent sources. The effect of electron irradiation on the electrical and optical properties of CIGS thin films and solar cells with the structure ZnO:Al/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/glass was studied. It was found that the degradation of the electrical parameters of solar cells (open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density and efficiency took place due to the formation of radiation defects (recombination centers with deep energy levels in the bandgap of CIGS. It was revealed that after electron irradiation intensity of near band-edge luminescence band at about 1,1 eV decreased considerably and bands of luminescence with maxima at 0,93 and 0,75 eV appeared.

  13. Comparative alternative materials assessment to screen toxicity hazards in the life cycle of CIGS thin film photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Daniel A; Yu, Mengjing; Lam, Carl W; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2013-09-15

    Copper-indium-gallium-selenium-sulfide (CIGS) thin film photovoltaics are increasingly penetrating the market supply for consumer solar panels. Although CIGS is attractive for producing less greenhouse gas emissions than fossil-fuel based energy sources, CIGS manufacturing processes and solar cell devices use hazardous materials that should be carefully considered in evaluating and comparing net environmental benefits of energy products. Through this research, we present a case study on the toxicity hazards associated with alternative materials selection for CIGS manufacturing. We applied two numeric models, The Green Screen for Safer Chemicals and the Toxic Potential Indicator. To improve the sensitivity of the model outputs, we developed a novel, life cycle thinking based hazard assessment method that facilitates the projection of hazards throughout material life cycles. Our results show that the least hazardous CIGS solar cell device and manufacturing protocol consist of a titanium substrate, molybdenum metal back electrode, CuInS₂ p-type absorber deposited by spray pyrolysis, ZnS buffer deposited by spray ion layer gas reduction, ZnO:Ga transparent conducting oxide (TCO) deposited by sputtering, and the encapsulant polydimethylsiloxane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Optical Physics of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cells and Their Layer Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibdah, Abedl-Rahman

    Polycrystalline Cu(In1-xGax)Se 2 (CIGS) thin film technology has emerged as a promising candidate for low cost and high performance solar modules. The efficiency of CIGS solar cells is strongly influenced by several key factors. Among these factors include Ga composition and its profile in the absorber layer, copper content in this layer, and the solar cell multilayer structure. As a result, tools for the characterization of thin film CIGS solar cells and their layer components are becoming increasingly essential in research and manufacturing. Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a non-invasive technique that can serve as an accurate probe of component layer optical properties and multilayer structures, and can be applied as a diagnostic tool for real-time, in-line, and off-line monitoring and analysis in small area solar cell fabrication as well as in large area photovoltaics manufacturing. Implementation of spectroscopic ellipsometry provides unique insights into the properties of complete solar cell multilayer structures and their layer components. These insights can improve our understanding of solar cell structures, overcome challenges associated with solar cell fabrication, and assist in process monitoring and control on a production line. In this dissertation research, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films with different Cu contents have been prepared by the one stage co-evaporation process. These films have been studied by real time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE) during deposition, and by in-situ SE at the deposition temperature as well as at room temperature to extract the dielectric functions (epsilon1, epsilon 2) of the thin film materials. Analytical expressions for the room temperature dielectric functions were developed, and the free parameters that describe these analytical functions were in turn expressed as functions of the Cu content. As a result of this parameterization, the dielectric function spectra (epsilon 1, epsilon2) can be predicted for any desired composition

  15. A facile chemical-mechanical polishing lift-off transfer process toward large scale Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cells on arbitrary substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuan-Chun; Yen, Yu-Ting; Thomas, Stuart R.; Tsai, Hung-Wei; Hsu, Cheng-Hung; Tsai, Wen-Chi; Shen, Chang-Hong; Shieh, Jia-Min; Wang, Zhiming M.; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells on flexible substrates is a non-trivial task due to thermal and ion diffusion related issues. In order to circumvent these issues, we have developed a chemical-mechanical polishing lift-off (CMPL) transfer process, enabling the direct transfer of CIGS solar cells from conventional soda-lime glass (SLG) onto arbitrary flexible substrates up to 4 cm2 in size. The structural and compositional nature of the pre- and post-transferred films is examined using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. We demonstrate the fabrication of solar cells on a range of flexible substrates while being able to maintain 75% cell efficiency (η) when compared to pre-transferred solar cells. The results obtained in this work suggest that our transfer process offers a highly promising approach toward large scale fabrication of CIGS-based solar cells on a wide variety of flexible substrates, suitable for use in the large scale CIGS photovoltaic industry.The fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells on flexible substrates is a non-trivial task due to thermal and ion diffusion related issues. In order to circumvent these issues, we have developed a chemical-mechanical polishing lift-off (CMPL) transfer process, enabling the direct transfer of CIGS solar cells from conventional soda-lime glass (SLG) onto arbitrary flexible substrates up to 4 cm2 in size. The structural and compositional nature of the pre- and post-transferred films is examined using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. We demonstrate the fabrication of solar cells on a range of flexible substrates while being able to maintain 75% cell efficiency (η) when compared to pre-transferred solar cells. The results obtained in this work suggest that our transfer process offers a highly promising approach toward large scale fabrication of CIGS-based solar cells on a wide

  16. Application of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Photovoltaic Cells to Extend the Endurance and Capabilities of the Raven RQ-11B Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    0.40 CIGS 0.565 21.3 75.7 9.1 0.47 CIGS 0.576 26.8 64.2 9.9 EPV 1. CIGSS Module 25.26 2.66 69.2 12.8 Shell Solar 0.87 CdTe ...Arrangement..........................52 Figure 27. Cutting CIGS Solar Cell.........................55 Figure 28. CIGS Module Cross-Section (From...Experimentation CdS Cadmium Sulfide CdTe Cadmium Telluride CIGS Cupper Indium Gallium Selenide COTS Commercial Off-The-Shelf Cu Cupper DDL

  17. Site selective doping of Zn for the p-type Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film for solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakata, Sho [Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Tokyo University of Science, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Selective doping of a Zn impurity at the group III site in a Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) film was performed by the doping of Zn at the first stage of the three-stage method. The p-type CIGS:Zn film was obtained, which is in contrast to the n-type CIGS:Zn film obtained by the Zn impurity doping at the second and third-stages. Based on excitation intensity dependence of photoluminescence (PL) at low-temperature, the change in the acceptor level was observed. The enhancement of carrier concentration as a result of Zn-doping in the p-type CIGS:Zn film was observed. The CIGS:Zn solar cells exhibited η of 14.5% and V{sub oc} of 0.658 V, which are higher than that of the corresponding solar cells using the undoped CIGS films. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Nanostructured Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Michal Jędrzej; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    Recent forecasts for alternative energy generation predict emerging importance of supporting state of art photovoltaic solar cells with their organic equivalents. Despite their significantly lower efficiency, number of application niches are suitable for organic solar cells. This work reveals...... the principles of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells fabrication as well as summarises major differences in physics of their operation....

  19. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  20. Synthesis of Cu-Poor Copper-Indium-Gallium-Diselenide Nanoparticles by Solvothermal Route for Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Ping Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS thin films were fabricated using precursor nanoparticle ink and sintering technology. The precursor was a Cu-poor quaternary compound with constituent ratios of Cu/(In+Ga=0.603, Ga/(In+Ga=0.674, and Se/(Cu+In+Ga=1.036. Cu-poor CIGS nanoparticles of chalcopyrite for solar cells were successfully synthesized using a relatively simple and convenient elemental solvothermal route. After a fixed reaction time of 36 h at 180°C, CIGS nanocrystals with diameters in the range of 20–70 nm were observed. The nanoparticle ink was fabricated by mixing CIGS nanoparticles, a solvent, and an organic polymer. Analytical results reveal that the Cu-poor CIGS absorption layer prepared from a nanoparticle-ink polymer by sintering has a chalcopyrite structure and a favorable composition. For this kind of sample, its mole ratio of Cu : In : Ga : Se is equal to 0.617 : 0.410 : 0.510 : 2.464 and related ratios of Ga/(In+Ga and Cu/(In+Ga are 0.554 and 0.671, respectively. Under the condition of standard air mass 1.5 global illumination, the conversion efficiency of the solar cell fabricated by this kind of sample is 4.05%.

  1. Modeling solar cells: A method for improving their efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Acevedo, Arturo, E-mail: amorales@solar.cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Electrical Engineering Department, Avenida IPN No. 2508, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez-Como, Norberto; Casados-Cruz, Gaspar [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Electrical Engineering Department, Avenida IPN No. 2508, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2012-09-20

    After a brief discussion on the theoretical basis for simulating solar cells and the available programs for doing this we proceed to discuss two examples that show the importance of doing numerical simulation of solar cells. We shall concentrate in silicon Heterojunction Intrinsic Thin film aSi/cSi (HIT) and CdS/CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells. In the first case, we will show that numerical simulation indicates that there is an optimum transparent conducting oxide (TCO) to be used in contact with the p-type aSi:H emitter layer although many experimental researchers might think that the results can be similar without regard of the TCO film used. In this case, it is shown that high work function TCO materials such as ZnO:Al are much better than smaller work function films such as ITO. HIT solar cells made with small work function TCO layers (<4.8 eV) will never be able to reach the high efficiencies already reported experimentally. It will also be discussed that simulations of CIGS solar cells by different groups predict efficiencies around 18-19% or even less, i.e. below the record efficiency reported experimentally (20.3%). In addition, the experimental band-gap which is optimum in this case is around 1.2 eV while several theoretical results predict a higher optimum band-gap (1.4-1.5 eV). This means that there are other effects not included in most of the simulation models developed until today. One of them is the possible presence of an interfacial (inversion) layer between CdS and CIGS. It is shown that this inversion layer might explain the smaller observed optimum band-gap, but some efficiency is lost. It is discussed that another possible explanation for the higher experimental efficiency is the possible variation of Ga concentration in the CIGS film causing a gradual variation of the band-gap. This band-gap grading might help improve the open-circuit voltage and, if it is appropriately done, it can also cause the enhancement of the photo-current density.

  2. PEROVSKITE SOLAR CELLS (REVIEW ARTICLE)

    OpenAIRE

    Benli, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    A solar cell is a device that converts sunlight into electricity. There are different types of solar cells but this report mainly focuses on a type of new generation solar cell that has the name organo-metal halide perovskite, shortly perovskite solar cells. In this respect, the efficiency of power conversion is taken into account to replace the dominancy of traditional and second generation solar cell fields by perovskite solar cells. Perovskite solar cell is a type of solar cell including a...

  3. Computational analysis of the effect of the surface defect layer (SDL) properties on Cu(In,Ga)Se2-based solar cell performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo, S.; Zougmoré, F.; Ndjaka, J. M. B.

    2014-05-01

    In this article, the performances of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells have been modelled and numerically simulated using the one-dimensional simulation program Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator in 1 Dimension (SCAPS-1D), and a detailed analysis of the effect of surface defect layer (SDL) thickness, band gap and carrier mobility with Fermi level pinning is presented. Furthermore, donor-type defect state density in the SDL has been investigated, and their effect on device performances has been presented. Based on the simulation results, optimal properties of the SDL for the CIGS solar cell are proposed. The simulated results show that the optimal thickness of the SDL to optimise the solar cells is in the range of 100-200 nm. The increase in the band gap of the SDL >1.3 eV improves the device performance by enhancing the open-circuit voltage (Voc), fill factor (FF) and conversion efficiency due to the larger quasi-Fermi energy-level splitting, and optimal band offset between the SDL and the buffer layer (CdS). The simulation results suggest that the SDL defect density as well as carrier mobilities are the critical parameters for the limitation of the performances for the CIGS solar cells. All these results show that the SDL plays an important role in designing high-efficiency and high-performance CIGS-based solar cells.

  4. Microstructural evolution of all-wet-processed CIGS films using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hee Soo; Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Pyo, Sung Gyu [School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Seoul, 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Pil [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We report a wet process deposition in order to identify a cost-effective processing scheme for CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) layers on molybdenum/soda lime glass substrates from a Cu-In-Ga precursor solution. We employed a spin coater at various settings to evaluate the uniformity of the resulting CIGS solar cell layer. After the CIGS precursor film was deposited, we applied a selenization process. In the selenization process, we used a controlled temperature RTA system and compared it to a noncontrolled temperature system. We investigated the morphological properties for different selenization temperature treatments. We used Raman mapping to detect binary compounds and found the binary compound effect on the film. Raman mapping results show that the density of the binary compound in the CIGS layer increased with selenization temperature, and at 600 C, the density of the binary compounds was highest. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-09-08

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  6. Efficiency enhancement calculations of state-of-the-art solar cells by luminescent layers with spectral shifting, quantum cutting, and quantum tripling function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Kate, O.M.; De Jong, M.; Hintzen, H.T.; Van der Kolk, E.

    2013-01-01

    Solar cells of which the efficiency is not limited by the Shockley-Queisser limit can be obtained by integrating a luminescent spectral conversion layer into the cell structure. We have calculated the maximum efficiency of state-of-the-art c-Si, pc-Si, a-Si, CdTe, GaAs, CIS, CIGS, CGS, GaSb, and Ge

  7. Enhancement of copper(indium, gallium)selenide solar cells and materials via the incorporation of silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Scott A.

    As Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) technology has proven itself to be a worthy solar cell technology, research efforts have redoubled to explore ways to enrich the already mature technology or create spin-offs of the technology with specific goals for manufacturing in mind. CIGS technology is now at an efficiency and production level that is competitive with other second generation solar cell devices and c-Si. Further research in CIGS allows for a toolbox of new ideas to try in the technology. This work aims at that goal by generating and presenting many ideas on how that may be possible. Primarily, this work contains information concerning the improvement of the manufacturing process using a hybrid sputter deposition chamber for scaling up and allowing for easy in situ monitoring using ellipsometry. It also explores the possibility of the addition of Ag to enhance and control device behavior and properties, and investigates the concept of a two-stage process with a co-sputtering deposition chamber. Monitoring of Ag in situ and in real time was explored to possibly improve the back contact of solar cells that use Ag as a back contact (not necessarily CIGS) and as a potential precursor for nanocrystals.

  8. CuIn1-xGaxSe2 Thin Film Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 5 January 1998 -- 31 October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhere, N. G.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the development of CIGS2 thin-film solar cells on glass and stainless-steel foil substrates; fabrication of a large-area, dual-chamber magnetron-sputtering unit; Round Robin AES and SIMS analysis; and current-voltage characteristics of CdTe modules and analysis of CdTe module samples. More detailed results on CIGS2 cells and the large-area, dual-chamber magnetron-sputtering unit were presented at the MRS Conference, the European PV Conference, and NCPV Program Review Meeting and are included in Appendices I, II, and III. The results of Round Robin AES and SIMS analysis were submitted to the National CIGS Team Meeting. The current-voltage characteristics of CdTe modules and results of analyses of CdTe module samples were submitted separately to NREL and First Solar.

  9. ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S-based buffer layer deposition for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N [Littleton, CO

    2009-11-03

    The invention provides CBD ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S and spray deposited ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S buffer layers prepared from a solution of zinc salt, thiourea and ammonium hydroxide dissolved in a non-aqueous/aqueous solvent mixture or in 100% non-aqueous solvent. Non-aqueous solvents useful in the invention include methanol, isopropanol and triethyl-amine. One-step deposition procedures are described for CIS, CIGS and other solar cell devices.

  10. A Comprehensive Study of One-Step Selenization Process for Cu(In1- x Ga x )Se2 Thin Film Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chen; Wang, Sheng-Wen; Kuo, Shou-Yi; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Lee, Po-Tsung; Luo, Chih Wei; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-03-01

    In this work, aiming at developing a rapid and environmental-friendly process for fabricating CuIn1- x Ga x Se2 (CIGS) solar cells, we demonstrated the one-step selenization process by using selenium vapor as the atmospheric gas instead of the commonly used H2Se gas. The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics indicate that there exists an optimal location with superior crystalline quality in the CIGS thin films obtained by one-step selenization. The energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) reveals that the Ga lateral distribution in the one-step selenized CIGS thin film is intimately correlated to the blue-shifted PL spectra. The surface morphologies examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) further suggested that voids and binary phase commonly existing in CIGS films could be successfully eliminated by the present one-step selenization process. The agglomeration phenomenon attributable to the formation of MoSe2 layer was also observed. Due to the significant microstructural improvement, the current-voltage ( J- V) characteristics and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the devices made of the present CIGS films have exhibited the remarkable carrier transportation characteristics and photon utilization at the optimal location, resulting in a high conversion efficiency of 11.28%. Correlations between the defect states and device performance of the one-step selenized CIGS thin film were convincingly delineated by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy.

  11. Efficiency enhancement of flexible Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells deposited on polyimide-coated soda lime glass substrate by alkali treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadono, Adiyudha; Ogihara, Tomohiro; Hino, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Nakada, Kazuyoshi; Yamada, Akira

    2017-08-01

    Alkali treatment effects on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells deposited on polyimide-coated soda lime glass (PI-coated SLG) were investigated. CIGS on PI-coated SLG shows Na diffusion from the substrate, which should be controlled to obtain high efficiencies. Further incorporation of Na was achieved by enhancing diffusion from the substrate or by external incorporation using post-deposition treatment (PDT) methods. Both methods lead to a high efficiency of approximately 15%. Moreover, aside from Na, K was also incorporated by KF-PDT, resulting in efficiency improvement from 12% for an untreated CIGS to more than 18% at the maximum substrate temperature of 450 °C, which is comparable to CIGS deposited at higher temperatures using the same equipment. It was also found that the alkali concentration of CIGS deposited on PI-coated SLG shows almost the same behavior as that of a film deposited on a rigid glass, suggesting that the deposition technique for CIGS on the rigid glass can be applied to flexible substrates.

  12. A Comprehensive Study of One-Step Selenization Process for Cu(In1-x Ga x )Se2 Thin Film Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chen; Wang, Sheng-Wen; Kuo, Shou-Yi; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Lee, Po-Tsung; Luo, Chih Wei; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-12-01

    In this work, aiming at developing a rapid and environmental-friendly process for fabricating CuIn1-x Ga x Se2 (CIGS) solar cells, we demonstrated the one-step selenization process by using selenium vapor as the atmospheric gas instead of the commonly used H2Se gas. The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics indicate that there exists an optimal location with superior crystalline quality in the CIGS thin films obtained by one-step selenization. The energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) reveals that the Ga lateral distribution in the one-step selenized CIGS thin film is intimately correlated to the blue-shifted PL spectra. The surface morphologies examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) further suggested that voids and binary phase commonly existing in CIGS films could be successfully eliminated by the present one-step selenization process. The agglomeration phenomenon attributable to the formation of MoSe2 layer was also observed. Due to the significant microstructural improvement, the current-voltage (J-V) characteristics and external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the devices made of the present CIGS films have exhibited the remarkable carrier transportation characteristics and photon utilization at the optimal location, resulting in a high conversion efficiency of 11.28%. Correlations between the defect states and device performance of the one-step selenized CIGS thin film were convincingly delineated by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy.

  13. Effect of zinc addition on properties of cadmium sulfide layer and performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Dowon, E-mail: bae.dowon@yahoo.co.kr; Gho, Junghwan; Shin, Minjung; Kwon, Sehan

    2013-05-01

    Cd{sub (1−x)}Zn{sub x}S (CdS:Zn) thin films were grown on an indium tin oxide-coated glass substrate and Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) surface by chemical bath deposition for solar cell applications, and their composition, and optical properties were studied to decide the optimum process conditions for buffer layer growth. The average conversion efficiency of CIGS solar panels (24-in.) with the CdS:Zn layer was 0.35% higher than that of conventional solar panels mainly because of the increased open-circuit voltage. This efficiency improvement was not due to modification of the optical properties of the buffer layer, but due to the change in the deposition rate during buffer layer growth. - Highlights: ► CdS:Zn buffer layers were fabricated for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) panels. ► Composition of buffer layers on indium–tin–oxide (ITO) and CIGS was investigated. ► Transmittance of CdS:Zn on ITO coated glass showed 5% higher than CdS. ► Efficiency of CdS:Zn solution adopted panels showed 0.47% higher than that with CdS. ► However, it was revealed that only Cd and S ions were found at the surface of CIGS.

  14. Solar cell. Taiyo denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, K.; Shitsutani, T. (Mitsubishi electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-09-10

    This invention provides a highly efficient soalr cell which requires no accurate conformity of collector electrodes, especially a highly efficient tandem solar cell. This invention comprises a collector electrode placed in an effective light receiving zone on the surface of the 2nd electroconductive semiconductor layer formed on the 1st electroconductive semiconductor substrate, the 1st electrode placed in the periphery of light receiving zone and comprising a common electrode connected to the above-mentioned collector electrode, and the 2nd electrode formed on the back side of above-mentioned semiconductor substrate in zones except the zone facing the effective light-receiving zone. In case of using as a tandem solar cell, the above-mentioned solar cell is used as the 1st solar cell, and, as the 2nd solar cell which is incidented by solar light which passed through it, a solar cell having no electrode is used on the surface which faces the 1st solar cell. 4 figs.

  15. Development of practical application technology for photovoltaic power generation systems in fiscal 1997. Development of technologies to manufacture next-generation thin film solar cells, development of technologies to manufacture CIS solar cell modules, development of technologies to increase high-quality film area; 1997 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu. Jisedai usumaku taiyo denchi module no seizo gijutsu kaihatsu, CIS taiyo denchi module no seizo gijutsu kaihatsu, kohinshitsumaku no daimensekika gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    With an objective to improve efficiency and reduce cost of CIS-based thin film solar cells, research and development has been made on technologies to increase high-quality CIS film area and technologies to increase speed in the manufacturing process. This paper describes the achievements attained during fiscal 1997. The research covered development of technologies to form high-grade Cu (In, Ga) Se{sub 2} (CIGS) film by using the multi-dimensional deposition process, component technologies for forming a rear electrode, a buffer layer and a transparent electrode, and patterning technologies. As a result of the research, thickness of the CIGS film was reduced to half as much as that of the conventional films, having achieved conversion efficiency of 13.1%, which corresponds to about 90% of the conventional CIGS solar cells. In addition, elucidation was made on the effect of an MoSe{sub 2} layer existing on interface with CIGS/Mo in a CIGS solar cell imposed on solar cell characteristics. In developing an Mo film laser scribing technology, intensity dependence of laser energy was made clear, the energy being required for scribing according to surface condition of the Mo film. (NEDO)

  16. 2D Finite Element Model of a CIGS Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, G.J.M.; Slooff, L.H.; Bende, E.E. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O.Box 1, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    The performance of thin-film CIGS (Copper indium gallium selenide) modules is often limited due to inhomogeneities in CIGS layers. A 2-dimensional Finite Element Model for CIGS modules is presented that predicts the impact of such inhomogeneities on the module performance. Results are presented of a module with a region of poor diode characteristics. It is concluded that according to this model the effects of poor diodes depend strongly on their location in the module and on their dispersion over the module surface. Due to its generic character the model can also be applied to other series connections of photovoltaic cells.

  17. Rectenna solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Moddel, Garret

    2013-01-01

    Rectenna Solar Cells discusses antenna-coupled diode solar cells, an emerging technology that has the potential to provide ultra-high efficiency, low-cost solar energy conversion. This book will provide an overview of solar rectennas, and provide thorough descriptions of the two main components: the diode, and the optical antenna. The editors discuss the science, design, modeling, and manufacturing of the antennas coupled with the diodes. The book will provide concepts to understanding the challenges, fabrication technologies, and materials required to develop rectenna structures. Written by e

  18. Copper-indium-gallium-diselenide nanoparticles synthesized by a solvothermal method for solar cell application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou Chuan-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chalcopyrite copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS nanoparticles are useful for photovoltaic applications. In this study, the synthesis of CIGS powder was examined, and the powder was successfully synthesized using a relatively simple and convenient elemental solvothermal route. From the reactions of elemental Cu, In, Se and Ga(NO33 powders in an autoclave with ethylenediamine as a solvent, spherical CIGS nanoparticles, with diameters ranging from 20-40 nm, were obtained using a temperature of 200°C for 36h. The structure, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties of the as-synthesized CIGS were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. In this sample, the mole ratio of Cu:In:Ga:Se was equal to 0.89:0.71:0.29:2.01, and the optical band gap was found to be 1.18 eV. The solar cell obtained a power conversion efficiency of 5.62% under standard air mass 1.5 global illumination.

  19. Modelling Defects Acceptors And Determination Of Electric Model From The Nyquist Plot And Bode In Thin Film CIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demba Diallo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The performance of the chalcopyrite material CuInGaSe2 CIGS used as an absorber layer in thin-film photovoltaic devices is significantly affected by the presence of native defects. Multivalent defects e.g. double acceptors or simple acceptor are important immaterial used in solar cell production in general and in chalcopyrite materials in particular. We used the thin film solar cell simulation software SCAPS to enable the simulation of multivalent defects with up to five different charge states.Algorithms enabled us to simulate an arbitrary number of possible states of load. The presented solution method avoids numerical inaccuracies caused by the subtraction of two almost equal numbers. This new modelling facility is afterwards used to investigate the consequences of the multivalent character of defects for the simulation of chalcopyrite based CIGS. The capacitance increase with the evolution of the number of defects C- f curves have found to have defect dependence.

  20. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wei

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO2, ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed.

  1. Quantum dot solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The third generation of solar cells includes those based on semiconductor quantum dots. This sophisticated technology applies nanotechnology and quantum mechanics theory to enhance the performance of ordinary solar cells. Although a practical application of quantum dot solar cells has yet to be achieved, a large number of theoretical calculations and experimental studies have confirmed the potential for meeting the requirement for ultra-high conversion efficiency. In this book, high-profile scientists have contributed tutorial chapters that outline the methods used in and the results of variou

  2. Progress on Low-Temperature Pulsed Electron Deposition of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Mazzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The quest for single-stage deposition of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS is an open race to replace very effective but capital intensive thin film solar cell manufacturing processes like multiple-stage coevaporation or sputtering combined with high pressure selenisation treatments. In this paper the most recent achievements of Low Temperature Pulsed Electron Deposition (LTPED, a novel single stage deposition process by which CIGS can be deposited at 250 °C, are presented and discussed. We show that selenium loss during the film deposition is not a problem with LTPED as good crystalline films are formed very close to the melting temperature of selenium. The mechanism of formation of good ohmic contacts between CIGS and Mo in the absence of any MoSe2 transition layers is also illustrated, followed by a brief summary of the measured characteristics of test solar cells grown by LTPED. The 17% efficiency target achieved by lab-scale CIGS devices without bandgap modulation, antireflection coating or K-doping is considered to be a crucial milestone along the path to the industrial scale-up of LTPED. The paper ends with a brief review of the open scientific and technological issues related to the scale-up and the possible future applications of the new technology.

  3. Nanostructured inorganic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musselman, Kevin P. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas [Ludwig-Maximilians Univ. Muenchen (DE). Dept. of Physics and Center for NanoScience (CeNS)

    2011-07-01

    Recent progress in the development of nanostructured inorganic solar cells is reviewed. Nanostructuring of inorganic solar cells offers the possibility of reducing the cost of photovoltaics by allowing smaller amounts of lower-grade photovoltaic semiconductors to be used. Various fabrication methods used to nanostructure traditional photovoltaic semiconductors are detailed and the performance of resulting devices is discussed. The synthesis of solar cells by solution-based methods using less traditional, abundant materials is identified as a promising route to widescale photovoltaic electricity generation, and nanostructured solar cell geometries are highlighted as essential in this approach. Templating and self-assembling methods used to produce appropriate low-cost nanostructures from solutions are detailed, and the performance of preliminary ultra-low-cost cells made with these structures is reviewed. (orig.)

  4. Solar cell radiation handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  5. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2013-11-26

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  6. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J

    2014-05-20

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electricity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  7. Characteristics of molybdenum bilayer back contacts for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells on Ti foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, Charles, E-mail: charles.rgr@gmail.com [CEA, LITEN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Noël, Sébastien; Sicardy, Olivier; Faucherand, Pascal; Grenet, Louis; Karst, Nicolas; Fournier, Hélène; Roux, Frédéric [CEA, LITEN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ducroquet, Frédérique [IMEP-LAHC, Minatec, Grenoble-INP, CNRS UMR 5130, 38016 Grenoble (France); Brioude, Arnaud [Laboratoire des Multimatériaux et Interfaces, UMR 5615, Villeurbanne (France); Perraud, Simon [CEA, LITEN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-02

    Molybdenum back contact properties are critical for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cell performance on metallic substrates. In this work, we investigated the properties of sputter-deposited Mo bilayer back contacts on Ti foils. The morphology, electrical resistivity, optical reflectance and residual mechanical stress of the bottom Mo layer were modified by varying the working pressure during its deposition. Working pressures ranging from 0.27 Pa to 4.00 Pa were used. The top Mo layer was deposited using constant conditions at a pressure of 0.13 Pa. It was demonstrated that unlike a Mo monolayer, the use of a Mo bilayer allows controlling the mechanical stress at the Mo/CIGS interface without degrading the optical reflectance and the electrical resistance of the back contact. It was also found that the morphology of the bottom Mo layer affects the growth of the top Mo layer, resulting in a modified back contact surface morphology. This induces changes in the crystalline orientation of the CIGS layer. The resulting solar cell characteristics strongly vary as a function of the bottom Mo layer deposition pressure. A bottom Mo layer growth at 2.93 Pa allows improving the solar cell conversion efficiency by 1.5 times compared to a bottom Mo layer deposited at 0.27 Pa. Using the improved Mo bilayer back contact, a maximum solar cell efficiency of 10.0% was obtained without sodium addition nor anti-reflection coating. - Highlights: • Mo bilayer back contacts for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells were grown on Ti substrates. • The sputtering pressure of the bottom Mo layer was varied between 0.27 Pa and 4 Pa. • The top Mo layer controls the optical and electrical properties of the back contact. • The structure of the bottom Mo layer influences the morphology of the top Mo layer. • The back contact affects the CIGS texture, device series resistance and efficiency.

  8. Application of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Photovoltaic Cells to Extend the Endurance and Capabilities of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Challenger (From [10]).............................................................................7 Figure 5. World Average Photovoltaic Module Cost per...Typical Configuration for a CdTe Cell (From [71]). .......................................51 Figure 55. Roll-to-Roll Manufacture of CIGS Solar Cells...Vehicle BDA Battle Damage Assessment BIPV Building Integrated Photovoltaics CdTe Cadmium Telluride CIGS Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide

  9. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gur, Ilan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  10. Effects of potassium on kesterite solar cells: Similarities, differences and synergies with sodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Haass

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of alkali dopants is essential for achieving high-efficiency conversion efficiency of thin film solar cells based on chalcogenide semiconductors like Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se4 (CZTSSe also called kesterite. Whereas the treatment with potassium allows boosting the performance of CIGS solar cells as compared to the conventional sodium doping, it is debated if similar effects can be expected for kesterite solar cells. Here the influence of potassium is investigated by introducing the dopant during the solution processing of kesterite absorbers. It is confirmed that the presence of potassium leads to an enhanced grain growth and a ten-fold lower potassium concentration is sufficient for obtaining grain size similar to sodium-containing absorbers. Potassium is located predominantly at grain boundaries and it suppresses incorporation of sodium into the absorber layer. The potassium doping increases the apparent carrier concentration to ∼2×1016 cm-3 for a potassium concentration of 0.2 at%. The potassium-doped solar cells yield conversion efficiency close to 10%, on par with only sodium-doped samples. Co-doping with potassium and sodium has not revealed any beneficial synergetic effects and it is concluded that both dopants exhibit similar effects on the kesterite solar cell performance.

  11. Impact of different Na-incorporating methods on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells with a low-Na substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shenglin; Tan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Minlin; Fan, Bin; Tang, Ken; Zhuang, Songlin

    2010-03-20

    As a kind of Na-incorporating control method, NaF co-evaporation or soda-lime glass thin films (SLGTFs) are useful to improve the photovoltaic performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se(2) (CIGS) cells fabricated on low-Na substrates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and scanning electron microscope pictures demonstrate that the grain size of CIGS thin film is reduced with the addition of Na. In addition, a variance of the preferred orientation is found by XRD patterns in terms of SLGTF samples. By a use of 100 nm thick SLGTF as a Na source, the best CIGS solar cell with an efficiency of 13.42% has been obtained.

  12. Alternative buffer layer development in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Peipei

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2-based thin film solar cells are considered to be one of the most promising photovoltaic technologies. Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar devices have the potential advantage of low-cost, fast fabrication by using semiconductor layers of only a few micrometers thick and high efficiency photovoltaics have been reported at both the cell and the module levels. CdS via chemical bath deposition (CBD) has been the most widely used buffer option to form the critical junction in CIGS-based thin film photovoltaic devices. However, the disadvantages of CdS can’t be ignored - regulations on cadmium usage are getting stricter primarily due to its toxicity and environmental impacts, and the proper handling of the large amount of toxic chemical bath waste is a massive and expensive task. This dissertation is devoted to the development of Cd-free alternative buffer layers in CIGS-based thin film solar cells. Based on the considerations of buffer layer selection criteria and extensive literature review, Zn-compound buffer materials are chosen as the primary investigation candidates. Radio frequency magnetron sputtering is the preferred buffer deposition approach since it’s a clean and more controllable technique compared to CBD, and is readily scaled to large area manufacturing. First, a comprehensive study of the ZnSe1-xOx compound prepared by reactive sputtering was completed. As the oxygen content in the reactive sputtering gas increased, ZnSe1-xOx crystallinity and bandgap decreased. It’s observed that oxygen miscibility in ZnSe was low and a secondary phase formed when the O2 / (O2 + Ar) ratio in the sputtering gas exceeded 2%. Two approaches were proposed to optimize the band alignment between the CIGS and buffer layer. One method focused on the bandgap engineering of the absorber, the other focused on the band structure modification of the buffer. As a result, improved current of the solar cell was achieved although a carrier transport barrier at the junction

  13. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of the surface chemistry and treatments of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Craig; Nordlund, Dennis; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Contreras, Miguel; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Mansfield, Lorelle; Hurst, Katherine E.; Dameron, Arrelaine; Ramanathan, Kannan; Prendergast, David; Christensen, Steven T.

    2017-02-01

    The surface and near surface structure of copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) absorber layers is integral to the producing a high-quality photovoltaic junction. By using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and monitoring multiple elemental absorption edges with both theory and experiment, we are able to identify several features of the surface of CIGS as a function of composition and surface treatments. The XAS data shows trends in the near surface region of oxygen, copper, indium and gallium species as the copper content is varied in the films. The oxygen surface species are also monitored through a series of experiments that systematically investigates the effects of water and various solutions of: ammonium hydroxide, cadmium sulfate, and thiourea. These being components of cadmium sulfide chemical bath deposition (CBD). Characteristics of the CBD are correlated with a restorative effect that produces as normalized, uniform surface chemistry as measured by XAS. This surface chemistry is found in CIGS solar cells with excellent power conversion efficiency (<19%). The results provide new insight for CIGS processing strategies that seek to replace CBD and/or cadmium sulfide.

  14. Atmospheric spatial atomic-layer-deposition of Zn(O, S) buffer layer for flexible Cu(In, Ga)Se2 solar cells: From lab-scale to large area roll to roll processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, C.H.; Bolt, P.J.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Knaapen, R.; Brink, J. van den; Ruth, M.; Bremaud, D.; Illiberi, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript we present the first successful application of a spatial atomic-layer-deposition process to thin film solar cells. Zn(O,S) has been grown by spatial atomic layer deposition (S-ALD) at atmospheric pressure and applied as buffer layer in rigid and flexible CIGS cells by a lab-scale

  15. E-Cigs, Menthol & Dip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Your Quitter FAQs for Helping Someone Quit E-Cigs, Menthol & Dip There are many types of tobacco products. Learn how e-cigarettes, menthol cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, and other products ...

  16. Proposed suitable electron reflector layer materials for thin-film CuIn1-xGaxSe2 solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharbati, Samaneh; Gharibshahian, Iman; Orouji, Ali A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the electrical properties of electron reflector layer to survey materials as an electron reflector (ER) for chalcopyrite CuInGaSe solar cells. The purpose is optimizing the conduction-band and valence-band offsets at ER layer/CIGS junction that can effectively reduce the electron recombination near the back contact. In this work, an initial device model based on an experimental solar cell is established, then the properties of a solar cell with electron reflector layer are physically analyzed. The electron reflector layer numerically applied to baseline model of thin-film CIGS cell fabricated by ZSW (efficiency = 20.3%). The improvement of efficiency is achievable by electron reflector layer materials with Eg > 1.3 eV and -0.3 0.5) are efficient electron reflector layer materials, so the potential improvement in efficiency obtained relative gain of 5%.

  17. Methods of forming CIGS films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, Lorelle; Ramanathan, Kannan

    2017-09-19

    Methods for forming CIGS films are provided. According to an aspect of the invention, a method of forming a CIGS film includes a precursor step, which includes simultaneously evaporating Cu, In, Ga, Se, and Sb onto a substrate. The Se is incident on the substrate at a rate of at least 20 .ANG./s. The method also includes a selenization step, which includes evaporating Se over the substrate after the precursor step.

  18. CTS and CZTS for solar cells made by pulsed laser deposition and pulsed electron deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    This thesis concerns the deposition of thin films for solar cells using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and pulsed electron deposition (PED). The aim was to deposit copper tin sulfide (CTS) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) by pulsed laser deposition to learn about these materials in relation to copper zinc tin......, which make them promising alternatives to the commercially successful solar cell material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Complementing our group's work on pulsed laser deposition of CZTS, we collaborated with IMEM-CNR in Parma, Italy, to deposit CZTS by pulsed electron deposition for the first...... of using pulsed electron deposition was to make CZTS at a low processing temperature, avoiding the 570 °C annealing step used for our pulsed laser deposited solar cells. Preliminary solar cells had an efficiency of 0.2 % with a 300 °C deposition step without annealing. Further process control is needed...

  19. Solar Photovoltaic Technology Assessment for Soldier-Portable and Mobile Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    Need: Fuel savings and Mission extension US Army CERDEC Solar PV Module Level Objectives Current Threshold Objective Pacing Technology All performance...Efficiency = 17% – PVD fabrication – Indium • Cadmium Telluride ( CdTe ) – Cell Efficiency = 16.5% f– PVD abrication – Health and environmental concerns are...alleviated CIGS and CdTe Device Construction CIGS CdTe Images are courtesy of HowStuffWorks.com US Army CERDEC Solar PV Current Developments

  20. The competing roles of i-ZnO in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, B.L.; Zardetto, V.; Kniknie, B.; Verheijen, M.A.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Creatore, M.

    2016-01-01

    The electrical role of the highly resistive and transparent (HRT) i-ZnO layer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2(CIGS) solar cells is investigated. By tuning the resistivity of atomic layer deposited (ALD) i-ZnO through the use of post-growth O2-plasma treatments, it is shown that low i-ZnO carrier densities (i.e.

  1. Cadmium sulfide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Development, fabrication and applications of CdS solar cells are reviewed in detail. The suitability of CdS cells for large solar panels and microcircuitry, and their low cost, are emphasized. Developments are reviewed by manufacturer-developer. Vapor phase deposition of thin-film solar cells, doping and co-evaporation, sputtering, chemical spray, and sintered layers are reviewed, in addition to spray deposition, monograin layer structures, and silk screening. Formation of junctions by electroplating, evaporation, brushing, CuCl dip, and chemiplating are discussed, along with counterelectrode fabrication, VPD film structures, the Cu2S barrier layer, and various photovoltaic effects (contact photovoltage, light intensity variation, optical enhancement), and various other CdS topics.

  2. Expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition of ZnO:Al layers for CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, K.; Williams, B.L.; Mittal, A.; Knoops, H.C.M.; Kniknie, B.J.; Bakker, N.J.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD) has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing

  3. Damp-heat-induced degradation of layers in CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Investors require a guarantee of a minimum lifetime for PV installations. It is tempting to provide such a guarantee for a longer lifetime simply by specifying test conditions that are more and more severe. In this paper it is argued that, with a more detailed understanding of the basic mechanisms

  4. Modeling and Simulation of a Dual-Junction CIGS Solar Cell Using Silvaco ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xv EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The intensive use of fossil fuels and nuclear power in recent years is largely responsible for the serious...INTRODUCTION One of the major problems of today is the limited availability of fossil fuels and hydrocarbons and the consequences of increasing consumption...An example of the ATLASTM syntax for defining the material properties is given by: MATERIAL MATERIAL=CdS EG300=2.4 PERMITTIVITY =10 \\ AFFINITY

  5. Functional layers for CIGS solar cell on-chip fabrication during post-processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitous deploying of wireless electronic devices due to pervasive computing results in the idea of Energy Scavenging, i.e., harvesting ambient energy from surroundings of the electronic devices [1]. As an approach to the most practical realization of such an energy scavenger, copper indium

  6. Identification and Analysis of Distinct Features in Imaging Thin-Film Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaunbrecher, K. N.; Johnston, S. W.; Sites, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    Electroluminescence and photoluminescence (EL and PL) are two imaging techniques employed at NREL that are used to qualitatively evaluate solar cells. In this work, imaging lab-scale CdTe and CIGS devices provides information about small-area PV response, which will aid in determining the effects of non-uniformities on cell performance. EL, PL, and dark lock-in thermography signatures are first catalogued. Their responses to varying conditions are then studied. Further analysis includes acquiring spectral data, making microscopy measurements, and correlating luminescence to device performance. The goal of this work is to quantitatively determine non-uniformity effects on cell performance using rapid imaging techniques.

  7. Confinement - assisted shock-wave-induced thin-film delamination (SWIFD) of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) on a flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Zagoranskiy, Igor; Ehrhardt, Martin; Han, Bing; Bayer, Lukas; Zimmer, Klaus

    2017-12-01

    The laser structuring of CIGS (copper indium gallium (di)selenide) solar cell material without influence and damaging the functionality of the active layer is a challenge for laser methods The shock-wave-induced thin-film delamination (SWIFD) process allows structuring without thermal modifications due to a spatial separation of the laser absorption from the functional layer removal process. In the present study, SWIFD structuring of CIGS solar cell stacks was investigated. The rear side of the polyimide was irradiated with a KrF-Excimer laser. The laser-induced ablation process generates a traverse shock wave, and the interaction of the shock wave with the layer-substrate interface results in a delamination process. The effect of a water confinement on the SWIFD process was studied where the rear side of the substrate was covered with a ∼2 mm thick water layer. The resultant surface morphology was analysed and discussed. At a sufficient number of laser pulses N and laser fluences Φ, the CIGS layer can be selectively removed from the Mo back contact. The water confinement, as well as the increasing laser beam size A0 and N, results in the reduction of the necessary minimal laser fluence Φth. Further, the delaminated CIGS area increased with increasing Φ, N, and A0.

  8. Characterization of solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkoenen, J.; Tuominen, E.; Nybergh, K.; Ezer, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Sinkkonen, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Dept. of Electrical and Communications Engineering

    1998-10-01

    Photovoltaic research in the Electron Physics Laboratory started in 1993, when laboratory joined the national TEKES/NEMO 2 research program. Since the beginning of the project, characterization as well as experimentally orientated development of the fabrication process of the solar cells were carried out parallery. The process development research started by the initiatives of the Finnish industry. At the moment a large amount of the laboratory personnel works on solar cell research and the financing comes mainly from external projects. The funding for the research has come from TEKES, Ministry of Education, Finnish Academy, GETA graduate school, special equipment grants of the university, and from the laboratory

  9. Numerical Analysis of Copper-Indium-Gallium-Diselenide-Based Solar Cells by SCAPS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ouédraogo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a one-dimensional simulation program Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator in 1 Dimension (SCAPS-1D to investigate Copper-Indium-Gallium-Diselenide- (CIGS- based solar cells properties. Starting with a conventional ZnO-B/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGS structure, we simulated the parameters of current-voltage characteristics and showed how the absorber layer thickness, hole density, and band gap influence the short-circuit current density (Jsc, open-circuit voltage (Voc, fill factor (FF, and efficiency of solar cell. Our simulation results showed that all electrical parameters are greatly affected by the absorber thickness (w below 1000 nm, due to the increase of back-contact recombination and very poor absorption. Increasing hole density (p or absorber band gap (Eg improves Voc and leads to high efficiency, which equals value of 16.1% when p = 1016 cm−3 and Eg=1.2 eV. In order to reduce back-contact recombination, the effect of a very thin layer with high band gap inserted near the back contact and acting as electrons reflector, the so-called back-electron reflector (EBR, has been investigated. The performances of the solar cells are significantly improved, when ultrathin absorbers (w < 500 nm are used; the corresponding gain of Jsc due to the EBR is 3 mA/cm2. Our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature from experiments.

  10. Investigations into alterntive substrate, absorber, and buffer layer processing for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuttle, J.R.; Berens, T.A.; Keane, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    High-performance Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}(CIGS)-based solar cells are presently fabricated within a narrow range of processing options. In this contribution, alternative substrate, absorber, and buffer layer processing is considered. Cell performance varies considerably when alternative substrates are employed. These variations are narrowed with the addition of Na via a Na{sub 2}S compound. Sputtered and electrodeposited CIGS precursors and completed absorbers show promise as alternatives to evaporation. A recrystallization process is required to improve their quality. (In,Ga){sub y}Se buffer layers contribute to cell performance above 10. Further improvements in these alternatives will lead to combined cell performance greater than 10% in the near term.

  11. Nature's Solar Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Nature's Solar Cell. Stephen Suresh Gautham Nadig. Research News Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 102-104. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/02/0102-0104 ...

  12. NASA Facts, Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The design and function of solar cells as a source of electrical power for unmanned space vehicles is described in this pamphlet written for high school physical science students. The pamphlet is one of the NASA Facts Science Series (each of which consists of four pages) and is designed to fit in the standard size three-ring notebook. Review…

  13. Fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 Solar Cells by Solution Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Pham Anh; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Huy, Tran Duc; Dung, Dang Viet Anh; Quang, Nguyen Xuan; Cuong, Nguyen Duy

    2017-06-01

    Cu(In,Ga)S2 (CIGS) nanoparticles were synthesized by hot-injection method at temperature of 240°C under nitrogen ambient, then dispersed in hexanethiol to form stable ink. CIGS thin films were prepared by doctor-blade method and annealed under different amounts of selenium at 540°C for 20 min. After annealing, the Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGSSe) films showed increasing crystallinity, particle size, and Se concentration with increasing amount of selenium. In addition, only CIGSSe phase existed in the film after annealing. The properties of CIGSSe cells were improved with increasing amount of selenium. The optimal results were obtained for the sample prepared with 0.2 g Se, showing short-circuit photocurrent density ( J SC) of 27.36 mA/cm2, open-circuit voltage ( V OC) of 0.42 V, fill factor (FF) of 0.36, and conversion efficiency ( η) of 4.2%. These results provide important insights into economically feasible production of CIGS-based solar cells.

  14. Characterization of solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkoenen, J.; Tuominen, E.; Nybergh, K.; Ezer, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Sinkkonen, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Electrical and Communications Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Photovoltaic research began at the Electron Physics Laboratory of the Helsinki University of Tehnology in 1993, when the laboratory joined the national NEMO 2 research program. During the early stages of the photovoltaic research the main objective was to establish necessary measurement and characterisation routines, as well as to develop the fabrication process. The fabrication process development work has been supported by characterisation and theoretical modelling of the solar cells. Theoretical investigations have been concerned with systematic studies of solar cell parameters, such as diffusion lengths, surface recombination velocities and junction depths. The main result of the modelling and characterisation work is a method which is based on a Laplace transform of the so-called spatial collection efficiency function of the cell. The basic objective of the research has been to develop a fabrication process cheap enough to be suitable for commercial production

  15. EDITORIAL: Nanostructured solar cells Nanostructured solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenham, Neil C.; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Conversion into electrical power of even a small fraction of the solar radiation incident on the Earth's surface has the potential to satisfy the world's energy demands without generating CO2 emissions. Current photovoltaic technology is not yet fulfilling this promise, largely due to the high cost of the electricity produced. Although the challenges of storage and distribution should not be underestimated, a major bottleneck lies in the photovoltaic devices themselves. Improving efficiency is part of the solution, but diminishing returns in that area mean that reducing the manufacturing cost is absolutely vital, whilst still retaining good efficiencies and device lifetimes. Solution-processible materials, e.g. organic molecules, conjugated polymers and semiconductor nanoparticles, offer new routes to the low-cost production of solar cells. The challenge here is that absorbing light in an organic material produces a coulombically bound exciton that requires dissociation at a donor-acceptor heterojunction. A thickness of at least 100 nm is required to absorb the incident light, but excitons only diffuse a few nanometres before decaying. The problem is therefore intrinsically at the nano-scale: we need composite devices with a large area of internal donor-acceptor interface, but where each carrier has a pathway to the respective electrode. Dye-sensitized and bulk heterojunction cells have nanostructures which approach this challenge in different ways, and leading research in this area is described in many of the articles in this special issue. This issue is not restricted to organic or dye-sensitized photovoltaics, since nanotechnology can also play an important role in devices based on more conventional inorganic materials. In these materials, the electronic properties can be controlled, tuned and in some cases completely changed by nanoscale confinement. Also, the techniques of nanoscience are the natural ones for investigating the localized states, particularly at

  16. The AM1.5 absorption factor of thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santbergen, R.; Goud, J.M.; van Zolingen, R.J.C. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Zeman, M. [Delft University of Technology, EEC-DIMES, P.O. Box 5053, 2600 GB Delft (Netherlands); van Roosmalen, J.A.M. [Energy Research Centre of The Netherlands ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    Both for photovoltaic and photovoltaic/thermal applications insight is required in the mechanisms that determine the effective absorption factor A{sub eff}. A{sub eff} is the part of the incident irradiation that is converted into heat, taking into account that part of the energy is withdrawn as electricity. A{sub eff} was studied for five different solar cell technologies using an optical simulation model and ranges from 74% for single junction amorphous silicon solar cells to 82% for CIGS solar cells. The simulations also show that the longer wavelength part of the spectrum is hardly absorbed by the active semiconductors, but mostly by free carrier absorption in the transparent conductive oxide film present in these devices. (author)

  17. Solar cell. Taiyo denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Sato, Katsumi; Hokuyo, Shigeru.

    1989-08-09

    In the conventional soalr cell, adhesives flow out to outside of the interconnector before it cures when the glass covers are fitted, causing the stress relief part going out of function; this results in the damage of the cell, the expansion of the distance between the cells at assembling, which means a trend for larger size of the cell. This is especially a demerit when mounted onto the artificial satellite. This invention aims to prevent the break of the elements and the interconnectors by making the assembled unit smaller. In other words, it contains a solar cell element having electrodes on a the light-receiving surface, a transparent cover adhered onto the electrode and the light receiving surface, and an interconnector at the bottom of this cover; numerous throughholes at the parts from the element-contact part to the externally exposed edge. This prevented the flow out of the adhesive. 3 figs.

  18. Silicon Solar Cell Turns 50

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, J.

    2004-08-01

    This short brochure describes a milestone in solar (or photovoltaic, PV) research-namely, the 50th anniversary of the invention of the first viable silicon solar cell by three researchers at Bell Laboratories.

  19. Silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, W R; Neitzert, H C

    2006-01-01

    The world of today must face up to two contradictory energy problems: on the one hand, there is the sharply growing consumer demand in countries such as China and India. On the other hand, natural resources are dwindling. Moreover, many of those countries which still possess substantial gas and oil supplies are politically unstable. As a result, renewable natural energy sources have received great attention. Among these, solar-cell technology is one of the most promising candidates. However, there still remains the problem of the manufacturing costs of such cells. Many attempts have been made

  20. Solar-Cell String Conveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasch, W.; Ciavola, S.

    1982-01-01

    String-conveyor portion of solar-array assembly line holds silicon solar cells while assembled into strings and tested. Cells are transported collector-side-down, while uniform cell spacing and registration are maintained. Microprocessor on machine controls indexing of cells.

  1. Emerging Solar Technologies: Perovskite Solar Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High efficiency, flexibility, and cell architecture of the emerging hybrid halide perovskite have caught the attention of researchers and technologists in the field. This article fo- cuses on the emergence, properties, and current research sta- tus of hybrid perovskite solar cells. 1. Introduction. Gradually, primary energy resources ...

  2. Emerging Solar Technologies: Perovskite Solar Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organic–inorganic halide perovskite, a newcomerin the solar cell industry has proved its potential forincreasing efficiency rapidly from 3.8% in 2009 to 22.1% in2016. High efficiency, flexibility, and cell architecture of theemerging hybrid halide perovskite have caught the attentionof researchers and technologists in the field.

  3. Recent Progress in CuInS2 Thin-Film Solar Cell Research at NASA Glenn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M. H.-C.; Banger, K. K.; Kelly, C. V.; Scofield, J. H.; McNatt, J. S.; Dickman, J. E.; Hepp, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in developing low-cost highly efficient solar cells on light-weight flexible substrates, which will ultimately lower the mass-specific power (W/kg) of the cell allowing extra payload for missions in space as well as cost reduction. In addition, thin film cells are anticipated to have greater resistance to radiation damage in space, prolonging their lifetime. The flexibility of the substrate has the added benefit of enabling roll-to-roll processing. The first major thin film solar cell was the "CdS solar cell" - a heterojunction between p-type CuxS and n-type CdS. The research on CdS cells started in the late 1950s and the efficiency in the laboratory was up to about 10 % in the 1980s. Today, three different thin film materials are leading the field. They include amorphous Si, CdTe, and Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS). The best thin film solar cell efficiency of 19.2 % was recently set by CIGS on glass. Typical module efficiencies, however, remain below 15 %.

  4. Solar cell. Taiyo denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunoi, Toru.

    1989-08-18

    This invention aims to improve the photovoltaic conversion efficiency with less electrode ares of the solar cell. In this invention, the cell consists of plural number of electrodes for collecting the current from tiny sections distributed on the light-receiving surface and a wiring installed at outside of the light-receiving surface for collecting the current from these electrodes. As a result, it becomes unnecessary to equip an electrode to gather the currents from the electrode to collect the currents from the tiny sections; this increases the light projected area, thus improving the characteristics of the soalr cell. In other words, values of voltage and current are improved in comparison with the conventional construction. 4 figs.

  5. Cascade Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.

    2011-09-27

    We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C 60/bathocuproine/Al. Using a tetracene layer grown in a descending energy cascade on 5,6-diphenyl-tetracene and capped with 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyl- tetracene, where the accessibility of the π-system in each material is expected to influence the rate of parasitic carrier leakage and charge recombination at the donor/acceptor interface, we observe an increase in open circuit voltage (Voc) of approximately 40% (corresponding to a change of +200 mV) compared to that of a single tetracene donor. Little change is observed in other parameters such as fill factor and short circuit current density (FF = 0.50 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.55 ± 0.23 mA/cm2) compared to those of the control tetracene-C60 solar cells (FF = 0.54 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.86 ± 0.23 mA/cm2). We demonstrate that this cascade architecture is effective in reducing losses due to polaron pair recombination at donor-acceptor interfaces, while enhancing spectral coverage, resulting in a substantial increase in the power conversion efficiency for cascade organic photovoltaic cells compared to tetracene and pentacene based devices with a single donor layer. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  6. Solar cell materials developing technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Conibeer, Gavin J

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a comparison of solar cell materials, including both new materials based on organics, nanostructures and novel inorganics and developments in more traditional photovoltaic materials. It surveys the materials and materials trends in the field including third generation solar cells (multiple energy level cells, thermal approaches and the modification of the solar spectrum) with an eye firmly on low costs, energy efficiency and the use of abundant non-toxic materials.

  7. Dye solar cell research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cummings, F

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cummings Energy and Processes Materials Science and Manufacturing Council for Scientific and Industrial Research P.O. Box 395 Pretoria 0001, South Africa 27 November 2009 CONTENT head2rightBackground head2rightCSIR Dye Solar Cell Research head2... rightCollaborations and Links © CSIR 2007 www.csir.co.za head2rightAcknowledgements BACKGROUND head2rightSA is dry: Annual rainfall average of 450 mm compared with a world average of 860 mm head2rightOn upside, we have some...

  8. Floating emitter solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  9. Module of solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Katsuaki; Ohira, Takeo

    1988-04-30

    It is proposed to apply transparent plastics film on the surface of solar cell module as the substitute of the transparent tempered glass. However, weather proof film made of polyester or polyvinyliden fluoride has a drawback of weak bonding with the filler made of ethylen-vinyl acetate copolymer. This invention relates to the improvement of the bonding characteristics without decreasing the transparency of the film, by covering the surface of it with Al or other metals, or inorganic material such as silicon dioxide, by applying sputtering or vapour deposition method. In addition, application of silan coupling agent is mentioned as an improving method of the bonding. (2 figs)

  10. Behavior of deep level defects on voltage-induced stress of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W.; Cho, S.E. [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, J.H. [Solar Cell Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, H.Y., E-mail: hycho@dongguk.edu [Department of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    The behavior of deep level defects by a voltage-induced stress for CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells has been investigated. CIGS solar cells were used with standard structures which are Al-doped ZnO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGSe{sub 2}/Mo on soda lime glass, and that resulted in conversion efficiencies as high as 16%. The samples with the same structure were isothermally stressed at 100 °C under the reverse voltages. The voltage-induced stressing in CIGS samples causes a decrease in the carrier density and conversion efficiency. To investigate the behavior of deep level defects in the stressed CIGS cells, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy was utilized, and normally 3 deep level defects (including 2 hole traps and 1 electron trap) were found to be located at 0.18 eV and 0.29 eV above the valence band maximum (and 0.36 eV below the conduction band). In voltage-induced cells, especially, it was found that the decrease of the hole carrier density could be responsible for the increase of the 0.29 eV defect, which is known to be observed in less efficient CIGS solar cells. And the carrier density and the defects are reversible at least to a large extent by resting at room-temperature without the bias voltage. From optical capture kinetics in photo-induced current transient spectroscopy measurement, the types of defects could be distinguished into the isolated point defect and the extended defect. In this work, it is suggested that the increase of the 0.29 eV defect by voltage-induced stress could be due to electrical activation accompanied by a loss of positive ion species and the activated defect gives rise to reduction of the carrier density. - Highlights: • We investigated behavior of deep level defects by voltage-induced stress. • Defect generation could affect the decrease of the conversion efficiency of cells. • Defect generation could be electrically activated by a loss of positive ion species. • Type of defects could be studied with models of point defects

  11. Dye Sensitized Solar Cell, DSSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsatorn Amornpitoksuk

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A dye sensitized solar cell is a new type of solar cell. The operating system of this solar cell type is similar to plant’s photosynthesis process. The sensitizer is available for absorption light and transfer electrons to nanocrystalline metal oxide semiconductor. The ruthenium(II complexes with polypyridyl ligands are usually used as the sensitizers in solar cell. At the present time, the complex of [Ru(2,2',2'’-(COOH3- terpy(NCS3] is the most efficient sensitizer. The total photon to current conversion efficiency was approximately 10% at AM = 1.5.

  12. Space Solar Cell Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Measures, characterizes, and analyzes photovoltaic materials and devices. The primary focus is the measurement and characterization of solar cell response...

  13. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  14. Effect of substrate temperatures on evaporated In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin film buffer layers for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Zhao Yang; Cho, Eou Sik; Kwon, Sang Jik, E-mail: sjkwon@gachon.ac.kr

    2013-11-29

    For the realization of vacuum in-line process in the fabrication of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells, In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin film buffer layers for CIGS have been deposited on glasses and CIGS layers with a thickness of about 650 Å by thermal evaporation process. During the thermal evaporation, the temperature of the substrate was varied from room temperature to 500 °C by heating and the grown In{sub 2}S{sub 3} films were investigated and analyzed in terms of the optimized buffer layer for CIGS solar cells. From the results of scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction, the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin film deposited at a higher substrate temperature showed the larger grain size and the films have amorphous structural characteristics. Although the structural characteristics such as the atomic ratio of In to S and transmittance of the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films were not proportional to temperature, it was possible to obtain the large optical band gap of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} films of about 3.8–3.9 eV enough to be used as the buffer layer of CIGS. - Highlights: • In{sub 2}S{sub 3} films were deposited at various substrate temperatures by thermal evaporation. • The atomic ratio of In to S in the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} film has the highest value at 300 °C. • The In{sub 2}S{sub 3} film has a band gap of about 3.8 eV because of its amorphous structure. • The In{sub 2}S{sub 3} film is expected to be used as a buffer layer by in-line vacuum process.

  15. Recycling of Indium From CIGS Photovoltaic Cells: Potential of Combining Acid-Resistant Nanofiltration with Liquid-Liquid Extraction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, Y.S.; Niewersch, C.; Lenz, M.; Corvini, P.F.X.; Schäffer, A.; Wintgens, T.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic consumer products such as smartphones, TV, computers, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells crucially depend on metals and metalloids. So-called “urban mining” considers them as secondary resources since they may contain precious elements at concentrations many times higher than

  16. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  17. Performance of Photovoltaic Modules of Different Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Gaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an attempt of performance evaluation of semitransparent and opaque photovoltaic (PV modules of different generation solar cells, having the maximum efficiencies reported in the literature at standard test conditions (STC, has been carried out particularly for the months of January and June. The outdoor performance is also evaluated for the commercially available semitransparent and opaque PV modules. Annual electrical energy, capitalized cost, annualized uniform cost (unacost, and cost per unit electrical energy for both types of solar modules, namely, semitransparent and opaque have also been computed along with their characteristics curves. Semitransparent PV modules have shown higher efficiencies compared to the opaque ones. Calculations show that for the PV modules made in laboratory, CdTe exhibits the maximum annual electrical energy generation resulting into minimum cost per unit electrical energy, whereas a-Si/nc-Si possesses the maximum annual electrical energy generation giving minimum cost per unit electrical energy when commercially available solar modules are concerned. CIGS has shown the lowest capitalized cost over all other PV technologies.

  18. Lambertian back reflector in Cu(InGa)Se2 solar cell: optical modeling and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Nir; Jehl, Zacharie; Guillemoles, Jean-François; Lincot, Daniel; Naghavi, Negar; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2013-03-01

    In the past years, reducing the thickness of the absorber layer in CIGS-based solar cells has become a key issue to reduce the global Indium consumption and thus increased its competitiveness. As the absorber thickness is reduced, less photons are absorbed and consequently the efficiency decreases. It is well known that scattering light in the absorbing layer increases the effective optical length, which results in enhanced absorption. In this study, we have deposited a transparent conductive oxide as a back contact to the cell with a white paint on the rear surface to diffuse the light back to the cell. A proof of concept device is realized and optically characterized. Modeling scattering by rough surfaces can be done by brute force numerical simulations but does not provide a physical insight in the absorption mechanisms. In our approach, we regard the collimated solar light and its specular reection/transmission as coherent. On an irregular surface, part of the collimated light is scattered in other directions. To model this diffuse light, we adopt the formalism of the radiative transfer equation, which is an energy transport equation. Thus, interference effects are accounted for only in the coherent part. A special attention is dedicated to preserving reciprocity and energy conservation on the interface. It is seen that most of the absorption near the energy bandgap of CIGS is due to the diffuse light and that this approach can yield very significant photocurrent gains below 500nm absorber thickness.

  19. Optimization of the ZnS Buffer Layer by Chemical Bath Deposition for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Dong-Hwan; Hwang, Dae-Kue; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated a ZnS buffer layer prepared using a chemical bath deposition (CBD) process for application in cadmium-free Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. The ZnS buffer layer showed good transmittance (above 90%) in the spectral range from 300 to 800 nm and was non-toxic compared with the CdS buffer layers normally used in CIGS solar cells. The CBD process was affected by several deposition conditions. The deposition rate was dependent on the ammonia concentration (complexing agent). When the ammonia concentration was either too high or low, a decrease in the deposition rate was observed. In addition, post heat treatments at high temperatures had detrimental influences on the ZnS buffer layers because portions of the ZnS thin films were transformed into ZnO. With optimized deposition conditions, a CIGS solar cell with a ZnS buffer layer showed an efficiency of 14.18% with a 0.23 cm2 active area under 100 mW/cm2 illumination.

  20. Thin-film solar cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, J.W.; Kuznetsov, V.I.

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to a thin-film solar cell provided with at least one p-i-n junction comprising at least one p-i junction which is at an angle alpha with that surface of the thin-film solar cell which collects light during operation and at least one i-n junction which is at an angle beta with

  1. An Introduction to Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Most likely, solar cells will play a significant role in this country's strategy to address the two interrelated issues of global warming and dependence on imported oil. The purpose of this paper is to present an explanation of how solar cells work at an introductory high school, college, or university physics course level. The treatment presented…

  2. High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Lin, Feng; Wu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells fabricated from organometal halide light harvesters have captured significant attention due to their tremendously low device costs as well as unprecedented rapid progress on power conversion efficiency (PCE). A certified PCE of 20.1% was achieved in late 2014 following the first study of long‐term stable all‐solid‐state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, showing their promising potential towards future cost‐effective and high performance solar cells. Here, notable achievements of primary device configuration involving perovskite layer, hole‐transporting materials (HTMs) and electron‐transporting materials (ETMs) are reviewed. Numerous strategies for enhancing photovoltaic parameters of perovskite solar cells, including morphology and crystallization control of perovskite layer, HTMs design and ETMs modifications are discussed in detail. In addition, perovskite solar cells outside of HTMs and ETMs are mentioned as well, providing guidelines for further simplification of device processing and hence cost reduction. PMID:27774402

  3. High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Lin, Feng; Wu, Jiang; Wang, Zhiming M

    2016-05-01

    Perovskite solar cells fabricated from organometal halide light harvesters have captured significant attention due to their tremendously low device costs as well as unprecedented rapid progress on power conversion efficiency (PCE). A certified PCE of 20.1% was achieved in late 2014 following the first study of long-term stable all-solid-state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, showing their promising potential towards future cost-effective and high performance solar cells. Here, notable achievements of primary device configuration involving perovskite layer, hole-transporting materials (HTMs) and electron-transporting materials (ETMs) are reviewed. Numerous strategies for enhancing photovoltaic parameters of perovskite solar cells, including morphology and crystallization control of perovskite layer, HTMs design and ETMs modifications are discussed in detail. In addition, perovskite solar cells outside of HTMs and ETMs are mentioned as well, providing guidelines for further simplification of device processing and hence cost reduction.

  4. Upconversion in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The possibility to tune chemical and physical properties in nanosized materials has a strong impact on a variety of technologies, including photovoltaics. One of the prominent research areas of nanomaterials for photovoltaics involves spectral conversion. Modification of the spectrum requires down- and/or upconversion or downshifting of the spectrum, meaning that the energy of photons is modified to either lower (down) or higher (up) energy. Nanostructures such as quantum dots, luminescent dye molecules, and lanthanide-doped glasses are capable of absorbing photons at a certain wavelength and emitting photons at a different (shorter or longer) wavelength. We will discuss upconversion by lanthanide compounds in various host materials and will further demonstrate upconversion to work for thin-film silicon solar cells. PMID:23413889

  5. Germanium Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Zachary Charles

    Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere are approaching historically unprecedented levels from burning fossil fuels to meet the ever-increasing world energy demand. A rapid transition to clean energy sources is necessary to avoid the potentially catastrophic consequences of global warming. The sun provides more than enough energy to power the world, and solar cells that convert sunlight to electricity are commercially available. However, the high cost and low efficiency of current solar cells prevent their widespread implementation, and grid parity is not anticipated to be reached for at least 15 years without breakthrough technologies. Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) show promise for cheap multi-junction photovoltaic devices. To compete with photovoltaic materials that are currently commercially available, NCs need to be inexpensively cast into dense thin films with bulk-like electrical mobilities and absorption spectra that can be tuned by altering the NC size. The Group II-VI and IV-VI NC communities have had some success in achieving this goal by drying and then chemically treating colloidal particles, but the more abundant and less toxic Group IV NCs have proven more challenging. This thesis reports thin films of plasma-synthesized Ge NCs deposited using three different techniques, and preliminary solar cells based on these films. Germanium tetrachloride is dissociated in the presence of hydrogen in a nonthermal plasma to nucleate Ge NCs. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicate that the particles are nearly monodisperse (standard deviations of 10-15% the mean particle diameter) and the mean diameter can be tuned from 4-15 nm by changing the residence time of the Ge NCs in the plasma. In the first deposition scheme, a Ge NC colloid is formed by reacting nanocrystalline powder with 1-dodecene and dispersing the functionalized NCs in a solvent. Films are then formed on substrates by drop-casting the colloid and allowing it to dry

  6. Superstrate and substrate type cadmium telluride solar cells and monolithic integration of photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionis, Ilvydas

    This dissertation describes the fabrication of polycrystalline CdTe-based solar cells and monolithic integration of photovoltaic devices into modules using laser scribing. We have improved the efficiency of sputtered superstrate type CdTe solar cells, including devices with unconventionally thin absorber, built world-record efficiency substrate type CdTe solar cells, observed effects related to interfacial layers, and investigated the use of 7 different types of lasers for scribing of materials used for CdTe and CuInGaSe2 solar cells. We have fabricated CdTe/CdS solar cells using magnetron sputtering with conversion efficiencies of 12.5%. As the thickness of CdTe is reduced to less than 1 mum, devices still maintain efficiencies near 10%. Thinning of the CdTe layer would make manufacturing of solar modules more economical. We have built inverted (substrate) configuration CdTe solar cells with state-of-the-art efficiencies of 7.8%. We find that tellurium and sulfur interdiffusion is strongly inhibited in substrate type cells due to the fact that the CdS is grown on fully formed CdTe grains. We have optimized a sputtering process for aluminum-doped ZnO, achieved a resistivity of 5 x 10-4 O-cm, and fabricated 5.8% efficient substrate type CdTe solar cells with the ZnO:Al top contact. We have researched the effect of a high resistivity (HR) layer between the CdS and a transparent conducting oxide. Cells with the HR layer maintain higher efficiencies as the thickness of the CdS is reduced to 60 nm and less. We have investigated the use of 7 different types of lasers for scribing of the polycrystalline materials used for CdTe and CuIn(Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin-film solar cells. The lasers included four different Nd:YAG (532 and 1064 nm), a Cu vapor (511 and 578 nm) and two excimers (308 and 248 nm). Pulse durations ranged from 0.1 to 250 ns. We find that most wavelength and pulse duration combinations work well for the thin-film materials. ZnO should be scribed with an

  7. Core Levels, Band Alignments, and Valence-Band States in CuSbS 2 for Solar Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittles, Thomas J. [Stephenson; Veal, Tim D. [Stephenson; Savory, Christopher N. [Department; Thomas; Welch, Adam W. [Material; de Souza Lucas, Francisco Willian [Material; Gibbon, James T. [Stephenson; Birkett, Max [Stephenson; Potter, Richard J. [Department; Scanlon, David O. [Department; Thomas; Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond; Zakutayev, Andriy [Material; Dhanak, Vinod R. [Stephenson

    2017-11-17

    The earth-abundant material CuSbS2 (CAS) has shown good optical properties as a photovoltaic solar absorber material, but has seen relatively poor solar cell performance. To investigate the reason for this anomaly, the core levels of the constituent elements, surface contaminants, ionization potential, and valence-band spectra are studied by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The ionization potential and electron affinity for this material (4.98 and 3.43 eV) are lower than those for other common absorbers, including CuInxGa(1-x)Se2 (CIGS). Experimentally corroborated density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the valence band maximum is raised by the lone pair electrons from the antimony cations contributing additional states when compared with indium or gallium cations in CIGS. The resulting conduction band misalignment with CdS is a reason for the poor performance of cells incorporating a CAS/CdS heterojunction, supporting the idea that using a cell design analogous to CIGS is unhelpful. These findings underline the critical importance of considering the electronic structure when selecting cell architectures that optimize open-circuit voltages and cell efficiencies.

  8. Beneficial Effect of Post-Deposition Treatment in High-Efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cells through Reduced Potential Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Soren A.; Glynn, Stephen; Kanevce, Ana; Dippo, Pat; Li, Jian V.; Levi, Dean H.; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2016-08-14

    World-record power conversion efficiencies for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells have been achieved via a post-deposition treatment with alkaline metals, which increases the open-circuit voltage and fill factor. We explore the role of the potassium fluoride (KF) post-deposition treatment in CIGS by employing energy- and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and electrical characterization combined with numerical modeling. The bulk carrier lifetime is found to increase with post-deposition treatment from 255 ns to 388 ns, which is the longest charge carrier lifetime reported for CIGS, and within ~40% of the radiative limit. We find evidence that the post-deposition treatment causes a decrease in the electronic potential fluctuations. These potential fluctuations have previously been shown to reduce the open-circuit voltage and the device efficiency in CIGS. Additionally, numerical simulations based on the measured carrier lifetimes and mobilities show a diffusion length of ~10 um, which is ~4 times larger than the film thickness. Thus, carrier collection in the bulk is not a limiting factor for device efficiency. By considering differences in doping, bandgap, and potential fluctuations, we present a possible explanation for the voltage difference between KF-treated and untreated samples.

  9. Development of Enhanced Window layers for CIGS Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J. Nicholas

    One of the most promising thin film devices right now is the Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS) solar cell with maximum reported power conversion efficiency of 22.3%. The Transparent Conducting Oxide (TCO) which is the top layer of the CIGS device also known as the window layer, is responsible for collecting the electrons generated in the CIGS device and conducting them to the circuit. Development of a very low resistivity film with a high optical transmission is crucial for optimal performance of devices as well as the ability to be deployed without changes to their properties for several decades. Current TCOs such as indium tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) are met with limitations with either using large amounts of expensive materials such as indium, often requiring and anneal step to obtain good conductivity, or have shown poor long term reliability. This thesis is focused on development of InZnO and zirconium doped InZnO as a potential replacement TCO to obtain high conductivity and high transmission like the leading TCOs without needing heated depositions, post deposition annealing, and maintain a good film reliability. Zirconium doping was employed to farther enhance both the optical and electrical properties through enhancement of the films high frequency permittivity of InZnO while providing improved reliability to the film. The films were grown through a mix of DC and RF co-sputtering. InZnO films were deposited at varying indium concentration ( 10-30%) and samples were able to achieve low resistivity ( 7x10-4 O-cm), high mobility (>30 cm2/v.s), high carrier concentration (>10 20 cm-3), while maintaining high transmission (> 80%) in the visible and near-infrared region. After zirconium was incorporated into the InZnO films by replacement of the ZnO target with a ZrO2/ZnO (5:95) target, films of Zr:InZnO were deposit through the same method to achieve films that maintained very similar electrical and optical properties. The little

  10. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front....... This result indicates the potential of improved cell performance and higher output power at diffuse light conditions and during daily and yearly operation. A second batch of RIEtextured solar cells with laser-doped selective emitters (LDSE) was fabricated. A power conversion eciency of 18.1% and a ll factor...

  11. Photon management in solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, Uwe; Gombert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Written by renowned experts in the field of photon management in solar cells, this one-stop reference gives an introduction to the physics of light management in solar cells, and discusses the different concepts and methods of applying photon management. The authors cover the physics, principles, concepts, technologies, and methods used, explaining how to increase the efficiency of solar cells by splitting or modifying the solar spectrum before they absorb the sunlight. In so doing, they present novel concepts and materials allowing for the cheaper, more flexible manufacture of solar cells and systems. For educational purposes, the authors have split the reasons for photon management into spatial and spectral light management. Bridging the gap between the photonics and the photovoltaics communities, this is an invaluable reference for materials scientists, physicists in industry, experimental physicists, lecturers in physics, Ph.D. students in physics and material sciences, engineers in power technology, appl...

  12. Controlling metastable native point-defect populations in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 materials and solar cells through voltage-bias annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeter, G.; Harvey, S. P.; Johnston, S.

    2017-01-01

    This contribution describes the influence of low-temperature annealing with and without applied voltage bias on thin-film Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe), Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), and CdS material properties and solar cell performance. To quantify the effects of cation disorder on CZTSe device performance, completed devices were annealed under open-circuit conditions at various temperatures from 110 °C to 215 °C and subsequently quenched. Measurements on these devices document systematic, reversible changes in solar-cell performance consistent with a reduction in CZTSe band tails at lower annealing temperatures. CIGS and CZTSe solar cells were also annealed at various temperatures (200 °C for CIGS and 110 °C-215 °C for CZTSe) and subsequently quenched with continuously applied voltage bias to explore the effects of non-equilibrium annealing conditions. For both absorbers, large reversible changes in device characteristics correlated with the magnitude and sign of the applied voltage bias were observed. For CZTSe devices, the voltage-bias annealing (VBA) produced reversible changes in open-circuit voltage (VOC) from 289 meV to 446 meV. For CIGS solar cells, even larger changes were observed in device performance: photovoltaic (PV) conversion efficiency of the CIGS device varied from below 3% to above 15%, with corresponding changes in CIGS hole density of about three orders of magnitude. Findings from these VBA experiments are interpreted in terms of changes to the metastable point-defect populations that control key properties in the absorber layers, and in the CdS buffer layer. Computational device modeling was performed to assess the impacts of cation disorder on the CZTSe VOC deficit, and to elucidate the effects of VBA treatments on metastable point defect populations in CZTSe, CIGS, and CdS. Results indicate that band tails impose important limitations on CZTSe device performance. Device modeling results also indicate that non-equilibrium processing conditions including

  13. Module level solutions to solar cell polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Grace , Li; Bo, [San Jose, CA

    2012-05-29

    A solar cell module includes interconnected solar cells, a transparent cover over the front sides of the solar cells, and a backsheet on the backsides of the solar cells. The solar cell module includes an electrical insulator between the transparent cover and the front sides of the solar cells. An encapsulant protectively packages the solar cells. To prevent polarization, the insulator has resistance suitable to prevent charge from leaking from the front sides of the solar cells to other portions of the solar cell module by way of the transparent cover. The insulator may be attached (e.g., by coating) directly on an underside of the transparent cover or be a separate layer formed between layers of the encapsulant. The solar cells may be back junction solar cells.

  14. A comparative study on charge carrier recombination across the junction region of Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} and Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halim, Mohammad Abdul, E-mail: halimtsukuba2012@gmail.com; Islam, Muhammad Monirul; Luo, Xianjia; Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Sakai, Noriyuki; Kato, Takuya; Sugimoto, Hiroki [Energy Solution Business Center, Showa Shell Sekiyu K.K., Minato, Tokyo 135-8074 (Japan); Tampo, Hitoshi; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    A comparative study with focusing on carrier recombination properties in Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} (CZTSSe) and the CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells has been carried out. For this purpose, electroluminescence (EL) and also bias-dependent time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) using femtosecond (fs) laser source were performed. For the similar forward current density, the EL-intensity of the CZTSSe sample was obtained significantly lower than that of the CIGS sample. Primarily, it can be attributed to the existence of excess amount of non-radiative recombination center in the CZTSSe, and/or CZTSSe/CdS interface comparing to that of CIGS sample. In case of CIGS sample, TRPL decay time was found to increase with the application of forward-bias. This can be attributed to the reduced charge separation rate resulting from the reduced electric-field at the junction. However, in CZTSSe sample, TRPL decay time has been found almost independent under the forward and reverse-bias conditions. This phenomenon indicates that the charge recombination rate strongly dominates over the charge separation rate across the junction of the CZTSSe sample. Finally, temperature dependent V{sub OC} suggests that interface related recombination in the CZTSSe solar cell structure might be one of the major factors that affect EL-intensity and also, TRPL decay curves.

  15. Surface Treatment of CuInGaSe2 Thin Films and Its Effect on the Photovoltaic Properties of Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, K.; Hasoon, F.S.; Smith, S.; Young, D.L.; Contreras, M.A.; Johnson, P.K.; Pudov, A.O.; Sites, J.R.

    2002-10-01

    Solar cells have been fabricated with partial electrolyte treatments of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) thin-film absorbers in lieu of a CdS layer. Treatment of the absorbers in a containing Cd or Zn solution is shown to produce conditions under which efficient solar cells can be fabricated. A similar effect is also observed in CuInGaSSe2 (CIGSS) graded-bandgap absorbers. These observations can be explained by the ability of Cd and Zn to produce n-type doping or inversion in the surface region. We also provide a brief review of similar work done elsewhere and identify directions for future investigations.

  16. Epitaxial lift-off technology of GaAs multijunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyps, P.; Dumiszewska, E.; Kaszub, W.; Przewłoka, A.; Strupinski, W.

    2016-12-01

    Epitaxial lift-off (ELO) is a process which enables the removal of solar cell structures (one junction GaAs, two junction GaAs/InGaP or three junction GaAs/InGaAs/InGaP) from the substrate on which they are grown and their transfer onto lightweight carriers such as metal or polymeric insulator films. The said solar cells exhibit superior power conversion efficiency compared with alternative single-junction photovoltaic cell designs such as those based on crystalline Si, copper indium gallium sulfide (CIGS) or CdTe. The major advantage of ELO solar cells is the potential for wafer reuse, which can enable significant manufacturing cost reduction by minimizing the consumption of expensive wafers. Here in this work we have grown one junction GaAs solar cells on GaAs (100) substrates. A 10 nm thick AlAs layer has been used as a release layer, which has been selectively etched in HF solution. We have investigated different methods of transferring thin films onto polymer and copper foils, including the usage of temporary mounting adhesives and electro-conductive pastes. Lift-off has been demonstrated to be a very promising technique for producing affordable solar cells with a very high efficiency of up to 30%.

  17. Dust Removal from Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  18. Fundamentals of thin solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yablonovitch, E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    It is now widely recognized that thin solar cells can present certain advantages for performance and cost. This is particularly the case when light trapping in the semiconductor film is incorporated, as compensation for the diminished single path thickness of the solar cell. In a solar cell thinner than a minority carrier diffusion length, the current collection is of course very easy. More importantly the concentration of an equivalent number of carriers in a thinner volume results in a higher Free Energy, or open circuit voltage. This extra Free Energy may be regarded as due to the concentration factor, just as it would be for photons, electrons, or for any chemical species. The final advantage of a thin solar cell is in the diminished material usage, a factor of considerable importance when we consider the material cost of the high quality semiconductors which we hope to employ.

  19. Solar cell with back side contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J; Wanlass, Mark Woodbury; Clews, Peggy J

    2013-12-24

    A III-V solar cell is described herein that includes all back side contacts. Additionally, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact compoud semiconductor layers of the solar cell other than the absorbing layer of the solar cell. That is, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact passivating layers of the solar cell.

  20. Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The experimental work in this thesis is focused on the fabrication of nanostructures that can be implemented in organic solar cell (OSC) architecture for enhancement of the device performance. Solar devices made from organic material are gaining increased attention, compared to their inorganic...... technique. Resist imprinted Al dimples drag the main focus showing increase in absorption and efficiency enhancement in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl (PCBM) BHJ devices. Not limited to this, nanostructures by imprinting the organic layer of P3HT:PCBM and imprinted...... for organic solar cell applications, opening new patterning possibilities....

  1. Industrial Silicon Wafer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk-Holger Neuhaus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, around 86% of all wafer-based silicon solar cells were produced using screen printing to form the silver front and aluminium rear contacts and chemical vapour deposition to grow silicon nitride as the antireflection coating onto the front surface. This paper reviews this dominant solar cell technology looking into state-of-the-art equipment and corresponding processes for each process step. The main efficiency losses of this type of solar cell are analyzed to demonstrate the future efficiency potential of this technology. In research and development, more various advanced solar cell concepts have demonstrated higher efficiencies. The question which arises is “why are new solar cell concepts not transferred into industrial production more frequently?”. We look into the requirements a new solar cell technology has to fulfill to have an advantage over the current approach. Finally, we give an overview of high-efficiency concepts which have already been transferred into industrial production.

  2. [Health effects of solar cell component material. Toxicity of indium compounds to laboratory animals determined by intratracheal instillations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the increasing interest being paid to the issue of the global environment, the production of solar cells has increased rapidly in recent years. Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a new efficient thin film used in some types of solar cell. Indium is a constitutive element of CIGS thin-film solar cells. It was thought that indium compounds were not harmful until the beginning of the 1990s because there was little information regarding the adverse health effects on humans or animals arising from exposure to indium compounds. After the mid-1990s, data became available indicating that indium compounds can be toxic to animals. In animal studies, it has been clearly demonstrated that indium compounds cause pulmonary toxicity and that the dissolution of indium compounds in the lungs is considerably slow, as shown by repeated intratracheal instillations in experimental animals. Thus, it is necessary to pay much greater attention to human exposure to indium compounds, and precautions against possible exposure to indium compounds are paramount with regard to health management.

  3. Solar electron source and thermionic solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parham Yaghoobi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Common solar technologies are either photovoltaic/thermophotovoltaic, or use indirect methods of electricity generation such as boiling water for a steam turbine. Thermionic energy conversion based on the emission of electrons from a hot cathode into vacuum and their collection by an anode is also a promising route. However, thermionic solar conversion is extremely challenging as the sunlight intensity is too low for heating a conventional cathode to thermionic emission temperatures in a practical manner. Therefore, compared to other technologies, little has been done in this area, and the devices have been mainly limited to large experimental apparatus investigated for space power applications. Based on a recently observed “Heat Trap” effect in carbon nanotube arrays, allowing their efficient heating with low-power light, we report the first compact thermionic solar cell. Even using a simple off-the-shelf focusing lens, the device delivered over 1 V across a load. The device also shows intrinsic storage capacity.

  4. Advances in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chuantian; Bolink, Henk J; Han, Hongwei; Huang, Jinsong; Cahen, David; Ding, Liming

    2016-07-01

    Organolead halide perovskite materials possess a combination of remarkable optoelectronic properties, such as steep optical absorption edge and high absorption coefficients, long charge carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes. Taken together with the ability for low temperature preparation, also from solution, perovskite-based devices, especially photovoltaic (PV) cells have been studied intensively, with remarkable progress in performance, over the past few years. The combination of high efficiency, low cost and additional (non-PV) applications provides great potential for commercialization. Performance and applications of perovskite solar cells often correlate with their device structures. Many innovative device structures were developed, aiming at large-scale fabrication, reducing fabrication cost, enhancing the power conversion efficiency and thus broadening potential future applications. This review summarizes typical structures of perovskite solar cells and comments on novel device structures. The applications of perovskite solar cells are discussed.

  5. Advances in Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chuantian; Bolink, Henk J.; Han, Hongwei; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Organolead halide perovskite materials possess a combination of remarkable optoelectronic properties, such as steep optical absorption edge and high absorption coefficients, long charge carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes. Taken together with the ability for low temperature preparation, also from solution, perovskite‐based devices, especially photovoltaic (PV) cells have been studied intensively, with remarkable progress in performance, over the past few years. The combination of high efficiency, low cost and additional (non‐PV) applications provides great potential for commercialization. Performance and applications of perovskite solar cells often correlate with their device structures. Many innovative device structures were developed, aiming at large‐scale fabrication, reducing fabrication cost, enhancing the power conversion efficiency and thus broadening potential future applications. This review summarizes typical structures of perovskite solar cells and comments on novel device structures. The applications of perovskite solar cells are discussed. PMID:27812475

  6. Finite mobility effects on the radiative efficiency limit of pn -junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheis, Julian; Werner, Jürgen H.; Rau, Uwe

    2008-02-01

    The maximum power conversion efficiency of a solar cell as defined by the Shockley-Queisser (SQ) radiative recombination limit relies on the assumption that the collection probability for all photogenerated electron/hole pairs is unity. This assumption implies a virtually infinite mobility μn of the photogenerated charge carriers. In order to compute the radiative efficiency limit with finite mobilities, we solve the continuity equation for minority carrier transport including an additional photon recycling term that accounts for emission of photons by radiative recombination and their subsequent reabsorption. This approach quantitatively connects the SQ approach with the classical diode theory. Even when assuming radiative recombination as the only loss mechanism, the maximum efficiency achievable within our model is reduced drastically when μn drops below a critical value. This critical value depends on the absorption coefficient, the doping density of the absorber material, as well as on the thickness and the light trapping scheme of the solar cell. Thus, these material and device parameters gain a fundamental importance as soon as finite carrier mobility is considered. Our theory yields a criterion that has to be fulfilled by any photovoltaic material in order to guarantee charge separation even in an otherwise most ideal case. Exemplary application of our model to three real photovoltaic materials, crystalline silicon (c-Si) , amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) , as well as Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), shows that mobilities of c-Si and CIGS are three, respectively, 1 order of magnitude above this critical limit whereas the effective hole mobilities in a-Si:H are scattered around the critical value. A comparison between solar cells and light-emitting diodes with finite mobility and finite nonradiative lifetime reveals that materials for these complementary devices have to fulfill different requirements.

  7. Nature's Solar Cell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The sun is the principal source of energy for all life on earth. Yet, only green plants and certain bacteria can directly use solar energy by converting the light energy into chemical energy. They do this by photosynthesis in specialised organelles called chloroplasts. The energy then trickles down to all the other organisms ...

  8. Development of concentrator solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    A limited pilot production run on PESC silicon solar cells for use at high concentrations (200 to 400 suns) is summarized. The front contact design of the cells was modified for operation without prismatic covers. The original objective of the contract was to systematically complete a process consolidation phase, in which all the, process improvements developed during the contract would be combined in a pilot production run. This pilot run was going to provide, a basis for estimating cell costs when produced at high throughput. Because of DOE funding limitations, the Photovoltaic Concentrator Initiative is on hold, and Applied Solar`s contract was operated at a low level of effort for most of 1993. The results obtained from the reduced scope pilot run showed the effects of discontinuous process optimization and characterization. However, the run provided valuable insight into the technical areas that can be optimized to achieve the original goals of the contract.

  9. The optimization of molybdenum back contact films for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells by the cathodic arc ion plating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Ki, E-mail: choyk@kitech.re.kr [Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering R and D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gang Sam; Song, Young Sik; Lim, Tae Hong [Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering R and D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Donggeun [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-02

    Molybdenum back contact films for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells have been deposited using DC magnetron sputtering methods. The electronic pathway properties of the molybdenum film have been highly dependent on the working gas pressure in magnetron sputtering, which should be carefully controlled to obtain high conductivity and adhesion. A coating method, cathodic arc ion plating, was used for molybdenum back contact electrode fabrication. The aim of this work was to find a metallization method for CIGS solar cells, which has less sensitivity on the working pressure. The resistivity, grain size, growth structures, stress, and efficiency of the films in CIGS solar cells were investigated. The results reveal that the growth structures of the molybdenum films mainly affect the conductivity. The lowest electrical resistivity of the ion-plated molybdenum films was 6.9 μΩ-cm at a pressure of 0.7 Pa. The electrical resistivity variation showed a gently increasing slope with linearity under a working gas pressure of 13.3 Pa. However, a high value of the residual stress of over 1.3 GPa was measured. In order to reduce stress, titanium film was selected as the buffer layer material, and the back contact films were optimized by double-layer coating of two kinds of hetero-materials with arc ion plating. CIGS solar cells prepared molybdenum films to measure the efficiency and to examine the effects of the back contact electrode. The resistivity, grain size, and surface morphology of molybdenum films were measured by four-point probe, X-ray diffraction, and a scanning electron microscope. The residual stress of the films was calculated from differences in bending curvatures measured using a laser beam. - Highlights: • Molybdenum back contact films for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells were prepared by the cathodic arc ion plating. • The lowest electrical resistivity of molybdenum film was 6.9 μΩ-cm. • Titanium buffer layer reduced the compressive residual stress

  10. Chemical bath deposited ZnS buffer layer for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiyeon; Lim, Donghwan; Eo, Young-Joo; Choi, Changhwan

    2018-02-01

    The dependence of Zn precursors using zinc sulfate (ZnSO4), zinc acetate (Zn(CH3COO)2), and zinc chloride (ZnCl2) on the characteristics of the chemical bath deposited ZnS thin film used as a buffer layer of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cell was studied. It is found that the ZnS film deposition rate increases with higher stability constant during decomplexation reaction of zinc ligands, which affects the crack formation and the amount of sulfur and oxygen contents within the film. The band gap energies of all deposited films are in the range of 3.40-3.49 eV, which is lower than that of the bulk ZnS film due to oxygen contents within the films. Among the CIGS solar cells having ZnS buffer layers prepared by different Zn precursors, the best cell efficiency with 9.4% was attained using Zn(CH3COO)2 precursor due to increased Voc mainly. This result suggests that [Zn(NH3)4]2+ complex formation should be well controlled to attain the high quality ZnS thin films.

  11. Solar cell circuit and method for manufacturing solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention is a novel manufacturing method for making multi-junction solar cell circuits that addresses current problems associated with such circuits by allowing the formation of integral diodes in the cells and allows for a large number of circuits to readily be placed on a single silicon wafer substrate. The standard Ge wafer used as the base for multi-junction solar cells is replaced with a thinner layer of Ge or a II-V semiconductor material on a silicon/silicon dioxide substrate. This allows high-voltage cells with multiple multi-junction circuits to be manufactured on a single wafer, resulting in less array assembly mass and simplified power management.

  12. Novel wide band gap materials for highly efficient thin film tandem solar cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Peters, Craig H.

    2012-06-11

    thin films using a mixture of solution and physical vapor deposition processing, but these films lacked the p-type doping levels that are required to make decent solar cells. Over the course of the project PLANT PV was able to fabricate efficient CIGS solar cells (8.7%) but could not achieve equivalent performance using AIGS. During the nine-month grant PLANT PV set up a variety of thin film characterization tools (e.g. drive-level capacitance profiling) at the Molecular Foundry, a Department of Energy User Facility, that are now available to both industrial and academic researchers via the grant process. PLANT PV was also able to develop the back end processing of thin film solar cells at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs to achieve 8.7% efficient CIGS solar cells. This processing development will be applied to other types of thin film PV cells at the Lawrence Berkeley National Labs. While PLANT PV was able to study AIGS film growth and optoelectronic properties we concluded that AIGS produced using these methods would have a limited efficiency and would not be commercially feasible. PLANT PV did not apply for the Phase II of this grant.

  13. Analysis on the Performance of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS Based Photovoltaic Thermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkepli Afzam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the efficiency improvement of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS Photovoltaic (PV and also solar thermal collector. Photovoltaic thermal (PV/T can improve overall efficiency for PV and also solve the problem of limited roof space at urban area. Objective of this study is to clarify the effect of mass flow rate on the efficiency of the PV/T system. A CIGS solar cell is used with rated output power 65 W and 1.18 m2 of area. 4 set of experiments were carried out, which were: thermal collector with 0.12 kg/s flow rate, PV/T with 0.12 kg/s flow rate, PV/T with 0.09 kg/s flow rate and PV. It was found that PV/T with 0.12 kg/s flow rate had the highest electrical efficiency, 2.92 %. PV/T with 0.09 kg/s flow rate had the lowest electrical efficiency, 2.68 %. It also had 2 % higher overall efficiency. The efficiency gained is low due to several factors. The rated output power of the PV is low for the area of 1.18 m2. The packing factor of the PV also need to be considered as it may not be operated at the optimal packing factor. Furthermore, aluminium sheet of the PV may affect the PV temperature due to high thermal conductivity. Further study on more values of mass flow rate and also other parameters that affect the efficiency of the PV/T is necessary.

  14. Organic and hybrid solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    This book delivers a comprehensive evaluation of organic and hybrid solar cells and identifies their fundamental principles and numerous applications. Great attention is given to the charge transport mechanism, donor and acceptor materials, interfacial materials, alternative electrodes, device engineering and physics, and device stability. The authors provide an industrial perspective on the future of photovoltaic technologies.

  15. Fullerene based organic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popescu, Lacramioara Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    The direct conversion of the sunlight into electricity is the most elegant process to generate environmentally-friendly renewable energy. Plastic solar cells offer the prospect of flexible, lightweight, lower cost of manufacturing, and hopefully an efficient way to produce electricity from sunlight.

  16. Graded bandgap perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergen, Onur; Gilbert, S. Matt; Pham, Thang; Turner, Sally J.; Tan, Mark Tian Zhi; Worsley, Marcus A.; Zettl, Alex

    2017-05-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite materials have emerged as attractive alternatives to conventional solar cell building blocks. Their high light absorption coefficients and long diffusion lengths suggest high power conversion efficiencies, and indeed perovskite-based single bandgap and tandem solar cell designs have yielded impressive performances. One approach to further enhance solar spectrum utilization is the graded bandgap, but this has not been previously achieved for perovskites. In this study, we demonstrate graded bandgap perovskite solar cells with steady-state conversion efficiencies averaging 18.4%, with a best of 21.7%, all without reflective coatings. An analysis of the experimental data yields high fill factors of ~75% and high short-circuit current densities up to 42.1 mA cm-2. The cells are based on an architecture of two perovskite layers (CH3NH3SnI3 and CH3NH3PbI3-xBrx), incorporating GaN, monolayer hexagonal boron nitride, and graphene aerogel.

  17. Semi-transparent solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Jasieniak, J. J.

    2017-03-01

    Semi-transparent solar cells are a type of technology that combines the benefits of visible light transparency and light-to-electricity conversion. One of the biggest opportunities for such technologies is in their integration as windows and skylights within energy-sustainable buildings. Currently, such building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) are dominated by crystalline silicon based modules; however, the opaque nature of silicon creates a unique opportunity for the adoption of emerging photovoltaic candidates that can be made truly semi-transparent. These include: amorphous silicon-, kesterite-, chalcopyrite-, CdTe-, dye-sensitized-, organic- and perovskite- based systems. For the most part, amorphous silicon has been the workhorse in the semi-transparent solar cell field owing to its established, low-temperature fabrication processes. Excitement around alternative classes, particularly perovskites and the inorganic candidates, has recently arisen because of the major efficiency gains exhibited by these technologies. Importantly, each of these presents unique opportunities and challenges within the context of BIPV. This topic review provides an overview into the broader benefits of semi-transparent solar cells as building-integrated features, as well as providing the current development status into all of the major types of semi-transparent solar cells technologies.

  18. Process of making solar cell module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, M.; Coyle, P.J.

    1981-03-09

    A process is presented for the manufacture of solar cell modules. A solution comprising a highly plasticized polyvinyl butyral is applied to a solar cell array. The coated array is dried and sandwiched between at last two sheets of polyvinyl butyral and at least two sheets of a rigid transparent member. The sandwich is laminated by the application of heat and pressure to cause fusion and bonding of the solar cell array with the rigid transparent members to produce a solar cell module.

  19. Perovskite solar cells: an emerging photovoltaic technology

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells based on organometal halides represent an emerging photovoltaic technology. Perovskite solar cells stem from dye-sensitized solar cells. In a liquid-based dye-sensitized solar cell structure, the adsorption of methylammonium lead halide perovskite on a nanocrystalline TiO2 surface produces a photocurrent with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of around 3–4%, as first discovered in 2009. The PCE was doubled after 2 years by optimizing the perovskite coating conditions....

  20. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  1. Effect of substrate temperature and post-annealing on the properties of CIGS thin films deposited using e-beam evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jieyi; Shen, Honglie; Zhai, Zihao; Li, Jinze; Wang, Wei; Shang, Huirong; Li, Yufang

    2016-12-01

    Cu(InGa)Se2 (CIGS) thin films were prepared using e-beam evaporation on a soda-lime glass substrate. The effect of substrate temperature and the difference between substrate temperature and post-annealing on the properties of the CIGS thin films and solar cells were studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis-NIR and the Hall effect were used to characterize the structural properties, composition, morphology, optical properties and electrical properties of the as-prepared CIGS thin films, respectively. The results demonstrated that the photoelectric properties of CIGS thin films prepared at a substrate temperature of 300 °C were optimal, with an efficiency of 7.1%. As the substrate temperature increased to over 300 °C, element gallium tended to evaporate from the substrate, which resulted in the variation of the Cu/(In  +  Ga) and Ga/(In  +  Ga) ratios of the films. The post-annealing process with in situ annealing temperatures of 300 °C and 400 °C was also studied. The results indicated that the post-annealing process, unlike the process of direct deposition at certain substrate temperatures, was able to avoid the element loss. At 300 °C in situ post-annealing temperature, there formed a ‘polygon grains’ Cu2-x Se phase, which disappeared when the in situ post-annealing temperature rose to 400 °C. The XRD patterns revealed that the post-annealing process made the element diffusion in films more uniform. The post-treated sample with an in situ post-annealing temperature at 400 °C, as a result, showed the highest efficiency of 9.0%, accompanied by the highest open-circuit voltage, short circuit current and fill factor.

  2. Surface Passivation for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deligiannis, D.

    2017-01-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells (SHJ) are currently one of the most promising solar cell technologies in the world. The SHJ solar cell is based on a crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafer, passivated on both sides with a thin intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer. Subsequently, p-type

  3. Sheet plastic filters for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizenick, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVF) film protects solar cells on Mars surface from radiation and prevents degradation of solar cell surfaces by Martian dust storms. PVF films may replace glass or quartz windows on solar cell arrays used to generate power on earth.

  4. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the ...

  5. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Abstract. A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction a-Si solar cells on polyimide sub- strates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and ...

  6. Concentrated sunlight for organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Concentrated sunlight provides a novel approach to the study of the physical and electrical parameters of organic solar cells. The study of performance of organic solar cells at high solar concentrations provides insight into the physics, which cannot be studied with conventional solar simulators....... A high solar intensity study of inverted P3HT:PCBM solar cells is presented. Performance peak positions were found to be in the range of 1-5 suns, with smaller cells peaking at higher solar concentrations. Additionally, concentrated sunlight is demonstrated as a practical tool for accelerated stability...... studies of polymers for organic solar cells. Degradation was monitored by the evolution of the UV-vis absorption over time. Varying the solar intensity from 1 to 200 suns, the degradation rates were increased by more than a factor of 100 relative to degradation at 1 simulated sun. 5 different polymers...

  7. The Effector Cig57 Hijacks FCHO-Mediated Vesicular Trafficking to Facilitate Intracellular Replication of Coxiella burnetii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latomanski, Eleanor A; Newton, Patrice; Khoo, Chen Ai; Newton, Hayley J

    2016-12-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that infects alveolar macrophages and replicates within a unique lysosome-derived vacuole. When Coxiella is trafficked to a host cell lysosome the essential Dot/Icm type IV secretion system is activated allowing over 130 bacterial effector proteins to be translocated into the host cytosol. This cohort of effectors is believed to manipulate host cell functions to facilitate Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV) biogenesis and bacterial replication. Transposon mutagenesis has demonstrated that the Dot/Icm effector Cig57 is required for CCV development and intracellular replication of Coxiella. Here, we demonstrate a role for Cig57 in subverting clathrin-mediated traffic through its interaction with FCHO2, an accessory protein of clathrin coated pits. A yeast two-hybrid screen identified FCHO2 as a binding partner of Cig57 and this interaction was confirmed during infection using immunoprecipitation experiments. The interaction between Cig57 and FCHO2 is dependent on one of three endocytic sorting motif encoded by Cig57. Importantly, complementation analysis demonstrated that this endocytic sorting motif is required for full function of Cig57. Consistent with the intracellular growth defect in cig57-disrupted Coxiella, siRNA gene silencing of FCHO2 or clathrin (CLTC) inhibits Coxiella growth and CCV biogenesis. Clathrin is recruited to the replicative CCV in a manner that is dependent on the interaction between Cig57 and FCHO2. Creation of an FCHO2 knockout cell line confirmed the importance of this protein for CCV expansion, intracellular replication of Coxiella and clathrin recruitment to the CCV. Collectively, these results reveal Cig57 to be a significant virulence factor that co-opts clathrin-mediated trafficking, via interaction with FCHO2, to facilitate the biogenesis of the fusogenic Coxiella replicative vacuole and enable intracellular success of this human pathogen.

  8. A novel chlorophyll solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, J. C.

    The photosynthetic process is reviewed in order to produce a design for a chlorophyll solar cell. In a leaf, antenna chlorophyll absorbs light energy and conducts it to an energy trap composed of a protein and two chlorophyll molecules, which perform the oxidation-reduction chemistry. The redox potential of the trap changes from 0.4 to -0.6 V, which is sufficient to reduce nearby molecules with redox potentials in that range. The reduction occurs by transfer of an electron, and a chlorophyll solar cell would direct the transferred electron to a current carrier. Chlorophyll antenna and traps are placed on a metallic support immersed in an electron acceptor solution, and resulting electrons from exposure to light are gathered by a metallic current collector. Spinach chlorophyll extracted, purified, and applied in a cell featuring a Pt collector and an octane water emulsion resulted in intensity independent voltages.

  9. Thin Film CIGS Photovoltaic Technology: Final Technical Report, 16 April 1998 - 15 October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahoy, A. E.; Cambridge, J.; Chen, L.; Kiss, Z. J.

    2002-03-01

    This report describes the state-of-the-art capabilities that were demonstrated for Mo, CIGS, and ZnO depositions at coating widths of 45 cm. The CIGS is formed by linear-source evaporation onto moving substrates using multiple line sources. The linear sources were characterized according to deposition uniformity and angular dependence of emitted flux. Uniformity maps were generated for CIGS composition and device performance over large areas. Large-area CIGS modules were produced with Voc's up to 36.9 V. High-Ga-content CIGS devices were produced in the pilot-line system with an efficiency of 11.2% (Voc 596 mV, Jsc 27.4 mA/cm2, FF 67.7%). The minimum bandgap in R&D CIGS was successfully controlled through Ga content and Ga profile. A reliable recipe was developed that yielded a best efficiency of 12.4% (Voc 532 mV, Jsc 34.3 mA/cm2, FF 67.9%). A promising source material (ZnIn2Se4) was synthesized and used for buffer layer deposition, resulting in an 11.6% cell on NREL CIGS (Voc 562 mV, Jsc 30.8 mA/cm2, FF 67.2%). Deposition rate from a charge of ZIS was recorded as a function of evaporation time and source temperature. Current generated in the CIGS component of an a-Si/a-Si/CIGS stacked device was increased from 5.6 to 12.9 mA/cm2. Useful gains in conductivity and transmission of large-area sputtered ZnO:Al were obtained through use of substrate heating. EPV is constructing an entirely new CIGS pilot line for scale up and limited manufacturing purposes. The coating width is 65 cm. The company's analytical capabilities have been upgraded with the installation of ICP, SEM/EDS, computerized QE, and stylus profilometer facilities.

  10. Controllable design of solid-state perovskite solar cells by SCAPS device simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kai; Lin, Peng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Yan; Xu, Zongchang; Lin, Yixin

    2016-12-01

    The highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of solid-state perovskite solar cells (ssPSCs) has achieved 20.1% recently. There is reason to believe that ssPSCs is a strong competitor with silicon and CIGS solar cells in photovoltaic field. The deep understanding of operation mechanism of ssPSCs is essential and required to furtherly improve device performance. The configuration and excition type are similar to inorganic semiconductor solar cells. Therefore, Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator (SCAPS), a device simulator widely using in inorganic solar cells, was employed to controllably design ssPSCs. The validity of device simulation was verified by comparing with real devices from reported literatures. The influence of absorber thickness on device property was discussed, which indicate that it exists an optimal thickness range. Two hypothetical interface layers, TiO2/perovskite layer and perovskite/HTM layer, were introduced into the construction model to consider the effects of interfaces defect density on device performance. It revealed TiO2/perovskite has stronger impact than perovskite/HTM, because higher excess carrier density existing at TiO2/perovskite will cause more recombination rate. In addition, hole transport materials (HTM) parameters, hole mobility and acceptor density, were chosen to study the impact of HTM characteristics on PCE. The analysis illuminate that the design of HTM layer should balance hole mobility and acceptor density. Meanwhile, different HTM candidates were selected and replaced typical HTM layer. The discussion about the function of candidates on solar cells performance demonstrated that a thiophene group hole-transporting polymer (PTAA) and a copper-based conductor (CuI) both have relatively high PCE, which is due to their wide bandgap, high conductivity, and better chemical interaction with perovskite absorber.

  11. Multi-Material Front Contact for 19% Thin Film Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joop van Deelen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The trade-off between transmittance and conductivity of the front contact material poses a bottleneck for thin film solar panels. Normally, the front contact material is a metal oxide and the optimal cell configuration and panel efficiency were determined for various band gap materials, representing Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS, CdTe and high band gap perovskites. Supplementing the metal oxide with a metallic copper grid improves the performance of the front contact and aims to increase the efficiency. Various front contact designs with and without a metallic finger grid were calculated with a variation of the transparent conductive oxide (TCO sheet resistance, scribing area, cell length, and finger dimensions. In addition, the contact resistance and illumination power were also assessed and the optimal thin film solar panel design was determined. Adding a metallic finger grid on a TCO gives a higher solar cell efficiency and this also enables longer cell lengths. However, contact resistance between the metal and the TCO material can reduce the efficiency benefit somewhat.

  12. SLAM examination of solar cells and solar cell welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, P. M.; Vorres, C. L.; Yuhas, D. E.

    The scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) has been evaluated for non-destructive examination of solar cells and interconnector bonds. Using this technique, it is possible to view through materials in order to reveal regions of discontinuity such as microcracks and voids. Of particular interest is the ability to evaluate, in a unique manner, the bonds produced by parallel gap welding. It is possible to not only determine the area and geometry of the bond between the tab and cell, but also to reveal any microcracks incurred during the welding. By correlating the SLAM results with conventional techniques of weld evaluation a more confident weld parameter optimization can be obtained.

  13. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hung Tai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si solar cell achieved an efficiency of 11.4%, while the efficiency of a typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was 9.0%. Furthermore, an efficiency of 11.7% was achieved by thickness optimization of the three-terminal solar cell.

  14. Superior light trapping in thin film silicon solar cells through nano imprint lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soppe, W.J.; Dorenkamper, M.S.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Pex, P.P.A.C.

    2013-10-15

    ECN and partners have developed a fabrication process based on nanoimprint lithography (NIL) of textures for light trapping in thin film solar cells such as thin-film silicon, OPV, CIGS and CdTe. The process can be applied in roll-to-roll mode when using a foil substrate or in roll-to-plate mode when using a glass substrate. The lacquer also serves as an electrically insulating layer for cells if steel foil is used as substrate, to enable monolithic series interconnection. In this paper we will show the superior light trapping in thin film silicon solar cells made on steel foil with nanotextured back contacts. We have made single junction a-Si and {mu}c-Si and a-Si/{mu}c-Si tandem cells, where we applied several types of nano-imprints with random and periodic structures. We will show that the nano-imprinted back contact enables more than 30% increase of current in comparison with non-textured back contacts and that optimized periodic textures outperform state-of-the-art random textures. For a-Si cells we obtained Jsc of 18 mA/cm{sup 2} and for {mu}c-Si cells more than 24 mA/cm{sup 2}. Tandem cells with a total Si absorber layer thickness of only 1350 nm have an initial efficiency of 11%.

  15. Hybrid density functional theory study of Cu(In1−xGaxSe2 band structure for solar cell application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Dong Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cu(In1−xGaxSe2 (CIGS alloy based thin film photovoltaic solar cells have attracted more and more attention due to its large optical absorption coefficient, long term stability, low cost and high efficiency. However, the previous theoretical investigation of this material with first principle calculation cannot fulfill the requirement of experimental development, especially the accurate description of band structure and density of states. In this work, we use first principle calculation based on hybrid density functional theory to investigate the feature of CIGS, with B3LYP applied in the CuIn1−xGaxSe2 stimulation of the band structure and density of states. We report the simulation of the lattice parameter, band gap and chemical composition. The band gaps of CuGaSe2, CuIn0.25Ga0.75Se2, CuIn0.5Ga0.5Se2, CuIn0.75Ga0.25Se2 and CuInSe2 are obtained as 1.568 eV, 1.445 eV, 1.416 eV, 1.275 eV and 1.205 eV according to our calculation, which agree well with the available experimental values. The band structure of CIGS is also in accordance with the current theory.

  16. Solar cell element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Satoru; Matsukuma, Kunihiro; Kokuuchi, Shigeru; Morita, Keiichi; Yagi, Hideyuki.

    1989-07-17

    This invention aims to provide a soalr cell element with an easily formable electrode having an independent BSF and BSR. For this purpose, in this invention, a layer with high concentration of impurities (which functions as BSF on the opposite surface of the light-receiving surface) is partly and adjacently placed; a back electrode is made to have an ohmic resistance to the high-impurity layer; a metal oxide film is forther placed in other parts. By this, the functions of BSF and BSR are sufficiently utilized as a boundary surface between the high-impurity layer (BSF) and the semi-conductor substrate and the metal oxide film (BSR) are separated, thus enhancing the conversion efficiency. As for the patterns on the separated layers of BSF and BSR, various patterns are possible to be relized by using resist printing patterns. 3 figs.

  17. Perovskite Solar Cells: Potentials, Challenges, and Opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmed, Muhammad Imran; Habib, Amir; Javaid, Syed Saad

    2015-01-01

      Heralded as a major scientific breakthrough of 2013, organic/inorganic lead halide perovskite solar cells have ushered in a new era of renewed efforts at increasing the efficiency and lowering the cost of solar energy...

  18. Impact of Na-addition effect into CZTS thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehira, Hiroshi; Jimbo, Kazuo; Katagiri, Hironori

    2017-07-01

    In our laboratory, the development of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cells has been conducted. It is said that the conversion efficiency of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) was improved by the diffusion of Sodium (Na) from Soda Lime Glass (SLG) substrate. In this study, the effect of Na-addition on CZTS solar cells was examined. Firstly, we deposited Mo bottom electrode on photovoltaic glass substrate by using an RF sputtering method. Then, CZTS precursor and Sodium Fluoride (NaF) were sequentially deposited on it. Then we sulfurized them in an atmosphere of Hydrogen Sulfide. So, the sodium was diffused from the both side of the CZTS surface and the substrate. From the C-V measurement, as the amount of thickness of NaF increased, the carrier density increased. At the same time, the open circuit voltages of CZTS solar cells were enhanced from 630mV to 655mV. From these findings, we confirmed that the improvement in PV characteristics was partly due to the increase of the carrier density by Na-addition effect on CZTS.

  19. Investigation of Non-Vacuum Deposition Techniques in Fabrication of Chalcogenide-Based Solar Cell Absorbers

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaggaf, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    The environmental challenges are increasing, and so is the need for renewable energy. For photovoltaic applications, thin film Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGS) and CuIn(S,Se)2 (CIS) solar cells are attractive with conversion efficiencies of more than 20%. However, the high-efficiency cells are fabricated using vacuum technologies such as sputtering or thermal co-evaporation, which are very costly and unfeasible at industrial level. The fabrication involves the uses of highly toxic gases such as H2Se, adding complexity to the fabrication process. The work described here focused on non-vacuum deposition methods such as printing. Special attention has been given to printing designed in a moving Roll-to-Roll (R2R) fashion. The results show potential of such technology to replace the vacuum processes. Conversion efficiencies for such non-vacuum deposition of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 solar cells have exceeded 15% using hazardous chemicals such as hydrazine, which is unsuitable for industrial scale up. In an effort to simplify the process, non-toxic suspensions of Cu(In,Ga)S2 molecular-based precursors achieved efficiencies of ~7-15%. Attempts to further simplify the selenization step, deposition of CuIn(S,Se)2 particulate solutions without the Ga doping and non-toxic suspensions of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 quaternary precursors achieved efficiencies (~1-8%). The contribution of this research was to provide a new method to monitor printed structures through spectral-domain optical coherence tomography SD-OCT in a moving fashion simulating R2R process design at speeds up to 1.05 m/min. The research clarified morphological and compositional impacts of Nd:YAG laser heat-treatment on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorber layer to simplify the annealing step in non-vacuum environment compatible to R2R. Finally, the research further simplified development methods for CIGS solar cells based on suspensions of quaternary Cu(In,Ga)Se2 precursors and ternary CuInS2 precursors. The methods consisted of post deposition reactive

  20. Thermochromic halide perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia; Lai, Minliang; Dou, Letian; Kley, Christopher S; Chen, Hong; Peng, Fei; Sun, Junliang; Lu, Dylan; Hawks, Steven A; Xie, Chenlu; Cui, Fan; Alivisatos, A Paul; Limmer, David T; Yang, Peidong

    2018-01-22

    Smart photovoltaic windows represent a promising green technology featuring tunable transparency and electrical power generation under external stimuli to control the light transmission and manage the solar energy. Here, we demonstrate a thermochromic solar cell for smart photovoltaic window applications utilizing the structural phase transitions in inorganic halide perovskite caesium lead iodide/bromide. The solar cells undergo thermally-driven, moisture-mediated reversible transitions between a transparent non-perovskite phase (81.7% visible transparency) with low power output and a deeply coloured perovskite phase (35.4% visible transparency) with high power output. The inorganic perovskites exhibit tunable colours and transparencies, a peak device efficiency above 7%, and a phase transition temperature as low as 105 °C. We demonstrate excellent device stability over repeated phase transition cycles without colour fade or performance degradation. The photovoltaic windows showing both photoactivity and thermochromic features represent key stepping-stones for integration with buildings, automobiles, information displays, and potentially many other technologies.

  1. Supramolecular photochemistry and solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IHA NEYDE YUKIE MURAKAMI

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular photochemistry as well as solar cells are fascinating topics of current interest in Inorganic Photochemistry and very active research fields which have attracted wide attention in last two decades. A brief outline of the investigations in these fields carried out in our Laboratory of Inorganic Photochemistry and Energy Conversion is given here with no attempt of an exhaustive coverage of the literature. The emphasis is placed on recent work and information on the above mentioned subjects. Three types of supramolecular systems have been the focus of this work: (i cage-type coordination compounds; (ii second-sphere coordination compounds, exemplified by ion-pair photochemistry of cobalt complexes and (iii covalently-linked systems. In the latter, modulation of the photoluminescence and photochemistry of some rhenium complexes are discussed. Solar energy conversion and development of thin-layer photoelectrochemical solar cells based on sensitization of nanocrystalline semiconductor films by some ruthenium polypyridyl complexes are presented as an important application that resulted from specifically engineered artificial assemblies.

  2. Commercialization of High Efficiency Low Cost CIGS Technology Based on Electroplating: Final Technical Progress Report, 28 September 2007 - 30 June 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basol, B.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes SoloPower's work as a Photovoltaic Technology Incubator awardee within the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program. The term of this subcontract with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was two years. The project focused on SoloPower's electrodeposition-based copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) technology. Under this subcontract, SoloPower improved the quality of its flexible metal substrates, increased the size of its solar cells from 0.5 cm2 to 120 cm2, increased the small-area cell efficiencies from near 11% to near 14%, demonstrated large-area cells, and developed a module manufacturing process.

  3. Semiconductor materials for solar photovoltaic cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wong-Ng, Winnie; Bhattacharya, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the current status of semiconductor materials for conversion of sunlight to electricity, and highlights advances in both basic science and manufacturing.  Photovoltaic (PV) solar electric technology will be a significant contributor to world energy supplies when reliable, efficient PV power products are manufactured in large volumes at low cost.  Expert chapters cover the full range of semiconductor materials for solar-to-electricity conversion, from crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon to cadmium telluride, copper indium gallium sulfide selenides, dye sensitized solar cells, organic solar cells, and environmentally friendly copper zinc tin sulfide selenides. The latest methods for synthesis and characterization of solar cell materials are described, together with techniques for measuring solar cell efficiency. Semiconductor Materials for Solar Photovoltaic Cells presents the current state of the art as well as key details about future strategies to increase the efficiency and reduce ...

  4. Energy Conversion: Nano Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Muhammad; Yap, Chi Chin; Mat Salleh, Muhamad

    2009-09-01

    Problems of fossil-fuel-induced climate change have sparked a demand for sustainable energy supply for all sectors of economy. Most laboratories continue to search for new materials and new technique to generate clean energy at affordable cost. Nanotechnology can play a major role in solving the energy problem. The prospect for solar energy using Si-based technology is not encouraging. Si photovoltaics can produce electricity at 20-30 c//kWhr with about 25% efficiency. Nanoparticles have a strong capacity to absorb light and generate more electrons for current as discovered in the recent work of organic and dye-sensitized cell. Using cheap preparation technique such as screen-printing and self-assembly growth, organic cells shows a strong potential for commercialization. Thin Films research group at National University Malaysia has been actively involved in these areas, and in this seminar, we will present a review works on nanomaterials for solar cells and particularly on hybrid organic solar cell based on ZnO nanorod arrays. The organic layer consisting of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEHPPV) and [6, 6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid 3-ethylthiophene ester (PCBE) was spin-coated on ZnO nanorod arrays. ZnO nanorod arrays were grown on FTO glass substrates which were pre-coated with ZnO nanoparticles using a low temperature chemical solution method. A gold electrode was used as the top contact. The device gave a short circuit current density of 2.49×10-4 mA/cm2 and an open circuit voltage of 0.45 V under illumination of a projector halogen light at 100 mW/cm2.

  5. Dye solar cells: a different approach to solar energy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Roux, Lukas J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available An attractive and cheaper alternative to siliconbased photovoltaic (PV) cells for the conversion of solar light into electrical energy is to utilise dyeadsorbed, large-band-gap metal oxide materials such as TiO2 to absorb the solar light...

  6. Heat blocking gallium arsenide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, F.; Farmer, C. D.; Schmidt, C.; Pfaff, G.; Stanley, C. R.

    2008-02-01

    The solar cell industry is witnessing an era of unprecedented growth and this trend is set to continue for the foreseeable future. Here we describe a heat reflection pigment-coated single-junction gallium arsenide solar cell that is capable of reflecting heat-inducing near-infrared radiation. The cell maintains its performance better than non-coated cells when exposed to infrared-rich radiant flux. In situations where solar cells get heated mainly from incident infrared radiation, these cells exhibit superior performance. The heat reflecting pigment, cell structure, coating process and cell performance have been described.

  7. Nanosolar: Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, Brian [Nanosolar, Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2012-05-31

    Nanosolar has developed proprietary technology based on Copper-Indium-Gallium-diSelenide (CIGS) absorber technology that allows the printing of this semiconductor material using a high-speed, high-throughput roll-to-roll manufacturing process. A central challenge in cost-effectively constructing a large-area CIGS-based solar cell or module is that the elements of the CIGS layer must be within a narrow stoichiometric ratio on nano-, meso-, and macroscopic length scale in all three dimensions in order for the resulting cell or module to be highly efficient. Achieving precise stoichiometric composition over relatively large substrate areas is however difficult using traditional vacuum-based deposition processes. For example, it is difficult to uniformly deposit compounds and/or alloys containing more than one element by sputtering or evaporation. Both techniques rely on deposition approaches that are limited to line-of-sight and limited-area sources, tending to result in poor surface coverage. Line-of-sight trajectories and limited-area sources can result in non-uniform three-dimensional distribution of the elements in all three dimensions and/or poor film-thickness uniformity over large areas. These non-uniformities can occur over the nano-, meso-, and/or macroscopic scales. Such non-uniformity also alters the local stoichiometric ratios of the absorber layer, decreasing the potential power conversion efficiency of the complete cell or module. Nanosolar has overcome these challenges by printing nanoparticulate CIGS precursor materials onto low-cost metal foil substrates, and performing a rapid thermal processing to convert the nanoparticulate coating into a CIGS absorber layer By locking in the appropriate stochiometry into the nanoparticulate precursor material, spatial uniformity is ensured in the coated layers, while printing at high speed and throughput minimizes solar cell cost.

  8. CIBS Solar Cell Development Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exstrom, Christopher L.; Soukup, Rodney J.; Ianno, Natale J.

    2011-09-28

    Efforts to fabricate and study a new photovoltaic material, copper indium boron diselenide (CuInxB1-xSe2 or CIBS), were undertaken. Attempts to prepare CIBS using sputtering deposition techniques resulted in segregation of boron from the rest of elements in the material. CIBS nanocrystals were prepared from the reaction of elemental Se with CuCl, InCl3, and boric acid in solution, but the product material quickly decomposed upon heating that was required in attempts to convert the nanocrystals into a thin film. The investigation of the reasons for the lack of CIBS material stability led to new structure-property studies of closely-related photovoltaic systems as well as studies of new solar cell materials and processing methods that could enhance the development of next-generation solar technologies. A detailed compositional study of CuIn1-xAlxSe2 (CIAS, a system closely related to CIBS) revealed a non-linear correlation between crystal lattice size and the Al/(In+Al) ratios with dual-phase formation being observed. A new nanocrystal-to-thin-film processing method was developed for the preparation of CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) thin films in which colloidal Se particles are sprayed in contact with CuIn1-xGaxS2 nanoparticles and heated in an argon atmosphere with no other Se source in the system. The process is non-vacuum and does not require toxic gases such as Se vapor or H2Se. Expertise gained from these studies was applied to new research in the preparation of thin-film pyrite FeS2, an attractive earth-abundant candidate material for next-generation photovoltaics. Three methods successfully produced pure pyrite FeS2 films: sulfurization of sputtered Fe films, chemical bath deposition, and sulfurization of Fe2O3 sol-gel precursors. The last method produced pinhole-free films that may be viable for device development. Nickel, platinum, and possibly carbon would appear to serve as good ohmic contact materials. While CdS has a reasonable conduction band energy match to

  9. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Seung Bum [Palo Alto, CA; Kim, Taeseok [San Jose, CA; Smith, David D [Campbell, CA; Cousins, Peter J [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-03-13

    Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

  10. Coupling of Luminescent Solar Concentrators to Plasmonic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Yi

    To make inexpensive solar cells is a continuous goal for solar photovoltaic (PV) energy industry. Thin film solar cells of various materials have been developed and continue to emerge in order to replace bulk silicon solar cells. A thin film solar cell not only uses less material but also requires a less expensive refinery process. In addition, other advantages coming along with small thickness are higher open circuit voltage and higher conversion efficiency. However, thin film solar cells, especially those made of silicon, have significant optical losses. In order to address this problem, this thesis investigates the spectral coupling of thin films PV to luminescent solar concentrators (LSC). LSC are passive devices, consisting of plastic sheets embedded with fluorescent dyes which absorb part of the incoming radiation spectrum and emit at specific wavelength. The emitted light is concentrated by total internal reflection to the edge of the sheet, where the PVs are placed. Since the light emitted from the LSC edge is usually in a narrow spectral range, it is possible to employ diverse strategies to enhance PV absorption at the peak of the emission wavelength. Employing plasmonic nanostructures has been shown to enhance absorption of thin films via forward scattering, diffraction and localized surface plasmon. These two strategies are theoretically investigated here for improving the absorption and elevating the output power of a thin film solar cell. First, the idea of spectral coupling of luminescent solar concentrators to plasmonic solar cells is introduced to assess its potential for increasing the power output. This study is carried out employing P3HT/PC60BM organic solar cells and LSC with Lumogen Red dyes. A simplified spectral coupling analysis is employed to predict the power density, considering the output spectrum of the LSC equivalent to the emission spectrum of the dye and neglecting any angular dependence. Plasmonic tuning is conducted to enhance

  11. Solar Cells Using Quantum Funnels

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2011-09-14

    Colloidal quantum dots offer broad tuning of semiconductor bandstructure via the quantum size effect. Devices involving a sequence of layers comprised of quantum dots selected to have different diameters, and therefore bandgaps, offer the possibility of funneling energy toward an acceptor. Here we report a quantum funnel that efficiently conveys photoelectrons from their point of generation toward an intended electron acceptor. Using this concept we build a solar cell that benefits from enhanced fill factor as a result of this quantum funnel. This concept addresses limitations on transport in soft condensed matter systems and leverages their advantages in large-area optoelectronic devices and systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. THIN FILM A-Slzfl SOLAR CELLS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    circuit current were compared to the parameters of crystalline silicon pit-junction solar cells. The effect of irradiance and spectral illumination on the cell performance was investigated. Finally, the applicability of the investigated thin. film a-Si:H solar cells for its practical operation in Ethiopia is discussed. Key words/phrases: ...

  13. Device operation of organic tandem solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadipour, A.; de Boer, B.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2008-01-01

    A generalized methodology is developed to obtain the current-voltage characteristic of polymer tandem solar cells by knowing the electrical performance of both sub cells. We demonstrate that the electrical characteristics of polymer tandem solar cells are correctly predicted for both the series and

  14. Solar power satellites - Heat engine or solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, H.; Gregory, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A solar power satellite is the energy-converting element of a system that can deliver some 10 GW of power to utilities on the earth's surface. We evaluated heat engines and solar cells for converting sunshine to electric power at the satellite. A potassium Rankine cycle was the best of the heat engines, and 50 microns thick single-crystal silicon cells were the best of the photovoltaic converters. Neither solar cells nor heat engines had a clear advantage when all factors were considered. The potassium-turbine power plant, however, was more difficult to assemble and required a more expensive orbital assembly base. We therefore based our cost analyses on solar-cell energy conversion, concluding that satellite-generated power could be delivered to utilities for around 4 to 5 cents a kWh.

  15. Hydrogenated indium oxide window layers for high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäger, Timo, E-mail: timo.jaeger@empa.ch; Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Bissig, Benjamin; Pianezzi, Fabian; Fuchs, Peter; Gretener, Christina; Tiwari, Ayodhya N. [Empa – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Thin Films and Photovoltaics, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Döbeli, Max [ETH Zürich, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-28

    High mobility hydrogenated indium oxide is investigated as a transparent contact for thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells. Hydrogen doping of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films is achieved by injection of H{sub 2}O water vapor or H{sub 2} gas during the sputter process. As-deposited amorphous In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:H films exhibit a high electron mobility of ∼50 cm{sup 2}/Vs at room temperature. A bulk hydrogen concentration of ∼4 at. % was measured for both optimized H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}-processed films, although the H{sub 2}O-derived film exhibits a doping gradient as detected by elastic recoil detection analysis. Amorphous IOH films are implemented as front contacts in CIGS based solar cells, and their performance is compared with the reference ZnO:Al electrodes. The most significant feature of IOH containing devices is an enhanced open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of ∼20 mV regardless of the doping approach, whereas the short circuit current and fill factor remain the same for the H{sub 2}O case or slightly decrease for H{sub 2}. The overall power conversion efficiency is improved from 15.7% to 16.2% by substituting ZnO:Al with IOH (H{sub 2}O) as front contacts. Finally, stability tests of non-encapsulated solar cells in dry air at 80 °C and constant illumination for 500 h demonstrate a higher stability for IOH-containing devices.

  16. Solution-Processed Ag Nanowires + PEDOT:PSS Hybrid Electrode for Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ Thin-Film Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Donghyeop; Kim, Taegeon; Ahn, Byung Tae; Han, Seung Min

    2015-06-24

    To reduce the cost of the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells while maximizing the efficiency, we report the use of an Ag nanowires (NWs) + poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) hybrid transparent electrode, which was deposited using all-solution-processed, low-cost, scalable methods. This is the first demonstration of an Ag NWs + PSS transparent electrode applied to CIGS solar cells. The spin-coated 10-nm-thick PSS conducting polymer layer in our hybrid electrode functioned as a filler of empty space of an electrostatically sprayed Ag NW network. Coating of PSS on the Ag NW network resulted in an increase in the short-circuit current from 15.4 to 26.5 mA/cm(2), but the open-circuit voltage and shunt resistance still needed to be improved. The limited open-circuit voltage was found to be due to interfacial recombination that is due to the ineffective hole-blocking ability of the CdS film. To suppress the interfacial recombination between Ag NWs and the CdS film, a Zn(S,O,OH) film was introduced as a hole-blocking layer between the CdS film and Ag NW network. The open-circuit voltage of the cell sharply improved from 0.35 to 0.6 V, which resulted in the best cell efficiency of 11.6%.

  17. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Peter John [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  18. Recent advances of flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Hee; Heo, Jin Hyuck; Im, Sang Hyuk

    2017-11-01

    Recently, hybrid perovskite solar cells have attracted great interest because they can be fabricated to low cost, flexible, and highly efficient solar cells. Here, we introduced recent advances of flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells. We introduced research background of flexible perovskite solar cells in introduction part. Then we composed the main body to i) structure and properties of hybrid perovskite solar cells, ii) why flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells are important?, iii) transparent conducting oxide (TCO) based flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells, and iv) TCO-free transparent conducting electrode (TCE) based flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells. Finally, we summarized research outlook of flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells.

  19. Improved open-circuit voltage in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells with high work function transparent electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäger, Timo, E-mail: timo.jaeger@empa.ch; Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Bissig, Benjamin; Pianezzi, Fabian; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Reinhard, Patrick; Steinhauser, Jérôme; Tiwari, Ayodhya N. [Empa—Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Thin Films and Photovoltaics, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Schwenk, Johannes [Empa—Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Nanoscale Materials Science, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2015-06-14

    Hydrogenated indium oxide (IOH) is implemented as transparent front contact in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells, leading to an open circuit voltage V{sub OC} enhanced by ∼20 mV as compared to reference devices with ZnO:Al (AZO) electrodes. This effect is reproducible in a wide range of contact sheet resistances corresponding to various IOH thicknesses. We present the detailed electrical characterization of glass/Mo/CIGS/CdS/intrinsic ZnO (i-ZnO)/transparent conductive oxide (TCO) with different IOH/AZO ratios in the front TCO contact in order to identify possible reasons for the enhanced V{sub OC}. Temperature and illumination intensity-dependent current-voltage measurements indicate that the dominant recombination path does not change when AZO is replaced by IOH, and it is mainly limited to recombination in the space charge region and at the junction interface of the solar cell. The main finding is that the introduction of even a 5 nm-thin IOH layer at the i-ZnO/TCO interface already results in a step-like increase in V{sub OC}. Two possible explanations are proposed and verified by one-dimensional simulations using the SCAPS software. First, a higher work function of IOH as compared to AZO is simulated to yield an V{sub OC} increase by 21 mV. Second, a lower defect density in the i-ZnO layer as a result of the reduced sputter damage during milder sputter-deposition of IOH can also add to a maximum enhanced V{sub OC} of 25 mV. Our results demonstrate that the proper choice of the front TCO contact can reduce the parasitic recombination and boost the efficiency of CIGS cells with improved corrosion stability.

  20. Integration of Solar Cells on Top of CMOS Chips Part I: a-Si Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; van der Werf, Karine H.M.; Schropp, Ruud E.I.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the monolithic integration of deepsubmicrometer complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) microchips with a-Si:H solar cells. Solar cells are manufactured directly on the CMOS chips. The microchips maintain comparable electronic performance, and the solar cells show efficiency values

  1. 77 FR 31309 - Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled Into Modules, From the People's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... telluride (CdTe), or copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS). Also excluded from the scope of this... International Trade Administration Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled Into Modules... crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells, whether or not assembled into modules (``solar cells''), from the...

  2. 77 FR 63791 - Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled into Modules, from the People's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ...-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), or copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS). ] Also excluded from the... International Trade Administration Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled into Modules... photovoltaic cells, whether or not assembled into modules (``solar cells''), from the People's Republic of...

  3. Advanced CIGS Photovoltaic Technology: Annual Technical Report, 15 November 2001-14 November 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahoy, A. E.; Chen, L.

    2003-05-01

    Energy Photovoltaics, Inc. (EPV) has consistently pursued a vacuum-based approach to CIGS production, using novel linear-source technology and standard soda-lime glass substrates. It has also chosen to develop processing methods with worker safety in mind. These choices result in layers having controllable purity and low physical defects, and production without significant hazards. Considerations such as these are important in helping to minimize the processing costs of CIGS. Technically, thin-film PV technologies have advanced considerably in the last few years. EPV successfully produced high-quality 0.43m2 Mo-coated glass substrates that, when cut, enabled NREL to produce 17.1% CIGS cells on such substrates. EPV successfully used novel linear evaporative sources for supply of Cu, In, Ga, and Se to form CIGS on 0.43m2 substrates, producing modules with Voc's of up to 37 V. A new approach to buffer-layer deposition was pioneered through synthesis of the compound ZnIn2Se4 and its use as a source material. In addition, the current generated in exploratory a-Si/a-Si/CIGS stacked devices was increased from 6 to 13 mA/cm2. Supporting these programs, EPV's upgraded analytical laboratories provided rapid in-house feedback concerning material and device properties. The objective of this subcontract is to develop and assemble the various pieces of new technology that EPV considers essential for cost-effective production of CIGS modules. The long-term objective of the Thin Film PV Partnership Program is to demonstrate low-cost, reproducible modules of 15% aperture-area efficiency.

  4. Perovskite Solar Cells with Large-Area CVD-Graphene for Tandem Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Felix; Gluba, Marc A; Albrecht, Steve; Rappich, Jörg; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Nickel, Norbert H

    2015-07-16

    Perovskite solar cells with transparent contacts may be used to compensate for thermalization losses of silicon solar cells in tandem devices. This offers a way to outreach stagnating efficiencies. However, perovskite top cells in tandem structures require contact layers with high electrical conductivity and optimal transparency. We address this challenge by implementing large-area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition as a highly transparent electrode in perovskite solar cells, leading to identical charge collection efficiencies. Electrical performance of solar cells with a graphene-based contact reached those of solar cells with standard gold contacts. The optical transmission by far exceeds that of reference devices and amounts to 64.3% below the perovskite band gap. Finally, we demonstrate a four-terminal tandem device combining a high band gap graphene-contacted perovskite top solar cell (Eg = 1.6 eV) with an amorphous/crystalline silicon bottom solar cell (Eg = 1.12 eV).

  5. Monolithic cells for solar fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongé, Jan; Bosserez, Tom; Martel, David; Nervi, Carlo; Boarino, Luca; Taulelle, Francis; Decher, Gero; Bordiga, Silvia; Martens, Johan A

    2014-12-07

    Hybrid energy generation models based on a variety of alternative energy supply technologies are considered the best way to cope with the depletion of fossil energy resources and to limit global warming. One of the currently missing technologies is the mimic of natural photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide and water into chemical fuel using sunlight. This idea has been around for decades, but artificial photosynthesis of organic molecules is still far away from providing real-world solutions. The scientific challenge is to perform in an efficient way the multi-electron transfer reactions of water oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction using holes and single electrons generated in an illuminated semiconductor. In this tutorial review the design of photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells that combine solar water oxidation and CO2 reduction is discussed. In such PEC cells simultaneous transport and efficient use of light, electrons, protons and molecules has to be managed. It is explained how efficiency can be gained by compartmentalisation of the water oxidation and CO2 reduction processes by proton exchange membranes, and monolithic concepts of artificial leaves and solar membranes are presented. Besides transferring protons from the anode to the cathode compartment the membrane serves as a molecular barrier material to prevent cross-over of oxygen and fuel molecules. Innovative nano-organized multimaterials will be needed to realise practical artificial photosynthesis devices. This review provides an overview of synthesis techniques which could be used to realise monolithic multifunctional membrane-electrode assemblies, such as Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), and porous silicon (porSi) engineering. Advances in modelling approaches, electrochemical techniques and in situ spectroscopies to characterise overall PEC cell performance are discussed.

  6. Dye-sensitised solar cell (artificial photosynthesis)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Roux, Lukas J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel system that harnesses solar energy is the nano-crystalline TiO dye-sensitised solar cell (DSC), in conjunction with several new concepts, such as nanotechnology and molecular devices. An efficient and low-cost cell can be produced by using...

  7. Perovskite solar cells: Different facets of performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eperon, Giles E.; Ginger, David S.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of halide perovskites vary significantly between crystalline grains, but the impact of this heterogeneity on solar cell performance is unclear. Now, this variability is shown to limit the photovoltaic properties of solar cells, and its origins are linked to differing properties between crystal facets.

  8. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  9. Methodologies for high efficiency perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Since the report on long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell in 2012, perovskite solar cells based on lead halide perovskites having organic cations such as methylammonium CH3NH3PbI3 or formamidinium HC(NH2)2PbI3 have received great attention because of superb photovoltaic performance with power conversion efficiency exceeding 22 %. In this review, emergence of perovskite solar cell is briefly introduced. Since understanding fundamentals of light absorbers is directly related to their photovoltaic performance, opto-electronic properties of organo lead halide perovskites are investigated in order to provide insight into design of higher efficiency perovskite solar cells. Since the conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cell is found to depend significantly on perovskite film quality, methodologies for fabricating high quality perovskite films are particularly emphasized, including various solution-processes and vacuum deposition method.

  10. Organic Based Solar Cells with Morphology Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Rieks

    The field of organic solar cells has in the last years gone through an impressive development with efficiencies reported up to 12 %. For organic solar cells to take the leap from primarily being a laboratory scale technology to being utilized as renewable energy source, several issues need...... Microscopy and as solar cells in a blend with PCBM. It was concluded that these particles did not show a potential large enough for continuous work due to a high material loss and low efficiency when applied in solar cells. The second method to achieve was preparation of pre-arranged morphology organic...... nanoparticles consisting of a blend of donor and acceptor in an aqueous dispersion, thereby addressing two of the issues remaining in the field of organic solar cells. This approach was used on six different polymers, which all had the ability to prepare aqueous nanoparticle inks. The morphology...

  11. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  12. Achieving 15% Tandem Polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    final support also enabled us to explore novel hybrid perovskite solar cells in depth. For example, single junction cell efficiency of 19.3% under...novel hybrid perovskite solar cells in depth. For example, single junction cell efficiency of 19.3% under reverse bias was achieved and the results...3 In a second effort, a monolithic integration of perovskite and LBG polymer:fullerene subcells into a tandem structure is realized through a full

  13. Coating Processes Boost Performance of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    NASA currently has spacecraft orbiting Mercury (MESSENGER), imaging the asteroid Vesta (Dawn), roaming the red plains of Mars (the Opportunity rover), and providing a laboratory for humans to advance scientific research in space (the International Space Station, or ISS). The heart of the technology that powers those missions and many others can be held in the palm of your hand - the solar cell. Solar, or photovoltaic (PV), cells are what make up the panels and arrays that draw on the Sun s light to generate electricity for everything from the Hubble Space Telescope s imaging equipment to the life support systems for the ISS. To enable NASA spacecraft to utilize the Sun s energy for exploring destinations as distant as Jupiter, the Agency has invested significant research into improving solar cell design and efficiency. Glenn Research Center has been a national leader in advancing PV technology. The Center s Photovoltaic and Power Technologies Branch has conducted numerous experiments aimed at developing lighter, more efficient solar cells that are less expensive to manufacture. Initiatives like the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiments I and II in which PV cells developed by NASA and private industry were mounted outside the ISS have tested how various solar technologies perform in the harsh conditions of space. While NASA seeks to improve solar cells for space applications, the results are returning to Earth to benefit the solar energy industry.

  14. Design and Optimization of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide Solar Cells for Lightweight Battlefield Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    band gap with thickness. The top of the CIGS layer would be high band gap material and then gradually transition to lower band gaps towards the bottom...transported in larger and heavier metal cases as seen in Figure 1. The size and weight of this system means that it is not man portable. Two complete...thick. In addition to being over 1/14th the thickness of the triple junction cell used in MAPS, the chalcopyrite structure of CIGS allows the cell

  15. Tandem photovoltaic solar cells and increased solar energy conversion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loferski, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Tandem photovoltaic cells, as proposed by Jackson (1955) to increase the efficiency of solar energy conversion, involve the construction of a system of stacked p/n homojunction photovoltaic cells composed of different semiconductors. It had been pointed out by critics, however, that the total power which could be extracted from the cells in the stack placed side by side was substantially greater than the power obtained from the stacked cells. A reexamination of the tandem cell concept in view of the development of the past few years is conducted. It is concluded that the use of tandem cell systems in flat plate collectors, as originally envisioned by Jackson, may yet become feasible as a result of the development of economically acceptable solar cells for large scale terrestrial power generation.

  16. Progress in Thin Film Solar Cells Based on Cu2ZnSnS4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The research in thin film solar cells has been dominated by light absorber materials based on CdTe and Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS in the last several decades. The concerns of environment impact of cadmium and the limited availability of indium in those materials have driven the research towards developing new substitute light absorbers made from earth abundant, environment benign materials. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS semiconductor material has emerged as one of the most promising candidates for this aim and has attracted considerable interest recently. Significant progress in this relatively new research area has been achieved in the last three years. Over 130 papers on CZTS have been published since 2007, and the majority of them are on the preparation of CZTS thin films by different methods. This paper, will review the wide range of techniques that have been used to deposit CZTS semiconductor thin films. The performance of the thin film solar cells using the CZTS material will also be discussed.

  17. Solar Cell Panel and the Method for Manufacturing the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Sarver, Charles F. (Inventor); Naidenkova, Maria (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    According to an aspect of an embodiment of the present disclosure, there is provided a solar cell panel and a method for manufacturing the same. The solar cell panel comprises: a solar cell for generating electric power from sunlight; a coverglass for covering the solar cell; transparent shims, which are disposed between the solar cell and the coverglass at the points where the distance between the solar cell and the coverglass needs to be controlled, and form a space between the solar cell and the coverglass; and adhesive layer, which fills the space between the solar cell and the coverglass and has the thickness the same as that of the transparent shims.

  18. Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Tian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs have been drawing great attention recently as a material for solar energy conversion due to their versatile optical and electrical properties. The QD-sensitized solar cell (QDSC is one of the burgeoning semiconductor QD solar cells that shows promising developments for the next generation of solar cells. This article focuses on recent developments in QDSCs, including 1 the effect of quantum confinement on QDSCs, 2 the multiple exciton generation (MEG of QDs, 3 fabrication methods of QDs, and 4 nanocrystalline photoelectrodes for solar cells. We also make suggestions for future research on QDSCs. Although the efficiency of QDSCs is still low, we think there will be major breakthroughs in developing QDSCs in the future.

  19. Recent Advances in Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kietzke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar cells based on organic semiconductors have attracted much attention. The thickness of the active layer of organic solar cells is typically only 100 nm thin, which is about 1000 times thinner than for crystalline silicon solar cells and still 10 times thinner than for current inorganic thin film cells. The low material consumption per area and the easy processing of organic semiconductors offer a huge potential for low cost large area solar cells. However, to compete with inorganic solar cells the efficiency of organic solar cells has to be improved by a factor of 2-3. Several organic semiconducting materials have been investigated so far, but the optimum material still has to be designed. Similar as for organic light emitting devices (OLED small molecules are competing with polymers to become the material of choice. After a general introduction into the device structures and operational principles of organic solar cells the three different basic types (all polymer based, all small molecules based and small molecules mixed with polymers are described in detail in this review. For each kind the current state of research is described and the best of class reported efficiencies are listed.

  20. Industrial n-type solar cells with >20% cell efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romijn, I.G.; Anker, J.; Burgers, A.R.; Gutjahr, A.; Koppes, M.; Kossen, E.J.; Lamers, M.W.P.E.; Heurtault, Benoit; Saynova-Oosterling, D.S.; Tool, C.J.J. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15

    To realize high efficiencies at low costs, ECN has developed the n-Pasha solar cell concept. The n-Pasha cell concept is a bifacial solar cell concept on n-Cz base material, with which average efficiencies of above 20% have been demonstrated. In this paper recent developments at ECN to improve the cost of ownership (lower Euro/Wp) of the n-Pasha cell concept are discussed. Two main drivers for the manufacturing costs of n-type solar cells are addressed: the n-type Cz silicon material and the silver consumption. We show that a large resistivity range between 2 and 8 cm can be tolerated for high cell efficiency, and that the costs due to the silver metallization can be significantly reduced while increasing the solar cell efficiency. Combining the improved efficiency and cost reduction makes the n-Pasha cell concept a very cost effective solution to manufacture high efficient solar cells and modules.

  1. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    In the past decade, research on organic solar cells has gone through an important development stage leading to major enhancements in power conversion efficiency, from 4% to 9% in single-junction devices. During this period, there are many novel processing techniques and device designs that have been proposed and adapted in organic solar-cell devices. One well-known device architecture that helps maximize the solar cell efficiency is the multi-junction tandem solar-cell design. Given this design, multiple photoactive absorbers as subcells are stacked in a monolithic fashion and assembled via series connection into one complete device, known as the tandem solar cell. Since multiple absorbers with different optical energy bandgaps are being applied in one tandem solar-cell device, the corresponding solar cell efficiency is maximized through expanded absorption spectrum and reduced carrier thermalization loss. In Chapter 3, the architecture of solution-processible, visibly transparent solar cells is introduced. Unlike conventional organic solar-cell devices with opaque electrodes (such as silver, aluminum, gold and etc.), the semi-transparent solar cells rely on highly transparent electrodes and visibly transparent photoactive absorbers. Given these two criteria, we first demonstrated the visibly transparent single-junction solar cells via the polymer absorber with near-infrared absorption and the top electrode based on solution-processible silver nanowire conductor. The highest visible transparency (400 ˜ 700 nm) of 65% was achieved for the complete device structure. More importantly, power conversion efficiency of 4% was also demonstrated. In Chapter 4, we stacked two semi-transparent photoactive absorbers in the tandem architecture in order to realize the semi-transparent tandem solar cells. A noticeable performance improvement from 4% to 7% was observed. More importantly, we modified the interconnecting layers with the incorporation of a thin conjugated

  2. 77 FR 73018 - Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled Into Modules, From the People's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... telluride (CdTe), or copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS). Also excluded from the scope of this order are... International Trade Administration Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells, Whether or Not Assembled Into Modules... assembled into modules (``solar cells''), from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). In addition, the...

  3. Solar cell with silicon oxynitride dielectric layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Michael; Smith, David D

    2015-04-28

    Solar cells with silicon oxynitride dielectric layers and methods of forming silicon oxynitride dielectric layers for solar cell fabrication are described. For example, an emitter region of a solar cell includes a portion of a substrate having a back surface opposite a light receiving surface. A silicon oxynitride (SiO.sub.xN.sub.y, 0

  4. Scaling Up ITO-free solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galagan, Yulia; Coenen, Erica W. C.; Zimmermann, Birger

    2014-01-01

    resistances. The performance of ITO-free organic solar cells with different dimensions and different electrode resistances are evaluated for different light intensities. The current generation and electric potential distribution are found to not be uniformly distributed in large-area devices at simulated 1......Indium-tin-oxide-free (ITO-free) polymer solar cells with composite electrodes containing current-collecting grids and a semitransparent poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conductor are demonstrated. The up-scaling of the length of the solar cell from 1 to 6 cm...... Sun illumination. The generated current uniformity increases with decreasing light intensities....

  5. Solar Cell Production using UMG Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovel, Harold; Prettyman, Kevin

    2009-09-21

    Materials studies and solar cells made from various blends of UMG Si are compared with reference solar (PV) grade in terms of efficiencies, voltages, currents, diffusion lengths, minority carrier lifetimes and compositions. The UMG material used in this study performed unexpectedly well when used in cells manufactured both in a lab environment and on a commercial PV line. The limited number of cells of each composition does not support a full statistical analysis. However in comparing solar efficiencies, it is clear that a relatively minor delta exists between UMG blends and the particular PV grade material used in this study. That delta is between zero and 0.5 percentage points.

  6. Recent Advances in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Mehmood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is an abundant and accessible source of renewable energy available on earth, and many types of photovoltaic (PV devices like organic, inorganic, and hybrid cells have been developed to harness the energy. PV cells directly convert solar radiation into electricity without affecting the environment. Although silicon based solar cells (inorganic cells are widely used because of their high efficiency, they are rigid and manufacturing costs are high. Researchers have focused on organic solar cells to overcome these disadvantages. DSSCs comprise a sensitized semiconductor (photoelectrode and a catalytic electrode (counter electrode with an electrolyte sandwiched between them and their efficiency depends on many factors. The maximum electrical conversion efficiency of DSSCs attained so far is 11.1%, which is still low for commercial applications. This review examines the working principle, factors affecting the efficiency, and key challenges facing DSSCs.

  7. Optical models for silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, T.; Sopori, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Light trapping is an important design feature for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Because light trapping can considerably enhance optical absorption, a thinner substrate can be used which, in turn, can lower the bulk carrier recombination and concommitantly increase open-circuit voltage, and fill factor of the cell. The basic concepts of light trapping are similar to that of excitation of an optical waveguide, where a prism or a grating structure increases the phase velocity of the incoming optical wave such that waves propagated within the waveguide are totally reflected at the interfaces. Unfortunately, these concepts break down because the entire solar cell is covered with such a structure, making it necessary to develop new analytical approaches to deal with incomplete light trapping in solar cells. This paper describes two models that analyze light trapping in thick and thin solar cells.

  8. Development and Prospect of Nanoarchitectured Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an overview of the development and prospect of nanotechnologies utilized in the solar cell applications. Even though it is not clearly pointed out, nanostructures indeed have been used in the fabrication of conventional solar cells for a long time. However, in those circumstances, only very limited benefits of nanostructures have been used to improve cell performance. During the last decade, the development of the photovoltaic device theory and nanofabrication technology enables studies of more complex nanostructured solar cells with higher conversion efficiency and lower production cost. The fundamental principles and important features of these advanced solar cell designs are systematically reviewed and summarized in this paper, with a focus on the function and role of nanostructures and the key factors affecting device performance. Among various nanostructures, special attention is given to those relying on quantum effect.

  9. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1982-12-28

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  10. Computer simulation of amorphous MIS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shousha, A.H.M.; El-Kosheiry, M.A. [Cairo University (Egypt). Electronics and Communications Engineering Dept.

    1997-10-01

    A computer model to simulate amorphous MIS solar cells is developed. The model is based on the self-consistent solution of the electron and hole continuity equations, together with the Poisson equation under proper boundary conditions. The program developed is used to investigate the cell performance characteristics in terms of its physical and structural parameters. The current-voltage characteristics of the solar cell are obtained under AMI solar illumination. The dependences of the short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage, fill factor and cell conversion efficiency on localized gap state density, carrier lifetime, cell thickness and surface recombination velocity are obtained and discussed. The results presented show how cell parameters can be varied to improve the cell performance characteristics. (Author)

  11. Solar cell anomaly detection method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Emmett L. (Inventor); Shumka, Alex (Inventor); Gauthier, Michael K. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting cracks and other imperfections in a solar cell, which includes scanning a narrow light beam back and forth across the cell in a raster pattern, while monitoring the electrical output of the cell to find locations where the electrical output varies significantly. The electrical output can be monitored on a television type screen containing a raster pattern with each point on the screen corresponding to a point on the solar cell surface, and with the brightness of each point on the screen corresponding to the electrical output from the cell which was produced when the light beam was at the corresponding point on the cell. The technique can be utilized to scan a large array of interconnected solar cells, to determine which ones are defective.

  12. Solar cell array design handbook, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    Twelve chapters discuss the following: historical developments, the environment and its effects, solar cells, solar cell filters and covers, solar cell and other electrical interconnections, blocking and shunt diodes, substrates and deployment mechanisms, material properties, design synthesis and optimization, design analysis, procurement, production and cost aspects, evaluation and test, orbital performance, and illustrative design examples. A comprehensive index permits rapid locating of desired topics. The handbook consists of two volumes: Volume 1 is of an expository nature while Volume 2 contains detailed design data in an appendix-like fashion. Volume 2 includes solar cell performance data, applicable unit conversion factors and physical constants, and mechanical, electrical, thermal optical, magnetic, and outgassing material properties. Extensive references are provided.

  13. Multijunction Ultralight Solar Cells and Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a continuing need within NASA for solar cells and arrays with very high specific power densities (1000-5000 kW/kg) for generating power in a new generation...

  14. Black Silicon Solar Cells with Black Ribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Tang, Peter Torben; Mizushima, Io

    2016-01-01

    We present the combination of mask-less reactive ion etch (RIE) texturing and blackened interconnecting ribbons as a method for obtaining all-black solar panels, while using conventional, front-contacted solar cells. Black silicon made by mask-less reactive ion etching has total, average...... in the range 15.7-16.3%. The KOH-textured reference cell had an efficiency of 17.9%. The combination of black Si and black interconnecting ribbons may result in aesthetic, all-black panels based on conventional, front-contacted silicon solar cells....... reflectance below 0.5% across a 156x156 mm2 silicon (Si) wafer. Black interconnecting ribbons were realized by oxidizing copper resulting in reflectance below 3% in the visible wavelength range. Screen-printed Si solar cells were realized on 156x156 mm2 black Si substrates with resulting efficiencies...

  15. High Efficiency, Deployable Solar Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultrathin, lightweight, flexible, and easily deployable solar cell (SC) capable of specific power greater than 1kW/kg are at an early stage of development for...

  16. Solar cell efficiency tables (version 50)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Martin A. [Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 Australia; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Research Center for Photovoltaics (RCPV), Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Ibaraki Tsukuba 305-8568 Japan; Warta, Wilhelm [Department: Characterisation and Simulation/CalLab Cells, Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstr. 2 Freiburg D-79110 Germany; Dunlop, Ewan D. [European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Directorate C-Energy, Transport and Climate, Via E. Fermi 2749 Ispra IT-21027 VA Italy; Levi, Dean H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Hohl-Ebinger, Jochen [Department: Characterisation and Simulation/CalLab Cells, Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstr. 2 Freiburg D-79110 Germany; Ho-Baillie, Anita W. H. [Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 Australia

    2017-06-21

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined, and new entries since January 2017 are reviewed.

  17. Singlet fission: Towards efficient solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlas, Zdeněk; Wen, Jin [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Michl, Josef [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-31

    Singlet fission (SF) offers an opportunity to improve solar cell efficiency, but its practical use is hindered by the limited number of known efficient materials, limited knowledge of SF mechanism, mainly the relation between the dimer structure and SF efficiency and diffusion of the triplet states allowing injection of electrons into the solar cell semiconductor band. Here we report on our attempt to design new classes of chromophores and to study the relation between the structure and SF efficiency.

  18. Investigating dye-sensitised solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Laura L.; O'Reilly, Thomas; Zerulla, Dominic; Sheridan, John T.

    2010-05-01

    At present there is considerable global concern in relation to environmental issues and future energy supplies, for instance climate change (global warming) and the rapid depletion of fossil fuel resources. This trepidation has initiated a more critical investigation into alternative and renewable sources of power such as geothermal, biomass, hydropower, wind and solar energy. The immense dependence on electrical power in today's society has prompted the manufacturing of devices such as photovoltaic (PV) cells to help alleviate and replace current electrical demands of the power grid. The most popular and commercially available PV cells are silicon solar cells which have to date the greatest efficiencies for PV cells. The drawback however is that the manufacturing of these cells is complex and costly due to the expense and difficulty of producing and processing pure silicon. One relatively inexpensive alternative to silicon PV cells that we are currently studying are dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC or Grätzel Cells). DSSC are biomimetic solar cells which are based on the process of photosynthesis. The SFI Strategic Research Centre for Solar Energy Conversion is a research cluster based in Ireland formed with the express intention of bringing together industry and academia to produce renewable energy solutions. Our specific research area is in DSSC and their electrical properties. We are currently developing testing equipment for arrays of DSSC and developing optoelectronic models which todescribe the performance and behaviour of DSSCs.

  19. Perovskite solar cells: from materials to devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-01-07

    Perovskite solar cells based on organometal halide light absorbers have been considered a promising photovoltaic technology due to their superb power conversion efficiency (PCE) along with very low material costs. Since the first report on a long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, a PCE as high as 19.3% was demonstrated in 2014, and a certified PCE of 17.9% was shown in 2014. Such a high photovoltaic performance is attributed to optically high absorption characteristics and balanced charge transport properties with long diffusion lengths. Nevertheless, there are lots of puzzles to unravel the basis for such high photovoltaic performances. The working principle of perovskite solar cells has not been well established by far, which is the most important thing for understanding perovksite solar cells. In this review, basic fundamentals of perovskite materials including opto-electronic and dielectric properties are described to give a better understanding and insight into high-performing perovskite solar cells. In addition, various fabrication techniques and device structures are described toward the further improvement of perovskite solar cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Perovskite Solar Cells: Progress and Advancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar Elumalai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Organic–inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs have emerged as a new class of optoelectronic semiconductors that revolutionized the photovoltaic research in the recent years. The perovskite solar cells present numerous advantages include unique electronic structure, bandgap tunability, superior charge transport properties, facile processing, and low cost. Perovskite solar cells have demonstrated unprecedented progress in efficiency and its architecture evolved over the period of the last 5–6 years, achieving a high power conversion efficiency of about 22% in 2016, serving as a promising candidate with the potential to replace the existing commercial PV technologies. This review discusses the progress of perovskite solar cells focusing on aspects such as superior electronic properties and unique features of halide perovskite materials compared to that of conventional light absorbing semiconductors. The review also presents a brief overview of device architectures, fabrication methods, and interface engineering of perovskite solar cells. The last part of the review elaborates on the major challenges such as hysteresis and stability issues in perovskite solar cells that serve as a bottleneck for successful commercialization of this promising PV technology.

  1. In-situ X-ray Nanocharacterization of Defect Kinetics in Chalcogenide Solar Cell Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoni, Mariana [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Lai, Barry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Masser, Jorg [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Buonassisi, Tonio [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-09-21

    For decades the optimization of polycrystalline absorbers has been done using an Edisonian approach, where trial and error and complex design of experiments in large parameter spaces have driven efficiencies to the record values we see today – CIGS at 22.5%, 22.1% for CdTe, 21.3% for high purity multi-crystalline silicon. Appropriate growth parameters are critical to ensure good quality crystals with low concentration of structural defects - low dislocation density and large grain sizes. However, to bridge the gap between the efficiencies today and the fundamental Shockley-Queisser limit for these materials a much more fundamental understanding of the role and interaction between composition, structure, defect density and electrical properties is required. In recent years multiple novel characterization techniques have shown the potential that nanoscale characterization can have in deciphering the composition of grain boundaries in materials like CIGS and CdTe. However, high resolution has come at the cost of small sampling areas and number of specimens, making it extremely difficult to draw conclusions based on the characteristic small sampling sizes. The missing links thus far have been: (1) the lack of statistical meaningfulness of the nanosclae studies and (2) the direct correlation of compositional variations to electrical performance with nanoscale resolution. In this work we present the use of synchrotron-based nano-X-ray fluorescence microscopy (nano-XRF), x-ray absorption nanospectroscopy (nano-XAS) coupled with nano-x-ray beam induced current (nano-XBIC) as ideal tools for investigating elemental, chemical and electrical properties of large areas of solar cell materials at the sub-micron scale with very high sensitivity. We show how the technique can provide statistical valuable information regarding the elemental segregation in CIGS and the direct correlation to current collection. For example, we demonstrate that Cu and Ga (and with that, CGI and GGI

  2. Photovoltaic manufacturing cost and throughput improvements for thin-film CIGS-based modules: Phase 1 technical report, July 1998--July 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedeman, S.; Wendt, R.G.

    2000-03-01

    The primary objectives of the Global Solar Energy (GSE) Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are directed toward reducing cost and expanding the production rate of thin-film CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS)-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. In Phase 1, GSE has successfully attacked many of the highest risk aspects of each task. All-laser, selective scribing processes for CIGS have been developed, and many end-of-contract goals for scribing speed have been exceeded in the first year. High-speed ink-jet deposition of insulating material in the scribes now appears to be a viable technique, again exceeding some end-of-contract goals in the first year. Absorber deposition of CIGS was reduced corresponding to throughput speeds of up to 24-in/min, also exceeding an end-of-contract goal. Alternate back-contact materials have been identified that show potential as candidates for replacement of higher-cost molybdenum, and a novel, real-time monitoring technique (parallel-detector spectroscopic ellipsometry) has shown remarkable sensitivity to relevant properties of the CIGS absorber layer for use as a diagnostic tool. Currently, one of the bilayers has been baselined by GSE for flexible CIGS on polymeric substrates. Resultant back-contacts meet sheet-resistance goals and exhibit much less intrinsic stress than Mo. CIGS has been deposited, and resultant devices are comparable in performance to pure Mo back-contacts. Debris in the chamber has been substantially reduced, allowing longer roll-length between system cleaning.

  3. Experimental advances in the next generation of solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Martí Vega, Antonio; Luque López, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We consider next generation solar cells concepts those that have the potential to exceed the limiting efficiency calculated by Shockley and Queisser for single gap solar cells (40.7 %) and still have not been commercialized. Among these concepts, this paper deals with the multiple exciton generation (or impact ionization or multiple carrier generation) solar cell, the intermediate band solar cell and the hot carrier solar cell. These concepts were proposed theoretically more than ten yea...

  4. HYBRID FUEL CELL-SOLAR CELL SPACE POWER SUBSYSTEM CAPABILITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report outlines the capabilities and limitations of a hybrid solar cell- fuel cell space power subsystem by comparing the proposed hybrid system...to conventional power subsystem devices. The comparisons are based on projected 1968 capability in the areas of primary and secondary battery, fuel ... cell , solar cell, and chemical dynamic power subsystems. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the relative merits of a hybrid power

  5. Overview and Challenges of Thin Film Solar Electric Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullal, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we report on the significant progress made worldwide by thin-film solar cells, namely, amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technology status is also discussed in detail. In addition, R&D and technology challenges in all three areas are elucidated. The worldwide estimated projection for thin-film PV technology production capacity announcements are estimated at more than 5000 MW by 2010.

  6. Ecofriendly and Nonvacuum Electrostatic Spray-Assisted Vapor Deposition of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 Thin Film Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Anower; Wang, Mingqing; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2015-10-14

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGSSe) thin films have been deposited by a novel, nonvacuum, and cost-effective electrostatic spray-assisted vapor deposition (ESAVD) method. The generation of a fine aerosol of precursor solution, and their controlled deposition onto a molybdenum substrate, results in adherent, dense, and uniform Cu(In,Ga)S2 (CIGS) films. This is an essential tool to keep the interfacial area of thin film solar cells to a minimum value for efficient charge separation as it helps to achieve the desired surface smoothness uniformity for subsequent cadmium sulfide and window layer deposition. This nonvacuum aerosol based approach for making the CIGSSe film uses environmentally benign precursor solution, and it is cheaper for producing solar cells than that of the vacuum-based thin film solar technology. An optimized CIGSSe thin film solar cell with a device configuration of molybdenum-coated soda-lime glass substrate/CIGSSe/CdS/i-ZnO/AZO shows the photovoltaic (j-V) characteristics of Voc=0.518 V, jsc=28.79 mA cm(-2), fill factor=64.02%, and a promising power conversion efficiency of η=9.55% under simulated AM 1.5 100 mW cm(-2) illuminations, without the use of an antireflection layer. This demonstrates the potential of ESAVD deposition as a promising alternative approach for making thin film CIGSSe solar cells at a lower cost.

  7. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of thin-film solar cells using solar cell local characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J.-M.; Carstensen, J.; Schütt, A.; Föll, H.

    2013-02-01

    The light-beam-induced current-based CELLO measurement technique (solar CELl LOcal characterization), originally developed for wafer-based silicon solar cells, can successfully be applied to thin-film solar cells, provided that contacting of a single cell is possible. This is shown exemplarily for several crystalline silicon on glass samples, having varying quality with respect to photocurrent extraction, series resistance, and power losses. For the latter, a comparison with results obtained from dark lock-in thermography gives quantitative agreement, provided that the cells are not severely shunted.

  8. Origin of Open-Circuit Voltage Loss in Polymer Solar Cells and Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Do; Yanagawa, Nayu; Shimazaki, Ai; Endo, Masaru; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Ohkita, Hideo; Benten, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2017-06-14

    Herein, the open-circuit voltage (V OC ) loss in both polymer solar cells and perovskite solar cells is quantitatively analyzed by measuring the temperature dependence of V OC to discuss the difference in the primary loss mechanism of V OC between them. As a result, the photon energy loss for polymer solar cells is in the range of about 0.7-1.4 eV, which is ascribed to temperature-independent and -dependent loss mechanisms, while that for perovskite solar cells is as small as about 0.5 eV, which is ascribed to a temperature-dependent loss mechanism. This difference is attributed to the different charge generation and recombination mechanisms between the two devices. The potential strategies for the improvement of V OC in both solar cells are further discussed on the basis of the experimental data.

  9. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K.

  10. Semi-transparent polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gómez, Pablo; Pastorelli, Francesco; Mantilla-Pérez, Paola; Mariano, Marina; Martínez-Otero, Alberto; Elias, Xavier; Betancur, Rafael; Martorell, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades, progress in the organic photovoltaic field has resulted in some device features which make organic cells applicable in electricity generation configurations where the standard silicon-based technology is not suitable, for instance, when a semi-transparent photovoltaic panel is needed. When the thin film solar cell performance is evaluated in terms of the device's visible transparency and power conversion efficiency, organic solar cells offer the most promising solution. During the last three years, research in the field has consolidated several approaches for the fabrication of high performance semi-transparent organic solar cells. We have grouped these approaches under three categories: devices where the absorber layer includes near-infrared absorption polymers, devices incorporating one-dimensional photonic crystals, and devices with a metal cavity light trapping configuration. We herein review these approaches.

  11. Amorphous silicon crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, Wolfgang Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells deals with some typical properties of heterojunction solar cells, such as their history, the properties and the challenges of the cells, some important measurement tools, some simulation programs and a brief survey of the state of the art, aiming to provide an initial framework in this field and serve as a ready reference for all those interested in the subject. This book helps to "fill in the blanks" on heterojunction solar cells. Readers will receive a comprehensive overview of the principles, structures, processing techniques and the current developmental states of the devices. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang R. Fahrner is a professor at the University of Hagen, Germany and Nanchang University, China.

  12. Organic solar cells fundamentals, devices, and upscaling

    CERN Document Server

    Rand, Barry P

    2014-01-01

    Solution-Processed DonorsB. Burkhart, B. C. ThompsonSmall-Molecule and Vapor-Deposited Organic Photovoltaics R. R. Lunt, R. J. HolmesAcceptor Materials for Solution-Processed Solar Cells Y. HeInterfacial Layers R. Po, C. Carbonera, A. BernardiElectrodes in Organic Photovoltaic Cells S. Yoo, J.-Y. Lee, H. Kim, J. LeeTandem and Multi-Junction Organic Solar Cells J. Gilot, R. A. J. JanssenBulk Heterojunction Morphology Control and Characterization T. Wang, D. G. LidzeyOptical Modeling and Light Management

  13. Polymer-Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Deibel, Carsten; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Organic solar cells have the potential to be low-cost and efficient solar energy converters, with a promising energy balance. They are made from carbon-based semiconductors, which exhibit favourable light absorption and charge generation properties, and can be manufactured by low temperature processes such as printing from solvent-based inks, which are compatible with flexible plastic substrates or even paper. In this review, we will present an overview of the physical function of organic sol...

  14. Microbial solar cells: applying photosynthetic and electrochemically active organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Timmers, R.A.; Helder, M.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial solar cells (MSCs) are recently developed technologies that utilize solar energy to produce electricity or chemicals. MSCs use photoautotrophic microorganisms or higher plants to harvest solar energy, and use electrochemically active microorganisms in the bioelectrochemical system to

  15. Solar destillation cell with microporous membrane connect to solar heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odicino, L.A.; Marchese, J. [Univ. Nacional de San Luis, Lab. de Energia Solar y Lab. de Cs. de Superficie y Medios Porosos Chacabuco y Pedernera, San Luis (Argentina); Lesino, G. [Univ. Nacional de Salta, INENCO, Salta (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    In earlier papers [Odicino,Eurosun 1998,1999] we presented the results of a system of distillation through microporous membranes, where this process is driven by temperature differences between the two sides of the membrane. In the former experiments the system was thermostatified in order to produce the temperature differences necessary for the function of the distillation cell, and it allowed us to effect the experimental determinations that conduce to the knowledge of the behavior of the cell and in particular the membrane as a function of the variation of parameters such as feeding flux, concentration, and temperature gradient. For these experiences the difference of temperature is given by a solar heater, which provides the necessary energy and at a cost the sufficiently low thing as to make the process of distillation economically viable. Two identic cells were constructed that were connected in series in a solar heater, inserting them between the collectors exit duct and the flux that goes to the storing tank, as this is the region of maximum temperature in the system. We find a relation among the efficiency {eta} of a solar heather and the permeado flow through the membrane. (au)

  16. Dye-sensitised solar cell (artificial photosynthesis)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Roux, Lukas J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available is the nano- crystalline TiO2dye- sensitised solar cell (DSC), in conjunction with several new concepts, such as nanotechnology and molecular devices. An efficient and low-cost cell can be produced by using simple materials. The production process generates...

  17. Walking-Beam Solar-Cell Conveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, H.; Frasch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Microprocessor-controlled walking-beam conveyor moves cells between work stations in automated assembly line. Conveyor has arm at each work station. In unison arms pick up all solar cells and advance them one station; then beam retracks to be in position for next step. Microprocessor sets beam stroke, speed, and position.

  18. Neutral Color Semitransparent Microstructured Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Eperon, Giles E.

    2014-01-28

    Neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are commercially desired to integrate solar cells into the windows and cladding of buildings and automotive applications. Here, we report the use of morphological control of perovskite thin films to form semitransparent planar heterojunction solar cells with neutral color and comparatively high efficiencies. We take advantage of spontaneous dewetting to create microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands", on a length-scale small enough to appear continuous to the eye yet large enough to enable unattenuated transmission of light between the islands. The islands are thick enough to absorb most visible light, and the combination of completely absorbing and completely transparent regions results in neutral transmission of light. Using these films, we fabricate thin-film solar cells with respectable power conversion efficiencies. Remarkably, we find that such discontinuous films still have good rectification behavior and relatively high open-circuit voltages due to the inherent rectification between the n- and p-type charge collection layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ease of "color-tinting" such microstructured perovksite solar cells with no reduction in performance, by incorporation of a dye within the hole transport medium. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. Light-trapping in perovskite solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Guo Du

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We numerically demonstrate enhanced light harvesting efficiency in both CH3NH3PbI3 and CH(NH22PbI3-based perovskite solar cells using inverted vertical-cone photonic-crystal nanostructures. For CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells, the maximum achievable photocurrent density (MAPD reaches 25.1 mA/cm2, corresponding to 92% of the total available photocurrent in the absorption range of 300 nm to 800 nm. Our cell shows 6% absorption enhancement compared to the Lambertian limit (23.7 mA/cm2 and has a projected power conversion efficiency of 12.9%. Excellent solar absorption is numerically demonstrated over a broad angular range from 0 to 60 degree for both S- and P- polarizations. For the corresponding CH(NH22PbI3 based perovskite solar cell, with absorption range of 300 nm to 850 nm, we find a MAPD of 29.1 mA/cm2, corresponding to 95.4% of the total available photocurrent. The projected power conversion efficiency of the CH(NH22PbI3 based photonic crystal solar cell is 23.4%, well above the current world record efficiency of 20.1%.

  20. Light-trapping in perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Qing Guo, E-mail: duqi0001@e.ntu.edu.sg [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 ST. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A7 (Canada); Institute of High Performance Computing, A* STAR, Singapore, 138632 (Singapore); Shen, Guansheng [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 ST. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A7 (Canada); School of Information and Communication Engineering, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); John, Sajeev [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 ST. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A7 (Canada); Department of Physics, Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2016-06-15

    We numerically demonstrate enhanced light harvesting efficiency in both CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} and CH(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}PbI{sub 3}-based perovskite solar cells using inverted vertical-cone photonic-crystal nanostructures. For CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cells, the maximum achievable photocurrent density (MAPD) reaches 25.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, corresponding to 92% of the total available photocurrent in the absorption range of 300 nm to 800 nm. Our cell shows 6% absorption enhancement compared to the Lambertian limit (23.7 mA/cm{sup 2}) and has a projected power conversion efficiency of 12.9%. Excellent solar absorption is numerically demonstrated over a broad angular range from 0 to 60 degree for both S- and P- polarizations. For the corresponding CH(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}PbI{sub 3} based perovskite solar cell, with absorption range of 300 nm to 850 nm, we find a MAPD of 29.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, corresponding to 95.4% of the total available photocurrent. The projected power conversion efficiency of the CH(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}PbI{sub 3} based photonic crystal solar cell is 23.4%, well above the current world record efficiency of 20.1%.

  1. Fruit based Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, M. C.; Sipaut, C. S.; Dayou, J.; Liow, K. S.; Kulip, J.; Mansa, R. F.

    2017-07-01

    Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) was first discovered in 1991 by O’regan and Gratzel. This new type of solar cell was reported to have lower production cost with efficiency as high as 12% which is comparable to conventional silicon solar cell. Initially, it uses ruthenium dye as light sensitizer for the operation. However, DSSC with ruthenium dyes are facing environment friendly issues due to the toxic chemicals and costly purification in processing ruthenium dye. Regardless of the poor performance in DSSC, natural dyes which are easy to prepare, cheap and environmental friendly still appear to be an alternative as dye sensitizer. In this study, dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated using anthocyanin source dyes extracted from several local fruits. All the extracts absorb a wide range of the visible light and ultraviolet spectrum. Therefore, all of the natural dyes show light absorption properties which is important for a dye sensitizer. A DSSC is comprised of conductive substrate, nanoporous semiconductor TiO2 layer, dye sensitizer, electrolyte with redox couple and a counter electrode with catalyst. In this study, the effect of different light source and different counter electrode are been investigated. However, it is vital to know that further research need to do more on the locally Borneo sourced dyes to evaluate and enhance their performance in Dye Sensitized Solar Cell.

  2. Space Radiation Effect on Si Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Jin Lee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High energy charged particles are trapped by geomagnetic field in the region named Van Allen Belt. These particles can move to low altitude along magnetic field and threaten even low altitude spacecraft. Space Radiation can cause equipment failures and on occasions can even destroy operations of satellites in orbit. Sun sensors aboard Science and Technology Satellite (STSAT-1 was designed to detect sun light with silicon solar cells which performance was degraded during satellite operation. In this study, we try to identify which particle contribute to the solar cell degradation with ground based radiation facilities. We measured the short circuit current after bombarding electrons and protons on the solar cells same as STSAT-1 sun sensors. Also we estimated particle flux on the STSAT-1 orbit with analyzing NOAA POES particle data. Our result clearly shows STSAT-1 solar cell degradation was caused by energetic protons which energy is about 700 keV to 1.5 MeV. Our result can be applied to estimate solar cell conditions of other satellites.

  3. Doctor Blade-Coated Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cho, Nam Chul

    2016-10-25

    In this work, we report polymer solar cells based on blade-coated P3HT:PC71BM and PBDTTT-EFT:PC71BM bulk heterojunction photoactive layers. Enhanced power conversion efficiency of 2.75 (conventional structure) and 3.03% (inverted structure) with improved reproducibility was obtained from blade-coated P3HT:PC71BM solar cells, compared to spin-coated ones. Furthermore, by demonstrating 3.10% efficiency flexible solar cells using blade-coated PBDTTT-EFT:PC71BM films on the plastic substrates, we suggest the potential applicability of blade coating technique to the high throughput roll-to-roll fabrication systems.

  4. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  5. Stability Issues on Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Organo lead halide perovskite materials like methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3 and formamidinium lead iodide (HC(NH22PbI3 show superb opto-electronic properties. Based on these perovskite light absorbers, power conversion efficiencies of the perovskite solar cells employing hole transporting layers have increased from 9.7% to 20.1% within just three years. Thus, it is apparent that perovskite solar cell is a promising next generation photovoltaic technology. However, the unstable nature of perovskite was observed when exposing it to continuous illumination, moisture and high temperature, impeding the commercial development in the long run and thus becoming the main issue that needs to be solved urgently. Here, we discuss the factors affecting instability of perovskite and give some perspectives about further enhancement of stability of perovskite solar cell.

  6. Perovskite Solar Cells: Potentials, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heralded as a major scientific breakthrough of 2013, organic/inorganic lead halide perovskite solar cells have ushered in a new era of renewed efforts at increasing the efficiency and lowering the cost of solar energy. As a potential game changer in the mix of technologies for alternate energy, it has emerged from a modest beginning in 2012 to efficiencies being claimed at 20.1% in a span of just two years. This remarkable progress, encouraging at one end, also points to the possibility that the potential may still be far from being fully realized. With greater insight into the photophysics involved and optimization of materials and methods, this technology stands to match or even exceed the efficiencies for single crystal silicon solar cells. With thin film solution processability, applicability to flexible substrates, and being free of liquid electrolyte, this technology combines the benefits of Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs, Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs, and thin film solar cells. In this review we present a brief historic perspective to this development, take a cognizance of the current state of the art, and highlight challenges and the opportunities.

  7. Method of fabricating a solar cell array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzery, Angelo G.; Crouthamel, Marvin S.; Coyle, Peter J.

    1982-01-01

    A first set of pre-tabbed solar cells are assembled in a predetermined array with at least part of each tab facing upward, each tab being fixed to a bonding pad on one cell and abutting a bonding pad on an adjacent cell. The cells are held in place with a first vacuum support. The array is then inverted onto a second vacuum support which holds the tabs firmly against the cell pads they abut. The cells are exposed to radiation to melt and reflow the solder pads for bonding the tab portions not already fixed to bonding pads to these pads.

  8. Questionable effects of antireflective coatings on inefficiently cooled solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhmatov, Vladislav; Galster, Georg; Larsen, Esben

    1998-01-01

    A model for temperature effects in p-n junction solar cells is introduced. The temperature of solar cells and the losses in the solar cell junction region caused by elevating temperature are discussed. The model developed is examined for low-cost silicon solar cells. In order to improve the shape...... of the output power and efficiency curves throughout the day the coherence between technical parameters of the solar cells and the climate in the operation region is observed and examined. It is shown how the drop in output power around noon can be avoided by fitting technical parameters of the solar cells...

  9. Kesterite Deposited by Spray Pyrolysis for Solar Cell Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Espindola Rodriguez, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells generate electrical power by direct conversion of solar radiation into electricity using semiconductors. Once produced, the solar cells do not require the use of water; operate in silence and can be easily installed almost everywhere, as solar panels with low technological risk. In this thesis new photovoltaic materials and solar cells are investigated. From the beginning of the semiconductor era, silicon has been present; the semiconductor theory improved with the silicon tec...

  10. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  11. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  12. Solar Cells Having a Nanostructured Antireflection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    An solar cell having a surface in a first material is provided, the optical device having a non-periodic nanostructure formed in the surface, the nanostructure comprising a plurality of cone -haped structures wherein the cones are distributed non-periodically on the surface and have a random height...... distribution, at least a part of the cone-shaped structures having a height of at least 100 nm. The first material may be SiC or GaN. A method of manufacturing a non-periodic nanostructured surface on a solar cell, is furthermore provided, the method comprising the steps of providing a surface comprising Si...

  13. Efficient upconversion systems for silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Löper, P.; Goldschmidt, J. C.; Peters, M.; Biner, D.; Krämer, K.; Schultz, O.; Glunz, S.W.; Luther, J.

    2007-01-01

    Frequency upconversion of sub-bandgap photons is one approach to push the efficiency limit of solar cells with one bandgap. A highly efficient upconversion system is Erbium doped NaYF4. In this paper we present photoluminescence studies on NaYF4 with 10%, 20% and 30% Erbium doping. We show experimental results of an upconversion system consisting of an upconverting powder on a bifacial silicon solar cell. The system has a quantum efficiency of 2.5·10-3% at 1520nm wavelength. We model the effi...

  14. Origami-enabled deformable silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Hai; Liang, Hanshuang; Liang, Mengbing [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong [Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, 5050 Anthony Wayne Dr., Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Song, Zeming; Jiang, Hanqing, E-mail: hanqing.jiang@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Yu, Hongyu, E-mail: hongyu.yu@asu.edu [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    Deformable electronics have found various applications and elastomeric materials have been widely used to reach flexibility and stretchability. In this Letter, we report an alternative approach to enable deformability through origami. In this approach, the deformability is achieved through folding and unfolding at the creases while the functional devices do not experience strain. We have demonstrated an example of origami-enabled silicon solar cells and showed that this solar cell can reach up to 644% areal compactness while maintaining reasonable good performance upon cyclic folding/unfolding. This approach opens an alternative direction of producing flexible, stretchable, and deformable electronics.

  15. Evaluation of solar cells for potential space satellite power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The evaluation focused on the following subjects: (1) the relative merits of alternative solar cell materials, based on performance and availability, (2) the best manufacturing methods for various solar cell options and the effects of extremely large production volumes on their ultimate costs and operational characteristics, (3) the areas of uncertainty in achieving large solar cell production volumes, (4) the effects of concentration ratios on solar array mass and system performance, (5) the factors influencing solar cell life in the radiation environment during transport to and in geosynchronous orbit, and (6) the merits of conducting solar cell manufacturing operations in space.

  16. Vaping cannabis (marijuana): parallel concerns to e-cigs?

    OpenAIRE

    Budney, Alan J.; Sargent, James D.; Lee, Dustin C.

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of vaporization (‘vaping’) as a method for administering cannabis raises many of the same public health issues being debated and investigated in relation to e-cigarettes (e-cigs). Good epidemiological data on the prevalence of vaping cannabis are not yet available, but with current trends towards societal approval of medicinal and recreational use of cannabis, the pros and cons of vaping cannabis warrant study. As with e-cigs, vaping cannabis portends putative health benefit...

  17. Solar-Cell Encapsulation by One-Step Lamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbolouki, M. N.

    1983-01-01

    Simple method of potting solar cells reduces encapsulating to one-step lamination process. Simplified process saves time and expense. Potting material is added to two inside faces of solar-cell assembly before they are sandwiched and cured.

  18. Electrical overstress failure in silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, R.L.; Barnum, J.R.; van Lint, V.A.J.; Vulliet, W.V.; Wrobel, T.F.

    1982-11-01

    A solar-cell electrical-overstress-failure model and the results of experimental measurements of threshold pulsed failure currents on four types of silicon solar cells are presented. The transient EMP field surrounding a lightning stroke has been identified as a potential threat to a photovoltaic array, yet failure analysis of solar cells in a pulsed environment had not previously been reported. Failure in the low-resistivity concentrator cells at pulse widths between 1 ..mu..s and 1 ms occurred initially in the junction. Finger damage in the form of silver melting occurs at currents only slightly greater than that required for junction damage. The result of reverse-bias transient-overstress tests on high-resistivity (10 ..cap omega..cm) cells demonstrated that the predominant failure mode was due to edge currents. These flat-plate cells failed at currents of only 4 to 20 A, which is one or two orders of magnitude below the model predictions. It thus appears that high-resistivity flat-plate cells are quite vulnerable to electrical overstress which could be produced by a variety of mechanisms.

  19. Phthalocyanine Blends Improve Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varotto, Alessandro; Nam, Chang-Yong; Radivojevic, Ivana; Tomé, Joao; Cavaleiro, José A.S.; Black, Charles T.; Drain, Charles Michael

    2010-01-01

    A core phthalocyanine platform allows engineering the solubility properties the band gap; shifting the maximum absorption toward the red. A simple method to increase the efficiency of heterojunction solar cells uses a self-organized blend of the phthalocyanine chromophores fabricated by solution processing. PMID:20136126

  20. Solar Cell Efficiency Tables (Version 51)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, Dean H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Green, Martin A. [University of New South Wales; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST); Dunlop, Ewan D. [European Commission-Joint Research Centre; Hohl-Ebinger, Jochen [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems; Ho-Baillie, Anita W. Y. [University of New South Wales

    2017-12-14

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined and new entries since July 2017 are reviewed, together with progress over the last 25 years. Appendices are included documenting area definitions and also listing recognised test centres.

  1. Fuel Cell / electrolyser, Solar Photovoltaic Powered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chioncel Cristian Paul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental obtained results in the operation ofelectrolyzer powered by solar photovoltaic modules, for the waterelectrolysis and with the obtained hydrogen and oxygen proceeds tothe operation in fuel cell mode, type PEM. The main operatingparameters and conditions to optimize the energy conversion on thesolar-hydrogen-electricity cycle are highlighted, so that those arecomparable or superior to conventional cycles.

  2. PHOTOELECTROCHEMICAL SOLAR CELLS BASED ON DYE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interfacial energetics [23], and altering the particle morphology [ 4,25,26]. According to the university. of Notre Dame and NASA demonstrations, the carbon nanotubes could help to make nanoparticle- based solar cells more efficient and practical. The present attained of 10% -11°/o energy conversion efficiency of DSC ...

  3. Solar cell power systems for space vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, N.W. (Inst. for Defense Analyses, Washington, DC); Karcher, R.W.

    1961-01-01

    On May 3 and 4, 1960, a symposium was held in Washington, DC, under the sponsorship of the Advanced Research Projects Agency by the Institute for Defense Analyses. Ten programs involving solar cell power systems for current US space vehicles conducted under government sponsorship were discussed by the project engineers who directed these programs. The results of that symposium are highlighted and summarized.

  4. Distributed series resistance effects in solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Drud

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical treatment is presented of the effects of one-dimensional distributed series resistance in solar cells. A general perturbation theory is developed, including consistently the induced spatial variation of diode current density and leading to a first-order equivalent lumped resistance...

  5. Hybrid Silicon Nanocone–Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Sangmoo

    2012-06-13

    Recently, hybrid Si/organic solar cells have been studied for low-cost Si photovoltaic devices because the Schottky junction between the Si and organic material can be formed by solution processes at a low temperature. In this study, we demonstrate a hybrid solar cell composed of Si nanocones and conductive polymer. The optimal nanocone structure with an aspect ratio (height/diameter of a nanocone) less than two allowed for conformal polymer surface coverage via spin-coating while also providing both excellent antireflection and light trapping properties. The uniform heterojunction over the nanocones with enhanced light absorption resulted in a power conversion efficiency above 11%. Based on our simulation study, the optimal nanocone structures for a 10 μm thick Si solar cell can achieve a short-circuit current density, up to 39.1 mA/cm 2, which is very close to the theoretical limit. With very thin material and inexpensive processing, hybrid Si nanocone/polymer solar cells are promising as an economically viable alternative energy solution. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Solar cell sheet. Taiyo denchi sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kazutomi; Nakatani, Kenji; Okaniwa, Hiroshi.

    1989-08-09

    This invention consists of a module sheet containing a thin film solar cell formed on a polymer film substrate, a cushioning sticky film layer and a protective film layer; thickness of module sheet is less than 1000 micron and its bending rigidity of 5 mm thick sample is less than 100 kg-mm {sup 2}. By this, the soalr cell can be wound and unwound in small roll of several cm level. This eliminates the internal wiring in the plural number of cells giving high durability of integrated amorphous solar cell against the repeated bending. The polymer film is films of PET, polysulphone, polyamide, with proper thickness of 30 - 300 micron. 2 figs.

  7. Diketopyrrolopyrrole Polymers for Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Hendriks, Koen H; Wienk, Martijn M; Janssen, René A J

    2016-01-19

    Conjugated polymers have been extensively studied for application in organic solar cells. In designing new polymers, particular attention has been given to tuning the absorption spectrum, molecular energy levels, crystallinity, and charge carrier mobility to enhance performance. As a result, the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of solar cells based on conjugated polymers as electron donor and fullerene derivatives as electron acceptor have exceeded 10% in single-junction and 11% in multijunction devices. Despite these efforts, it is notoriously difficult to establish thorough structure-property relationships that will be required to further optimize existing high-performance polymers to their intrinsic limits. In this Account, we highlight progress on the development and our understanding of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) based conjugated polymers for polymer solar cells. The DPP moiety is strongly electron withdrawing and its polar nature enhances the tendency of DPP-based polymers to crystallize. As a result, DPP-based conjugated polymers often exhibit an advantageously broad and tunable optical absorption, up to 1000 nm, and high mobilities for holes and electrons, which can result in high photocurrents and good fill factors in solar cells. Here we focus on the structural modifications applied to DPP polymers and rationalize and explain the relationships between chemical structure and organic photovoltaic performance. The DPP polymers can be tuned via their aromatic substituents, their alkyl side chains, and the nature of the π-conjugated segment linking the units along the polymer chain. We show that these building blocks work together in determining the molecular conformation, the optical properties, the charge carrier mobility, and the solubility of the polymer. We identify the latter as a decisive parameter for DPP-based organic solar cells because it regulates the diameter of the semicrystalline DPP polymer fibers that form in the photovoltaic blends with

  8. Defect engineering in solar cell manufacturing and thin film solar cell development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    During the last few years many defect engineering concepts were successfully applied to fabricate high efficiency silicon solar cells on low-cost substrates. Some of the research advances are described.

  9. How the relative permittivity of solar cell materials influences solar cell performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Huss-Hansen, Mathias K.; Hansen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    The relative permittivity of the materials constituting heterojunction solar cells is usually not considered as a design parameter when searching for novel combinations of heterojunction materials. In this work, we investigate the validity of such an approach. Specifically, we show the effect...... of the materials permittivity on the physics and performance of the solar cell by means of numerical simulation supported by analytical relations. We demonstrate that, depending on the specific solar cell configuration and materials properties, there are scenarios where the relative permittivity has a major...... the heterojunction partner has a high permittivity, solar cells are consistently more robust against several non-idealities that are especially likely to occur in early-stage development, when the device is not yet optimized....

  10. Solar cell efficiency tables (version 48): Solar cell efficiency tables (version 48)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Martin A. [Australian Centre for Advanced Photovoltaics, University of New South Wales, Sydney New South Wales 2052 Australia; Emery, Keith [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro [Research Center for Photovoltaics (RCPV), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1 Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-8568 Japan; Warta, Wilhelm [Characterisation and Simulation/CalLab Cells, Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstr. 2 D-79110 Freiburg Germany; Dunlop, Ewan D. [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Renewable Energy Unit, Institute for Energy, Via E. Fermi 2749 IT-21027 Ispra VA Italy

    2016-06-17

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined, and new entries since January 2016 are reviewed.

  11. Dual-Layer Nanostructured Flexible Thin-Film Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells with Enhanced Light Harvesting and Photoelectric Conversion Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yinyue; Xu, Zhen; Yu, Dongliang; Lu, Linfeng; Yin, Min; Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Hao, Yuying; Fan, Zhiyong; Cui, Yanxia; Li, Dongdong

    2016-05-04

    Three-dimensional (3-D) structures have triggered tremendous interest for thin-film solar cells since they can dramatically reduce the material usage and incident light reflection. However, the high aspect ratio feature of some 3-D structures leads to deterioration of internal electric field and carrier collection capability, which reduces device power conversion efficiency (PCE). Here, we report high performance flexible thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells with a unique and effective light trapping scheme. In this device structure, a polymer nanopillar membrane is attached on top of a device, which benefits broadband and omnidirectional performances, and a 3-D nanostructure with shallow dent arrays underneath serves as a back reflector on flexible titanium (Ti) foil resulting in an increased optical path length by exciting hybrid optical modes. The efficient light management results in 42.7% and 41.7% remarkable improvements of short-circuit current density and overall efficiency, respectively. Meanwhile, an excellent flexibility has been achieved as PCE remains 97.6% of the initial efficiency even after 10 000 bending cycles. This unique device structure can also be duplicated for other flexible photovoltaic devices based on different active materials such as CdTe, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), organohalide lead perovskites, and so forth.

  12. Si based nanostructures for solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Garozzo, Cristina Annamaria

    2011-01-01

    Photovoltaic technology has received increased attention as one of the most promising approach to carbon-free energy production. Bulk silicon cells, which convert between 14 and 17% of incident light into electricity, make up 90% of the solar cell market. Silicon is widely used because it is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust, and because the electronics industry has already developed infrastructure to process it. Yet the pricey and complicated manufacturing makes these pho...

  13. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Peter H [Glendale, CA; Brandt, Randolph J [Palmdale, CA

    2012-06-19

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  14. A Cost Roadmap for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwen, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375268456; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074628526; Schropp, Ruud; Faaij, A.

    Research and development of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells has seen a marked increase since the recent expiry of core patents describing SHJ technology. SHJ solar cells are expected to offer various cost benefits compared to conventional crystalline silicon solar cells. This paper analyses

  15. Review of Recent Progress in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Tai Kong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduced the structure and the principle of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC. The latest results about the critical technology and the industrialization research on dye-sensitized solar cells were reviewed. The development of key components, including nanoporous semiconductor films, dye sensitizers, redox electrolyte, counter electrode, and conducting substrate in dye-sensitized solar cells was reviewed in detail. The developing progress and prospect of dye-sensitized solar cells from small cells in the laboratory to industrialization large-scale production were reviewed. At last, the future development of DSC was prospective for the tendency of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  16. Assessing Rare Metal Availability Challenges for Solar Energy Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Grandell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is commonly seen as a future energy source with significant potential. Ruthenium, gallium, indium and several other rare elements are common and vital components of many solar energy technologies, including dye-sensitized solar cells, CIGS cells and various artificial photosynthesis approaches. This study surveys solar energy technologies and their reliance on rare metals such as indium, gallium, and ruthenium. Several of these rare materials do not occur as primary ores, and are found as byproducts associated with primary base metal ores. This will have an impact on future production trends and the availability for various applications. In addition, the geological reserves of many vital metals are scarce and severely limit the potential of certain solar energy technologies. It is the conclusion of this study that certain solar energy concepts are unrealistic in terms of achieving TW scales.

  17. Cost and Reliability Improvement for CIGS-Based PV on Flexible Substrate: May 24, 2006 -- July 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedeman, S.

    2011-05-01

    Global Solar Energy rapidly advances the cost and performance of commercial thin-film CIGS products using roll-to-roll processing on steel foil substrate in compact, low cost deposition equipment, with in-situ sensors for real-time intelligent process control. Substantial increases in power module efficiency, which now exceed 13%, are evident at GSE factories in two countries with a combined capacity greater than 75 MW. During 2009 the average efficiency of cell strings (3780 cm2) was increased from 7% to over 11%, with champion results exceeding 13% Continued testing of module reliability in rigid product has reaffirmed extended life expectancy for standard glass product, and has qualified additional lower-cost methods and materials. Expected lifetime for PV in flexible packages continues to increase as failure mechanisms are elucidated, and resolved by better methods and materials. Cost reduction has been achieved through better materials utilization, enhanced vendor and material qualification and selection. The largest cost gains have come as a result of higher cell conversion efficiency and yields, higher processing rates, greater automation and improved control in all process steps. These improvements are integral to this thin film PV partnership program, and all realized with the 'Gen2' manufacturing plants, processes and equipment.

  18. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Kehan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.

  19. TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatkowski, P. J.; Landis, D. A.

    2013-04-16

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT

  20. Solar Airplanes and Regenerative Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.

    2007-01-01

    A solar electric aircraft with the potential to "fly forever" has captured NASA's interest, and the concept for such an aircraft was pursued under Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Feasibility of this aircraft happens to depend on the successful development of solar power technologies critical to NASA's Exploration Initiatives; hence, there was widespread interest throughout NASA to bring these technologies to a flight demonstration. The most critical is an energy storage system to sustain mission power during night periods. For the solar airplane, whose flight capability is already limited by the diffuse nature of solar flux and subject to latitude and time of year constraints, the feasibility of long endurance flight depends on a storage density figure of merit better than 400-600 watt-hr per kilogram. This figure of merit is beyond the capability of present day storage technologies (other than nuclear) but may be achievable in the hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC). This potential has led NASA to undertake the practical development of a hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell, initially as solar energy storage for a high altitude UAV science platform but eventually to serve as the primary power source for NASAs lunar base and other planet surface installations. Potentially the highest storage capacity and lowest weight of any non-nuclear device, a flight-weight RFC aboard a solar-electric aircraft that is flown continuously through several successive day-night cycles will provide the most convincing demonstration that this technology's widespread potential has been realized. In 1998 NASA began development of a closed cycle hydrogen oxygen PEM RFC under the Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project and continued its development, originally for a solar electric airplane flight, through FY2005 under the Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) project. Construction of

  1. Nanoparticles and nanoimaging for organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Emil Bøje Lind

    Solar energy is one of the few energy sources with the potential to power humanity in a future scenario where fossil fuels are not attractive due to their effect on the global climate or fossil fuels have been depleted all together. Organic photovoltaics is a promising technology for solar...... in photoactive Landfester nanoparticles. The dispersed particles are characterized by size, internal structure and crystallinity. Crystal orientation and spatial distribution of materials are quantified for cast layers of Landfester particles. A layer of particles is also investigated in a tandem solar cell...... and results in decreased angular displacements and increased spatial resolution. Further development of the algorithm could therefore be used to increase spatial resolution for characterization of organic photovoltaics and computed tomography in general....

  2. Proton irradiation effects of amorphous silicon solar cell for solar power satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yousuke; Oshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sasaki, Susumu; Kuroda, Hideo; Ushirokawa, Akio

    1997-03-01

    Flexible amorphous silicon(fa-Si) solar cell module, a thin film type, is regarded as a realistic power generator for solar power satellite. The radiation resistance of fa-Si cells was investigated by the irradiations of 3,4 and 10 MeV protons. The hydrogen gas treatment of the irradiated fa-Si cells was also studied. The fa-Si cell shows high radiation resistance for proton irradiations, compared with a crystalline silicon solar cell. (author)

  3. High Aspect Ratio Semiconductor Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redwing, Joan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Material Science and Engineering; Mallouk, Tom [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Mayer, Theresa [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Dickey, Elizabeth [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Wronski, Chris [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2013-05-17

    The project focused on the development of high aspect ratio silicon heterojunction (HARSH) solar cells. The solar cells developed in this study consisted of high density vertical arrays of radial junction silicon microwires/pillars formed on Si substrates. Prior studies have demonstrated that vertical Si wire/pillar arrays enable reduced reflectivity and improved light trapping characteristics compared to planar solar cells. In addition, the radial junction structure offers the possibility of increased carrier collection in solar cells fabricated using material with short carrier diffusion lengths. However, the high junction and surface area of radial junction Si wire/pillar array devices can be problematic and lead to increased diode leakage and enhanced surface recombination. This study investigated the use of amorphous hydrogenated Si in the form of a heterojunction-intrinsic-thin layer (HIT) structure as a junction formation method for these devices. The HIT layer structure has widely been employed to reduce surface recombination in planar crystalline Si solar cells. Consequently, it was anticipated that it would also provide significant benefits to the performance of radial junction Si wire/pillar array devices. The overall goals of the project were to demonstrate a HARSH cell with a HIT-type structure in the radial junction Si wire/pillar array configuration and to develop potentially low cost pathways to fabricate these devices. Our studies demonstrated that the HIT structure lead to significant improvements in the open circuit voltage (Voc>0.5) of radial junction Si pillar array devices compared to devices fabricated using junctions formed by thermal diffusion or low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). In addition, our work experimentally demonstrated that the radial junction structure lead to improvements in efficiency compared to comparable planar devices for devices fabricated using heavily doped Si that had reduced carrier diffusion

  4. Semiconductor Nanocrystals as Light Harvesters in Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etgar, Lioz

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into electrical current and are regarded as a key technology for a sustainable energy supply. Quantum dot-based solar cells have shown great potential as next generation, high performance, low-cost photovoltaics due to the outstanding optoelectronic properties of quantum dots and their multiple exciton generation (MEG) capability. This review focuses on QDs as light harvesters in solar cells, including different structures of QD-based solar cells, such as QD heterojunction solar cells, QD-Schottky solar cells, QD-sensitized solar cells and the recent development in organic-inorganic perovskite heterojunction solar cells. Mechanisms, procedures, advantages, disadvantages and the latest results obtained in the field are described. To summarize, a future perspective is offered. PMID:28809318

  5. Semiconductor Nanocrystals as Light Harvesters in Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioz Etgar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into electrical current and are regarded as a key technology for a sustainable energy supply. Quantum dot-based solar cells have shown great potential as next generation, high performance, low-cost photovoltaics due to the outstanding optoelectronic properties of quantum dots and their multiple exciton generation (MEG capability. This review focuses on QDs as light harvesters in solar cells, including different structures of QD-based solar cells, such as QD heterojunction solar cells, QD-Schottky solar cells, QD-sensitized solar cells and the recent development in organic-inorganic perovskite heterojunction solar cells. Mechanisms, procedures, advantages, disadvantages and the latest results obtained in the field are described. To summarize, a future perspective is offered.

  6. Semiconductor Nanocrystals as Light Harvesters in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etgar, Lioz

    2013-02-04

    Photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into electrical current and are regarded as a key technology for a sustainable energy supply. Quantum dot-based solar cells have shown great potential as next generation, high performance, low-cost photovoltaics due to the outstanding optoelectronic properties of quantum dots and their multiple exciton generation (MEG) capability. This review focuses on QDs as light harvesters in solar cells, including different structures of QD-based solar cells, such as QD heterojunction solar cells, QD-Schottky solar cells, QD-sensitized solar cells and the recent development in organic-inorganic perovskite heterojunction solar cells. Mechanisms, procedures, advantages, disadvantages and the latest results obtained in the field are described. To summarize, a future perspective is offered.

  7. Rational Strategies for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jangwon; Noh, Jun Hong; Seok, Sang Il

    2016-03-15

    A long-standing dream in the large scale application of solar energy conversion is the fabrication of solar cells with high-efficiency and long-term stability at low cost. The realization of such practical goals depends on the architecture, process and key materials because solar cells are typically constructed from multilayer heterostructures of light harvesters, with electron and hole transporting layers as a major component. Recently, inorganic-organic hybrid lead halide perovskites have attracted significant attention as light absorbers for the fabrication of low-cost and high-efficiency solar cells via a solution process. This mainly stems from long-range ambipolar charge transport properties, low exciton binding energies, and suitable band gap tuning by managing the chemical composition. In our pioneering work, a new photovoltaic platform for efficient perovskite solar cells (PSCs) was proposed, which yielded a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12%. The platform consisted of a pillared architecture of a three-dimensional nanocomposite of perovskites fully infiltrating mesoporous TiO2, resulting in the formation of continuous phases and perovskite domains overlaid with a polymeric hole conductor. Since then, the PCE of our PSCs has been rapidly increased from 3% to over 20% certified efficiency. The unprecedented increase in the PCE can be attributed to the effective integration of the advantageous attributes of the refined bicontinuous architecture, deposition process, and composition of perovskite materials. Specifically, the bicontinuous architectures used in the high efficiency comprise a layer of perovskite sandwiched between mesoporous metal-oxide layer, which is a very thinner than that of used in conventional dye-sensitized solar cells, and hole-conducting contact materials with a metal back contact. The mesoporous scaffold can affect the hysteresis under different scan direction in measurements of PSCs. The hysteresis also greatly depends on

  8. Production technology for high efficiency ion implanted solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Minnucci, J. A.; Greenwald, A. C.; Josephs, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ion implantation is being developed for high volume automated production of silicon solar cells. An implanter designed for solar cell processing and able to properly implant up to 300 4-inch wafers per hour is now operational. A machine to implant 180 sq m/hr of solar cell material has been designed. Implanted silicon solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 16% AM1 are now being produced and higher efficiencies are expected. Ion implantation and transient processing by pulsed electron beams are being integrated with electrostatic bonding to accomplish a simple method for large scale, low cost production of high efficiency solar cell arrays.

  9. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  10. Interface engineering of Graphene-Silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dikai; Yu, Xuegong; Yang, Lifei; Yang, Deren

    2016-11-01

    Graphene has attracted great research interests due to its unique mechanical, electrical and optical properties, which opens up a huge number of opportunities for applications. Recently, Graphene-Silicon (Grsbnd Si) solar cell has been recognized as one interesting candidate for the future photovoltaic. Since the first Grsbnd Si solar cell reported in 2010, Grsbnd Si solar cell has been intensively investigated and the power converse efficiency (PCE) of it has been developed to 15.6%. This review presents and discusses current development of Grsbnd Si solar cell. Firstly, the basic concept and mechanism of Grsbnd Si solar cell are introduced. Then, several key technologies are introduced to improve the performance of Grsbnd Si solar cells, such as chemical doping, annealing, Si surface passivation and interlayer insertion. Particular emphasis is placed on strategies for Grsbnd Si interface engineering. Finally, new pathways and opportunities of "MIS-like structure" Grsbnd Si solar cells are described.

  11. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF A SOLAR CELL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    ; and estimating variations in the solar cell, thereby electrically characterizing the solar cell. The disclosure further relates to a solar cell characterization apparatus for characterization of a solar cell, comprising: a light source for generating an optical probe light; a modulation unit, configured......The present disclosure relates to a method for characterization of a solar cell, comprising the steps of: providing an optical probe light; modulating the optical probe light with a modulation frequency of between 100 kHz and 50 MHz, thereby obtaining a modulated probe light; scanning the modulated...... probe light such that said modulated probe light is incident on at least a part of the surface of the solar cell, and such that the part of the solar cell exposed to the modulated probe light converts the modulated probe light to an electrical signal; detecting and analyzing said electrical signal...

  12. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Cui, Hui-Juan; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells. PMID:26733112

  13. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  14. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Cui, Hui-Juan; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  15. Low-Stress interconnection of solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, I.J.; De Jong, P.C.; Kloos, M.J.H.; Stam, C.N.J. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Henckens, A.; Schuermans, J. [Emerson and Cuming, Nijverheidstraat 7, 2260 Westerlo (Belgium); Gomez, R.J. [BP Solar Spain, P. I. Tres Cantos, Zona Oeste, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Friera, P.; Lalaguna, B. [Isofoton, C/ Severo Ochoa 50, PTA, 29590 Malaga (Spain); Schmidt, H. [Solar World Industries Deutschland GmbH, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    The suitability of a snap-curable acrylic-based conductive adhesive as a low-stress interconnection for thin solar cells was studied. Modules were manufactured using the conductive adhesive with industrial thin crystalline silicon solar cells. The best results were obtained for an adhesive with a high silver filler content. The adhesive resulted in a similar peel strength to a soldered interconnection. Although the contact resistance of the adhesive is much higher than for solder, it does not affect the module output power. Degradation in fill factor of only 2 % was measured after 1000 thermal shock cycles while no degradation was observed at all after 1000 hours damp-heat. Further testing on full-size modules to prove the suitability of the conductive adhesive in outdoor use is ongoing. Climate chamber test results of a direct comparison with soldered modules are presented.

  16. Modeling of Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luppina, P.; Lugli, P.; Goodnick, S.

    2015-06-14

    Here we present modeling results on crystalline Si/amorphous Si (a-Si) heterojunction solar cells using Sentaurus including various models for defect states in the a-Si barriers, as well as explicit models for the ITO emitter contact. We investigate the impact of the band offsets and barrier heights of the a-Si/c-Si interface, particularly in terms of the open circuit voltage. It is also shown that the solar cell performance is sensitively dependent on the quality of the a-Si in terms of defect states and their distribution, particularly on the emitter side. Finally, we have investigate the role of tunneling and thermionic emission across the heterointerface in terms of transport from the Si to the ITO contact layer

  17. PLASMONIC NANOSTRUCTURES FOR ORGANIC SOLAR CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsafaei, Mina

    2017-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics represent the third generation PV technology, and it is a technology that offers large cost reductions using inexpensive materials and low cost printing fabrication techniques such as roll-to-roll processing. The lower power conversion efficiencies of organic solar cells......, however, limit their viability and sustainability for cost competitive commercial production. Plasmonic assisted organic photovoltaics have a potential to increase the performance of devices and thus reduce the cost/kW of generating capacity. This is the motivation of the work presented in this doctoral...... thesis. Metallic nanostructures are used to enhance the light absorption within the semiconductor film in organic solar cells. A new lithography-free method for nanostructure formation from conjugated polymer is presented in this work. A highly concentrated polyethyleneglycol-capped gold nanoparticles...

  18. A Bicontinuous Double Gyroid Hybrid Solar Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Crossland, Edward J. W.

    2009-08-12

    We report the first successful application of an ordered bicontinuous gyroid semiconducting network in a hybrid bulk heterojunction solar cell. The freestanding gyroid network is fabricated by electrochemical deposition into the 10 nm wide voided channels of a self-assembled, selectively degradable block copolymer film. The highly ordered pore structure is ideal for uniform infiltration of an organic hole transporting material, and solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells only 400 nm thick exhibit up to 1.7% power conversion efficiency. This patterning technique can be readily extended to other promising heterojunction systems and is a major step toward realizing the full potential of self-assembly in the next generation of device technologies. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  19. Perovskite Materials: Solar Cell and Optoelectronic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid organometallic trihalide perovskites are promising candidates in the applications for next-generation, high-performance, low-cost optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaics, light emitting diodes, and photodetectors. Particularly, the solar cells based on this type of materials have reached 22% lab scale power conversion efficiency in only about seven years, comparable to the other thin film photovoltaic technologies. Hybrid perovskite materials not only exhibit superior optoelectronic properties, but also show many interesting physical properties such as ion migration and defect physics, which may allow the exploration of more device functionalities. In this article, the fundamental understanding of the interrelationships between crystal structure, electronic structure, and material properties is discussed. Various chemical synthesis and processing methods for superior device performance in solar cells and optoelectronic devices are reviewed.

  20. Promises and challenges of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Baena, Juan-Pablo; Saliba, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio; Grätzel, Michael; Abate, Antonio; Tress, Wolfgang; Hagfeldt, Anders

    2017-11-01

    The efficiencies of perovskite solar cells have gone from single digits to a certified 22.1% in a few years’ time. At this stage of their development, the key issues concern how to achieve further improvements in efficiency and long-term stability. We review recent developments in the quest to improve the current state of the art. Because photocurrents are near the theoretical maximum, our focus is on efforts to increase open-circuit voltage by means of improving charge-selective contacts and charge carrier lifetimes in perovskites via processes such as ion tailoring. The challenges associated with long-term perovskite solar cell device stability include the role of testing protocols, ionic movement affecting performance metrics over extended periods of time, and determination of the best ways to counteract degradation mechanisms.

  1. A thermodynamic cycle for the solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Jenkins, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    A solar cell is a heat engine, but textbook treatments are not wholly satisfactory from a thermodynamic standpoint, since they present solar cells as directly converting the energy of light into electricity, and the current in the circuit as maintained by an electrostatic potential. We propose a thermodynamic cycle in which the gas of electrons in the p phase serves as the working substance. The interface between the p and n phases acts as a self-oscillating piston that modulates the absorption of heat from the photons so that it may perform a net positive work during a complete cycle of its motion, in accordance with the laws of thermodynamics. We draw a simple hydrodynamical analogy between this model and the "putt-putt" engine of toy boats, in which the interface between the water's liquid and gas phases serves as the piston. We point out some testable consequences of this model.

  2. Organic p-i-n solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maennig, B.; Drechsel, J.; Gebeyehu, D.; Kozlowski, F.; Werner, A.; Li, F.; Grundmann, S.; Sonntag, S.; Koch, M.; Leo, K.; Pfeiffer, M. [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062, Dresden (Germany); Simon, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden, 01187, Dresden (Germany); Hoppe, H.; Meissner, D.; Sariciftci, N.S. [Linz Institute for Organic Solar Cells (LIOS), Physical Chemistry, Johannes Kepler University, 4040, Linz (Austria); Riedel, I.; Dyakonov, V.; Parisi, J. [Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Institute of Physics, University of Oldenburg, 26111, Oldenburg (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    We introduce a p-i-n-type heterojunction architecture for organic solar cells where the active region is sandwiched between two doped wide-gap layers. The term p-i-n means here a layer sequence in the form p-doped layer, intrinsic layer and n-doped layer. The doping is realized by controlled co-evaporation using organic dopants and leads to conductivities of 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -5} S/cm in the p- and n-doped wide-gap layers, respectively. The photoactive layer is formed by a mixture of phthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc) and the fullerene C{sub 60} and shows mainly amorphous morphology. As a first step towards p-i-n structures, we show the advantage of using wide-gap layers in M-i-p-type diodes (metal layer-intrinsic layer-p-doped layer). The solar cells exhibit a maximum external quantum efficiency of 40% between 630-nm and 700-nm wavelength. With the help of an optical multilayer model, we optimize the optical properties of the solar cells by placing the active region at the maximum of the optical field distribution. The results of the model are largely confirmed by the experimental findings. For an optically optimized device, we find an internal quantum efficiency of around 82% under short-circuit conditions. Adding a layer of 10-nm thickness of the red material N,N'-dimethylperylene-3,4:9,10-dicarboximide (Me-PTCDI) to the active region, a power-conversion efficiency of 1.9% for a single cell is obtained. Such optically thin cells with high internal quantum efficiency are an important step towards high-efficiency tandem cells. First tandem cells which are not yet optimized already show 2.4% power-conversion efficiency under simulated AM 1.5 illumination of 125 mW/cm{sup 2}. (orig.)

  3. Polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of solar cells made from a conjugated polymer blended with a fullerene derivative has risen from around 1 % to over 9 % in the last ten years, making organic photovoltaic technology a viable contender for commercialization. The efficiency increases have resulted from the development of new materials with lower optical gaps, new polymer:fullerene combinations with higher charge separated state energies, and new approaches to control the blend microstructure, all driven by a qual...

  4. Panchromatic Sequentially Cast Ternary Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Masoud; Ye, Long; Zhang, Qianqian; Yan, Liang; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Awartani, Omar; You, Wei; Gadisa, Abay; Ade, Harald

    2017-01-01

    A sequential-casting ternary method is developed to create stratified bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, in which the two BHJ layers are spin cast sequentially without the need of adopting a middle electrode and orthogonal solvents. This method is found to be particularly useful for polymers that form a mechanically alloyed morphology due to the high degree of miscibility in the blend. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Plasmonic Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, I-Kang

    2010-12-14

    This image presents a scanning electron microscopy image of solid state dye-sensitized solar cell with a plasmonic back reflector, overlaid with simulated field intensity plots when monochromatic light is incident on the device. Plasmonic back reflectors, which consist of 2D arrays of silver nanodomes, can enhance absorption through excitation of plasmonic modes and increased light scattering, as reported by Michael D. McGehee, Yi Cui, and co-workers.

  6. PbSe Nanocrystal Excitonic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2009-11-11

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of colloidal PbSe nanocrystal (NC)-based photovoltaic test structures that exhibit an excitonic solar cell mechanism. Charge extraction from the NC active layer is driven by a photoinduced chemical potential energy gradient at the nanostructured heterojunction. By minimizing perturbation to PbSe NC energy levels and thereby gaining insight into the "intrinsic" photovoltaic properties and charge transfer mechanism of PbSe NC, we show a direct correlation between interfacial energy level offsets and photovoltaic device performance. Size dependent PbSe NC energy levels were determined by cyclic voltammetry and optical spectroscopy and correlated to photovoltaic measurements. Photovoltaic test structures were fabricated from PbSe NC films sandwiched between layers of ZnO nanoparticles and PEDOT:PSS as electron and hole transporting elements, respectively. The device current-voltage characteristics suggest a charge separation mechanism that Is distinct from previously reported Schottky devices and consistent with signatures of excitonic solar cells. Remarkably, despite the limitation of planar junction structure, and without film thickness optimization, the best performing device shows a 1-sun power conversion efficiency of 3.4%, ranking among the highest performing NC-based solar cells reported to date. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  7. Oxide nanowires for solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qifeng; Yodyingyong, Supan; Xi, Junting; Myers, Daniel; Cao, Guozhong

    2012-03-07

    Oxide nanowire arrays were studied for their applications to solar cells. It was demonstrated that the nanowires could provide direct pathways for electron transport in dye-sensitized solar cells and therefore, while forming photoelectrode films, they offered better suppression of charge recombination than nanoparticles. However, the photoelectron films consisting of nanowires suffered a disadvantage in giving large surface area for dye adsorption. Such a shortcoming of nanowires had been exemplified in this paper illustrating that it could be well compensated by incorporating with nanoparticles to form a nanoparticle-nanowire array hybrid photoelectrode film. The oxide nanowires were also demonstrated to be able to enhance the performance of inverted structure polymer solar cells as a cathode buffer layer by establishing a large interface with the polymers so as to facilitate the transport of photogenerated electrons from the polymer to the electron collecting electrode. Such an enhancement effect could be further boosted while the nanowires were replaced with nanotubes; the latter may build up larger interface with the polymers than the former and therefore facilitates the electron transport more efficiently.

  8. Solar-hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deluchi, M.A. (California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies); Ogden, J.M. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies)

    1993-05-01

    A fuel cycle in which hydrogen is produced by solar-electrolysis of water, or by gasification of renewable grown biomass, and then used in a fuel-cell powered electric-motor vehicle (FCEV), would produce little or no local, regional or global pollution. Hydrogen FCEVs would combine the best features of battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVS) - zero emissions, high efficiency, quiet operation and long life -with the long range and fast refueling time of internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs). If fuel-cell technology develops as hoped, then hydrogen FCEVs will be a significant advance over both hydrogen ICEVs and solar BPEVs: they will be cleaner and more efficient than hydrogen ICEVs, have a much shorter refueling time than BPEVs and have a lower life-cycle cost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles would be general-purpose zero-emission vehicles, and could be an important component of a strategy for reducing dependence on imported oil, mitigating global warming and improving urban air quality, at an acceptable cost. (author)

  9. Laser scanning of experimental solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plunkett, B.C.; Lasswell, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    An instrument is described which measures and displays the response of the solar cell to a precisely positioned spot of HeNe laser light. By scanning the spot across the cell surface, one can create a map of the spatial variation in response of the cell. This map allows one to isolate flaws in cell contact integrity, locate open top surface grid lines, and evaluate fundamental junction performance. The system is useful for identifying and locating changes in the cell as it progresses through various experiments (e.g. stability studies). The laser scanner system is designed to be flexible and can accommodate different types of solar cell materials and a wide range of spot and scan sizes. Several modes of operation of the equipment are described, and results from two photovoltaic materials (CdS/Cu/sub 2/S and Zn/sub 3/P/sub 2/) are presented which demonstrate the capabilities of the system. Finally some of the proposed future uses of the system are discussed. 6 refs.

  10. Semitransparent organic solar cells with organic wavelength dependent reflectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, Y.O.; Debije, M.G.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Semitransparent organic solar cells employing solution-processable organic wavelength dependent reflectors of chiral nematic (cholesteric) liquid crystals are demonstrated. The cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) reflects only in a narrow band of the solar spectrum and remains transparent for the

  11. Solar energy powered microbial fuel cell with a reversible bioelectrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2010-01-01

    The solar energy powered microbial fuel cell is an emerging technology for electricity generation via electrochemically active microorganisms fueled by solar energy via in situ photosynthesized metabolites from algae, cyanobacteria, or living higher plants. A general problem with microbial fuel

  12. Performance evaluation of hybrid modified micro-channel solar cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Keywords: Solar cell thermal tile, Micro-channel, Electrical efficiency, Thermal modeling. 1. ... performance of building integrated photovoltaic water –heating system for ... experimental study on energy generation with a photovoltaic (PV) solar ...

  13. Strategies to reduce the open-circuit voltage deficit in Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jekyung; Shin, Byungha

    2017-09-01

    Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 thin film solar cell has attracted significant attention in thin film solar cell technologies considering its low-cost, non-toxicity, and earth-abundance. However, the highest efficiency still remains at 12.6%, far below the theoretical efficiency of Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit of around 30%. The limitation behind such shortcoming in the device performance was reported to stem primarily from a high V oc deficit compared to other thin film solar cell technologies such as CdTe or Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), whose origins are attributed to the prevalence of band tailing from cation disordering as well as to the high recombination at the interfaces. In this report, systematic studies on the causes of a high V oc deficit and associated remarkable approaches to achieve high V oc have been reviewed, provided with a guidance on the future direction of CZTSSe research in resolving the high V oc deficit issue. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Microstructured extremely thin absorber solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biancardo, Matteo; Krebs, Frederik C

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the realization of extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells employing conductive glass substrates functionalized with TiO2 microstructures produced by embossing. Nanocrystalline or compact TiO2 films on Indium doped tin oxide (ITO) glass substrates were embossed...... by pressing a silicon stamp containing a mu m size raised grid structure into the TiO2 by use of a hydraulic press (1 ton/50 cm(2)). The performance of these microstructured substrates in a ETA cell sensitized by a thermally evaporated or chemical bath deposited PbS film and completed by a PEDOT:PSS hole...

  15. Five-Junction Solar Cell Optimization Using Silvaco Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    cell design by Fraunhofer ISE to provide the baseline structure for a simulation model based on published cell characteristics. This structure is...devices, which offer significant improvements over conventional single-junction solar cell designs . This research uses an existing five-junction solar...and maximize efficiency. Optimization of solar cell efficiency is carried out via nearly orthogonal balanced design of experiments methodology. Silvaco

  16. High performance organic solar cell architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kanzan

    This research is dedicated to the study of physical processes in solar cells based on organic polymers and small molecules, which may replace fossil-fuel based energy sources in future. The bulk of this research involves (1) improving charge generation and collection in well known bulk heterojunction polymer/fullerene-based devices via creating a percolating interpenetrating networks for further efficiency improvement, (2) developing new device architectures for multi-junction organic photovoltaics, and (3) developing new methods for encapsulation of organic solar cells by multilayer coatings. For bulk heterojunction Regio Regular P3HT/PCBM-based devices, the importance of pre-production and optimum post-production heat treatment conditions have been studied for different P3HT molecular weights and a record-breaking power conversion efficiency near 4% was achieved. This effect is partially achieved because annealing induces better crystalinity and hence increases the charge mobility in Regio Regular P3HT and initiates a diffusion controlled formation of PCBM network. This is reflected in the improvement of Fill Factor. The importance of pre-production to create a fine homogenization was discovered in this project. The novel electron and hole blocking layers deployed bulk heterojunction devices have been developed and the further improvement in the charge collection efficiency and fill factor were observed. Combining the P3HT/PCBM-based back cell with small organic molecular front cell, a new spectrally asymmetric multi-junction tandem device prototype has been created. With this device, wide range of solar spectra can be observed and open-circuit voltage greater than 1V can be routinely achieved, compared to 0.5--0.6V in conventional one layer devices. Purely polymeric tandem cell has also been tested. Such devices have a great prospect of low cost mass production.

  17. Defect behavior of polycrystalline solar cell silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroder, D.K.; Park, S.H.; Hwang, I.G.; Mohr, J.B.; Hanly, M.P. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (US). Center for Solid State Electronics Research

    1993-05-01

    The major objective of this study, conducted from October 1988 to September 1991, was to gain an understanding of the behavior of impurities in polycrystalline silicon and the influence of these impurities on solar cell efficiency. The authors studied edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) and cast poly-Si materials and solar cells. With EFG Si they concentrated on chromium-doped materials and cells to determine the role of Cr on solar cell performance. Cast poly-Si samples were not deliberately contaminated. Samples were characterized by cell efficiency, current-voltage, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), surface photovoltage (SPV), open-circuit voltage decay, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. They find that Cr forms Cr-B pairs with boron at room temperature and these pairs dissociate into Cr{sub i}{sup +} and B{sup {minus}} during anneals at 210{degrees}C for 10 min. Following the anneal, Cr-B pairs reform at room temperature with a time constant of 230 h. Chromium forms CrSi{sub 2} precipitates in heavily contaminated regions and they find evidence of CrSi{sub 2} gettering, but a lack of chromium segregation or precipitation to grain boundaries and dislocations. Cr-B pairs have well defined DLTS peaks. However, DLTS spectra of other defects are not well defined, giving broad peaks indicative of defects with a range of energy levels in the band gap. In some high-stress, low-efficiency cast poly-Si they detect SiC precipitates, but not in low-stress, high-efficiency samples. SPV measurements result in nonlinear SPV curves in some materials that are likely due to varying optical absorption coefficients due to locally varying stress in the material.

  18. Materials That Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiadong; Wang, Haorong

    2012-01-01

    A thin layer (approximately 10 microns) of a novel "transparent" fluorescent material is applied to existing solar cells or modules to effectively block and convert UV light, or other lower solar response waveband of solar radiation, to visible or IR light that can be more efficiently used by solar cells for additional photocurrent. Meanwhile, the layer of fluorescent coating material remains fully "transparent" to the visible and IR waveband of solar radiation, resulting in a net gain of solar cell efficiency. This innovation alters the effective solar spectral power distribution to which an existing cell gets exposed, and matches the maximum photovoltaic (PV) response of existing cells. By shifting a low PV response waveband (e.g., UV) of solar radiation to a high PV response waveband (e.g. Vis-Near IR) with novel fluorescent materials that are transparent to other solar-cell sensitive wavebands, electrical output from solar cells will be enhanced. This approach enhances the efficiency of solar cells by converting UV and high-energy particles in space that would otherwise be wasted to visible/IR light. This innovation is a generic technique that can be readily implemented to significantly increase efficiencies of both space and terrestrial solar cells, without incurring much cost, thus bringing a broad base of economical, social, and environmental benefits. The key to this approach is that the "fluorescent" material must be very efficient, and cannot block or attenuate the "desirable" and unconverted" waveband of solar radiation (e.g. Vis-NIR) from reaching the cells. Some nano-phosphors and novel organometallic complex materials have been identified that enhance the energy efficiency on some state-of-the-art commercial silicon and thin-film-based solar cells by over 6%.

  19. Organic Solar Cells: Problems and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chidichimo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For photovoltaic cells to convert solar into electric energy is probably the most interesting research challenge nowadays. A good efficiency of these devices has been obtained by using inorganic semiconductor materials. On the other hand, manufacture processes are very expensive in terms of both materials and techniques. For this reason organic-based photovoltaic (OPV cells are attracting the general attention because of the possible realization of more economical devices. Organic materials are abundant and easily handling. Unfortunately OPV cells efficiency is significantly lower than that of inorganic-based devices, representing a big point of weakness at the present. This is mainly due to the fact that organic semiconductors have a much higher band gap with respect to inorganic semiconductors. In addition, OPV cells are very susceptible to oxygen and water. In this paper we will describe some of the different approaches to the understanding and improving of organic photovoltaic devices.

  20. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiency Using Photon Upconversion Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yunfei; Hao, Shuwei; Yang, Chunhui; Chen, Guanying

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells are able to convert sunlight into electricity, providing enough of the most abundant and cleanest energy to cover our energy needs. However, the efficiency of current photovoltaics is significantly impeded by the transmission loss of sub-band-gap photons. Photon upconversion is a promising route to circumvent this problem by converting these transmitted sub-band-gap photons into above-band-gap light, where solar cells typically have high quantum efficiency. Here, we summarize recent progress on varying types of efficient upconversion materials as well as their outstanding uses in a series of solar cells, including silicon solar cells (crystalline and amorphous), gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, and other types of solar cells. The challenge and prospect of upconversion materials for photovoltaic applications are also discussed. PMID:28347095

  1. Using amorphous silicon solar cells to boost the viability of luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farrell, D.J.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Velthuijsen, S.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    We have, for the first time, designed and fabricated hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells to be used in conjunction with Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs). LSCs are planar plastic sheets doped with organic dyes that absorb solar illumination and down shift the energy to narrowband

  2. CIGS P1, P2, P3 Scribing Processes using a Pulse Programmable Industrial Fiber Laser: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rekow, M.; Murison, R.; Panarello, T.; Dunsky, C.; Dinkel, C.; Nikumb, S.; Pern, F. J.; Mansfield, L.

    2010-10-01

    We describe a novel set of laser processes for the CIGS P1, P2 and P3 scribing steps, the development of which has been enabled by a unique pulse-programmable fiber laser. We find that the unique pulse control properties of this 1064 nm wavelength laser have significant effects on the material removal dynamics of the various film layers in the CIGS material system. In the case of the P2 and P3 processes, the shaped pulses create new laser/material interaction effects that permit the material to be cleanly and precisely removed with zero Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) at the edges of the scribe. The new P2 and P3 processes we describe demonstrate the first use of infrared nanosecond laser pulses that eliminate the HAZ and the consequent localized compositional changes in the CIGS absorber material that result in poor shunt resistance. SEM micrographs and EDX compositional scans are presented. For the P1 scribe, we process the bi-layer molybdenum from the film side as well as through the glass substrate. Microscopic inspection and compositional analysis of the scribe lines are not sufficient to determine electrical and optical performance in working PV modules. Therefore, to demonstrate the applicability of the infrared pulse-programmable laser to all three scribing processes for thin-film CIGS, we fabricate small-size multiple-cell monolithically interconnected mini-modules in partnership with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (Golden, Colorado). A total of four mini-modules are produced, two utilizing all laser scribing, and two with the P2 and P3 steps mechanically scribed (by a third party) for reference. Mini-module performance data measured at NREL is presented, and we also discuss the commercialization potential of the new single-laser CIGS scribing process. Finally we present a phenomenological model to describe this physics underlying this novel ablation process.

  3. Nanorods and nanotubes for solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislyuk, V V; Dimitriev, O P

    2008-01-01

    Nanorods and nanotubes as photoactive materials as well as electrodes in photovoltaic cells have been launched a few years ago, and the literature in this field started to appear only recently. The first steps have shown both advantages and disadvantages of their application, and the main expectation associated with their effective charge transport has not been realized completely. This article aims to review both the first and the recent tendencies in the development and application of nanorod and nanotube materials in photovoltaic cells. Two basic techniques of synthesis of crystalline nanorod structures are described, the top-down and bottom-up approaches, respectively. Design and photovoltaic performance of solar cells based on various semiconductor nanorod materials, such as TiO2, ZnO, CdS, CdSe, CdTe, CuO, Si are presented and compared with respective solar cells based on semiconductor nanoparticles. Specific of synthesis and application of carbon nanotubes in photovoltaic devices is also reviewed.

  4. Industrialization of polymer solar cells - phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, H.; Krebs, F.C. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark); Andersen, Rasmus B. [Mekoprint A/S, Stoevrimg (Denmark); Bork, J.; Bentzen, B.

    2012-03-15

    A three-phased project with the objective to industrialize DTU's basic polymer solar cell technology was started in the summer of 2009. The technology comprises a specific design of the polymer solar cell and a corresponding roll-to-roll manufacturing process. This basic technology is referred to as ProcessOne in the open literature. The present report relates to the project's phase 1.The key tasks in phase 1 are to stream-line DTU's tech-nology for the industrial utilization, to demonstrate production according to this stream-lined technology at Mekoprint A/S and finally to fertilize the market for polymer solar cells by demonstrating their use in appli-cations that harmonize with their present maturity level. The main focus in the stream-lining of DTU's technology has been to demonstrate a convincing rate of reduction for the production cost, and thereby make a competitive price plausible. This has been materialized as a learning curve showing that the polymer technology presently develops considerably faster than the silicon technology. The polymer solar cells will, under the assumption that both technologies follow a projection of the learning curve, gain a cost-leading position within a reasonable time. A production cost of 5 Euro/Wp has already been demonstrated in DTU's pilot plant, and a road map for the further decrease to 1 Euro/Wp is drawn. This target is expected to be reached in 2013 in the ongoing phase 2 of the project. Another activity essential for the industrialization has been the launch of specialized materials, equipment and services required for the processing of DTU's polymer solar cells. Relevant products and services are made available for sale on DTU's homepage, www.energyconversion.dtu.dk. A production line for polymer solar cells has been established at Mekoprint. For this a retrofit solution was chosen where the core of an existing screen-printing line was dismantled and fitted to a slot-die printing head manufactured in DTU's workshop

  5. Interfacial Engineering and Charge Carrier Dynamics in Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edley, Michael

    . With these techniques, the extension of the depletion layer from CdSe into ZnO was determined to be vital to suppression of interfacial recombination. However, depletion of the ZnO also restricted the effective diffusion core for electrons and slowed their transport. Thus, materials and geometries should be chosen to allow for a depletion layer that suppresses interfacial recombination without impeding electron transport to the point that it is detrimental to cell performance. Thin film solar cells are another promising technology that can reduce costs by relaxing material processing requirements. CuInxGa (1-x)Se (CIGS) is a well studied thin film solar cell material that has achieved good efficiencies of 22.6%. However, use of rare elements raise concerns over the use of CIGS for global power production. CuSbS2 shares chemistry with CuInSe2 and also presents desirable properties for thin film absorbers such as optimal band gap (1.5 eV), high absorption coefficient, and Earth-abundant and non-toxic elements. Despite the promise of CuSbS2, direct characterization of the material for solar cell application is scarce in the literature. CuSbS2 nanoplates were synthesized by a colloidal hot-injection method at 220 °C in oleylamine. The CuSbS2 platelets synthesized for 30 minutes had dimensions of 300 nm by 400 nm with a thickness of 50 nm and were capped with the insulating oleylamine synthesis ligand. The oleylamine synthesis ligand provides control over nanocrystal growth but is detrimental to intercrystal charge transport that is necessary for optoelectronic device applications. Solid-state and solution phase ligand exchange of oleylamine with S2- were used to fabricate mesoporous films of CuSbS2 nanoplates for application in solar cells. Exchange of the synthesis ligand with S2- resulted in a two order of magnitude increase in 4-point probe conductivity. Photoexcited carrier lifetimes of 1.4 ns were measured by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy, indicating potential

  6. Investigation of Indoor Stability Testing of Polymer Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelin Kavak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated organic solar cell of a new low bandgap polymer poly[4,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl-4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b:3,4-b′]dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-4,7-bis(2-thienyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-5′,5′′-diyl] (PCPDTTBTT. We have investigated for the first time the stability tests, ISOS-L-1 and ISOS-D-3, of PCPDTTBTT solar cells. Thermal annealing of PCPDTTBTT solar cells at 80°C brought about an improvement of photocurrent generation, stability, and efficiency of the solar cells. T80 value of PCPDTTBTT solar cell is about 150 hours which is close to P3HT (235 h. PCPDTTBTT is very promising polymer for both polymer solar cell efficiency and stability.

  7. Applications of Fluorogens with Rotor Structures in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kok-Haw; Liu, Bin

    2017-05-29

    Solar cells are devices that convert light energy into electricity. To drive greater adoption of solar cell technologies, higher cell efficiencies and reductions in manufacturing cost are necessary. Fluorogens containing rotor structures may be helpful in addressing some of these challenges due to their unique twisted structures and photophysics. In this review, we discuss the applications of rotor-containing molecules as dyes for luminescent down-shifting layers and luminescent solar concentrators, where their aggregation-induced emission properties and large Stokes shifts are highly desirable. We also discuss the applications of molecules containing rotors in third-generation solar cell technologies, namely dye-sensitized solar cells and organic photovoltaics, where the twisted 3-dimensional rotor structures are used primarily for aggregation control. Finally, we discuss perspectives on the future role of molecules containing rotor structures in solar cell technologies.

  8. Advantages of thin silicon solar cells for use in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A system definition study on the Solar Power Satellite System showed that a thin, 50 micrometers, silicon solar cell has significant advantages. The advantages include a significantly lower performance degradation in a radiation environment and high power-to-mass ratios. The advantages of such cells for an employment in space is further investigated. Basic questions concerning the operation of solar cells are considered along with aspects of radiation induced performance degradation. The question arose in this connection how thin a silicon solar cell had to be to achieve resistance to radiation degradation and still have good initial performance. It was found that single-crystal silicon solar cells could be as thin as 50 micrometers and still develop high conversion efficiencies. It is concluded that the use of 50 micrometer silicon solar cells in space-based photovoltaic power systems would be advantageous.

  9. Recent progress in stability of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaojun; Zhao, Zhiguo; Wang, Yidan; Wu, Junbo; Jiang, Qi; You, Jingbi

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells have attracted significant attention in just the past few years in solar cell research fields, where the power conversion efficiency was beyond 22.1%. Now, the most important challenge for perovskite solar cells in practical applications is the stability issue. In this mini-review, we will summarize the degradation mechanism of perovskite solar cells, including the perovskite material itself and also the interfaces. While we also provide our opinion on improving the stability of perovskite solar cells. Project supported by China Huaneng Group Project High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells (No. TW-15-HJK01), the National Key Research and Development Program of China (No. 2016YFB0700700), the National 1000 Young Talent Awards, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61574133).

  10. Solar Cell Nanotechnology Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Biswajit [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-05-07

    The objective of this project is to develop a low cost nonlithographic nanofabrication technology for the fabrication of thin film porous templates as well as uniform arrays of semiconductor nanostructures for the implementation of high efficiency solar cells. Solar cells based on semiconductor nanostructures are expected to have very high energy conversion efficiencies due to the increased absorption coefficients of semiconductor nanostructures. In addition, the thin film porous template can be used for optimum surface texturing of solar cells leading to additional enhancement in energy conversion efficiency. An important requirement for these applications is the ability to synthesize nanostructure arrays of different dimensions with good size control. This project employed nanoporous alumina templates created by the anodization of aluminum thin films deposited on glass substrates for the fabrication of the nanostructures and optimized the process parameters to obtain uniform pore diameters. An additional requirement is uniformity or regularity of the nanostructure arrays. While constant current anodization was observed to provide controlled pore diameters, constant voltage anodization was needed for regularity of the nanostructure arrays. Thus a two-step anodization process was investigated and developed in this project for improving the pore size distribution and pore periodicity of the nanoporous alumina templates. CdTe was selected to be the active material for the nanowires, and the process for the successful synthesis of CdTe nanowires was developed in this project. Two different synthesis approaches were investigated in this project, electrochemical and electrophoretic deposition. While electrochemical synthesis was successfully employed for the synthesis of nanowires inside the pores of the alumina templates, the technique was determined to be non-optimum due to the need of elevated temperature that is detrimental to the structural integrity of the

  11. Materials availability for thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Yunosuke

    1997-04-01

    Materials availability is one of the most important factors when we consider the mass-production of next generation photovoltaic devices. "In (indium)" is a vital element to produce high efficient thin film solar cells such as InP and CuIn(Ga)Se2 but its lifetime as a natural resource is suggested to be of order of 10˜15 years. The lifetime of a specific natural resource as an element to produce useful device substances is directly related with its abundance in the earth's crust, consumption rate and recycling rate (if recycling is economically meaningful). The chemical elements having long lifetime as a natural resource are those existing in the atmosphere such as N (nitrogen) and O (oxygen); the rich elements in the earth's crust such as Si, Ca, Sr and Ba; the mass-used metals such as Fe (iron), Al (aluminum) and Cu (copper) that reached the stage of large-scale recycling. We here propose a new paradigm of semiconductor material-science for the future generation thin film solar cells in which only abundant chemical elements are used. It is important to remark that these abundant chemical elements are normally not toxic and are fairly friendly to the environment. β-FeSi2 is composed of two most abundant and nontoxic chemical elements. This material is one of the most promising device materials for future generation energy devices (solar cells and thermoelectric device that is most efficient at temperature range of 700-900 °C). One should remind of the versatility of β-FeSi2 that this material can be used not only as energy devices but also as photodetector, light emitting diode and/or laser diode at the wavelength of 1.5 μm that can be monolithically integrated on Si substrates due to the relatively small lattice mismatch.

  12. Device physics of polymer: fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, Paul W. M.; Mihailetchi, Valentin D.; Koster, L. Jan Anton; Markov, Denis E.

    2007-01-01

    Plastic solar cells bear the potential for large-scale power generation based on materials that provide the possibility of flexible, lightweight, inexpensive, efficient solar cells. Since the discovery of the photoinduced electron transfer from a conjugated polymer to fullerene molecules, followed by the introduction of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) concept, this material combination has been extensively studied in organic solar cells, leading to several breakthroughs in efficiency, with a po...

  13. Nanoscale dimples for improved absorption in organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jaroslaw; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    Organic solar cells (OSC’s) have attracted much attention in the past years due to their potential low-cost, light-weight and mechanical flexibility. A method for improving the power conversion efficiencies of the devices is by incorporating structured electrodes in the solar cell architecture...... ordered and discorded dimple arrangement and their contribution to light management is presented. Such dimples can later be employed to fabricate nanostructured electrodes in P3HT/PCBM organic solar cells....

  14. Inexpensive transparent nanoelectrode for crystalline silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Qiang; Pei, Ke; Han, Bing; Li, Ruopeng; Zhou, Guofu; Liu, Jun-Ming; Kempa, Krzysztof; Gao, Jinwei

    2016-01-01

    We report an easily manufacturable and inexpensive transparent conductive electrode for crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells. It is based on a silver nanoparticle network self-forming in the valleys between the pyramids of a textured solar cell surface, transformed into a nanowire network by sintering, and subsequently ?buried? under the silicon surface by a metal-assisted chemical etching. We have successfully incorporated these steps into the conventional c-Si solar cell manufacturing pro...

  15. Effector Protein Cig2 Decreases Host Tolerance of Infection by Directing Constitutive Fusion of Autophagosomes with the Coxiella-Containing Vacuole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Lara J; Reed, Shawna C O; Sarraf, Shireen A; Arteaga, David D; Newton, Hayley J; Roy, Craig R

    2016-07-19

    Coxiella burnetii replicates in an acidified lysosome-derived vacuole. Biogenesis of the Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV) requires bacterial effector proteins delivered into host cells by the Dot/Icm secretion system. Genetic and cell biological analysis revealed that an effector protein called Cig2 promotes constitutive fusion of autophagosomes with the CCV to maintain this compartment in an autolysosomal stage of maturation. This distinguishes the CCV from other pathogen-containing vacuoles that are targeted by the host autophagy pathway, which typically confers host resistance to infection by delivering the pathogen to a toxic lysosomal environment. By maintaining the CCV in an autolysosomal stage of maturation, Cig2 enabled CCV homotypic fusion and enhanced bacterial virulence in the Galleria mellonella (wax moth) model of infection by a mechanism that decreases host tolerance. Thus, C. burnetii residence in an autolysosomal organelle alters host tolerance of infection, which indicates that Cig2-dependent manipulation of a lysosome-derived vacuole influences the host response to infection. Coxiella burnetii is an obligate, intracellular bacterial pathogen that replicates inside a unique, lysosome-like compartment called the Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV). Over 130 bacterial effector proteins are delivered into the host cell cytosol by the C. burnetii Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. Although the Dot/Icm system is essential for pathogenesis, the functions of most effectors remain unknown. Here we show that the effector protein Cig2 is essential for converting the CCV to an organelle that is similar to the autolysosome. Cig2 function promotes constitutive fusion between the CCV and autophagosomes generated by selective autophagy. Cig2-directed biogenesis of an autolysosomal vacuole is essential for the unique fusogenic properties of the CCV and for virulence in an animal model of disease. This work highlights how bacterial subversion of the host autophagy

  16. Stability and Degradation of Polymer Solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Kion

    The current state-of-the-art allows for roll-to-roll manufacture of polymer solar cells in high volume with stability and efficiency sufficient to grant success in low-energy applications. However, further improvement is needed for the successful application of the devices in real life applications....... This is obtained by detailed knowledge of the degradation mechanisms. Methods to compare and standardize device stability are urgently needed. Methodologies to study failure mechanism that are based on physical processes (e.g. morphological changes) are well-established. However, methodologies to study chemical...

  17. Dye solar cell research: EU delegation presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cummings, F

    2009-11-09

    Full Text Available Franscious Cummings Energy and Processes Materials Science and Manufacturing Council for Scientific and Industrial Research P.O. Box 395 Pretoria 0001, South Africa 13 November 2009 © CSIR 2007 www.csir.co.za CONTENT head2right...Background head2rightCSIR Dye Solar Cell Research head2rightCollaborations and Links head2rightAcknowledgements © CSIR 2007 www.csir.co.za BACKGROUND head2rightSA is dry: Annual rainfall average of 450 mm compared with a world average...

  18. Method of fabricating bifacial tandem solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczuk, Steven J; Chiu, Philip T; Zhang, Xuebing; Gagnon, Edward; Timmons, Michael

    2014-10-07

    A method of fabricating on a semiconductor substrate bifacial tandem solar cells with semiconductor subcells having a lower bandgap than the substrate bandgap on one side of the substrate and with subcells having a higher bandgap than the substrate on the other including, first, growing a lower bandgap subcell on one substrate side that uses only the same periodic table group V material in the dislocation-reducing grading layers and bottom subcells as is present in the substrate and after the initial growth is complete and then flipping the substrate and growing the higher bandgap subcells on the opposite substrate side which can be of different group V material.

  19. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  20. Baselines for Lifetime of Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Ciammaruchi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The process of accurately gauging lifetime improvements in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) or other similar emerging technologies, such as perovskites solar cells is still a major challenge. The presented work is part of a larger effort of developing a worldwide database of lifetimes that can help...... the baselines of lifetime for OPVs tested under different conditions. The work also provides the recent progress in stability of unencapsulated OPVs with different architectures, as well as presents the updated diagram of the reported record lifetimes of OPVs. The presented work is another step forward towards...

  1. Flexible ITO-Free Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angmo, Dechan; Krebs, Frederik C

    2013-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is the material-of-choice for transparent conductors in any optoelectronic application. However, scarce resources of indium and high market demand of ITO have created large price fluctuations and future supply concerns. In polymer solar cells (PSCs), ITO is the single......-cost alternatives to ITO suitable for use in PSCs. These alternatives belong to four material groups: polymers; metal and polymer composites; metal nanowires and ultra-thin metal films; and carbon nanotubes and graphene. We further present the progress of employing these alternatives in PSCs and identify future...

  2. Solar-Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    DeLuchi, Mark A.; Ogden, Joan M.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen is an especially attractive transportation fuel. It is the least polluting fuel available, and can be produced anywhere there is water and a clean source of electricity. A fuel cycle in which hydrogen is produced by solar-electrolysis of water, or by gasification of renewably grown biomass, and then used in a fuel-cell powered electric-motor vehicle (FCEV), would produce little or no local, regional or global pollution. Hydrogen FCEVs would combine the best features of battery-powere...

  3. Photon recycling in the graded bandgap solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafat, N.H. [Cairo Univ., Dept. of Mathematics and Engineering Physics, Giza (Egypt); Haleem, A.M. Abdel [Cairo Univ., Dept. of Mathematics and Engineering Physics, EIFayoum (Egypt); Habib, S.E.D. [Cairo Univ., Electronics and Communication Dept., Giza (Egypt)

    2006-07-01

    We derived a general integral expression for the carrier radiative recombination rate in solar cells. The photon Boltzmann equation is solved taking into account the photon recycling effect inside the cell and assuming arbitrary spatial variation of the absorption coefficient. This expression can thus be used for graded bandgap solar cells. (Author)

  4. High efficiency solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding solar cell response to pulsed laser outputs is important for the evaluation of power beaming applications. The time response of high efficiency GaAs and silicon solar cells to a 25 nS monochromatic pulse input is described. The PC-1D computer code is used to analyze the cell current during and after the pulse for various conditions.

  5. Performance improvement of silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzhafarov T. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the method is shown to improve the photovoltaic parameters of screen-printed silicon solar cells by nanoporous silicon film formation on the frontal surface of the cell using the electrochemical etching. The possible mechanisms responsible for observed improvement of silicon solar cell performance are discussed.

  6. Plasmonic ZnO/p-silicon heterojunction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokeen, Poonam; Jain, Amit; Kapoor, Avinashi

    2017-05-01

    A ZnO/p-Si heterojunction solar cell has been fabricated by sol-gel technique. Silver nanostructures have been deposited on the top surface of the cell by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system. Silver nanoparticles show strong surface plasmon resonance at 500 nm and improve the overall absorbance of the cell. Deposition of silver nanoparticles on the top surface of the solar cell quenches the photoluminescence and indicates an effective scattering of incident light into the absorber layer. A solar cell containing silver nanoparticles shows fivefold improvement in short circuit current density in comparison to a pristine cell. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations illustrate the effect of silver nanoparticles on the performance of the solar cell. The total quantum efficiency (TQE) of the device shows a Gaussian curve with the aspect ratio (diameter: interspacing) of nanoparticles. Optimized distribution of silver nanoparticles can improve the light trapping capabilities of various thin-film solar cells.

  7. Flexible PCPDTBT:PCBM solar cells with integrated grating structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de; Liu, Yinghui; Madsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    spectra of the active layer. This optimized solar cell structure leads to an enhanced absorption in the active layer and thus improved short-circuit currents and power conversion efficiencies in the fabricated devices. Fabrication of the solar cells on thin polyimide substrates which are compatible......We report on development of flexible PCPDTBT:PCBM solar cells with integrated diffraction gratings on the bottom electrodes. The presented results address PCPDTBT:PCBM solar cells in an inverted geometry, which contains implemented grating structures whose pitch is tuned to match the absorption...

  8. Stability and Degradation of Organic and Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Organic photovoltaics (OPV) are a new generation of solar cells with the potential to offer very short energy pay back times, mechanical flexibility and significantly lower production costs compared to traditional crystalline photovoltaic systems. A weakness of OPV is their comparative instability...... during operation and this is a critical area of research towards the successful development and commercialization of these 3rd generation solar cells. Covering both small molecule and polymer solar cells, Stability and Degradation of Organic and Polymer Solar Cells summarizes the state of the art...

  9. Organic solar cells theory, experiment, and device simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Tress, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    This book covers in a textbook-like fashion the basics or organic solar cells, addressing the limits of photovoltaic energy conversion and giving a well-illustrated introduction to molecular electronics with focus on the working principle and characterization of organic solar cells. Further chapters based on the author's dissertation focus on the electrical processes in organic solar cells by presenting a detailed drift-diffusion approach to describe exciton separation and charge-carrier transport and extraction. The results, although elaborated on small-molecule solar cells and with focus on

  10. Nanostructured InGaP Solar Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The operating conditions of conventional multijunction solar cells are severely limited by the current matching requirements of serially connected devices. The goal...

  11. Testing of gallium arsenide solar cells on the CRRES vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumble, T. M.

    A flight experiment was designed to determine the optimum design for gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cell panels in a radiation environment. Elements of the experiment design include, different coverglass material and thicknesses, welded and soldered interconnects, different solar cell efficiencies, different solar cell types, and measurement of annealing properties. This experiment is scheduled to fly on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). This satellite will simultaneously measure the radiation environment and provide engineering data on solar cell degradation that can be directly related to radiation damage.

  12. Stability and Degradation of Organic and Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    during operation and this is a critical area of research towards the successful development and commercialization of these 3rd generation solar cells. Covering both small molecule and polymer solar cells, Stability and Degradation of Organic and Polymer Solar Cells summarizes the state of the art......Organic photovoltaics (OPV) are a new generation of solar cells with the potential to offer very short energy pay back times, mechanical flexibility and significantly lower production costs compared to traditional crystalline photovoltaic systems. A weakness of OPV is their comparative instability...... measures for extending the duration of operation....

  13. Molecular doping of low-bandgap-polymer:fullerene solar cells: Effects on transport and solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tunc, Ali Veysel; Sio, Antonietta De; Riedel, Daniel; Deschler, Felix; Da Como, Enrico; Parisi, Juergen; von Hauff, Elizabeth

    We show how molecular doping can be implemented to improve the performance of solution processed bulk heterojunction solar cells based on a low-bandgap polymer mixed with a fullerene derivative. The molecular dopant 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) is introduced into

  14. Characteristics of the New Solar Cell Power Supply System

    OpenAIRE

    松尾, 博文; 黒川, 不二雄; 川原, 学

    1982-01-01

    Recently, the solar cell has been used as power sources for the radio relay stations, the light houses, the agricultural systems, the microwave communication systems, and so forth. In such solar call power supply systems, it often requires that the maximum power point of the solar array is tracked, in spite of the variations in the load and the light intensity, to make the most efficient use of the solar array and the storage battery. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new solar cell ...

  15. Recyclable organic solar cells on cellulose nanocrystal substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yinhua; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M; Liu, Jen-Chieh; Hsu, James; Shim, Jae Won; Dindar, Amir; Youngblood, Jeffrey P; Moon, Robert J; Kippelen, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is potentially the largest source of renewable energy at our disposal, but significant advances are required to make photovoltaic technologies economically viable and, from a life-cycle perspective, environmentally friendly, and consequently scalable. Cellulose nanomaterials are emerging high-value nanoparticles extracted from plants that are abundant, renewable, and sustainable. Here, we report on the first demonstration of efficient polymer solar cells fabricated on optically transparent cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) substrates. The solar cells fabricated on the CNC substrates display good rectification in the dark and reach a power conversion efficiency of 2.7%. In addition, we demonstrate that these solar cells can be easily separated and recycled into their major components using low-energy processes at room temperature, opening the door for a truly recyclable solar cell technology. Efficient and easily recyclable organic solar cells on CNC substrates are expected to be an attractive technology for sustainable, scalable, and environmentally-friendly energy production.

  16. A Solar Cell That Is Triggered by Sun and Rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qunwei; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Peizhi; He, Benlin

    2016-04-18

    All-weather solar cells are promising in solving the energy crisis. A flexible solar cell is presented that is triggered by combining an electron-enriched graphene electrode with a dye-sensitized solar cell. The new solar cell can be excited by incident light on sunny days and raindrops on rainy days, yielding an optimal solar-to-electric conversion efficiency of 6.53 % under AM 1.5 irradiation and current over microamps as well as a voltage of hundreds of microvolts by simulated raindrops. The formation of π-electron|cation electrical double-layer pseudocapacitors at graphene/raindrop interface is contributable to current and voltage outputs at switchable charging-discharging process. The new concept can guide the design of advanced all-weather solar cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Effects of radiation on solar cells as photovoltaic generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Radovan Lj.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing need for obtaining electrical energy through renewable energy sources such as solar energy have lead to significant technological developments in the production of the basic element of PV conversion, the solar cell. Basically, a solar cell is a p-n junction whose characteristics have a great influence on its output parameters, primarily efficiency. Defects and impurities in the basic material, especially if located within the energy gap, may be activated during its lifetime, becoming traps for optically produced electron-hole pairs and, thus, decreasing the output power of the cell. All of the said effects could be induced in many ways over a lifetime of a solar cell and are consistent with the effects that radiation produces in semiconductor devices. The aim of this paper is to investigate changes in the main characteristics of solar cells, such as efficiency, output current and power, due to the exposure of solar systems to different (hostile radiation environments.

  18. Recyclable organic solar cells on cellulose nanocrystal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yinhua; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M.; Liu, Jen-Chieh; Hsu, James; Shim, Jae Won; Dindar, Amir; Youngblood, Jeffrey P.; Moon, Robert J.; Kippelen, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is potentially the largest source of renewable energy at our disposal, but significant advances are required to make photovoltaic technologies economically viable and, from a life-cycle perspective, environmentally friendly, and consequently scalable. Cellulose nanomaterials are emerging high-value nanoparticles extracted from plants that are abundant, renewable, and sustainable. Here, we report on the first demonstration of efficient polymer solar cells fabricated on optically transparent cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) substrates. The solar cells fabricated on the CNC substrates display good rectification in the dark and reach a power conversion efficiency of 2.7%. In addition, we demonstrate that these solar cells can be easily separated and recycled into their major components using low-energy processes at room temperature, opening the door for a truly recyclable solar cell technology. Efficient and easily recyclable organic solar cells on CNC substrates are expected to be an attractive technology for sustainable, scalable, and environmentally-friendly energy production. PMID:23524333

  19. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Cost and Throughput Improvements for Thin-Film CIGS-Based Modules; Phase II Annual Subcontract Technical Report, July 1999 - August 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, T.G.; Wiedeman, S. (Global Solar Energy, L.L.C.)

    2001-03-12

    Thin-film photovoltaics (PV) has expanded dramatically in the last five years, but commercial use remains limited by performance, cost, and reliability. Of all the thin-film systems, copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) has demonstrated the greatest potential for achieving high performance at a low cost. The highest-quality CIGS has been formed by multi-source co-evaporation, a technique pioneered in this country by researchers at NREL. Multi-source co-evaporation is also potentially the fastest and most cost-effective method of CIGS absorber deposition. Global Solar Energy (GSE) has adapted multi-source co-evaporation of CIGS to large-area, roll-to-roll processing on flexible substrates, enabling several manufacturing and product capability advantages. Roll-to-roll processing enables a low-cost, automated continuous manufacturing process. Flexible substrates enable product application in unique, as well as traditional, areas. The primary objectives of the GSE Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are to reduce cost and expand the production rate of thin-film CIGS-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. Specific goals of the three-year contract are: - Monolithic Integration - Increase integration speed by developing high-speed, all-laser scribing processes that are more than 100% faster than the baseline process and offer clean, selective scribing; increase capacity and substantially reduce module area losses by insulating materials with high accuracy into laser scribes. - Absorber Deposition - Increase absorber-layer deposition rate by 75% in the large-area, continuous GSE process, increasing throughput and reducing labor and capital costs. Integrate a parallel detector spectroscopic ellipsometer (PDSE) with mathematical algorithms for in-situ control of the CIGS absorber, enabling runs of over 300 meters

  20. Photosensitizers from Spirulina for Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spirulina is a kind of blue-green algae with good photosynthetic efficiency and might be used for photovoltaic power generation. So this paper used living spirulina as novel photosensitizer to construct spirulina biosolar cell. The results showed that spirulina had the photoelectric conversion effect, and could let the spirulina biosolar cell have 70 μA photocurrent. Meanwhile, adding glucose sucrose or chitosan in the spirulina anode chamber, they could make the maxima current density of the cell greatly increased by 80 μA, 100 μA, and 84 μA, respectively, and the sucrose could improve the maximum power density of the cell to 63 mW/m−2. Phycobiliprotein played an important role in the photosynthesis of spirulina. So in this paper phycobiliprotein was extracted from spirulina to composite with squaraine dye to sensitize nanocrystalline TiO2 photoanode for building dye sensitized solar cell, and the photoelectric properties of the cell also were investigated.

  1. A three solar cell system based on a self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs top solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negley, Gerald H.; Rhoads, Sandra L.; Terranova, Nancy E.; Mcneely, James B.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a three solar cell stack can lead to practical efficiencies greater than 30 percent (1x,AM0). A theoretical efficiency limitation of 43.7 percent at AM0 and one sun is predicted by this model. Including expected losses, a practical system efficiency of 36.8 percent is anticipated. These calculations are based on a 1.93eV/1.43eV/0.89eV energy band gap combination. AlGaAs/GaAs/GaInAsP materials can be used with a six-terminal wiring configuration. The key issues for multijunction solar cells are the top and middle solar cell performance and the sub-bandgap transparency. AstroPower has developed a technique to fabricate AlGaAs solar cells on rugged, self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs substrates. Top solar cell efficiencies greater than 11 percent AM0 have been achieved. State-of-the-art GaAs or InP devices will be used for the middle solar cell. GaInAsP will be used to fabricate the bottom solar cell. This material is lattice-matched to InP and offers a wide range of bandgaps for optimization of the three solar cell stack. Liquid phase epitaxy is being used to grow the quaternary material. Initial solar cells have shown open-circuit voltages of 462 mV for a bandgap of 0.92eV. Design rules for the multijunction three solar cell stack are discussed. The progress in the development of the self-supporting AlGaAs top solar cell and the GaInAsP bottom solar cell is presented.

  2. Sensitizers for Aqueous-Based Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ting; Lin, Ryan Yeh-Yung; Lin, Jiann T

    2017-03-02

    Aqueous dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are attractive due to their sustainability, the use of water as a safe solvent for the redox mediators, and their possible applications in photoelectrochemical water splitting. However, the higher tendency of dye leaching by water and the lower wettability of dye molecules are two major obstacles that need to be tackled for future applications of aqueous DSSCs. Sensitizers designed for aqueous DSSCs are discussed based on their functions, such as modification of the molecular skeleton and the anchoring group for better stability against dye leaching by water, and the incorporation of hydrophilic entities into the dye molecule or the addition of a surfactant to the system to increase the wettability of the dye for more facile dye regeneration. Surface treatment of the photoanode to deter dye leaching or improve the wettability of the dye molecule is also discussed. Redox mediators designed for aqueous DSSCs are also discussed. The review also includes quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, with a focus on improvements in QD loading and suppression of interfacial charge recombination at the photoanode. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Hybrid Perovskite/Perovskite Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinghong; Schlipf, Johannes; Wussler, Michael; Petrus, Michiel L; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Bein, Thomas; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Docampo, Pablo

    2016-06-28

    Recently developed organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells combine low-cost fabrication and high power conversion efficiency. Advances in perovskite film optimization have led to an outstanding power conversion efficiency of more than 20%. Looking forward, shifting the focus toward new device architectures holds great potential to induce the next leap in device performance. Here, we demonstrate a perovskite/perovskite heterojunction solar cell. We developed a facile solution-based cation infiltration process to deposit layered perovskite (LPK) structures onto methylammonium lead iodide (MAPI) films. Grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments were performed to gain insights into the crystallite orientation and the formation process of the perovskite bilayer. Our results show that the self-assembly of the LPK layer on top of an intact MAPI layer is accompanied by a reorganization of the perovskite interface. This leads to an enhancement of the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency due to reduced recombination losses, as well as improved moisture stability in the resulting photovoltaic devices.

  4. Bifacial Perovskite Solar Cells Featuring Semitransparent Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanmandlu, Chintam; Chen, Chien-Yu; Boopathi, Karunakara Moorthy; Lin, Hao-Wu; Lai, Chao-Sung; Chu, Chih-Wei

    2017-09-27

    Inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are promising devices for providing future clean energy because of their low cost, ease of fabrication, and high efficiencies, similar to those of silicon solar cells. These materials have been investigated for their potential use in bifacial PSCs, which can absorb light from both sides of the electrodes. Here, we fabricated bifacial PSCs featuring transparent BCP/Ag/MoO3 rear electrodes, which we formed through low-temperature processing using thermal evaporation methods. We employed a comprehensive optical distribution program to calculate the distributions of the optical field intensities with constant thicknesses of the absorbing layer in the top electrode configuration. The best PSC having a transparent BCP/Ag/MoO3 electrode achieved PCEs of 13.49% and 9.61% when illuminated from the sides of the indium tin oxide and BCP/Ag/MoO3 electrodes, respectively. We observed significant power enhancement when operating this PSC using mirror reflectors and bifacial light illumination from both sides of the electrodes.

  5. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  6. Experimental Investigation on Thermoelectric Chiller Driven by Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Lin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental explorations on cooling performance of thermoelectric chillers being driven by solar cells, as well as comparison results to the performance being driven by fixed direct current. Solar energy is clear and limitless and can be collected by solar cells. We use solar cells to drive thermoelectric chillers, where the cold side is connected to the water tank. It is found that 250 mL of water can be cooled from 18.5°C to 13°C, where the corresponding coefficient of performance (COP is changed between 0.55 and 1.05, when solar insolation is changed between 450 W/m2 and 1000 W/m2. The experimental results demonstrate that the thermoelectric chiller driven by solar cell is feasible and effective for energy saving issues.

  7. Practical antireflection coatings for metal-semiconductor solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Y. C. M.; Ernest, F. P.; Stirn, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The metal-semiconductor solar cell is a potential candidate for converting solar energy to electrical energy for space and terrestrial application. In this paper, a method for obtaining parameters of practical antireflection (AR) coatings for the metal-semiconductor solar cells is given. This method utilizes the measured equivalent index of refraction obtained from ellipsometry, since the surface to be AR coated has a multilayer structure. Both the experimental results and theoretical calculations of optical parameters for Ta2O5 AR coatings on Au-GaAs and Au-GaAs(0.78)P(0.22) solar cells are presented for comparison.

  8. Practical anti-reflection coating for metal semiconductor solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Y.-C. M.; Stirn, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The metal-semiconductor solar cell is a possible candidate for converting solar to electrical energy for terrestrial application. A method is given for obtaining optical parameters of practical antireflection coatings for the metal-semiconductor solar cell. This method utilizes the measured refractive index obtained from ellipsometry since the surface to be AR coated has a multilayer structure. Both the experimental results and theoretical calculation of optical parameters for Ta2O5 antireflection coatings on Au-GaAs and Au-GaAs(0.78)P(0.22) solar cells are presented for comparison.

  9. Review of Polymer, Dye-Sensitized, and Hybrid Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. F. Mohd-Nasir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of inorganic nanoparticles semiconductor, conjugated polymer, and dye-sensitized in a layer of solar cell is now recognized as potential application in developing flexible, large area, and low cost photovoltaic devices. Several conjugated low bandgap polymers, dyes, and underlayer materials based on the previous studies are quoted in this paper, which can provide guidelines in designing low cost photovoltaic solar cells. All of these materials are designed to help harvest more sunlight in a wider range of the solar spectrum besides enhancing the rate of charge transfer in a device structure. This review focuses on developing solid-state dye-synthesized, polymer, and hybrid solar cells.

  10. Characteristics of Bilayer Molybdenum Films Deposited Using RF Sputtering for Back Contact of Thin Film Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sea-Fue Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mo films prepared under a single deposition condition seldom simultaneously obtain a low resistivity and a good adhesion necessary for use in solar cells. In order to surmount the obstacle, bilayer Mo films using DC sputtering at a higher working pressure and a lower working pressure have been attempted as reported in the literature. In this study, RF sputtering with different powers in conjunction with different working pressures was explored to prepare bilayer Mo film. The first bottom layer was grown at a RF sputtering power of 30 W and a working pressure of 12 mTorr, and the second top layer was deposited at 100 W and 4.5 mTorr. The films revealed a columnar growth with a preferred orientation along the (110 plane. The bilayer Mo films reported an electrical resistivity of 6.35 × 10−5 Ω-cm and passed the Scotch tape test for adhesion to the soda-lime glass substrate, thereby qualifying the bilayer Mo films for use as back metal contacts for CIGS substrates.

  11. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon applied in very thin tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicho, Sandra

    2011-07-28

    Thin-film solar cells are fabricated by low-cost production processes, and are therefore an alternative to conventionally used wafer solar cells based on crystalline silicon. Due to the different band gaps, tandem cells that consist of amorphous (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline ({mu}c-Si:H) single junction solar cells deposited on top of each other use the solar spectrum much more efficient than single junction solar cells. The silicon layers are usually deposited on TCO (Transparent Conductive Oxide)-coated glass and metal- or plastic foils. Compared to the CdTe and CIGS based thin-film technologies, silicon thin-film solar cells have the advantage that no limitation of raw material supply is expected and no toxic elements are used. Nevertheless, the production cost per Wattpeak is the decisive factor concerning competitiveness and can be reduced by, e.g., shorter deposition times or reduced material consumption. Both cost-reducing conceptions are simultaneously achieved by reducing the a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si:H absorber layer thicknesses in a tandem device. In the work on hand, the influence of an absorber layer thickness reduction up to 77% on the photovoltaic parameters of a-Si:H/{mu}c-Si:H tandem solar cells was investigated. An industry-oriented Radio Frequency Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (RF-PECVD) system was used to deposit the solar cells on glass substrates coated with randomly structured TCO layers. The thicknesses of top and bottom cell absorber layers were varied by adjusting the deposition time. Reduced layer thicknesses lead to lower absorption and, hence, to reduced short-circuit current densities which, however, are partially balanced by higher open-circuit voltages and fill factors. Furthermore, by using very thin amorphous top cells, the light-induced degradation decreases tremendously. Accordingly, a thickness reduction of 75% led to an efficiency loss of only 21 %. By adjusting the parameters for the deposition of a-Si:H top cells, a

  12. Electron Acceptor Materials Engineering in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Huan

    2011-07-15

    Lead sulfide colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells with a solar power conversion efficiency of 5.6% are reported. The result is achieved through careful optimization of the titanium dioxide electrode that serves as the electron acceptor. Metal-ion-doped sol-gel-derived titanium dioxide electrodes produce a tunable-bandedge, well-passivated materials platform for CQD solar cell optimization. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Solar cells as a renewable source for electricity generation

    OpenAIRE

    Mezek, Maksimilijan

    2017-01-01

    Thesis is dedicated to in-service primary school technology teachers. The operation of solar cells is described first, then a history, followed by the direction of the development of solar cells. The next part of the thesis compare generation of electricity with various power plants in relation to the environment. There is also described some photovoltaic systems and what are the possibilities of obtaining solar energy. Project-based learning characteristics, types and phases are presente...

  14. Experiment Based Teaching of Solar Cell Operation and Characterization Using the SolarLab Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Sera, Dezso; Kerekes, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Experiment based teaching methods are a great way to get students involved and interested in almost any topic. This paper presents such a hands-on approach for teaching solar cell operation principles along with characterization and modelling methods. This is achieved with the SolarLab platform...... interfaces for exploring different solar cell principles and topics. The exercises presented in the current paper have been adapted from the original exercises developed for the SolarLab platform and are currently included in the Photovoltaic Power Systems courses (MSc and PhD level) taught at the Department...

  15. Topology optimization of front metallization patterns for solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, D.K.; Langelaar, M.; Barink, M.; Keulen, F. van

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the application of topology optimization (TO) for designing the front electrode patterns for solar cells. Improving the front electrode design is one of the approaches to improve the performance of the solar cells. It serves to produce the voltage distribution for the front

  16. Transparent conductive oxides for thin-film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löffler, J.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes research on thin-film silicon solar cells with focus on the transparent conductive oxide (TCO) for such devices. In addition to the formation of a transparent and electrically conductive front electrode for the solar cell allowing photocurrent collection with low ohmic losses,

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Aspects of Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovich, V.A.

    2013-01-01

    Due to pressure from the photovoltaic industry to decrease the cost of solar cell production, there is a tendency to reduce the thickness of silicon wafers. Unfortunately, wafers contain defects created by the various processing steps involved in solar cell production, which significantly reduce the

  18. Improvement of multicrystalline silicon wafer solar cells by post ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) and the fill factor (FF) of finished multicrystalline silicon (-Si) solar cells by using a new chemical treatment with a hot phosphoric (H3PO4) acidic solution. These -Si solar cells were made by a standard industrial process with ...

  19. A solution process for inverted tandem solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Bundgaard, Eva; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O.

    2011-01-01

    Tandem solar cells with normal and inverted device geometries were prepared by a solution process. Both device types were based on the use of zinc(II)oxide as the electron transporting layer (ETL). The hole transporting layer (HTL) was either PEDOT:PSS for normal geometry tandem solar cells...

  20. Applications of ``PV Optics`` for solar cell and module design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Madjdpour, J.; Chen, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes some applications of a new optics software package, PV Optics, developed for the optical design of solar cells and modules. PV Optics is suitable for the analysis and design of both thick and thin solar cells. It also includes a feature for calculation of metallic losses related to contacts and back reflectors.

  1. The appropriateness of organic solar cells for indoor lighting conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnaert, B.; Veelaert, P.

    2010-05-01

    Most commercially available photovoltaic solar cells are crystalline silicon cells. However, in indoor environments, the efficiency of silicon solar cells is poor. Typically, the light intensity under artificial lighting conditions is less than 10 W/m2 as compared to 100-1000 W/m2 under outdoor conditions. Moreover, the spectrum is different from the outdoor solar spectrum and there is more diffuse than direct light. Taken into account the predicted cheaper costs for the production of organic solar cells, a possible niche market for organic PV can be indoor applications. In this article, we study the influence of the narrow absorption window, characteristic for organic solar cells, for different indoor conditions. This comparison is made for typical artificial light sources, i.e. a common incandescent lamp, an LED lamp and a "warm" and a "cool" fluorescent tube, which are compared to the outdoor AM 1.5 spectrum as reference. The comparisons are done by simulation based on the quantum efficiencies of the solar cells and the light spectra of the different light sources. A classical silicon solar cell is used as reference. In this way we determine the appropriateness for indoor use of organic solar cells.

  2. Stability and degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Bernhard

    2012-04-26

    This thesis deals with stability improvements and the investigation of degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells. Organic solar cells have been in the focus of extensive academic research for over almost two decades and are currently entering the market in small scale applications. For successful large scale applications, next to the improvement of the power conversion efficiency, the stability of organic solar cells has to be increased. This thesis is dedicated to the investigation of novel materials and architectures to study stability-related issues and degradation mechanisms in order to contribute to the basic understanding of the working principles of organic solar cells. Here, impedance spectroscopy, a frequency domain technique, is used to gain information about stability and degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells. In combination with systematic variations in the preparation of solar cells, impedance spectroscopy gives the possibility to differentiate between interface and bulk dominated effects. Additionally, impedance spectroscopy gives access to the dielectric properties of the device, such as capacitance. This offers among other things the opportunity to probe the charge carrier concentration and the density of states. Another powerful way of evaluation is the combination of experimentally obtained impedance spectra with equivalent circuit modelling. The thesis presents results on novel materials and solar cell architectures for efficient hole and electron extraction. This indicates the importance of knowledge over interlayers and interfaces for improving both the efficiency and stability of organic solar cells.

  3. Inkjet printing of back electrodes for inverted polymer solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angmo, D.; Sweelssen, J.; Andriessen, H.A.J.M.; Galagan, Y.O.; Krebs, F.C.

    2013-01-01

    Evaporation is the most commonly used deposition method in the processing of back electrodes in polymer solar cells used in scientifi c studies. However, vacuum-based methods such as evaporation are uneconomical in the upscaling of polymer solar cells as they are throughput limiting steps in an

  4. Amorphous and crystalline silicon based heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttauf, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314118039

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, research on amorphous and crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells is described. Probably the most important feature of SHJ solar cells is a thin intrinsic amorphous silicion (a‑Si:H) layer that is deposited before depositing the doped emitter and back surface field. The

  5. Pathways to a New Efficiency Regime for Organic Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, L. Jan Anton; Shaheen, Sean E.; Hummelen, Jan C.

    2012-01-01

    Three different theoretical approaches are presented to identify pathways to organic solar cells with power conversion efficiencies in excess of 20%. A radiation limit for organic solar cells is introduced that elucidates the role of charge-transfer (CT) state absorption. Provided this CT action is

  6. Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-09

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0048 TR-2015-0048 SUPERLATTICE INTERMEDIATE BAND SOLAR CELL ON GALLIUM ARSENIDE Alexandre Freundlich...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-13-1-0232 Superlattice Intermediate Band Solar Cell on Gallium Arsenide 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  7. Solar cell is housed in light-bulb enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Inexpensive, conventional solar-cell module uses focusing principle of electric lamp in reverse to produce electric power from sunlight. Standard outdoor light enclosure provides low-cost housing which concentrates sunlight in solar cell. Unit is capable of producing approximately 1 watt of electric power.

  8. Device physics of polymer : fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Paul W. M.; Mihailetchi, Valentin D.; Koster, L. Jan Anton; Markov, Denis E.

    2007-01-01

    Plastic solar cells bear the potential for large-scale power generation based on materials that provide the possibility of flexible, lightweight, inexpensive, efficient solar cells. Since the discovery of the photoinduced electron transfer from a conjugated polymer to fullerene molecules, followed

  9. Topology optimization for improving the performance of solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, D.K.; Langelaar, M.; Keulen, F. van; Barink, M.

    2014-01-01

    This work introduces the application of Topology Optimization (TO) to design optimal front metallization patterns for solar cells and increase their power output. A challenging aspect of the solar cell electrode design problem is the strong nonlinear relation between the active layer current and the

  10. Evaluation of solar cells and arrays for potential solar power satellite applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almgren, D.W.; Csigi, K.; Gaudet, A.D.

    1978-03-31

    Proposed solar array designs and manufacturing methods are evaluated to identify options which show the greatest promise of leading up to the develpment of a cost-effective SPS solar cell array design. The key program elements which have to be accomplished as part of an SPS solar cell array development program are defined. The issues focussed on are: (1) definition of one or more designs of a candidate SPS solar array module, using results from current system studies; (2) development of the necessary manufacturing requirements for the candidate SPS solar cell arrays and an assessment of the market size, timing, and industry infrastructure needed to produce the arrays for the SPS program; (3) evaluation of current DOE, NASA and DOD photovoltaic programs to determine the impacts of recent advances in solar cell materials, array designs and manufacturing technology on the candidate SPS solar cell arrays; and (4) definition of key program elements for the development of the most promising solar cell arrays for the SPS program.

  11. Evaluation of solar cells and arrays for potential solar power satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almgren, D. W.; Csigi, K.; Gaudet, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    Proposed solar array designs and manufacturing methods are evaluated to identify options which show the greatest promise of leading up to the develpment of a cost-effective SPS solar cell array design. The key program elements which have to be accomplished as part of an SPS solar cell array development program are defined. The issues focussed on are: (1) definition of one or more designs of a candidate SPS solar array module, using results from current system studies; (2) development of the necessary manufacturing requirements for the candidate SPS solar cell arrays and an assessment of the market size, timing, and industry infrastructure needed to produce the arrays for the SPS program; (3) evaluation of current DOE, NASA and DOD photovoltaic programs to determine the impacts of recent advances in solar cell materials, array designs and manufacturing technology on the candidate SPS solar cell arrays; and (4) definition of key program elements for the development of the most promising solar cell arrays for the SPS program.

  12. Silicon Thin-Film Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Beaucarne

    2007-01-01

    with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. In spite of the fundamental limitation of this material due to its disorder and metastability, the technology is now gaining industrial momentum thanks to the entry of equipment manufacturers with experience with large-area PECVD. Microcrystalline Si (also called nanocrystalline Si is a material with crystallites in the nanometer range in an amorphous matrix, and which contains less defects than amorphous silicon. Its lower bandgap makes it particularly appropriate as active material for the bottom cell in tandem and triple junction devices. The combination of an amorphous silicon top cell and a microcrystalline bottom cell has yielded promising results, but much work is needed to implement it on large-area and to limit light-induced degradation. Finally thin-film polysilicon solar cells, with grain size in the micrometer range, has recently emerged as an alternative photovoltaic technology. The layers have a grain size ranging from 1 μm to several tens of microns, and are formed at a temperature ranging from 600 to more than 1000∘C. Solid Phase Crystallization has yielded the best results so far but there has recently been fast progress with seed layer approaches, particularly those using the aluminum-induced crystallization technique.

  13. Monolithic Perovskite Silicon Tandem Solar Cells with Advanced Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Jan C.; Bett, Alexander J.; Bivour, Martin; Blasi, Benedikt; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Kohlstadt, Markus; Lee, Seunghun; Mastroianni, Simone; Mundt, Laura; Mundus, Markus; Ndione, Paul; Reichel, Christian; Schubert, Martin; Schulze, Patricia S.; Tucher, Nico; Veit, Clemens; Veurman, Welmoed; Wienands, Karl; Winkler, Kristina; Wurfel, Uli; Glunz, Stefan W.; Hermle, Martin

    2016-11-14

    For high efficiency monolithic perovskite silicon tandem solar cells, we develop low-temperature processes for the perovskite top cell, rear-side light trapping, optimized perovskite growth, transparent contacts and adapted characterization methods.

  14. Environmentally benign silicon solar cell manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Menna, P. [National Agency for New Technologies Energy and Environment, Portici (Italy); Strebkov, D.S.; Pinov, A.; Zadde, V. [Intersolarcenter, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-09-01

    The manufacturing of silicon devices--from polysilicon production, crystal growth, ingot slicing, wafer cleaning, device processing, to encapsulation--requires many steps that are energy intensive and use large amounts of water and toxic chemicals. In the past two years, the silicon integrated-circuit (IC) industry has initiated several programs to promote environmentally benign manufacturing, i.e., manufacturing practices that recover, recycle, and reuse materials resources with a minimal consumption of energy. Crystalline-silicon solar photovoltaic (PV) modules, which accounted for 87% of the worldwide module shipments in 1997, are large-area devices with many manufacturing steps similar to those used in the IC industry. Obviously, there are significant opportunities for the PV industry to implement more environmentally benign manufacturing approaches. Such approaches often have the potential for significant cost reduction by reducing energy use and/or the purchase volume of new chemicals and by cutting the amount of used chemicals that must be discarded. This paper will review recent accomplishments of the IC industry initiatives and discuss new processes for environmentally benign silicon solar-cell manufacturing.

  15. Photoelectrochemistry of metallo-octacarboxyphthalocyanines for the development of dye solar cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mphahlele, N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Significant attention is being paid to dye solar cells (DSCs) as the next generation in solar cell technology for their low cost alternative as compared to solid state solar cells....

  16. Cooling performance of solar cell driven, thermoelectric cooling prototype headgear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, T.; Azuma, H.; Shimizu, H.; Obora, H.; Sato, S. [Nippon Inst. of Technology, Saitama (Japan). Dept. of Systems Engineering

    1998-11-01

    Cooling performance of solar cell-driven, thermoelectric cooling prototype headgear was examined experimentally. Three types of prototype headgear were made and examined. They were cooled by thermoelectric elements and driven by solar cells. Conventional cooling caps driven by solar cells only blow ambient air to the face with an electric fan. A thermoelectric element was set at the front of the headgear to cool the forehead. Solar cells were mounted on the top and the brim of the headgear to work the thermoelectric element. Three prototypes of headgear with solar cells and a thermoelectric element were made and tested. Refrigeration capacity and thermal comfort were examined by subject in cases of sitting, walking and bicycling. The temperature difference between ambient and cooling temperature was required to be 4-5 degrees Celsius for thermal comfort. (author)

  17. Neutral- and Multi-Colored Semitransparent Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Tae Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarize recent works on perovskite solar cells with neutral- and multi-colored semitransparency for building-integrated photovoltaics and tandem solar cells. The perovskite solar cells exploiting microstructured arrays of perovskite “islands” and transparent electrodes—the latter of which include thin metallic films, metal nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphenes, and transparent conductive oxides for achieving optical transparency—are investigated. Moreover, the perovskite solar cells with distinctive color generation, which are enabled by engineering the band gap of the perovskite light-harvesting semiconductors with chemical management and integrating with photonic nanostructures, including microcavity, are discussed. We conclude by providing future research directions toward further performance improvements of the semitransparent perovskite solar cells.

  18. Near-field electromagnetic theory for thin solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, A; Gharghi, M; Gladden, C; Miller, O D; Zhang, X

    2012-09-28

    Current methods for evaluating solar cell efficiencies cannot be applied to low-dimensional structures where phenomena from the realm of near-field optics prevail. We present a theoretical approach to analyze solar cell performance by allowing rigorous electromagnetic calculations of the emission rate using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Our approach shows the direct quantification of the voltage, current, and efficiency of low-dimensional solar cells. This approach is demonstrated by calculating the voltage and the efficiency of a GaAs slab solar cell for thicknesses from several microns down to a few nanometers. This example highlights the ability of the proposed approach to capture the role of optical near-field effects in solar cell performance.

  19. Emerging Semitransparent Solar Cells: Materials and Device Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Qidong; Yan, Feng

    2017-09-01

    Semitransparent solar cells can provide not only efficient power-generation but also appealing images and show promising applications in building integrated photovoltaics, wearable electronics, photovoltaic vehicles and so forth in the future. Such devices have been successfully realized by incorporating transparent electrodes in new generation low-cost solar cells, including organic solar cells (OSCs), dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) and organometal halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs). In this review, the advances in the preparation of semitransparent OSCs, DSCs, and PSCs are summarized, focusing on the top transparent electrode materials and device designs, which are all crucial to the performance of these devices. Techniques for optimizing the efficiency, color and transparency of the devices are addressed in detail. Finally, a summary of the research field and an outlook into the future development in this area are provided. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Neutral- and Multi-Colored Semitransparent Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Guo, L Jay; Park, Hui Joon

    2016-04-11

    In this review, we summarize recent works on perovskite solar cells with neutral- and multi-colored semitransparency for building-integrated photovoltaics and tandem solar cells. The perovskite solar cells exploiting microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands" and transparent electrodes-the latter of which include thin metallic films, metal nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphenes, and transparent conductive oxides for achieving optical transparency-are investigated. Moreover, the perovskite solar cells with distinctive color generation, which are enabled by engineering the band gap of the perovskite light-harvesting semiconductors with chemical management and integrating with photonic nanostructures, including microcavity, are discussed. We conclude by providing future research directions toward further performance improvements of the semitransparent perovskite solar cells.