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Sample records for cieslik malgorzata waszak

  1. Malgorzata Kasperska Henryk Bunka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The MarCo Engineering Company Ltd. has its registered seat at Gdynia and was established in 1990. We are the exclusive representative for Poland of the world`s renowned manufacturers of heat distribution network products; Through six subsidiaries (Gdynia, Warsaw, Wroclaw, Cracow, Gliwice and Lublin) and our dealers` network all over Poland the following products and services are offered: (1) automatic control systems for heating and air conditioning; (2) a supervisory remote control system for heat distribution centers; (3) compensating devices for central heating and household hot water installations; (4) radiator thermostatic valves; (5) Meinecke water meters; (6) thermal energy counters; (6) a remote calorimeter data reading system SIOX; (7) an electronic central heating costs sharing system - GT-15; (8) compact thermal stations; and (9) compact and pipe exchangers. The modern, high standard devices offered have achieved much success on the Polish market.

  2. Eesti kunst poola silmade kaudu / Heie Treier

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Treier, Heie, 1963-

    2002-01-01

    Poolas Gdanski Laznia keskuses avatud eesti kunsti suurnäitusest, mille koostas Malgorzata Lisiewizc, kes võttis näituse komplekteerimise keskseks märksõnaks "keha". Osaleb 30 kunstnikku, ilmus kataloog. Eksponaatide saatetekstidest

  3. Eesti kunsti dessant Poolas / Johannes Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Saar, Johannes, 1965-

    2002-01-01

    Gdanskis Laznia Kunstikeskuses eesti maalikunsti, foto, videokunsti, moe- ja ehtekunsti näitus "Kauguste kahanemine". Kuraator Malgorzata Lisiewicz. Näitusekataloogi artiklid on kirjutanud M. Lisiewicz, H. Treier, M. Sobolev ja K. Kivimaa

  4. Experimental Investigation into the Aerodynamic Performance of Both Rigid and Flexible Wing Structured Micro-Air-Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    aircraft. James McMichael, DARPA’s MAV Program Manager uniquely described the MAV concept as: MAVs should be thought of as aerial robots , as six-degree... Sailboats use the adaptive washout technique to aid control of the sail through twist of the sail edge normal to the relative wind (Waszak and Jenkins

  5. Reward Modulates Adaptations to Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, Senne; Verguts, Tom; Roggeman, Chantal; Notebaert, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Both cognitive conflict (e.g. Verguts & Notebaert, 2009) and reward signals (e.g. Waszak & Pholulamdeth, 2009) have been proposed to enhance task-relevant associations. Bringing these two notions together, we predicted that reward modulates conflict-based sequential adaptations in cognitive control. This was tested combining either a single…

  6. Poola Nike 2008 / Hendrik Lindepuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lindepuu, Hendrik

    2008-01-01

    Poola mainekaima kirjandusauhinna Nike pälvis tänavu Olga Tokarczuki romaan "Jooksjad". Nominendid olid veel: Bronislaw Swiderski "Surma assistent", Krzysztof Varga "Hauakivi terrasiidiga", Andrzej Sosnowski "Pärast vikerkaart", Andrzej Szczeklik "Kore. Haigetest, haigusest ja hinge otsinguist", Wlodzimierz Nowaki "Pea ümbermõõt" ja Malgorzata Szejnerti "Must aed"

  7. Diet-induced metabolic hamster model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Prakash, Satya; Bhathena, Jasmine; Urbanska,Aleksandra; Kulamarva,Arun; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Martoni, Christopher; Paul, Arghya

    2011-01-01

    Jasmine Bhathena, Arun Kulamarva, Christopher Martoni, Aleksandra Malgorzata Urbanska, Meenakshi Malhotra, Arghya Paul, Satya PrakashBiomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, CanadaBackground: Obesity, hypercholesterolemia, elevated triglycerides, and type 2 diabetes are major risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Hamsters, un...

  8. Analysis of the relationships between edentulism, periodontal health, body composition, and bone mineral density in elderly women

    OpenAIRE

    Ignasiak Z; Radwan-Oczko M; Rozek-Piechura K; Cholewa M.; Skrzek A; Ignasiak T; Slawinska T

    2016-01-01

    Zofia Ignasiak,1 Malgorzata Radwan-Oczko,2 Krystyna Rozek-Piechura,3 Marta Cholewa,4 Anna Skrzek,5 Tomasz Ignasiak,6 Teresa Slawinska1 1Department of Biostructure, University School of Physical Education, Wroclaw, Poland; 2Department of Periodontology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; 3Department of Physiotherapy and Occupation Therapy in Internal Diseases, University School of Physical Education, Wroclaw, Poland; 4DENTARAMA Dentistry Center, Walbrzych, Poland; 5Department of Phy...

  9. Correction to: Impact of a mixed educational and semi-restrictive antimicrobial stewardship project in a large teaching hospital in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbe, Daniele Roberto; Del Bono, Valerio; Mikulska, Malgorzata; Gustinetti, Giulia; Marchese, Anna; Mina, Federica; Signori, Alessio; Orsi, Andrea; Rudello, Fulvio; Alicino, Cristiano; Bonalumi, Beatrice; Morando, Alessandra; Icardi, Giancarlo; Beltramini, Sabrina; Viscoli, Claudio

    2017-12-01

    A technical error led to incorrect rendering of the author group in this article. The correct authorship is as follows: Daniele Roberto Giacobbe 1 , Valerio Del Bono 1 , Malgorzata Mikulska 1 , Giulia Gustinetti 1 , Anna Marchese 2 , Federica Mina 3 , Alessio Signori 4 , Andrea Orsi 5 , Fulvio Rudello 6 , Cristiano Alicino 5 , Beatrice Bonalumi 3 , Alessandra Morando 7 , Giancarlo Icardi 5 , Sabrina Beltramini 3 , Claudio Viscoli 1 ; On behalf of the San Martino Antimicrobial Stewardship Group.

  10. Response to “Oral health in the elderly patient and its impact on general well-being: a nonsystematic review” paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muc-Wierzgoń M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Malgorzata Muc-Wierzgoń, Teresa Kokot, Ewa Nowakowska-Zajdel, Adam Błażelonis, Edyta Fatyga Department of Internal Medicine, Silesian Medical University, Bytom, PolandDear editorGil-Montoya et al has recently published an interesting article in Clinical Interventions in Aging entitled: “Oral health in the elderly patient and its impact on general well-being: a nonsystematic review”.1 Authors presented a non-systematic review of the published data regarding the oral health status of the elderly and its main repercussions, including its impact on general health and nutrition.View original paper by Gil-Montoya and colleagues.

  11. Poland at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    On 17 October 2000, the second Polish industrial and technological exhibition opens at CERN*. The first one was held five years ago and nine of the companies that were present then have come back again this year. Six of those companies were awarded contracts with CERN in 1995. Three Polish officials were present at the Opening Ceremony today: Mrs Malgorzata Kozlowska, Under-secretary of State in the State Committee for Scientific Research, Mr Henryk Ogryczak, Under-secretary of State in Ministry of Economy and Prof. Jerzy Niewodniczanski, President of National Atomic Energy Agency.

  12. Polish Industry and Art at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    On 17 October 2000 the second Polish industrial and technological exhibition opened at CERN. The first one was held five years ago and nine of the companies that were present then have come back again this year. Six of those companies were awarded contracts with CERN in 1995. Three Polish officials were present at the Opening Ceremony today: Mrs Malgorzata Kozlowska, Under-secretary of State in the State Committee for Scientific Research, Mr Henryk Ogryczak, Under-secretary of State in Ministry of Economy and Prof. Jerzy Niewodniczanski, President of National Atomic Energy Agency. Professor Luciano Maiani welcomed the Polish delegation to CERN and stressed the important contribution of Polish scientists and industrialists to the work of the laboratory. Director General Luciano Maiani (back left) and head of SPL division Karl-Heinz Kissler (back right) visit the Poland at CERN exhibition… The exhibition offers Polish companies the opportunity to establish professional contacts with CERN. Nineteen companies...

  13. Disentangling Inhibition-Based and Retrieval-Based Aftereffects of Distractors: Cognitive Versus Motor Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tarini; Laub, Ruth; Burgard, Jan Pablo; Frings, Christian

    2017-11-20

    Selective attention refers to the ability to selectively act upon relevant information at the expense of irrelevant information. Yet, in many experimental tasks, what happens to the representation of the irrelevant information is still debated. Typically, 2 approaches to distractor processing have been suggested, namely distractor inhibition and distractor-based retrieval. However, it is also typical that both processes are hard to disentangle. For instance, in the negative priming literature (for a review Frings, Schneider, & Fox, 2015) this has been a continuous debate since the early 1980s. In the present study, we attempted to prove that both processes exist, but that they reflect distractor processing at different levels of representation. Distractor inhibition impacts stimulus representation, whereas distractor-based retrieval impacts mainly motor processes. We investigated both processes in a distractor-priming task, which enables an independent measurement of both processes. For our argument that both processes impact different levels of distractor representation, we estimated the exponential parameter (τ) and Gaussian components (μ, σ) of the exponential Gaussian reaction-time (RT) distribution, which have previously been used to independently test the effects of cognitive and motor processes (e.g., Moutsopoulou & Waszak, 2012). The distractor-based retrieval effect was evident for the Gaussian component, which is typically discussed as reflecting motor processes, but not for the exponential parameter, whereas the inhibition component was evident for the exponential parameter, which is typically discussed as reflecting cognitive processes, but not for the Gaussian parameter. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. A novel approach to study radiation track structure with nanometer-equivalent resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiraghi, Margherita; Bashkirov, Vladimir; Hurley, Ford; Schulte, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    Clustered DNA damages are considered the critical lesions in the pathways leading from the initial energy deposition by radiation to radiobiological damage. The spatial distribution of the initial DNA damage is mainly determined by radiation track-structure at the nanometer level. In this work, a novel experimental approach to image the three-dimensional structure of micrometric radiation track segments is presented. The approach utilizes the detection of single ions created in low-pressure gas. Ions produced by radiation drift towards a GEM-like 2D hole-pattern detector. When entering individual holes, ions can induce ion-impact ionization of the working-gas starting a confined electron avalanche that generates the output signal. By registering positive ions rather than electrons, diffusion is reduced and a spatial resolution of the track image of the order of water-equivalent nanometers can be achieved. Measurements and simulations to characterize the performance of a few detector designs were performed. Different cathode materials were tested and ionization cluster size distributions of 241Am alpha particles were measured. The electric field configuration in the detector was calculated to optimize the ion focusing into the detector holes. The preliminary results obtained show the directions for further development of the detector. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Nano-scale Insights into Ion-beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Paulo Limão-Vieira and Malgorzata Smialek-Telega

  15. Managing myelodysplastic syndromes in very old patients: a teaching case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niscola P

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pasquale Niscola, Massimiliano Palombi, Malgorzata Monika Trawinska, Andrea Tendas, Marco Giovannini, Laura Scaramucci, Alessio Perrotti, Paolo de Fabritiis Hematology Unit, Sant'Eugenio Hospital, Rome, Italy Abstract: The introduction of hypomethylating agents in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS has significantly changed the clinical scenario of these diseases, which afflict predominantly older individuals. However, some concerns regarding the optimal application of these innovative and costly agents in the treatment of geriatric high-risk MDS remain. We report here the case of a nonagenarian treated with hypomethylating agents achieving a long-lasting clinical response and a significant improvement in her functional status. Our case confirmed that functional status and biological status, rather than the chronological age alone, can substantially guide the plan of an appropriate treatment strategy in high-risk MDS patients; moreover, the current case emphasizes the need for targeted studies in the field of geriatric MDS in order to formulate guidelines on the appropriate use of these costly agents, so that candidate patients can receive adequate treatment to preserve their quality of life and life expectancy, but at the same time avoiding unnecessary costs deriving from the use of high-cost drugs for those in whom a significant therapeutic result cannot be reasonably expected. Keywords: myelodysplastic syndromes, azacitidine, older patients

  16. Cervical elastography during pregnancy: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swiatkowska-Freund M

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Malgorzata Swiatkowska-Freund, Krzysztof Preis Department of Obstetrics, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland Abstract: Uterine cervix is a part of the uterus responsible for maintaining pregnancy till term. As long as the cervix remains long and firm and its internal orifice (os is closed, it can withstand enlargement of the uterine contents and resultant growing pressure. Mechanical properties of the cervix change during pregnancy; the cervix ripens prior to delivery, then effaces and dilates with contractions of the uterus. Ripening of the cervix can be assessed using the Bishop score and ultrasonographically determined length of the cervical canal and internal os. Consistency is one of the cervical properties that change during the course of the maturation process. Until recently, cervical consistency has been assessed only manually, but in 2007, the first report on elastographic imaging of the cervix during pregnancy has been published. Elastography presents the ability of a tissue to deform under pressure. The softer the tissue, the easier it changes its shape. Different methods of elastography are used – static, when tissue displacement in response to manual compression or physiological movements of vessels is measured, or dynamic, when the speed of shear wave propagation is determined. Irrespective of the method, elastography provides information on the internal os stiffness; this parameter, impossible for manual assessment, was shown to correlate with pregnancy outcome and is a strong predictor of preterm delivery or successful labor induction. Although elastography seems to be a highly promising diagnostic option, still no consensus has been reached regarding an optimal method for uterine cervix assessment, and virtually all previous studies of various elastographic methods produced highly satisfactory results. Future studies need to identify the most promising and objective elastographic method which may serve as a novel

  17. Assessment of chicken protection against Campylobacter jejuni infection by immunization with avirulent Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium strain producing Campylobacter CjaD/Pal protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łaniewski P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Pawel Laniewski,1 Malgorzata Lis,2 Agnieszka Wyszynska,1 Pawel Majewski,3 Renata Godlewska,1 Elzbieta Katarzyna Jagusztyn-Krynicka11Department of Bacterial Genetics, Institute of Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland; 2Biowet Pulawy Ltd, Pulawy, Poland; 3Department of Vertebrate Physiology, Institute of Zoology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Warsaw, PolandAbstract: Campylobacter jejuni is a major food-borne pathogen, causing gastroenteritis worldwide. Chickens are considered to be one of the most common sources of human C. jejuni infection in developed countries. Campylobacter CjaD/Pal protein (annotated as Cj0113 in C. jejuni strain NCTC11168 is a highly immunogenic, membrane-located antigen, conserved among different strains, with the potential to provide broad protection against C. jejuni colonization. The present study examines the immunogenicity and the general efficacy of avirulent S. enterica sv. Typhimurium Δcrp Δcya expressing C. jejuni CjaD as a chicken vaccine against Campylobacter colonization. The high copy number plasmid pYA3341 Asd+ was used as a cloning vector. Here, 1- and 14-day old chickens were orally immunized with a delivery vector strain, expressing C. jejuni CjaD. Two weeks later, they were challenged with a wild-type C. jejuni strain isolated from chicken carcasses. This schedule of immunization induced significant levels of serum-specific IgG as well as mucosal intestinal sIgA as measured by ELISA tests using Campylobacter membrane proteins as a coating antigen. Nevertheless, protection experiments did not result in significant reduction of colonization of vaccinated birds relative to nonvaccinated birds.Keywords: Campylobacter, cjaD, immunization, Pal

  18. Diet-induced metabolic hamster model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhathena J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jasmine Bhathena, Arun Kulamarva, Christopher Martoni, Aleksandra Malgorzata Urbanska, Meenakshi Malhotra, Arghya Paul, Satya PrakashBiomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Artificial Cells and Organs Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, CanadaBackground: Obesity, hypercholesterolemia, elevated triglycerides, and type 2 diabetes are major risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Hamsters, unlike rats or mice, respond well to diet-induced obesity, increase body mass and adiposity on group housing, and increase food intake due to social confrontation-induced stress. They have a cardiovascular and hepatic system similar to that of humans, and can thus be a useful model for human pathophysiology.Methods: Experiments were planned to develop a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model of dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hamsters were fed a normal control diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, a high-fat/high-cholesterol/methionine-deficient/choline-devoid diet, and a high-fat/high-cholesterol/choline-deficient diet. Serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, atherogenic index, and body weight were quantified biweekly. Fat deposition in the liver was observed and assessed following lipid staining with hematoxylin and eosin and with oil red O.Results: In this study, we established a diet-induced Bio F1B Golden Syrian hamster model for studying dyslipidemia and associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the metabolic syndrome. Hyperlipidemia and elevated serum glucose concentrations were induced using this diet. Atherogenic index was elevated, increasing the risk for a cardiovascular event. Histological analysis of liver specimens at the end of four weeks showed increased fat deposition in the liver of animals fed

  19. Analysis of the relationships between edentulism, periodontal health, body composition, and bone mineral density in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignasiak Z

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Zofia Ignasiak,1 Malgorzata Radwan-Oczko,2 Krystyna Rozek-Piechura,3 Marta Cholewa,4 Anna Skrzek,5 Tomasz Ignasiak,6 Teresa Slawinska1 1Department of Biostructure, University School of Physical Education, Wroclaw, Poland; 2Department of Periodontology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; 3Department of Physiotherapy and Occupation Therapy in Internal Diseases, University School of Physical Education, Wroclaw, Poland; 4DENTARAMA Dentistry Center, Walbrzych, Poland; 5Department of Physiotherapy and Ocupation Therapy in Motor-System Dysfunction, University School of Physical Education, Wroclaw, Poland; 6Karkonosze State Higher School in Jelenia Gora, Jelenia Gora, Poland Objective: The relationship between bone mineral density (BMD and tooth loss in conjunction with periodontal disease is not clear. The suggested effects include alteration in bone remodeling rates as well as the multifaceted etiology of edentulism. There is also a question if other body-related variables besides BMD, such as body composition, may be associated with tooth number and general periodontal health. The aim of this study was to evaluate if tooth number and marginal periodontal status are associated with body composition and BMD in a sample of elderly women. Materials and methods: The study involved 91 postmenopausal women. Data included basic anthropometric characteristics, body composition via bioelectrical impedance analysis, and BMD analysis at the distal end of the radial bone of the nondominant arm via peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A dental examination was performed to assess tooth number, periodontal pocket depth (PD, and gingival bleeding. Results: In nonosteoporotic women, a significant positive correlation was found between BMD and lean body mass, total body water, and muscle mass. The indicators of bone metabolism correlated negatively with PD. Such relationships did not appear in osteoporotic women. In both groups, basic anthropometric

  20. Masseter muscle tension, chewing ability, and selected parameters of physical fitness in elderly care home residents in Lodz, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaszynska E

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ewelina Gaszynska,1 Malgorzata Godala,2 Franciszek Szatko,1 Tomasz Gaszynski3 1Department of Hygiene and Health Promotion, Medical University of Lodz, Poland; 2Department of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland; 3Department of Emergency Medicine and Disaster Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Poland Background: Maintaining good physical fitness and oral function in old age is an important element of good quality of life. Disability-related impairment of oral function contributes to a deterioration of the diet of older people and to the reduction of their social activity.Objectives: Investigate the association between masseter muscle tension, dental status, and physical fitness parameters.Materials and methods: Two hundred fifty-nine elderly care home residents (97 men, 162 women; mean age, 75.3±8.9 years were involved in this cross-sectional study. Their chewing ability was evaluated by masseter muscle tension palpation, differences of masseter muscle thickness, self-reported chewing ability, number of present and functional teeth, and number of posterior tooth pairs. Masseter muscle thickness was measured by ultrasonography. To assess physical fitness, hand grip strength and the timed up-and-go test were performed. Nutritional status was assessed using body mass index and body cell mass index (BCMI, calculated on the basis of electrical bioimpedance measurements. Medical records were used to collect information on systemic diseases and the number of prescribed medications. Subjects were also evaluated for their ability to perform ten activities of daily living.Results: Ninety-seven percent of the subjects suffered from systemic diseases. The three most prevalent illnesses were cardiac/circulatory 64.5%, musculoskeletal 37.3%, and endocrine/metabolic/nutritional 29.3%. Of the participants, 1.5% were underweight and more than one third (34.4% were overweight. Malnutrition (BCMI below normal was found in almost