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Sample records for ciertas anemias graves

  1. Remission of aplastic anemia induced by treatment for Graves disease in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prabodh Kumar; Wherrett, Diane; Dror, Yigal

    2007-08-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is mediated by T-cell autoimmunity in the majority of cases; it is rare and mostly idiopathic in children. We describe a child, who developed AA following Graves' disease which could not be attributed to antithyroid drugs. We hypothesized that both diseases were caused by similar autoimmune process. We monitored the blood counts and did not administer any conventional treatment for AA assuming that the existing anti- hematopoietic stem cell humoral and cellular immunity might subside with induction of remission of Grave's disease. The child went into complete remission with the treatment of the Graves' disease.

  2. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... child might have anemia. They will do a physical exam and review your health history and symptoms. To diagnose anemia, your doctor ... and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food ...

  3. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a hemoglobin value of less than 13.5 gm/dl in a man or less than 12.0 gm/dl in a woman. Normal values for children ... types of anemia cannot be prevented, eating healthy foods can help you avoid both iron-and vitamin- ...

  4. Glicanos de la vellosidad trofoblástica en la anemia ferropénica y la preeclampsia grave

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Alejandra María; Parra-Sosa, Beatriz Elena; Bueno-Sánchez, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: Las glicoproteínas de la membrana del sincitiotrofoblasto (STB) se encuentran en contacto con la sangre materna, por lo que pueden participar en la comunicación en la interface materno-fetal. Objetivo: caracterizar patrones de glicanos de la vellosidad trofoblástica de mujeres sanas, anémicas por deficiencia de hierro y preeclámpticas graves de inicio temprano. Materiales y métodos: se obtuvieron extractos proteínicos de vellosidad placentaria de tercer trimestre y se determinó ...

  5. Pancytopenia in a Patient with Grave's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Huai Heng; Tan, Florence

    2013-08-01

    Pancytopenia can rarely complicate Grave's disease. It can be due to uncontrolled thyrotoxicosis or as a result of rare side effect of antithyroid medication. Pernicious anemia leading to Vitamin B12 deficiency is another rare associated cause. We report a case of a patient with Grave's disease and undiagnosed pernicious anemia whom was assumed to have antithyroid drug induced pancytopenia. Failure to recognize this rare association of pernicious anemia as a cause of pancytopenia had resulted in delay in treatment and neurological complication in our patient.

  6. Pernicious anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... malabsorption); Anemia - intrinsic factor; Anemia - IF; Anemia - atrophic gastritis ... of pernicious anemia include: Weakened stomach lining (atrophic gastritis) An autoimmune condition in which the body's immune ...

  7. Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011 survey of clinical practice patterns in the management of Graves' disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2012 Dec;97( ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  8. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  9. Pernicious Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... glands, such as Addison's disease, type 1 diabetes, Graves' disease, or vitiligo. Research suggests a link may exist ... disorders (such as Addison's disease, type 1 diabetes, Graves' disease, or vitiligo). Research suggests a link may exist ...

  10. Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  11. Thyroid storm and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joseph A; Gliga, Louise; Nagalla, Srikanth

    2017-08-01

    Graves' disease is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, including rare associations with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We describe a unique presentation of thyroid storm and warm AIHA diagnosed concurrently in a young female with hyperthyroidism. The patient presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and altered mental status. Laboratory studies revealed hemoglobin 3.9g/dL, platelets 171×10 9 L -1 , haptoglobin storm and warm AIHA. She was started on glucocorticoids to treat both warm AIHA and thyroid storm, as well as antithyroid medications, propranolol and folic acid. Due to profound anemia and hemodynamic instability, the patient was transfused two units of uncrossmatched packed red blood cells slowly and tolerated this well. She was discharged on methimazole as well as a prolonged prednisone taper, and achieved complete resolution of the thyrotoxicosis and anemia at one month. Hyperthyroidism can affect all three blood cell lineages of the hematopoietic system. Anemia can be seen in 10-20% of patients with thyrotoxicosis. Several autoimmune processes can lead to anemia in Graves' disease, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, and warm AIHA. This case illustrates a rarely described presentation of a patient with Graves' disease presenting with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worsen your condition or lead to complications. Hemolytic Anemia and Children Parents of children who have hemolytic anemia usually ... members, friends, and your child's classmates about hemolytic anemia. You also may want to tell your child's teachers or other caregivers about the condition. Let ...

  13. Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possibly given through a vein) to treat infections Blood transfusions to treat symptoms due to low blood counts ... have regular check-ups to screen for cancer. Alternative Names Fanconi's anemia; Anemia - Fanconi's Images Formed elements of blood References Bagby GC. Aplastic anemia and related bone ...

  14. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  15. Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Anemia What's in this article? ... Deficiency Anemia in My Kids? Print What Is Anemia? Anemia is when the level of healthy red ...

  16. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Anemia Aplastic Anemia Also known as What Is Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Graves disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Graves disease Graves disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Graves disease is a condition that affects the function of ...

  18. Atypical Clinical Manifestations of Graves' Disease: An Analysis in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazi, Mohamed Osama; Ahmed, Sherif

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been an increase in the number of reports about newly recognized (atypical or unusual) manifestations of Graves' disease (GD), that are related to various body systems. One of these manifestations is sometimes the main presenting feature of GD. Some of the atypical manifestations are specifically related to GD, while others are also similarly seen in patients with other forms of hyperthyroidism. Lack of knowledge of the association between these findings and GD may lead to delay in diagnosis, misdiagnosis, or unnecessary investigations. The atypical clinical presentations of GD include anemia, vomiting, jaundice, and right heart failure. There is one type of anemia that is not explained by any of the known etiological factors and responds well to hyperthyroidism treatment. This type of anemia resembles anemia of chronic disease and may be termed GD anemia. Other forms of anemia that are associated with GD include pernicious anemia, iron deficiency anemia of celiac disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Vomiting has been reported as a presenting feature of Graves' disease. Some cases had the typical findings of hyperthyroidism initially masked, and the vomiting did not improve until hyperthyroidism has been detected and treated. Hyperthyroidism may present with jaundice, and on the other hand, deep jaundice may develop with the onset of overt hyperthyroidism in previously compensated chronic liver disease patients. Pulmonary hypertension is reported to be associated with GD and to respond to its treatment. GD-related pulmonary hypertension may be so severe to produce isolated right-sided heart failure that is occasionally found as the presenting manifestation of GD. PMID:22132347

  19. Miastenia grave y miastenia grave ocular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Naranjo Fernández

    Full Text Available La miastenia grave es una enfermedad caracterizada por debilidad y fatiga de los músculos voluntarios debido a una trasmisión anómala a nivel de la unión neuromuscular. La prevalencia es aproximadamente de 5 casos/100 000 personas. La miastenia grave puede ser bulbar, ocular o generalizada.Existen formas clínicas en la infancia como son la miastenia neonatal transitoria, la miastenia congénita y la miastenia juvenil. Los músculos oculares, faciales y bulbares son los más frecuentes afectados por la enfermedad. Cuando los síntomas se limitan a la musculatura cercana al ojo se denomina miastenia grave ocular. Una vez el oftalmólogo diagnostica o sospecha la miastenia grave, un neurólogo generalmente dirige la comprobación y tratamiento. El papel del oftalmólogo continúa siendo importante, además de chequear la motilidad y disfunción palpebral y proporcionar el alivio sintomático para estos desórdenes, debe estar alerta a la posibilidad de ambliopía.

  20. Your Guide to Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inherited Causes l Folate or iron deficiency l Fanconi anemia from poor diet l Shwachman-Diamond l Demand ... cells, leading to aplastic anemia. These conditions include Fanconi anemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, Diamond- Blackfan anemia, ...

  1. About Anemia (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español About Anemia KidsHealth / For Kids / About Anemia What's in this ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia happens when a person doesn't have ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  5. Højfolkets Grave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    For the special exhibition 'Højfolkets Grave - Oak Coffins from Borum Eshøj' on Moesgaard Museum in 2007: The development of 3D graphics which was displayed on a big screen in the exhibition. The animation shows - in a very stylistic way - the design principles behind the construction of Bronze Age...

  6. Management of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2007-01-01

    Management of Graves' ophthalmopathy is preferably done in a multidisciplinary setting. Smoking is associated with worse disease outcome. (131)I therapy for hyperthyroidism can also worsen ophthalmopathy, especially if administered during active disease or to patients who smoke or have severe

  7. APLASTIC ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Dharma Laksmi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Aplastic Anemia describes a disorder of the clinical syndrome is marked by a deficiency of red blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets in the absence of other forms of bone marrow damage. Aplastic anemia is classified as a rare disease in developed countries the incidence of 3-6 cases / 1 million inhabitants / year. The exact cause of someone suffering from aplastic anemia also can not be established with certainty, but there are several sources of potential risk factors. Prognosis or course of the disease varies widely aplastic anemia, but without treatment generally gives a poor prognosis /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... detect signs of iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain ... your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing my iron-deficiency anemia? ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [ ...

  14. Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page Print this page My Cart Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a disease ... leukemia (ALL) Other diseases What is severe aplastic anemia (SAA)? SAA is a bone marrow disease. The ...

  15. What Is Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Anemia Anemia Also known as Iron-poor blood , Low blood , ... you or your child diagnosed with Diamond-Blackfan anemia? The registry is collecting information from people with ...

  16. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  17. Anemia and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Disorders Anemia Anemia and Pregnancy Your body goes through significant changes ... becoming anemic. back to top Is Pregnancy-Related Anemia Preventable? Good nutrition is the best way to ...

  18. Microchimerism in Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofré, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Microchimerism is the presence of cells from one individual in another genetically distinct individual. Pregnancy is the main cause of natural microchimerism through transplacental bidirectional cell trafficking between mother and fetus. The consequences of pregnancy-related microchimerism are under active investigation. However, many authors have suggested a close relationship linking fetal microchimerism and the development of autoimmune diseases. It has been more than ten years now since the demonstration of the presence of a significant high number of fetal microchimeric cells residing in thyroid glands from operated patients with Graves' disease. This intrathyroidal fetal microchimerism is an attractive candidate mechanism for the modulation of Graves' disease in pregnancy and the postpartum period. PMID:22577597

  19. [Grave's disease in 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Jacques

    2009-04-08

    Grave's disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland characterized by hyperthyroidism, a homogenous goiter and occasionally an ophtalmopathy. It occurs in less than 1% of the population with a large predominance in women (10/1). Treatment is directed to inhibit thyroid hormone synthesis with carbimazole during 12-18 months. Recurrence rates after stopping treatment is about 50%; in these patients, radioactive iodine is the preferred treatment.

  20. Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulier, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is the most frequent inherited cause of BM failure (BMF). Fifteen FANC genes have been identified to date, the most prevalent being FANCA, FANCC, FANCG, and FANCD2. In addition to classical presentations with progressive BMF during childhood and a positive chromosome breakage test in the blood, atypical clinical and/or biological situations can be seen in which a FA diagnosis has to be confirmed or eliminated. For this, a range of biological tools have been developed, including analysis of skin fibroblasts. FA patients experience a strong selective pressure in the BM that predisposes to clonal evolution and to the emergence in their teens or young adulthood of myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a specific pattern of somatic chromosomal lesions. The cellular mechanisms underlying (1) the hematopoietic defect which leads to progressive BMF and (2) somatic clonal evolutions in this background, are still largely elusive. Elucidation of these mechanisms at the molecular and cellular levels should be useful to understand the physiopathology of the disease and to adapt the follow-up and treatment of FA patients. This may also ultimately benefit older, non-FA patients with aplastic anemia, MDS/AML for whom FA represents a model genetic condition.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  3. Anemia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anemia KidsHealth / For Teens / Anemia What's in this article? ... Enough Iron Print en español Anemia What Is Anemia? Lots of teens are tired. With all the ...

  4. Prevention of Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalena, Luigi

    2012-06-01

    Smoking is the most important risk factor for the occurrence/progression of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), as well as for its lower/slower response to immunosuppression. Accordingly, refrain from smoking should be urged, both as primary prevention (removal of risk factors in Graves' patients without GO), secondary prevention (early detection and treatment of asymptomatic/very mild GO) and tertiary prevention (reduction of complications/disability of overt GO). A 6-month course of 200 μg/day sodium selenite can prevent progression of mild GO to more severe GO and is, therefore, a form of secondary prevention and, probably, primary prevention. Correction of thyroid dysfunction and stable maintenance of euthyroidism are important preventive measures. The optimal treatment for hyperthyroidism in patients with GO is uncertain, because evidence demonstrating the superiority of antithyroid drugs over thyroid ablation (radioiodine, thyroidectomy, or both) is lacking. If radioiodine is used, low-dose steroid prophylaxis is recommended, particularly in smokers, to prevent radioiodine-associated GO progression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inborn anemias in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an α-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes

  6. Current Concepts in Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Christian M.; Champion, Bernard L.; Wall, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the developed world. It is caused by an immune defect in genetically susceptible individuals in whom the production of unique antibodies results in thyroid hormone excess and glandular hyperplasia. When unrecognized, Graves' disease impacts negatively on quality of life and poses serious risks of psychosis, tachyarrhythmia and cardiac failure. Beyond the thyroid, Graves' disease has diverse soft-tissue effects that reflect its systemic autoimmune nature. Thyroid eye disease is the most common of these manifestations and is important to recognise given its risk to vision and potential to deteriorate in response to radioactive iodine ablation. In this review we discuss the investigation and management of Graves' disease, the recent controversy regarding the hepatotoxicity of propylthiouracil and the emergence of novel small-molecule thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor ligands as potential targets in the treatment of Graves' disease. PMID:23148179

  7. Graves' disease following subacute thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoshishige; Kurihara, Hideo; Sasaki, Jun

    2011-12-01

    Subacute thyroiditis is a painful, inflammatory disease frequently accompanied with fever. It is suspected to be a viral infectious disease, while Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease. Thus, there appears to be no etiological relationship between the two diseases. A total of 25,267 thyroid disease patients made their first visits to our thyroid clinic during a period of 24 years between 1985 and 2008. Among them, subacute thyroiditis and Graves' disease accounted for 918 patients (3.6%) and 4,617 patients (18.2%), respectively. We have encountered 7 patients (one male and six female) with subacute thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease in this period (0.15% of the 4,617 patients with Graves' disease and 0.76% of the 918 patients with subacute thyroiditis). The age ranges were 40~66 years (mean 48.7 years) at the onset of subacute thyroiditis. The intervals between the onsets of subacute thyroiditis and Graves' disease were 1~8 months (mean 4.7 months). Because Graves' disease was preceded by subacute thyroiditis, the signs and symptoms of both diseases were evident together in the intervening period. The diagnosis of Graves' disease in those patients is always difficult because of atypical signs and symptoms and an unclear onset time. The causes of the Graves'disease that followed subacute thyroiditis are still unknown. However, the inflammatory nature of subacute thyroiditis may lead to the activation of the autoimmune response in susceptible subjects, resulting in the onset of Graves' disease. Graves' disease should be suspected when a high blood level of thyroid hormone persists after subacute thyroiditis.

  8. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia (See ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia NOTE: ...

  9. Hashimoto's thyroiditis following Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Husaini; Muallima, Nur; Adam, John M F; Sanusi, Harsinen

    2010-01-01

    Both Graves' disease and chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland. Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of TSH receptor located on the thyroid gland by an antibody, which is known as TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Furthermore, this may lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. On the contrary, the cause of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought due to a TSH stimulation-blocking antibody (TSBAb) which blocks the action of TSH hormone and subsequently brings damage and atrophy to thyroid gland. Approximately 15-20% of patients with Graves' disease had been reported to have spontaneous hypothyroidism resulting from the chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease). Pathogenesis for chronic thyroiditis following anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Graves' disease remains unclear. It has been estimated that chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease, which occurs following the Graves' disease episode is due to extended immune response in Graves' disease. It includes the immune response to endogenous thyroid antigens, i.e. thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin, which may enhance lymphocyte infiltration and finally causes Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We report four cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) in patients who have been previously diagnosed with Graves' hyperthyroidism. In three cases, Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs in 7 to 25 years after the treatment of Grave's disease; while the other case has it only after few months of Grave's disease treatment. The diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) was based on clinical manifestation, high TSHs level, positive thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody, and supported by positive results of fine needle aspiration biopsy. Moreover, the result of histopathological test has also confirmed the diagnosis in two cases. All cases have been successfully treated by levothyroxine treatment.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1.54MB] Cardiovascular Health Study Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... contribute to differences in disease severity and how patients respond to treatment. The NHLBI Strategic Vision highlights ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... both full-term and preterm infants. Look for Diagnosis will explain tests and procedures that your doctor ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam Your doctor may ask about ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual ... Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  11. Anemia in the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview of Horseshoe Kidney Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Andrew W. Walter, MS ... for the Professional Version Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn ...

  12. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  13. Sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  14. Side Effects: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia is a side effect of cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It can make women and men feel fatigued, dizzy, and short of breath. Learn how to manage fatigue caused by anemia during cancer treatment.

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  17. Sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    ŘÍHOVÁ, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called sickle cell anemia, or drepanocytosis. In this thesis is described the history of the disease, pathophysiology, laboratory features, various clinical features, diferencial diagnosis, quality of life in sickle cell anemia and therapy.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  6. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  8. Mouse Models of Graves' Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    Graves' disease is characterized by overstimulation of the thyroid gland with agonistic autoantibodies against the thyrotropin (TSH) receptor, leading to hyperthyroidism and diffuse hyperplasia of the thyroid gland. Our and other laboratories have recently established several animal models of Graves' hyperthyroidism with novel immunization approaches, i.e., in vivo expression of the TSH receptor by injection of syngeneic living cells co-expressing the TSH receptor and major histocompatibility...

  9. [Grave's disease and stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A Matos; Nobre, E Lacerda; Garcia e Costa, J; Nogueira, P J; Macedo, Ana; De Castro, J Jácome; Teles, A Galvão

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, there have been many reports about a possible association between Stressful Life Events (SLE) and the onset of Graves' Disease (GD). Nevertheless, most papers have been criticised and no such association has yet been proven. To assess the possible associations between SLE and the onset of GD. Retrospective study of 62 subjects, divided into 2 groups of 31 each, GD (Gp1) and controls (Gp2). The patients in Gp1 had thyroid disease diagnosed within the last 12 months, with clinical and biochemical confirmation. In Gp2, psychopathological and endocrine disturbances had been ruled out. Each 2 group consisted of 9 males (29%) and 22 females (71%). The mean age was 38.48 + 10.9 in Gp1 and 41.1 + 11.8 in Gp2. SLE evaluation (number and impact) was reported for the 12 months preceding the onset of symptoms of thyroid disease. To assess SLE, we used the Life Experiences Survey-LES from Saranson, Johnson and Siegel (1978; 1985). Statistical analysis was done using Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Patients with GD had a significantly greater number of SLEs compared to Controls (p < .001). The number and impact of negative SLEs was significantly higher in Gp1 compared to Gp2 (p < .001). There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of the number and impact of both positive and neutral SLEs. The findings of this study support that SLEs may contribute to the precipitation of GD. We observed that patients with GD had significantly more negative events and experienced a greater negative impact from them prior to the onset of GD. The association of SLEs with GD is probably related to the association of stress with changes in the immune system, which can play an important role in the aetiology of thyrotoxicosis.

  10. Immunosuppression in Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Rong; Kuang Anren; Qin Weishi; Zhang Huimin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is a disease that seriously threatens the health of patients. But up to now, no optimal therapies have been established. Immunosuppressive treatment is usually used in the management of GO, but they may cause side effects. Recently, 99 Tc-MDP, commercially named 'Yun Ke', is used in the management of autoimmune disease. Therefore, a randomized trial was done to compare the values in the treatment of GO with between Yun Ke and immunosuppression. Methods: 42 consecutive patients with moderate or severe GO were randomly assigned to receive either Yun Ke therapy or immunosuppressive therapy. The degree of ocular involvement and responses to the treatment were evaluated by numerical scoring (ophthalmopathy index, OI) and clinical assessment. Therapy outcome was assessed 4 months after the start of treatment by the change in the highest NOSPECS class and OI. Data analysis was performed with the SPASS statistic software. Chi-square test was used to compare percentages, logistic regression was performed to identify which variables might correlated with the treatment outcome. Results: The remarkably effective outcome was observed in 14 (67%) cases in immunosuppression treated group and 13 (62%) cases in Yun Ke treated group. There were no significant differences in the degree of improvements in ocular involvements. There was a marked decrease of thyroid antibody titres in both groups. The variables found to correlated significantly with treatment outcome were thyroid antibody titres and GO activity. Side effects were more frequent and severe during immunosuppressive therapy. No side effects were found during Yun Ke treatment. Conclusion: Yun Ke and immunosuppression appeared to be equally effective in the management of GO, but Yun Ke is safer for patients during treatment

  11. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artérielle Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in ... as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  12. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cysts Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ... function as well as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs ...

  13. Grave's disease 1835-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weetman, A P

    2003-01-01

    This brief review describes the history of Graves' disease, starting with the original descriptions by Parry, Graves and von Basedow. The true aetiology of the disorder was uncovered in the 1950s and 1960s, based on the search for a novel thyroid stimulator which turned out to be an immunoglobulin G autoantibody. Assays for these thyroid stimulatory antibodies have been continually refined and their epitopes on the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor are increasingly well characterized. We also understand far more about the genetic and environmental susceptibility factors that predispose to disease, and even thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy has now been better defined as primarily a T-cell-mediated disease resulting from cytokine stimulation of orbital fibroblasts. These advances should improve treatment options for Graves' disease in the foreseeable future.

  14. Optimal management of Graves orbitopathy: a multidisciplinary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeters, M. R.; van Zeijl, C. J. J.; Boelen, A.; Kloos, R.; Saeed, P.; Vriesendorp, T. M.; Mourits, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Graves' thyroid disease is a relatively common disorder in endocrinology and general internal medicine practice. Graves' hyperthyroidism is mediated by circulating stimulating autoantibodies. Up to 60% of patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism develop some form of Graves' orbitopathy. Immune

  15. Graves disease hyperthyroidism and glycometabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qiting; Zhao Deshan

    2010-01-01

    The Patients with Graves disease hyperthyroidism are often accompanied by disorder of glycometabolism. β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance play a main role in this disease, while the immune and genetic factors are also relevant with the disease. The blood glycose level can become normal gradually with the recovery of thyroid hormone after 131 I and antithyroid drug treatment. Therefore, the blood glycose level could be improved and complications could be prevented by early treatment in the patients with Graves disease hyperthyroidism accompanied with glycometabolism disorder is helpful for improving the blood glycose level. (authors)

  16. Graves' disease and Thyroid anaplasic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero E, Helena; Quintero A, Flor Maria; Carmona C, Antonio

    1992-01-01

    A case of a 34 year-old patient is presented, who was diagnosed with Graves' disease and developed a thyroid anaplastic carcinoma from a clinically detected nodular mass. The incidence of thyroid cancer associated with Graves' disease is revisited

  17. Death by suicide in Graves' disease and Graves' orbitopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferløv-Schwensen, Charlotte; Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hegedus, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Graves' disease is associated with excess morbidity and mortality, but little is known about unnatural manners of death and the potential relation with Graves' orbitopathy. Here we investigate the risk of unnatural death in Graves' patients with orbitopathy (GO) and without (GD), comp...... in the pathophysiological mechanisms of suicidal behavior. Beyond independent confirmation, reasons for this need to be explored in order to introduce preventive measures....... with GD, and 3,965 with GO were identified and matched for age and gender with four subjects from the background population. Manner of death was identified and hazard ratios (HR) for mortality due to unnatural deaths (accident, suicide, violence/homicide, and unknown) were calculated using Cox regression...... analyses, adjusted for pre-existing somatic and psychiatric morbidity. RESULTS: In Graves' disease overall there was an increased risk of death from unknown unnatural manners [HR: 2.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.17-3.45); P=0.012] and of suicide, although the latter difference was not with certainty...

  18. Temporal relationship between onset of Graves' ophthalmopathy and onset of thyroidal Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.; Smit, T.; van der Gaag, R.; Koornneef, L.

    1988-01-01

    The temporal relationship between the onset of Graves' ophthalmopathy and the onset of thyroidal Graves' disease was evaluated in 125 consecutive patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Thyroidal Graves' disease--past or present--was clinically evident in 99 patients (79%): hyperthyroidism in 3 cases.

  19. SOBRE LA (NO) RESPONSABILIDAD DE LA TECNOCIENCIA EN LOS PROBLEMAS AMBIENTALES Y LA BÚSQUEDA DE CIERTA POLÍTICA

    OpenAIRE

    JORGE MARTÍNEZ BARRERA

    2016-01-01

    En este trabajo me propongo reflexionar acerca de la configuración moderna de la técnica, es decir, la tecnociencia, y su responsabilidad con nuestro manejo del medio ambiente. Busco mostrar que la construcción tecnológica de un mundo implica una cierta actitud de agresividad contra la naturaleza, contrastante con la actitud de protección frente a ella propia del mundo pretecnológico. Sugiero, como conclusión, la recuperación de la noción clásica de Política como una alternativa posible de co...

  20. Secrets of a Mass Grave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Caitlin Marie; Graham, Theodore J.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a unit of study in which students examine skeletons and draw conclusions from the evidence they find in a simulated mass grave. The activity involves the foundation of forensic anthropology--interpreting the structure of skeletal remains to determine sex, age, height, and possible cause of death. Working through a series of…

  1. Medical management of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, M. F.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    In most patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism the eye signs are self-limiting and mostly subclinical. However, about one-third of the patients have clinically relevant ophthalmopathy, which can be disabling and disfiguring. The mechanical causes of the symptoms and signs of the eye disease are

  2. Biologiske behandlingsmuligheder ved Graves' oftalmopati

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    The current medical treatment options for Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) are unsatisfactory. Recent treatment of GO patients with the B-lymphocyte depleting monoclonal antibody rituximab or with the anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agents etanercept and infliximab has shown promising results. We...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot ... Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, ... (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we fund research and development for domestic small businesses that have strong potential ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  4. Incidencia y mortalidad por anemia en pacientes gravemente enfermos Incidence and mortality due to anemia in acutely ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maicelys Ramírez Zaldívar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la anemia es una de las enfermedades más conocidas y evaluadas en la práctica médica diaria. Objetivo: determinar la morbilidad y mortalidad de pacientes graves con anemia. Métodos: se realizó un estudio prospectivo de 118 pacientes ingresados en la Unidad de Terapia Intensiva del Hospital General Universitario "Vladimir Ilich Lenin" de Holguín, desde agosto hasta diciembre de 2010. Las variables discretas fueron comparadas mediante el test de £i al cuadrado y el de Fisher, y las continuas, por medio de las pruebas de T-Student y Mann-Whitney (la hemoglobina media, para á=0,05. Resultados: la anemia afectó 79,6 % de los integrantes de la serie y aumentó evolutivamente, con el consecuente empeoramiento de estos, de los cuales fallecieron 34,0 %, quienes tenían mayor edad (p=0,0004, necesitaron más transfusiones sanguíneas (p=0,005 y presentaron el trastorno de la hemoglobina más tardíamente (5,1 días. De los pacientes con anemia grave (hemoglobina:0,05. Conclusiones: la anemia en los pacientes graves se relacionó con una mayor mortalidad, estadía, necesidad de transfusiones de glóbulos rojos y causas médicas (neurológicas, en tanto, la edad avanzada y la gravedad de la anemia de aparición tardía se asociaron fundamentalmente a la mortalidad.Introduction: anemia is one of the well-known and evaluated diseases in the daily medical practice. Objective: to determine the morbidity and mortality of acutely ill patients with anemia. Methods: a prospective study of 118 patients admitted in the Intensive Therapy Unit of "Vladimir Ilich Lenin" General University Hospital in Holguín was carried out from August to December, 2010. Discrete variables were compared by means of the X² and Fisher tests, and the continuous variables, by means of the T-Student and Mann-Whitney tests (the mean hemoglobin, for á =0.05. Results: anemia affected 79.6% of the members of the series and it increased progressively, with the

  5. Thyroid surgery for Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zi Wei; Masterson, Liam; Fish, Brian; Jani, Piyush; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-11-25

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease caused by the production of auto-antibodies against the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, which stimulates follicular cell production of thyroid hormone. It is the commonest cause of hyperthyroidism and may cause considerable morbidity with increased risk of cardiovascular and respiratory adverse events. Five per cent of people with Graves' disease develop moderate to severe Graves' ophthalmopathy. Thyroid surgery for Graves' disease commonly falls into one of three categories: 1) total thyroidectomy, which aims to achieve complete macroscopic removal of thyroid tissue; 2) bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy, in which bilateral thyroid remnants are left; and 3) unilateral total and contralateral subtotal thyroidectomy, or the Dunhill procedure. Recent American Thyroid Association guidelines on treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism emphasised the role of surgery as one of the first-line treatments. Total thyroidectomy removes target tissue for the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody. It controls hyperthyroidism at the cost of lifelong thyroxine replacement. Subtotal thyroidectomy leaves a thyroid remnant and may be less likely to lead to complications, however a higher rate of recurrent hyperthyroidism is expected and revision surgery would be challenging. The choice of the thyroidectomy technique is currently largely a matter of surgeon preference, and a systematic review of the evidence base is required to determine which option offers the best outcomes for patients. To assess the optimal surgical technique for Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy. We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and PubMed, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). The date of the last search was June 2015 for all databases. We did not apply any language restrictions. Only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving participants with a diagnosis

  6. Genetic susceptibility to Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Chen, Qiuying

    2013-06-01

    The variety of clinical presentations of eye changes in patients with Graves' disease (GD) suggests that complex interactions between genetic, environmental, endogenous and local factors influence the severity of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). It is thought that the development of GO might be influenced by genetic factors and environmental factors, such as cigarette smoking. At present, however, the role of genetic factors in the development of GO is not known. On the basis of studies with candidate genes and other genetic approaches, several susceptibility loci in GO have been proposed, including immunological genes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), regulatory T-cell genes and thyroid-specific genes. This review gives a brief overview of the current range of major susceptibility genes found for GD.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia? Read more When there is inflammation, your liver makes more of a hormone called hepcidin. Hepcidin ... your abdomen to check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for gastrointestinal bleeding To see if gastrointestinal bleeding is causing your iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order the following procedures to guide treatment . Fecal ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your blood, such as vitamin B12 or folic acid. Visit our Pernicious Anemia Health Topic to learn ... recommend options such as taking your supplements with food, lowering the dose, trying a different type of ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. ... are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... these usually go away within a day or two. Red blood cell transfusions. These may be used ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red blood cells, called hemolysis . Hemolysis, in this case, is caused by strong muscle contractions and the ... to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness ... If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may ... of other nutrients in your blood, such as vitamin B12 or folic acid. Visit our Pernicious Anemia ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  12. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... systemic lupus erythematosus , rheumatoid arthritis , and ulcerative colitis Cancer , including lymphoma and Hodgkin disease Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS , lung abscess, hepatitis B or hepatitis C Symptoms Anemia of ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People ... make it hard to find the energy to do normal activities. Headache Irregular heartbeat. This is a ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to make more red blood ... NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. Read ... to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that increase your risk of ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron- ... factors , such as if you are following a vegetarian eating pattern, your doctor may recommend changes to ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . View all trials from ClinicalTrials.gov . Visit Children and Clinical ... Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough hemoglobin-carrying red blood cells, your heart has to work harder to move oxygen-rich blood through your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... in our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for ... Surgery, upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of Intramural Research , which includes investigators in our Hematology Branch , performs research on anemia. We fund research. ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... whether your bone marrow is healthy and making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms. More severe iron-deficiency anemia may cause fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. ... in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common symptom. ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of ... anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your doctor will want ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to learn more about iron-deficiency anemia, our role in research and clinical trials to improve health, ... of Blood Diseases and Resources (DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ... to your doctor if you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, unhealthy environments, family ... 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast milk or are fed formula that is not fortified ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding ... of iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual periods, may be ... anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance athletes ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  18. Immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) or removal of the spleen (splenectomy) may be considered. You may receive treatment to ... need special treatment. In most people, steroids or splenectomy can totally or partially control anemia.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ... heavy menstrual bleeding, your doctor will want to control these other conditions to prevent you from developing ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough hemoglobin-carrying ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red blood cells, called hemolysis . Hemolysis, in this case, is caused by strong muscle contractions and the ... anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that NHLBI is ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk ... upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the ... Our support of SBIR/STTR programs is helping advance research in iron-deficiency anemia, in part by ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you for ... and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for ...

  9. Graves' disease in Albanian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjikopulli, A; Tomori, Sonila; Kollçaku, L; Hoxha, P; Grimci, Lindita; Ylli, Zamira

    2014-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) accounts for 10-15% of thyroid disorders in patients less than 18 years of age. It is the most common cause of thyrotoxicosis in children and accounts for at least 95% of cases in children. Pediatric Treatment of Graves' disease consists of anti-thyroid drugs, radioactive iodide and thyroidectomy but the optimal treatment of GD in children is still controversial. To review treatment outcome of pediatric Graves' disease in Albania. Descriptive review of 15 children with Graves' disease, diagnosed from Jan.2007 to Dec. 2013, at the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Centre "Mother Teresa", Albania was performed. All patients, mean age 10.56 ± 3.37 years, (range 2.02-16.09 years) were presented with goiter and increased serum FT4, mean 39.80 ± 16.02 ng/mL, (range 21.0-74.70 ng/mL), serum FT3, mean 12.98 ± 3.45 pg/mL, (range 6.90 -17.90 pg/mL) and suppressed TSH levels, mean 0.02 ± 0.01 mUI/L, (range 0.01-0.05 mUI/L). Anti TSH Receptor were positive in 100% of patients mean value 6.51 ± 3.61 UI/mL (range 1.63 - 14.10 UI/mL). Anti-thyroglobulin and Anti-TPO antibodies were positive in 60% and 46.6% respectively. Clinical course of 15 patients after treatment with anti-thyroid drugs mainly MMI for 3.19 ± 1.48 (range 0.60 - 6.20) years is as follows: seven (46.66%) underwent remission, five out of seven (71.41%) who underwent remission, relapsed. Three of them (20%) were treated with I(131), and two (13.3%) underwent to total thyroidectomy. MMI was the most common first line therapy in the presented patients with Graves' disease. Remission rate was 46.66% after an average 1.48 ± 0.71 years (range 0.60 - 2.70 years) of treatment with anti-thyroid drugs. Remission period was 2.70 ± 0.36 years (2.1 - 3.1 years) Relapse occurred in 71.41% of patient. I(131) and thyroidectomy were used as second line therapy in the present study.

  10. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D'Andrea, Alan; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  11. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D' Andrea, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Niedernhofer, Laura J., E-mail: niedernhoferl@upmc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, 5117 Centre Avenue, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion 2.6, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  12. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity.

  13. Atresia biliar: una enfermedad grave

    OpenAIRE

    Ramonet, Margarita; Ciocca, Mirta; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    La atresia biliar es una grave enfermedad que se manifiesta en los recién nacidos, y se desconoce su causa. La inflamación y destrucciónprogresiva de los conductos biliares conducen a la aparición de ictericia, coluria y acolia entre la segunda y sexta semana de vida. Como existen múltiples causas de colestasis neonatal en esta etapa de la vida, es necesario realizar un diagnóstico y derivación precoz para ofrecer un tratamiento quirúrgico, con el fin de restablecer el flujo biliar. Alrededor...

  14. Cancer-related anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rzaeq, Hikmat N.

    2004-01-01

    Anemia is the most common hematological abnormality in cancer patients is often under-recognized and undertreated. The pathogenesis of cancer anemia is complex and most of time multifactorial; involving factors related to the tumor itself or its therapy. While anemia can be present in a wide range of symptoms, involing almost every organ, it is beleived that it contributes much to cancer-related-fatigue, one of the most common symptoms in cancer patients. In addition there is increasing evidence to suggest that anemia is an independent factor adversely affecting tumor reponse and patient survival. While blood transfusion was the only option to treat cancer related anemia, the use of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is becomig the new standard of care, more so with the recent studies demonstrating the feasibility of a sigle weekly injection .Things are even getting better with the recent approval of a new form of rHuEPO; Darbepoetin an analogue with a 3-fold longer half-life. In addition to its effects in raising homoglobin, several well controlled studies demonstrated decrease in transfusion requirementsand better qualify of life assessed objectively using standard assesments scales. (author)

  15. Epidemiology and prevention of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Bartalena, Luigi

    2002-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy is clinically relevant in approximately 50% of patients with Graves' disease, severe forms affecting 3%-5% of patients. Two age peaks of incidence are observed in the fifth and seventh decades of life, with slight differences between women and men. The disease is more frequent

  16. PREGO (presentation of Graves' orbitopathy) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perros, Petros; Žarković, Miloš; Azzolini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The epidemiology of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) may be changing. The aim of the study was to identify trends in presentation of GO to tertiary centres and initial management over time. METHODS: Prospective observational study of European Group On Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO) centres...

  17. Factores genéticos en casos graves de gripe (H1N1 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Calafell i Majó

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La pandemia de gripe (H1N1 2009 generó una serie de cuestiones, entre las cuales estuvo que entre un 25 y un 30% de los casos graves de gripe no presentaron ningún factor de riesgo obvio. Hipotetizamos que un elemento que puede contribuir a la respuesta son factores de riesgo gené ticos del huésped involucrados en la mala progresió n de la enfermedad. Varios indicios nos llevaron a esta hipótesis: estudios de agregación familiar en islandeses y mormones de Utah muestran una cierta heredabilidad de la mortalidad por gripe; se conocen casi 300 genes humanos necesarios para la replicació n del virus de la gripe; y los pacientes más graves de gripe (H1N12009 mostraron una desregulació n del sistema inmune adaptativo. Estamos abordando este problema mediante un diseñ o caso-control (casos hospitalizados de gripe (H1N12009 confirmados contra casos ambulatorios, tambié n confirmados para (H1N12009, en el que se genotiparán más de un milló n de polimorfismos de cambios de nucleó tido (SNPs y de variació n de número de copia (CNVs en casos y controles.

  18. Socio-economic and demographic determinants of childhood anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar Goswmai

    2015-09-01

    regressão logística multimodal para avaliar a relevância de alguns fatores de risco em diferentes graus de anemia infantil. A anemia foi diagnosticada pelos pontos de corte de nível de hemoglobinas da OMS. O teste Qui-quadrado de Pearson foi utilizado para justificar as associações da anemia com diferentes categorias de população estudada. Resultados: A prevalência de anemia foi de 69,5%, sendo 26,2% de anemia leve, 40,4% de anemia moderada e 2,9% de anemia grave. A taxa de prevalência geral, juntamente com a de anemia leve e moderada, mostrou uma tendência de aumento até os dois anos de idade e, depois disso, de queda. As crianças da zona rural têm maior taxa de prevalência. Dos 28 Estados indianos do estudo, 10 apresentaram prevalência muito alta, sendo Bihar o maior deles (77,9%. A ordem de nascimento elevada, alto índice de pobreza, baixo nível de escolaridade materna, anemia materna, não ingestão de suplementos de ferro durante a gravidez e vegetarianismo materno aumentaram os riscos de todos os tipos de anemia entre crianças (p < 0,05. A população cristã tinha o menor risco; e as categorias Casta Reconhecida, Tribo Reconhecida e Outras Classes Atrasadas tinham o maior risco de anemia. Conclusão: Os resultados sugerem a necessidade de planejamento e implementação adequados de medidas preventivas contra a anemia infantil. Grupos economicamente carentes, a nutrição e escolaridade maternas e o controle da natalidade devem ser prioridades nos programas. Keywords: India, Child, Anemia, Risk factors, Palavras-chave: Índia, Criança, Anemia, Fatores de risco

  19. Severe anemia in Malawian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Job C. J.; Phiri, Kamija S.; Faragher, E. Brian; Brabin, Bernard J.; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E.; de Haan, Rob J.; Phiri, Ajib I.; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul J. M.; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel G. H. M.; teo, Yik Y.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Boele van Hensbroek, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. Methods We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and

  20. Severe anemia in Malawian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Job Cj; Phiri, Kamija S.; Faragher, E. Brian; Brabin, Bernard J.; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E.; de Haan, Rob J.; Phiri, Ajib I.; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul Jm; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel Ghm; teo, Yik Y.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele

    2016-01-01

    Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and 757 preschool

  1. Severe Anemia in Malawian Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, J.C.J.; Kamija, S.P.; Faragher, E.B.; Brabin, B.J.; Bates, I.; Cuevas, L.E.; Haan, de R.J.; Phiri, A.I.; Malange, P.; Khoka, M.; Hulshof, P.J.M.; Lieshout, L.; Beld, M.G.H.M.; Teo, Y.Y.; Rockett, K.A.; Richardson, A.; Kwiatkowski, D.P.; Molyneux, M.E.; Hensbroek, van M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. Methods We conducted a case¿control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration,

  2. Anemia in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Andersson, Charlotte; Andell, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    predictor of mortality, with the highest mortality observed for macrocytic anemia, which was less prevalent than microcytic and normocytic anemia. Dietary intake of iron and vitamin B12 were significantly lower and use of antithrombotic medications was significantly higher in subjects with anemia. The World...

  3. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  4. Current treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, T.; Shimaoka, K.; Mimura, T.; Ito, K.

    1987-01-01

    In this review we have described the rationale for the appropriate treatment of patients with Graves' disease. Because the etiology of this disorder remains obscure, its management remains controversial. Since antithyroid drugs and radioiodine became readily available in the early 1950s, they have been widely used for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, and the number of cases treated surgically has markedly decreased. However, almost four decades of experience have disclosed an unexpectedly high incidence of delayed hypothyroidism after radioiodine treatment and a low remission rate after antithyroid therapy. As a result, surgery is again being advocated as the treatment of choice. The three modalities of treatment have different advantages and disadvantages, and selection of treatment is of importance. In principle, we believe that for most patients a subtotal thyroidectomy should be performed after the patient has been rendered euthyroid by antithyroid drugs. We attempt to leave a thyroid remnant of 6 to 8 gm.36 references

  5. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J.

    2001-01-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge [de

  6. [Orbital decompression in Grave's ophtalmopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longueville, E

    2010-01-01

    Graves disease orbitopathy is a complex progressive inflammatory disease. Medical treatment remains in all cases the proposed treatment of choice. Surgical treatment by bone decompression can be considered as an emergency mainly in cases of optic neuropathy or ocular hypertension not being controlled medically or in post-traumatic exophthalmos stage. Emergency bone decompression eliminates compression or stretching of the optic nerve allowing visual recovery. The uncontrolled ocular hypertension will benefit from decompression. The normalization of intraocular pressure may be obtained by this surgery or if needed by the use of postoperative antiglaucoma drops or even filtration surgery. In all operated cases, the IOP was normalized with an average decrease of 7.71 mmHg and a cessation of eye drops in 3/7 cases. Regarding sequelae, our therapeutic strategy involves consecutively surgery of the orbit, extraocular muscles and eyelids. The orbital expansion gives excellent results on the cosmetic level and facilitates the implementation of subsequent actions.

  7. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for Graves' orbitopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyd, R.; Herkstroeter, M.; Martin, T.; Zamboglou, N.; Strassmann, G.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy (RT) has been proven effective in the management of Graves' orbitopathy in numerous studies. Most commonly is the use of conventional fractionated RT and the value of hypofractionated irradiation has not been investigated. Materials and methods: The results in 33 euthyroid cases who underwent RT with a total dose of 21.0 Gy given in three weekly fractions of 3.0 Gy are retrospectively analyzed. The duration of symptoms ranged from 1-84 months and all of the cases had treatment failure after previous administration of corticosteroids. After a mean follow-up period of 33.6 months the overall results were assessed according to the criteria by Donaldson et al. and for evaluation of the clinical outcome a classification with the main criteria being eye-lid changes, exophthalmos, myopathy and eye nerve involvement was used. Results: At follow-up, the overall response to RT was 84.8% (28/33 cases). The analysis with the clinical classification demonstrated that in 19/33 (57.6%) cases occurred a decrease of eye lid changes and exophthalmos and 12/33 (36.4%) had a relief of myopathy. 2/33 cases (6.0%) developed an eye nerve compression causing the necessity of surgical decompression. 3/33 cases (9.0%) had a progression of at least of one of the single criteria of the score and therefore they were classified as non-responders. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT has been proven effective for treatment of severe cases of Graves' orbitopathy in cases with a prolongated duration of symptoms. The comparison with literature data demonstrate that the results after hypofractionated RT are comparable to those obtained after conventional fractionated RT. (orig.)

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) ... We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... This is sometimes used to deliver iron through a blood vessel to increase iron levels in the blood. One benefit of IV iron ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and ... of Health [NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or even heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, ... Upper endoscopy to look for bleeding in the esophagus, stomach, and the first part of the ... blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes participants with anemia, which ...

  18. Anemia - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... XYZ List of All Topics All Anemia - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated on 30 April 2018

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  20. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... raise your risk for this type of anemia: Alcoholism Eating overcooked food Poor diet (often seen in the poor, the older people, and people who do not eat fresh fruits or vegetables) Pregnancy Folic acid is needed to help a baby ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough hemoglobin-carrying red blood cells, your heart has to work harder to move oxygen-rich blood through your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  4. Anemia and School Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia may ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have ... our Pernicious Anemia Health Topic to learn more. Bone marrow tests help your doctor see whether your ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin ... resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and save lives. We are committed to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through ...

  12. Twin anemia polycythemia sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaghekke, Femke

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe that Twin Anemia Polycythemia Sequence (TAPS) is a form of chronic feto-fetal transfusion in monochorionic (identical) twins based on a small amount of blood transfusion through very small anastomoses. For the antenatal diagnosis of TAPS, Middle Cerebral Artery – Peak

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron ... anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the body. When your heart has to work harder, this can lead to several conditions: irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias , a heart murmur , an ... chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result in treatments not working as well. Look for Diagnosis will discuss any ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  17. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes ... Studies (REDS) program Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI ...

  19. Multidisciplinary approach to anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Ghiațău

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We present the case of a 65 years- old woman who was admitted with a severe macrocytic anemia Hb= 5.7g/dl and diffuse bone pain. Biologically she has moderate thrombocytopenia 35 000/µl, a hepatic cytolysis and cholestatic syndrome. Material and method: The patient was extensively evaluated before presentation for a mild iron - deficiency anemia for which she underwent endoscopic examination of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract- normal. The bone marrow aspiration on admission revealed a marked hyperplasia of the erythroblastic line with ~50% basophilic erythroblasts suggesting a regenerative erythroid hyperplasia. These changes along with the marked reticulocytosis on the peripheral blood smear oriented us towards a hemolytic anemia; Folic acid, vitamin B12, autoimmune tests and hemolytic tests were all normal. We continued the investigations with a thoraco-abdominopelvic computed tomography which identified diffuse demineralization, vertebral compactation and pelvic stress fractures. The breast examination revealed a right breast nodule, but the breast ultrasonography pleaded for benignity. Lacking a clear definitive diagnosis we decided to perform a bone marrow biopsy. Results: The osteo- medullary biopsy pointed towards a medullar invasion from a lobular mammary carcinoma; In these circumstances we performed an ultrasound guided biopsy of the right mammary lump thus histologically confirming a tumoral invasion of the bone marrow with subsequent anemia. The patient started chemotherapy in the Oncology ward. Conclusion: The particularity of this case consists in the pattern of anemia, which initially seemed iron deficient and afterwards macrocytic – apparently hemolytic and was actually due to the tumoral medullar invasion and also the nonspecific ultrasonographic appearance of the breast tumor.

  20. Resolution of Graves' disease after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yvonne; Butani, Lavjay; Glaser, Nicole; Nguyen, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of an adolescent boy with Down's syndrome and ESRD on hemodialysis who developed mild Graves' disease that was not amenable to radioablation, surgery, or ATDs. After 14 months of observation without resolution of Graves' disease, he successfully received a DDRT with a steroid minimization protocol. Thymoglobulin and a three-day course of steroids were used for induction and he was started on tacrolimus, MMF, and pravastatin for maintenance transplant immunosuppression. One month after transplantation, all biochemical markers and antibody profiling for Graves' disease had resolved and remain normal one yr later. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Nodular Graves' disease with medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat Hussain; Rather, Tanveer Ahmed; Makhdoomi, Rumana; Malik, Dharmender

    2015-01-01

    Co-existence of thyroid nodules with Graves' disease has been reported in various studies. 10-15% of such nodules harbor thyroid cancer with papillary thyroid cancer being the commonest. Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) in nodules associated with Graves' disease is rare. On literature survey, we came across 11 such cases reported so far. We report a 62-year-old female with Graves' disease who also had a thyroid nodule that on fine-needle aspiration cytology and the subsequent postthyroidectomy histopathological examination was reported to be MTC.

  2. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossage, A.A.R.; Crawley, J.C.W.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of [ 9 -9μTc]pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity - TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p<0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination

  3. Postoperative hypocalcemia after thyroidectomy for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Catherine E; Shiue, Zita; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Umbricht, Christopher B; Tufano, Ralph P; Dackiw, Alan P B; Kowalski, Jeanne; Zeiger, Martha A

    2010-11-01

    It is believed that patients who undergo thyroidectomy for Graves' disease are more likely to experience postoperative hypocalcemia than patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for other indications. However, no study has directly compared these two groups of patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an increased incidence or severity of postoperative hypocalcemia in patients who underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. An institutional review board-approved database was created of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 1998 to 2009 at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. There were a total of 68 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgery. Fifty-five patients who underwent total thyroidectomy were randomly selected and served as control subjects. An analysis was conducted that examined potential covariates for postoperative hypocalcemia, including age, gender, ethnicity, preoperative alkaline phosphatase level, size of goiter, whether parathyroid tissue or glands were present in the specimen, and the reason the patient underwent surgery. Specific outcomes examined were calcium levels on postoperative day 1, whether or not patients experienced symptoms of hypocalcemia, whether or not Rocaltrol was required, the number of calcium tablets prescribed upon discharge, whether or not postoperative tetany occurred, and calcium levels 1 month after discharge. Each outcome was analyzed using a logistic regression. Graves' disease patients had a significantly (p-value Graves' disease and no patient in the control group were readmitted with tetany (p = 0.033). There was a trend, though not significant, toward patients with Graves' disease having a higher prevalence of hypocalcemia the day after thyroidectomy and 1 month later. Patients with Graves' disease are more likely to require increased dosages of calcium as well as experience tetany postoperatively than patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for other indications. This suggests that

  4. [Anemia in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  5. [Thyroid cancer in patients with Grave's Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mssrouri, R; Benamr, S; Essadel, A; Mdaghri, J; Mohammadine, El H; Lahlou, M-K; Taghy, A; Belmahi, A; Chad, B

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of thyroid carcinoma in patients operated on for Graves' disease, to identify criteria which may predict malignancy, and to develop a practical approach to determine the extensiveness of thyroidectomy. Retrospective study of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease between 1995 and 2005. 547 patients underwent subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease during this period. Post-operative pathology examination revealed six cases of thyroid cancer (1.1%). All six cases had differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary carcinoma in 3 cases, follicular carcinoma in 2 cases and papillo-follicular carcinoma in 1 case). The indication for initial thyroidectomy was a palpable thyroid nodule in 3 cases (50%), failure of medical treatment for Grave's disease in 2 cases (33%), and signs of goiter compression in 1 case (17%). Five patients underwent re-operative total thyroidectomy. This study shows that while malignancy in Grave's disease is uncommon, the presence of thyroid nodule(s) in patients with Grave's disease may be considered as an indication for radical surgery. The most adequate radical surgery in this situation is to perform a total thyroidectomy.

  6. Thiamine– Responsive Megaloblastic Anemia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Motavaselian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiamine Responsive megaloblastic anemia in DIDMOA (Wolfram syndrome has an autosomal- recessive mode of inheritance . Megaloblastic anemia and sideroblastic anemia is accompanied by diabetes insipidus (DI, diabetes mellitus (DM ,optic atrophy (OA and deafness (D. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia are also present. We report a 7 month old girl with congenital macrocytic anemia; a rare clinical feature of Wolfram,s syndrome with increased plasma levels of blood glucose, both of which dramatically responded to administration of thiamine in large doses . The patient also had neurosensorial deafness, but no improvement was observed in the deafness. We presented the case because thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia is a rare clinical presentation of Wolfram syndrome and after institution of treatment with thiamine, the anemia and hyperglycemia returned to normal.

  7. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  9. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  10. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  11. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  12. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-09-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T{sub 50} Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  13. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T 50 Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  14. Celiac disease, iron deficiency anaemia, grave's disease, osteopenia and short stature in single patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radaideh, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an intestinal immune mediated disorder, triggered by ingestion of gluten-containing diet in genetically susceptible individuals. The genetic pre-disposition is related to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, especially HLA-DQ2 positive patients. The prevalence of celiac disease in high worldwide and it has been estimated to be 1-26% in Western countries. Many auto-immune diseases can be associated with celiac disease including auto-immune thyroid disease; hashimoto thyroiditis and grave's disease. The opposite also appears to be true, celiac disease is found on persons with auto-immune thyroid disorders at high rates than the general population. Celiac disease is also associated with other extraintestinal diseases other the auto-immune diseases like anemia, short stature, metabolic bone disease and others. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with auto-immune thyroid disease, anemia, short stature and metabolic bone disease. The life-long adherence to gluten-free diet is the only cure in celiac disease and can improve the quality of patients life and prevent future complications. This report describes a case of Grave's disease, Iron deficiency anemia, Short stature, Osteopenia, diagnosed to have Celiac disease. (author)

  15. Estudio poblacional de prevalencia de anemia ferropénica en La Plata y sus factores condicionantes

    OpenAIRE

    Marín, Gustavo Horacio

    2006-01-01

    La anemia es una de las mayores causales de muerte en la población mundial, y constituye el problema nutricional más grave en el mundo. La anemia y la deficiencia de hierro afectan a aproximadamente mil ochocientos millones de personas. Entre los grupos más afectados figuran las mujeres en edad fértil debido a las pérdidas de sangre en las menstruaciones; las embarazadas, ya que tienen un aumento en las demandas de sangre que determina que los requerimientos de hierro de su organismo no pueda...

  16. Prevalencia de anemia en escolares de la zona amazónica de Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quizhpe Edy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la prevalencia de anemia en niños campesinos de edad escolar en la región amazónica de Ecuador. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio transversal durante los meses de mayo a octubre de 2000 en dos cantones de la provincia de Orellana, al noreste de Ecuador. Se eligieron 17 escuelas aleatoriamente hasta completar el tamaño muestral deseado, que fue de 626 niños. Se recogieron los datos demográficos y antropométricos (peso y talla; se determinaron los valores de hemoglobina y de protoporfirina eritrocitaria, y se analizaron muestras de heces en busca de infestación por parásitos. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia general de anemia fue de 16,6% y de los escolares afectados, 75,5% tenían anemia por déficit de hierro. La prevalencia de desnutrición crónica moderada fue de 28,8% y la de desnutrición crónica grave, de 9,3%. Asimismo, se encontró una prevalencia de desnutrición aguda moderada de 8,4% y de desnutrición aguda grave de 3,4%. Las infecciones parasitarias fueron muy frecuentes (82,0%. Los parásitos más comunes fueron Entamoeba coli (30,3% y Ascaris lumbricoides (25,0%. No se encontró ninguna relación entre la prevalencia de anemia y anemia por déficit de hierro por un lado, y los indicadores nutricionales o de infección parasitaria por el otro. CONCLUSIÓN: La anemia no es un problema grave de salud pública en la población estudiada. No obstante, la elevada prevalencia de niños con desnutrición crónica apunta a la necesidad de mejorar las características de la dieta. La falta de asociación entre la prevalencia de desnutrición y la anemia podría deberse a una baja biodisponibilidad o absorción de hierro, más que a una ingestión insuficiente. Se necesitan estudios que evalúen el tipo de dieta consumida habitualmente por esta población.

  17. [Serum glycosaminoglycans in Graves' disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna B; Olczyk, Krystyna Z; Koźma, Ewa M; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna B; Wisowski, Grzegorz R; Marcisz, Czesław

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the blood serum sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and hyaluronic acid (HA) concentration of Graves' disease patients before treatment and after attainment of the euthyroid state. The study was carried out on the blood serum obtained from 17 patients with newly recognised Graves' disease and from the same patients after attainment of the euthyroid state. Graves' patients had not any clinical symptoms neither of ophthalmopathy nor pretibial myxedema. GAGs were isolated from the blood serum by the multistage extraction and purification using papaine hydrolysis, alkali elimination, as well as cetylpyridium chloride binding. Total amount of GAGs was quantified by the hexuronic acids assay. HA content in obtained GAGs sample was evaluated by the ELISA method. Increased serum concentration of sulfated GAGs in non-treated Graves' disease patients was found. Similarly, serum HA level in untreated patients was significantly elevated. The attainment of euthyroid state was accompanied by the decreased serum sulfated GAGs level and by normalization of serum HA concentration. In conclusion, the results obtained demonstrate that the alterations of GAGs metabolism connected with Graves' disease can lead to systemic changes of the extracellular matrix properties.

  18. Aplastic anemia due to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kunio; Saito, Akira

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between radiation exposure and aplastic anemia, clarified previously, is discussed. When persons such as radiological technicians receive whole-body irradiation in rather large doses, it is possible that aplastic anemia will result later on. However, this is difficult to determine because the irradiated region is limited despite large doses of radiation. (Bell, E.)

  19. Correction of anemia in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía Cánepa

    2015-11-01

    Se observó que en el 50% de las pacientes estudiadas no se logró corregir la anemia. Concluimos que existe una dificultad en la corrección de la anemia y una necesidad de realizar futuros estudios que permitan conocer las causas de este problema e implementar acciones en base a ellas.

  20. [Neonatal hyperthyroidism and maternal Graves disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, K; Chioukh, F Z; Marmouch, H; Ben Hamida, H; Bizid, M; Monastiri, K

    2015-04-01

    The onset of Graves disease during pregnancy exposes the neonate to the risk of hyperthyroidism. The newborn must be monitored and treatment modalities known to ensure early treatment of the newborn. We report on the case of an infant born at term of a mother with Graves disease discovered during pregnancy. He was asymptomatic during the first days of life, before declaring the disease. Neonatal hyperthyroidism was confirmed by hormonal assays. Hyperthyroidism was treated with antithyroid drugs and propranolol with a satisfactory clinical and biological course. Neonatal hyperthyroidism should be systematically sought in infants born to a mother with Graves disease. The absence of clinical signs during the first days of life does not exclude the diagnosis. The duration of monitoring should be decided according to the results of the first hormonal balance tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Neonatal Graves' Disease with Maternal Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akangire, Gangaram; Cuna, Alain; Lachica, Charisse; Fischer, Ryan; Raman, Sripriya; Sampath, Venkatesh

    2017-07-01

    Neonatal Graves' disease presenting as conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is a diagnostic challenge because the differential includes a gamut of liver and systemic diseases. We present a unique case of neonatal Graves' disease in a premature infant with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia born to a mother with hypothyroidism during pregnancy and remote history of Graves' disease. Infant was treated with a combination of methimazole, propranolol, and potassium iodide for 4 weeks. Thyroid function improved after 8 weeks of treatment with full recovery of thyroid function, disappearance of thyroid-stimulating antibodies, and resolution of failure to thrive and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. This case provides several clinical vignettes as it is a rare, severe, presentation of an uncommon neonatal disease, signs, symptoms, and clinical history presented a diagnostic challenge for neonatologists and endocrinologists, normal newborn screen was misleading, and yet timely treatment led to a full recovery.

  2. Changes of hepatofibrosis markers in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Feihua; Xu Haifeng; Zhou Runsuo; Gao Feng; Wang Lei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of hepatofibrosis markers (IV-C, PC III, HA, LN) in Graves' disease. Methods: Serum levels of hepatofibrosis were measured with RIA in 40 patients with Graves' disease (CD) before any treatment and 35 patients with Graves' disease after successful anti-thyroid drug therapy as well as in 30 controls. Results: The serum IV-C and PC III levels in GD patients were significant higher than those in controls before treatment (P<0.01). After successful treatment, the IV-C, PC III levels dropped markedly (vs before treatment, P<0.01). However, there were no significant differences among the serum HA, LN levels in all the subjects tested. Conclusion: Serum levels of IV-C and PC III increased markedly with hyperthyroidim. When IV-C and PC III levels were taken for assessment of degree of hepatofibeosis, GD must be ruled out first. (authors)

  3. Rituximab in relapsing Graves' disease, a phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, Karen A.; Toes, Rene E.; Sepers, Jan; Pereira, Alberto M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes W.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional therapies for Graves' disease, consisting of medical therapy or radioiodine are unsatisfactory, because of limited efficacy and adverse events. Interventions aimed at the underlying autoimmune pathogenesis of Graves' disease may be worthwhile to explore. We therefore performed a

  4. Metformin Therapy for Fanconis Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0300 TITLE: Metformin Therapy for Fanconis Anemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Markus Grompe CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION... Anemia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0300 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Markus Grompe 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 This award pertains to the treatment of the inherited bone marrow failure syndrome Fanconi’s Anemia

  5. Anemia como problema de saúde pública: uma realidade atual Anemia as a public health problem: the current situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaquias Batista Filho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Em 1990, as Nações Unidas promoveram a Reunião de Cúpula de Nova Iorque, onde foram traçadas metas para o decênio vindouro, dentre as quais, a redução de um terço na prevalência das anemias nas mulheres em idade fértil. Porém, apesar de percentual modesto, indícios epidemiológicos apontam no sentido inverso, ou seja, indicam a crescente e grave ocorrência de anemia em diferentes regiões do mundo, inclusive no Brasil. Ao reunir esses informes, constata-se que a anemia continua, desde a antiguidade, a ser uma das entidades nosológicas mais prevalentes e difundidas nas populações humanas. A partir daí surge uma série de questionamentos ainda sem respostas em relação às reais prevalência e etiopatogenia do problema, ao grau de implantação e à efetividade das medidas de controle.In 1990, the United Nations held a World Summit in New York, in which goals for the upcoming decade were established. One of these goals was a one-third reduction in the prevalence of anemia among women at childbearing age. Despite this modest percentage, epidemiological indicators point to the opposite direction, indicating an increasing occurrence of anemia in different regions of the world, including in Brazil. These data show that anemia has continued since the antiquity to be one of the most prevalent and widespread diseases in human populations. Thus, a number of questions without answers arise regarding the actual prevalence and etiopathogenesis of the problem as well as with respect to the degree of implantation and the effectiveness of control measures.

  6. Sjiele sacrifices, Odin treasures and Saami graves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Zachrisson

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents archaeological findings described as Saami metal deposits. These well-known "Finds from Lapp Places of Sacrifice", objects from the Viking Age and Early Middle Ages, were mostly found in northern Sweden. The author also presents a research project dealing with prehistoric and medieval Saami graves from the south Saami area.

  7. Graves' orbitopathy: Management of difficult cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2012-01-01

    Management of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is based on three pillars: to stop smoking, to restore and maintain euthyroidism, and to treat the eye changes according to severity and activity of GO. Difficulties are frequently encountered in each of these three management issues. The advice to

  8. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossage, A.A.; Crawley, J.C.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of [/sup 99m/Tc]pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity--TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p less than 0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fanconi anemia: at the crossroads of DNA repair. Biochemistry (Mosc). 2011 Jan;76(1):36-48. Review. ... not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a ...

  10. Effect of 131I therapy on outcomes of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Renfei; Tan Jian; Zhang Guizhi; Yin Liang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the correlation between the therapeutic effect of Graves' hyperthyroidism and the outcomes of Graves' ophthalmopathy after 131 I therapy, and to explore the effect of 131 I treatment on turnout of Graves' ophthalmopathy. Methods: Six hundreds and fifty-two patients of Graves' disease accompanied with Graves' ophthalmopathy, received one-time 131 I treatment according to routine procedure. We recorded exophthalmometer readings, the signs and symptoms of eyes before therapy. Regular follow-up and appraisal of curative effect were carried out. Results: At least six months after 131 I therapy, the effective rate of Graves' hyperthyroidism and Graves' ophthalmopathy were 94.3% and 73.3% respectively. The total effective rate of hyperthyroidism with ophthalmopathy was 71.2%. There was a significant correlation between the prognosis of Graves' ophthalmopathy and therapeutic efficacy of hyperthyroidism (r=0.302, P 131 I therapy (χ 2 =0.296, P>0.05). Conclusions: The key to treat Graves' ophthalmopathy is the cure of Graves' hyperthyroidism through 131 I therapy. The timely diagnosis and replacement treatment of hypothyroidism can effectively avoid the aggravation of Graves' ophthalmopathy after 131 I therapy. (authors)

  11. Follow up of Graves' Opthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M.S.R.; Paul, A. K.; Rahman, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy may first appear or worsen during or after treatment for hyperthyroidism. We followed up 158 Graves' hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine of which 49 had Grave's' ophthalmopathy during presentation in Nuclear Medicine Centre, Khulna during the period from 1995 to 2000. The aim of our study is to see the effect of radioiodine in Graves' ophthalmopathy. All the patients received radioiodine at fixed dose regime ranged from 7 mCi to 12 mCi. The duration of follow up was at least 12 months Graves' ophthalmopathy patients, 4 (4/49 i.e., 8.2%) showed exaggeration of ophthalmopathy and the rest (45/49 i.e., 91.8%) remained unchanged. None of ophthalmopathy developed among any of Graves' hyperthyroid or disappeared after radioiodine treatment during follow up period. From the study we concluded that eye changes in Graves' hyperthyroidism remain unchanged or exaggerated after radioiodine therapy and needs ophthalmologist care.(author)

  12. Thyroid cancer in Graves' disease: is surgery the best treatment for Graves' disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamatea, Jade A U; Tu'akoi, Kelson; Conaglen, John V; Elston, Marianne S; Meyer-Rochow, Goswin Y

    2014-04-01

    Graves' disease is a common cause of thyrotoxicosis. Treatment options include anti-thyroid medications or definitive therapy: thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine (I(131) ). Traditionally, I(131) has been the preferred definitive treatment for Graves' disease in New Zealand. Reports of concomitant thyroid cancer occurring in up to 17% of Graves' patients suggest surgery, if performed with low morbidity, may be the preferred option. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of thyroid cancer and surgical outcomes in a New Zealand cohort of patients undergoing thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. This study is a retrospective review of Waikato region patients undergoing thyroid surgery for Graves' disease during the 10-year period prior to 1 December 2011. A total of 833 patients underwent thyroid surgery. Of these, 117 were for Graves' disease. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 82, near-total in 33 and subtotal in 2 patients. Recurrent thyrotoxicosis developed in one subtotal patient requiring I(131) therapy. There were two cases of permanent hypoparathyroidism and one of permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Eight patients (6.8%) had thyroid cancer detected, none of whom had overt nodal disease. Five were papillary microcarcinomas (one of which was multifocal), two were papillary carcinomas (11 mm and 15 mm) and one was a minimally invasive follicular carcinoma. Thyroid cancer was identified in approximately 7% of patients undergoing surgery for Graves' disease. A low complication rate (<2%) of permanent hypoparathyroidism and nerve injury (<1%) supports surgery being a safe alternative to I(131) especially for patients with young children, ophthalmopathy or compressive symptoms. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  14. The microclimate within a Neolithic passage grave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klenz Larsen, Poul; Aasbjerg Jensen, Lars; Ryhl-Svendsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Microclimate measurements in a Neolithic passage grave in Denmark have shown that natural ventilation through the open entrance destabilizes the relative humidity (RH), whereas a sealed entrance gives a much more stable RH, above 90%. Episodes of condensation occur on the stone surfaces in summer...... with too much ventilation and in winter with too little ventilation. Soil moisture measurements above, below, and beside the grave mound indicate that rainfall on the mound is not a significant source of moisture to the chamber, whereas the ground below the sealed chamber is constantly moist. The chamber...... can be kept dry all year by putting a moisture barrier membrane over the floor. Apart from the more variable climate within the open chamber, there is also a significant penetration of ozone, which is absent in the sealed chamber. The ozone may have deteriorated the folds of birch bark put between...

  15. Tratamiento de la enfermedad de Graves Basedow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Vargas-Uricoechea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión narrativa rigurosa de la literatura inglesa y en español sobre diferentes aspectos de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow e hipertiroidismo. Esta patología –parte de la llamada “enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune”- se produce como consecuencia de la presencia de anticuerpos circulantes que se unen y activan al receptor de tirotropina, desencadenándose generalmente el hipertiroidismo en asociación con un estrés agudo. En este artículo actualizamos tanto el manejo de hipertiroidismo como el de problemas especiales con el que puede estar asociado. La fisiopatología y el diagnóstico de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow son motivo de otra publicación.

  16. Hyperthyroidism: diagnosis and management of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, J S

    1997-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism, or thyrotoxicosis, results when the body's tissues are exposed to excessive levels of thyroid hormone. Hyperthyroidism affects 2% of women but only one-tenth as many men. Graves' disease is the most common form of hyperthyroidism, often occurring in young adults. It is an autoimmune disorder with an important genetic component. Hyperthyroidism's hallmarks include goiter and myriad signs and symptoms related to increased metabolic activity in virtually all body tissues. Increased sensitivity to circulating catecholamines adds to the clinical picture. Diagnosed by patient history, physical examination, and laboratory tests, Graves' disease is treated with antithyroid drugs, radioactive iodine, and/or surgery, plus supportive therapy. A good treatment outcome can be expected; long-term follow-up is indicated.

  17. A mild Grave's ophthalmopathy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbouda, Alessandro; Trimboli, Pierpaolo; Bruscolini, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid ophthalmopathy is a complication most commonly associated with Grave's disease. The disease course ranges from mild to severe, with severe cases resulting in major visual impairment. A complete ophthalmic examination in a 35-year-old secundigravida to 14 weeks of gestation presented to the hospital for a routine ophthalmological examination with eyelid retraction in the right eye was made. We studied the course of ocular disease through the gestation with orbit ecography and a 3T MRI. A diagnosis of Grave's Ophthalmopathy was made. This case presents an unusual course of the GD during pregnancy and a normal post-partum relapse, according to the Th1/Th2 balance. The frequent follow-up and the use of MRI allowed a prompt identification and complete control of the disease.

  18. Fanconi anemia and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Asako; Komatsu, Kenshi [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1999-09-01

    Aplastic Fanconi anemia (FA) accompanying malformation was firstly reported in 1927. This review concerns the recent findings on FA. FA belongs to the chromosomal instability syndrome and its detailed molecular mechanism is still unknown. The disease has been defined to be highly sensitive to radiation, however, which is quite an important problem since irradiation with a large dose of radiation is required before its radical treatment (bone marrow transplantation). FA cells are also mitomycin C-sensitive and FA patients are said to be the mosaic of the sensitive and normal cells. This enables to classify FA into 8 types of A-H groups, whose genotypes (FAA-FAH, FANCA-FANCH) are becoming clear. However, the intracellular function of the FANC-expressed protein, although known to form a big complex, is not elucidated yet. There is an abnormality in DNA processing such as re-linkage of the double strand-broken DNA in FA cells. FA causal gene FANCG is found identical to XRCC9 which is associated to high sensitivity to radiation. Analysis of FANC genes will provide useful findings on molecular mechanism of DNA-repair. (K.H.)

  19. Fanconi anemia and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Asako; Komatsu, Kenshi

    1999-01-01

    Aplastic Fanconi anemia (FA) accompanying malformation was firstly reported in 1927. This review concerns the recent findings on FA. FA belongs to the chromosomal instability syndrome and its detailed molecular mechanism is still unknown. The disease has been defined to be highly sensitive to radiation, however, which is quite an important problem since irradiation with a large dose of radiation is required before its radical treatment (bone marrow transplantation). FA cells are also mitomycin C-sensitive and FA patients are said to be the mosaic of the sensitive and normal cells. This enables to classify FA into 8 types of A-H groups, whose genotypes (FAA-FAH, FANCA-FANCH) are becoming clear. However, the intracellular function of the FANC-expressed protein, although known to form a big complex, is not elucidated yet. There is an abnormality in DNA processing such as re-linkage of the double strand-broken DNA in FA cells. FA causal gene FANCG is found identical to XRCC9 which is associated to high sensitivity to radiation. Analysis of FANC genes will provide useful findings on molecular mechanism of DNA-repair. (K.H.)

  20. Osteogenesis imperfecta in combination with Graves disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina S. Sheremeta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI – is a group of genetically disorders, which are charaterized by a disturbed bone formation. In turn, the excess of thyroid hormones in Graves' disease (GD also posses a negative effect on bone tissue, thereby aggravating OI. That requires from the endocrinologist the most careful management of patients with the combination of these pathologies. In this article, we present a unique clinical case of a combination of GD and OI.

  1. Graves hyperthyroidism and pregnancy: a clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil-Sisodia, Komal; Mestman, Jorge H

    2010-01-01

    To provide a clinical update on Graves' hyperthyroidism and pregnancy with a focus on treatment with antithyroid drugs. We searched the English-language literature for studies published between 1929 and 2009 related to management of hyperthyroidism in pregnancy. In this review, we discuss differential diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, management, importance of early diagnosis, and importance of achieving proper control to avoid maternal and fetal complications. Diagnosing hyperthyroidism during pregnancy can be challenging because many of the signs and symptoms are similar to normal physiologic changes that occur in pregnancy. Patients with Graves disease require prompt treatment with antithyroid drugs and should undergo frequent monitoring for signs of fetal and maternal hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Rates of maternal and perinatal complications are directly related to control of hyperthyroidism in the mother. Thyroid receptor antibodies should be assessed in all women with hyperthyroidism to help predict and reduce the risk of fetal or neonatal hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. The maternal thyroxine level should be kept in the upper third of the reference range or just above normal, using the lowest possible antithyroid drug dosage. Hyperthyroidism may recur in the postpartum period as Graves disease or postpartum thyroiditis; thus, it is prudent to evaluate thyroid function 6 weeks after delivery. Preconception counseling, a multidisciplinary approach to care, and patient education regarding potential maternal and fetal complications that can occur with different types of treatment are important. Preconception counseling and a multifaceted approach to care by the endocrinologist and the obstetric team are imperative for a successful pregnancy in women with Graves hyperthyroidism.

  2. Thyroidectomy for Graves' disease: is hypothyroidism inevitable?

    OpenAIRE

    Davenport, M.; Talbot, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    The outcome of 234 patients with Graves' disease treated by subtotal thyroidectomy over a 12-year period is analysed with specific reference to hypothyroidism. Of definite hypothyroid cases, 98% occurred within 2 years. Failure to develop hypothyroidism was statistically related to large remnant size and a large goitre preoperatively. Histological review showed that any degree of lymphocytic infiltration was associated with the development of hypothyroidism (50% vs 22%). Late onset hypothyroi...

  3. Resultados do tratamento da pancreatite aguda grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Robert Apodaca-Torrez

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados do Protocolo de Atendimento de pacientes com diagnóstico de pancreatite aguda grave. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados, consecutivamente, a partir de janeiro de 2002, idade, sexo, etiologia, tempo de internação, tipo de tratamento e mortalidade de 37 pacientes portadores de pancreatite aguda grave. RESULTADOS: A idade dos pacientes variou de 20 a 88 anos (média de 50 anos; 27% foram do sexo feminino e 73% do masculino. O tempo médio global de internação foi 47 dias. Treze pacientes foram tratados cirurgicamente; a média de operações realizadas foi duas por paciente. Ocorreram seis óbitos dentre os pacientes submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico (46% e dois óbitos no grupo submetido somente ao tratamento clínico (8,3%. A mortalidade global foi 21% CONCLUSÃO: Após a modificação na forma de abordagem dos pacientes com pancreatite aguda grave, houve diminuição da mortalidade e uma tendência para a conduta expectante.

  4. Grave Tending: With Mom at the Cemetery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Ellis

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This autoethnographic story shows the process of tending the graves of family members. In the past, the author reluctantly accompanied her mother on her visits to the family cemetery. Once there, she took on the role of distant observer as her mother took care of the family cemetery plots. When her mother becomes disabled, the author begins to arrange the flowers on the graves. Doing so leads her to examine the meaning of visiting the cemetery, feel and connect with her losses, and consider the customs she wants to be part of her own death. When her mother dies, the next generation of women in the family—the author, her sister, and sister-in-law—take on the role of tending the graves, connected in their love and respect for their mother and their feelings of family and family responsibility. This story examines the meanings of family rituals around death and how they are passed from generation to generation. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0302285

  5. Severe anemia in Malawian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calis, Job Cj; Phiri, Kamija S; Faragher, E Brian; Brabin, Bernard J; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E; de Haan, Rob J; Phiri, Ajib I; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul Jm; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel Ghm; Teo, Yik Y; Rockett, Kirk A; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Molyneux, Malcolm E; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele

    2016-09-01

    Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and 757 preschool children without severe anemia in urban and rural settings in Malawi. Causal factors previously associated with severe anemia were studied. The data were examined by multivariate analysis and structural equation modeling. Bacteremia (adjusted odds ratio, 5.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.6 to 10.9), malaria (adjusted odds ratio, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6 to 3.3), hookworm (adjusted odds ratio, 4.8; 95% CI, 2.0 to 11.8), human immunodeficiency virus infection (adjusted odds ratio, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.8), the G6PD -202/-376 genetic disorder (adjusted odds ratio, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3 to 4.4), vitamin A deficiency (adjusted odds ratio, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 5.8), and vitamin B 12 deficiency (adjusted odds ratio, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4 to 3.6) were associated with severe anemia. Folate deficiency, sickle cell disease, and laboratory signs of an abnormal inflammatory response were uncommon. Iron deficiency was not prevalent in case patients (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.60) and was negatively associated with bacteremia. Malaria was associated with severe anemia in the urban site (with seasonal transmission) but not in the rural site (where malaria was holoendemic). Seventy-six percent of hookworm infections were found in children under 2 years of age. There are multiple causes of severe anemia in Malawian preschool children, but folate and iron deficiencies are not prominent among them. Even in the presence of malaria parasites, additional or alternative causes of severe anemia should be considered.

  6. Iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Mahmoud; Jaberian, Sara; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Riazi, Sajedeh; Rangraz, Maryam Aghababa; Mokhber, Somayyeh

    2017-03-01

    The association between obesity and different types of anemia remained uncertain. The present study aimed to assess the relation between obesity parameters and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia and also megaloblastic anemia among Iranian population. This cross-sectional study was performed on 1252 patients with morbid obesity that randomly selected from all patients referred to Clinic of obesity at Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital in 2014. The morbid obesity was defined according to the guideline as body mass index (BMI) equal to or higher than 40 kg/m2. Various laboratory parameters including serum levels of hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, folic acid, and vitamin B12 were assessed using the standard laboratory techniques. BMI was adversely associated with serum vitamin B12, but not associated with other hematologic parameters. The overall prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 9.8%. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was independent to patients' age and also to body mass index. The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency was totally 20.9%. According to the multivariable logistic regression model, no association was revealed between BMI and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia adjusting gender and age. A similar regression model showed that higher BMI could predict occurrence of vitamin B12 deficiency in morbid obese patients. Although iron deficiency is a common finding among obese patients, vitamin B12 deficiency is more frequent so about one-fifth of these patients suffer vitamin B12 deficiency. In fact, the exacerbation of obesity can result in exacerbation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions CDA Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  8. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 188,000 ...

  9. Hipoxia após traumatismos crânio-encefálicos graves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Frowein

    1964-09-01

    Full Text Available Após traumatismos crânio-encefálicos graves ocorre hipoxia cerebral, não apenas nas primeiras horas mas também durante vários dias da fase aguda. A saturação arterial de O2 é muitas vêzes normal, mas, com mais freqüência do que se supõe, existe anemia; como conseqüência do aumento da pressão intracraniana, da hipotensão arterial ou da alcalose respiratória, diminui o afluxo sangüíneo ao encéfalo, baixando a tensão do O2 celular, o que é demonstrado pela diminuição da tensão de O2 no sangue venoso provindo do encéfalo. Por isso, no tratamento da fase aguda pós-traumática deve-se, ao lado da normalização da pressão intracraniana, manter a pressão arterial, evitar a hiperventilação pulmonar mediante a administração de neuroplégicos e impedir a anemia mediante transfusões de sangue.

  10. [Association Budd Chiari syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouelhi, Leila; Chaieb, Mouna; Debbeche, Radhouane; Salem, Mohamed; Sfar, Imene; Trabelsi, Sinda; Gorgi, Yosr; Najjar, Taoufik

    2009-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome in 5% of the cases. Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis, foetal loss and positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies, namely lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I. Anticardiolipin antibodies was reported in auto-immune thyroid disorders, particularly in Grave's disease. Antiphospholipid syndrome associated to Grave's disease was reported in only three cases. To describe a case report of association of Grave's disease and antiphospholipid syndrome. We report the first case of Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. Our observation is particular by the fact that it is about a patient presenting a Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. This triple association has never been reported in literature. Although association between antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease was previously described, further studies evaluating the coexistence of these two affections in the same patient would be useful.

  11. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AI/ACD. AI/ACD is easily confused with iron- deficiency anemia because in both forms of anemia levels of ... cell production. Low blood iron levels occur in iron-deficiency anemia because levels of the iron stored in the ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Iron-Deficiency Anemia What's in ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  13. Syngeneic transplantation in aplastic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerull, Sabine; Stern, Martin; Apperley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is usually treated with immunosuppression or allogeneic transplant, depending on patient and disease characteristics. Syngeneic transplant offers a rare treatment opportunity with minimal transplant-related mortality, and offers an insight into disease mechanisms. We present here...... a retrospective analysis of all syngeneic transplants for aplastic anemia reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Between 1976 and 2009, 88 patients received 113 transplants. Most transplants (n=85) were preceded by a conditioning regimen, 22 of these including anti-thymocyte globulin...

  14. Diagnosis of Grave's disease with pulmonary hypertension on chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Hye Rin; Chun, Eun Ju; White, Charles S

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of chest CT findings to diagnose Grave's disease in pulmonary hypertension. We retrospectively evaluated chest CT and the medical records of 13 patients with Grave's disease with (n=6) or without pulmonary hypertension (n=7) and in 17 control patients. Presence of iso-attenuation of diffusely enlarged thyroid glands compared with adjacent neck muscle on non-enhanced CT as a diagnostic clue of Grave's disease, and assessment of pulmonary hypertension on CT has high diagnostic accuracy. Chest CT has the potential to diagnose Grave's disease with pulmonary hypertension in the absence of other information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ANEMIA DAN ANEMIA GIZI BESI PADA KEHAMILAN: HUBUNGANNYA DENGAN ASUPAN PROTEIN DAN ZAT GIZI MIKRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Handayani Utami

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anemia masih menjadi permasalahan kesehatan pada wanita hamil. Zat besi dianggap sebagai salah satu zat gizi mikro yang berperan terhadap terjadinya anemia. Kekurangan gizi besi dalam tingkat lanjut dapat menyebabkan anemia, yang disebut sebagai anemia gizi besi. Tujuan studi ini adalah untuk menganalisis perbedaan antara asupan protein dan gizi mikro serta menghitung odd ratio (OR kejadian anemia dan anemia gizi besi akibat asupan protein dan gizi mikro pada wanita hamil di lokasi studi. Analisis ini merupakan analisa dari data studi kohor Tumbuh Kembang anak pada tahun pertama, yang dilaksanakan di Kelurahan Kebon Kalapa dan Ciwaringin, Kota Bogor yang dianalisa menggunakan disainkasus kontrol. Sebanyak 47 ibu hamil menjadi sampel dalam analisa ini. Kategori untuk anemia yaitu apabila kadar hemoglobin (Hb ibu hamil ≤11 g/dL. Kekurangan gizi besi dikategorikan apabila kadar serum transferrin reseptor (sTfR diatas 4.4 mg/L. Sedangkan Anemia Gizi Besi dikategorikan apabila memiliki kadar Hb < 11 g/dL dan sTfr > 4.4 mg/L. Tes one way anova digunakan untuk menganalisa adanya perbedaan asupan energi, protein dan zat gizi mikro antara ibu hamil yang mengalami anemia, anemia gizi besi maupun yang normal. Odd ratio dianalisa dengan menggunakan uji chi square. Nilai signifikan ditentukan apabila nilai p value < 0.05 dan perhitungan OR> 1. 27.7% dari ibu hamil di lokasi studi mengalami anemia, 14.9% tergolong dalam anemia ringan, 10.6% anemia sedang dan 2.1% anemia berat. Anemia gizi besi dialami oleh 17% dari wanita hamil. Terdapat hubungan yang signifikan antara keparahan anemia dan terjadinya anemia gizi besi. Tidak ditemukan perbedaan antara asupan protein, besi, folate dan zink pada wanita yang mengalami anemia, anemia gizi besi maupun yang normal. Akan tetapi terdapat kecenderungan bahwa asupan zat besi dan seng pada ibu yang anemia dan anemia gizi besi lebih rendah daripada ibu yang normal. Anemia masih menjadi permasalahan kesehatan pada ibu

  16. Preoperative management in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantanida, Eliana

    2017-10-01

    Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism in iodine-sufficient geographical areas and is characterized by the presence in patients' serum of autoantibodies directed against the thyrotropin receptor (TRAb) that cause overproduction and release of thyroid hormones. Clinical presentation results from both hyperthyroidism and underlying autoimmunity. The diagnosis is based on characteristic clinical features and biochemical abnormalities. If serum thyrotropin (TSH) is low, serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations should be measured to distinguish between subclinical (with normal circulating thyroid hormones) and overt hyperthyroidism (with increased circulating thyroid hormones). Graves' disease is treated with any of three effective and relatively safe initial treatment options: antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioactive iodine ablation (RAIU), and surgery. Total thyroidectomy is favored in several clinical situations, such as intolerance, ineffectiveness or recurrence after ATD treatment, radioiodine therapy contraindicated, documented or suspected thyroid malignancy, one or more large thyroid nodules, coexisting moderate-to-severe active Graves' orbitopathy, women planning a pregnancy within 6 months. Whenever surgery is selected as treatment, selection of an expert high-volume thyroid surgeons is fundamental and careful preoperative management is essential to optimize surgical outcomes. Pretreatment with ATDs in order to promptly achieve the euthyroid state is recommended to avoid the risk of precipitating thyroid storm during surgery. For the majority of patients, euthyroidism is achieved after few weeks of ATD treatment. Beta-blockers, such as propranolol, are often added effectively to control hyperthyroid symptoms. Saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI) or potassium iodine (Lugol's solution), given for a short period prior to surgery, in order to reduce both thyroid hormone release and thyroid gland

  17. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  18. Tratamiento de la enfermedad de Graves Basedow

    OpenAIRE

    Hernando Vargas-Uricoechea; Carlos Hernán Sierra-Torres; Ivonne Alejandra Meza-Cabrera

    2014-01-01

    Se realizó una revisión narrativa rigurosa de la literatura inglesa y en español sobre diferentes aspectos de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow e hipertiroidismo. Esta patología –parte de la llamada “enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune”- se produce como consecuencia de la presencia de anticuerpos circulantes que se unen y activan al receptor de tirotropina, desencadenándose generalmente el hipertiroidismo en asociación con un estrés agudo. En este artículo actualizamos tanto el manejo de hipertiroid...

  19. Graves' disease. Manifestations and therapeutic options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, K.F.; Saleeby, G.

    1988-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Clinical features include thyroid enlargement, eye signs, tachycardia, heat intolerance, emotional lability, weight loss, and hyperkinesis. Three modes of therapy are available. The preferences of the patient and physician are usually prime considerations in devising the therapeutic plan. Radioactive iodine is the most frequently used and safest method of treatment for adults. Antithyroid drugs are preferred for children and pregnant women. Surgery is usually reserved for patients in whom the other forms of treatment are not acceptable. Considerable patient education during the decision-making process enhances the success of the therapeutic plan

  20. Pancreatitis aguda grave asociada a gangrena vesicular

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo-Sánchez, Abel S; Aguirre-Mejía, Rosa Y; Echenique-Martínez, Sergio E

    2014-01-01

    Se presenta el caso un paciente diabético que desarrolló un cuadro de pancreatitis aguda grave asociada a gangrena vesicular, en el que se evaluó la aplicabilidad de los criterios de clasificación y manejo de la hoja de ruta para pancreatitis aguda, así mismo se proponen algunos tópicos que pudieran ser investigados a futuro We present a diabetic patient who developed severe acute pancreatitis associated to gallbladder gangrene, in this case we assessed the applicability of classification ...

  1. Graves' disease and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gutch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a central nervous system disorder characterized by raised intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid composition and absence of any structural anomaly on neuroimaging. Among all endocrine disorders associated with the development of IIH, the association of hyperthyroidism and IIH is very rare with few cases reported till date. Thyroid disturbances have a unique association with IIH. Hypo- and hyper-thyroidism have been reported in association with this disorder. We present a rare case of a 25-year-old man with Graves' disease with intractable headache that was later investigated and attributed to development of IIH.

  2. Anemias hemolíticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cediel Ángel

    1957-04-01

    Full Text Available Hayem (1898 y más tarde Widal (1907 señalaron que, al paso que la forma congénita clásica de anemia hemolítica de Minkowski y Chauffard a menudo causaba pocos síntomas, otro tipo que ellos clasificaron como adquirido, con frecuencia' se asociaba con anemia severa y acentuada incapacidad. Incluyeron allí casos de excesiva destrucción de sangre asociada a diversas infecciones ó intoxicaciones lo mismo que casos de etiología desconocida. Chauffard fue capaz de demostrar autohemolisinas en el suero de unos pocos casos de anemia hemolítica aguda adquirida y se refirió a ellos como "ictericias hemolisínicas". Sin embargo por muchos años existió la duda de que hubiera un verdadero tipo de anemia hemolítica adquirida y muy poco fue tenida en cuenta la posibilidad de que pudiera jugar papel en estos casos una reacción inmunológica.

  3. Radiosensitivity in Fanconi's anemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alter, Blanche P.

    2002-01-01

    The risks of radiation therapy in patients with Fanconi's anemia who have cancer are not clear. Possible toxicity was reported in six of 14 patients: 1/1 with vaginal cancer, 4/10 with head and neck or esophageal cancer, and 1/3 with oral cancer following bone marrow transplant

  4. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  5. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  6. Dosimetry-based treatment for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Steve L; Pratt, Brenda; Gray, Matthew; Chittenden, Sarah; Du, Yong; Harmer, Clive L; Flux, Glenn D

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the long-term outcome of a personalized dosimetry approach in Graves' disease aiming to render patients euthyroid from a planned thyroid absorbed dose of 60 Gy. A total of 284 patients with Graves' disease were followed prospectively following administration of radioiodine calculated to deliver an absorbed dose of 60 Gy. Patients with cardiac disease were excluded. Outcomes were analysed at yearly intervals for up to 10 years with a median follow-up of 37.5 months. A single radioiodine administration was sufficient to render a patient either euthyroid or hypothyroid in 175 (62%) patients, the remainder requiring further radioiodine. The median radioactivity required to deliver 60 Gy was 77 MBq. Less than 2% patients required 400-600 MBq, the standard activity administered in many centres. In the cohort receiving a single administration, 38, 32 and 26% were euthyroid on no specific thyroid medication at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Larger thyroid volumes were associated with the need for further therapy. The presence of nodules on ultrasonography did not adversely affect treatment outcome. A personalized dosimetric approach delayed the long-term onset of hypothyroidism in 26% of patients. This was achieved using much lower administered activities than currently recommended. Future studies will aim to identify those patients who would benefit most from this approach.

  7. Thymic hyperplasia in a patient with Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, Amira A; Klii, Rim R; Salem, Randa R; Kochtali, Ines I; Golli, Mondher M; Mahjoub, Silvia S

    2012-02-09

    Hyperplastic changes of the thymus may be found in patients with Graves' disease. However, this rarely presents as an anterior mediastinal mass, particularly among adults. In this report, we describe a 46-year old woman with Graves' disease and thymic hyperplasia.

  8. Thymic hyperplasia in a patient with Grave's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzaoui Amira A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyperplastic changes of the thymus may be found in patients with Graves' disease. However, this rarely presents as an anterior mediastinal mass, particularly among adults. In this report, we describe a 46-year old woman with Graves' disease and thymic hyperplasia.

  9. [Diagnostic difficulties in Grave's orbitopathy--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzejowski, Maciej; Grzesiuk, Wiesław; Szwejda, Elzbieta; Bar-Andziak, Ewa

    2004-03-01

    Graves' orbitopathy is caused by intraorbital inflammatory reaction due to autoimmune thyroid disease. In most cases the diagnosis is based on the coexistence of typical eye signs and hyperthyroidism symptoms. In presented case, the absence of thyroid dysfunction implicated performance of differential diagnosis. Among many available diagnostic tools nuclear magnetic resonance seems to be the most accurate in confirmation of diagnosis of Graves' orbitopathy.

  10. Consumo de leite de vaca e anemia ferropriva na infância Cow's milk consumption and iron deficiency anemia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. A. Oliveira

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar aspectos do consumo de leite de vaca associados à anemia na infância. FONTES DOS DADOS: As informações foram coletadas a partir de artigos publicados nas 2 últimas décadas, pesquisados nas bases de dados Lilacs e MEDLINE, livros técnicos e publicações de organizações internacionais. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A anemia ferropriva é um grave problema de saúde pública nos países em desenvolvimento. Até os 6 meses de idade, o leite materno supre as necessidades de ferro das crianças nascidas a termo. A partir daí, torna-se necessária a ingestão de uma alimentação complementar rica em ferro. Considerando a importância da dieta na determinação da anemia e o alto consumo de leite de vaca na infância, discute-se neste artigo a relação desse alimento com a deficiência de ferro. A introdução precoce ou a substituição do leite materno por leite de vaca pode ocasionar problemas gastrintestinais e alérgicos. Além disso, esse alimento apresenta baixa biodisponibilidade e densidade de ferro, excesso de proteínas e minerais, especialmente cálcio, interferindo na absorção do ferro de outros alimentos, e associa-se às micro-hemorragias intestinais, principalmente nas crianças menores. CONCLUSÕES: A utilização do leite de vaca em detrimento de outros alimentos ricos em ferro biodisponível constitui um risco para o desenvolvimento da anemia. O estímulo ao aleitamento materno exclusivo até os 6 meses de vida e sua continuidade até pelo menos 24 meses, juntamente com uma dieta complementar rica em ferro são medidas de grande importância para a prevenção da anemia e de suas conseqüências na infância.OBJECTIVE: To thoroughly investigate the association between the consumption of cow's milk and anemia in childhood. SOURCES OF DATA: The information was gathered from papers catalogued in Lilacs and MEDLINE and published during the last two decades, and also from textbooks and publications by international

  11. Notes on Glasinac: The chronology of princely graves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Rastko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Princely graves of the Iron Age represent a particular phenomenon in archaeology, which is constantly the subject of interest. They are usually dated to the end of the 6th and the beginning of the 5th century. The author discusses the chronology of princely graves in the Central Balkans and analyses their appearance in each part of this territory: on the Glasinac plateau, in Serbia, Kosovo and Metohija, Montenegro, North Albania and Nordwest Bulgaria. He concludes that they date from the middle of the 7th to the middle of the 4th century, depending on the cultural and socio-economic situation in the respective area. In the middle of the 7th century princely graves in the true sense of the word were known only on the Glasinac plateau, in the Ilijak necropolis. At the end of the 7th and in the beginning of the 6th century they still appear on Glasinac, though in greater number and in various parts of the plateau. In northwest Bulgaria a grave dating to the second half of the 7th century was found, which would, according to grave goods, correspond to the Glasinac princely graves. On the other hand, there are no princely graves in Serbia and north Albania from that time but some outstanding warrior graves are known, belonging possibly to the chiefs of smaller warlike bands, whose power was limited. Princely graves from Arareva gromila on Glasinac, Pilatovići by Požega and Lisijevo Polje by Berane date to the beginning of the second half of the 6th century, and according to their characteristics represent princes, whose power and wealth were considerable and known to the neighbours. Culmination of the rise of the princes in this region was demonstrated by the graves from Novi Pazar, Atenica, and Pećka banja, which date to the end of the 6th and the first quarter of the 5th century. Some decades later there are several rich graves, e.g. the recently discovered grave from Velika Krsna, which could belong to a prince, but can not be compared with the

  12. Predictors of anemia in preschool children: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Grant J; Huang, Jin; Varadhan, Ravi; Temple, Victor; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Macdonald, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background: A lack of information on the etiology of anemia has hampered the design and monitoring of anemia-control efforts. Objective: We aimed to evaluate predictors of anemia in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6–59 mo) by country and infection-burden category. Design: Cross-sectional data from 16 surveys (n = 29,293) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed separately and pooled by category of infection burden. We assessed relations between anemia (hemoglobin concentration anemia (hemoglobin concentration anemia with concomitant iron deficiency (defined as an inflammation-adjusted ferritin concentration anemia in >50% of surveys. Associations between breastfeeding and anemia were attenuated by controlling for child age, which was negatively associated with anemia. The most consistent predictors of severe anemia were malaria, poor sanitation, and underweight. In multivariable pooled models, child age, iron deficiency, and stunting independently predicted anemia and severe anemia. Inflammation was generally associated with anemia in the high- and very high–infection groups but not in the low- and medium-infection groups. In PSC with anemia, 50%, 30%, 55%, and 58% of children had concomitant iron deficiency in low-, medium-, high-, and very high–infection categories, respectively. Conclusions: Although causal inference is limited by cross-sectional survey data, results suggest anemia-control programs should address both iron deficiency and infections. The relative importance of factors that are associated with anemia varies by setting, and thus, country-specific data are needed to guide programs. PMID:28615260

  13. The 2016 European Thyroid Association/European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy Guidelines for the Management of Graves' Orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartalena, Luigi; Baldeschi, Lelio; Boboridis, Kostas; Eckstein, Anja; Kahaly, George J.; Marcocci, Claudio; Perros, Petros; Salvi, Mario; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Adamidou, Fotini; Anagnostis, Panagiotis; Ayvaz, Goksun; Azzolini, Claudio; Boschi, Antonella; Bournaud, Claire; Clarke, Lucy; Currò, Nicola; Daumerie, Chantal; Dayan, Colin; Fuhrer, Dagmar; Konuk, Onur; Marinò, Michele; Morris, Daniel; Nardi, Marco; Pearce, Simon; Pitz, Susanne; Rudovsky, Gottfried; Vannucchi, Guia; Vardanian, Christine; von Arx, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is the main extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, though severe forms are rare. Management of GO is often suboptimal, largely because available treatments do not target pathogenic mech anisms of the disease. Treatment should rely on a thorough assessment of the

  14. Predictive score for the development or progression of Graves' orbitopathy in patients with newly diagnosed Graves' hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar; Žarković, Miloš; Bartalena, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To construct a predictive score for the development or progression of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) in Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH). DESIGN: Prospective observational study in patients with newly diagnosed GH, treated with antithyroid drugs (ATD) for 18 months at ten participating centers f...

  15. Outcome of very long-term treatment with antithyroid drugs in Graves' hyperthyroidism associated with Graves' orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, Laura; Mourits, Maarten; Wiersinga, Wilmar

    2011-01-01

    It is still debated which treatment modality for Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH) is most appropriate when Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is present. The preference in our center has been always to continue antithyroid drugs for GH (as the block-and-replace [B-R] regimen) until all medical and/or surgical

  16. Graves' ophthalmopathy and 131I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcocci, C.; Bartalena, L.; Tanda, M.L.; Manetti, L.; Dell'Unto, E.; Mazzi, B.; Rocchi, R.; Barbesino, G.; Pinchera, A.

    1999-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy is an autoimmune process initiated and maintained by antigen(s) shared by the thyroid and the orbit. A matter of argument concerns the choice of the method of treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism when clinically evident ophthalmopathy is present. Restoration of euthyroidism appears to be beneficial for ophthalmopathy. On the other hand the continuing disease activity associated with the recurrence of hyperthyroidism appears to adversely affect the course of ophthalmopathy. For these reasons it is our opinion that in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy the permanent control of thyroid hyper function by ablation of thyroid tissue should be obtained by radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy. The rationale for an ablative strategy is the following: i) permanent control of hyperthyroidism avoids exacerbations of eye disease associated with recurrence of hyperthyroidism; i i) hypothyroidism, which follows thyroid tissue ablation, should be regarded as a therapeutic end point rather than as an undesirable result; iii) ablation of thyroid tissue may result in the removal of both the thyroid-orbit cross-reacting antigen(s) and the major source of thyroid-auto reactive lymphocytes. The relationship between radioiodine therapy and the course of GO is a matter of controversy, and some authors have suggested that radioiodine administration ma be associated with a worsening of preexisting ophthalmopathy. This was not observed when radioiodine treatment was associated with a 3-month oral course of prednisone. The development or progression of GO after radioiodine therapy might be due to the release of thyroid antigens following radiation injury and to subsequent exacerbations of autoimmune reactions directed towards antigens shared by the thyroid and the orbit. The view that radioiodine therapy may be associated with a progression of ophthalmopathy is not shared by some authors who claim that the apparent link between progression of

  17. Fanconi anemia - learning from children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Svahn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is a rare autosomic recessive and X-linked disease with chromosomal instability after exposure to crosslinking agents as the hallmark. Clinical features of FA are somatic malformations, progressive bone marrow failure and cancer proneness, however there is wide clinical heterogeneity. The symptom most frequently and early associated with morbidity and mortality is progressive pancytopenia in the first decade of life although acute myelogenous leukemia (AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS can appear before aplastic anemia. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the head-neck, intestinal or genital tract has a very high incidence in FA and can appear at young age. This paper will focus on treatment of bone marrow failure in FA.

  18. Acquired Aplastic Anemia in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Helge D.; Olson, Timothy S.; Bessler, Monica

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder. PMID:24237973

  19. APLASTIC ANEMIA AND VIRAL HEPATITIS

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    Laura Cudillo

    2009-11-01

    Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic  and blood lymphocytes with  T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia.

  20. Management of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgiazzi, J.

    1987-06-01

    Management of Graves' disease hyperthyroidism, a life-long disease, hinges on a clear strategy and involves the patient's understanding and adherence. Antithyroid drug treatment is difficult to adapt to each patient's need; so far, the more efficient use of antithyroid drug remains on long-term courses of 18 months or more. Although a picture is evolving of patients more likely to go into remission after the medical treatment, its characteristics are not yet reliable. Radical (ablative) treatments are often necessary. In general, surgery might appear less appealing than /sup 131/I irradiation which, as compared to surgery, carries only the risk of later hypothyroidism. It is hoped that basic as well as clinical research is able to generate innovative, better adapted, and pathophysiologically oriented new therapeutic means. 124 references.

  1. Radiation therapy of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Toshiki; Koga, Sukehiko; Anno, Hirofumi; Komai, Satoshi (Fujita-Gakuen Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    During the decade from 1978 to 1987, 20 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with irradiation of 2000 cGy to the orbital tissue. We examined the effects of the therapy on 17 such patients. Exophthalmos tended to decrease. When the degree of deviation of the exophthalmic eye was small, the effect of therapy tended to be better than when it was large. Two cases that showed an increase in retrobulbar fatty tissue without thickening of the extraocular muscles did not respond as well as those that had thickening of the extraocular muscles. Diplopia tended to improve both subjectively and objectively. Ocular movement improved in 11 of the 17 patients. There were no serious radiation injuries after the radiation therapy, except for some transient swelling of the eyelid. (author).

  2. Pathogenesis of Graves' disease and therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seif, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Graves' disease presents itself clinically mainly as hyperthyroidism and infiltrative ophthalmopathy and to a minimal extent also as dermopathy and acropachy. Autoimmune processes are the basic pathogenesis. Stimulating antibodies against the TSH receptor cause hyperthyroidism. Autoantibodies and autoreactive T lymphocytes against primarily thyroidal antigens cross-react with similar antigens of the eye muscles and orbital connective tissue, thus spreading the disease from the thyroid to the eyes. The therapeutic goal comprises not only the treatment of hyperthyroidism, but also the induction of a steady immuntolerance in order to minimize the irreversible damage to the eye. The therapeutic armamentarium is formed by antithyroid drugs, glucocorticoids, retrobulbar radition and thyroid ablation, either by nearly total thyroidectomy or by radioiodine. The different indications for both ablative procedures are discussed. (orig.) [de

  3. Supervoltage orbital radiotherapy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriss, J.P.; McDougall, I.R.; Petersen, I.A.; Donaldson, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1968 we have employed supervoltage orbital radiation as treatment for severe progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. A numerical ophthalmic index was used to asess pre- and post-treatment serverity. In the past 20 years we have treated 311 patients of whom 275 have been followed for ≤ 1 year or until any eye surgery was performed. An orbital radiation dosage of 2000 rads in 2 weeks was used for the majority of patients (Series I and III). Series II patients received an orbital dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks. Demographic differences were observed between these series, thus mandating presentation of the results of each separately. Analyses excluded any result achieved by any post-radiation surgical procedure on the eyes. Post-theraphy worsening of ophtalmopathy occurred in only 29 of 1025 observations. Improvement or complete resolution was observed within each category of eye involvement, but lack of favorable response was also recorded in significant numbers. Improvement in proptosis occurred with the lowest frequency and magnitude. About 30% of the patients required eye muscle surgery to correct residual diplopia. Analysis of the data by step-wise linear regression analysis enabled us a. to derive formulae predicting the problable response to radiation therapy according to sign and severity, and b. identify parameters which diminished the likelihood or the extent of a favorable response. The latter included male sex, never thyrotoxic, age greater than 60 years, and requirement for concomitant treatment for hyperthyroidism. No long-term adverse reactions attributable to the radiotherapy have been observed. We conclude that supervoltage orbital radiotherapy, combined with later eye muscle surgery if necessary, is an effective treatment strategy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. (author)

  4. Radiotherapy in the management of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Koh-ichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Morita, Kazuo; Osanai, Hajime; Ohtsuka, Kenji; Hinoda, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    To report the results of radiotherapy for patients with failure, adverse reactions or relative contraindications to the use of steroids or immunosuppressants, by using newly developed quantitative indexes. Fourteen female and six male patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with radiotherapy between 1989 and 1996. Prior to radiotherapy, eight patients received treatment with prednisone, four received immunosuppressants and four received a combination of both. Four patients with contraindications to steroids were initially managed with radiotherapy. Most of the patients received a dose of 24-28 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. We used the newly developed motility limitation index to assess extraocular motility. Treatment was well tolerated. There have been no late complications. All 12 patients with soft tissue signs such as edema, irritation, tearing and pain were improved. Proptosis did not improve or improved only slightly, 3 mm at best. However, proptosis in all but two has been stabilized and has not deteriorated in the follow-up period. Most of the patients have experienced an improvement of eye-muscle motility. Extraocular muscles that work for elevation were impaired more severely than the other muscles and this tended to remain. Of the 16 patients using steroids before or when radiotherapy was initiated, 15 were tapered off and only one patient required additional steroids, thus sparing the majority from steroid adverse reactions. Radiotherapy was effective in preventing exacerbations of active inflammatory ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves' disease with minimal morbidity and thus eliminated the adverse reactions associated with protracted corticosteroid use. The newly developed motility limitation index was useful in detecting delicate changes in motility of individual extraocular muscles. (author)

  5. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–201...

  6. CLASSIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTICS OF ANEMIA IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    A. G. Rumyantsev

    2011-01-01

    Anemia in children is one of the most frequent somatic diseases. Criteria of anemia diagnosis are strictly regulated as decrease of hemoglobin/erythrocytes level accompanies majority of infectious, inflammatory, autoimmune, hereditary diseases and, in several cases, it is estimated as transitory disease in some periods of children’s growth and development. The article presents main classification and differential diagnostic schemes of anemia. Diagnostics makes accent on laboratory analysis; t...

  7. An unusual cause of anemia and encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Sharma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors present here an interesting case of recent onset anemia that was associated with an encephalopathy of the unusual cause.Although severe anemia can theoretically result in anemic hypoxia and can then lead to hypoxic encephalopathy, it is not a primary cause of encephalopathy. More frequently anemia can contribute together with other multiple causes of encephalopathy, such as infections, metabolic abnormalities, trauma, hepatic dysfunction, hypertension, toxins.

  8. Injuria renal aguda en la sepsis grave Acute kidney injury in severe sepsis

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    Hernán Trimarchi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available La sepsis afecta al 40% de los pacientes críticos, siendo su mortalidad de aproximadamente un 30% en el caso de la sepsis grave, y de 75% con injuria renal aguda, la cual sucede en el 20-51% de los casos. Se realizó un estudio prospectivo, observacional, longitudinal, en 80 pacientes sépticos graves en el lapso de 1 año para determinar el desarrollo de injuria renal aguda y su relación con la mortalidad; correlacionar antecedentes clínicos y variaciones del laboratorio con la mortalidad; determinar la tasa de mortalidad de la sepsis grave; relacionar óbito y foco séptico primario; evaluar la predictibilidad de mortalidad según niveles de creatinina de ingreso y sus variaciones finales. Se definieron dos grupos: Obito (n = 25 y No-óbito (n = 55. Analizados según la creatinina de ingreso, 39 tenían valores normales de creatinina (10 óbitos y 41 la presentaban elevada (15 óbitos; según la creatinina de egreso, 48 presentaron creatinina normal y fallecieron 7, mientras que 32 tenían daño renal agudo, de los cuales 18 fallecieron. De los 25 pacientes fallecidos, el 72% presentaron daño renal. De éstos, 7 pacientes vivos y 2 fallecidos requirieron hemodiálisis. El foco primario más frecuente fue el respiratorio (26.4%. El desarrollo de daño renal es un alto predictor de mortalidad en la sepsis, independientemente de los valores iniciales de creatinina. Edad más avanzada, hipertensión arterial, score APACHE más elevado, anemia más grave, hipoalbuminemia, hiperfosfatemia e hiperkalemia se asociaron a mayor mortalidad. La mortalidad global fue 31.3%. La imposibilidad de identificar el foco séptico primario se asoció a mayor mortalidad. El foco respiratorio se relacionó a mayor riesgo de requerir hemodiálisis.Sepsis affects 40% of critically ill patients, with a reported mortality of approximately 30% in severe sepsis, raising to 75% when acute kidney injury ensues, which occurs in about 20-51% of cases. The present study

  9. Anemia em crianças indígenas da etnia Karapotó Anemia in indigenous children of Karapotó ethnic backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Ferro Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: identificar a prevalência e fatores associados à anemia em crianças indígenas Karapotó. MÉTODOS: estudo transversal em que foi realizada dosagem de hemoglobina com fotômetro portátil Hemocue, coletadas medidas de peso e estatura e dados socioeconômicos de 99 crianças de 6 a 59 meses da etnia karapotó. Foi analisada a associação entre a prevalência de anemia e variáveis referentes às crianças, às mães e às famílias utilizando teste qui-quadrado ou teste exato de Fisher. RESULTADOS: a prevalência de anemia nas crianças foi de 57,6%, as prevalências de baixa estatura para idade, baixo peso para estatura e baixo peso para idade entre as crianças foram de 15,6%, 3,0% e 2,0%, respectivamente. A ocorrência de anemia associou-se à menor idade da criança, a um menor tempo de estudo materno, a um maior número de membros da família, à menor posse de itens de consumo e à moradia fora da aldeia (desaldeados. CONSLUSÕES: os resultados evidenciam que a anemia é um grave problema de saúde entre as crianças Karapotó, principalmente naquelas desaldeadas, coexistindo com problemas como sobrepeso e déficit estatural.OBJECTIVES: to identify the prevalence and factors associated with anemia in children of Karapotó ethnic backgrounds. METHODS: a cross-sectional study of hemoglobin dosage levels using a portable Hemocue photometer to collect measurements of weight and height along with socioeconomic data for 99 children between 6 and 59 months of age, all of Karapotó ethnicity. The association between the prevalence of anemia and variables related to children, mothers and families were analyzed, using chi-square tests or Fisher Exact Tests. RESULTS: the prevalence of anemia in the children was 57.6%, the prevalences of low height for age range, low weight-to-height ratios and low weight for age range in the children were 15.6%, 3.0% and 2.0% respectively. The occurrence of anemia was associated with younger children

  10. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hea Min; Park, Soon Hyun; Lee, Jae Min; Park, Kang Seo

    2013-09-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  11. Predictive factors of thyroid cancer in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Meng; Wu, Mu Chao; Shang, Chang Zhen; Wang, Xiao Yi; Zhang, Jing Lu; Cheng, Hua; Xu, Ming Tong; Yan, Li

    2014-01-01

    The best preoperative examination in Graves' disease with thyroid cancer still remains uncertain. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of thyroid cancer in Graves' disease patients, and to identify the predictive factors and ultrasonographic features of thyroid cancer that may aid the preoperative diagnosis in Graves' disease. This retrospective study included 423 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgical treatment from 2002 to 2012 at our institution. The clinical features and ultrasonographic findings of thyroid nodules were recorded. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was determined according to the pathological results. Thyroid cancer was discovered in 58 of the 423 (13.7 %) surgically treated Graves' disease patients; 46 of those 58 patients had thyroid nodules, and the other 12 patients were diagnosed with incidentally discovered thyroid carcinomas without thyroid nodules. Among the 58 patients with thyroid cancer, papillary microcarcinomas were discovered in 50 patients, and multifocality and lymph node involvement were detected in the other 8 patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed younger age was the only significant factor predictive of metastatic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonographic findings of calcification and intranodular blood flow in thyroid nodules indicate that they are more likely to harbor thyroid cancers. Because the influencing factor of metastatic thyroid cancers in Graves' disease is young age, every suspicious nodule in Graves' disease patients should be evaluated and treated carefully, especially in younger patients because of the potential for metastasis.

  12. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hea Min Yu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  13. Psychiatric manifestations of Graves' hyperthyroidism: pathophysiology and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunevicius, Robertas; Prange, Arthur J

    2006-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Other symptoms associated with the disease are goitre, ophthalmopathy, and psychiatric manifestations such as mood and anxiety disorders and, sometimes, cognitive dysfunction. Graves' hyperthyroidism may result in these latter manifestations via the induction of hyperactivity of the adrenergic nervous system. This review addresses the psychiatric presentations, and their pathophysiology and treatment, in patients with hyperthyroidism, based on literature identified by a PubMed/MEDLINE database search. Although the focus is on mental symptoms associated with Graves' disease, it is not always clear from the literature whether patients had Graves' disease: in some studies, the patients were thought to have Graves' disease based on clinical findings such as diffuse goitre or ophthalmopathy or on measurements of thyroid antibodies in serum; however, in other studies, no distinction was made between Graves' hyperthyroidism and hyperthyroidism from other causes. Antithyroid drugs combined with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are the treatments of choice for hyperthyroidism, as well as for the psychiatric disorders and mental symptoms caused by hyperthyroidism. A substantial proportion of patients have an altered mental state even after successful treatment of hyperthyroidism, suggesting that mechanisms other than hyperthyroidism, including the Graves' autoimmune process per se and ophthalmopathy, may also be involved. When psychiatric disorders remain after restoration of euthyroidism and after treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, specific treatment for the psychiatric symptoms, especially psychotropic drugs, may be needed.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that prevents developing red ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hearing ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Printable PDF Open All Close All ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  17. Aplastic anemia in Japanese radiological technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitabatake, T.; Watanabe, T.; Saito, A.; Nakamura, M.; Shiohama Hospital, Mie

    1976-01-01

    Among the Japanese radiological technicians, four deaths from aplastic anemia have been reported after 1930. On the other hand, during the period from 1930 to 1960, the population of radiological technicians is estimated to be 74,400 man-years, in which 0.5 aplastic anemias are expected. However, actually three died from aplastic anemia. This difference is statistically significant at the 1% level. While, in the period from 1961 to 1973, the observed value is 1 against 0.7 expected. It is concluded that aplastic anemia had been induced frequently among the Japanese radiological technicians in the era when there was much exposure to occupational radiation. (orig.) [de

  18. The challenge of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanain Hani Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA is a Coomb's-negative hemolytic anemia characterized by red cell fragmentation (schistocytes. Thrombotic microangiopathy anemia, including thrombotic thrombocytopenia and hemolytic-uremic syndrome, malignant hypertension, preeclampsia are among the most common causes. We present a case of MAHA presenting with thrombocytopenia initially diagnosed as MAHA secondary to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and received five sessions plasmapheresis without improvement but with worsening of anemia and thrombocytopenia. On further inquiry, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency was identified, and the patient showed dramatic recovery after the trial of B12 and folate.

  19. Thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniforth, Joy U L; Erdirimanne, Senarath; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid carcinoma is increasing worldwide. Graves' disease is the most common hyperthyroid disease. Studies have suggested an increased risk of thyroid malignancy in Graves' disease: there has not yet been a meta-analysis to allow quantitative comparison. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease, and to gather information on the histological subtypes of carcinoma and the co-existence of thyroid nodules. Several databases and article reference lists were searched. Inclusion criteria included appropriate diagnostic criteria for thyroid conditions and a diagnoses of carcinoma based on histology. 33 studies were selected, all reporting on surgically-resected specimens. The event rate of thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease was 0.07 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.12). There was no data to allow comparison with patients without hyperthyroid diseases. There was no increase in the odds of developing carcinoma in Graves' disease compared to toxic multinodular goitre and toxic uninodular goitre. 88% of thyroid carcinomas in Graves' disease were papillary, with solitary papillary micro-carcinoma (diameter 10 mm or less) comprising 23% of all detected thyroid carcinomas. Patients with Graves' disease and co-existing thyroid nodules were almost 5 times more likely to be diagnosed with thyroid carcinoma than those without nodules. Thyroid malignancy in Graves' disease requiring surgical treatment should be considered as likely as in other hyperthyroid diseases needing surgical treatment. Clinicians should consider screening selected patients with Graves' disease for nodules whilst being aware of potentially over-diagnosing papillary micro-carcinoma. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Death by Suicide in Graves' Disease and Graves' Orbitopathy: A Nationwide Danish Register Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferløv-Schwensen, Charlotte; Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-12-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is associated with excess morbidity and mortality, but little is known about unnatural manners of death and the potential relation with Graves' orbitopathy (GO). This study investigated the risk of unnatural death in Graves' patients with and without orbitopathy compared to matched control populations. This was a cohort study covering all adult Danes (≥18 years) diagnosed with GD or GO during 1995-2012. Median follow-up time was 7.9 years (range 0-17.5 years). Utilizing the Danish Register of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Registry, 28,461 subjects with GD and 3965 with GO were identified and matched for age and sex with four subjects from the background population. The manner of death was identified, and hazard ratios (HR) for mortality due to unnatural deaths (accident, suicide, violence/homicide, and unknown) were calculated using Cox regression analyses, adjusted for pre-existing somatic and psychiatric morbidity. In Graves' disease overall (GD + GO), there was an increased risk of death from unknown unnatural manners (HR = 2.01 [confidence interval (CI) 1.17-3.45], p = 0.012) and of suicide, although the latter difference was not with certainty statistically significant (HR = 1.43 [CI 1.00-2.04], p = 0.053). There was no significant difference in risk of death from suicide in GD subjects compared to their controls (HR = 1.27 [CI 0.85-1.89], p = 0.253). However, GO patients had a significantly higher risk of death from suicide (HR = 2.71 [CI 1.16-6.32], p = 0.022). Mortality by suicide was increased in Graves' disease overall, most significantly in patients with GO, also after adjustment for pre-existing somatic and psychiatric disease. These findings indicate that GD and GO may have a significant role in the pathophysiological mechanisms of suicidal behavior. Beyond independent confirmation, reasons for this need to be explored in order to introduce preventive measures.

  1. Prevalencia de anemia y deficiencia de hierro en escolares jujeños de 12 años Prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in 12 year old school children from Jujuy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C. Buys

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available La deficiencia de hierro es una de las deficiencias de micronutrientes más comunes. Los adolescentes son un grupo vulnerable. Un reconocimiento oportuno puede prevenir una anemia ferropénica, etapa final y grave de dicha deficiencia, insuficientemente conocida en nuestro país. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar los valores hematológicos en adolescentes y conocer las prevalencias de anemia y deficiencia de hierro. Definidas como a anemia: hematocrito (Hto Iron deficiency is highly frequent among adolescents. Its early detection can prevent the development of a ferropenic anemia, a serious condition. The problem has not been well studied in our country. The purpose of this work was to determine the frequency of iron deficiency and anemia in adolescents. The criteria considered were: hematocrit below 38%, b saturation transferrin below 16%, c ferritin below 15 ng/ml. The study was carried out in 2.265 schoolchildren, 12 years old, of both sexes, in urban and periurban areas in the city of San Salvador de Jujuy (1.250 a.s.l.. The following parameters were measured: hematocrit as well as serum iron and total iron binding capacity, both by colorimetric method. Ferritin was measured by ELISA. Anemia was not found. Iron deficiency as estimated by the iron functional component, was found in 25% of girls and 21% of boys and, through iron stores, in 28% of girls and 18% of boys. Iron deficiency stores in both sexes is the more relevant alteration, indicating that the population sample here studied constitutes a highly vulnerable group. The early detection of iron deficiency will help physical and intellectual development so that adequate sanitary policies are necessary for its prevention.

  2. Concomitant Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, presenting as primary hypothyroidism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Hypothyroidism in patients with Graves\\' disease is usually the result of ablative treatment. We describe a 58 year old man with Graves\\' ophthalmopathy and pre-tibial myxoedema, who presented with spontaneous primary hypothyroidism. Circulating TSH receptor antibody activity was increased, while thyroid microsomal antibody was detectable in titres greater than one in one hundred thousand. It is likely that the TSH receptor antibody of Graves\\' disease was ineffective in stimulating hyperthyroidism because of concomitant thyroid destruction due to Hashimoto\\'s disease. Alternatively, primary hypothyroidism could have resulted from the effects of a circulating TSH receptor blocking antibody.

  3. Standardization of 131I therapy for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Jianlin; Li Yuying; Gao Liuyan; Tang Xiuping; Hu Hongyong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To establish the normative and standard measures, to ensure medical safety and quality of care of the patients with Graves disease treated by 131 I therapy. Methods: Formulating and strictly implementing the medical organizational and technical measures of 131 I therapy for Graves disease and regular follow-up. Results: Receiving 131 I treatment of 104 patients, follow-up 6-36 months, no adverse events, the cure rate of 59.6%, the efficient rate is 99.9%. Conclusion: It is important guarantee for the medical quality and safety to standardize the 131 I therapy of Graves disease. (authors)

  4. Graves' disease with special reference to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegenschmidt, M. H.; Heyd, R.; Esser, J.; Mould, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Graves' disease, although not malignant, nevertheless can lead to serious events such as permanent loss of vision if it remains untreated. This review article describes the clinical symptoms of the disease, includes a commentary on the Graves' disease subgroup of thyroid-associated orbitipathy (TAO), and defines clinical activity scoring systems which grade the severity of the disease in patients (clinical activity, NOSPECS and LEMO scoring ). An review of radiotherapy in the 1980s is followed by a summary of the 2003 German national survey on radiotherapy for Graves' disease. Radiation therapy technique is then described and discussed. Case histories are from the Alfred Krupp Hospital in Essen. (author)

  5. Immunoreactive 'TSH' in urinary concentrates of Graves' disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Herle, A.; Orgiazzi, J.; Greipel, M.A.; Slucher, J.A.; Honbo, K.S.; Hopital de l'Antiquaille, 69 - Lyon

    1978-01-01

    A double antibody radioimmunoassay was used to analyse immunoreactive thyrotrophin in urinary concentrates from fourteen patients with hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease, in three subjects with primary hypothyroidism, and in six normal subjects. Immunoreactive thyrotrophin was detectable in eleven subjects with Graves' disease, in one subject with primary hypothyroidism, and in four normal subjects. The mean urinary thyrotrophin concentration was significantly higher in Graves' disease (492+-99.9μU/24h(SEM)(n=11)) than in normal subjects (177+-26.4μU/24h(SEM)(n=4)(P [de

  6. Persistent hyperthyroidism and de novo Graves' ophthalmopathy after total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Wei Lin; Loh, Wann Jia; Lee, Lianne Ai Ling; Chng, Chiaw Ling

    2017-01-01

    We report a patient with Graves' disease who remained persistently hyperthyroid after a total thyroidectomy and also developed de novo Graves' ophthalmopathy 5 months after surgery. She was subsequently found to have a mature cystic teratoma containing struma ovarii after undergoing a total hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy for an incidental ovarian lesion. It is important to investigate for other causes of primary hyperthyroidism when thyrotoxicosis persists after total thyroidectomy.TSH receptor antibody may persist after total thyroidectomy and may potentially contribute to the development of de novo Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  7. Grave's disease associated with immunoglobulin A nephropathy: A rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, I; Bhat, R A; Khan, I; Hameed, I

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (Ig A) nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis. The association of Ig A nephropathy with Grave's disease has not been reported so far. We report a case of 20-year-old female with Grave's disease who presented with edema, facial puffiness, and decreased urine output. She was found to be hypertensive with renal failure and nephrotic range proteinuria. Renal biopsy revealed features of Ig A nephropathy. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids (1 mg/kg/day). To our knowledge, this is the first case showing association of Grave's disease with Ig A nephropathy.

  8. Treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B; Anand, Inder S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia.......Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia....

  9. Effect of abnormal thyroid function on the severity of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, M. F.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Mourits, M. P.; Koornneef, L.; Berghout, A.; van der Gaag, R.

    1990-01-01

    Many clinicians have the impression that treatment of thyroid dysfunction ameliorates ophthalmopathy in Graves' disease. The aim of our study was to relate thyroid function to the severity of Graves' ophthalmopathy. We studied 90 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy and Graves' hyperthyroidism in

  10. Contribución de Graells a la posición de España en el primer convenio internacional para la protección de ciertas especies de la fauna silvestre (1902

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrero-García, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The process followed by Spain to decide whether it should subscribe the International Convention for the Protection of Birds Useful to Agriculture, signed in 1902 is described. The fundamental role played by Mariano de la Paz Graells, one of the foremost Spanish naturalists of the 19th century, in the technical review and acceptance of the draft agreement, drawn up in 1895, is highlighted. Furthermore, a critical analysis of Graells’s position in relation to this so-called first international convention for the conservation of certain wildlife species, has been carried out.

    Se describe el proceso que siguió España para decidir si debía suscribir el Convenio Internacional para la Protección de las Aves Útiles a la Agricultura, firmado en 1902. Se pone de manifiesto el papel fundamental que tuvo Mariano de la Paz Graells, uno de los más importantes naturalistas españoles del siglo XIX, en el examen técnico y aceptación del proyecto de dicho convenio, redactado en 1895. Además, se ha realizado un análisis crítico de la postura de Graells en relación con la que puede calificarse como la primera convención internacional para la conservación de ciertas especies de la fauna silvestre.

  11. Anemia intrahospitalaria y descenso de hemoglobina en pacientes internados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina V. Gianserra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Es frecuente observar el desarrollo de anemia durante la internación, especialmente en pacientes graves. Esto se ha relacionado a extracciones de laboratorio. Pocos estudios evaluaron su prevalencia y factores asociados en pacientes internados en sala general. El objetivo fue determinar la prevalencia, características y factores clínicos asociados a anemia intrahospitalaria y descenso de hemoglobina en pacientes internados. Se efectuó un estudio transversal, prospectivo, descriptivo. Se analizaron 192 internaciones consecutivas en sala general. Se determinó aquellas que presentaron un descenso del valor de hemoglobina = 2 g/dl y se analizaron factores de riesgo asociados. Presentaron anemia 139 pacientes (72.4%, 89 (46.4% al ingreso y 50 (26% durante la internación. Se presentaron 47 casos de descenso de hemoglobina = 2 g/dl (24.47%, en los que se observaron los valores más bajos de hematocrito y hemoglobina al alta (p = 0.01, hidratación parenteral con mayor volumen (p = 0.01 y estadías hospitalarias más prolongadas (p = 0.0001. En el análisis univariado las variables leucocitosis = 11 000mm³ (OR; IC95%: 2.02; 1.03-4; p = 0.01, días de internación = 7 (OR; IC95%: 3.39; 1.62-7.09; p = 0.0006, hidratación parenteral = 1500 ml/día (OR; IC95%: 2.47; 1.06-6.4; p = 0.01, vía central (OR; IC95%: 10.29; 1.75-108.07, p = 0.003 y anemia intrahospitalaria (OR; IC95%: 7.06; 3.41-15.83; p = 0.00000004 fueron estadísticamente significativos como factores de riesgo para descenso de hemoglobina = 2 g/dl. En el análisis multivariado las variables leucocitosis = 11 000 mm³ (OR; IC95%:2.45; 1.14-5.27; p = 0.02; días de internación = 7 (OR; IC95%: 5.15; 2.19-12.07; p = 0.0002; hidratación parenteral = 1500 ml/día (OR; IC95%: 2.95; 1.13-7.72; p = 0.02 y vía central (OR; IC95%:8.82; 1.37-56.82; p = 0.02 fueron factores predictivos independientes de descenso de hemoglobina = 2 g/dl. La anemia intrahospitalaria tuvo una elevada prevalencia. La

  12. Development of Graves' disease following radiation therapy in Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, J.S.; Tarbell, N.J.; Garber, J.R.; Mauch, P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-related thyroid dysfunction is a common occurrence in patients with Hodgkin's disease treated with mantle field radiation. Although chemical and clinical hypothyroidism are most commonly seen, Graves' disease has also been described. We have examined the records of 437 surgically staged patients who received mantle field irradiation between April 1969 and December 1980 to ascertain the frequency of manifestations of Graves' disease. Within this group, seven patients developed hyperthyroidism accompanied by ophthalmic findings typical of those seen in Graves' disease. The actuarial risk of developing Graves' disease at 10 years following mantle irradiation for Hodgkin's disease was 3.3% in female patients and 1% in male patients in this study. The observed/expected ratios were 5.9 and 5.1 for female and male patients, respectively. This observed risk significantly exceeded that seen in the general population

  13. Graves disease with ophthalmopathy following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, D.R.; Fleming, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    The number of patients achieving long-term survival following neck irradiation for Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies is increasing. Paralleling this increase in survivors is the development of late complications of the therapy itself. Eleven patients have previously been reported who developed Graves ophthalmopathy 18 months to seven years after receiving neck radiotherapy for nonthyroidal malignancies. The seven patients who had HLA typing were all HLA-B8 negative, despite the reported association of the HLA-B8 antigen with Graves disease. A patient who is HLA-B8 positive who developed Graves ophthalmopathy and hyperthyroidism nine years after receiving mantle radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease is reported. It is recommended that Graves disease be included among the thyroid diseases that receive consideration during follow-up of patients who have received mantle radiotherapy

  14. Graves' Disease Associated with Cerebrovascular Disease and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Khochtali

    2010-01-01

    have increased risk for developing thromboembolic accidents, which are favoured by a simultaneous presence of antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome. in this paper, we describe the case of a patient with Graves' disease, who developed strokes with antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome.

  15. Thyroid Function after Subtotal Thyroidectomy in Patients with Graves' Hyperthyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limonard, E. J.; Bisschop, P. H.; Fliers, E.; Nieveen van Dijkum, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Subtotal thyroidectomy is a surgical procedure, in which the surgeon leaves a small thyroid remnant in situ to preserve thyroid function, thereby preventing lifelong thyroid hormone supplementation therapy. Aim. To evaluate thyroid function after subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves'

  16. An assessment of psychiatric disturbances in graves disease in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of psychiatric disturbances in graves disease in a medical college in eastern India. ... standard error of difference, the chi-square test, and paired Student's T-test. ... The common symptoms were insomnia, irritability, and anxiety.

  17. CASE REPORT : GRAVE'S DISEASE PRESENTING AS PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S.K.; Hatwal, A.; Agarwal, J.K.; Bajpai, H.S.; Sharma, I.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY The case of a 37 year old male is described who initially presented as paranoid schizophrenia unresponsive to anti-psychotic drug treatment and subsequently developed features of Grave's disease. Treatment with carbimazole alone improved his psychiatric symptoms.

  18. Erythropoietin in Cardiorenal Anemia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Fazlibegović

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Incidents of heart and renal failure (HF, RF together, are increasing in our country and all over the world, so a great attention has been dedicated to this problem recently. These diseases together have shown bad results because of the process of accelerated arteriosclerosis, structural changes of myocardium, oxidative stress, inflammation, increased activities of sympathetic nervous system (SNS, increased activities of a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS. These factors are crucial in the development of patho-physiological process and consequential development of anemia, that together with heart and renal failure through interaction, cause serious disorder that we call the cardio-renal anemia syndrome. We examined effects of erythropoietin (Epoetin beta at 90 (60 men and 30 women pre-dialysed and dialysed patients with HF signs during a period of three years in individual dozes of 2000-6000 units subcutaneous (sc weekly. Using computer S PLUS and SAS multiple variant analysis we have got correlations by Pearson. Epoetin beta significantly develops anemiaparameters: number of erythrocytes (r=0.51779; p<0.0001, hemoglobin (r=0.38811; p<0.0002, MCV (r=0.59876; p<0.0001 at patients with HF. Positive effects are seen at NYHA class (r=0.59906; p<0.0001, on quality of life before and after prescribing medicine. Parameters of renal functions are improving: more urea (r =0.45557; p<0.0001 than creatinine (r=0.26397; p<0.00119 and potassium values K(+ are not changed significantly (r=0.02060; p<0.8471. Epoetin beta has been useful in treatment of pre-dialysed and dialysed patients with HF and anemia by improving functional ability of myocardium and quality of life.

  19. Study progress on free radicals and graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruiguo; Jin Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidative injury has been closely implicated in the occurrence and development of many diseases. Graves disease was also accompanied by changes of the free radicals, especially for reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen, et al, and the oxidative stress can cause a certain degree of injury on the thyroid and other human important organs. Antithyroid drug and 131 I treatment of Graves disease, the oxidative and antioxidative parameters can also be changed. (authors)

  20. An evaluation of supervoltage orbital irradiation for Graves' opthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, C.S.; Crombie, A.L.; Hall, R.; Ross, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty patients with moderately severe ophthalmopathy due to Graves' disease or ophtalmic Graves' disease were treated by supervoltage orbital radiotherapy generated by a linear accelerator. Seven patients (35%) showed some response within 3 weeks of the treatment, four patients (20%) improved minimally while nine patients (45%) were unchanged. Improvement was noted mainly in soft tissue changes while proptosis decreased in only four patients. With one exception, ophthalmoplegia did not improve after the radiotherapy. The benefit obtained with the treatment was not impressive. (author)

  1. Airway complication occurring during radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yoneyama, Tatsuya; Michigishi, Takatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Airway complications rarely occur in 131 I radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. This study presents two cases in which 131 I therapy caused this acute complication. The patients complained of the symptom 6 h and 33 h after administration of 131 I. A histamine H1 receptor antagonist and hydrocortisone rapidly resolved symptoms in both cases. These two cases remind physicians that 131 I therapy for Graves' disease may cause potentially life-threatening complications. (author)

  2. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  3. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  4. An analysis of anemia and child mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabin, B. J.; Premji, Z.; Verhoeff, F.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship of anemia as a risk factor for child mortality was analyzed by using cross-sectional, longitudinal and case-control studies, and randomized trials. Five methods of estimation were adopted: 1) the proportion of child deaths attributable to anemia; 2) the proportion of anemic children

  5. Salmonella osteomyelitis by sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, H.; Tran, V.T.; Boeckmann, U.; Duesseldorf Univ.

    1985-01-01

    Case report of a 28 year old black sickle cell anemia patient with salmonella osteomyelitis of the radius. Aside from sickle cell anemia patients this skeletal complication of enteric salmonellosis is an extreme rarity. Description of the typical roentgenological features includes intracortical fissures and sequestration. (orig.) [de

  6. Anemia: An approach to evaluation, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Kuriakose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is very commonly encountered in general clinical practice among all age groups. The more commonly used way to classify anemia has been to categorize it as being microcytic (mean corpuscular volume [MCV] 100 fL, which in turn allows for a more practical way to attempt to come up with a cause for any decrease in hemoglobin. Microcytic anemias are usually due to iron deficiency (in turn, a result of a number of different etiologies ranging from decreased intake, malabsorption, or blood loss, hemoglobinopathies (thalassemic syndromes, and some cases of severe anemia resulting from chronic disease. Normocytic anemia is often a result of anemia of chronic disease, hemolysis, or secondary to bone marrow failure. Macrocytic anemias are frequently caused by deficiencies of folic acid and/or Vitamin B12, exposure to toxic agents like drugs that interfere with DNA metabolism and alcohol, as also bone marrow failure states, such as from myelodysplastic syndrome. A comprehensive history, physical examination, and directed laboratory evaluation will help to identify a specific cause for anemia.

  7. Anemia in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkers, K.; Jontofson, R.; Meuret, G.; Blume, K.G.; Heinze, V.; Freiburg Univ.; Freiburg Univ.

    1975-01-01

    Radio-iron utilization was nearly normal in these patients, only bilateral nephrectomized patients showed a reduced radio-iron utilization. Red blood half-life span was shortened in all patients, well corresponding to the degree of anemia. Parameters of erythropoesis like plasma iron clearance, bone marrow transit time, erythron iron turnover, non-erythron iron turnover and hemolysis iron turnover failed to quantitate disorders of red blood cell regeneration in these patients. No defect in red blood cell enzyme activity could be demonstrated. Enzymes of glycolysis were increased corresponding to the reduced erythrocyte half-life span. (orig.) [de

  8. Hyperparathyroidism after radioactive iodine therapy for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esselstyn, C.B. Jr.; Schumacher, O.P.; Eversman, J.; Sheeler, L.; Levy, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    The association of external ionizing radiation to the head and neck and the subsequent development of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands has been documented in recent years. This also has been demonstrated experimentally in animals. Despite the numbers of patients with Graves disease who have been treated with radioactive iodine, there are no reports in the literature of parathyroid surgery for hyperparathyroidism secondary to earlier treatment with radioactive iodine for Graves disease. This report describes the operative and pathologic findings in four patients with hyperparathyroidism. These patients had previously been treated with radioactive iodine for Graves disease. The pathologic findings at surgery included in three cases a single enlarged hyperplastic gland consistent with a parathyroid adenoma. One patient had hyperplasia of all four glands. The two largest glands and halves of the two remaining glands were removed. In a long-term follow-up of children and adolescents treated with radioactive iodine for Graves disease, Levy and Schumacher found calcium elevations in 10 of 159 patients. The increased incidence of hyperparathyroidism following radioactive iodine treatment for Graves disease in children and adolescents would seem several times higher than normal. Whether adults who have radioactive iodine treatment for Graves disease have a similar increase incidence is not known. Meanwhile it would seem reasonable to suggest that patients whose hyperthyroidism is treated with radioactive iodine should have their serum calcium levels determined at 5-year intervals

  9. Delineation of graves using electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nero, Callistus; Aning, Akwasi Acheampong; Danuor, Sylvester K.; Noye, Reginald M.

    2016-03-01

    A suspected old royal cemetery has been surveyed at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) campus, Kumasi, Ghana using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) with the objective of detecting graves in order to make informed decisions with regard to the future use of the area. The survey was conducted on a 10,000 m2 area. Continuous Vertical Electrical Sounding (CVES) was combined with the roll along technique for 51 profiles with 1 m probe separation separated by 2 m. Inverted data results indicated wide resistivity variations ranging between 9.34 Ωm and 600 Ωm in the near surface. Such heterogeneity suggests a disturbance of the soil at this level. Both high (≥ 600 Ωm) and low resistivity (≤ 74.7 Ωm) anomalies, relative to background levels, were identified within the first 4 m of the subsurface. These were suspected to be burial tombs because of their rectangular geometries and resistivity contrasts. The results were validated with forward numerical modeling results. The study area is therefore an old cemetery and should be preserved as a cultural heritage site.

  10. Lymphocyte-platelet crosstalk in Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznik, Boris I; Vitkovsky, Yuri A; Gvozdeva, Olga V; Solpov, Alexey V; Magen, Eli

    2014-03-01

    Platelets can modulate lymphocytes' role in the pathophysiology of thyroid autoimmune diseases. The present study was performed to clarify the status of platelet-lymphocyte subpopulations aggregation in circulating blood in patients with Graves' disease (GD). One hundred and fifty patients with GD (GD group) and 45 hyperthyroid patients with toxic multinodular goiter (TMG group) were recruited in the study. Control group consisted 150 healthy subjects. Immunophenotyping of lymphocytes was performed by flow cytometry. Detection of lymphocyte-platelet aggregates (LPAs) was done using light microscope after Ficoll-gradient centrifugation. The group of GD patients exhibited reduced CD8 lymphocyte and higher CD19 cell counts compared with TMG group and healthy controls. A greater number of activated CD3, HLA-DR+ lymphocytes were observed in GD than in TMG group and control group. GD group was characterized by lower blood platelet count (232 ± 89 × 10 cells/µL) than TMG group (251 ± 97 × 10 cells/µL; P TMG group (116 ± 67/µL, P < 0.005) and control group (104 ± 58 /µL; P < 0.001). GD is associated with higher levels of activated lymphocytes and lymphocyte-platelet aggregates.

  11. Radioiodine treatment for pediatric hyperthyroid Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ma; Jiawei, Xie; Guoming, Wang; Jianbin, Liu; Wanxia, Liu; Driedger, Al; Shuyao, Zuo; Qin, Zhang

    2009-10-01

    Grave's disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease in which excessive amounts of thyroid hormones circulate in the blood. Treatment for pediatric GD includes (1) antithyroid drugs (ATD), (2) radioiodine, and (3) thyroidectomy. Yet, the optimal therapy remains controversial. We collected studies from all electronically available sources as well as from conferences held in China. All studies using radioiodine and/or ATD and/or thyroidectomy were included. Information was found on 1,874 pediatric GD patients treated with radioiodine, 1,279 patients treated with ATD and 1,362 patients treated surgically. The cure rate for radioiodine was 49.8%; the incidence of hypothyroidism, 37.8%; of relapse, 6.3%; of adverse effects, 1.55%; and of drop outs, 0.6%. These data show that radioiodine treatment is safe and effective in pediatric GD with significant lower incidence of relapse and adverse effects but significantly higher incidence of hypothyroidism as compared with both ATD and thyroidectomy. For the time being, radioiodine treatment for pediatric GD remains an excellent first-line therapy and a good second-line therapy for patients with ATD failure, severe complications, or poor compliance.

  12. Concurrence of Grave's disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Takata, I; Taketani, T; Saida, K; Nakajima, H

    1977-01-01

    Early histological changes in the thyroid gland were examined in 30 patients with juvenile thyrotoxicosis, by means of needle biopsy. Based on the degree of lymphocytic infiltration and degenerative changes in follicular epithelium, results were classified into four groups. A: hyperplastic changes without cellular infiltration (6 patients, 20%); B: hyperplastic changes with areas of focal thyroiditis less than 30% of specimen (10 patients, 33%); C: those with 30 to 60% areas ot thyroiditis (10 patients, 33%); D: almost diffuse thyroiditis (4 patients, 13%). Moderate to severe lymphocytic thyroiditis was frequently present in the early stage of hyperplastic thyroid glands. The clinical significance of the 4 histological groups was evaluated. Neither clinical signs nor routine laboratory tests could differentiate these groups except group D, in which thyrotoxic signs were mild and transient. However, serum antithyroid antibodies tended to increase in accordance with severity of thyroiditis. The rate of remission was high in groups C and D, whereas relapse was frequent in group A. These results suggest that Grave's disease and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis are closely related in the early stage of thyrotoxicosis in children, and that the clinical course may be considerably altered by the degree of associated thyroiditis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 3 PMID:580172

  13. Anemia y anemia por déficit de hierro en niños menores de cinco años y su relación con el consumo de hierro en la alimentación. Turbo, Antioquia, Colombia Anemia and iron deficit anemia in children under five years of age and their relation with iron consumption in alimentation, Turbo, Antioquia, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Margarita Alcaraz López

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la frecuencia de anemia y de anemia por deficiencia de hierro y su relación con el contenido de hierro en la alimentación en niños de 6 meses a 5 años. Materiales y métodos: Estudio descriptivo de corte transversal en el que se estudiaron 113 niños que asistieron a la consulta de crecimiento y desarrollo y al programa de vacunación de la ESE Hospital Francisco Valderrama de Turbo entre el mes de septiembre de 2001 y el mes de junio de 2002. Las pruebas de laboratorio empleadas fueron Hb, ferritina, coprológico directo y sangre oculta en heces. El hierro dietario se estudió con una encuesta semiestructurada. Resultados y discusión: Promedio de Hb 11,3 g/dl (DE 1,4; presentan anemia 48,7%, los más afectados fueron los menores de un año. Promedio de ferritina 47,1 µg/L (DE 58,7, mediana 23,3 µg/L.; 50,4% presentan ferritina baja y de estos, 23,9% presentan agotamiento en los depósitos de hierro. De los 55 niños con anemia 23,6% presentan anemia con deficiencia de hierro. Promedio en el consumo de hierro 7,1 mg/día (DE 3,96; promedio de hierro hemínico de 3,9 mg/día. Promedio de lactancia materna exclusiva: 3 meses. La lactancia se alterna con leche de vaca pasteurizada. De cada 10 menores de un año, 6 tienen anemia con déficit de hierro. Conclusiones: La anemia, la ferritina baja y el bajo consumo de hierro en los niños estudiados perfilan un grave problema de salud pública. Se requiere una política clara y articulada a la cultura de la población para prevenir este problema y sus secuelas en el crecimiento, el desarrollo y en la capacidad cognitiva de los niños.Objective: to determine the frequency of anemia and iron deficit anemia in relation to the iron content in the alimentation of children from 6 months to five years in Turbo. Methodology and materials: transversal descriptive study of 113 children attending the growth, development and vaccination program clinic, from September 2001 to June 2002

  14. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  15. Relationship between the management of Graves' disease and the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Suping; Kuang Anren

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To perform literature search and review on the controversial relationship between therapies of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease (GD) and the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). Methods: We searched the database of MEDLINE (1966-2006.3), EMBASE (1984-2005), Cochrane Library(2006 No. 1), CBMdisc (1978.1-2006.4) and CNKI (1994-2006). The methodological quality of the studies selected for review was assessed according to the quality assessment criteria suggested by the Cochrane systematic review guideline. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 4.2 software. Results: Eight studies were included in the systematic review. Meta-analysis showed that there was statistically significant difference between mi and other forms of therapy [surgery or antithyroid drugs (ATD)] (test value: 2.31, 5.97, 3.70, 5.55; all P 0.05). There were not yet any studies on the impact between early prevention of hypothyroidism after mi therapy and GO. Conclusions: Based on meta-analysis on literature data, if early measures are not performed to prevent hypothyroidism after mi therapy, it may induce or aggravate GO more frequently than ATD or surgical treatment. Symptomatic relief of GO after 131 I therapy is also less effective than the other 2 forms of therapy. Therefore, 131 I therapy should be delivered carefully in those patients with GO. (authors)

  16. Prevalence and Correlates of Maternal Anemia in Rural Sidama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to assess the prevalence and correlates of prenatal anemia, a survey was conducted among 700 randomly selected pregnant women in rural Sidama, Southern Ethiopia. The prevalences of anemia, Iron Deficiency (ID) and ID anemia were 31.6%, 17.4% and 8.7%, respectively. The burden of anemia was ...

  17. Iron Deficiency, Anemia and Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenga, Michele F.; Minovic, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P.; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Navis, Gerjan; van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality

  18. Iron Deficiency, Anemia and Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenga, Michele F.; Minovic, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality

  19. Factores de Risco da Asma Grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Adel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Apesar da rápida progressão do conhecimento da fisiopatologia da asma e da larga difusão de meios terapêuticos de eficácia acrescida, observase um aumento da morbalidade e da morbildade da asma em numerosos paises, em particular nos paises industrialtzados, por razões ainda pouco conhecidas Estes factos permitem questionar o funcionamento do sistema de cuidados de saúde e a difusão dos progressos terapêuticos na população asmática. Os autores definem o concetto de asma aguda grave, salientando dois tipos: o tipo 1, de «instalação progressiva» em algumas horas ou dtas eo upo 2 de «instalação brutal» em menos de três horas Os factores de risco para cada urn deles parecem ser diferentes.Os autores fazem uma revisão dos factores de risco da asma grave, tendo em conta as caracterisucas individuais do doente, os factores ambientats e a intervenção da sociedade.Em relação aos factores individuais como a idade e o sexo, verificase que na infância, as taxas de internarmento por asma são mais elevadas no sexo masculino, sendo no total de internamentos em todas as idades, mais elevadas no sexo feminino e em doentes com internamentos anteriores por asma. O aumento da mortalidade por asma atinge em particular os doentes jovens economicamente desfavorecidos, pela dificuldade no acesso aos cuidados de saúde e na compra dos medicamentos, por utilizarem com menor frequência os tratamentos de crise e de fundo. Os factores psicológicos podem predispor à morte por asma no adolescente, sendo relevantes a subvalo-rização e a negação da doença por parte do doente ou da família Verificase por outro lado, um aumento da prevalência da depressão e do desespero nas cnanças com asma grave. As reacçõs psicológicas face a acontecimentos negauvos, como a morte de um ente próximo, a perda de emprego, conflitos familiares, provocam maior

  20. Miastenia grave ocular Severe ocular myastenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaimir Estevéz Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La miastenia grave es una enfermedad autoinmune de la unión neuromuscular que se caracteriza por la variabilidad de la debilidad muscular, que empeora o está provocada por el ejercicio del músculo o de los grupos musculares implicados, mientras que el descanso la mejora. La primera descripción de la enfermedad data de 1672, su relación con una afección del timo no se estableció hasta 1901. La enfermedad es poco frecuente, afecta a todas las etnias por igual, y no tiene predilección geográfica. Se reporta un paciente masculino de 28 años de edad atendido en el Servicio de Oftalmología Pediátrica del Instituto Cubano de Oftalmología "Ramón Pando Ferrer" por presentar visión doble, ptosis palpebral ligera en ojo derecho que empeora con el transcurso del día. Por el interrogatorio y el cuadro clínico se sospecha de una miastenia grave, se remite al clínico y el neurólogo. En los estudios realizados de neuroimágenes, tomografía y electroencefalograma no se encontraron alteraciones. Se decide valorar el caso con el servicio de Neuroftalmología de nuestro centro y por el Instituto de Neurología y es confirmado el diagnóstico.Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune illness of the neuromuscular joint that is characterized by the variability of the muscular weakness that worsens or caused by exercising of the muscle or the involved muscular groups; resting helps in improving the condition of the muscle. The first description of the illness dates back to 1672, but its linking to a thymus disorder was not discovered until 1901. This illness is not very frequent, affects equally to all the races, and it does not predominate in any particular geographic region. This paper presented a male patient aged 28 years who went to the Ophthalmologic Service at "Ramón Pando Ferrer" Cuban Institute of Ophthalmology because he suffered from double vision, slight palpebral ptosis in his right eye that became worse as the day went by. After the

  1. Pretibial myxedema without ophthalmopathy: an initial presentation of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohiya, Sheela; Lohiya, Vipin; Stahl, Elizabeth J

    2013-07-01

    To report a rare case of Graves' disease without ophthalmopathy presenting with pretibial myxedema (PM) as an initial presentation. We present the clinical history, physical findings, laboratory studies and biopsy data of a 62-year-old man with a history of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (DM2) presenting with arm and leg skin lesions in the absence of other physical findings. Histopathology confirmed PM. Graves' disease and its association with PM without Graves' ophthalmopathy and the pertinent literature are reviewed. A 60-year-old man with a history of uncontrolled DM2 presented for glycemic management. He described symptoms of anxiety, insomnia and fatigue for the last 5 to 6 months. He described diffuse chest pain, occasionally associated with palpitations, and a 50-pound weight loss. He also complained of severe itching and burning of his arms and legs for the past several months. Subsequent thyroid studies revealed hyperthyroidism suggestive of Graves' disease. In the interim, he was hospitalized for atrial flutter and was cardioverted. After being started on methimazole, his symptoms abated. His skin lesions were biopsied, and the leg biopsy was consistent with PM. He however had no lid lag or proptosis characteristic of Graves' disease. He subsequently underwent radioiodine ablation. His hyperglycemia was better control led after treatment of his hyperthyroidism. PM is an autoimmune manifestation of Graves' disease. Almost all cases of thyroid dermopathy are associated with relatively severe ophthalmopathy. Usually ophthalmopathy appears first and dermopathy much later. However, this case represents a rare initial presentation of Graves' disease with PM without ophthalmologic symptoms or findings. Hyperthyroidism is typically associated with worsening glycemic control and increased insulin requirements. In patients with diabetes having hyperthyroidism, deterioration in glycemic control should be anticipated and treatment should be adjusted accordingly

  2. Graves' disease: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges (multimedia activity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Grebe, Stefan K G; Lupo, Mark A; McDonald, Nicole; Sipos, Jennifer A

    2011-06-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the United States. Graves' disease occurs more often in women with a female:male ratio of 5:1 and a population prevalence of 1% to 2%. A genetic determinant to the susceptibility to Graves' disease is suspected because of familial clustering of the disease, a high sibling recurrence risk, the familial occurrence of thyroid autoantibodies, and the 30% concordance in disease status between identical twins. Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by the infiltration of immune effector cells and thyroid antigen-specific T cells into the thyroid and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor expressing tissues, with the production of autoantibodies to well-defined thyroidal antigens, such as thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin, and the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor is central to the regulation of thyroid growth and function. Stimulatory autoantibodies in Graves' disease activate the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor leading to thyroid hyperplasia and unregulated thyroid hormone production and secretion. Below-normal levels of baseline serum thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, normal to elevated serum levels of T4, elevated serum levels of T3 and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor autoantibodies, and a diffusely enlarged, heterogeneous, hypervascular (increased Doppler flow) thyroid gland confirm diagnosis of Graves' disease (available at: http://supplements.amjmed.com/2010/hyperthyroid/faculty.php). This Resource Center is also available through the website of The American Journal of Medicine (www.amjmed.com). Click on the “Thyroid/Graves' Disease” link in the “Resource Centers” section, found on the right side of the Journal homepage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  4. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women's Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201 1-800-994- ...

  5. Retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Fiona L M; Tajunisah, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    To describe a case of retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Observational case report. A 44-year-old Indian man diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia presented with a 1-week history of blurred vision in both eyes. Fundus biomicroscopy revealed bilateral peripheral retinal venous sheathing and cellophane maculopathy. Fundus fluorescent angiogram showed bilateral late leakage from the peripheral venous arcades and submacular fluid accumulation. The retinal phlebitis resolved following a blood transfusion and administration of systemic steroids. Retinopathy associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia is not well known. This is thought to be the first documentation of retinal phlebitis occurring in this condition.

  6. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli

  7. Significance of changes of serum TPOAb and TRAb levels in patients with Graves' disease (GD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongshu Xu Ruiji; Wang Guohong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the significance of changes of serum TPOAb and TRAb levels in patients with Graves' dis- ease (GD). Methods: Serum TPOAb (with RIA) and TRAb (with RRA) levels were determined in 27 patients with Graves' disease, before treatment 10 patients with Graves' disease clinically cured and 35 controls. Results: The serum levels and positive rates of TPOAb and TRAb in patients with Graves' disease before treatment were significantly higher than those in the patients with Graves' disease clinically cured and controls (P<0.01). Conclusion: TPOAb and TRAb were involved in the pathogenesis of Graves' dis- ease and could be used as diagnostic and treatment indicators. (authors)

  8. Clinical management of aplastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeZern, Amy E; Brodsky, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is a potentially fatal bone marrow failure disorder that is characterized by pancytopenia and a hypocellular bone marrow. Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the treatment of choice for young patients who have a matched sibling donor. Immunosuppression with either anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine or high-dose cyclophosphamide is an effective therapy for patients who are not suitable BMT candidates owing to age or lack of a suitable donor. Results of BMT from unrelated and mismatched donors are improving, but presently this treatment option is best reserved for those patients who do not respond, relapse or develop secondary clonal disorders following immunosuppressive therapy. Efforts are currently underway to both improve immunosuppressive regimens and to expand the application of BMT. PMID:21495931

  9. Epidemiological survey of graves' disease in Tianjin area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shuo; Fang Peihua; Lai Zemin; Chen Bingzhong; Lu Tizhang; Zhou Yinbao; Tan Jian; Ni Xiaoyan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the incidence of Graves' disease and associated factors. Methods: From 1997.4 to 1999.12, by using cluster and stratified sampling, total of 31530 people aged 6 years and over were surveyed epidemiologically for Graves' disease in five districts and one county of Tianjin area where the study subjects had been resided for at least one year. The researching team consisted of endocrinologists, epidemiologists and technicians and was divided into three branches, they served as investigators, professional experts and technicians, respectively. The serum thyroid hormones, thyroid antibodies, iodine in table salt, urine iodine and B-US were examined for the suspected cases, the final diagnoses were concluded by the professional experts. Results: Eighty-nine patients with Graves' disease were confirmed, 26 (0.166%) of them were males and 63(0.397%) of them were females, the total incidence was 0.282%. The incidence significantly associated with sex (female higher than male, P<0.001), age (50-60 group for male and 30-40 group for female higher than others, P<0.001) and family history (the patients with vs without family history, P<0.001). The survey showed an ascending trend of incidence of Graves' disease, along with decreasing of goiter rate and increasing of iodine contents in table salt and in urine. Further research work should be pursued. Conclusion: This study may provide some theoretical basis for prevention and treatment of Graves' disease

  10. Hickam's dictum: Myasthenia Gravis presenting concurrently with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Shekhar; Rebello, Roshan; Wolmarans, Louise; Elston, Marianne

    2017-09-07

    We present two patients with Graves' disease and concurrent myasthenia gravis. The impact of the dual diagnosis on the clinical course and the potential for a delayed diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is discussed. Patient 1, a 28-year-old man was diagnosed with Graves' disease following his second respiratory arrest. His history was strongly suggestive of a second pathology. Patient 2, a 66-year-old Cantonese woman with established Graves' disease presented with thionamide-related neutropaenia. Examination revealed bilateral ptosis and right lateral rectus palsy. Both patients had thyrotoxicosis secondary to Graves' disease with concurrent myasthenia gravis. Although neuromuscular weakness is common in Graves' disease, coexisting myasthenia gravis (MG) is rare and can cause profound morbidity. Ocular signs in both diseases may cause diagnostic confusion although ptosis suggests coexisting MG. In both cases, the thyrotoxicosis delayed the diagnosis of MG. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Vitamin D and Graves' disease: a meta-analysis update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mei-Yan; Cao, Bing; Yin, Jian; Wang, Dong-Fang; Chen, Kai-Li; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2015-05-21

    The association between vitamin D levels and Graves' disease is not well studied. This update review aims to further analyze the relationship in order to provide an actual view of estimating the risk. We searched for the publications on vitamin D and Graves' disease in English or Chinese on PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medical and Wanfang databases. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for the vitamin D levels. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI were calculated for vitamin D deficiency. We also performed sensitivity analysis and meta-regression. Combining effect sizes from 26 studies for Graves' disease as an outcome found a pooled effect of SMD = -0.77 (95% CI: -1.12, -0.42; p Graves' disease were more likely to be deficient in vitamin D compared to the controls (OR = 2.24, 95% CI: 1.31, 3.81) with a high heterogeneity (I2 = 84.1%, p Graves' disease.

  12. Anemia muy precoz del prematuro con peso ≤ 1 500 g:: prevalencia y factores asociados Very early anemia in premature weighing ≤ 1 500 g:: prevalence and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusleivy Milagros López Negrín

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. En el Hospital Ginecoobstétrico Docente «Ramón González Coro» no se ha estudiado la prevalencia de la anemia muy precoz de la prematuridad y los factores asociados a su aparición. Se decidió realizar esta investigación para dar respuesta a esta interrogante y proporcionar bases a las autoridades administrativas para el trazado de estrategias preventivas más eficaces, que reduzcan esta complicación y sus consecuencias. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio prospectivo, de corte transversal, donde se incluyeron todos los recién nacidos (RN ≤ de 1 500 g nacidos antes de las 37 semanas y atendidos en el servicio de neonatología del hospital durante el año 2008. El universo de estudio estuvo constituido por 25 neonatos. Se determinó en cada uno la presencia o no de anemia muy precoz. Se determinó la prevalencia de esta enfermedad y los factores maternos, perinatales y posnatales asociados. RESULTADOS. Presentó anemia muy precoz el 52 % de los neonatos (13/25. La hemoglobina materna baja no se asoció a la anemia muy precoz (RP 0,62; IC 95 % 0,21-1,80. Ninguna variable perinatal se asoció a la anemia muy precoz, aunque se encontró que la prevalencia de esta enfermedad disminuye al aumentar la edad gestacional al nacer (tendencia lineal: X² 4,33; gl 1; p 0,037. Los RN con alguna morbilidad grave tuvieron 2,44 veces más probabilidad de presentar anemia muy precoz (RP 2,44; IC 95 % 1,01-5,87. La prevalencia de la anemia muy precoz se incrementó al aumentar los mililitros por kilogramo de peso de sangre extraída (tendencia lineal: X² 7,6195; gl 1; p 0,0058. Los RN con extracciones entre 5 y 10 mL/kg y > 10 mL/kg tuvieron 5,3 y 4,5 veces más probabilidad de presentar anemia (RP 5,33; IC 95 % 1,4739-19,2988 y RP4,5 ; IC 95 % 1,1254-17,9930, respectivamente. CONCLUSIONES. Un poco más de la mitad de los casos presentaron anemia muy precoz y los factores independientes asociados a su aparición fueron la presencia de

  13. Prevalence of anemia in children 1 to 12 years of age: results from a nationwide probabilistic survey in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villalpando Salvador

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology and analyze factors associated with iron deficiency anemia in a probabilistic sample of the Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición 1999 (ENN-99 [National Nutritional Survey 1999 (NNS-99]. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample included 8 111 children aged 1 to 12 years, and was nationaly representative by rural and urban strata and by four geographical regions. Capillary hemoglobin was measured using a portable photometer (HemoCue. The analysis of the determining factors of anemia was performed by odds ratios derived from a logistic regression model and multiple regression models. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia was 50% in infants <2 years of age, with no significant differences between urban and rural strata or among regions. It varied between 14 and 22% in 6-11 year-old children and was higher in the South region and among the indigenous children. Dietary intake of iron was 50% of the recommended daily allowance in children <2 years of age, but not in older children. Phytate (»500-800 mg/d and tannin (»19 mg/d intakes were very high in children over 7 years of age. Hemoglobin was positively associated with nutritional status of children (p=0.01, socioeconomic status (p range 0.05-0.001, duration of lactation in children under 2 years of age (p=0.1, and iron and calcium intake (p=0.02, but not with folic acid or vitamin B12 intake. Hemoglobin was negatively associated with maternal education (p=0.01 in older children, but not in those under 2 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: We present evidence of an alarming national epidemic of anemia, particularly marked in children 12 to 24 months of age. The control of anemia should be considered as an urgent national concern given its grave consequences on the physical and mental development of these children and on their long-term health.

  14. 9511 ANEMIA AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS AMONG SCHOOL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mimi

    Children with Hb lower than 11.5 g/dL were considered anemic. Information ... Anemia is commonly associated with nutritional deficiencies, especially iron ... children aged five to six years, given that public access to preschool education is not.

  15. Role of Erythropoietin in Renal Anemia Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of erythropoietin and others drugs in renal anemia treatment, as well as the cause of erythropoietin resistance. .... mouth health, atrophy prevention, prevention of artery hardening ... Secondary hyperthyroidism can lead to osteitis fibrosa ...

  16. Transient hypothyroidism after 131I treatment of Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianfeng; Fang Yi; Zhang Xiuli; Ye Genyao; Xing Jialiu; Zhang Youren

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results of the transient hypothyroidism after 131 I treatment of Graves disease. Methods: A total of 32 transient hypothyroidism patients treated with 131 I for Graves disease were studied and followed up. Results: Transient hypothyroidism occurred within 2-6 months after 131 I treatment and 19 patients were symptomatic. At diagnosis of transient hypothyroidism, T 3 and T 4 levels were decreased had normal, TSH levels were increased, normal or low. Follow-up examination found that 20 patients were normal and 12 patients had relapse of hyperthyroidism. Conclusions: Therapy of Graves disease with low doses of 131 I causes a high incidence of transient hypothyroidism. After recovery of transient hypothyroidism, some patients have relapse of hyperthyroidism

  17. Radiation retinopathy after orbital irradiation for Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Kalina, R.E.; Brower, S.A.; Mills, R.P.; Johnson, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that orbital irradiation for Graves' ophthalmopathy is sometimes beneficial, particularly for dysthyroid optic neuropathy, and is not associated with serious complications. We are aware, however, of four patients who were found to have radiation retinopathy after orbital irradiation for Grave's ophthalmopathy. All four patients have decreased central acuity, and three of the four are legally blind in one or both eyes. Computer reconstruction of the dosimetry, based on computed tomography and beam profiles, shows that errors in dosage calculations and radiotherapy technique probably account for the radiation retinopathy in three of the four patients. Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy should be administered only by competent radiotherapists who are experienced in the treatment of this disease. Similar errors in dosage calculations and treatment techniques may account for other reports of radiation retinopathy after reportedly safe dosages

  18. Esclerodermia, tireoidite e miastenia grave: estudo de um caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio L. dos Santos Werneck

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available Uma paciente de 36 anos com miastenia grave desenvolveu após dois anos intolerância ao frio, o que conduziu ao diagnóstico de tireoidite de Hashimoto. Quatro anos mais tarde apresentou pele espessada nas mãos (esclerodermia limitada. O quadro clínico e os exames complementares encaminharam o diagnóstico para a forma CREST de esclerodermia sistêmica progressiva. Discute-se a dificuldade diagnóstica da esclerodermia, assim como suas síndromes de superposição. Doença de Hashimoto e miastenia grave constituem associação pouco frequente. A presença de esclerodermia e miastenia grave é rara. Não encontramos na literatura a coincidência destas três doenças.

  19. Clinical experience of radiation therapy for Graves` ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagashima, Hisako; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Murata, Osamu; Ishizeki, Kei; Shimaya, Sanae; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    The effect of radiation therapy for Graves` ophthalmopathy was evaluated. Ten patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy were treated with radiation therapy between 1992 and 1993 in Gunma University Hospital. All patients had a past history of hyperthyroidism and received 2,000 cGy to the retrobulbar tissues in 20 fractions. Nine of ten patients were treated with radiation therapy after the failure of corticosteroids. Six patients (60%) showed good or excellent responses. The exophthalmos type was more responsive to radiation therapy than the double vision type in this series. Two of five patients with the exophthalmos type demonstrated excellent responses, and their symptoms disappeared almost completely. The improvement of symptoms appeared within 3-6 months, and obvious clinical effects were demonstrated after 6 months of radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and we have not observed any side effects of radiation therapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy is effective treatment for Graves` ophthalmopathy. (author)

  20. Clinical experience of radiation therapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagashima, Hisako; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Murata, Osamu; Ishizeki, Kei; Shimaya, Sanae; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    The effect of radiation therapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy was evaluated. Ten patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with radiation therapy between 1992 and 1993 in Gunma University Hospital. All patients had a past history of hyperthyroidism and received 2,000 cGy to the retrobulbar tissues in 20 fractions. Nine of ten patients were treated with radiation therapy after the failure of corticosteroids. Six patients (60%) showed good or excellent responses. The exophthalmos type was more responsive to radiation therapy than the double vision type in this series. Two of five patients with the exophthalmos type demonstrated excellent responses, and their symptoms disappeared almost completely. The improvement of symptoms appeared within 3-6 months, and obvious clinical effects were demonstrated after 6 months of radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and we have not observed any side effects of radiation therapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy is effective treatment for Graves' ophthalmopathy. (author)

  1. An update on the medical treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinò, Michele; Latrofa, Francesco; Menconi, Francesca; Chiovato, Luca; Vitti, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Medical treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism is based on the use of thionamides; namely, methimazole and propylthiouracil. In the past, methimazole was preferred by European endocrinologists, whereas propylthiouracil was the first choice for the majority of their North American colleagues. However, because of the recent definition of a better side-effect profile, methimazole is nowadays the first choice world while. Although thionamides are quite effective for the short-term control of Graves' hyperthyroidism, a relatively high proportion of patients relapses after thionamide withdrawal. Other possible medical treatments, include iodine and compounds containing iodine, perchlorate, lithium (as an adjuvant in patients undergoing radioiodine therapy), β-adrenergic antagonists, glucocorticoids, and some new molecules still under investigation. Management of Graves' hyperthyroidism using thionamides as well as the other available medical treatments is here reviewed in detail, with a special mention of situations such as pregnancy and lactation, as well as neonatal and fetal thyrotoxicosis.

  2. F-18-FDG PET of the thyroid in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, A.R.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.; Wienhard, K.; Wagner, R.

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluates F-18-FDG PET of the thyroid in Graves' disease. Methods: Thirty patients were investigated the day before radioiodine therapy, 15 patients 3-10 days after radioiodine therapy. Twenty patients with cancer of the head or neck and normal thyroid function served as controls. Results: F-18-FDG uptake was higher in Graves' disease patients than in controls. Negative correlations of F-18-FDG uptake with half-life of radioiodine and absorbed radiation dose due to radioiodine therapy were found along with a positive correlation to autoantibody levels. Conclusion: Thus F-18-FDG PET is likely to give information on the biological activity of Graves' disease as well as on early radiation effects. (orig.) [de

  3. A case of severe autoimmune hepatitis associated with Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Abdulla Bokhari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a common condition and is known to have a wide range of effects on a variety of organs. Hepatic dysfunction ranging from mild to severe due to direct effect of high circulating thyroid hormones as well as a deleterious effect of antithyroid medications (methimazole and propylthiouracil has been well - documented in literature. However, severe autoimmune hepatitis (AIH associated with Graves' disease is rare and limited to few case reports only. A 38-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and yellowish discolouration of conjunctivae. On investigation, she was found to have Graves' disease and AIH. The liver histopathology showed typical features of AIH. She responded excellently to glucocorticoid therapy with normalisation of thyroid function and liver histology. The case is discussed with relevant literature review.

  4. Graves' Disease Pharmacotherapy in Women of Reproductive Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunty, Jeremy J; Heise, Crystal D; Chaffin, David G

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder in which inappropriate stimulation of the thyroid gland results in unregulated secretion of thyroid hormones resulting in hyperthyroidism. Graves' disease is the most common cause of autoimmune hyperthyroidism during pregnancy. Treatment options for Graves' disease include thioamide therapy, partial or total thyroidectomy, and radioactive iodine. In this article, we review guideline recommendations for Graves' disease treatment in women of reproductive age including the recent guideline from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Controversy regarding appropriate thioamide therapy before, during, and after pregnancy is reviewed. Surgical and radioactive iodine therapy considerations in this patient population are also reviewed. In patients who may find themselves pregnant during therapy or develop Graves' disease during their pregnancy, consideration should be given to the most appropriate treatment course for the mother and fetus. Thioamide therapy should be used with either propylthiouracil or methimazole at appropriate doses that target the upper range of normal to slightly hyperthyroid to avoid creating hypothyroidism in the fetus. Consideration should also be given to the adverse effects of thioamide, such as agranulocytosis and hepatotoxicity, with appropriate patient consultation regarding signs and symptoms. Individuals who wish to breastfeed their infants while taking thioamide should receive the lowest effective dose. Surgery should be reserved for extreme cases and limited to the second trimester, if possible. Radioactive iodine therapy may be used in nonpregnant individuals, with limited harm to future fertility. Radioactive iodine therapy should be withheld in pregnant women and those who are actively breastfeeding. Clinicians should keep abreast of developments in clinical trials and evidence-based recommendations regarding Graves' disease in reproductive-age women for any changes in evidence

  5. Serum immunoglobulin G4 levels and Graves' disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carmen Sorina; Sirbu, Anca Elena; Betivoiu, Minodora Andreea; Florea, Suzana; Barbu, Carmen Gabriela; Fica, Simona Vasilica

    2017-02-01

    We investigated, at diagnosis, the relationship between serum immunoglobulin G4 levels and the main characteristics of Graves' disease: hyperthyroidism severity, goiter size, presence of active Graves' ophthalmopathy, antithyroid antibodies status, and titer. This prospective study included 80 newly diagnosed Graves' disease patients. The main parameters measured at diagnosis: thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine, total triiodothyronine, thyroglobulin, antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies, immunoglobulin G4. In Graves' disease patients, serum immunoglobulin G4 levels were higher than in general population (p = 0.028) and higher in men compared to women (p = 0.002). Only one female patient with intense hypoechoic goiter, high anti-thyroglobulin antibody, and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titers had an elevated serum immunoglobulin G4 level at diagnosis. Patients with immunoglobulin G4 levels above the 75th percentile (>237.52 mg/dl, N = 20) were younger at Graves' ophthalmopathy onset (p 286.28 mg/dl, N = 8) had lower total triiodothyronine values (p = 0.001) than patients with IgG below the 90th percentile. No significant correlations were found between smoking status (p = 0.58), goiter size (p = 0.50), the presence of ophthalmopathy (p = 0.42) or thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody titers (p = 0.45) and the mean value of immunoglobulin G4 levels at diagnosis. Our data suggest that Graves' disease patients with elevated immunoglobulin G4 levels at diagnosis have a phenotype characterized by higher anti-thyroglobulin antibody and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titers, less severe T3 hyperthyroidism, younger age at ophthalmopathy onset and require a shorter duration of the first methimazole treatment cycle.

  6. Thyroid Ultrasonography in Differentiation between Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishdad, P; Pishdad, G R; Tavanaa, S; Pishdad, R; Jalli, R

    2017-03-01

    Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are the most common causes of hyper and hypothyroidism, respectively. Differentiation of these 2 diseases, if the patient is euthyroid, may sometimes be extremely difficult on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of gray scale sonography in differentiation of Graves' disease from Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study included 149 patients divided into three groups, patients with Graves' disease (34 patients, mean age = 36.8 ± 10.17 years), Patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (62 patients, mean age = 33.4 ± 12.16 years) and control group (53 healthy people, mean age = 34.74 ± 16.87 years). Members of all groups were referred to a single radiologist for thyroid sonography for evaluation of thyroid echogenicity pattern. A total of 117 women and 32 men were examined by sonography. The most common sonographic pattern in Hashimoto and Graves' was homogenous hypo-echogenicity which was observed in 45.2% and 47.1% of cases, respectively. Peripheral hypo-echogenicity pattern was seen in 40.3% of Hashimoto's group with 100% specificity and 40.3% sensitivity. Central-hypoechogenic pattern was observed in 17.6% of Graves' group with 100% and 17.6% specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Our findings indicate that sonography has high specificity but low sensitivity in the diagnosis of either Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. It is therefore not possible to differentiate between these two diseases using sonography alone. Confirmation by laboratory data is also needed.

  7. Anemia ferropriva em crianças de 6 a 12 meses atendidas na rede pública de saúde do município de Viçosa, Minas Gerais Iron deficiency anemia in 6 to 12-month-old infants attended at the public health service of Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Góes da SILVA

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivos verificar a prevalência de anemia em lactentes de 6 a 12 meses atendidos na rede pública de saúde do município de Viçosa, MG e analisar alguns possíveis fatores de risco. As informações foram obtidas através de questionário aplicado aos responsáveis pela criança e através da verificação de medidas antropométricas e da dosagem de hemoglobina por hemoglobinômetro portátil. No diagnóstico de anemia, utilizou-se o ponto de corte de 11 g/dL. A prevalência de anemia ferropriva nas 204 crianças estudadas foi 60,8%, e 55,6% dos casos de anemia eram graves. A média da hemoglobina foi 9,28±1,07 nos anêmicos e 12,07±0,89 mg/dL nos não-anêmicos. A baixa escolaridade paterna e a idade materna mostraram associação estatística com a anemia (pThis study aimed at verifying the prevalence of anemia in 6 to 12-month-old infantsattended at the public health service of the city of Viçosa, state of Minas Gerais, and analyzing some possible risk factors. Information was obtained through questionnaire applied to those responsible for the infants and through the verification of the anthropometric measures and the hemoglobin dosage by portable hemoglobinometer. In diagnosing anemia, a 11g/dL cutoff point was used. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in a total of 204 infants reached 60.8%, and 55.6% of the cases of anemia were serious. The hemoglobin average was 9.28±1.07 mg/dL in anemic infants, and 12.07± 0.89 mg/dL in non-anemic ones. The father's low school level and the mother's age showed statistical association with anemia (p<0.05. A high prevalence and severity of the anemia was found, emphasizing the need for prevention and control of this disease in the city of Viçosa.

  8. Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, Kammi K

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. From Bad to Worse: Anemia on Admission and Hospital-Acquired Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Colleen G; Li, Liang; Sun, Zhiyuan; Hixson, Eric D; Tang, Anne S; Phillips, Shannon C; Blackstone, Eugene H; Henderson, J Michael

    2017-12-01

    Anemia at hospitalization is often treated as an accompaniment to an underlying illness, without active investigation, despite its association with morbidity. Development of hospital-acquired anemia (HAA) has also been associated with increased risk for poor outcomes. Together, they may further heighten morbidity risk from bad to worse. The aims of this study were to (1) examine mortality, length of stay, and total charges in patients with present-on-admission (POA) anemia and (2) determine whether these are exacerbated by development of HAA. In this cohort investigation, from January 1, 2009, to August 31, 2011, a total of 44,483 patients with POA anemia were admitted to a single health system compared with a reference group of 48,640 without POA anemia or HAA. Data sources included the University HealthSystem Consortium database and electronic medical records. Risk-adjustment methods included logistic and linear regression models for mortality, length of stay, and total charges. Present-on-admission anemia was defined by administrative coding. Hospital-acquired anemia was determined by changes in hemoglobin values from the electronic medical record. Approximately one-half of the patients experienced worsening of anemia with development of HAA. Risk for death and resource use increased with increasing severity of HAA. Those who developed severe HAA had 2-fold greater odds for death; that is, mild POA anemia with development of severe HAA resulted in greater mortality (odds ratio, 2.57; 95% confidence interval, 2.08-3.18; P < 0.001), increased length of stay (2.23; 2.16-2.31; P < 0.001), and higher charges (2.09; 2.03-2.15; P < 0.001). Present-on-admission anemia is associated with increased mortality and resource use. This risk is further increased from bad to worse when patients develop HAA. Efforts to address POA anemia and HAA deserve attention.

  10. La enfermedad de Graves, signos y síntomas

    OpenAIRE

    Young, P.; Finn, B. C.; Bruetman, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    La enfermedad de Graves es la causa más común de hipertiroidismo, es de patogenia autoinmune. Se distingue clínicamente de otras formas de hipertiroidismo por la presencia de bocio difuso, oftalmopatía y ocasionalmente mixedema pretibial. En este artículo describimos la vida y obra de Robert Graves, realizando posteriormente una revisión de los signos y síntomas de la enfermedad. En el mundo de la medicina actual, en donde la tecnología juega un rol preponderante, queremos recordar la importa...

  11. Dissociative disorder due to Graves' hyperthyroidism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Kaoru; Nishimura, Katsuji; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Ishigooka, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 20-year-old Japanese woman with no psychiatric history with apparent dissociative symptoms. These consisted of amnesia for episodes of shoplifting behaviors and a suicide attempt, developing together with an exacerbation of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease frequently manifest various psychiatric disorders; however, very few reports have described dissociative disorder due to this disease. Along with other possible causes, for example, encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease, clinicians should be aware of this possibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treating the thyroid in the presence of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo; Bonnema, Steen J; Smith, Terry J

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) remains enigmatic. Optimal therapeutic choices for the hyperthyroidism associated with Graves' disease (GD) in the presence of GO remain controversial. Whether antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioiodine (RAI), or thyroidectomy should be favored in such patients...... - independent of extent - do not influence the natural course of GO. RAI can cause de novo development or progression of GO, which is largely preventable with oral steroid prophylaxis. In patients with mild GO, the thyroid treatment is largely independent of GO. Moderate to severe GO should be treated promptly...

  13. Graves' disease presenting as pseudotumor cerebri: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitas Cláudia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pseudotumor cerebri is an entity characterized by elevated intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid and no structural abnormalities detected on brain MRI scans. Common secondary causes include endocrine pathologies. Hyperthyroidism is very rarely associated and only three case reports have been published so far. Case presentation We report the case of a 31-year-old Luso-African woman with clinical symptoms and laboratory confirmation of Graves' disease that presented as pseudotumor cerebri. Conclusion This is a rare form of presentation of Graves' disease and a rare cause of pseudotumor cerebri. It should be remembered that hyperthyroidism is a potential cause of pseudotumor cerebri.

  14. CT volumetric measurements of the orbits in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahe, T.; Schlolaut, K.H.; Poss, T.; Trier, H.G.; Lackner, K.; Bonn Univ.; Bonn Univ.

    1989-01-01

    The volumes of the four recti muscles and the orbital fat was measured by CT in 40 normal persons and in 60 patients with clinically confirmed Graves' disease. Compared with normal persons, 42 patients (70%) showed an increase in muscle volume and 28 patients (46.7%) an increase in the amount of fat. In nine patients (15%) muscle volume was normal, but the fat was increased. By using volumetric measurements, the amount of fat in the orbits in patients with Graves' disease could be determined. (orig.) [de

  15. Facts and fallacies about radioactive iodine therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The therapeutic options available in the hyerthyroidism of Graves' disease are two basic treatments. Firstly antithyroid drugs and secondly one can 'ablate' the thyroid gland by means of thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine ( 131 I). At present 131 I is the current treatment of chioce for Graves' disease. In a follow-up study of 21 714 patients who were treated with 131 I and observed for a period of 8 years, there was no increase in the incidence of thyriod carcinoma. A possible explanation for this is that the dose of 131 I used destroys the ability of the thyroid cells to replicate and thus transmit genetically damaged material

  16. Severe aplastic anaemia and Grave's disease in a paediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manjusha; Goldman, Jeffrey

    2002-07-01

    Severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) is considered to be an autoimmune disorder affecting the haematopoietic cells and most often is idiopathic. An association between SAA and other autoimmune diseases is rare and has been described in adults for eosinophilic fasciitis, thymomas, systemic lupus erythematosus and thyroid disorders. We describe the first paediatric patient with chronic relapsing SAA and Grave's disease. We discuss the difficulty in diagnosis of Grave's disease, the possibility of its manifestation due to withdrawal of immunosuppressants, and issues to consider in the treatment of this disease in the setting of bone marrow failure.

  17. Graves' ophthalmopathy evaluated by infrared eye-movement recordings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldon, S.E.; Unsoeld, R.

    1982-01-01

    Thirteen patients with varying degrees of Graves' ophthalmopathy were examined using high-resolution infrared oculography to determine peak velocities for horizontal eye movements between 3 degrees and 30 degrees. As severity of the orbital disease increased, peak velocities became substantially lower. Vertical-muscle surgery failed to have any effect on peak velocity of horizontal eye movements. In contrast, orbital decompression caused notable improvement in peak velocity of eye movements. Eye-movement recordings, which provide a measure of extraocular muscle function rather than structure, may provide a safe, sensitive, and accurate method for classifying and following up patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy

  18. Correlative study on anemia and radiotherapy effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jinsheng; Jiang Yuanshi; Cao Xibiao; Zhan Yongzhong; Yang Liye; Chen Jianxiu; Chen Chengwu; Li Yang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of oxygen-carrying ability of blood efficacy of radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Altogether 161 cases of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were classified according to severity of anemia, and Hb, RBC, MCH, HCT, MCV, MCHC and RDW were tested before, during and after radiotherapy. The patients were followed-up for up to 5 years, the relationship and mechanism among anemia, radiotherapy effects and survival rate was discussed. Results: The survival rate between anemia group and non-anemia group was different significantly (P<0.05). Anemia before radiotherapy, anemia appearance or anemia deterioration during radiotherapy were sensitive factors affecting radiotherapy results. The anemia more severe, the radiotherapy worse. Conclusion: Anemia-hypohemoglobinemia leads to decrease of oxygen-carrying capacity of blood, resulting in oxygen deficiency of tumor cells and their radiotherapy resistance. Therefore this method is worthy of further studies

  19. A controlled monitoring study of simulated clandestine graves using 3D ground penetrating radar

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    van Schoor, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A controlled three-dimensional ground penetrating radar monitoring study over simulated clandestine graves was conducted near Pretoria, South Africa, in which the detectability of graves as a function of post-burial interval was assessed...

  20. Genotypes in relation to phenotypic appearance and exposure to environmental factors in Graves' hyperthyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Xander G.; Endert, Erik; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Genetic polymorphisms and environmental factors are both involved in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease, but their interaction and effect on Graves' phenotypes have scarcely been investigated. Objective: To test the hypothesis that subjects with susceptibility genotypes develop more

  1. Auto-estima na forma inativa da oftalmopatia de Graves Inactive Graves' ophthalmopathy and self-esteem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique de Toledo Magalhães

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a auto-estima dos pacientes com oftalmopatia de Graves na fase inativa. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 30 pacientes portadores de oftalmopatia de Graves, eutireoideanos, na fase inativa, com idade variando entre 26 e 65 anos, média 43 ± 11,0 anos, denominado grupo estudo e 39 indivíduos que não apresentavam oftalmopatia de Graves, com idade variando entre 18 e 67 anos, média de 41 ± 13,4 anos, selecionados na população geral denominado grupo controle. Para avaliar a auto-estima foi utilizada a escala de auto-estima Rosenberg Unifesp-EPM aplicada por meio de entrevista. Os valores dos escores de auto-estima nos dois grupos estudados foram comparados pelo teste não paramétrico de Mann-Whitney. O mesmo teste foi aplicado com objetivo de comparar os resultados obtidos no grupo oftalmopatia de Graves considerando a gravidade da doença. RESULTADOS: Não foi observada alteração com significância estatística na auto-estima dos pacientes com oftalmopatia de Graves (p=0,057. O grupo estudo apresentou, em média, valores inferiores de auto-estima, comparado ao grupo controle. Não houve diferença da auto-estima entre os pacientes dos subgrupos leve e moderado-grave (P=0,2710. CONCLUSÃO: A oftalmopatia de Graves na fase inativa não afetou a auto-estima dos pacientes, no grupo estudado.PURPOSE: To assess the self-esteem of Graves' ophthalmopathy patients in the inactive phase. METHODS: Thirty euthyroid patients were evaluated in the inactive phase of disease with age ranging from 26 to 65 years, average of 43 ± 11,0 years, called study group and 39 individuals without Graves' ophthalmopathy with age ranging from 18 to 67 years, average of 41 ± 13,4 years, selected from the general population called control group. To evaluate the self-esteem the Rosenberg UNIFESP/EPM self-esteem scale, applied by means of an interview, was utilized. The self-esteem scores in the two studied groups were compared by means of the non

  2. APLASTIC ANEMIA AND VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cudillo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Acquired aplastic anemia(aAA is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells . The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA  is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA.

    In none of the  studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics  and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial

  3. Fanconi Anemia — Case Report of Rare Aplastic Anemia at Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaconu Alina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, defective haematopoiesis, and a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and cancers. FA was first described in 1927 by the Swiss pediatrician Guido Fanconi. The diagnosis is based on morphological abnormalities, hematologic abnormalities (pancytopenia, macrocytic anemia and progressive bone marrow failure and genetic tests (cariograma.

  4. Messiniense: compleja y grave crisis ecologica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre, E.

    2003-08-01

    yacimientos de mamíferos fósiles en España y otras regiones con importantes novedades, entre ellas diversos intercambios intercontinentales, en el mismo intervalo cronológico añaden cuestiones de interés además de obligar a la correlación entre la estratigrafía basada en series marinas y la biostratigrafía continental. A las singularidades de estas series se añade el descubrimiento reciente de homínidos fósiles con indicios de bipedia en edades comprendidas en este intervalo. En el mismo se han datado graves eventos paleogeográficos, geodinámicos, paleoambientales y paleoclimáticos, que empezaron a investigarse hace 40 años como la «Crisis de Salinidad del Mediterráneo*, y sobre cuyo desarrollo e interacciones se han publicado diversos modelos más o menos incompletos: aislamiento del mediterráneo, descenso global del nivel del mar, acreción continental y orogenia, glaciación, deterioro de la cubierta vegetal. Una interpretación de la secuencia de eventos en estos diversos campos de estudio de Historia de la Tierra y de la Vida, y sus interacciones, puede trazarse con una calibración del orden de los cien mil años.

  5. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation? : Differential diagnosis and mechanisms of anemia of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body's iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear phagocytes system in liver and spleen. This results in iron-limited erythropoiesis and anemia. This review summarizes current diagnostic and pathophysiological concepts of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of inflammation, as well as combined conditions, and provides a brief outlook on novel therapeutic options.

  6. Fanconi's Anemia Effect or Sickle Cell Anemia Effect: That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Sule; Chui, David H K; Gumruk, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy who was diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia was referred to our center. The parental consanguinity, growth retardation and dysmorphic features prompted a search for possible Fanconi's Anemia (FA). The diepoxybutane (DEB) test was positive, confirming FA. The interaction of both diseases might account for his relatively mild phenotype in terms of both sickle cell anemia (or Hb S, HBB: c.20A > T) and FA. The high Hb F level that might be related to concomitant FA, may have caused a milder phenotype of sickle cell anemia, whereas nitric oxide (NO) depletion as a consequence of sickle cell anemia, may have caused a delay in the bone marrow failure of FA.

  7. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlotto, John; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  8. 77 FR 39406 - Safety Zone; Tom Graves Memorial Fireworks, Port Bay, Wolcott, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Tom Graves Memorial Fireworks, Port Bay, Wolcott, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION..., NY. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Port Bay during the Tom Graves... necessary to ensure the safety of spectators and vessels during the Tom Graves Memorial Fireworks. This zone...

  9. Grave's Disease and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis—An Unusual and Challenging Association

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Shiran; Rajasekaran, Senthilkumar; Venkatakrishnan, Leela

    2013-01-01

    Jaundice in Grave's diseases is uncommon, but when it does occur, complication of thyrotoxicosis (heart failure/infection) or intrinsic liver disease should be considered. Grave's disease can cause asymptomatic elevation of liver enzymes, jaundice and rarely acute liver failure. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like autoimmune hepatitis, or primary biliary cirrhosis. The cause of jaundice in Grave's disease is multifactorial.

  10. Grave's Disease and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis-An Unusual and Challenging Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Shiran; Rajasekaran, Senthilkumar; Venkatakrishnan, Leela

    2014-03-01

    Jaundice in Grave's diseases is uncommon, but when it does occur, complication of thyrotoxicosis (heart failure/infection) or intrinsic liver disease should be considered. Grave's disease can cause asymptomatic elevation of liver enzymes, jaundice and rarely acute liver failure. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like autoimmune hepatitis, or primary biliary cirrhosis. The cause of jaundice in Grave's disease is multifactorial.

  11. Fanconi anemia and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grompe, M; D'Andrea, A

    2001-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects in at least eight distinct genes FANCA, B, C, D1, D2, E, F and G. The clinical phenotype of all FA complementation groups is similar and is characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, cancer proneness and typical birth defects. The principal cellular phenotype is hypersensitivity to DNA damage, particularly interstrand DNA crosslinks. The FA proteins constitute a multiprotein pathway whose precise biochemical function(s) remain unknown. Five of the FA proteins (FANCA, C, E, F and G) interact in a nuclear complex upstream of FANCD2. FANCB and FANCD1 have not yet been cloned, but it is likely that FANCB is part of the nuclear complex and that FANCD1 acts downstream of FANCD2. The FA nuclear complex regulates the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 in response to DNA damage, resulting in targeting of this protein into nuclear foci. These foci also contain BRCA1 and other DNA damage response proteins. In male meiosis, FANCD2 also co-localizes with BRCA1 at synaptonemal complexes. Together, these data suggest that the FA pathway functions primarily as a DNA damage response system, although its exact role (direct involvement in DNA repair versus indirect, facilitating role) has not yet been defined.

  12. Fanconi Anemia and Laron Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Cortazar, Inma; de Ita, Julieta Rodriguez; Aguirre, Gabriel Amador; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Ortiz-Urbina, Jesús; García-Magariño, Mariano; de la Garza, Rocío García; Diaz Olachea, Carlos; Elizondo Leal, Martha Irma

    2017-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a condition characterized by genetic instability and short stature, which is due to growth hormone (GH) deficiency in most cases. However, no apparent relationships have been identified between FA complementation group genes and GH. In this study, we thereby considered an association between FA and Laron syndrome (LS) (insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1] deficiency). A 21-year-old female Mexican patient with a genetic diagnosis of FA was referred to our research department for an evaluation of her short stature. Upon admission to our facility, her phenotype led to a suspicion of LS; accordingly, serum levels of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein 3 were analyzed and a GH stimulation test was performed. In addition, we used a next-generation sequencing approach for a molecular evaluation of FA disease-causing mutations and genes involved in the GH-IGF signaling pathway. Tests revealed low levels of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein 3 that remained within normal ranges, as well as a lack of response to GH stimulation. Sequencing confirmed a defect in the GH receptor signaling pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to suggest an association between FA and LS. We propose that IGF-1 administration might improve some FA complications and functions based upon IGF-1 beneficial actions observed in animal, cell and indirect clinical models: erythropoiesis modulation, immune function improvement and metabolic regulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aspectos moleculares da anemia falciforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galiza Neto Gentil Claudino de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente artigo abordaram-se vários aspectos relacionados à natureza molecular da anemia falciforme, desordem hematológica de caráter hereditário que acomete expressivo número de indivíduos em várias regiões do mundo. As pesquisas realizadas em torno desta patologia da hemácia, ao longo de quase um século, a partir de 1910, cooperaram para a criação de um novo e importante segmento da ciência, denominado biologia molecular. A descoberta dos polimorfismos da mutação (GAT->GTG no gene que codifica a cadeia beta da hemoglobina, originando diferentes haplótipos da doença, permitiu um melhor e mais amplo conhecimento em torno da heterogeneidade clínica nos pacientes falcêmicos. Analisando a hemoglobina na sua estrutura normal e mutante, sua produção e evolução, pode-se ter um entendimento mais completo da fisiopatologia desta doença e da sua complexidade clínica.

  14. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  15. Quality control of 131I treatment of graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zeng; Liu Guoqiang

    2009-01-01

    To make a preliminary quality control (QC) criteria and apply on the various stages of clinic 131 I treatment of Graves' disease in order to decrease the early happening of hypothyroidism and enhance the onetime 131 I cure rate of Graves' disease, the quality control criteria in the stochastic outpatient with 131 I treatment, such as plan of the indication, contraindication, method of treatment, matters needing attention, follow-up observation and curative effect appraisal, patient selection, RAIU, thyroid gland weight measurement and 131 I dose criteria for the various steps of 131 I medication were determined. The 131 I treatment effects of Graves' disease including the once-cure rate, the improving rate, duplicate cure rate and the early happening rate of hypothyroidism were analyzed in patients with applying QC and without QC ccriteria. The results showed that the oncecure rate in patients with applying QC criteria was increased from 76.6% to 90.9% (P≤0.01); the improving rate was decreased from 12.2% to 7.0% (P≤0.01); the duplicate cure rate was increased from 90.1% to 93.0% (P>0.05); the early happening rate of hypothyroidism was decreased from 11.0% to 2.1% (P≤0.01). The 131 I treatment of Graves' disease applying with QC criteria had tremendously improved the oncecure rate and decreased the early happening of hypothyroidism rate. (authors)

  16. Graves' orbitopathy as a rare disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perros, Petros; Hegedüs, L; Bartalena, L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is an autoimmune condition, which is associated with poor clinical outcomes including impaired quality of life and socio-economic status. Current evidence suggests that the incidence of GO in Europe may be declining, however data on the prevalence of this dise...

  17. The plundering of the ship graves from Oseberg and Gokstad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Jan; Daly, Aoife

    2012-01-01

    Not the least of the unusual revelations that have come from the wonderfully preserved ninth-century Norwegian ship burials at Oseberg and Gokstad, is the fact that both had been later broken into-by interlopers who defaced the ship, damaged the grave goods and pulled out and dispersed the bones...

  18. Classification of the eye changes of Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.; Prummel, M. F.; Mourits, M. P.; Koornneef, L.; Buller, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    Classification of the eye changes of Graves' disease may have clinical use in the description of the present eye state, in the assessment of treatment results, and in the choice of therapy. Requirements for any classification system should include simplicity, clinical nature (i.e., easily carried

  19. Diabetes mellitus: a risk factor in patients with Graves' orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmann, R.; Mourits, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prevalence of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and Graves' orbitopathy (GO) and to investigate the complications of surgery for GO in these patients. METHODS: The records of 482 consecutive patients with GO referred in a 5 year period were

  20. Contrast sensitivity function in Graves' ophthalmopathy and dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp-Schulten, M. S.; Tijssen, R.; Mourits, M. P.; Apkarian, P.

    1993-01-01

    Contrast sensitivity function was measured by a computer automated method on 38 eyes with dysthyroid optic neuropathy and 34 eyes with Graves' ophthalmopathy only. The results were compared with 74 healthy control eyes. Disturbances of contrast sensitivity functions were found in both groups when

  1. 131I therapy of Graves' disease using lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kenshi

    1983-01-01

    Lithium is known to cause goiter and hypothyroidism. In the mechanism of goitrogenesis, there is general agreement that lithium inhibits the release of the thyroid hormones from the thyroid gland without significantly impairing other thyroid functions. The present study was undertaken, therefore, to investigate the usefulness of lithium in the radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease. Nine patients with Graves' disease who were all, except one, previously treated with antithyroid drugs were studied. 600 mg of lithium carbonate were administered daily to investigate the effects on thyroidal 131 I uptake, disappearance rate of 131 I from the prelabeled thyroid and the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones. Lithium showed no significant effect on the thyroidal 131 I uptake when the 24 hour thyroidal 131 I uptakes were determined both before and during lithium treatment in the five cases. On the other hand, lithium clearly prolonged the mean value of effective half-lives of 131 I to approximately 8 days vs. 5.1 days before lithium treatment (p 4 and T 3 levels significantly decreased during lithium treatment, from 21.3 to 12.4μg/dl (n=9, p 131 I for the Graves' disease can be reduced by using lithium, the radiation exposure to the total body is decreased. Moreover, it is possible to perform the 131 I therapy while improving the thyrotoxicosis with lithium. Finally, it is concluded that lithium is a very useful drug to be combined with the 131 I therapy of Graves' disease. (author)

  2. [Guideline for the treatment of Graves' disease with antithyroid drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2006-12-01

    We have published "Guideline for the Treatment of Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug in Japan 2006" in the middle of May from the Japan Thyroid Association. The background, working process, composition, aim and significance of this guideline are described. The most remarkable feature of this guideline is "evidence based".

  3. Radiotherapy for Graves' orbitopathy : randomised placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, MP; van Kempen-Harteveld, ML; Garcia, MBG; Koppeschaar, HPF; Tick, L; Terwee, CB

    2000-01-01

    Background The best treatment (steroids, irradiation, or both) for moderately severe Graves' orbitopathy, a self-limiting disease is not known. We tested the efficacy of external beam irradiation compared with sham-irradiation. Methods In a double-blind randomised clinical trial, 30 patients with

  4. CASE REPORT : GRAVE'S DISEASE PRESENTING AS PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.K.; Hatwal, A.; Agarwal, J.K.; Bajpai, H.S.; Sharma, I.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY The case of a 37 year old male is described who initially presented as paranoid schizophrenia unresponsive to anti-psychotic drug treatment and subsequently developed features of Grave's disease. Treatment with carbimazole alone improved his psychiatric symptoms. PMID:21927380

  5. [Rituximab: a new therapeutic alternative in Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello-Winniczuk, Nina; Díaz-Jouanen, Efraín

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism, affecting mainly young aged women, with an etiology of autoimmune basis. One of its manifestations, Graves' ophthalmopathy whose pathophysiology is unknown, represents one of the greatest therapeutic challenges in these patients, because they require aggressive treatment with steroids and multiple subsequent reconstructive surgeries in certain cases. It also represents a high burden to the health system. Drugs targeting B cells have been very effective for many autoimmune diseases. Rituximab is a murine humanized monoclonal antibody against CD20 + cells currently being studied in various autoimmune diseases including Graves' disease. The objective of this paper is to expose possible mechanisms by which rituximab could act in both hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease, as well as the experience with its use acquired so far. The employment of rituximab in recently diagnosed patients or with mild ophthalmopathy is questionable with the evidence available today however, we think that it may have a role in refractory cases or those who have a contraindication for steroid use.

  6. Personalised immunomodulating treatments for Graves' disease: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struja, Tristan Mirko; Kutz, Alexander; Fischli, Stefan; Meier, Christian; Müller, Beat; Schütz, Philipp

    2017-08-14

    Although Graves' disease has been recognised for more than 100 years, its physiopathological mechanisms are incompletely understood. Treatment strategies today mainly focus on suppression of thyroid hormone production by use of antithyroid drugs or radio-iodine, but neglect the underlying immunological mechanisms. Although Graves' disease is often seen as a prototype for an autoimmune mechanism, it is more likely to be a heterogeneous syndrome showing characteristics of both autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. The interplay of these two mechanisms may well characterise the physiopathology of this disease and its complications. Immunodeficiency may be either genetically determined or secondarily acquired. Various triggering events lead to autoimmunity with stimulation of the thyroid gland resulting in the clinical syndrome of hyperthyroidism. Also, relapse risk differs from patient to patient and can be estimated from clinical parameters incorporated into the Graves' Recurrent Events After Therapy (GREAT) score. Accurate risk stratification may help to distinguish high-risk patients for whom a more definitive treatment approach should be used from others where there is a high probability that the disease will recover with medical treatment alone. Several smaller trials having found positive effects of immunosuppressive drugs on recurrence risk in Graves' disease; therefoore, there is great potential in the use of novel immunomodulating drugs in addition to the currently used antithyroid drugs for the successful treatment of this condition. Further in-depth exploration of susceptibility, triggering factors and immunological mechanisms has the potential to improve treatment of Graves' disease, with more personalised, risk-adapted treatment strategies based on the different physiopathological concepts of this heterogeneous condition.

  7. Follow-up of newborns of mothers with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Shraga, Yael; Tamir-Hostovsky, Liran; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit

    2014-06-01

    Overt neonatal Graves' disease is rare, but may be severe, even life threatening, with deleterious effects on neural development. The main objective of this study was to describe the course of thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxin (fT4) levels, as well as postnatal weight gain in relation to fT4 levels, in neonates born to women with Graves' disease without overt neonatal thyrotoxicosis. Such information is important to deduce the optimal schedule for evaluation. We conducted a retrospective chart review of neonates born to mothers with Graves' disease between January 2007 and December 2012. The records were reviewed for sex, gestational age, birth weight, maternal treatment during pregnancy, and maternal thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) level. For each visit in the clinic, the data included growth parameters, presence of symptoms suspected for hyperthyroidism, blood test results (levels of TSH, fT4, and TSI), and treatment. Ninety-six neonates were included in the study (49 males), with a total of 320 measurements of thyroid function tests (TSH and fT4). Four neonates (4%) had overt neonatal Graves' disease; one of them along with nine others were born preterm. In 77 (92.9%) of the remaining 83 neonates (the subclinical group), fT4 levels were above the 95th percentile on day 5. All had normal fT4 on day 15. A negative association was found between fT4 and weight gain during the first two weeks. In this cohort, most neonates born to mothers with Graves' disease had a subclinical course with abnormal fT4 levels that peaked at day 5. After day 14, all measurements of fT4 returned to the normal range, although measurements of TSH remained suppressed for up to three months. Elevated fT4 was associated with poor weight gain.

  8. SUBTOTAL THYROIDECTOMY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF GRAVE'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, P J; Garg, M K; Singh, Y; Bhalla, V P; Datta, S

    2001-07-01

    Treatment options for Grave's disease include radio-iodine ablation, which is the standard treatment in the USA, antithyroid drug therapy, which is popular in Japan, and surgery, which is commonly employed in Europe and India. There are very few reports about the outcome of surgery in Grave's disease in the Indian setting. Surgery for Grave's disease is an attractive option in under developed countries to cut short prolonged drug treatment, costly follow up and avoid the need for radio-isotope facilities for 1311 ablation. Aim of the present study was to assess the result of subtotal thyroidectomy in 32 cases of Grave's Disease referred for surgery by the endocrinologist in a teaching hospital. Patients were prepared for surgery with Lugol's iodine and propranalol. Subtotal thyroidectomy was performed by a standard technique, which included dissection and exposure of recurrent laryngeal nerves and parathyroid glands. Actual estimation of weight of the remnant gland was not part of the study. Duration of follow up ranged from 6 months to 4 years. 13 of 32 cases were males. Age ranged from 20 to 57 years. There was 1 death in the immediate post-operative period. There were no cases of permanent hypoparathyroidism or recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. 1 patient developed temporary hypoparathyroidism. 1 patient developed recurrence of hyperthyroidism and 3 cases developed hypothyroidism all within 2 years of surgery. The study has demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of surgery for Grave's Disease in comparison to the reported high incidence of hypothyroidism following radio-iodine therapy and high recurrence rate after anti thyroid drug therapy.

  9. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  10. Graves' orbitopathy as a rare disease in Europe: a European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO) position statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perros, P.; Hegedüs, L.; Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Kahaly, G. J.; Baldeschi, L.; Salvi, M.; Lazarus, J. H.; Eckstein, A.; Pitz, S.; Boboridis, K.; Anagnostis, P.; Ayvaz, G.; Boschi, A.; Brix, T. H.; Currò, N.; Konuk, O.; Marinò, M.; Mitchell, A. L.; Stankovic, B.; Törüner, F. B.; von Arx, G.; Zarković, M.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    2017-01-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is an autoimmune condition, which is associated with poor clinical outcomes including impaired quality of life and socio-economic status. Current evidence suggests that the incidence of GO in Europe may be declining, however data on the prevalence of this disease are sparse.

  11. Sickle Cell Anemia: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Disease Also called: Hemoglobin SS disease, Sickle cell anemia On this page Basics Summary Start Here Diagnosis ... red blood cells. This is a condition called anemia , and it can make you feel tired. The ...

  12. The Eye/Brain Radioactivity Ratio for Assessment of Graves Ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. W.; Sung, S. K.; Suh, K. S.; Park, W.; Choi, D. J.; Kim, J. S.

    1988-01-01

    In Graves' disease, changes in orbital tissue and structure are caused by inflammatory infiltration, which induces increase of capillary permeability and breakdown of blood-tissue barriers. Using the uptake of 99m Tc-DTPA in inflammatory lesion, Eye/Brain radioactivity ratios in brain scintigraphy were evaluated in 15 normal controls and 40 Graves' patients. The results were as follows; 1) Eye/Brain radioactivity ratio was significantly higher in Graves' ophthalmopathy group than in control group (p 99m Tc-DTPA brain scintigraphy may be useful to determine the activity of Graves' ophthalmopathy and whether treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy is necessary or not.

  13. Tissue Factor and Thrombin in Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Chantrathammachart, Pichika; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited hematologic disorder associated with hemolytic and vaso-occlusive complications. An activation of coagulation is also a prominent feature of sickle cell anemia. Growing evidence indicates that coagulation may contribute to the inflammation and vascular injury in sickle cell anemia. This review focuses on tissue factor expression and its contribution to the activation of coagulation, thrombosis and vascular inflammation in sickle cell anemia.

  14. The clinical value of serum thyrotrophin receptor antibody level in patients with Graves ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chaodian; Shi Yuhong; Yan Bing

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of serum thyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb) on the pathological mechanism of Graves ophthalmopathy. Methods: Two hundred and nineteen newly diagnosed Graves disease patients who were divided into Graves ophthalmopathy group (n=121) and without Graves ophthalmopathy group (n=98) were tested serum concentration with thyroid function, thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb), thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) and TRAb. According to the consensus statement of the European Group on Graves ophthalmopathy, clinical activity score (CAS) and severity evaluation were carried out on Graves ophthalmopathy patients. Results: There was no significant difference in serum concentration of free thyroxine (FT 4 ), free triiodothyronine (FT 3 ), TPOAb and TRAb between the Graves ophthalmopathy group and the without Graves ophthalmopathy group. Serum concentration of TRAb was not correlated with the severity and CAS of Graves ophthalmopathy. Conclusions: The CAS and the severity of Graves ophthalmopathy were irrelevant to the serum concentration of TRAb. Therefore, the correlation between TRAb and Graves ophthalmopathy still needs further study. (authors)

  15. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia by Diepoxybutane Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer, particularly hematological malignancies and solid tumors of the head and neck. The main role of FA proteins is in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). FA results from pathogenic variants in at least 16 distinct genes, causing genomic instability. Although the highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, diagnosis based on a profound sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. Diepoxybutane (DEB) analysis is the preferred test for FA because other agents have higher rates of false-positive and false-negative results. PMID:25827349

  16. Pediatric gastric ganglioneuroma presenting as anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina M. Morgan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary gastric masses are rare in childhood, and a gastric ganglioneuroma has not been reported in the pediatric population. In this report, we describe a 12-year-old female who presented with iron deficiency anemia and melena. Endoscopy was performed to elucidate the source of her symptoms, and revealed a gastric mass with overlying ulceration. Following resection and pathologic examination, the mass was diagnosed as a solitary polypoid ganglioneuroma. A solitary polypoid ganglioneuroma is an uncommon, benign tumor of neural crest cell origin. They are most often asymptomatic and found incidentally, but can present with rectal bleeding, obstruction, pain, and changes in bowel function. Complete resection is the therapy of choice to prevent progression of symptoms or rare transformation into a malignant neuroblastic tumor, like neuroblastoma. As of the patient's last post-operative appointment, she was healthy with resolution of her anemia. Keywords: Ganglioneuroma, Pediatric, Gastric mass, Anemia, Neuroblastic tumor

  17. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of anemia and thrombocytopenia as a result of uterine fibroid and adenomyosis, complicated by immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP. Symptoms were presented as menorrhagia and metrorrhagia in a 34-year-old African American woman, who was later treated with blood and platelet transfusion and iron therapy with steroids. Uterine fibroids are commonly found to cause hematologic disturbances such as anemia and reactive thrombocytosis and, less commonly, thrombocytopenia. Moreover, such hematologic disturbances are secondary to heavy and irregular uterine bleeding, which is typically presented. A previous uterine fibroid diagnosis was made and reconfirmed by pelvic and transvaginal ultrasound to exclude other locoregional pathologies. ITP was suggested by Coombs test and several other serologies, leading to confirmation via bone marrow biopsy. In a previous case study, we reported positive responses in hemotecrit and platelet count after the introduction of iron therapy to an iron-depleted middle-aged female presenting severe anemia and thrombocytopenia. 1

  18. Ultrasonographic Features of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Patients with Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin Ook; Cho, Dong Hyeok; Chung, Dong Jin

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims To characterize ultrasonographic findings in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) combined with Graves' disease. Methods Medical records and ultrasonographic findings of 1,013 patients with Graves' disease and 3,380 patients without Graves' disease were analyzed retrospectively. A diagnosis of PTC was based on a pathologic examination. Results The frequency of hypoechogenicity was lower in patients with PTC and Graves' disease than in patients with PTC alone (p Graves' disease was significantly higher than in those with PTC alone (p Graves' disease was characterized by more ill-defined borders and less frequency of overall calcification, punctate calcification, and heterogeneous echogenicity, although the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions Our results suggest that patients with Graves' disease more frequently have atypical PTC findings on ultrasonography. PMID:20195406

  19. Clinical significance of determination of serum TRAb levels in patients with relapsing graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chunlei; Zhou Jiaqiang; Li Wenpeng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum TRAb levels in patients with relapsing Graves' disease. Methods: Serum TRAb (with RRA) and several other thyroid-related hormones (TT 4 , TT 3 , TSH, FT 3 , with CLIA) were determined in the following subjects: 1. 25 cases of relapsing Graves' disease after previous successful treatment; 2. 18 cases of recently diagnosed Graves' disease; 3. 31 cases of successfully treated Graves' disease; 4. 15 cases of simple goiter; 5. 10 cases of nodular goiter; 6. 18 cases of hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto disease. Results: Positive rate of TRAb was 76.00% in patients with relapsing Graves' disease and 77.78% in recently diagnosed Graves' disease cases, both being significantly higher than that in all the other sets of patients studied (P<0.01). Conclusion: Determination of serum TRAb levels was helpful for the diagnosis of relapse in Graves' disease

  20. Unexpected Anemia and Reticulocytopenia in an Adolescent With Sickle Cell Anemia Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauel, Emily R; Grossmann, Lily T; Vissa, Madhav; Miller, Scott T

    2015-10-01

    In a patient with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion, exacerbation of anemia with reticulocytopenia must prompt consideration of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis, as further transfusion may worsen this condition; definitive diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Anemia evolving during parvovirus B19-induced erythroid hypoplasia (transient aplastic crisis) should be attenuated in chronic transfusion patients due to superior survival of transfused over endogenous red blood cells. A 16-year-old with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion of modified intensity (goal to maintain hemoglobin S<50%) who developed symptomatic anemia with reticulocytopenia was later shown to have had transient aplastic crisis.

  1. Assessment of anemia during CT pulmonary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Caroline; Groth, Michael; Bley, Thorsten A.; Henes, Frank O.; Treszl, András; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Anemia is associated with increased mortality in patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements on the single unenhanced trigger slice of pulmonary CT angiography scans for diagnosis of anemia. Material and Methods: 150 consecutive patients (median age 64 ± 16 years) with suspected PE underwent pulmonary CT angiography. Two radiologists, blinded to laboratory results, performed HU measurements in the single unenhanced trigger scan independently by region-based analysis (ROI). HU values from ascending and descending aorta and the calculated mean of both were correlated with serum hemoglobin levels. Inter- and intraobserver variability was determined for HU measurements, and ROC analysis was performed for diagnosis of anemia. Calculated linear models were used to assess formulas for estimation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. Results: HU measurements revealed high intra- and interrater reliability (ICC > 0.981 and ICC > 0.965, respectively). Calculated mean HU values showed a strong correlation with serum hemoglobin levels (r = 0.734), which allowed generation of different formulas for calculation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. ROC analyses confirmed a high sensitivity (80.4 for men; 91.3 for women) and specificity (84.0 for men; 84.9 for women) for diagnosing anemia. Conclusion: Diagnosis of anemia and quantification of hemoglobin levels upon a single unenhanced trigger scan of pulmonary CT angiography is feasible. We suggest disclosing the anemic state in the radiological report, independent of the presence of PE, since anemia carries increased risks of morbidity and mortality.

  2. Assessment of anemia during CT pulmonary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Caroline, E-mail: cjung@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Groth, Michael; Bley, Thorsten A.; Henes, Frank O. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Treszl, András [Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: Anemia is associated with increased mortality in patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements on the single unenhanced trigger slice of pulmonary CT angiography scans for diagnosis of anemia. Material and Methods: 150 consecutive patients (median age 64 ± 16 years) with suspected PE underwent pulmonary CT angiography. Two radiologists, blinded to laboratory results, performed HU measurements in the single unenhanced trigger scan independently by region-based analysis (ROI). HU values from ascending and descending aorta and the calculated mean of both were correlated with serum hemoglobin levels. Inter- and intraobserver variability was determined for HU measurements, and ROC analysis was performed for diagnosis of anemia. Calculated linear models were used to assess formulas for estimation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. Results: HU measurements revealed high intra- and interrater reliability (ICC > 0.981 and ICC > 0.965, respectively). Calculated mean HU values showed a strong correlation with serum hemoglobin levels (r = 0.734), which allowed generation of different formulas for calculation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. ROC analyses confirmed a high sensitivity (80.4 for men; 91.3 for women) and specificity (84.0 for men; 84.9 for women) for diagnosing anemia. Conclusion: Diagnosis of anemia and quantification of hemoglobin levels upon a single unenhanced trigger scan of pulmonary CT angiography is feasible. We suggest disclosing the anemic state in the radiological report, independent of the presence of PE, since anemia carries increased risks of morbidity and mortality.

  3. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A novel ubiquitin ligase is deficient in Fanconi anemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meetei, AR; Winter, de J.P.; Medhurst, A.L. dr.; Wallisch, M; Waisfisz, Q.; Vrugt, van der H.J.; Oostra, A.B.; Yan, Z; Ling, C; Bishop, CE; Hoatlin, M.E.; Joenje, H.

    2003-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia are highly sensitive to DNA-crosslinking drugs, such as mitomycin C (MMC). Fanconi anemia proteins function in a DNA damage

  5. Hematocrit, anemia, and arm preference for blood sample collection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anemia in pregnancy is a common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Regular review of hematocrit (HCT) and anemia patterns in pregnancy is necessary in our environment. Aim: The aim was to determine the average HCT, prevalence, and pattern of anemia, as well the arm ...

  6. Anemia: monosymptomatic celiac disease. A report of 3 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depla, A. C.; Bartelsman, J. F.; Mulder, C. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Patients with monosymptomatic celiac disease (CD) can escape diagnosis for a long period. Anemia is a common finding in CD, although anemia as the sole symptom is relatively unknown. We report on three patients who presented with iron deficiency anemia and no other symptom, in whom CD was considered

  7. George Hoyt Whipple and the Impact of Liver on Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis George Hoyt Whipple and the Impact of Liver on Anemia cases of anemia". George Hoyt Whipple Courtesy of University of Rochester Medical Center Whipple's main research was concerned with anemia and with the physiology and pathology of the liver. He won the

  8. Idiopathic aplastic anemia: diagnosis and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolberg, Osnat Jarchowsky; Levy, Yair

    2014-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is a disease characterized by pancytopenia and hypoplastic bone marrow caused by the decrease of hematopoietic stem cells. The pathogenesis of AA is complex and involves an abnormal hematopoietic microenvironment, hematopoietic stem cell/progenitor cell deficiencies and immunity disorders. Survival in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) has markedly improved in the past 4 decades because of advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive and biologic drugs, and supportive care. Herein, we will update the main issues concern AA according to our literature review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkmaz S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sevda Korkmaz,1 Sevler Yildiz,1 Tuba Korucu,1 Burcu Gundogan,1 Zehra Emine Sunbul,1 Hasan Korkmaz,2 Murad Atmaca1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey Purpose: Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency.Methods: All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic.Findings: Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%, followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%, and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%. Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients.Results: The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population

  10. Anemia intrahospitalaria y descenso de hemoglobina en pacientes internados Hospital-acquired anemia and decrease of hemoglobin levels in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina V. Gianserra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Es frecuente observar el desarrollo de anemia durante la internación, especialmente en pacientes graves. Esto se ha relacionado a extracciones de laboratorio. Pocos estudios evaluaron su prevalencia y factores asociados en pacientes internados en sala general. El objetivo fue determinar la prevalencia, características y factores clínicos asociados a anemia intrahospitalaria y descenso de hemoglobina en pacientes internados. Se efectuó un estudio transversal, prospectivo, descriptivo. Se analizaron 192 internaciones consecutivas en sala general. Se determinó aquellas que presentaron un descenso del valor de hemoglobina = 2 g/dl y se analizaron factores de riesgo asociados. Presentaron anemia 139 pacientes (72.4%, 89 (46.4% al ingreso y 50 (26% durante la internación. Se presentaron 47 casos de descenso de hemoglobina = 2 g/dl (24.47%, en los que se observaron los valores más bajos de hematocrito y hemoglobina al alta (p = 0.01, hidratación parenteral con mayor volumen (p = 0.01 y estadías hospitalarias más prolongadas (p = 0.0001. En el análisis univariado las variables leucocitosis = 11 000mm³ (OR; IC95%: 2.02; 1.03-4; p = 0.01, días de internación = 7 (OR; IC95%: 3.39; 1.62-7.09; p = 0.0006, hidratación parenteral = 1500 ml/día (OR; IC95%: 2.47; 1.06-6.4; p = 0.01, vía central (OR; IC95%: 10.29; 1.75-108.07, p = 0.003 y anemia intrahospitalaria (OR; IC95%: 7.06; 3.41-15.83; p = 0.00000004 fueron estadísticamente significativos como factores de riesgo para descenso de hemoglobina = 2 g/dl. En el análisis multivariado las variables leucocitosis = 11 000 mm³ (OR; IC95%:2.45; 1.14-5.27; p = 0.02; días de internación = 7 (OR; IC95%: 5.15; 2.19-12.07; p = 0.0002; hidratación parenteral = 1500 ml/día (OR; IC95%: 2.95; 1.13-7.72; p = 0.02 y vía central (OR; IC95%:8.82; 1.37-56.82; p = 0.02 fueron factores predictivos independientes de descenso de hemoglobina = 2 g/dl. La anemia intrahospitalaria tuvo una elevada prevalencia. La

  11. Case report of Graves' disease manifesting with odynophagia and heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evsyutina, Yulia; Trukhmanov, Alexander; Ivashkin, Vladimir; Storonova, Olga; Godjello, Elina

    2015-12-28

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease, which can manifest with a variety of extrathyroidal clinical syndromes like ophthalmopathy, pretibial myxedema (dermopathy), acropathy, cardiomyopathy, and encephalopathy. Though quite rare, this disease can also manifest with gastrointestinal symptoms such as dysphagia, heartburn, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. We report a clinical case of Graves' disease manifesting with dysfunction of the esophagus and heartburn in a 61-year-old man. In the muscular layer of the esophagus we found dystrophic changes led to its atony, which was documented by endoscopy and high-resolution manometry. The pathology features of esophageal symptoms were: focal proliferation of the basal cells, vascular distension, and dystrophy of the epithelial cells. Antithyroid treatment led to decrease of all clinical symptoms after 5 d of Thiamazole administration. Complete restoration of peristalsis in the esophagus, according to manometry, was observed in 1 mo after initiation of treatment.

  12. The role of radiation therapy in Graves` ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, A.D.; Moriaty, M.J. [Saint Luke`s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    1996-11-01

    Graves` ophthalmopathy can occur in 25-30% of patients with hyperthyroidism. This condition can result in serious visual disturbance and disfigurement. The treatment options for symptomatic disease are oral corticosteroids or orbital irradiation. Ten patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy were treated with external beam radiotherapy at Saint Lukes Hospital from March 1991 to February 1994. Eight of these patients had excellent response with minimal morbidity. A dose of 2000 cGy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks is considered to be sufficient to alleviate symptoms in most patients. It is concluded that orbital radiotherapy is effective and well tolerated, and should replace corticosteroid therapy as the initial treatment modality in these patients. A minimum follo-up of 6 months is considered adequate for detecting radiation-induced complications. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

  14. Ecocardiograma e fatores de risco cardiovascular em obesos graves

    OpenAIRE

    Elaine Gonçalves Moreira Rocha, Isaura

    2003-01-01

    Introducão: Alterações em parâmetros hemodinâmicos e na função cardíaca ocorrem na obesidade grave, em associação a outros fatores de risco cardiovascular, como dislipidemia, hipertensão arterial e diabete melito. Material e métodos: Foi descrito o perfil clínico, metabólico, ecocardiográfico e o risco de doença cardiovascular, avaliado através do escore de Framingham, em 32 obesos graves candidatos à gastroplastia, no Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, entre jane...

  15. Hyperthyroidism and Graves' disease: Is an ultrasound examination needed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Varadhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study was to assess the limitation of clinical examination in determining the morphology of thyroid gland in patients with hyperthyroidism and its implications. Methods: A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with hyperthyroidism seen in a tertiary endocrine clinic were analyzed. Sub-analysis was performed on patients with proven Graves' disease. Results: Of the 133 patients included in this study with hyperthyroidism, 60 (45% patients had significant nodularity on ultrasound (US. However, only 67% of these were identified on clinical examination. In patients with confirmed Graves' disease (n = 73, the discordance between US and clinical examination was very similar (18 of 30 patients, 60%. Conclusion: US should form an essential part of the evaluation of hyperthyroidism as the morphology of thyroid gland could be variable and nodules in these glands would also need to be appropriately investigated. This would also significantly influence decision-making and appropriate immediate and follow-up management plan.

  16. Generalised pruritus as a presentation of Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ce; Loh, Ky

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus is a lesser known symptom of hyperthyroidism, particularly in autoimmune thyroid disorders. This is a case report of a 27-year-old woman who presented with generalised pruritus at a primary care clinic. Incidental findings of tachycardia and a goiter led to the investigations of her thyroid status. The thyroid function test revealed elevated serum free T4 and suppressed thyroid stimulating hormone levels. The anti-thyroid antibodies were positive. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and treated with carbimazole until her symptoms subsided. Graves' disease should be considered as an underlying cause for patients presenting with pruritus. A thorough history and complete physical examination are crucial in making an accurate diagnosis. Underlying causes must be determined before treating the symptoms.

  17. [Orbital decompression in Grave's disease: comparison of techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellari-Franceschini, S; Berrettini, S; Forli, F; Bartalena, L; Marcocci, C; Tanda, M L; Nardi, M; Lepri, A; Pinchera, A

    1999-12-01

    Grave's ophthalmopathy is an inflammatory, autoimmune disorder often associated with Grave's disease. The inflammatory infiltration involves the retrobulbar fatty tissue and the extrinsic eye muscles, causing proptosis, extraocular muscle dysfunction and often diplopia. Orbital decompression is an effective treatment in such cases, particularly when resistant to drugs and external radiation therapy. This work compares the results of orbital decompression performed by removing: a) the medial and lateral walls (Mourits technique) in 10 patients (19 orbits) and b) the medial and lower walls (Walsh-Ogura technique) in 17 patients (31 orbits). The results show that removing the floor of the orbit enables better reduction of proptosis but more easily leads to post-operative diplopia. Thus it proves necessary to combine the two techniques, modifying the surgical approach on a case-by-case basis.

  18. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Efficacy of treatment with I(131) in paediatric Graves disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enes Romero, P; Martín-Frías, M; de Jesús, M; Caballero Loscos, C; Alonso Blanco, M; Barrio Castellanos, R

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine is an important therapeutic option in young patients with Grave's disease (GD). In the United States it is a widespread therapy, but in Europe its use in paediatrics is still controversial. To report our experience in radioiodine therapy of paediatric GD patients and analyse its effectiveness and safety. We retrospectively studied our paediatric population (de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Graves' hyperthyroidism and moderate alcohol consumption: evidence for disease prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carle, A.; Bülow Pedersen, I.; Knudsen, N.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We recently demonstrated that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a considerable reduction in the risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism, similar to findings in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. We aimed to study a possible....... CONCLUSIONS: Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a considerable reduction in the risk of Graves' disease with hyperthyroidism - irrespective of age and sex. Autoimmune thyroid disease seems to be much more dependent on environmental factors than hitherto anticipated....