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Sample records for cichlid neolamprologus pulcher

  1. Alternative Reproductive Tactics in the Shell-Brooding Lake Tanganyika Cichlid Neolamprologus brevis

    OpenAIRE

    Kazutaka Ota; Mitsuto Aibara; Masaya Morita; Satoshi Awata; Michio Hori; Masanori Kohda

    2012-01-01

    Alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) are found in several Lake Tanganyika shell-brooding cichlids. Field studies were conducted in the Wonzye population to examine reproductive ecology and ARTs in the Lake Tanganyika shell-brooding cichlid Neolamprologus brevis. We discovered that this fish occurred in both rocky- and sandy-bottom habitats, but in rocky habitats, brood-caring females exclusively occurred in shell-patches that another cichlid species created. All N. brevis of both sexes in ...

  2. Alternative Reproductive Tactics in the Shell-Brooding Lake Tanganyika Cichlid Neolamprologus brevis

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    Kazutaka Ota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs are found in several Lake Tanganyika shell-brooding cichlids. Field studies were conducted in the Wonzye population to examine reproductive ecology and ARTs in the Lake Tanganyika shell-brooding cichlid Neolamprologus brevis. We discovered that this fish occurred in both rocky- and sandy-bottom habitats, but in rocky habitats, brood-caring females exclusively occurred in shell-patches that another cichlid species created. All N. brevis of both sexes in the patches were sexually mature, whereas immature males and females with unripe eggs were found frequently in sandy-bottom habitats. Males in sandy-bottom habitats were smaller, but fed more frequently and were in better somatic condition than males in the patches. Similar tendency was found in females. This indicates that N. brevis uses different habitats depending on the stage of its life history, with migration from sandy-bottom habitats to the shell-patches for reproduction. Males in the patches exhibited different behavior patterns: floating above the patches and lying in the patches. The former was larger, more aggressive, and invested less in gonads (relative to body size than the latter. These results accord with those of other shell-brooding Lake Tanganyika cichlids with ARTs, and they therefore suggest the presence of ARTs in N. brevis.

  3. The genomic substrate for adaptive radiation in African cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Brawand, David; Russell, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Cichlid fishes are famous for large, diverse and replicated adaptive radiations in the Great Lakes of East Africa. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cichlid phenotypic diversity, we sequenced the genomes and transcriptomes of five lineages of African cichlids: the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), an ancestral lineage with low diversity; and four members of the East African lineage: Neolamprologus brichardi/pulcher (older radiation, Lake Tanganyika), Metriaclima zebra (rec...

  4. Social context may affect urinary excretion of 11-ketotestosterone in african cichlids

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschenhauser, Katharina; Canário, Adelino V. M.; Ros, Albert F. H.; Taborsky, Michael; Oliveira, Rui Filipe

    2008-01-01

    We previously investigated the androgen responsiveness of males to simulated partner and territory intrusions in five African cichlid species (Neolamprologus pulcher, Lamprologus callipterus, Tropheus moorii, Pseudosimochromis curvifrons, Oreochromis mossambicus; Hirschenhauser et al., 2004). Here we re-analysed data on 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) levels in holding water to compare the free (presumably from the gills) and conjugated (presumably from urine and faeces) 11-KT frac...

  5. The building-up of social relationships: behavioural types, social networks and cooperative breeding in a cichlid

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    Schürch, Roger; Rothenberger, Susan; Heg, Dik

    2010-01-01

    Consistent individual differences in behavioural types may not only cause variation in life-history decisions, but may also affect the choice of social partners and sociality in general. Here, we tested whether and how behavioural type influences the establishment of social ties using the cooperatively breeding cichlid, Neolamprologus pulcher. In a habitat saturation experiment with individuals pre-tested for behavioural type, we first analysed whether behavioural type affected the likelihood...

  6. Chronic playback of boat noise does not impact hatching success or post-hatching larval growth and survival in a cichlid fish

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    Rick Bruintjes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic (man-made noise has been shown to have a negative impact on the behaviour and physiology of a range of terrestrial and aquatic animals. However, direct assessments of fitness consequences are rare. Here we examine the effect of additional noise on early life stages in the model cichlid fish, Neolamprologus pulcher. Many fishes use and produce sounds, they are crucial elements of aquatic ecosystems, and there is mounting evidence that they are vulnerable to anthropogenic noise; adult N. pulcher have recently been shown to change key behaviours during playback of motor boat noise. Using a split-brood design to eliminate potential genetic effects, we exposed half of the eggs and fry from each clutch to four weeks of playbacks of noise originally recorded from small motor boats with the other half acting as a control (receiving no noise playback. There was no significant effect of additional noise on hatching success or fry survival, length or weight at the end of the exposure period. Although care should be taken not to generalize these findings on a single species from a laboratory study, our data suggest that moderate noise increases do not necessarily have direct negative impacts on early-life survival and growth. Further studies on a range of species in natural conditions are urgently needed to inform conservation efforts and policy decisions about the consequences of anthropogenic noise.

  7. Facial Recognition in a Group-Living Cichlid Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Masanori Kohda; Lyndon Alexander Jordan; Takashi Hotta; Naoya Kosaka; Kenji Karino; Hirokazu Tanaka; Masami Taniyama; Tomohiro Takeyama

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical underpinnings of the mechanisms of sociality, e.g. territoriality, hierarchy, and reciprocity, are based on assumptions of individual recognition. While behavioural evidence suggests individual recognition is widespread, the cues that animals use to recognise individuals are established in only a handful of systems. Here, we use digital models to demonstrate that facial features are the visual cue used for individual recognition in the social fish Neolamprologus pulcher. Focal...

  8. Species-specific patterns of nonapeptide brain gene expression relative to pair-bonding behavior in grouping and non-grouping cichlids.

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    O'Connor, Constance M; Marsh-Rollo, Susan E; Aubin-Horth, Nadia; Balshine, Sigal

    2016-04-01

    Comparative studies have revealed that vasopressin-oxytocin pathways are associated with both pair bonding and grouping behavior. However, the relationship between pair bonding and grouping behavior remains unclear. In this study, our aim was to identify whether two species that differ in grouping behavior display a corresponding difference in their pair bonds, and in the underlying vasopressin-oxytocin hormonal pathways. Using two species of cichlid fishes, the highly social Neolamprologus pulcher and the non-social Telmatochromis temporalis, we measured proximity of pairs during pair bond formation, and then measured social behaviors (proximity, aggression, submission, affiliation) and brain gene expression of isotocin and arginine vasotocin (the teleost homologues of oxytocin and vasopressin, respectively), as well as their receptors, after a temporary separation and subsequent reunion of the bonded pairs. Pairs of the social species spent more time in close proximity relative to the non-social species. Rates of aggression increased in both species following the separation and reunion treatment, relative to controls that were not separated. Overall, whole brain expression of isotocin was higher in the social species relative to the non-social species, and correlated with proximity, submission, and affiliation, but only in the social species. Our results suggest that both a social and a non-social cichlid species have similar behavioral responses to a temporary separation from a mate, and we found no difference in the brain gene expression of measured hormones and receptors based on our separation-reunion treatment. However, our results highlight the importance of isotocin in mediating submissive and affiliative behaviors in cichlid fishes, and demonstrate that isotocin has species-specific correlations with socially relevant behaviors. PMID:26519858

  9. Facial Recognition in a Group-Living Cichlid Fish.

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    Masanori Kohda

    Full Text Available The theoretical underpinnings of the mechanisms of sociality, e.g. territoriality, hierarchy, and reciprocity, are based on assumptions of individual recognition. While behavioural evidence suggests individual recognition is widespread, the cues that animals use to recognise individuals are established in only a handful of systems. Here, we use digital models to demonstrate that facial features are the visual cue used for individual recognition in the social fish Neolamprologus pulcher. Focal fish were exposed to digital images showing four different combinations of familiar and unfamiliar face and body colorations. Focal fish attended to digital models with unfamiliar faces longer and from a further distance to the model than to models with familiar faces. These results strongly suggest that fish can distinguish individuals accurately using facial colour patterns. Our observations also suggest that fish are able to rapidly (≤ 0.5 sec discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar individuals, a speed of recognition comparable to primates including humans.

  10. Maternal food provisioning in a substrate-brooding African cichlid.

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    Kazutaka Ota

    Full Text Available Fish demonstrate the greatest variety of parental care strategies within the animal kingdom. Fish parents seldom provision food for offspring, with some exceptions predominantly found in substrate-brooding Central American cichlids and mouth-brooding African cichlids. Here, we provide the first evidence of food provisioning in a substrate-brooding African cichlid Neolamprologus mondabu. This fish is a maternal substrate-brooding cichlid endemic to Lake Tanganyika, and feeds on benthic animals using unique techniques-individuals typically feed on the surface of sandy substrates, but also expose prey by digging up substrates with vigorous wriggling of their body and fins. Young also feed on benthos on the substrate surface, but only using the first technique. We observed that feeding induced by digging accounted for 30% of total feeding bouts in adult females, demonstrating that digging is an important foraging tactic. However, parental females fed less frequently after digging than non-parental females, although both females stayed in pits created by digging for approximately 30 s. Instead, young gathered in the pit and fed intensively, suggesting that parental females provision food for young by means of digging. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the feeding frequency of young before and after digging that was simulated by hand, and observed that young doubled their feeding frequency after the simulated digging. This suggests that parental females engage in digging to uncover food items that are otherwise unavailable to young, and provision food for them at the expense of their own foraging. This behavior was similar to what has been observed in Central American cichlids.

  11. TYPES OF DICHOGAMY, BREEDING SYSTEMS AND POLLEN LIMITATION ON Aeschynanthus pulcher (Blume G.Don. (GESNERIACEAE

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    Wiguna Rahman

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Observasi tentang tipe dikogami, sistem penyerbukan, dan keterbatasan serbuk sari telah dilakukan pada populasi Aeschynanthus pulcher di Kebun Raya Cibodas. Pengamatan fenologi bunga dilakukan untuk menentukan tipe dikogami. Dalam rangka menentukan sistem perkawinan dan keterbatasan serbuk sari, lima perlakuan penyerbukan telah dilakukan yaitu penyerbukan bebas sebagai kontrol, penyerbukan silang, penyerbukan sendiri, autogami, dan agamospermi. Hasil pengamatan menunjukkan bahwa dikogami pada A. pulcher adalah protandri, tidak sempurna dan durasi tampilan serbuk sari dan stigma reseptif masing-masing yaitu 3-9 hari dan 6-12 hari. A. pulcher merupakan tumbuhan yang dapat membuahi sendiri, sedangkan proses autogami dan agamospermi tidak terjadi. Sindrom keterbatasan serbuk sari pada populasi A. pulcher yang diamati diindikasikan terjadi. Derajat keterbatasan serbuk sari pada A. pulcher mencapai 0.79-0.80. Tiga faktor yang dapat menyebabkan keterbatasan serbuk sari adalah (1 kompetisi antar jenis tumbuhan yang berbunga bersamaan, (2 perilaku berbunga dalam satu periode yang sama, dan (3 kompetisi antara polinator dan pencuri nektar.

  12. The early social environment affects social competence in a cooperative breeder

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    Taborsky, Barbara; Arnold, Cornelia; Junker, Julian; Tschopp, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Social competence is defined as the ability of an animal to optimize the expression of social behaviour as a function of the available social information. The social environment encountered early in life can affect the expression of various social behaviours later in life. We investigated whether early social experience can affect social competence. In the cooperatively breeding cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher, we tested whether individuals reared with older brood-caring conspecifics persisten...

  13. Evolution of genomic structural variation and genomic architecture in the adaptive radiations of African cichlid fishes

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    Shaohua eFan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available African cichlid fishes are an ideal system for studying explosive rates of speciation and the origin of diversity in adaptive radiation. Within the last few million years, more than 2000 species have evolved in the Great Lakes of East Africa, the largest adaptive radiation in vertebrates. These young species show spectacular diversity in their coloration, morphology and behavior. However, little is known about the genomic basis of this astonishing diversity. Recently, five African cichlid genomes were sequenced, including that of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, a basal and only relatively moderately diversified lineage, and the genomes of four representative endemic species of the adaptive radiations, Neolamprologus brichardi, Astatotilapia burtoni, Metriaclima zebra, and Pundamila nyererei. Using the tilapia genome as the reference genome, we generated a high-resolution genomic variation map, consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, short insertions and deletions (indels, inversions and deletions. In total, around 18.8, 17.7, 17.0 and 17.0 million SNPs, 2.3, 2.2, 1.4 and 1.9 million indels, 262, 306, 162, and 154 inversions, and 3509, 2705, 2710 and 2634 deletions were inferred to have evolved in the N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei and M. zebra respectively. Many of these variations affected the annotated gene regions in the genome. Different patterns of genetic variation were detected during the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes. For SNPs, the highest rate of evolution was detected in the common ancestor of N. brichardi, A. burtoni, P. nyererei and M. zebra. However, for the evolution of inversions and deletions, we found that the rates at the terminal taxa are substantially higher than the rates at the ancestral lineages. The high-resolution map provides an ideal opportunity to understand the genomic bases of the adaptive radiation of African cichlid fishes.

  14. Occupational contact dermatitis due to Codiaeum variegatum and possibly to Aeschynantus pulcher.

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    van Ketel, W G

    1979-01-01

    Codiaeum variegatum is a plant that has a rather strong sensitizing capacity as appeared from an examination in a large nursery of so called Crotons. Rather striking were two positive reactions to Aeschynantus pulcher (family: Gesneriaceae), It is not sure if Aeschynantus really has sensitizing properties. More investigations about handeczema caused by contact with Aeschynantus has to be performed. PMID:546619

  15. The tadpole of Atelopus pulcher Boulenger (Annura, Bufonidae) from Manaus, Amazonas

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    Claude Gascon

    1989-01-01

    The tadpole of Atelopus pulcher is described for the first time. Tadpoles of this species were encountered in large streams where reproduction occurs. Tadpoles of this species conform to the genus characteristics in exhibiting an enlarged ventral disc and a 2/3 tooth row formula. One characteristic, however, distinguishes this species from other Atelopodids in that the upper beak is shorter than the lower beak.

  16. The tadpole of Atelopus pulcher Boulenger (Annura, Bufonidae from Manaus, Amazonas

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    Claude Gascon

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The tadpole of Atelopus pulcher is described for the first time. Tadpoles of this species were encountered in large streams where reproduction occurs. Tadpoles of this species conform to the genus characteristics in exhibiting an enlarged ventral disc and a 2/3 tooth row formula. One characteristic, however, distinguishes this species from other Atelopodids in that the upper beak is shorter than the lower beak.

  17. Genetic variation and phylogeography of Micronoemacheilus pulcher populations among drainage systems between western South China and Hainan Island

    OpenAIRE

    QIU Cheng-Feng; LIN Yue-Guang; QING Ning; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Xiang-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variation and phylogeographic patterns of Micronemacheilus pulcher populations from 12 drainage systems between western South China and Hainan Island were investigated, based on nucleotide sequences of the mtDNA cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene, with 108 individuals. There were 138 variable nucleotide sites among 1140 base pairs of the Cyt b gene (12.11% of the full sequence). Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that most of the genetic variation resides within populations (58.5...

  18. Feeding habits of Cocobolo Andinoacara pulcher in the cienaga Grande de Lorica, Colombia

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    Charles W. Olaya-Nieto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The feeding habits of Cocobolo (Andinoacara pulcher in the cienaga Grande de Lorica, Sinu river basin, were studied. Materials and methods. The stomach content was analyzed using the Proportion of empty stomachs, Grade of digestion, Frequency of occurrence, numerical Frequency, Gravimetry, relative importance Index (RII and the gut length-total length relationship. Results. 39.8% of stomachs were empty, 47.1% of preys were fresh and five food groups were identified. Vegetable remains was the most frequent group (63.8% and the prey with greatest composition in weight (33.5%, while Rest of fishes was the most abundant group (34.7%. It was observed that in low and rising waters, fishes was the most consumed prey, while that in high and falling waters the most consumed prey was vegetable remains. Vegetable remains, detritus and fishes were food groups of secondary relative importance, while Insects and Others were circumstantial or incidental groups. Conclusions. The results achieved indicate that Cocobolo is a fish with omnivores feeding habits with a preference for fishes and vegetable remains.

  19. A phylogeographic break and bioacoustic intraspecific differentiation in the Buff-barred Warbler (Phylloscopus pulcher)(Aves:Passeriformes,Phylloscopidae)

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    Martin; P?ckert; Yue-Hua; Sun; Balduin; S; Fischer; Dieter; Thomas; Tietze; Jochen; Martens

    2014-01-01

    Background: According to current taxonomy only three out of 27 Sinohimalayan leaf warbler species(Phylloscopidae) are considered genetically uniform across their entire breeding range along the Southeastern margin of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, the Buff-barred Warbler(Phylloscopus pulcher) being one of them. Because marked differentiation among Himalayan and Chinese populations has been recently demonstrated for a number of Phylloscopus species(or sister species) we investigated the intraspecific variation of a mitochondrial gene, songs and morphology of P. pulcher in a phylogeographic approach.Methods: We sequenced a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b, reconstructed haplotype networks and analyzed DNA polymorphism among Himalayan and Chinese populations. We measured time and frequency parameters of two distinct song types and analyzed among population-differentiation in a principal component analysis and a discriminant analysis. We also compared measurements of body size dimensions taken from museum specimens.Results: The mitochondrial haplotype network(cytb) was divided into two distinct clusters corresponding to geographic origin of samples. Pairwise genetic distances among Himalayan and Chinese mt DNA lineages account for 1.3% which coincides with Pleistocene lineage separation at roughly 650,000 years ago. Genetic diversity is slightly higher in the Chinese part of the species’ range with respect to haplotype and nucleotide diversity while the less diversified Himalayan population lineage shows signs of recent range expansion. The vocal repertoire of P. pulcher comprises two distinct verse types that are combined with short interspersed click notes to long continuous song displays. Trill verse types showed significant differences among regions in almost all measured frequency and time parameters: Chinese males displayed more rapid and more broad-banded trills at a lower pitch. In contrast,warbling verse types showed a distinctively different

  20. Cherax (Astaconephrops pulcher, a new species of freshwater crayfish (Crustacea, Decapoda, Parastacidae from the Kepala Burung (Vogelkop Peninsula, Irian Jaya (West Papua, Indonesia

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    Christian Lukhaup

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A new species, Cherax (Astaconephrops pulcher sp. n., from Hoa Creek, close to the village Teminabuan in the southern-central part of the Kepala Burung (Vogelkop Peninsula, West Papua, Indonesia, is described, figured and compared with the morphologically closest species, Cherax boesemani Lukhaup & Pekny, 2008.

  1. Chromosome differentiation patterns during cichlid fish evolution

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    Nirchio Mauro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation which has led to an extensive ecological diversity and their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To increase our understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, karyotypes of one Asian, 22 African, and 30 South American cichlid species were investigated, and chromosomal data of the family was reviewed. Results Although there is extensive variation in the karyotypes of cichlid fishes (from 2n = 32 to 2n = 60 chromosomes, the modal chromosome number for South American species was 2n = 48 and the modal number for the African ones was 2n = 44. The only Asian species analyzed, Etroplus maculatus, was observed to have 46 chromosomes. The presence of one or two macro B chromosomes was detected in two African species. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA gene revealed a variable number of clusters among species varying from two to six. Conclusions The karyotype diversification of cichlids seems to have occurred through several chromosomal rearrangements involving fissions, fusions and inversions. It was possible to identify karyotype markers for the subfamilies Pseudocrenilabrinae (African and Cichlinae (American. The karyotype analyses did not clarify the phylogenetic relationship among the Cichlinae tribes. On the other hand, the two major groups of Pseudocrenilabrinae (tilapiine and haplochromine were clearly discriminated based on the characteristics of their karyotypes. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA gene did not follow the chromosome diversification in the family. The dynamic evolution of the repeated units of rRNA genes generates patterns of chromosomal distribution that do not help follows the phylogenetic relationships among taxa. The presence of B chromosomes in cichlids is of particular interest because they may not be represented in

  2. Chemical communication in cichlids: A mini-review.

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    Keller-Costa, Tina; Canário, Adelino V M; Hubbard, Peter C

    2015-09-15

    The family Cichlidae is well-known for pair-formation, parental care, territoriality, elaborate courtship and social organization. Do cichlids use chemical communication to mediate any of these behaviours? Early studies suggest that parent cichlids can discriminate between conspecific and heterospecific wrigglers (but not eggs) using olfactory cues. Some species are able to discriminate between their own brood and other conspecific broods based on olfaction. The young recognise conspecific adults (although not necessarily their parents) through the odorants they release. In both scenarios, protection of the young from predation is the likely selective force. Some male cichlids use urinary pheromones during courtship and spawning to attract females and induce ovulation. Females--in their turn--may base their mate-choice in part on assessment of those self-same pheromones. The same pheromonal system may be involved in establishing and maintaining the social hierarchies in lek-breeding cichlids. Individual recognition is also mediated by chemical communication. Finally, there is ample behavioural evidence that cichlids--like ostariophysan fish--release alarm cues that alert conspecifics to predation danger. Although the effects of these cues may be similar (e.g., increased shelter use, tighter schooling), they are different substances which remain to be identified. Cichlids, then, use chemical communication associated with many different behaviours. However, given the diversity of cichlids, little is known about the mechanisms of chemical communication or the chemical identity of the cues involved. The aim of this mini-review is to persuade those working with cichlids to consider the involvement of chemical communication, and those working in chemical communication to consider using cichlids. PMID:25622908

  3. Annotation of expressed sequence tags for the East African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni and evolutionary analyses of cichlid ORFs

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    Braasch Ingo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cichlid fishes in general, and the exceptionally diverse East African haplochromine cichlids in particular, are famous examples of adaptive radiation and explosive speciation. Here we report the collection and annotation of more than 12,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs generated from three different cDNA libraries obtained from the East African haplochromine cichlid species Astatotilapia burtoni and Metriaclima zebra. Results We first annotated more than 12,000 newly generated cichlid ESTs using the Gene Ontology classification system. For evolutionary analyses, we combined these ESTs with all available sequence data for haplochromine cichlids, which resulted in a total of more than 45,000 ESTs. The ESTs represent a broad range of molecular functions and biological processes. We compared the haplochromine ESTs to sequence data from those available for other fish model systems such as pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes and Tetraodon nigroviridis, trout, and zebrafish. We characterized genes that show a faster or slower rate of base substitutions in haplochromine cichlids compared to other fish species, as this is indicative of a relaxed or reinforced selection regime. Four of these genes showed the signature of positive selection as revealed by calculating Ka/Ks ratios. Conclusion About 22% of the surveyed ESTs were found to have cichlid specific rate differences suggesting that these genes might play a role in lineage specific characteristics of cichlids. We also conclude that the four genes with a Ka/Ks ratio greater than one appear as good candidate genes for further work on the genetic basis of evolutionary success of haplochromine cichlid fishes.

  4. Replicated divergence in cichlid radiations mirrors a major vertebrate innovation.

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    McGee, Matthew D; Faircloth, Brant C; Borstein, Samuel R; Zheng, Jimmy; Darrin Hulsey, C; Wainwright, Peter C; Alfaro, Michael E

    2016-01-13

    Decoupling of the upper jaw bones--jaw kinesis--is a distinctive feature of the ray-finned fishes, but it is not clear how the innovation is related to the extraordinary diversity of feeding behaviours and feeding ecology in this group. We address this issue in a lineage of ray-finned fishes that is well known for its ecological and functional diversity--African rift lake cichlids. We sequenced ultraconserved elements to generate a phylogenomic tree of the Lake Tanganyika and Lake Malawi cichlid radiations. We filmed a diverse array of over 50 cichlid species capturing live prey and quantified the extent of jaw kinesis in the premaxillary and maxillary bones. Our combination of phylogenomic and kinematic data reveals a strong association between biting modes of feeding and reduced jaw kinesis, suggesting that the contrasting demands of biting and suction feeding have strongly influenced cranial evolution in both cichlid radiations. PMID:26763694

  5. Mating and Parental Care in Lake Tanganyika's Cichlids

    OpenAIRE

    Sefc, Kristina M

    2011-01-01

    Cichlid fishes of Lake Tanganyika display a variety of mating and parental care behaviors, including polygamous and monogamous mouthbrooding and substrate breeding, cooperative breeding, as well as various alternative reproductive tactics such as sneaking and piracy. Moreover, reproductive behaviors sometimes vary within species both in space and in time. Here, I survey reports on mating and parenting behaviors of Lake Tanganyika cichlid species and address the evolution of mating and parenta...

  6. Adaptive responses to environmental changes in Lake Victoria cichlids

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    Rijssel, Jacobus Cornelis van (Jacco)

    2014-01-01

    Lake Victoria cichlids show the fastest vertebrate adaptive radiation known which is why they function as a model organism to study evolution. In the past 40 years, Lake Victoria experienced severe environmental changes including the boom of the introduced, predatory Nile perch and eutrophication. Both environmental changes resulted in a decline of haplochromine cichlid species and numbers during the 1980s. However, during the 1990s and 2000s, some haplochromine species recovered. With the us...

  7. Social fishes and single mothers: brain evolution in African cichlids

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    Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; Winberg, Svante; Kolm, Niclas

    2008-01-01

    As with any organ, differences in brain size—after adequate control of allometry—are assumed to be a response to selection. With over 200 species and an astonishing diversity in niche preferences and social organization, Tanganyikan cichlids present an excellent opportunity to study brain evolution. We used phylogenetic comparative analyses of sexed adults from 39 Tanganyikan cichlid species in a multiple regression framework to investigate the influence of ecology, sexual selection and paren...

  8. The Midas cichlid species complex : Incipient sympatric speciation in Nicaraguan cichlid fishes?

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    Barluenga, Marta; Meyer, Axel

    2004-01-01

    Sympatric speciation is a contentious concept, although theoretical models as well as empirical evidence support its relevance in evolutionary biology. The Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus citrinellus, labiatus, zaliosus) from several crater lakes in Nicaragua fits several of the key characteristics of a sympatric speciation model. In particular, in A. citrinellus (i) strong assortative mating on the basis of colour polymorphism and (ii) ecological differentiation based on morpholog...

  9. Identification of cichlid fishes from Lake Malawi using computer vision.

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    Deokjin Joo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The explosively radiating evolution of cichlid fishes of Lake Malawi has yielded an amazing number of haplochromine species estimated as many as 500 to 800 with a surprising degree of diversity not only in color and stripe pattern but also in the shape of jaw and body among them. As these morphological diversities have been a central subject of adaptive speciation and taxonomic classification, such high diversity could serve as a foundation for automation of species identification of cichlids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Here we demonstrate a method for automatic classification of the Lake Malawi cichlids based on computer vision and geometric morphometrics. For this end we developed a pipeline that integrates multiple image processing tools to automatically extract informative features of color and stripe patterns from a large set of photographic images of wild cichlids. The extracted information was evaluated by statistical classifiers Support Vector Machine and Random Forests. Both classifiers performed better when body shape information was added to the feature of color and stripe. Besides the coloration and stripe pattern, body shape variables boosted the accuracy of classification by about 10%. The programs were able to classify 594 live cichlid individuals belonging to 12 different classes (species and sexes with an average accuracy of 78%, contrasting to a mere 42% success rate by human eyes. The variables that contributed most to the accuracy were body height and the hue of the most frequent color. CONCLUSIONS: Computer vision showed a notable performance in extracting information from the color and stripe patterns of Lake Malawi cichlids although the information was not enough for errorless species identification. Our results indicate that there appears an unavoidable difficulty in automatic species identification of cichlid fishes, which may arise from short divergence times and gene flow between closely related species.

  10. Hybrid origin of a cichlid population in Lake Malawi: implications for genetic variation and species diversity.

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    Smith, Peter F; Konings, Ad; Kornfield, Irv

    2003-09-01

    The importance of species recognition to taxonomic diversity among Lake Malawi cichlids has been frequently discussed. Hybridization - the apparent breakdown of species recognition - has been observed sporadically among cichlids and has been viewed as both a constructive and a destructive force with respect to species diversity. Here we provide genetic evidence of a natural hybrid cichlid population with a unique colour phenotype and elevated levels of genetic variation. We discuss the potential evolutionary consequences of interspecific hybridization in Lake Malawi cichlids and propose that the role of hybridization in generating both genetic variability and species diversity of Lake Malawi cichlids warrants further consideration. PMID:12919487

  11. Colour forms of Amazonian cichlid fish represent reproductively isolated species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready, J S; Sampaio, I; Schneider, H; Vinson, C; Dos Santos, T; Turner, G F

    2006-07-01

    Laboratory mate choice experiments have confirmed species status for cichlid fish in the African Great Lakes that differ in colour and little else. Colour differences between allopatric populations of the South American cichlid genus Apistogramma are known for many species, yet the status of such populations has not been previously tested. Analysis of the genetic relationships and mate choice characteristics of populations previously described as Apistogramma caetei from eastern Amazonia indicates genetic differentiation into at least three allopatric lineages, which also show strong prezygotic isolation through female mate choice, confirming them as Biological species. If future studies confirm that this result is indicative of a general trend, the species richness of the South American cichlid fishes may presently be seriously underestimated. PMID:16780514

  12. Mating and Parental Care in Lake Tanganyika's Cichlids

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    Kristina M. Sefc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cichlid fishes of Lake Tanganyika display a variety of mating and parental care behaviors, including polygamous and monogamous mouthbrooding and substrate breeding, cooperative breeding, as well as various alternative reproductive tactics such as sneaking and piracy. Moreover, reproductive behaviors sometimes vary within species both in space and in time. Here, I survey reports on mating and parenting behaviors of Lake Tanganyika cichlid species and address the evolution of mating and parental care patterns and sexual dimorphism. Notes on measures of sexual selection intensity and the difficulties of defining mating systems and estimating selection intensities at species level conclude the essay.

  13. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of the threadfin cichlid (Petrochromis trewavasae and the blunthead cichlid (Tropheus moorii and patterns of mitochondrial genome evolution in cichlid fishes.

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    Christoph Fischer

    Full Text Available The cichlid fishes of the East African Great Lakes represent a model especially suited to study adaptive radiation and speciation. With several African cichlid genome projects being in progress, a promising set of closely related genomes is emerging, which is expected to serve as a valuable data base to solve questions on genotype-phenotype relations. The mitochondrial (mt genomes presented here are the first results of the assembly and annotation process for two closely related but eco-morphologically highly distinct Lake Tanganyika cichlids, Petrochromis trewavasae and Tropheus moorii. The genomic sequences comprise 16,588 bp (P. trewavasae and 16,590 bp (T. moorii, and exhibit the typical mitochondrial structure, with 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and a non-coding control region. Analyses confirmed that the two species are very closely related with an overall sequence similarity of 96%. We analyzed the newly generated sequences in the phylogenetic context of 21 published labroid fish mitochondrial genomes. Consistent with other vertebrates, the D-loop region was found to evolve faster than protein-coding genes, which in turn are followed by the rRNAs; the tRNAs vary greatly in the rate of sequence evolution, but on average evolve the slowest. Within the group of coding genes, ND6 evolves most rapidly. Codon usage is similar among examined cichlid tribes and labroid families; although a slight shift in usage patterns down the gene tree could be observed. Despite having a clearly different nucleotide composition, ND6 showed a similar codon usage. C-terminal ends of Cox1 exhibit variations, where the varying number of amino acids is related to the structure of the obtained phylogenetic tree. This variation may be of functional relevance for Cox1 synthesis.

  14. Tempo and mode of diversification of lake Tanganyika cichlid fishes.

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    Julia J Day

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the causes of disparities in species diversity across taxonomic groups and regions is a fundamental aim in evolutionary biology. Addressing these questions is difficult because of the need for densely sampled phylogenies and suitable empirical systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigate the cichlid fish radiation of Lake Tanganyika and show that per lineage diversification rates have been more than six times slower than in the species flocks of Lakes Victoria and Malawi. The result holds even at peak periods of diversification in Lake Tanganyika, ruling out the age of the lake as an explanation for slow average rates, and is robust to uncertainties over the calibration of cichlid radiations in geological time. Moreover, Lake Tanganyika lineages, irrespective of different biological characteristics (e.g. sexually dichromatic versus sexually monochromatic clades, have diversified at similar rates, falling within typical estimates across a range of plant and animal clades. For example, the mostly sexually dichromatic haplochromines, which have speciated explosively in Lakes Victoria and Malawi, have displayed modest rates in Lake Tanganyika (where they are called Tropheini. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that either the Lake Tanganyika environment is less conducive for cichlid speciation or the remarkable diversifying abilities of the haplochromines were inhibited by the prior occupancy of older radiations. Although the results indicate a dominant role for the environment in shaping cichlid diversification, differences in the timing of diversification among the Tanganyikan tribes indicate that biological differences were still important for the dynamics of species build-up in the lake. While we cannot resolve the timing of the radiation relative to the origin of the lake, because of the lack of robust geological date calibrations for cichlids, our results are consistent with a scenario that the

  15. Evolution of cichlid vision via trans-regulatory divergence

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    O’Quin Kelly E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic evolution may occur through mutations that affect either the structure or expression of protein-coding genes. Although the evolution of color vision has historically been attributed to structural mutations within the opsin genes, recent research has shown that opsin regulatory mutations can also tune photoreceptor sensitivity and color vision. Visual sensitivity in African cichlid fishes varies as a result of the differential expression of seven opsin genes. We crossed cichlid species that express different opsin gene sets and scanned their genome for expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL responsible for these differences. Our results shed light on the role that different structural, cis-, and trans-regulatory mutations play in the evolution of color vision. Results We identified 11 eQTL that contribute to the divergent expression of five opsin genes. On three linkage groups, several eQTL formed regulatory “hotspots” associated with the expression of multiple opsins. Importantly, however, the majority of the eQTL we identified (8/11 or 73% occur on linkage groups located trans to the opsin genes, suggesting that cichlid color vision has evolved primarily via trans-regulatory divergence. By modeling the impact of just two of these trans-regulatory eQTL, we show that opsin regulatory mutations can alter cichlid photoreceptor sensitivity and color vision at least as much as opsin structural mutations can. Conclusions Combined with previous work, we demonstrate that the evolution of cichlid color vision results from the interplay of structural, cis-, and especially trans-regulatory loci. Although there are numerous examples of structural and cis-regulatory mutations that contribute to phenotypic evolution, our results suggest that trans-regulatory mutations could contribute to phenotypic divergence more commonly than previously expected, especially in systems like color vision, where compensatory changes in the

  16. Lake Tanganyika—A 'Melting Pot' of Ancient and Young Cichlid Lineages (Teleostei: Cichlidae)?

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Juliane D.; Cotterill, Fenton P. D.; Schliewen, Ulrich K

    2015-01-01

    A long history of research focused on the East Africa cichlid radiations (EAR) revealed discrepancies between mtDNA and nuclear phylogenies, suggesting that interspecific hybridisation may have been significant during the radiation of these fishes. The approximately 250 cichlid species of Lake Tanganyika have their roots in a monophyletic African cichlid assemblage, but controversies remain about the precise phylogenetic origin and placement of different lineages and consequently about L. Tan...

  17. Big fish, little divergence: phylogeography of Lake Tanganyika’s giant cichlid, Boulengerochromis microlepis

    OpenAIRE

    Koblmüller, Stephan; Elizabeth A. Odhiambo; Sinyinza, Danny; Sturmbauer, Christian; Sefc, Kristina M

    2015-01-01

    The largely endemic cichlid species flocks of the East African Great Lakes are among the prime examples for explosive speciation and adaptive radiation. Speciation rates differ among cichlid lineages, and the propensity to radiate has been linked to intrinsic and extrinsic factors such as sexual selection and ecological opportunity. Remarkably, only one cichlid tribe—the Boulengerochromini—comprises just a single species, Boulengerochromis microlepis, a predominantly piscivorous endemic of La...

  18. Parallel evolution in Ugandan crater lakes: repeated evolution of limnetic body shapes in haplochromine cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Kautt, Andreas F; Kusche, Henrik; Meyer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Background The enormous diversity found in East African cichlid fishes in terms of morphology, coloration, and behavior have made them a model for the study of speciation and adaptive evolution. In particular, haplochromine cichlids, by far the most species-rich lineage of cichlids, are a well-known textbook example for parallel evolution. Southwestern Uganda is an area of high tectonic activity, and is home to numerous crater lakes. Many Ugandan crater lakes were colonized, apparently indepe...

  19. Origin of the superflock of cichlid fishes from Lake Victoria, East Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Verheyen, Erik; Salzburger, Walter; Snoeks, Jos; Meyer, Axel

    2003-01-01

    Lake Victoria harbors a unique species-rich flock of more than 500 endemic haplochromine cichlid fishes. The origin, age, and mechanism of diversification of this extraordinary radiation are still debated. Geological evidence suggests that the lake dried out completely about 14,700 years ago.Onthe basis of phylogenetic analyses of almost 300 DNA sequences of the mitochondrial control region of East African cichlids, we find that the Lake Victoria cichlid flock is derived from the geologically...

  20. On the origin of Lake Malawi cichlid species: A population genetic analysis of divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Yong-jin; Sivasundar, Arjun; Wang, Yong; Hey, Jody

    2005-01-01

    The cichlid fishes of Lake Malawi are famously diverse. However, phylogenetic and population genetic studies of their history have been difficult because of the great amount of genetic variation that is shared between species. We apply a recently developed method for fitting the “isolation with migration” divergence model to a data set of specially designed compound loci to develop portraits of cichlid species divergence. Outgroup sequences from a cichlid from Lake Tanganyika permit model par...

  1. An Evaluation of the Role of Sensory Drive in the Evolution of Lake Malawi Cichlid Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Adam R.; Moira J. van Staaden; Carleton, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Although the cichlids of Lake Malawi are an important model system for the study of sensory evolution and sexual selection, the evolutionary processes linking these two phenomena remain unclear. Prior works have proposed that evolutionary divergence is driven by sensory drive, particularly as it applies to the visual system. While evidence suggests that sensory drive has played a role in the speciation of Lake Victoria cichlids, the findings from several lines of research on cichlids of Lake ...

  2. Evolutionary History of Lake Tanganyika’s Predatory Deepwater Cichlids

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchberger, Paul C; Sefc, Kristina M; Christian Sturmbauer; Stephan Koblmüller

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization among littoral cichlid species in Lake Tanganyika was inferred in several molecular phylogenetic studies. The phenomenon is generally attributed to the lake level-induced shoreline and habitat changes. These allow for allopatric divergence of geographically fragmented populations alternating with locally restricted secondary contact and introgression between incompletely isolated taxa. In contrast, the deepwater habitat is characterized by weak geographic structure and a high po...

  3. Developmental basis of phenotypic integration in two Lake Malawi cichlids

    OpenAIRE

    Le Pabic, Pierre; Cooper, W. James; Schilling, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cichlid fishes from the Rift Lakes of East Africa have undergone the most spectacular adaptive radiations in vertebrate history. Eco-morphological adaptations in lakes Victoria, Malawi and Tanganyika have resulted in a vast array of skull shapes and sizes, yet primary axes of morphological variation are conserved in all three radiations, prominently including the size of the preorbital region of the skull. This conserved pattern suggests that development may constrain the trajector...

  4. New record of a fossil haplotilapiine cichlid from Central Kenya

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    Stefanie B. R. Penk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available African freshwater cichlids (Cichlidae: Pseudocrenilabrinae are well known for their exceptionally great diversity and their capability of rapid speciation as well as diverse adaptations. The extant Pseudocrenilabrinae can be grouped into 27 tribes, with more than 2000 species harbored in the Great Lakes and surrounding water bodies of the East African Rift System. However, this unique diversity is not reflected in the fossil record because fossil cichlids were predominantly reported based on isolated teeth and bones. Moreover, the few articulated specimens that are known have not been analyzed sufficiently with regard to their systematic position due to lack of comparative material. Here we present a new extraordinarily well-preserved cichlid fish fossil from the Middle Miocene (c. 12.5 Ma Lagerstaette Kabchore, which was recovered during recent fieldwork in the Tugen Hills (Baringo County, Central Kenya Rift. Based on the evidence of tricuspid teeth, the Kabchore fossil can be assigned to the subclade of the Haplotilapiines within the Pseudocrenilabrinae. The multivariate analysis of a large meristic data set, derived from 1014 extant specimens (encompassing all main lineages of Haplotilapiines and usage of available osteological data suggest that this fossil is most likely related to one of the three haplotilapiine tribes Tilapiini, Haplochromini or Oreochromini. Moreover, the fossil specimen closely resembles the extinct cichlid Oreochromis martyni (Van Couvering, 1982, previously described as species of Sarotherodon from the Middle Miocene alkaline Kapkiamu Lake in the Tugen Hills. The analysis of the greatly preserved fossil fish specimen from Kabchore definitely supplements the fragmentary fossil record of Africa’s Cichlidae and will afford new insights into its evolutionary history. We also expect that this fossil will be useful as calibration point for new divergence-time estimates.

  5. The Adaptive Radiation of Cichlid Fish in Lake Tanganyika: A Morphological Perspective

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    Tetsumi Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake Tanganyika is the oldest of the Great Ancient Lakes in the East Africa. This lake harbours about 250 species of cichlid fish, which are highly diverse in terms of morphology, behaviour, and ecology. Lake Tanganyika's cichlid diversity has evolved through explosive speciation and is treated as a textbook example of adaptive radiation, the rapid differentiation of a single ancestor into an array of species that differ in traits used to exploit their environments and resources. To elucidate the processes and mechanisms underlying the rapid speciation and adaptive radiation of Lake Tanganyika's cichlid species assemblage it is important to integrate evidence from several lines of research. Great efforts have been, are, and certainly will be taken to solve the mystery of how so many cichlid species evolved in so little time. In the present review, we summarize morphological studies that relate to the adaptive radiation of Lake Tanganyika's cichlids and highlight their importance for understanding the process of adaptive radiation.

  6. Phylogeny of the Lake Tanganyika cichlid species flock and its relationship to the Central and East African haplochromine cichlid fish fauna

    OpenAIRE

    Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel; Baric, Sanja; Verheyen, Erik; Sturmbauer, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika, the oldest of the East African Great Lakes, harbors the ecologically, morphologically, and behaviorally most complex of all assemblages of cichlid Fishes, consisting of about 200 described species. The evolutionary old age of the cichlid assemblage, its extreme degree of morphological differentiation, the lack of species with intermediate morphologies, and the rapidity of lineage formation havemade evolutionary reconstruction difficult. The number and origin of seeding lineag...

  7. Predation risk drives social complexity in cooperative breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewoud, Frank; Frommen, Joachim Gerhard; Josi, Dario; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Jungwirth, Arne; Taborsky, Michael

    2016-04-12

    Predation risk is a major ecological factor selecting for group living. It is largely ignored, however, as an evolutionary driver of social complexity and cooperative breeding, which is attributed mainly to a combination of habitat saturation and enhanced relatedness levels. Social cichlids neither suffer from habitat saturation, nor are their groups composed primarily of relatives. This demands alternative ecological explanations for the evolution of advanced social organization. To address this question, we compared the ecology of eight populations of Neolamprologus pulcher, a cichlid fish arguably representing the pinnacle of social evolution in poikilothermic vertebrates. Results show that variation in social organization and behavior of these fish is primarily explained by predation risk and related ecological factors. Remarkably, ecology affects group structure more strongly than group size, with predation inversely affecting small and large group members. High predation and shelter limitation leads to groups containing few small but many large members, which is an effect enhanced at low population densities. Apparently, enhanced safety from predators by cooperative defense and shelter construction are the primary benefits of sociality. This finding suggests that predation risk can be fundamental for the transition toward complex social organization, which is generally undervalued. PMID:27035973

  8. Out of Tanganyika: Genesis, explosive speciation, key-innovations and phylogeography of the haplochromine cichlid fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Verheyen Erik; Mack Tanja; Salzburger Walter; Meyer Axel

    2005-01-01

    BackgroundThe adaptive radiations of cichlid fishes in East Africa are well known for their spectacular diversity and their astonishingly fast rates of speciation. About 80% of all 2,500 cichlid species in East Africa, and virtually all cichlid species from Lakes Victoria (~500 species) and Malawi (~1,000 species) are haplochromines. Here, we present the most extensive phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis so far that includes about 100 species and is based on about 2,000 bp of the mitoch...

  9. Evolution of brain-body allometry in Lake Tanganyika cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Masahito; Kotrschal, Alexander; Hayward, Alexander; Buechel, Severine Denise; Zidar, Josefina; Løvlie, Hanne; Kolm, Niclas

    2016-07-01

    Brain size is strongly associated with body size in all vertebrates. This relationship has been hypothesized to be an important constraint on adaptive brain size evolution. The essential assumption behind this idea is that static (i.e., within species) brain-body allometry has low ability to evolve. However, recent studies have reported mixed support for this view. Here, we examine brain-body static allometry in Lake Tanganyika cichlids using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We found considerable variation in the static allometric intercept, which explained the majority of variation in absolute and relative brain size. In contrast, the slope of the brain-body static allometry had relatively low variation, which explained less variation in absolute and relative brain size compared to the intercept and body size. Further examination of the tempo and mode of evolution of static allometric parameters confirmed these observations. Moreover, the estimated evolutionary parameters indicate that the limited observed variation in the static allometric slope could be a result of strong stabilizing selection. Overall, our findings suggest that the brain-body static allometric slope may represent an evolutionary constraint in Lake Tanganyika cichlids. PMID:27241216

  10. Evolutionary History of Lake Tanganyika’s Predatory Deepwater Cichlids

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    Paul C. Kirchberger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybridization among littoral cichlid species in Lake Tanganyika was inferred in several molecular phylogenetic studies. The phenomenon is generally attributed to the lake level-induced shoreline and habitat changes. These allow for allopatric divergence of geographically fragmented populations alternating with locally restricted secondary contact and introgression between incompletely isolated taxa. In contrast, the deepwater habitat is characterized by weak geographic structure and a high potential for gene flow, which may explain the lower species richness of deepwater than littoral lineages. For the same reason, divergent deepwater lineages should have evolved strong intrinsic reproductive isolation already in the incipient stages of diversification, and, consequently, hybridization among established lineages should have been less frequent than in littoral lineages. We test this hypothesis in the endemic Lake Tanganyika deepwater cichlid tribe Bathybatini by comparing phylogenetic trees of Hemibates and Bathybates species obtained with nuclear multilocus AFLP data with a phylogeny based on mitochondrial sequences. Consistent with our hypothesis, largely congruent tree topologies and negative tests for introgression provided no evidence for introgressive hybridization between the deepwater taxa. Together, the nuclear and mitochondrial data established a well-supported phylogeny and suggested ecological segregation during speciation.

  11. Origin of the superflock of cichlid fishes from Lake Victoria, East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyen, Erik; Salzburger, Walter; Snoeks, Jos; Meyer, Axel

    2003-04-11

    Lake Victoria harbors a unique species-rich flock of more than 500 endemic haplochromine cichlid fishes. The origin, age, and mechanism of diversification of this extraordinary radiation are still debated. Geological evidence suggests that the lake dried out completely about 14,700 years ago. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses of almost 300 DNA sequences of the mitochondrial control region of East African cichlids, we find that the Lake Victoria cichlid flock is derived from the geologically older Lake Kivu. We suggest that the two seeding lineages may have already been lake-adapted when they colonized Lake Victoria. A haplotype analysis further shows that the most recent desiccation of Lake Victoria did not lead to a complete extinction of its endemic cichlid fauna and that the major lineage diversification took place about 100,000 years ago. PMID:12649486

  12. Evolutionary history of the Lake Tanganyika cichlid tribe Lamprologini (Teleostei: Perciformes) derived from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA data

    OpenAIRE

    Sturmbauer, Christian; Salzburger, Walter; Duftner, Nina; Schelly, Robert; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika comprises a cichlid species flock with substrate-breeding and mouthbrooding lineages. While sexual selection via mate choice on male mating color is thought to boost speciation rates in mouthbrooding cichlids, this is not the case in substrate-breeding lamprologines, which mostly form stable pairs and lack sexual dichromatism. We present a comprehensive reconstruction of the evolution of the cichlid tribe Lamprologini, based upon mtDNA sequences and multilocus nuclear DNA (AFL...

  13. Hidden biodiversity in an ancient lake: phylogenetic congruence between Lake Tanganyika tropheine cichlids and their monogenean flatworm parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Vanhove, Maarten p. m.; Antoine Pariselle; Maarten Van Steenberge; Raeymaekers, Joost A. M.; Hablützel, Pascal I; Céline Gillardin; Bart Hellemans; Floris C Breman; Stephan Koblmüller; Christian Sturmbauer; Jos Snoeks; Filip A M Volckaert; Tine Huyse

    2015-01-01

    The stunning diversity of cichlid fishes has greatly enhanced our understanding of speciation and radiation. Little is known about the evolution of cichlid parasites. Parasites are abundant components of biodiversity, whose diversity typically exceeds that of their hosts. In the first comprehensive phylogenetic parasitological analysis of a vertebrate radiation, we study monogenean parasites infecting tropheine cichlids from Lake Tanganyika. Monogeneans are flatworms usually infecting the bod...

  14. Phenotypic plasticity and heterochrony in Cichlasoma managuense (Pisces, Cichlidae) and their implications for speciation in cichlid fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Axel

    1987-01-01

    Cichlid fishes in African rift lakes have undergone rapid speciation, resulting in "species flocks" with more than 300 endemic species in some of the lakes. Most researchers assume that there is little phenotypic variation in cichlid fishes. I report here extensive phenotypic plasticity in a Neotropical cichlid species. I examined the influence of diet on trophic morphology during ontogeny in Cichlasonia managuense. Two groups of full siblings were fed two different diets for eight months aft...

  15. A multi-marker perspective on the evolutionary history of East African cichlid fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Britta Silke

    2015-01-01

    The East African cichlids, more precisely the cichlid fishes of Lake Tanganyika, Lake Victoria and Lake Malawi, are among the most famous textbook examples of adaptive radiations. Both hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting explain the high degree of shared gene lineages within these species-flocks. Considerable effort has been put into the understanding of the relationships between and among the main lineages as this is essential to establish the phylogenetic backbone of the East Afric...

  16. Contrasting parasite communities among allopatric colour morphs of the Lake Tanganyika cichlid Tropheus

    OpenAIRE

    Raeymaekers, Joost; Hablützel, Pascal István; Grégoir, Arnout; Bamps, Jolien; Roose, Anna; Vanhove, Maarten; Van SteenBerge, Maarten; Pariselle, Antoine; Huyse, Tine; Snoeks, Jos; VOLCKAERT Filip

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adaptation to different ecological environments is thought to drive ecological speciation. This phenomenon culminates in the radiations of cichlid fishes in the African Great Lakes. Multiple characteristic traits of cichlids, targeted by natural or sexual selection, are considered among the driving factors of these radiations. Parasites and pathogens have been suggested to initiate or accelerate speciation by triggering both natural and sexual selection. Three prerequisites for pa...

  17. The Adaptive Radiation of Cichlid Fish in Lake Tanganyika: A Morphological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsumi Takahashi; Stephan Koblmüller

    2011-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika is the oldest of the Great Ancient Lakes in the East Africa. This lake harbours about 250 species of cichlid fish, which are highly diverse in terms of morphology, behaviour, and ecology. Lake Tanganyika's cichlid diversity has evolved through explosive speciation and is treated as a textbook example of adaptive radiation, the rapid differentiation of a single ancestor into an array of species that differ in traits used to exploit their environments and resources. To elucidate...

  18. Replicated evolution of trophic specializations in an endemic cichlid fish lineage from Lake Tanganyika

    OpenAIRE

    Rüber, Lukas; Verheyen, Erik; Meyer, Axel

    1999-01-01

    The current phylogenetic hypothesis for the endemic Lake Tanganyika cichlid fishes of the tribe Eretmodini is based solely on morphology and suggests that more complex trophic morphologies derived only once from a less specialized ancestral condition. A molecular phylogeny of eretmodine cichlids based on partial mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b and control-region sequences was used to reconstruct the evolutionary sequence of trophic adaptations and to test alternative models of morphological di...

  19. The role of physiology in the divergence of two incipient cichlid species

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkstra, P. D.; Wiegertjes, G.F.; Forlenza, M.; van der Sluijs, I.; Hofmann, H. A.; Metcalfe, N. B.; Groothuis, T. G. G.

    2011-01-01

    Sexual selection on male coloration has been implicated in the evolution of colourful species flocks of East African cichlid fish. During adaptive radiations, animals diverge in multiple phenotypic traits, but the role of physiology has received limited attention. Here, we report how divergence in physiology may contribute to the stable coexistence of two hybridizing incipient species of cichlid fish from Lake Victoria. Males of Pundamilia nyererei (males are red) tend to defeat those of Pund...

  20. Repeated trans-watershed hybridization among haplochromine cichlids (Cichlidae) was triggered by Neogene landscape evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarzer, Julia; Swartz, Ernst Roelof; Vreven, Emmanuel; Snoeks, Jos; Cotterill, Fenton Peter David; Misof, Bernhard; Schliewen, Ulrich Kurt

    2012-01-01

    The megadiverse haplochromine cichlid radiations of the East African lakes, famous examples of explosive speciation and adaptive radiation, are according to recent studies, introgressed by different riverine lineages. This study is based on the first comprehensive mitochondrial and nuclear DNA dataset from extensive sampling of riverine haplochromine cichlids. It includes species from the lower River Congo and Angolan (River Kwanza) drainages. Reconstruction of phylogenetic hypotheses reveale...

  1. The interaction of sexually and naturally selected traits in the adaptive radiations of cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzburger, Walter

    2009-01-01

    The question of how genetic variation translates into organismal diversity has puzzled biologists for decades. Despite recent advances in evolutionary and developmental genetics, the mechanisms that underlie adaptation, diversification and evolutionary innovation remain largely unknown. The exceptionally diverse species flocks of cichlid fishes are textbook examples of adaptive radiation and explosive speciation and emerge as powerful model systems to study the genetic basis of animal diversification. East Africa's hundreds of endemic cichlid species are akin to a natural mutagenesis screen and differ greatly not only in ecologically relevant (hence naturally selected) characters such as mouth morphology and body shape, but also in sexually selected traits such as coloration. One of the most fascinating aspects of cichlid evolution is the frequent occurrence of evolutionary parallelisms, which has led to the question whether selection alone is sufficient to produce these parallel morphologies, or whether a developmental or genetic bias has influenced the direction of diversification. Here, I review fitness-relevant traits that could be responsible for the cichlids' evolutionary success and assess whether these were shaped by sexual or natural selection. I then focus on the interaction and the relative importance of sexual vs. natural selection in cichlid evolution. Finally, I discuss what is currently known about the genes underlying the morphogenesis of adaptively relevant traits and highlight the importance of the forthcoming cichlid genomes in the quest of the genetic basis of diversification in this group. PMID:18992003

  2. What, if anything, is a Tilapia? : Mitochondrial ND2 phylogeny of Tilapiines and the evolution of parental care systems in the African Cichlid Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Klett, Vera; Meyer, Axel

    2002-01-01

    We estimated a novel phylogeny of tilapiine cichlid fish (an assemblage endemic to Africa and the Near East) within the African cichlid fishes on the basis of complete mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) gene sequences. The ND2 (1,047 bp) gene was sequenced in 39 tilapiine cichlids (38 species and 1 subspecies) and in an additional 14 nontilapiine cichlid species in order to evaluate the traditional morphologically based hypothesis of the respective monophyly of the tilapiine and...

  3. Time-place learning in the cichlid angelfish, Pterophyllum scalare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Laplaza, Luis M; Morgan, Elfed

    2005-09-30

    The ability of the cichlid angelfish, Pterophyllum scalare, to associate time and place to locate food, provided twice a day in two different places, was tested. Food was delivered daily in one corner of the tank in the morning and in the diagonally opposite corner in the afternoon, for a 3-week period, and the distribution of the fish in the tank was noted prior to and during feeding time. The results indicate that, in a fairly uniform environment and in the absence of external time cues, angelfish can discriminate and associate time and place to obtain a food reward. It is suggested that they do so by means of an endogenous timing mechanism. PMID:16129239

  4. Adaptive phenotypic plasticity in the Midas cichlid fish pharyngeal jaw and its relevance in adaptive radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzburger Walter

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic evolution and its role in the diversification of organisms is a central topic in evolutionary biology. A neglected factor during the modern evolutionary synthesis, adaptive phenotypic plasticity, more recently attracted the attention of many evolutionary biologists and is now recognized as an important ingredient in both population persistence and diversification. The traits and directions in which an ancestral source population displays phenotypic plasticity might partly determine the trajectories in morphospace, which are accessible for an adaptive radiation, starting from the colonization of a novel environment. In the case of repeated colonizations of similar environments from the same source population this "flexible stem" hypothesis predicts similar phenotypes to arise in repeated subsequent radiations. The Midas Cichlid (Amphilophus spp. in Nicaragua has radiated in parallel in several crater-lakes seeded by populations originating from the Nicaraguan Great Lakes. Here, we tested phenotypic plasticity in the pharyngeal jaw of Midas Cichlids. The pharyngeal jaw apparatus of cichlids, a second set of jaws functionally decoupled from the oral ones, is known to mediate ecological specialization and often differs strongly between sister-species. Results We performed a common garden experiment raising three groups of Midas cichlids on food differing in hardness and calcium content. Analyzing the lower pharyngeal jaw-bones we find significant differences between diet groups qualitatively resembling the differences found between specialized species. Observed differences in pharyngeal jaw expression between groups were attributable to the diet's mechanical resistance, whereas surplus calcium in the diet was not found to be of importance. Conclusions The pharyngeal jaw apparatus of Midas Cichlids can be expressed plastically if stimulated mechanically during feeding. Since this trait is commonly differentiated - among

  5. The Impact of the Geologic History and Paleoclimate on the Diversification of East African Cichlids

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    Patrick D. Danley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cichlid fishes of the East African Great Lakes are the largest extant vertebrate radiation identified to date. These lakes and their surrounding waters support over 2,000 species of cichlid fish, many of which are descended from a single common ancestor within the past 10 Ma. The extraordinary East African cichlid diversity is intricately linked to the highly variable geologic and paleoclimatic history of this region. Greater than 10 Ma, the western arm of the East African rift system began to separate, thereby creating a series of rift basins that would come to contain several water bodies, including the extremely deep Lakes Tanganyika and Malawi. Uplifting associated with this rifting backponded many rivers and created the extremely large, but shallow Lake Victoria. Since their creation, the size, shape, and existence of these lakes have changed dramatically which has, in turn, significantly influenced the evolutionary history of the lakes' cichlids. This paper reviews the geologic history and paleoclimate of the East African Great Lakes and the impact of these forces on the region's endemic cichlid flocks.

  6. On the origin of Lake Malawi cichlid species: a population genetic analysis of divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yong-Jin; Sivasundar, Arjun; Wang, Yong; Hey, Jody

    2005-05-01

    The cichlid fishes of Lake Malawi are famously diverse. However, phylogenetic and population genetic studies of their history have been difficult because of the great amount of genetic variation that is shared between species. We apply a recently developed method for fitting the "isolation with migration" divergence model to a data set of specially designed compound loci to develop portraits of cichlid species divergence. Outgroup sequences from a cichlid from Lake Tanganyika permit model parameter estimates in units of years and effective population sizes. Estimated speciation times range from 1,000 to 17,000 years for species in the genus Tropheops. These exceptionally recent dates suggest that Malawi cichlids as a group experience a very active and dynamic diversification process. Current effective population size estimates range form 2,000 to near 40,000, and to >120,000 for estimates of ancestral population sizes. It appears that very recent speciation and gene flow are among the reasons why it has been difficult to discern the phylogenetic history of Malawi cichlids. PMID:15851665

  7. A pharyngeal jaw evolutionary innovation facilitated extinction in Lake Victoria cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Matthew D; Borstein, Samuel R; Neches, Russell Y; Buescher, Heinz H; Seehausen, Ole; Wainwright, Peter C

    2015-11-27

    Evolutionary innovations, traits that give species access to previously unoccupied niches, may promote speciation and adaptive radiation. Here, we show that such innovations can also result in competitive inferiority and extinction. We present evidence that the modified pharyngeal jaws of cichlid fishes and several marine fish lineages, a classic example of evolutionary innovation, are not universally beneficial. A large-scale analysis of dietary evolution across marine fish lineages reveals that the innovation compromises access to energy-rich predator niches. We show that this competitive inferiority shaped the adaptive radiation of cichlids in Lake Tanganyika and played a pivotal and previously unrecognized role in the mass extinction of cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria after Nile perch invasion. PMID:26612951

  8. A complex mode of aggressive mimicry in a scale-eating cichlid fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Nicolas; Cortesi, Fabio; Egger, Bernd; Muschick, Moritz; Indermaur, Adrian; Theis, Anya; Büscher, Heinz H; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-09-01

    Aggressive mimicry is an adaptive tactic of parasitic or predatory species that closely resemble inoffensive models in order to increase fitness via predatory gains. Although similarity of distantly related species is often intuitively implicated with mimicry, the exact mechanisms and evolutionary causes remain elusive in many cases. Here, we report a complex aggressive mimicry strategy in Plecodus straeleni, a scale-eating cichlid fish from Lake Tanganyika, which imitates two other cichlid species. Employing targeted sequencing on ingested scales, we show that P. straeleni does not preferentially parasitize its models but—contrary to prevailing assumptions—targets a variety of co-occurring dissimilar looking fish species. Combined with tests for visual resemblance and visual modelling from a prey perspective, our results suggest that complex interactions among different cichlid species are involved in this mimicry system. PMID:26399975

  9. Continental cichlid radiations: functional diversity reveals the role of changing ecological opportunity in the Neotropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Jessica Hilary; López-Fernández, Hernán

    2016-08-17

    Adaptive radiations have been hypothesized to contribute broadly to the diversity of organisms. Models of adaptive radiation predict that ecological opportunity and ecological release, the availability of empty ecological niches and the response by adapting lineages to occupy them, respectively, drive patterns of phenotypic and lineage diversification. Adaptive radiations driven by 'ecological opportunity' are well established in island systems; it is less clear if ecological opportunity influences continent-wide diversification. We use Neotropical cichlid fishes to test if variation in rates of functional evolution is consistent with changing ecological opportunity. Across a functional morphological axis associated with ram-suction feeding traits, evolutionary rates declined through time as lineages diversified in South America. Evolutionary rates of ram-suction functional morphology also appear to have accelerated as cichlids colonized Central America and encountered renewed opportunity. Our results suggest that ecological opportunity may play an important role in shaping patterns of morphological diversity of even broadly distributed lineages like Neotropical cichlids. PMID:27512144

  10. Lake Tanganyika--a 'melting pot' of ancient and young cichlid lineages (Teleostei: Cichlidae)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Juliane D; Cotterill, Fenton P D; Schliewen, Ulrich K

    2015-01-01

    A long history of research focused on the East Africa cichlid radiations (EAR) revealed discrepancies between mtDNA and nuclear phylogenies, suggesting that interspecific hybridisation may have been significant during the radiation of these fishes. The approximately 250 cichlid species of Lake Tanganyika have their roots in a monophyletic African cichlid assemblage, but controversies remain about the precise phylogenetic origin and placement of different lineages and consequently about L. Tanganyika colonization scenarios. 3312 AFLP loci and the mitochondrial ND2 gene were genotyped for 91 species representing almost all major lacustrine and riverine haplotilapiine east African cichlid lineages with a focus on L. Tanganyika endemics. Explicitly testing for the possibility of ancient hybridisation events, a comprehensive phylogenetic network hypothesis is proposed for the origin and diversification of L. Tanganyika cichlids. Inference of discordant phylogenetic signal strongly suggests that the genomes of two endemic L. Tanganyika tribes, Eretmodini and Tropheini, are composed of an ancient mixture of riverine and lacustrine lineages. For the first time a strong monophyly signal of all non-haplochromine mouthbrooding species endemic to L. Tanganyika ("ancient mouthbrooders") was detected. Further, in the genomes of early diverging L. Tanganyika endemics Trematocarini, Bathybatini, Hemibatini and Boulengerochromis genetic components of other lineages belonging to the East African Radiation appear to be present. In combination with recent palaeo-geological results showing that tectonic activity in the L. Tanganyika region resulted in highly dynamic and heterogeneous landscape evolution over the Neogene and Pleistocene, the novel phylogenetic data render a single lacustrine basin as the geographical cradle of the endemic L. Tanganyika cichlid lineages unlikely. Instead a scenario of a pre-rift origin of several independent L. Tanganyika precursor lineages which

  11. Lake Tanganyika--a 'melting pot' of ancient and young cichlid lineages (Teleostei: Cichlidae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane D Weiss

    Full Text Available A long history of research focused on the East Africa cichlid radiations (EAR revealed discrepancies between mtDNA and nuclear phylogenies, suggesting that interspecific hybridisation may have been significant during the radiation of these fishes. The approximately 250 cichlid species of Lake Tanganyika have their roots in a monophyletic African cichlid assemblage, but controversies remain about the precise phylogenetic origin and placement of different lineages and consequently about L. Tanganyika colonization scenarios. 3312 AFLP loci and the mitochondrial ND2 gene were genotyped for 91 species representing almost all major lacustrine and riverine haplotilapiine east African cichlid lineages with a focus on L. Tanganyika endemics. Explicitly testing for the possibility of ancient hybridisation events, a comprehensive phylogenetic network hypothesis is proposed for the origin and diversification of L. Tanganyika cichlids. Inference of discordant phylogenetic signal strongly suggests that the genomes of two endemic L. Tanganyika tribes, Eretmodini and Tropheini, are composed of an ancient mixture of riverine and lacustrine lineages. For the first time a strong monophyly signal of all non-haplochromine mouthbrooding species endemic to L. Tanganyika ("ancient mouthbrooders" was detected. Further, in the genomes of early diverging L. Tanganyika endemics Trematocarini, Bathybatini, Hemibatini and Boulengerochromis genetic components of other lineages belonging to the East African Radiation appear to be present. In combination with recent palaeo-geological results showing that tectonic activity in the L. Tanganyika region resulted in highly dynamic and heterogeneous landscape evolution over the Neogene and Pleistocene, the novel phylogenetic data render a single lacustrine basin as the geographical cradle of the endemic L. Tanganyika cichlid lineages unlikely. Instead a scenario of a pre-rift origin of several independent L. Tanganyika precursor

  12. Biological Diversity and Resilience: Lessons from the Recovery of Cichlid Species in Lake Victoria

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    Alex O. Awiti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental feature of the Anthropocene is the inexorable erosion of the self-repairing capacity or adaptive renewal of natural systems because of natural perturbation, exploitation, or management failure. The concept of resilience offers a systematic framework for understanding the dynamics and variables that govern response dynamics of ecosystems. Resilience of haplochromine cichlids is assessed using limnological and biodiversity changes in Lake Victoria, the world's second largest freshwater lake, over the last five decades. The review explores the resurgence of the haplochromine cichlids using Holling's adaptive renewal cycle and attempts to illustrate how resilience-based management approaches might learn from an inadvertent management experiment. The introduction in the 1980s of the Nile perch (Lates niloticus, a fecund and voracious predator of the endemic phytoplankton feeding haplochromine cichlids, anthropogenic eutrophication, and deep water hypoxia have combined in a synergistic way to increase the vulnerability of the lake ecosystem to perturbations that were hitherto absorbed. However, the upsurge in commercial Nile perch fishing appears to be enabling the resurgence of the haplochromine cichlids. The resurgence of haplochromine cichlids is characterized by phenotypic plasticity, ecological and life history traits and demonstrates the critical role of response diversity in the maintenance of systems resilience. Resilience of the haplochromine cichlids resides in the requisite functional response diversity and habitat diversity that provide the resources for renewal and regeneration. This paper concludes that management of Nile perch fisheries and control of nutrient loading into Lake Victoria could halt or reverse eutrophication, hence offer the best promise for a diverse, productive, and resilient social-ecological system.

  13. Parasitic infections in ornamental cichlid fish in the Peruvian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinaga, Jefferson Yunis; Marcusso, Paulo Fernandes; Claudiano, Gustavo da Silva; Lima, Bruno Tadeu Marotta; Marotta, Bruno L; Sebastião, Fernanda de Alexandre; Fernandes, João Batista Kochenborger; de Moraes, Flávio Ruas; de Moraes, Julieta Rodini Engracia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and seasonal distribution of the main parasite species in Amazonian ornamental cichlids that affect their trade. The study was conducted from August 2007 to September 2009. We sampled 3042 specimens from 9 different species, of which 9.47% had at least one type of external parasite. 81.25% of the cases occurred in the dry season. Crenicichla anthurus (28.57%) was the most parasitized, followed by Aequidens diadema (26.32%), Pterophyllum scalare (22.69%), Cichlasoma sp. (9.52%), Apistogramma sp. (3.88%) and Symphysodon aequifasciatus (3.66%). Monogenea was the most abundant group of parasites, occurring in 66.67% of the cases, of which 96.88% occurred in the dry season. This parasite infested 95.68% of Pterophyllum scalare, 76.67% of Apistogramma sp, 33.33% of Cichlasoma sp. and 23.81% of Symphysodon aequifasciatus cases. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis infested 100% of Aequidens diadema, 76.19% of Symphysodon aequifasciatus, 66.67% of Cichlasoma sp, 41.67% of Crenicichla anthurus and 23.33% of Apistogramma sp cases. Myxosporidia infested 58.33% of Crenicichla anthurus. Trichodina infested 4.32% of Pterophyllum scalare. The prevalence of these parasites is related to the season, preferred habitat, fish behavior, individual susceptibility and handling of animals during transportation by fishermen. PMID:25909258

  14. Hydrodynamic drag constrains head enlargement for mouthbrooding in cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wassenbergh, Sam; Potes, Nuno Zavattieri; Adriaens, Dominique

    2015-08-01

    Presumably as an adaptation for mouthbrooding, many cichlid fish species have evolved a prominent sexual dimorphism in the adult head. Since the head of fishes serves as a bow during locomotion, an evolutionary increase in head volume to brood more eggs can trade-off with the hydrodynamic efficiency of swimming. Here, the differences between males and females in three-dimensional shape and size of the external head surfaces and the effect thereof on drag force during locomotion was analysed for the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a maternal mouthbrooder. To do so, three-dimensional body surface reconstructions from laser scans and computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed. After scaling the scanned specimens to post-cranial body volume, in order to theoretically equalize propulsive power, the external volume of the head of females was 27% larger than that of males (head length + 14%; head width + 9%). These differences resulted in an approximate 15% increase in drag force. Yet, hydrodynamics imposed important constraints on the adaptation for mouthbrooding as a much more drastic drop in swimming efficiency seems avoided by mainly enlarging the head along the swimming direction. PMID:26224567

  15. Evolution of ligand specificity in vertebrate corticosteroid receptors

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    Deitcher David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticosteroid receptors include mineralocorticoid (MR and glucocorticoid (GR receptors. Teleost fishes have a single MR and duplicate GRs that show variable sensitivities to mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids. How these receptors compare functionally to tetrapod MR and GR, and the evolutionary significance of maintaining two GRs, remains unclear. Results We used up to seven steroids (including aldosterone, cortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone [DOC] to compare the ligand specificity of the ligand binding domains of corticosteroid receptors between a mammal (Mus musculus and the midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus, a teleost model for steroid regulation of neural and behavioral plasticity. Variation in mineralocorticoid sensitivity was considered in a broader phylogenetic context by examining the aldosterone sensitivity of MR and GRs from the distantly related daffodil cichlid (Neolamprologus pulcher, another teleost model for neurobehavioral plasticity. Both teleost species had a single MR and duplicate GRs. All MRs were sensitive to DOC, consistent with the hypothesis that DOC was the initial ligand of the ancestral MR. Variation in GR steroid-specificity corresponds to nine identified amino acid residue substitutions rather than phylogenetic relationships based on receptor sequences. Conclusion The mineralocorticoid sensitivity of duplicate GRs in teleosts is highly labile in the context of their evolutionary phylogeny, a property that likely led to neo-functionalization and maintenance of two GRs.

  16. The evolution of complex brains and behaviors in African cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroly A. Shumway

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review, I explore the effects of both social organization and the physical environment, specifically habitat complexity, on the brains and behavior of highly visual African cichlid fishes, drawing on examples from primates and birds where appropriate. In closely related fishes from the monophyletic Ectodinii clade of Lake Tanganyika, both forces influence cichlid brains and behavior. Considering social influences first, visual acuity differs with respect to social organization (monogamy versus polygyny. Both the telencephalon and amygdalar homologue, area Dm, are larger in monogamous species. Monogamous species are found to have more vasotocin-immunoreactive cells in the preoptic area of the brain. Habitat complexity also influences brain and behavior in these fishes. Total brain size, telencephalic and cerebellar size are positively correlated with habitat complexity. Visual acuity and spatial memory are enhanced in cichlids living in more complex environments. However habitat complexity and social forces affect cichlid brains differently. Taken together, our field data and plasticity data suggest that some of the species-specific neural effects of habitat complexity could be the consequence of the corresponding social correlates. Environmental forces, however, exert a broader effect on brain structures than social ones do, suggesting allometric expansion of the brain structures in concert with brain size and/or co-evolution of these structures [Current Zoology 56 (1: 144–156 2010].

  17. Fitness correlates of male coloration in a Lake Victoria cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, Martine E.; van der Spoel, Michael; Jimenez, Paloma Quesada; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.; Seehausen, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Sexual selection by female choice has contributed to the rapid evolution of phenotypic diversity in the cichlid fish species flocks of East Africa. Yet, very little is known about the ecological mechanisms that drive the evolution of female mating preferences. We studied fitness correlates of male n

  18. Divergent mating preferences and nuptial coloration in sibling species of cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, Inke van der

    2008-01-01

    Mate choice by female cichlid fish from Lake Victoria plays an important role in speciation and the maintenance of species. Females are expected to select against males that are intermediate in their phenotype during the process of speciation driven by sexual selection. To test this, we hybridized t

  19. Parasite-mediated sexual selection and species divergence in Lake Victoria cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, Martine E.; Van Rooijen, Anne M. C.; Van Alphen, Jacques J. M.; Seehausen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the role of parasite-mediated sexual selection in the divergence of two species of Lake Victoria cichlids. Pundamilia pundamilia and Pundamilia nyererei represent a common pattern of male nuptial colour divergence between haplochromine sister species: metallic grey-blue in P. pundamil

  20. Heritability and heterochrony of polychromatism in a Lake Victoria cichlid fish : Stepping stones for speciation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, ME; Haesler, MP; Seehausen, O; Van Alphen, JJM

    2006-01-01

    In many haplochromine cichlid fish, male nuptial coloration is subject to female mate choice and plays a central role in the evolution of reproductive isolation between incipient species. Intraspecific variation in male coloration may serve as a target for diversifying sexual selection and provide a

  1. Sexual conflict over breeding substrate causes female expulsion and offspring loss in a cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, Martine E.; Taborsky, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Females of the Lake Tanganyika cichlid Lamprologus callipterus exclusively breed in empty snail shells that males collect in their territories. Male-male competition for shells is severe, leading to frequent shell stealing and territory takeover. As a consequence, males have breeding females in thei

  2. The species flocks of East African cichlid fishes: recent advances in molecular phylogenetics and population genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzburger, Walter; Meyer, Axel

    With more than 3,000 species, the fish family Cichlidae is one of the most species-rich families of vertebrates. Cichlids occur in southern and central America, Africa, Madagascar, and India. The hotspot of their biodiversity is East Africa, where they form adaptive radiations composed of hundreds of endemic species in several lakes of various sizes and ages. The unparalleled species richness of East African cichlids has been something of a conundrum for evolutionary biologists and ecologists, since it has been in doubt whether these hundreds of species arose by allopatric speciation or whether it is necessary to invoke somewhat less traditional models of speciation, such as micro-allopatric, peripatric, or even sympatric speciation or evolution through sexual selection mediated by female choice. Ernst Mayr's analyses of these evolutionary uniquely diverse species assemblages have contributed to a more direct approach to this problem and have led to a deeper understanding of the patterns and processes that caused the formation of these huge groups of species. We review here recent molecular data on population differentiation and phylogenetics, which have helped to unravel, to some extent, the patterns and processes that led to the formation and ecological maintenance of cichlid species flocks. It is becoming apparent that sexually selected traits do play an important role in speciation in micro-allopatric or even sympatric settings. Species richness seems to be roughly correlated with the surface area, but not the age, of the lakes. We observe that the oldest lineages of a species flock of cichlids are often less species-rich and live in the open water or deepwater habitats. While the species flocks of the Lake Malawai and the Lake Victoria areas were shown to be monophyletic, the cichlid assemblage of Lake Tanganyika seems to consist of several independent species flocks. Cichlids emerge as an evolutionary model system in which many fundamental questions in

  3. A tribal level phylogeny of Lake Tanganyika cichlid fishes based on a genomic multi-marker approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Britta S; Matschiner, Michael; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-02-01

    The species-flocks of cichlid fishes in the East African Great Lakes Victoria, Malawi and Tanganyika constitute the most diverse extant adaptive radiations in vertebrates. Lake Tanganyika, the oldest of the lakes, harbors the morphologically and genetically most diverse assemblage of cichlids and contains the highest number of endemic cichlid genera of all African lakes. Based on morphological grounds, the Tanganyikan cichlid species have been grouped into 12-16 distinct lineages, so-called tribes. While the monophyly of most of the tribes is well established, the phylogenetic relationships among the tribes remain largely elusive. Here, we present a new tribal level phylogenetic hypothesis for the cichlid fishes of Lake Tanganyika that is based on the so far largest set of nuclear markers and a total alignment length of close to 18kb. Using next-generation amplicon sequencing with the 454 pyrosequencing technology, we compiled a dataset consisting of 42 nuclear loci in 45 East African cichlid species, which we subjected to maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference phylogenetic analyses. We analyzed the entire concatenated dataset and each marker individually, and performed a Bayesian concordance analysis and gene tree discordance tests. Overall, we find strong support for a position of the Oreochromini, Boulengerochromini, Bathybatini and Trematocarini outside of a clade combining the substrate spawning Lamprologini and the mouthbrooding tribes of the 'H-lineage', which are both strongly supported to be monophyletic. The Eretmodini are firmly placed within the 'H-lineage', as sister-group to the most species-rich tribe of cichlids, the Haplochromini. The phylogenetic relationships at the base of the 'H-lineage' received less support, which is likely due to high speciation rates in the early phase of the radiation. Discordance among gene trees and marker sets further suggests the occurrence of past hybridization and/or incomplete lineage sorting in the cichlid

  4. Back to Tanganyika: a case of recent trans-species-flock dispersal in East African haplochromine cichlid fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Britta S.; Indermaur, Adrian; Ehrensperger, Xenia; Egger, Bernd; Banyankimbona, Gaspard; Snoeks, Jos; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The species flocks of cichlid fishes in the East African Great Lakes are the largest vertebrate adaptive radiations in the world and illustrious textbook examples of convergent evolution between independent species assemblages. Although recent studies suggest some degrees of genetic exchange between riverine taxa and the lake faunas, not a single cichlid species is known from Lakes Tanganyika, Malawi and Victoria that is derived from the radiation associated with another of these lakes. Here,...

  5. A tribal level phylogeny of Lake Tanganyika cichlid fishes based on a genomic multi-marker approach

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Britta S.; Matschiner, Michael; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We provide a new phylogeny for Lake Tanganyika cichlids using 42 nuclear makers. • Data concatenation and a Bayesian concordance analysis lead to congruent results. • Gene tree discordance hints to past hybridization or incomplete lineage sorting. • The Lamprologini are the sister-group to the ‘H-lineage’. • The Eretmodini are nested within the ‘H-lineage’. Abstract: The species-flocks of cichlid fishes in the East African Great Lakes Victoria, Malawi and ...

  6. Nuclear markers reveal unexpected genetic variation and a Congolese-Nilotic origin of the Lake Victoria cichlid species flock.

    OpenAIRE

    Seehausen, Ole; Koetsier, Egbert; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Chapman, Lauren J.; Colin A Chapman; Knight, Mairi E.; Turner, George F.; van Alphen, Jacques J.M; Bills, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial (mt) DNA have indicated that the cichlid species flock of the Lake Victoria region is derived from a single ancestral species found in East African rivers, closely related to the ancestor of the Lake Malawi cichlid species flock. The Lake Victoria flock contains ten times less mtDNA variation than the Lake Malawi radiation, consistent with current estimates of the ages of the lakes. We present results of a phylogenetic investigation using nuclear (...

  7. The Role of microRNAs in the Repeated Parallel Diversification of Lineages of Midas Cichlid Fish from Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Paolo; Xiong, Peiwen; Fruciano, Carmelo; Meyer, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Cichlid fishes are an ideal model system for studying biological diversification because they provide textbook examples of rapid speciation. To date, there has been little focus on the role of gene regulation during cichlid speciation. However, in recent years, gene regulation has been recognized as a powerful force linking diversification in gene function to speciation. Here, we investigated the potential role of miRNA regulation in the diversification of six cichlid species of the Midas cichlid lineage (Amphilophus spp.) inhabiting the Nicaraguan crater lakes. Using several genomic resources, we inferred 236 Midas miRNA genes that were used to predict the miRNA target sites on 8,232 Midas 3'-UTRs. Using population genomic calculations of SNP diversity, we found the miRNA genes to be more conserved than protein coding genes. In contrast to what has been observed in other cichlid fish, but similar to what has been typically found in other groups, we observed genomic signatures of purifying selection on the miRNA targets by comparing these sites with the less conserved nontarget portion of the 3'-UTRs. However, in one species pair that has putatively speciated sympatrically in crater Lake Apoyo, we recovered a different pattern of relaxed purifying selection and high genetic divergence at miRNA targets. Our results suggest that sequence evolution at miRNA binding sites could be a critical genomic mechanism contributing to the rapid phenotypic evolution of Midas cichlids. PMID:27189980

  8. Molecular phylogeny and evidence for an adaptive radiation of geophagine cichlids from South America (Perciformes: Labroidei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, Hernán; Honeycutt, Rodney L; Winemiller, Kirk O

    2005-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences from the mitochondrial ND4 gene and the nuclear RAG2 gene were used to derive the most extensive molecular phylogeny to date for the Neotropical cichlid subfamily Geophaginae. Previous hypotheses of relationships were tested in light of these new data and a synthesis of all existing molecular information was provided. Novel phylogenetic findings included support for : (1) a 'Big Clade' containing the genera Geophagus sensu lato, Gymnogeophagus, Mikrogeophagus, Biotodoma, Crenicara, and Dicrossus; (2) a clade including the genera Satanoperca, Apistogramma, Apistogrammoides, and Taeniacara; and (3) corroboration for Kullander's clade Acarichthyini. ND4 demonstrated saturation effects at the third code position and lineage-specific rate heterogeneity, both of which influenced phylogeny reconstruction when only equal weighted parsimony was employed. Both branch lengths and internal branch tests revealed extremely short basal nodes that add support to the idea that geophagine cichlids have experienced an adaptive radiation sensu Schluter that involved ecomorphological specializations and life history diversification. PMID:15579395

  9. Comparative Osteology of the Suspensorial Complex of Algal-Feeding Cichlids (Pisces, Teleostei) from Lake Tanganyika

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaoka, Kosaku

    1988-01-01

    The comparative osteology of the suspensorial complex in 20 species of epilithic algal feeders from Lake Tanganyika was studied as a means of obtaining fundamental data for understanding the adaptive radiation in feeding habits of cichlid fishes in the East African lakes. Six types of suspensorial complex could be recognized within the 20 species studied. For the palatine, ectopterygoid, entopterygoid, metapterygoid, quadrate, symplectic, preoperculum and hyomandibula, 5, 2, 3, 3, 5, 2, 2 and...

  10. Genetic divergence, speciation and morphological stasis in a lineage of African cichlid fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Sturmbauer, Christian; Meyer, Axel

    1992-01-01

    Since their discovery at the turn of the century, the species assemblages of cichlid fishes in the East African Lakes Victoria, Malawi and Tanganyika have fascinated evolutionary biologists. Many models have attempted to account for the 'explosive' evolution of several hundred species within these lakes. Here we report a case of surprisingly large genetic divergence among populations of the endemic Tropheus lineage of Lake Tanganyika. This lineage of six species contains twice as much genetic...

  11. Monogamy in the maternally mouthbrooding Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish Tropheus moorii

    OpenAIRE

    Egger, Bernd; Obermüller, Beate; Phiri, Harris; Sturmbauer, Christian; Sefc, Kristina M

    2006-01-01

    Supported by evidence for assortative mating and polygynandry, sexual selection through mate choice was suggested as the main force driving the evolution of colour diversity of haplochromine cichlids in Lakes Malawi and Victoria. The phylogenetically closely related tribe Tropheini of Lake Tanganyika includes the genus Tropheus, which comprises over 100 colour variants currently classified into six morphologically similar, polyphyletic species. To assess the potential for sexual selection in ...

  12. Phenotypic integration of brain size and head morphology in Lake Tanganyika Cichlids

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuboi, Masahito; González-Voyer, Alejandro; Kolm, N.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Phenotypic integration among different anatomical parts of the head is a common phenomenon across vertebrates. Interestingly, despite centuries of research into the factors that contribute to the existing variation in brain size among vertebrates, little is known about the role of phenotypic integration in brain size diversification. Here we used geometric morphometrics on the morphologically diverse Tanganyikan cichlids to investigate phenotypic integration across key mor...

  13. Gut Microbiota Dynamics during Dietary Shift in Eastern African Cichlid Fishes.

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    Laura Baldo

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota structure reflects both a host phylogenetic history and a signature of adaptation to the host ecological, mainly trophic niches. African cichlid fishes, with their array of closely related species that underwent a rapid dietary niche radiation, offer a particularly interesting system to explore the relative contribution of these two factors in nature. Here we surveyed the host intra- and interspecific natural variation of the gut microbiota of five cichlid species from the monophyletic tribe Perissodini of lake Tanganyika, whose members transitioned from being zooplanktivorous to feeding primarily on fish scales. The outgroup riverine species Astatotilapia burtoni, largely omnivorous, was also included in the study. Fusobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria represented the dominant components in the gut microbiota of all 30 specimens analysed according to two distinct 16S rRNA markers. All members of the Perissodini tribe showed a homogenous pattern of microbial alpha and beta diversities, with no significant qualitative differences, despite changes in diet. The recent diet shift between zooplantkon- and scale-eaters simply reflects on a significant enrichment of Clostridium taxa in scale-eaters where they might be involved in the scale metabolism. Comparison with the omnivorous species A. burtoni suggests that, with increased host phylogenetic distance and/or increasing herbivory, the gut microbiota begins differentiating also at qualitative level. The cichlids show presence of a large conserved core of taxa and a small set of core OTUs (average 13-15%, remarkably stable also in captivity, and putatively favoured by both restricted microbial transmission among related hosts (putatively enhanced by mouthbrooding behavior and common host constraints. This study sets the basis for a future large-scale investigation of the gut microbiota of cichlids and its adaptation in the process of the host adaptive radiation.

  14. Laboratory Class Project: Using a Cichlid Fish Display Tank to Teach Students about Complex Behavioral Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Brian C.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory activities serve several important functions in undergraduate science education. For neuroscience majors, an important and sometimes underemphasized tool is the use of behavioral observations to help inform us about the consequences of changes that are occurring on a neuronal level. To help address this concern, the following laboratory exercise is presented. The current project tested the prediction that the most dominant fish in a tank of cichlids will have gained the most benefi...

  15. Fish & Chips: Functional Genomics of Social Plasticity in an African Cichlid Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Renn, Susan C.P.; Aubin-Horth, Nadia; Hofmann, Hans A.

    2008-01-01

    Behaviour and physiology are regulated by both environment and social context. A central goal in the study of the social control of behaviour is to determine the underlying physiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms in the brain. The African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni has long been used as a model system to study how social interactions regulate neural and behavioural plasticity. In this species, males are either socially dominant and reproductively active or subordinate and rep...

  16. Color changing and behavioral context in the Amazonian Dwarf Cichlid Apistogramma hippolytae (Perciformes)

    OpenAIRE

    Raoni Rosa Rodrigues; Lucélia Nobre Carvalho; Jansen Zuanon; Kleber Del-Claro

    2009-01-01

    Animal coloration has many functions, and fishes are noted among vertebrates for presenting a wide variety of color patterns. Although in marine fishes the relationship between body coloration and behavioral context is well documented, there's not much information about freshwater fishes. Here we describe color patterns displayed by the dwarf cichlid Apistogramma hippolytae and suggest that these patterns are dependent on different social and behavioral settings. Field observations were condu...

  17. Time and Origin of Cichlid Colonization of the Lower Congo Rapids

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Schwarzer; Bernhard Misof; Ifuta, Seraphin N.; Schliewen, Ulrich K.

    2011-01-01

    Most freshwater diversity is arguably located in networks of rivers and streams, but, in contrast to lacustrine systems riverine radiations, are largely understudied. The extensive rapids of the lower Congo River is one of the few river stretches inhabited by a locally endemic cichlid species flock as well as several species pairs, for which we provide evidence that they have radiated in situ. We use more that 2,000 AFLP markers as well as multilocus sequence datasets to reconstruct their ori...

  18. Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of the Neotropical cichlid fish tribe Cichlasomatini (Teleostei: Cichlidae: Cichlasomatinae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musilová, Zuzana; Říčan, Oldřich; Janko, Karel; Novák, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 46, - (2008), s. 659-672. ISSN 1055-7903 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) 182/2004/B-BIO; GA UK(CZ) 139407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : molecular phylogeny * Cichlids * south America Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.871, year: 2008

  19. On the age and origin of the species flock of haplochromine cichlid fishes of Lake Victoria.

    OpenAIRE

    Fryer, G.

    2001-01-01

    Recent suggestions concerning the age and origin of the flock of haplochromine cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria (East Africa) are considered. These accept as proven the suggestion that Lake Victoria dried out completely in the Late Pleistocene, was dry for several thousand years, and refilled ca. 12400 years ago. Apart from the fact that other geophysical evidence contradicts this claim, its biological implications, which do likewise, have never been considered by those who have accepted it. L...

  20. Monophyletic origin of Lake Victoria cichlid fishes suggested by mitochondrial DNA sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Axel; Kocher, Thomas D.; Basasibwaki, Pereti; Wilson, Allan C.

    1990-01-01

    Lake Victoria, together with its satellite lakes, harbours roughly 200 endemic forms of cichlid fishes that are classified as 'haplo-chromines' and yet the lake system is less than a million years old. This 'flock' has attracted attention because of the possibility that it evolved within the lake from one ancestral species and that biologists are thus presented with a case of explosive evolution. Within the past decade, however, morphology has increasingly emphasized the view that the flock m...

  1. Know thine enemy: Intra-sexual selection and sympatric speciation in Lake Victoria cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Dijkstra, Peter Douwe

    2006-01-01

    Speciation by sexual selection research has traditionally concentrated on mechanisms for divergence driven via female mate choice (intersexual selection). The pivotal role of competition between members of the same sex (intrasexual selection) has been largely overlooked. In this thesis, I describe a series of experimental studies investigating the role of intrasexual selection in sympatric divergence, using Lake Victoria haplochromine cichlid fish as a model system. Such experiments are neede...

  2. Sex-specific effects of maternal testosterone on lateralization in a cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Schaafsma, Sara M.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Lateralization of cerebral functions is a fundamental aspect of the organization of brain and behaviour in vertebrates. Sex differences in human lateralization have inspired researchers to postulate several hypotheses concerning the effect of prenatal testosterone on lateralization, but few experimental studies have examined these hypotheses. We investigated whether prenatal testosterone affects strength or direction of lateralization in a cichlid fish, Aequidens rivulatus. Eggs were given a ...

  3. Reproductive success and female preference in the amazonian cichlid angel fish, Pterophyllum scalare (Lichtenstein, 1823)

    OpenAIRE

    Maria do Socorro R.F Cacho; Sathyabama Chellappa; Maria Emília Yamamoto

    2006-01-01

    The angel fish, Pterophyllum scalare is a cichlid native to the Amazon Basin of Brazil and is exported as an ornamental fish. In this study the importance of the experience and previous reproductive success of males in mate selection was investigated. In order to investigate reproductive experience, six pairs of males (experienced and inexperienced) and six females were used. Males were placed in an aquarium, where one female was released. Mate selection was verified by the time spent by a fe...

  4. Age, growth, and mortality of the Mayan cichlid (Cichlasoma urophthalmus) from the southeastern Everglades

    OpenAIRE

    Faunce, Craig H.; Patterson, Heather M.; Lorenz, Jerome J.

    2002-01-01

    Mayan cichlids (Cichlasoma urophthalmus) were collected monthly from March 1996 to October 1997 with hook-and-line gear at Taylor River, Florida, an area within the Crocodile Sanctuary of Everglades National Park, where human activities such as fishing are prohibited. Fish were aged by examining thin-sectioned otoliths, and past size-at-age information was generated by using back-calculation techniques. Marginal increment analysis showed that opaque growth zones were annuli deposited between ...

  5. Morphology, molecules, and monogenean parasites: an example of an integrative approach to cichlid biodiversity.

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    Maarten Van Steenberge

    Full Text Available The unparalleled biodiversity of Lake Tanganyika (Africa has fascinated biologists for over a century; its unique cichlid communities are a preferred model for evolutionary research. Although species delineation is, in most cases, relatively straightforward, higher-order classifications were shown not to agree with monophyletic groups. Here, traditional morphological methods meet their limitations. A typical example are the tropheine cichlids currently belonging to Simochromis and Pseudosimochromis. The affiliations of these widespread and abundant cichlids are poorly understood. Molecular work suggested that genus and species boundaries should be revised. Moreover, previous morphological results indicated that intraspecific variation should be considered to delineate species in Lake Tanganyika cichlids. We review the genera Simochromis and Pseudosimochromis using an integrative approach. Besides a morphometric study and a barcoding approach, monogenean Cichlidogyrus (Platyhelminthes: Ancyrocephalidae gill parasites, often highly species-specific, are used as complementary markers. Six new species are described. Cichlidogyrus raeymaekersi sp. nov., C. muterezii sp. nov. and C. banyankimbonai sp. nov. infect S. diagramma. Cichlidogyrus georgesmertensi sp. nov. was found on S. babaulti and S. pleurospilus, C. franswittei sp. nov. on both S. marginatus and P. curvifrons and C. frankwillemsi sp. nov. only on P. curvifrons. As relatedness between Cichlidogyrus species usually reflects relatedness between hosts, we considered Simochromis monotypic because the three Cichlidogyrus species found on S. diagramma belonged to a different morphotype than those found on the other Simochromis. The transfer of S. babaulti, S. marginatus, S. pleurospilus and S. margaretae to Pseudosimochromis was justified by the similarity of their Cichlidogyrus fauna and the intermediate morphology of S. margaretae. Finally parasite data also supported the synonymy between S

  6. Cichlid fishes as a model to understand normal and clinical craniofacial variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powder, Kara E; Albertson, R Craig

    2016-07-15

    We have made great strides towards understanding the etiology of craniofacial disorders, especially for 'simple' Mendelian traits. However, the facial skeleton is a complex trait, and the full spectrum of genetic, developmental, and environmental factors that contribute to its final geometry remain unresolved. Forward genetic screens are constrained with respect to complex traits due to the types of genes and alleles commonly identified, developmental pleiotropy, and limited information about the impact of environmental interactions. Here, we discuss how studies in an evolutionary model - African cichlid fishes - can complement traditional approaches to understand the genetic and developmental origins of complex shape. Cichlids exhibit an unparalleled range of natural craniofacial morphologies that model normal human variation, and in certain instances mimic human facial dysmorphologies. Moreover, the evolutionary history and genomic architecture of cichlids make them an ideal system to identify the genetic basis of these phenotypes via quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and population genomics. Given the molecular conservation of developmental genes and pathways, insights from cichlids are applicable to human facial variation and disease. We review recent work in this system, which has identified lbh as a novel regulator of neural crest cell migration, determined the Wnt and Hedgehog pathways mediate species-specific bone morphologies, and examined how plastic responses to diet modulate adult facial shapes. These studies have not only revealed new roles for existing pathways in craniofacial development, but have identified new genes and mechanisms involved in shaping the craniofacial skeleton. In all, we suggest that combining work in traditional laboratory and evolutionary models offers significant potential to provide a more complete and comprehensive picture of the myriad factors that are involved in the development of complex traits. PMID:26719128

  7. Tol2-mediated generation of a transgenic haplochromine cichlid, Astatotilapia burtoni.

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    Scott A Juntti

    Full Text Available Cichlid fishes represent one of the most species-rich and rapid radiations of a vertebrate family. These ~2200 species, predominantly found in the East African Great Lakes, exhibit dramatic differences in anatomy, physiology, and behavior. However, the genetic bases for this radiation, and for the control of their divergent traits, are unknown. A flood of genomic and transcriptomic data promises to suggest mechanisms underlying the diversity, but transgenic technology will be needed to rigorously test the hypotheses generated. Here we demonstrate the successful use of the Tol2 transposon system to generate transgenic Astatotilapia burtoni, a haplochromine cichlid from Lake Tanganyika, carrying the GFP transgene under the control of the ubiquitous EF1α promoter. The transgene integrates into the genome, is successfully passed through the germline, and the widespread GFP expression pattern is stable across siblings and multiple generations. The stable inheritance and expression patterns indicate that the Tol2 system can be applied to generate A. burtoni transgenic lines. Transgenesis has proven to be a powerful technology for manipulating genes and cells in other model organisms and we anticipate that transgenic A. burtoni and other cichlids will be used to test the mechanisms underlying behavior and speciation.

  8. Investigation of Acute Toxicity Diazinon, Deltamethrin, Butachlor and pretilachlor on Zebra Cichlid (Cryptoheros nigrofasciatus

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    Ali Sadeghi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of pesticide due to the huge demand for agricultural purposes is very prevalent in surface waters of Iran. These pesticides could finally accumulate in aquatic ecosystems and have been proved to have toxic effects on aquatic animals. The aim of this study was to assess the acute toxicity of Diazinon, Deltamethrin, Butachlor and Pretilachlor on Zebra Cichlid (Cryptoheros nigrofasciatus. Methods: Fish samples were exposed to different concentrations of Diazinon (60% (0, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 ppm, Deltamethrin (2.5% (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.10, 0.20 and 0.40 ppm, butachlor (60% (0, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 ppm and pretilachlor (50% (0, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 ppm for 96 h within the 100 L glass aquaria and cumulative mortality of Zebra Cichlid fish was calculated in 24-h interval. Results: The very low LC50 obtained for diazinon (5.06±0.37 ppm, deltamethrin (0.15±0.39 ppm, butachlor (8.93±0.26 ppm and pretilachlor (20.72±0.58 ppm indicated that these are highly toxic chemicals. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that deltamethrin and pretilachlor had the lowest and highest rate of mortality on the Zebra Cichlid respectively.

  9. Chromosome Evolution in African Cichlid Fish: Contributions from the Physical Mapping of Repeated DNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, I.A.; Poletto, A.B.; Kocher, T.D.; Mota-Velasco, J.C.; Penman, D.J.; Martins, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation that has led to extensive ecological diversity and because of their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To further understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, we have comparatively mapped the SATA satellite DNA, the transposable element ROn-1, and repeated sequences in the bacterial artificial chromosome clone BAC-C4E09 on the chromosomes of a range of African species of Cichlidae, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. The SATA satellite DNA was mapped in almost all the centromeres of all tilapiine and haplochromine species studied. The maintenance and centromeric distribution of the SATA satellite DNA in African cichlids suggest that this sequence plays an important role in the organization and function of the centromere in these species. Furthermore, analysis of SATA element distribution clarifies that chromosome fusions occurred independently in Oreochromis and Tilapia genera, and led to the reduced chromosome number detected in O. karongae and T. mariae. The comparative chromosome mapping of the ROn-1 SINE-like element and BAC-C4E09 shows that the repeated sequences have been maintained among tilapiine, haplochromine and hemichromine fishes and has demonstrated the homology of the largest chromosomes among these groups. Furthermore, the mapping of ROn-1 suggested that different chromosomal rearrangements could have occurred in the origin of the largest chromosome pairs of tilapiines and non-tilapiines. PMID:20606399

  10. Morphology and efficiency of a specialized foraging behavior, sediment sifting, in neotropical cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, Hernán; Arbour, Jessica; Willis, Stuart; Watkins, Crystal; Honeycutt, Rodney L; Winemiller, Kirk O

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of relationships between morphology and ecological performance can help to reveal how natural selection drives biological diversification. We investigate relationships between feeding behavior, foraging performance and morphology within a diverse group of teleost fishes, and examine the extent to which associations can be explained by evolutionary relatedness. Morphological adaptation associated with sediment sifting was examined using a phylogenetic linear discriminant analysis on a set of ecomorphological traits from 27 species of Neotropical cichlids. For most sifting taxa, feeding behavior could be effectively predicted by a linear discriminant function of ecomorphology across multiple clades of sediment sifters, and this pattern could not be explained by shared evolutionary history alone. Additionally, we tested foraging efficiency in seven Neotropical cichlid species, five of which are specialized benthic feeders with differing head morphology. Efficiency was evaluated based on the degree to which invertebrate prey could be retrieved at different depths of sediment. Feeding performance was compared both with respect to feeding mode and species using a phylogenetic ANCOVA, with substrate depth as a covariate. Benthic foraging performance was constant across sediment depths in non-sifters but declined with depth in sifters. The non-sifting Hypsophrys used sweeping motions of the body and fins to excavate large pits to uncover prey; this tactic was more efficient for consuming deeply buried invertebrates than observed among sediment sifters. Findings indicate that similar feeding performance among sediment-sifting cichlids extracting invertebrate prey from shallow sediment layers reflects constraints associated with functional morphology and, to a lesser extent, phylogeny. PMID:24603485

  11. Rapid sympatric ecological differentiation of crater lake cichlid fishes within historic times

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    Harrod Chris

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After a volcano erupts, a lake may form in the cooled crater and become an isolated aquatic ecosystem. This makes fishes in crater lakes informative for understanding sympatric evolution and ecological diversification in barren environments. From a geological and limnological perspective, such research offers insight about the process of crater lake ecosystem establishment and speciation. In the present study we use genetic and coalescence approaches to infer the colonization history of Midas cichlid fishes (Amphilophus cf. citrinellus that inhabit a very young crater lake in Nicaragua-the ca. 1800 year-old Lake Apoyeque. This lake holds two sympatric, endemic morphs of Midas cichlid: one with large, hypertrophied lips (~20% of the total population and another with thin lips. Here we test the associated ecological, morphological and genetic diversification of these two morphs and their potential to represent incipient speciation. Results Gene coalescence analyses [11 microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences] suggest that crater lake Apoyeque was colonized in a single event from the large neighbouring great lake Managua only about 100 years ago. This founding in historic times is also reflected in the extremely low nuclear and mitochondrial genetic diversity in Apoyeque. We found that sympatric adult thin- and thick-lipped fishes occupy distinct ecological trophic niches. Diet, body shape, head width, pharyngeal jaw size and shape and stable isotope values all differ significantly between the two lip-morphs. The eco-morphological features pharyngeal jaw shape, body shape, stomach contents and stable isotopes (δ15N all show a bimodal distribution of traits, which is compatible with the expectations of an initial stage of ecological speciation under disruptive selection. Genetic differentiation between the thin- and thick-lipped population is weak at mtDNA sequence (FST = 0.018 and absent at nuclear

  12. Correlated evolution of short wavelength sensitive photoreceptor sensitivity and color pattern in Lake Malawi cichlids

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    Michael J. Pauers

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For evolutionary ecologists, the holy grail of visual ecology is to establish an unambiguous link between photoreceptor sensitivity, the spectral environment, and the perception of specific visual stimuli (e.g., mates, food, predators, etc.. Due to the bright nuptial colors of the males, and the role female mate choice plays in their evolution, the haplochromine cichlid fishes of the African great lakes are favorite research subjects for such investigations. Despite this attention, current evidence is equivocal; while distinct correlations among photoreceptor sensitivity, photic environment, and male coloration exist in Lake Victorian haplochromines, attempts to find such correlations in Lake Malawian cichlids have failed. Lake Malawi haplochromines have a wide variability in their short-wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors, especially compared to their mid- and long-wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors; these cichlids also vary in the degree to which they express one of three basic color patterns (vertical bars, horizontal stripes, and solid patches of colors, each of which is likely used in a different form of communication. Thus, we hypothesize that, in these fishes, spectral sensitivity and color pattern have evolved in a correlated fashion to maximize visual communication; specifically, ultraviolet sensitivity should be found in vertically-barred species to promote ‘private’ communication, while striped species should be less likely to have ultraviolet sensitivity, since their color pattern carries ‘public’ information. Using phylogenetic independent contrasts, we found that barred species had strong sensitivity to ultraviolet wavelengths, but that striped species typically lacked sensitivity to ultraviolet light. Further, the only variable, even when environmental variables were simultaneously considered, that could predict ultraviolet sensitivity was color pattern. We also found that, using models of correlated evolution, color

  13. Back to Tanganyika: a case of recent trans-species-flock dispersal in East African haplochromine cichlid fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Britta S.; Indermaur, Adrian; Ehrensperger, Xenia; Egger, Bernd; Banyankimbona, Gaspard; Snoeks, Jos; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The species flocks of cichlid fishes in the East African Great Lakes are the largest vertebrate adaptive radiations in the world and illustrious textbook examples of convergent evolution between independent species assemblages. Although recent studies suggest some degrees of genetic exchange between riverine taxa and the lake faunas, not a single cichlid species is known from Lakes Tanganyika, Malawi and Victoria that is derived from the radiation associated with another of these lakes. Here, we report the discovery of a haplochromine cichlid species in Lake Tanganyika, which belongs genetically to the species flock of haplochromines of the Lake Victoria region. The new species colonized Lake Tanganyika only recently, suggesting that faunal exchange across watersheds and, hence, between isolated ichthyofaunas, is more common than previously thought. PMID:26064619

  14. Testing the carotenoid trade-off hypothesis in the polychromatic Midas cichlid, Amphilophus citrinellus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Susan M; Nieves-Puigdoller, Katherine; Brown, Alexandria C; McGraw, Kevin J; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2010-01-01

    Many animals use carotenoid pigments derived from their diet for coloration and immunity. The carotenoid trade-off hypothesis predicts that, under conditions of carotenoid scarcity, individuals may be forced to allocate limited carotenoids to either coloration or immunity. In polychromatic species, the pattern of allocation may differ among individuals. We tested the carotenoid trade-off hypothesis in the Midas cichlid, Amphilophus citrinellus, a species with two ontogenetic color morphs, barred and gold, the latter of which is the result of carotenoid expression. We performed a diet-supplementation experiment in which cichlids of both color morphs were assigned to one of two diet treatments that differed only in carotenoid content (beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin). We measured integument color using spectrometry, quantified carotenoid concentrations in tissue and plasma, and assessed innate immunity using lysozyme activity and alternative complement pathway assays. In both color morphs, dietary carotenoid supplementation elevated plasma carotenoid circulation but failed to affect skin coloration. Consistent with observable differences in integument coloration, we found that gold fish sequestered more carotenoids in skin tissue than barred fish, but barred fish had higher concentrations of carotenoids in plasma than gold fish. Neither measure of innate immunity differed between gold and barred fish, or as a function of dietary carotenoid supplementation. Lysozyme activity, but not complement activity, was strongly affected by body condition. Our data show that a diet low in carotenoids is sufficient to maintain both coloration and innate immunity in Midas cichlids. Our data also suggest that the developmental transition from the barred to gold morph is not accompanied by a decrease in innate immunity in this species. PMID:20151818

  15. Assortative mating among Lake Malawi cichlid fish populations is not simply predictable from male nuptial colour

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    Taylor Martin I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the evolution of reproductive isolation in African cichlid fishes has largely focussed on the role of male colours and female mate choice. Here, we tested predictions from the hypothesis that allopatric divergence in male colour is associated with corresponding divergence in preference. Methods We studied four populations of the Lake Malawi Pseudotropheus zebra complex. We predicted that more distantly-related populations that independently evolved similar colours would interbreed freely while more closely-related populations with different colours mate assortatively. We used microsatellite genotypes or mesh false-floors to assign paternity. Fisher's exact tests as well as Binomial and Wilcoxon tests were used to detect if mating departed from random expectations. Results Surprisingly, laboratory mate choice experiments revealed significant assortative mating not only between population pairs with differently coloured males, but between population pairs with similarly-coloured males too. This suggested that assortative mating could be based on non-visual cues, so we further examined the sensory basis of assortative mating between two populations with different male colour. Conducting trials under monochromatic (orange light, intended to mask the distinctive male dorsal fin hues (blue v orange of these populations, did not significantly affect the assortative mating by female P. emmiltos observed under control conditions. By contrast, assortative mating broke down when direct contact between female and male was prevented. Conclusion We suggest that non-visual cues, such as olfactory signals, may play an important role in mate choice and behavioural isolation in these and perhaps other African cichlid fish. Future speciation models aimed at explaining African cichlid radiations may therefore consider incorporating such mating cues in mate choice scenarios.

  16. Cutting the Gordian knot:Complex signaling in African cichlids is more than multimodal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Moira J.VAN STAADEN; Adam R.SMITH

    2011-01-01

    The active transmission of information from sender to recelver is a fundamental component of communication,and is therefore a primary facet in evolutionary models of sexual selection.Research in several systetms has underlined the importance of multiple sensory modalities in courtship signals.However,we still tend to think of individuals as having a relatively static signal in consecutive communicative events.While this may be true for certain traits such as body size or coloration,behaviorally modulated signals can quickly violate this assumption.In this work,we explore how intraspecific variation may be an important component of interspeclfic signal divergence using cichlid fishes from Lake Maiawi.Behavloral analyses were made using six species of Malawian cichlids from two divergent genera.while interspecific differences were found between congeners based on species-level analyses of both acoustic and audiovisual signais,intraspecific variation was of a similar magnitude.Specifically,individual fishes were found to possess highiy plastic signal repertoires.This finding was ubiquitous across all species and resulted in a great deal of overlap between heterospecific individuals,despite statistically distinct species means.These results demonstrate that some aspects of courtship in Malawian cichlids are more plastic than previously proposed,and that studies must account for signal variability within individuals.We propose here that bebavioral variability in signaling is important in determining the communication landscape on which signals are perceived.We review potential complexity deriving from multimodal signaling,discuss the sources for such lability,and suggest ways in which is issue may be approached experimentally.

  17. Integrating cytogenetics and genomics in comparative evolutionary studies of cichlid fish

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    Mazzuchelli Juliana

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of a large number of recently sequenced vertebrate genomes opens new avenues to integrate cytogenetics and genomics in comparative and evolutionary studies. Cytogenetic mapping can offer alternative means to identify conserved synteny shared by distinct genomes and also to define genome regions that are still not fine characterized even after wide-ranging nucleotide sequence efforts. An efficient way to perform comparative cytogenetic mapping is based on BAC clones mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In this report, to address the knowledge gap on the genome evolution in cichlid fishes, BAC clones of an Oreochromis niloticus library covering the linkage groups (LG 1, 3, 5, and 7 were mapped onto the chromosomes of 9 African cichlid species. The cytogenetic mapping data were also integrated with BAC-end sequences information of O. niloticus and comparatively analyzed against the genome of other fish species and vertebrates. Results The location of BACs from LG1, 3, 5, and 7 revealed a strong chromosomal conservation among the analyzed cichlid species genomes, which evidenced a synteny of the markers of each LG. Comparative in silico analysis also identified large genomic blocks that were conserved in distantly related fish groups and also in other vertebrates. Conclusions Although it has been suggested that fishes contain plastic genomes with high rates of chromosomal rearrangements and probably low rates of synteny conservation, our results evidence that large syntenic chromosome segments have been maintained conserved during evolution, at least for the considered markers. Additionally, our current cytogenetic mapping efforts integrated with genomic approaches conduct to a new perspective to address important questions involving chromosome evolution in fishes.

  18. Morphology and efficiency of a specialized foraging behavior, sediment sifting, in neotropical cichlid fishes.

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    Hernán López-Fernández

    Full Text Available Understanding of relationships between morphology and ecological performance can help to reveal how natural selection drives biological diversification. We investigate relationships between feeding behavior, foraging performance and morphology within a diverse group of teleost fishes, and examine the extent to which associations can be explained by evolutionary relatedness. Morphological adaptation associated with sediment sifting was examined using a phylogenetic linear discriminant analysis on a set of ecomorphological traits from 27 species of Neotropical cichlids. For most sifting taxa, feeding behavior could be effectively predicted by a linear discriminant function of ecomorphology across multiple clades of sediment sifters, and this pattern could not be explained by shared evolutionary history alone. Additionally, we tested foraging efficiency in seven Neotropical cichlid species, five of which are specialized benthic feeders with differing head morphology. Efficiency was evaluated based on the degree to which invertebrate prey could be retrieved at different depths of sediment. Feeding performance was compared both with respect to feeding mode and species using a phylogenetic ANCOVA, with substrate depth as a covariate. Benthic foraging performance was constant across sediment depths in non-sifters but declined with depth in sifters. The non-sifting Hypsophrys used sweeping motions of the body and fins to excavate large pits to uncover prey; this tactic was more efficient for consuming deeply buried invertebrates than observed among sediment sifters. Findings indicate that similar feeding performance among sediment-sifting cichlids extracting invertebrate prey from shallow sediment layers reflects constraints associated with functional morphology and, to a lesser extent, phylogeny.

  19. Histochemical localisation of carbonic anhydrase in the inner ear of developing cichlid fish, Oreochromis mossambicus

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    Beier, M.; Hilbig, R.; Anken, R.

    2008-12-01

    Inner ear otolith growth in terms of mineralisation mainly depends on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CAH). CAH is located in specialised, mitochondria-rich macular cells (ionocytes), which are involved in the endolymphatic ion exchange, and the enzyme is responsible for the provision of the pH-value necessary for otolithic calcium carbonate deposition. In the present study, for the first time the localisation of histochemically demonstrated CAH was analysed during the early larval development of a teleost, the cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus. CAH-reactivity was observed already in stage 7 animals (onset of otocyst development; staging follows Anken et al. [Anken, R., Kappel, T., Slenzka, K., Rahmann, H. The early morphogenetic development of the cichlid fish, Oreochromis mossambicus (Perciformes, Teleostei). Zool. Anz. 231, 1-10, 1993]). Neuroblasts (from which sensory and supporting cells are derived) proved to be CAH-positive. Already at stage 12 (hatch), CAH-positive regions could be attributed to ionocyte containing regions both in the so-called meshwork and patches area of the macula (i.e., clearly before ionocytes can be identified on ultrastructural level or by employing immunocytochemistry). In contrast to the circumstances observed in mammalian species, sensory hair cells stained negative for CAH in the cichlid. With the onset of stage 16 (finray primordia in dorsal fin, yolk-sac being increasingly absorbed), CAH-reactivity was observed in the vestibular nerve. This indicates the onset of myelinisation and thus commencement of operation. The localisation of CAH in the inner ear of fish (especially the differences in comparison to mammals) is discussed on the basis of its role in otolith calcification. Since the vestibular system is a detector of acceleration and thus gravity, also aspects regarding effects of altered gravity on CAH and hence on the mineralisation of otoliths in an adaptive process are addressed.

  20. Out of Tanganyika: Genesis, explosive speciation, key-innovations and phylogeography of the haplochromine cichlid fishes

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    Verheyen Erik

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adaptive radiations of cichlid fishes in East Africa are well known for their spectacular diversity and their astonishingly fast rates of speciation. About 80% of all 2,500 cichlid species in East Africa, and virtually all cichlid species from Lakes Victoria (~500 species and Malawi (~1,000 species are haplochromines. Here, we present the most extensive phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis so far that includes about 100 species and is based on about 2,000 bp of the mitochondrial DNA. Results Our analyses revealed that all haplochromine lineages are ultimately derived from Lake Tanganyika endemics. We find that the three most ancestral lineages of the haplochromines sensu lato are relatively species poor, albeit widely distributed in Africa, whereas a fourth newly defined lineage – the 'modern haplochromines' – contains an unparalleled diversity that makes up more than 7% of the worlds' ~25,000 teleost species. The modern haplochromines' ancestor, most likely a riverine generalist, repeatedly gave rise to similar ecomorphs now found in several of the species flocks. Also, the Tanganyikan Tropheini are derived from that riverine ancestor suggesting that they successfully re-colonized Lake Tanganyika and speciated in parallel to an already established cichlid adaptive radiation. In contrast to most other known examples of adaptive radiations, these generalist ancestors were derived from highly diverse and specialized endemics from Lake Tanganyika. A reconstruction of life-history traits revealed that in an ancestral lineage leading to the modern haplochromines the characteristic egg-spots on anal fins of male individuals evolved. Conclusion We conclude that Lake Tanganyika is the geographic and genetic cradle of all haplochromine lineages. In the ancestors of the replicate adaptive radiations of the 'modern haplochromines', behavioral (maternal mouthbrooding, morphological (egg-spots and sexually selected (color

  1. Changes in the acoustic environment alter the foraging and sheltering behaviour of the cichlid Amititlania nigrofasciata.

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    McLaughlin, Kirsty Elizabeth; Kunc, Hansjoerg P

    2015-07-01

    Anthropogenic noise can affect behaviour across a wide range of species in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. However, behaviours might not be affected in isolation. Therefore, a more holistic approach investigating how environmental stressors, such as noise pollution, affect different behaviours in concert is necessary. Using tank-based noise exposure experiments, we tested how changes in the acoustic environment affect the behaviour of the cichlid Amatitlania nigrofasciata. We found that exposure to anthropogenic noise affected a couple of behaviours: an increase in sheltering was accompanied by a decrease in foraging. Our results highlight the multiple negative effects of an environmental stressor on an individual's behaviour. PMID:25937344

  2. Brain structure evolution in a basal vertebrate clade: evidence from phylogenetic comparative analysis of cichlid fishes

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    Kolm Niclas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate brain is composed of several interconnected, functionally distinct structures and much debate has surrounded the basic question of how these structures evolve. On the one hand, according to the 'mosaic evolution hypothesis', because of the elevated metabolic cost of brain tissue, selection is expected to target specific structures mediating the cognitive abilities which are being favored. On the other hand, the 'concerted evolution hypothesis' argues that developmental constraints limit such mosaic evolution and instead the size of the entire brain varies in response to selection on any of its constituent parts. To date, analyses of these hypotheses of brain evolution have been limited to mammals and birds; excluding Actinopterygii, the basal and most diverse class of vertebrates. Using a combination of recently developed phylogenetic multivariate allometry analyses and comparative methods that can identify distinct rates of evolution, even in highly correlated traits, we studied brain structure evolution in a highly variable clade of ray-finned fishes; the Tanganyikan cichlids. Results Total brain size explained 86% of the variance in brain structure volume in cichlids, a lower proportion than what has previously been reported for mammals. Brain structures showed variation in pair-wise allometry suggesting some degree of independence in evolutionary changes in size. This result is supported by variation among structures on the strength of their loadings on the principal size axis of the allometric analysis. The rate of evolution analyses generally supported the results of the multivariate allometry analyses, showing variation among several structures in their evolutionary patterns. The olfactory bulbs and hypothalamus were found to evolve faster than other structures while the dorsal medulla presented the slowest evolutionary rate. Conclusion Our results favor a mosaic model of brain evolution, as certain

  3. Not a simple case - A first comprehensive phylogenetic hypothesis for the Midas cichlid complex in Nicaragua (Teleostei: Cichlidae: Amphilophus).

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    Geiger, Matthias F; McCrary, Jeffrey K; Schliewen, Ulrich K

    2010-09-01

    Nicaraguan Midas cichlids from crater lakes have recently attracted attention as potential model systems for speciation research, but no attempt has been made to comprehensively reconstruct phylogenetic relationships of this highly diverse and recently evolved species complex. We present a first AFLP (2793 loci) and mtDNA based phylogenetic hypothesis including all described and several undescribed species from six crater lakes (Apoyeque, Apoyo, Asososca Leon, Masaya, Tiscapa and Xiloá), the two great Lakes Managua and Nicaragua and the San Juan River. Our analyses demonstrate that the relationships between the Midas cichlid members are complex, and that phylogenetic information from different markers and methods do not always yield congruent results. Nevertheless, monophyly support for crater lake assemblages from Lakes Apoyeque, Apoyo, A. Leon is high as compared to those from L. Xiloá indicating occurrence of sympatric speciation. Further, we demonstrate that a 'three species' concept for the Midas cichlid complex is inapplicable and consequently that an individualized and voucher based approach in speciation research of the Midas cichlid complex is necessary at least as long as there is no comprehensive revision of the species complex available. PMID:20580847

  4. Genetic isolation and morphological divergence mediated by high-energy rapids in two cichlid genera from the lower Congo rapids

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    Stiassny Melanie LJ

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that one of the mechanisms promoting diversification in cichlid fishes in the African Great Lakes has been the well-documented pattern of philopatry along shoreline habitats leading to high levels of genetic isolation among populations. However lake habitats are not the only centers of cichlid biodiversity - certain African rivers also contain large numbers of narrowly endemic species. Patterns of isolation and divergence in these systems have tended to be overlooked and are not well understood. Results We examined genetic and morphological divergence among populations of two narrowly endemic cichlid species, Teleogramma depressum and Lamprologus tigripictilis, from a 100 km stretch of the lower Congo River using both nDNA microsatellites and mtDNA markers along with coordinate-based morphological techniques. In L. tigripictilis, the strongest genetic break was concordant with measurable phenotypic divergence but no morphological disjunction was detected for T. depressum despite significant differentiation at mtDNA and nDNA microsatellite markers. Conclusions The genetic markers revealed patterns of philopatry and estimates of genetic isolation that are among the highest reported for any African cichlid species over a comparable geographic scale. We hypothesize that the high levels of philopatry observed are generated and maintained by the extreme hydrology of the lower Congo River.

  5. Aggression and welfare in a common aquarium fish, the Midas cichlid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Ronald G

    2011-01-01

    Many species of fishes are aggressive when placed in small aquaria. Aggression can negatively affect the welfare of those individuals toward whom it is directed. Animals may behave aggressively in order to defend resources such as food, shelter, mates, and offspring. The decision to defend depends on the distribution of resources and on ecological factors such as number of competitors, amount of available space, and amount of habitat complexity. This study tested the effects of these factors on aggression in a common aquarium fish, the Midas cichlid (Amphilophus citrinellus). The study found that time spent behaving aggressively was not associated with small-scale differences in group size or available space. Aggression was significantly lower in a large aquarium with a complex habitat. Aquaria of sizes typically used in the companion animal (pet) hobby did not provide optimal welfare for cichlids housed with aggressive conspecifics. The public should be aware that this and similar species require larger aquaria with complex habitat, which elicit more natural behavior. PMID:21932947

  6. The gut microbial community of Midas cichlid fish in repeatedly evolved limnetic-benthic species pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Paolo; Fruciano, Carmelo; Frickey, Tancred; Jones, Julia C; Meyer, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Gut bacterial communities are now known to influence a range of fitness related aspects of organisms. But how different the microbial community is in closely related species, and if these differences can be interpreted as adaptive is still unclear. In this study we compared microbial communities in two sets of closely related sympatric crater lake cichlid fish species pairs that show similar adaptations along the limnetic-benthic axis. The gut microbial community composition differs in the species pair inhabiting the older of two crater lakes. One major difference, relative to other fish, is that in these cichlids that live in hypersaline crater lakes, the microbial community is largely made up of Oceanospirillales (52.28%) which are halotolerant or halophilic bacteria. This analysis opens up further avenues to identify candidate symbiotic or co-evolved bacteria playing a role in adaptation to similar diets and life-styles or even have a role in speciation. Future functional and phylosymbiotic analyses might help to address these issues. PMID:24733403

  7. Handed foraging behavior in scale-eating cichlid fish: its potential role in shaping morphological asymmetry.

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    Hyuk Je Lee

    Full Text Available Scale-eating cichlid fish, Perissodus microlepis, from Lake Tanganyika display handed (lateralized foraging behavior, where an asymmetric 'left' mouth morph preferentially feeds on the scales of the right side of its victim fish and a 'right' morph bites the scales of the left side. This species has therefore become a textbook example of the astonishing degree of ecological specialization and negative frequency-dependent selection. We investigated the strength of handedness of foraging behavior as well as its interaction with morphological mouth laterality in P. microlepis. In wild-caught adult fish we found that mouth laterality is, as expected, a strong predictor of their preferred attack orientation. Also laboratory-reared juvenile fish exhibited a strong laterality in behavioral preference to feed on scales, even at an early age, although the initial level of mouth asymmetry appeared to be small. This suggests that pronounced mouth asymmetry is not a prerequisite for handed foraging behavior in juvenile scale-eating cichlid fish and might suggest that behavioral preference to attack a particular side of the prey plays a role in facilitating morphological asymmetry of this species.

  8. Lateralized kinematics of predation behavior in a Lake Tanganyika scale-eating cichlid fish.

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    Yuichi Takeuchi

    Full Text Available Behavioral lateralization has been documented in many vertebrates. The scale-eating cichlid fish Perissodus microlepis is well known for exhibiting lateral dimorphism in its mouth morphology and lateralized behavior in robbing scales from prey fish. A previous field study indicated that this mouth asymmetry closely correlates with the side on which prey is attacked, but details of this species' predation behavior have not been previously analyzed because of the rapidity of the movements. Here, we studied scale-eating behavior in cichlids in a tank through high-speed video monitoring and quantitative assessment of behavioral laterality and kinematics. The fish observed showed a clear bias toward striking on one side, which closely correlated with their asymmetric mouth morphologies. Furthermore, the maximum angular velocity and amplitude of body flexion were significantly larger during attacks on the preferred side compared to those on the nonpreferred side, permitting increased predation success. In contrast, no such lateral difference in movement elements was observed in acoustically evoked flexion during the escape response, which is similar to flexion during scale eating and suggests that they share a common motor control pathway. Thus the neuronal circuits controlling body flexion during scale eating may be functionally lateralized upstream of this common motor pathway.

  9. A robust phylogeny among major lineages of the East African cichlids.

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    Takahashi, Tetsumi; Sota, Teiji

    2016-07-01

    The huge monophyletic group of the East African cichlid radiations (EAR) consists of thousands of species belonging to 12-14 tribes; the number of tribes differs among studies. Many studies have inferred phylogenies of EAR tribes using various genetic markers. However, these phylogenies partly contradict one another and can have weak statistic support. In this study, we conducted maximum-likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analyses using restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequences and propose a new robust phylogenetic hypothesis among Lake Tanganyika cichlid fishes, which cover most EAR tribes. Data matrices can vary in size and contents depending on the strategies used to process RAD sequences. Therefore, we prepared 23 data matrices with various processing strategies. The ML phylogenies inferred from 15 large matrices (2.0×10(6) to 1.1×10(7) base pairs) resolved every tribe as a monophyletic group with 100% bootstrap support and shared the same topology regarding relationships among the tribes. Most nodes among the tribes were supported by 100% bootstrap values, and the bootstrap support for the other node varied among the 15 ML trees from 70% to 100%. These robust ML trees differ partly in topology from those in earlier studies, and these phylogenetic relationships have important implications for the tribal classification of EAR. PMID:27068840

  10. Male mate preference and size-assortative mating in convict cichlids: A role for female aggression?

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    Bloch, A N; Estela, V J; Leese, J M; Itzkowitz, M

    2016-09-01

    Many monogamous species demonstrate size-assortative mating patterns within natural populations. To better understand the role of intersexual selection in this process, we examined the effect of male preference for female body size in the convict cichlid (Amatitlania siquia). We provided males with a choice between females that differed in size, relative to each other and in relation to the focal male. Based on previous work, we expected males to prefer the largest available female mates across all treatments. Surprisingly, males spent more time near the smaller of two available females, but only when the other female was larger than the male. Additionally, males spent little time with either of two potential female mates when both females were larger than the male. We hypothesized that while males might prefer the largest of available females, female behavior might limit males from acting on this preference. To test this, males were force paired with a smaller or larger female. Pair formation only occurred when the female was smaller than the male, and females that were larger than their male counterparts showed significantly more aggression when compared to smaller females. Together, these data suggest that in the absence of intrasexual competition, male mate preference for large females in convict cichlids might be limited by female aggression. PMID:27444247

  11. Genetic structure of pelagic and littoral cichlid fishes from Lake Victoria.

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    Miyuki Takeda

    Full Text Available The approximately 700 species of cichlids found in Lake Victoria in East Africa are thought to have evolved over a short period of time, and they represent one of the largest known examples of adaptive radiation. To understand the processes that are driving this spectacular radiation, we must determine the present genetic structure of these species and elucidate how this structure relates to the ecological conditions that caused their adaptation. We analyzed the genetic structure of two pelagic and seven littoral species sampled from the southeast area of Lake Victoria using sequences from the mtDNA control region and 12 microsatellite loci as markers. Using a Bayesian model-based clustering method to analyze the microsatellite data, we separated these nine species into four groups: one group composed of pelagic species and another three groups composed mainly of rocky-shore species. Furthermore, we found significant levels of genetic variation between species within each group at both marker loci using analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA, although the nine species often shared mtDNA haplotypes. We also found significant levels of genetic variation between populations within species. These results suggest that initial groupings, some of which appear to have been related to habitat differences, as well as divergence between species within groups took place among the cichlid species of Lake Victoria.

  12. On the age and origin of the species flock of haplochromine cichlid fishes of Lake Victoria.

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    Fryer, G

    2001-06-01

    Recent suggestions concerning the age and origin of the flock of haplochromine cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria (East Africa) are considered. These accept as proven the suggestion that Lake Victoria dried out completely in the Late Pleistocene, was dry for several thousand years, and refilled ca. 12400 years ago. Apart from the fact that other geophysical evidence contradicts this claim, its biological implications, which do likewise, have never been considered by those who have accepted it. Like those of all previous authors who have seized on the presence of the haplochromine flock of perhaps more than 600 species as evidence of extremely rapid evolution since the lake allegedly refilled, the account completely overlooks the fact that any such desiccation must have eliminated not only the haplochromine cichlids but the entire biota of the lake. Nevertheless, its present fauna not only includes the haplochromines but many other endemic organisms that would not be expected, and whose presence and history demand an explanation if the lake did indeed dry out. No such explanation has been offered, nor does such seem possible. The recent interpretation of events is questioned and rejected. PMID:11375102

  13. Sensory basis for detection of benthic prey in two Lake Malawi cichlids.

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    Schwalbe, Margot A B; Webb, Jacqueline F

    2014-04-01

    The adaptive radiations of African cichlids resulted in a diversity of feeding morphologies and strategies, but the role of sensory biology in prey detection and feeding ecology remains largely unexplored. Two endemic Lake Malawi cichlid genera, Tramitichromis and Aulonocara, feed on benthic invertebrates, but differ in lateral line morphology (narrow and widened lateral line canals, respectively) and foraging strategy. The hypothesis that they use their lateral line systems differently was tested by looking at the relative contribution of the lateral line system and vision in prey detection by Tramitichromis sp. and comparing results to those from a complementary study using Aulonocara stuartgranti (Schwalbe et al., 2012). First, behavioral trials were used to assess the ability of Tramitichromis sp. to detect live (mobile) and dead (immobile) benthic prey under light and dark conditions. Second, trials were run before, immediately after, and several weeks after chemical ablation of the lateral line system to determine its role in feeding behavior. Results show that Tramitichromis sp. is a visual predator that neither locates prey in the dark nor depends on lateral line input for prey detection and is thus distinct from A. stuartgranti, which uses its lateral line or a combination of vision and lateral line to detect prey depending on light condition. Investigating how functionally distinctive differences in sensory morphology are correlated with feeding behavior in the laboratory and determining the role of sensory systems in feeding ecology will provide insights into how sensory capabilities may contribute to trophic niche segregation. PMID:24369759

  14. Assessment of Mercury Bioaccumulation in Zebra Cichlid (Cichlasoma Nigrofasciatum Exposed to Sublethal Concentrations of Permethrin

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    Mahdi Banaee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aquatic ecosystems are frequently subjected to contamination by toxic heavy metals and pesticides, yet very little is known about the influence of pesticides on bioaccumulation of heavy metals in aquatic organisms. Mercury is a toxic metal with no known biological benefit to organisms. Bioavailability of mercury in aquatic environments depends on biological and non-biological parameters including other pollutants. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to determine the effects of permethrin on bioaccumulation of mercury in zebra cichlid. Methods: Acute toxicity (LC50 of permethrin and mercury chloride was evaluated by estimating mortality in Probit Model in SPSS (version 19.0 IBM. In sub-lethal toxicity, zebra cichlid (Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum was exposed to various concentrations of permethrin (0.0, 0.40, 0.80, 1.20 and 1.60 µg.L-1 combined with 20 µg.L-1 mercury chloride for 15 days. At the end of the experiment, mercury concentrations were measured using ICP-OES-Perkin elmer (optima 7300-DV. Results: 96 h LC50 values of permethrin and mercury for C. nigrofasciatum were calculated to be 17.55 µg.L-1 and 140.38 µg.L-1, respectively. Our results clearly showed that the bioaccumulation of mercury in the specimens increased with increasing concentrations of permethrin to 1.20 and 1.60 µg.L-1. Conclusion: Increasing the concentration of permethrin had synergistic effects on the bioaccumulation of mercury in fish.

  15. The Utility of Geometric Morphometrics to Elucidate Pathways of Cichlid Fish Evolution

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    Michaela Kerschbaumer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fishes of the family Cichlidae are famous for their spectacular species flocks and therefore constitute a model system for the study of the pathways of adaptive radiation. Their radiation is connected to trophic specialization, manifested in dentition, head morphology, and body shape. Geometric morphometric methods have been established as efficient tools to quantify such differences in overall body shape or in particular morphological structures and meanwhile found wide application in evolutionary biology. As a common feature, these approaches define and analyze coordinates of anatomical landmarks, rather than traditional counts or measurements. Geometric morphometric methods have several merits compared to traditional morphometrics, particularly for the distinction and analysis of closely related entities. Cichlid evolutionary research benefits from the efficiency of data acquisition, the manifold opportunities of analyses, and the potential to visualize shape changes of those landmark-based methods. This paper briefly introduces to the concepts and methods of geometric morphometrics and presents a selection of publications where those techniques have been successfully applied to various aspects of cichlid fish diversification.

  16. What, if anything, is a Tilapia?-mitochondrial ND2 phylogeny of tilapiines and the evolution of parental care systems in the African cichlid fishes.

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    Klett, Vera; Meyer, Axel

    2002-06-01

    We estimated a novel phylogeny of tilapiine cichlid fish (an assemblage endemic to Africa and the Near East) within the African cichlid fishes on the basis of complete mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) gene sequences. The ND2 (1,047 bp) gene was sequenced in 39 tilapiine cichlids (38 species and 1 subspecies) and in an additional 14 nontilapiine cichlid species in order to evaluate the traditional morphologically based hypothesis of the respective monophyly of the tilapiine and haplochromine cichlid fish assemblages. The analyses included many additional cichlid lineages, not only the so-called tilapiines, but also lineages from Lake Tanganyika, east Africa, the Neotropics and an out-group from Madagascar with a wide range of parental care and mating systems. Our results suggest, in contrast to the historical morphology-based hypotheses from Regan (1920, 1922 ), Trewavas (1983), and Stiassny (1991), that the tilapiines do not form a monophyletic group because there is strong evidence that the genus Tilapia is not monophyletic but divided into at least five distinct groups. In contrast to this finding, an allozyme analysis of Pouyaud and Agnèse (1995), largely based on the same samples as used here, found a clustering of the Tilapia species into only two groups. This discrepancy is likely caused by the difference in resolution power of the two marker systems used. Our data suggest that only type species Tilapia sparrmanii Smith (1840) should retain the genus name TILAPIA: One particular group of tilapiines (composed of genera Sarotherodon, Oreochromis, Iranocichla, and Tristramella) is more closely related to an evolutionarily highly successful lineage, the haplochromine cichlids that compose the adaptive radiations of cichlid species flocks of east Africa. It appears that the highly adaptable biology of tilapiines is the ancestral state for all African cichlids and that the more stenotypic lifestyle of the haplochromine cichlids is derived from this

  17. Evolution of a unique predatory feeding apparatus: functional anatomy, development and a genetic locus for jaw laterality in Lake Tanganyika scale-eating cichlids

    OpenAIRE

    Albertson R Craig; Stewart Thomas A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background While bilaterality is a defining characteristic of triploblastic animals, several assemblages have managed to break this symmetry in order to exploit the adaptive peaks garnered through the lateralization of behaviour or morphology. One striking example of an evolved asymmetry in vertebrates comes from a group of scale-eating cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika. Members of the Perissodini tribe of cichlid fishes have evolved dental and craniofacial asymmetries in order to ...

  18. Ancyrocephalidae (Monogenea) of Lake Tanganyika. III : Cichlidogyrus infecting the world's biggest cichlid and the non-endemic tribes Haplochromini, Oreochromini and Tylochromini (Teleostei, Cichlidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Bukinga, F. M.; Vanhove, M.P.M.; Van Steenberge, M.; Pariselle, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika is the deepest and oldest African Great Lake and of economic importance. While the diversity of its endemic cichlid radiations yielded scientific interest, a number of cichlid tribes have few representatives in the lake. Some of those, namely Oreochromini (ex-Tilapiini), Haplochromini and Tylochromini, reach higher species numbers in riverine systems. Conversely, the phylogenetic position of the monospecific and endemic Boulengerochromini is unclear. The oreochromines Oreochro...

  19. Diet disparity among sympatric herbivorous cichlids in the same ecomorphs in Lake Tanganyika: amplicon pyrosequences on algal farms and stomach contents

    OpenAIRE

    Hata, Hiroki; Akifumi S Tanabe; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Toju, Hirokazu; Kohda, Masanori; Hori, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Background Lake Tanganyika, an ancient lake in the Great Rift Valley, is famous for the adaptive radiation of cichlids. Five tribes of the Cichlidae family have acquired herbivory, with five ecomorphs: grazers, browsers, scrapers, biters and scoopers. Sixteen species of the herbivorous cichlids coexist on a rocky littoral slope in the lake. Seven of them individually defend feeding territories against intruding herbivores to establish algal farms. We collected epiphyton from these territories...

  20. Assessing the dietary sources of two cichlid species in River Nile sub-branches: Stomach contents, fatty acids and stable isotopes analyses

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    Mohamad S. Abd El-Karim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We assess the importance of four different food sources as dietary components of Oreochromis niloticus and Sarotherodon galilaeus in Nile sub-branches using stomach contents, fatty acids (FA and stable isotopes (SI analyses. Diatoms were the dominant food items, whereas sand and mud constitute a major part of the stomach contents of both cichlids in the northern ElBehery canal. FAs and SI were compared in cichlids and four potential food sources. Carbon isotopes excluded the fresh macrophyte Myriophyllum spicatum and its epiphytes as a potential food source, whereas FA biomarkers indicated that M. spicatum is assimilated in cichlids’ muscles as detrital materials. FA profiles of cichlids’ muscles were highly enriched by live diatom markers whereas decayed diatoms and bacterial markers were partially present. Carbon isotope signatures of cichlids were much close to that of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM which elucidated that SPOM was the source of diatoms and bacterial detritus incorporated in cichlids muscles. Cichlids were highly enriched with nitrogen signatures which was a result of increased anthropogenic effects and incorporation of bacterial films. SI and FA analyses precisely indicated that live diatoms and bacteria, detrital macrophytes are the main sources of organic matter incorporated in cichlids muscles.

  1. Reticulate phylogeny of gastropod-shell-breeding cichlids from Lake Tanganyika – the result of repeated introgressive hybridization

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    Blanc Michel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tribe Lamprologini is the major substrate breeding lineage of Lake Tanganyika's cichlid species flock. Among several different life history strategies found in lamprologines, the adaptation to live and breed in empty gastropod shells is probably the most peculiar. Although shell-breeding arose several times in the evolutionary history of the lamprologines, all obligatory and most facultative shell-breeders belong to the so called "ossified group", a monophyletic lineage within the lamprologine cichlids. Since their distinctive life style enables these species to live and breed in closest vicinity, we hypothesized that these cichlids might be particularly prone to accidental hybridization, and that introgression might have affected the evolutionary history of this cichlid lineage. Results Our analyses revealed discrepancies between phylogenetic hypotheses based on mitochondrial and nuclear (AFLP data. While the nuclear phylogeny was congruent with morphological, behavioral and ecological characteristics, several species – usually highly specialized shell-breeders – were placed at contradicting positions in the mitochondrial phylogeny. The discordant phylogenies strongly suggest repeated incidents of introgressive hybridization between several distantly related shell-breeding species, which reticulated the phylogeny of this group of cichlids. Long interior branches and high bootstrap support for many interior nodes in the mitochondrial phylogeny argue against a major effect of ancient incomplete lineage sorting on the phylogenetic reconstruction. Moreover, we provide morphological and genetic (mtDNA and microsatellites evidence for ongoing hybridization among distantly related shell-breeders. In these cases, the territorial males of the inferred paternal species are too large to enter the shells of their mate, such that they have to release their sperm over the entrance of the shell to fertilize the eggs. With sperm

  2. Complex patterns of divergence among green-sensitive (RH2a African cichlid opsins revealed by Clade model analyses

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    Weadick Cameron J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene duplications play an important role in the evolution of functional protein diversity. Some models of duplicate gene evolution predict complex forms of paralog divergence; orthologous proteins may diverge as well, further complicating patterns of divergence among and within gene families. Consequently, studying the link between protein sequence evolution and duplication requires the use of flexible substitution models that can accommodate multiple shifts in selection across a phylogeny. Here, we employed a variety of codon substitution models, primarily Clade models, to explore how selective constraint evolved following the duplication of a green-sensitive (RH2a visual pigment protein (opsin in African cichlids. Past studies have linked opsin divergence to ecological and sexual divergence within the African cichlid adaptive radiation. Furthermore, biochemical and regulatory differences between the RH2aα and RH2aβ paralogs have been documented. It thus seems likely that selection varies in complex ways throughout this gene family. Results Clade model analysis of African cichlid RH2a opsins revealed a large increase in the nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution rate ratio (ω following the duplication, as well as an even larger increase, one consistent with positive selection, for Lake Tanganyikan cichlid RH2aβ opsins. Analysis using the popular Branch-site models, by contrast, revealed no such alteration of constraint. Several amino acid sites known to influence spectral and non-spectral aspects of opsin biochemistry were found to be evolving divergently, suggesting that orthologous RH2a opsins may vary in terms of spectral sensitivity and response kinetics. Divergence appears to be occurring despite intronic gene conversion among the tandemly-arranged duplicates. Conclusions Our findings indicate that variation in selective constraint is associated with both gene duplication and divergence among orthologs in African

  3. Testing the stages model in the adaptive radiation of cichlid fishes in East African Lake Tanganyika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschick, Moritz; Nosil, Patrik; Roesti, Marius; Dittmann, Marie Theres; Harmon, Luke; Salzburger, Walter

    2014-11-22

    Adaptive radiation (AR) is a key process in the origin of organismal diversity. However, the evolution of trait disparity in connection with ecological specialization is still poorly understood. Available models for vertebrate ARs predict that diversification occurs in the form of temporal stages driven by different selective forces. Here, we investigate the AR of cichlid fishes in East African Lake Tanganyika and use macroevolutionary model fitting to evaluate whether diversification happened in temporal stages. Six trait complexes, for which we also provide evidence of their adaptiveness, are analysed with comparative methods: body shape, pharyngeal jaw shape, gill raker traits, gut length, brain weight and body coloration. Overall, we do not find strong evidence for the 'stages model' of AR. However, our results suggest that trophic traits diversify earlier than traits implicated in macrohabitat adaptation and that sexual communication traits (i.e. coloration) diversify late in the radiation. PMID:25274371

  4. Genomic islands of speciation separate cichlid ecomorphs in an East African crater lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinsky, Milan; Challis, Richard J; Tyers, Alexandra M; Schiffels, Stephan; Terai, Yohey; Ngatunga, Benjamin P; Miska, Eric A; Durbin, Richard; Genner, Martin J; Turner, George F

    2015-12-18

    The genomic causes and effects of divergent ecological selection during speciation are still poorly understood. Here we report the discovery and detailed characterization of early-stage adaptive divergence of two cichlid fish ecomorphs in a small (700 meters in diameter) isolated crater lake in Tanzania. The ecomorphs differ in depth preference, male breeding color, body shape, diet, and trophic morphology. With whole-genome sequences of 146 fish, we identified 98 clearly demarcated genomic "islands" of high differentiation and demonstrated the association of genotypes across these islands with divergent mate preferences. The islands contain candidate adaptive genes enriched for functions in sensory perception (including rhodopsin and other twilight-vision-associated genes), hormone signaling, and morphogenesis. Our study suggests mechanisms and genomic regions that may play a role in the closely related mega-radiation of Lake Malawi. PMID:26680190

  5. Monophyletic origin of Lake Victoria cichlid fishes suggested by mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A; Kocher, T D; Basasibwaki, P; Wilson, A C

    1990-10-11

    Lake Victoria, together with its satellite lakes, harbours roughly 200 endemic forms of cichlid fishes that are classified as 'haplochromines' and yet the lake system is less than a million years old. This 'flock' has attracted attention because of the possibility that it evolved within the lake from one ancestral species and that biologists are thus presented with a case of explosive evolution. Within the past decade, however, morphology has increasingly emphasized the view that the flock may be polyphyletic. We sequenced up to 803 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from 14 representative Victorian species and 23 additional African species. The flock seems to be monophyletic, and is more akin to that from Lake Malawi than to species from Lake Tanganyika; in addition, it contains less genetic variation than does the human species, and there is virtually no sharing of mitochondrial DNA types among species. These results confirm that the founding event was recent. PMID:2215680

  6. Gonad development in Midas cichlids and the evolution of sex change in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Ronald G

    2011-01-01

    Some fishes mature and function as one sex and later transform to the other sex in response to social interactions. Previous evidence suggested that a change in developmental timing may be involved in the evolution of adult sex change in fishes. The most recent support for this idea came from reports that sex in the Midas cichlid, Amphilophus citrinellus, was determined by social conditions experienced at the juvenile stage. Differentiation as a male was reported to be dependent on large body size relative to group-mates, and thought to be mediated through aggressive interactions. Here I demonstrate that socially controlled sex determination does not occur as was originally reported. Previously, I found that sex was not associated with body size in juveniles either in nature or in captivity. Similarly, I found no association between aggressive behavior and sex in juveniles. I later demonstrated that socially controlled sex determination does not typically occur in the Midas cichlid and closely related species and supported an alternative mechanism to explain large body size in adult males. Finally, in the current study I analyze gonad histology of fish from the same population used by the original authors and lay to rest the idea of socially controlled sex determination in this species. Recent observations of socially controlled sex determination in juveniles of species that typically change sex at the adult stage are examples of phenotypic plasticity, not genetic variation. Therefore, juvenile socially controlled sex determination does not support a theory that a change in developmental timing is involved in the evolution of adult sex change in fishes. PMID:21740508

  7. Tucunarella n. Gen. and other dactylogyrids (Monogenoidea) from cichlid fish (Perciformes) from Peruvian Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F; Scholz, T; Rozkosná, P

    2010-06-01

    During parasitological research on cichlid fish from the tributaries of the Amazon River around Iquitos, Peru, the following gill monogenoidean species were found: Tucunarella cichlae n. gen. and n. sp. from Cichla monoculus Spix and Agassiz; Gussevia alioides Kritsky, Thatcher, and Boeger, 1986 from Heros severus Heckel; Gussevia asota Kritsky, Thatcher, and Boeger, 1989 from Astronotus ocellatus (Agassiz); Gussevia disparoides Kritsky, Thatcher, and Boeger, 1986 from H. severus (all new geographical records) and Cichlasoma amazonarum Kullander (new host record); Gussevia longihaptor (Mizelle and Kritsky, 1969) Kritsky, Thatcher, and Boeger, 1986 and Gussevia undulata Kritsky, Thatcher, and Boeger, 1986 from C. monoculus ; Sciadicleithrum satanopercae Yamada, Takemoto, Bellay, and Pavanelli, 2008 from Satanoperca jurupari Heckel; and Sciadicleithrum variabilum (Mizelle and Kritsky, 1969) Kritsky, Thatcher, and Boeger, 1989 from C. amazonarum (new host and geographical records). Tucunarella n. gen. is proposed to accommodate a new species, Tucunarella cichlae , which is its type and only known species in the genus. The new genus is characterized by, besides a very large body size (about 1.5 mm vs. much less than 1 mm in other ancyrocephaline genera in Amazonia), a thickened tegument, 1 pair of eyes, overlapping gonads (testis dorsal to the germarium), nonarticulated male copulatory organ (MCO) and accessory piece, a coiled (counterclockwise) MCO, a dextral vaginal aperture, a haptor armed with 2 pairs of anchors (each with broad base and subequal roots, which are marginally folded), and dorsal and ventral bars and 14 hooks with protruding blunt thumbs and 2 different shapes (slender vs. slightly expanded shanks). Illustrations and data on morphological and biometric variability of individual species from different hosts are provided. The present data provide evidence of a relatively wide host specificity of gill monogenoideans parasitic in South American cichlids

  8. A hybrid genetic linkage map of two ecologically and morphologically divergent Midas cichlid fishes (Amphilophus spp.) obtained by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ddRADSeq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recknagel, Hans; Elmer, Kathryn R; Meyer, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Cichlid fishes are an excellent model system for studying speciation and the formation of adaptive radiations because of their tremendous species richness and astonishing phenotypic diversity. Most research has focused on African rift lake fishes, although Neotropical cichlid species display much variability as well. Almost one dozen species of the Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus spp.) have been described so far and have formed repeated adaptive radiations in several Nicaraguan crater lakes. Here we apply double-digest restriction-site associated DNA sequencing to obtain a high-density linkage map of an interspecific cross between the benthic Amphilophus astorquii and the limnetic Amphilophus zaliosus, which are sympatric species endemic to Crater Lake Apoyo, Nicaragua. A total of 755 RAD markers were genotyped in 343 F(2) hybrids. The map resolved 25 linkage groups and spans a total distance of 1427 cM with an average marker spacing distance of 1.95 cM, almost matching the total number of chromosomes (n = 24) in these species. Regions of segregation distortion were identified in five linkage groups. Based on the pedigree of parents to F(2) offspring, we calculated a genome-wide mutation rate of 6.6 × 10(-8) mutations per nucleotide per generation. This genetic map will facilitate the mapping of ecomorphologically relevant adaptive traits in the repeated phenotypes that evolved within the Midas cichlid lineage and, as the first linkage map of a Neotropical cichlid, facilitate comparative genomic analyses between African cichlids, Neotropical cichlids and other teleost fishes. PMID:23316439

  9. Acquisition of Lateralized Predation Behavior Associated with Development of Mouth Asymmetry in a Lake Tanganyika Scale-Eating Cichlid Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Yuichi Takeuchi; Michio Hori; Shinya Tada; Yoichi Oda

    2016-01-01

    The scale-eating cichlid Perissodus microlepis with asymmetric mouth is an attractive model of behavioral laterality: each adult tears off scales from prey fishes' left or right flanks according to the direction in which its mouth is skewed. To investigate the development of behavioral laterality and mouth asymmetry, we analyzed stomach contents and lower jaw-bone asymmetry of various-sized P. microlepis (22 ≤ SL

  10. Evidence for genetic monogamy and female-biased dispersal in the biparental mouthbrooding cichlid Eretmodus cyanostictus from Lake Tanganyika

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Martin I.; Rico, Ciro; Balshine, Sigal

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we investigate whether apparent social monogamy (where a species forms a pair bond but may participate in copulations outside the pair bond) corresponds with genetic monogamy (where individuals participate only in copulations within a pair bond) in a biparental mouthbrooding cichlid fish, Eretmodus cyanostictus, from Lake Tanganyika, Africa. Our findings suggest that E. cyanostictus is both socially and genetically monogamous and that monogamy may result from limited opportunit...

  11. Nuclear and mitochondrial data reveal different evolutionary processes in the Lake Tanganyika cichlid genus Tropheus

    OpenAIRE

    Sturmbauer Christian; Koblmüller Stephan; Egger Bernd; Sefc Kristina M

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Cichlid fishes are notorious for their wealth of intra- and interspecific colour pattern diversity. In Lake Tanganyika, the endemic genus Tropheus represents the most impressive example for geographic variation in the pattern and hue of integument colouration, but the taxonomy of the over 100 mostly allopatric colour morphs remains to a large degree unresolved. Previous studies of mitochondrial DNA sequence data revealed polyphyly of the six nominally described species and...

  12. Dealing with food and eggs in mouthbrooding cichlids: structural and functional trade-offs in fitness related traits.

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    Tim Tkint

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As in any vertebrate, heads of fishes are densely packed with functions. These functions often impose conflicting mechanical demands resulting in trade-offs in the species-specific phenotype. When phenotypical traits are linked to gender-specific parental behavior, we expect sexual differences in these trade-offs. This study aims to use mouthbrooding cichlids as an example to test hypotheses on evolutionary trade-offs between intricately linked traits that affect different aspects of fitness. We focused on the oral apparatus, which is not only equipped with features used to feed and breathe, but is also used for the incubation of eggs. We used this approach to study mouthbrooding as part of an integrated functional system with diverging performance requirements and to explore gender-specific selective environments within a species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Because cichlids are morphologically very diverse, we hypothesize that the implications of the added constraint of mouthbrooding will primarily depend on the dominant mode of feeding of the studied species. To test this, we compared the trade-off for two maternal mouthbrooding cichlid species: a "suction feeder" (Haplochromis piceatus and a "biter" (H. fischeri. The comparison of morphology and performance of both species revealed clear interspecific and intersex differences. Our observation that females have larger heads was interpreted as a possible consequence of the fact that in both the studied species mouthbrooding is done by females only. As hypothesized, the observed sexual dimorphism in head shape is inferred as being suboptimal for some aspects of the feeding performance in each of the studied species. Our comparison also demonstrated that the suction feeding species had smaller egg clutches and more elongated eggs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings support the hypothesis that there is a trade-off between mouthbrooding and feeding performance in the two

  13. Local variation and parallel evolution: morphological and genetic diversity across a species complex of neotropical crater lake cichlid fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Elmer, Kathryn R; Kusche, Henrik; Lehtonen, Topi K; Meyer, Axel

    2010-01-01

    The polychromatic and trophically polymorphic Midas cichlid fish species complex (Amphilophus cf. citrinellus) is an excellent model system for studying the mechanisms of speciation and patterns of phenotypic diversification in allopatry and in sympatry. Here, we first review research to date on the species complex and the geological history of its habitat. We analyse body shape variation from all currently described species in the complex, sampled from six crater lakes (maximally 1.2 23.9 ky...

  14. Phylogeography, colonization and population history of the Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus spp.) in the Nicaraguan crater lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer Axel; Barluenga Marta

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Elucidation of the mechanisms driving speciation requires detailed knowledge about the phylogenetic relationships and phylogeography of the incipient species within their entire ranges as well as their colonization history. The Midas cichlid species complex Amphilophus spp. has been proven to be a powerful model system for the study of ecological specialization, sexual selection and the mechanisms of sympatric speciation. Here we present a comprehensive and integrative phy...

  15. Comparative cytogenetics of Neotropical cichlid fishes (Nannacara, Ivanacara and Cleithracara) indicates evolutionary reduction of diploid chromosome numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Hodaňová,Lucie; Kalous, Lukáš; Musilová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A comparative cytogenetic analysis was carried out in five species of a monophyletic clade of neotropical Cichlasomatine cichlids, namely Cleithracara maronii Steindachner, 1881, Ivanacara adoketa (Kullander & Prada-Pedreros, 1993), Nannacara anomala Regan, 1905, N. aureocephalus Allgayer, 1983 and N. taenia Regan, 1912. Karyotypes and other chromosomal characteristics were revealed by CDD banding and mapped onto the phylogenetic hypothesis based on molecular analyses of four genes, ...

  16. Male-male competition and nuptial-colour displacement as a diversifying force in Lake Victoria cichlid fishes.

    OpenAIRE

    Seehausen, Ole; Schluter, Dolph

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism for diversification of male nuptial-colour patterns in the rapidly speciating cichlid fishes of Lake Victoria. Sympatric closely related species often display nuptial colours at opposite ends of the spectrum with males either blue or yellow to red. Colour polymorphisms within single populations are common too. We propose that competition between males for breeding sites promotes such colour diversification, and thereby speciation. We hypothesize that male aggression...

  17. Phylogeography, colonization and population history of the Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus spp. in the Nicaraguan crater lakes

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    Meyer Axel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidation of the mechanisms driving speciation requires detailed knowledge about the phylogenetic relationships and phylogeography of the incipient species within their entire ranges as well as their colonization history. The Midas cichlid species complex Amphilophus spp. has been proven to be a powerful model system for the study of ecological specialization, sexual selection and the mechanisms of sympatric speciation. Here we present a comprehensive and integrative phylogeographic analysis of the complete Midas Cichlid species complex in Nicaragua (> 2000 individuals covering the entire distributional range, using two types of molecular markers (the mitochondrial DNA control region and 15 microsatellites. We investigated the majority of known lake populations of this species complex and reconstructed their colonization history in order to distinguish between alternative speciation scenarios. Results We found that the large lakes contain older and more diverse Midas Cichlid populations, while all crater lakes hold younger and genetically less variable species assemblages. The large lakes appear to have repeatedly acted as source populations for all crater lakes, and our data indicate that faunal exchange among crater lakes is extremely unlikely. Despite their very recent (often only a few thousand years old and common origin from the two large Nicaraguan lakes, all crater lake Midas Cichlid radiations underwent independent, but parallel, evolution, and comprise distinct genetic units. Indeed several of these crater lakes contain multiple genetically distinct incipient species that most likely arose through sympatric speciation. Several crater lake radiations can be traced back to a single ancestral line, but some appear to have more than one founding lineage. The timing of the colonization(s of each crater lake differs, although most of them occurred more (probably much more recently than 20,000 years ago. Conclusion The

  18. Antipredator responses by native mosquitofish to non-native cichlids: An examination of the role of prey naiveté

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    Rehage, Jennifer S.; Dunlop, Katherine L.; Loftus, William F.

    2009-01-01

    The strong impact of non-native predators in aquatic systems is thought to relate to the evolutionary naiveté of prey. Due to isolation and limited dispersal, this naiveté may be relatively high in freshwater systems. In this study, we tested this notion by examining the antipredator response of native mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, to two non-native predators found in the Everglades, the African jewelfish,Hemichromis letourneuxi, and the Mayan cichlid, Cichlasoma urophthalmus. We manipulated prey naiveté by using two mosquitofish populations that varied in their experience with the recent invader, the African jewelfish, but had similar levels of experience with the longer-established Mayan cichlid. Specifically, we tested these predictions: (1) predator hunting modes differed between the two predators, (2) predation rates would be higher by the novel jewelfish predator, (3) particularly on the naive population living where jewelfish have not invaded yet, (4) antipredator responses would be stronger to Mayan cichlids due to greater experience and weaker and/or ineffective to jewelfish, and (5) especially weakest by the naive population. We assayed prey and predator behavior, and prey mortality in lab aquaria where both predators and prey were free-ranging. Predator hunting modes and habitat domains differed, with jewelfish being more active search predators that used slightly higher parts of the water column and less of the habitat structure relative to Mayan cichlids. In disagreement with our predictions, predation rates were similar between the two predators, antipredator responses were stronger to African jewelfish (except for predator inspections), and there was no difference in response between jewelfish-savvy and jewelfish-naive populations. These results suggest that despite the novelty of introduced predators, prey may be able to respond appropriately if non-native predator archetypes are similar enough to those of native predators, if prey rely

  19. Changes in reproductive life-history strategies in response to nest density in a shell-brooding cichlid, Telmatochromis vittatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ota, Kazutaka; Hori, Michio; Kohda, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the appearance of a reproductively parasitic tactic varies, and how this variation affects territorial males of the Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish Telmatochromis vittatus, we examined the reproductive ecology of territorial males in Mtondwe and compared it with that of a neighboring Wonzye population, where nest density differs from that at Mtondwe. In Wonzye, with high nest density, male tactics change with their body size from a territorial to a non-territorial parasitic ...

  20. The use of multiple sources of social information in contest behavior: testing the social cognitive abilities of a cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Hotta, Takashi; Takeyama, Tomohiro; Heg, Dik; Awata, Satoshi; Jordan, Lyndon A.; Kohda, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Theory suggests that living in large social groups with dynamic social interactions often favors the evolution of enhanced cognitive abilities. Studies of how animals assess their own contest ability commonly focus on a single cognitive task, and little is known about the diversity or co-occurrence of cognitive abilities in social species. We examined how a highly social cichlid fish Julidochromis transcriptus uses four major cognitive abilities in contest situations; direct experience, winne...

  1. Early learning and speciation: the effects of early experience on sexual and aggressive behaviour in Lake Victoria cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Verzijden, Machteld Nicolette

    2008-01-01

    The great Lakes of East Africa are inhabited by a great number of haplochromine cichlid species, which form a diverse group in both ecology and nuptial coloration. The large number of sympatrically occuriring closely related species has raised questions about the underlying mechanism for reproductive isolation. In this thesis I describe experiments that test for the effects of early experience on their species assortative behaviour in the contexts of mate choice and male territorial interacti...

  2. Hidden biodiversity in an ancient lake: phylogenetic congruence between Lake Tanganyika tropheine cichlids and their monogenean flatworm parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhove, Maarten P M; Pariselle, Antoine; Van Steenberge, Maarten; Raeymaekers, Joost A M; Hablützel, Pascal I; Gillardin, Céline; Hellemans, Bart; Breman, Floris C; Koblmüller, Stephan; Sturmbauer, Christian; Snoeks, Jos; Volckaert, Filip A M; Huyse, Tine

    2015-01-01

    The stunning diversity of cichlid fishes has greatly enhanced our understanding of speciation and radiation. Little is known about the evolution of cichlid parasites. Parasites are abundant components of biodiversity, whose diversity typically exceeds that of their hosts. In the first comprehensive phylogenetic parasitological analysis of a vertebrate radiation, we study monogenean parasites infecting tropheine cichlids from Lake Tanganyika. Monogeneans are flatworms usually infecting the body surface and gills of fishes. In contrast to many other parasites, they depend only on a single host species to complete their lifecycle. Our spatially comprehensive combined nuclear-mitochondrial DNA dataset of the parasites covering almost all tropheine host species (N = 18), reveals species-rich parasite assemblages and shows consistent host-specificity. Statistical comparisons of host and parasite phylogenies based on distance and topology-based tests demonstrate significant congruence and suggest that host-switching is rare. Molecular rate evaluation indicates that species of Cichlidogyrus probably diverged synchronically with the initial radiation of the tropheines. They further diversified through within-host speciation into an overlooked species radiation. The unique life history and specialisation of certain parasite groups has profound evolutionary consequences. Hence, evolutionary parasitology adds a new dimension to the study of biodiversity hotspots like Lake Tanganyika. PMID:26335652

  3. Evolutionary Fate of the Androgen Receptor-Signaling Pathway in Ray-Finned Fishes with a Special Focus on Cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Thibault; Salzburger, Walter; Böhne, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of the steroid system is coupled to the evolution of multicellular animals. In vertebrates in particular, the steroid receptor repertoire has been shaped by genome duplications characteristic to this lineage. Here, we investigate for the first time the composition of the androgen receptor-signaling pathway in ray-finned fish genomes by focusing in particular on duplicates that emerged from the teleost-specific whole-genome duplication. We trace lineage- and species-specific duplications and gene losses for the genomic and nongenomic pathway of androgen signaling and subsequently investigate the sequence evolution of these genes. In one particular fish lineage, the cichlids, we find evidence for differing selection pressures acting on teleost-specific whole-genome duplication paralogs at a derived evolutionary stage. We then look into the expression of these duplicated genes in four cichlid species from Lake Tanganyika indicating, once more, rapid changes in expression patterns in closely related fish species. We focus on a particular case, the cichlid specific duplication of the rac1 GTPase, which shows possible signs of a neofunctionalization event. PMID:26333839

  4. Male convict cichlid 11-ketotestosterone levels throughout the reproductive cycle: an exploratory profile study in laboratory and field populations

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    Natalie April van Breukelen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The convict cichlid (Amatitlania nigrofasciata has been extensively examined in relation to many behavioral topics, such as courtship, pair-bonding, bi-parental care, and territoriality. Recently, this model species has been utilized in studies on genetics, endocrinology, and neuroanatomy, with an ultimate goal of connecting behavior with its underlying mechanisms. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1 profile the circulating levels of plasma 11KT in the male convict cichlid at multiple points during the reproductive cycle and (2 generally compare the hormonal profiles of the widely used laboratory populations and those of a free-living population in the streams of Costa Rica. The results of the field experiment showed that male convict cichlids had higher levels of circulating 11KT during courtship and lower during the parental care and non-breeding phases. The profile of the laboratory population was similar to the profile of the free-living individuals, with significantly higher levels of 11KT occurring during courtship than during parental care, though the level of 11KT during non-breeding phase was elevated in the laboratory. The high levels of 11KT during courtship and low levels of 11KT during parental care found in both the field and the laboratory is similar to what has been reported in other species of teleosts, and may suggest an important function of 11KT in the expression of courtship behavior and the subsequent onset of parental behaviors in this model species.

  5. Nuclear markers reveal unexpected genetic variation and a Congolese-Nilotic origin of the Lake Victoria cichlid species flock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehausen, Ole; Koetsier, Egbert; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Chapman, Lauren J; Chapman, Colin A; Knight, Mairi E; Turner, George F; van Alphen, Jacques J M; Bills, Roger

    2003-01-22

    Phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial (mt) DNA have indicated that the cichlid species flock of the Lake Victoria region is derived from a single ancestral species found in East African rivers, closely related to the ancestor of the Lake Malawi cichlid species flock. The Lake Victoria flock contains ten times less mtDNA variation than the Lake Malawi radiation, consistent with current estimates of the ages of the lakes. We present results of a phylogenetic investigation using nuclear (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers and a wider coverage of riverine haplochromines. We demonstrate that the Lake Victoria-Edward flock is derived from the morphologically and ecologically diverse cichlid genus Thoracochromis from the Congo and Nile, rather than from the phenotypically conservative East African Astatotilapia. This implies that the ability to express much of the morphological diversity found in the species flock may by far pre-date the origin of the flock. Our data indicate that the nuclear diversity of the Lake Victoria-Edward species flock is similar to that of the Lake Malawi flock, indicating that the genetic diversity is considerably older than the 15 000 years that have passed since the lake began to refill. Most of this variation is manifested in trans-species polymorphisms, indicating very recent cladogenesis from a genetically very diverse founder stock. Our data do not confirm strict monophyly of either of the species flocks, but raise the possibility that these flocks have arisen from hybrid swarms. PMID:12590750

  6. Hematological parameters of Iranian cichlid Iranocichla hormuzensis: Coad, 1982 (Perciformes in Mehran River

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    Ehsan Daneshvar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the hematological parameters in Iranocichla hormuzensis, an Iranian freshwater cichlid important as ornamental and food fish. Forty fish were captured with seine net at Mehran river Hormozgan province, Iran. Blood was used to determine the total counts of red blood cells (RBC and white blood cells (WBC, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC and morphometric data of erythrocytes. The Iranian fish showed lower RBC and WBC values than the other cichlids (Oreochromis niloticus, O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. hybrid, Cichlasoma dimerus and Cichla monoculus. Hematocrit did not vary among the species, but MCV, MCH and MCHC in I. hormuzensis were higher than those for O. niloticus, O. aureus, O. hybrid, C. dimerus and C. monoculus. These differences may be related to different life habit of fish. This study suggests that I. hormuzensis is well acclimated to the environment being the first report for its hematology. It is also suggested high efficiency in oxygen transportation, and an efficient inflow of oxygen by the gills, indicating the welfare of fish on this environment.Este estudo descreve os parâmetros hematológicos em Iranocichla hormuzensis, ciclídeo iraniano de água doce, importante como peixe ornamental e como de consumo. Quarenta peixes foram capturados com rede no rio Mehran, província de Hormozgan, Irã. O sangue foi usado para determinar as contagens totais de eritrócitos (RBC e leucócitos (WBC, hematócrito, volume corpuscular médio (MCV, hemoglobina corpuscular média (MCH, concentração de hemoglobina corpuscular média (MCHC e dados morfométricos de eritrócitos. O peixe iraniano mostrou valores menores de RBC e WBC do que outros ciclídeos (Oreochromis niloticus, O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. hybrid, Cichlasoma dimerus e Cichla monoculus. O hematócrito não variou entre as espécies, mas MCV, MCH e MCHC em I

  7. Duration of memory of dominance relationships in a group living cichlid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Takashi; Takeyama, Tomohiro; Jordan, Lyndon Alexander; Kohda, Masanori

    2014-09-01

    Animal contests are costly and tend to escalate when rivals have similar competitive abilities. Individuals that remember dominance relationships with rivals may avoid repeated agonistic interactions and hence avoid the costs of repeated escalation of contests. However, it can be difficult to experimentally disentangle the effects of memory from those of loser effects (losers behaving subordinately due to prior defeats). Here, we test whether loser effects or individual memory mediate contest behaviour in the African cichlid, Julidochromis transcriptus. We find that on days 3 and 5 after initial contests, losers display subordinate behaviour to contest winners but not to novel contestants. However, this effect disappears after 7 days, at which time losers do not display subordinate behaviour to either rival. These results show that (1) this fish can recall a previously dominant contestant for up to 5 days and (2) as no subordinate displays were shown to the novel contestant, there are no evidences for loser effects in this species. Such short-term memory of past interactions may have broad significance in social species with repeated interactions.

  8. Evolution of feeding specialization in Tanganyikan scale-eating cichlids: a molecular phylogenetic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Mutsumi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes in Lake Tanganyika exhibit remarkable diversity in their feeding habits. Among them, seven species in the genus Perissodus are known for their unique feeding habit of scale eating with specialized feeding morphology and behaviour. Although the origin of the scale-eating habit has long been questioned, its evolutionary process is still unknown. In the present study, we conducted interspecific phylogenetic analyses for all nine known species in the tribe Perissodini (seven Perissodus and two Haplotaxodon species using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP analyses of the nuclear DNA. On the basis of the resultant phylogenetic frameworks, the evolution of their feeding habits was traced using data from analyses of stomach contents, habitat depths, and observations of oral jaw tooth morphology. Results AFLP analyses resolved the phylogenetic relationships of the Perissodini, strongly supporting monophyly for each species. The character reconstruction of feeding ecology based on the AFLP tree suggested that scale eating evolved from general carnivorous feeding to highly specialized scale eating. Furthermore, scale eating is suggested to have evolved in deepwater habitats in the lake. Oral jaw tooth shape was also estimated to have diverged in step with specialization for scale eating. Conclusion The present evolutionary analyses of feeding ecology and morphology based on the obtained phylogenetic tree demonstrate for the first time the evolutionary process leading from generalised to highly specialized scale eating, with diversification in feeding morphology and behaviour among species.

  9. Symmetry perception in bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium griseum) and Malawi cichlids (Pseudotropheus sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluessel, V; Beil, O; Weber, T; Bleckmann, H

    2014-09-01

    Several species have been shown to perceive symmetry as a measure of superior genetic quality, useful for assessing potential mates or mediating other visual activities such as the selection of food sources. The current study assessed whether Pseudotropheus sp. and Chiloscyllium griseum, two fish species from distantly related groups, possess symmetry perception. In alternative two choice experiments, individuals were tested for spontaneous preferences and trained to discriminate between abstract symmetrical and asymmetrical stimulus pairs. Pair discriminations were followed by extensive categorization experiments. Transfer tests elucidated whether bilaterally symmetrical and rotationally symmetrical stimuli could be distinguished. Sharks were also tested for the degree of dissimilarity between two symbols that could still be detected. While sharks showed both a spontaneous preference for symmetry as well as remarkable discrimination abilities by succeeding in all of the presented tasks, cichlids showed no spontaneous preference, had difficulties in discriminating between symbols and performed poorly in the categorization experiments. Sharks distinguished between bilaterally and rotationally symmetrical stimuli and easily differentiated between a four-armed cross (all arms 90° apart) and a cross where one of the arms was only 45° spaced from the one next to it. Performance did not decline when the separation was extended to 70°, but was significantly reduced at an 80° separation. Results indicate that the ability for symmetry perception varies across fish species and individuals, whereby some can detect even subtle differences in this respect. PMID:24794621

  10. Experimental Infection of the Mayan Cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus with the Oomycete Aphanomyces invadans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Ayala, Daniel; Vidal-Martínez, Víctor Manuel

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of the Mayan cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus to infection with the fungus Aphanomyces invadans (also known as epizootic ulcerative syndrome [EUS]). A total of 27 C. urophthalmus were exposed to the original A. Invadans 2006/86/EC strain by intramuscularly injecting the fish with 25,000 zoospores/ml or exposing the fish to a suspension of 25,000 zoospores/ml in 6-L aquaria for 30 days. To assess the infectious capacity of A. invadans, 3 golden barbs (Puntius semifasciolatus) were infected intramuscularly with 200,000 zoospores/ml. A second experiment using 100 C. urophthalmus was performed for 60 days with 50 fish in each treatment group. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic method was used; muscle and gills were the target tissues. In the first experiment, none of the exposed C. urophthalmus developed skin lesions related to A. invadans infection. However, PCR analysis revealed that infection had occurred. For the intramuscular treatment, there were significant differences between the controls and the muscle samples (Fisher's exact test; P 0.05). All golden barbs became infected, as indicated by PCR, and developed skin lesions typical of A. invadans infection. We concluded that C. urophthalmus was infected with A. invadans but was an asymptomatic carrier because skin lesions did not develop. In the second experiment, all fish were negative, suggesting that the fish had cleared the infection by the end of the experiment. PMID:25742055

  11. As clear as mud: Turbidity induces behavioral changes in the African cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suzanne M. GRAY; Laura H. McDONNELL; Fabio G. CINQUEMANI; Lauren J. CHAPMAN

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic biodiversity is being lost at an unprecedented rate.One factor driving this loss is increased turbidity,an environmental stressor that can impose behavioral,morphological,and/or physiological costs on fishes.Here we describe the behavioral response of a widespread African cichlid,Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae,to turbidity.We used a split-brood rearing design to test if F1 offspring reared in turbid water,originating from river (turbid) and swamp (clear) populations,behave differently than full-sibs reared in clear water.We examined two facets of behavior:(1) behaviors of fish in full sib groups,including activity level and social dynamics collected during the rearing period; and (2) male aggressive behavior directed at potential male competitors after fish had reached maturity; this was done in an experimental set-up independent of the rearing aquaria.Regardless of population of origin,fish reared in turbid water were marginally less active and performed fewer social behaviors than those reared in clear water.On the other hand,when tested against a competitor in turbid water,males performed more aggressive behaviors,regardless of population of origin or rearing environment.Our results suggest a plastic behavioral response to turbidity that may allow P multicolor to persist over a range of turbidity levels in nature by decreasing activity and general social behaviors and intensifying reproductive behaviors to ensure reproductive success [ Current Zoology 58 (1):146-157,2012].

  12. Phylogeographic Diversity of the Lower Central American Cichlid Andinoacara coeruleopunctatus (Cichlidae

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    S. Shawn McCafferty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well appreciated that historical and ecological processes are important determinates of freshwater biogeographic assemblages. Phylogeography can potentially lend important insights into the relative contribution of historical processes in biogeography. However, the extent that phylogeography reflects historical patterns of drainage connection may depend in large part on the dispersal capability of the species. Here, we test the hypothesis that due to their relatively greater dispersal capabilities, the neotropical cichlid species Andinoacara coeruleopunctatus will display a phylogeographic pattern that differs from previously described biogeographic assemblages in this important region. Based on an analysis of 318 individuals using mtDNA ATPase 6/8 sequence and restriction fragment length polymorphism data, we found eight distinct clades that are closely associated with biogeographic patterns. The branching patterns among the clades and a Bayesian clock analysis suggest a relatively rapid colonization and diversification among drainages in the emergent Isthmus of Panama followed by the coalescing of some drainages due to historical connections. We also present evidence for extensive cross-cordillera sharing of clades in central Panama and the Canal region. Our results suggest that contemporary phylogeographic patterns and diversification in Lower Central American fishes reflect an interaction of historical drainage connections, dispersal, and demographic processes.

  13. Effect of mate size on maternal reproductive effort in the convict cichlid Amatitlania siquia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ashley R. ROBART

    2012-01-01

    The differential allocation hypothesis predicts individuals will increase their reproductive investment when mated to a high quality partner.In many species of fish with biparental care females prefer large males due to the males' greater ability to raise more offspring to independence.I examined the relationship between mate quality,parental care and number of offspring in a natural population of convict cichlids Amatitlania siquia.The frequency of frontal displays by females was positively correlated with male standard length.Additionally,as males increased in length relative to their mate,females increased the frequency of chases towards predators,while males decreased the number of displays towards brood predators.This trade-off in parental effort within a pair due to mate quality is a key prediction of differential allocation.The number of offspring was correlated with male,but not female,standard length.These results support the differential allocation hypothesis in that females offered more parental care to offspring of a larger male,while their mates decreased the amount of care they provided.Additionally,females benefited in terms of number of offspring by pairing with higher quality mates.Increased female investment may provide an incentive to ensure male care and maintain pair bonding,which could lead to greater reproductive success through increased offspring survival [Current Zoology 58 (1):66-72,2012].

  14. Unusual allometry for sexual size dimorphism in a cichlid where males are extremely larger than females

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kazutaka Ota; Masanori Kohda; Tetsu Sato

    2010-06-01

    When males are the larger sex, a positive allometric relationship between male and female sizes is often found across populations of a single species (i.e. Rensch’s rule). This pattern is typically explained by a sexual selection pressure on males. Here, we report that the allometric relationship was negative across populations of a shell-brooding cichlid fish Lamprologus callipterus, although males are extremely larger than females. Male L. callipterus collect and defend empty snail shells in each of which a female breeds. We found that, across six populations, male and female sizes are positively correlated with not only sexual and fecundity selection indices, but also with shell sizes. Given their different reproductive behaviours, these correlations mean that males are required to be more powerful, and thus larger, to transport larger shells, while female bodies are reduced to the shell size to enable them to enter the shells. Among the three size selections (sexual selection, fecundity selection and shell size), shell size explained the allometry, suggesting that females are more strongly subject to size selection associated with shell size availability than males. However, the allometry was violated when considering an additional population where size-selection regimes of males differed from that of other populations. Therefore, sexual size allometry will be violated by body size divergence induced by multiple selection regimes.

  15. Process and pattern in cichlid radiations - inferences for understanding unusually high rates of evolutionary diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehausen, Ole

    2015-07-01

    The cichlid fish radiations in the African Great Lakes differ from all other known cases of rapid speciation in vertebrates by their spectacular trophic diversity and richness of sympatric species, comparable to the most rapid angiosperm radiations. I review factors that may have facilitated these radiations and compare these with insights from recent work on plant radiations. Work to date suggests that it was a coincidence of ecological opportunity, intrinsic ecological versatility and genomic flexibility, rapidly evolving behavioral mate choice and large amounts of standing genetic variation that permitted these spectacular fish radiations. I propose that spatially orthogonal gradients in the fit of phenotypes to the environment facilitate speciation because they allow colonization of alternative fitness peaks during clinal speciation despite local disruptive selection. Such gradients are manifold in lakes because of the interaction of water depth as an omnipresent third spatial dimension with other fitness-relevant variables. I introduce a conceptual model of adaptive radiation that integrates these elements and discuss its applicability to, and predictions for, plant radiations. PMID:25983053

  16. Reproductive-tactic-specific variation in sperm swimming speeds in a shell-brooding cichlid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, J L; Desjardins, J K; Milligan, N; Montgomerie, R; Balshine, S

    2007-08-01

    Theory predicts that males experiencing elevated levels of sperm competition will invest more in gonads and produce faster-swimming sperm. Although there is ample evidence in support of the first prediction, few studies have examined sperm swimming speed in relation to sperm competition. In this study, we tested these predictions from sperm competition theory by examining sperm characteristics in Telmatochromis vittatus, a small shell-brooding cichlid fish endemic to Lake Tanganyika. Males exhibit four different reproductive tactics: pirate, territorial, satellite, and sneaker. Pirate males temporarily displace all other competing males from a shell nest, whereas sneaker males always release sperm in the presence of territorial and satellite males. Due to the fact that sneakers spawn in the presence of another male, sneakers face the highest levels of sperm competition and pirates the lowest, whereas satellites and territorials experience intermediate levels. In accordance with predictions, sperm from sneakers swam faster than sperm from males adopting the other reproductive tactics, whereas sperm from pirates was slowest. Interestingly, we were unable to detect any variation in sperm tail length among these reproductive tactics. Thus, sperm competition appears to have influenced sperm energetics in this species without having any influence on sperm size. PMID:17460159

  17. Male mate choice scales female ornament allometry in a cichlid fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kullmann Harald

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies addressing the adaptive significance of female ornamentation have gained ground recently. However, the expression of female ornaments in relation to body size, known as trait allometry, still remains unexplored. Here, we investigated the allometry of a conspicuous female ornament in Pelvicachromis taeniatus, a biparental cichlid that shows mutual mate choice and ornamentation. Females feature an eye-catching pelvic fin greatly differing from that of males. Results We show that allometry of the female pelvic fin is scaled more positively in comparison to other fins. The pelvic fin exhibits isometry, whereas the other fins (except the caudal fin show negative allometry. The size of the pelvic fin might be exaggerated by male choice because males prefer female stimuli that show a larger extension of the trait. Female pelvic fin size is correlated with individual condition, suggesting that males can assess direct and indirect benefits. Conclusions The absence of positive ornament allometry might be a result of sexual selection constricted by natural selection: fins are related to locomotion and thus may be subject to viability selection. Our study provides evidence that male mate choice might scale the expression of a female sexual ornament, and therefore has implications for the understanding of the relationship of female sexual traits with body size in species with conventional sex-roles.

  18. Can convict Cichlids (Amatitlania siquia socially learn the degree of predation risk associated with novel visual cues in their environment?

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    Patrick M Barks

    Full Text Available For many animals, the ability to distinguish cues indicative of predation risk from cues unrelated to predation risk is not entirely innate, but rather is learned and improved with experience. Two pathways to such learning are possible. First, an animal could initially express antipredator behaviour toward a wide range of cues and subsequently learn which of those cues are non-threatening. Alternatively, it could initially express no antipredator behaviour toward a wide range of cues and subsequently learn which of them are threatening. While the learned recognition of threatening cues may occur either through personal interaction with a cue (asocial learning or through observation of the behaviour of social companions toward a cue (social learning, the learned recognition of non-threatening cues seems to occur exclusively through habituation, a form of asocial learning. Here, we tested whether convict cichlid fish (Amatitlaniasiquia can socially learn to recognize visual cues in their environment as either threatening or non-threatening. We exposed juvenile convict cichlids simultaneously to a novel visual cue and one of three (visual social cues: a social cue indicative of non-risk (the sight of conspecifics that had previously been habituated to the novel cue, a social cue indicative of predation risk (the sight of conspecifics trained to fear the novel cue, or a control treatment with no social cue. The subsequent response of focal fish, when presented with the novel cue alone, was not influenced by the social cue that they had previously witnessed. We therefore did not find evidence that convict cichlids in our study could use social learning to recognize novel visual cues as either threatening or non-threatening. We consider alternative explanations for our findings.

  19. Multispecies Outcomes of Sympatric Speciation after Admixture with the Source Population in Two Radiations of Nicaraguan Crater Lake Cichlids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautt, Andreas F.; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Meyer, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The formation of species in the absence of geographic barriers (i.e. sympatric speciation) remains one of the most controversial topics in evolutionary biology. While theoretical models have shown that this most extreme case of primary divergence-with-gene-flow is possible, only a handful of accepted empirical examples exist. And even for the most convincing examples uncertainties remain; complex histories of isolation and secondary contact can make species falsely appear to have originated by sympatric speciation. This alternative scenario is notoriously difficult to rule out. Midas cichlids inhabiting small and remote crater lakes in Nicaragua are traditionally considered to be one of the best examples of sympatric speciation and lend themselves to test the different evolutionary scenarios that could lead to apparent sympatric speciation since the system is relatively small and the source populations known. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of two small-scale radiations of Midas cichlids inhabiting crater lakes Apoyo and Xiloá through a comprehensive genomic data set. We find no signs of differential admixture of any of the sympatric species in the respective radiations. Together with coalescent simulations of different demographic models our results support a scenario of speciation that was initiated in sympatry and does not result from secondary contact of already partly diverged populations. Furthermore, several species seem to have diverged simultaneously, making Midas cichlids an empirical example of multispecies outcomes of sympatric speciation. Importantly, however, the demographic models strongly support an admixture event from the source population into both crater lakes shortly before the onset of the radiations within the lakes. This opens the possibility that the formation of reproductive barriers involved in sympatric speciation was facilitated by genetic variants that evolved in a period of isolation between the initial founding

  20. Community Genetics Reveal Elevated Levels of Sympatric Gene Flow among Morphologically Similar but Not among Morphologically Dissimilar Species of Lake Victoria Cichlid Fish

    OpenAIRE

    M. Egas; Seehausen, O.; Mrosso, H D J; D. A. Joyce; Konijnendijk, N.

    2011-01-01

    We examined genetic structure among five species of Lake Victoria haplochromine cichlids in four island communities, using a full factorial sampling design that compared genetic differentiation between pairs of species and populations of varying morphological similarity and geographical proximity. We found that allopatric conspecific populations were on average significantly more strongly differentiated than sympatric heterospecific populations of morphologically similar species. Allopatric h...

  1. Disturbance cues in freshwater prey fishes: Does urea function as an ‘early warning cue’in juvenile convict cichlids and rainbow trout?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant E. BROWN, Christopher D. JACKSON, Patrick H. MALKA,Élisa JACQUES, Marc-Andre COUTURIER

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater vertebrate and invertebrate prey species commonly rely on chemosensory information, including non-injury released disturbance cues, to assess local predation threats. We conducted laboratory studies to (1 determine if urea can function as a disturbance cue in juvenile convict cichlids and rainbow trout and (2 determine if the background level of urea influences the behavioral response to a subsequent pulse of urea (‘background noise’ hypothesis. In the first series of trials, juvenile cichlids and trout were exposed to urea at varying concentrations (0 to 0.5 mg L-1 for cichlids and 0 to 1.0 mg L-1 for trout. Our results suggest that both cichilds and trout exhibited functionally similar responses to urea and conspecific disturbance cues and that increasing the concentration of urea results in an increase intensity of antipredator behaviour. In the second series of trials, we pre-exposed cichlids or trout to intermediate or high concentrations of urea (or a distilled water control and then tested for the response to a second pulse of urea at at intermediate or high concentrations (versus a distilled water control. Our results demonstrate that pre-exposure to urea reduces or eliminates the response to a second pulse of urea, supporting the background noise hypothesis. Together, our results suggest that pulses of urea, released by disturbed or stressed individuals, may function as an early warning signal in freshwater prey species [Current Zoology 58 (2: 250–259 , 2012].

  2. Color changing and behavioral context in the Amazonian Dwarf Cichlid Apistogramma hippolytae (Perciformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoni Rosa Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal coloration has many functions, and fishes are noted among vertebrates for presenting a wide variety of color patterns. Although in marine fishes the relationship between body coloration and behavioral context is well documented, there's not much information about freshwater fishes. Here we describe color patterns displayed by the dwarf cichlid Apistogramma hippolytae and suggest that these patterns are dependent on different social and behavioral settings. Field observations were conducted underwater in a pond in Central Amazonia, Brazil. We recorded six body coloration patterns related to seven different kinds of behavioral activities: foraging, resting, reproductive and agonistic displays, aggression (attacking and fleeing and parental care. Changes in coloration occur rapidly and take only a few seconds. Females on parental care exhibited a unique pattern that are more persistent and probably manifests more slowly. In the shallow and clear waters of the natural environment of this dwarf cichlid, color communication seems to constitute an efficient way to display information about individual mood, social status and reproductive readiness, contributing to minimize loss of energy in unnecessary interactions.Coloração animal tem diferentes funções, e os peixes se destacam entre os vertebrados por apresentarem uma grande diversidade de padrões de cores. Embora se conheça relativamente bem a relação entre coloração e contexto comportamental para peixes marinhos, pouco se sabe para os peixes de água doce. Nós descrevemos os padrões de coloração de um ciclídeo amazônico, Apistogramma hippolytae, e sugerimos como esses padrões são dependentes das características sociais e comportamentais. Realizamos observações subaquáticas utilizando mergulho livre em campo durante o dia em uma lagoa na Amazônia Central. Nós caracterizamos seis padrões de coloração associados a sete comportamentos diferentes: alimentação, repouso

  3. Population structure and reproductive behavior of Sinaloa cichlid Cichlasoma beani (Jordan, 1889 in a tropical reservoir

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    Melgen A. García-Lizárraga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The population structure and reproductive condition of the Sinaloa cichlid Cichlasoma beani from samples obtained from June 2000 to July 2001 were determined. Samples in the first week each month from the largest trader of tilapia in the Aguamilpa Reservoir in Mexico and were caught in gillnets (9.6 and 11.4 cm stretch-mesh size. Of 596 specimens, there were 427 males and 169 females; monthly sex ratio, frequency of lengths by the multinomial distribution, timing of reproduction, condition index, and size at first maturity was determined. Differences in the sex ratio and monthly totals were significant, favoring males, except for September 2000 and March 2001. From one (August 2000 to three modal groups (July 2000 and June 2001 were identified by size. There were no significant differences in standard length weight relationships by sex, which indicated that a shared model for both genders is appropriate, and isometric growth was detected. Based on the proportion of mature and partially matures fish, the main reproductive period was April through June; size at first maturity was 18.9 cm. Water temperature was not significantly related to the percentage of mature and partially matures Sinaloa cichlids or spawning. These findings provide information for regulating the Cichlasoma beani fishery in this region such minimum legal size and non-fishing period.Se determinó la estructura poblacional y condición reproductiva del cíclido de Sinaloa Cichlasoma beani desde junio de 2000 a julio de 2001. Las muestras se obtuvieron de la captura comercial de tilapia en el embalse de Aguamilpa, México durante la primera semana de cada mes. Los especímenes se capturaron con redes de enmalle (9,6 y 11,4 cm de tamaño de malla. De los 596 organismos recolectados, 427 fueron machos y 169 hembras. Se determinó la proporción de sexos mensual, grupos modales de tallas a través de una distribución multinomial, época reproductiva, índice de condición y talla

  4. Protective Effects of Silymarin Extract on Malthion-Induced Zebra Cichlid (Cichlasoma Nigrofasciatum Hepatotoxicity

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    Mahdi Banaee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is much evidence indicating that natural substances from edible and medicinal plants possess powerful antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities. The objective of the present study was to investigate the potential hepatoprotective effect of silymarin in fish exposed to malathion. Methods: Zebra cichlid fish were allocated into five groups of which one group received normal feed and served as control. Fish from group 2 were treated with 0.1 mg.L-1 malathion. Fish from group 3 and 4 were fed with enriched diet with 1400 mg and 2100 mg silymarin per 1 kg feed, respectively. While fish from group 5 and 6 were fed with enriched diet with 1400 mg and 2100 mg silymarin per 1 kg feed, respectively and simultaneously were treated with 0.1 mg.L-1 malathion for 15 days. Activities of hepatic enzymes including alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase were evaluated. Oxidative stress was ascertained by measuring malondialdehyde as marker of lipid peroxidation and total cellular antioxidant capacity. Results: Exposure to malathion caused a significant increase in MDA levels and altered AST, ALT, ALP and LDH activities in liver tissues (p<0.05. The hepatic antioxidant capacity was significantly lowered in malathion treated fish as compared to the control group (p<0.05. Treatment with silymarin significantly ameliorated these changes in the malathion-treated groups. Conclusion: These finding demonstrated that silymarin have protective effects against the toxic influence of malathion on the examined biochemical parameters in liver tissue of fish.

  5. Growth and social behavior in a cichlid fish are affected by social rearing environment and kinship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Saskia; Thünken, Timo

    2014-04-01

    Living in groups is a widespread phenomenon in many animal taxa. The reduction of predation risk is thought to be an important cause for the formation of groups. Consequently, grouping behavior is particularly pronounced during vulnerable life stages, i.e., as juveniles. However, group living does not only provide benefits but also imposes costs on group members, e.g., increased competition for food. Thus, benefits of grouping behavior might not be evident when predation risk is absent. The adaptive significance of living and also developing in a group independent from predation risk has received relatively little attention although this might have important implications on the evolution and maintenance of group living. The first aim of the present study was to examine whether the social environment affects juvenile performance in the cichlid fish Pelvicachromis taeniatus and, secondly, whether kinship affects social behavior. Kin selection theory predicts benefits from grouping with kin. Here, we demonstrate that juveniles reared in a group grow on average faster compared to juveniles reared in isolation under standardized laboratory conditions without predation risk. Furthermore, we found significant differences in social behavior between juveniles reared in a group and reared in isolation. Fish reared in isolation were significantly more aggressive and less willing to shoal than group-reared fish. As expected, genetic relatedness influenced social behavior in group-reared fish as well: dyads of juveniles consisting of kin showed increased group cohesiveness compared to non-kin dyads. We discuss the potential benefits of group living in general and living with kin in particular.

  6. Two types of dominant male cichlid fish: behavioral and hormonal characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcazar, Rosa M; Becker, Lisa; Hilliard, Austin T; Kent, Kai R; Fernald, Russell D

    2016-01-01

    Male African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, have been classified as dominant or subordinate, each with unique behavioral and endocrine profiles. Here we characterize two distinct subclasses of dominant males based on types of aggressive behavior: (1) males that display escalating levels of aggression and court females while they establish a territory, and (2) males that display a stable level of aggression and delay courting females until they have established a territory. To profile differences in their approach to a challenge, we used an intruder assay. In every case, there was a male-male confrontation between the resident dominant male and the intruder, with the intruder quickly taking a subordinate role. However, we found that dominant males with escalating aggression spent measurably more time attacking subordinates than did dominant males with stable aggression that instead increased their attention toward the females in their tank. There was no difference in the behavior of intruders exposed to either type of dominant male, suggesting that escalating aggression is an intrinsic characteristic of some dominant males and is not elicited by the behavior of their challengers. Male behavior during the first 15 min of establishing a territory predicts their aggressive class. These two types of dominant males also showed distinctive physiological characteristics. After the intruder assay, males with escalating aggression had elevated levels of 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), testosterone, estradiol, and cortisol, while those with stable aggression did not. These observations show that the same stimulus can elicit different behavioral and endocrine responses among A. burtoni dominant males that characterize them as either escalating or stable aggressive types. Our ability to identify which individuals within a population have escalating levels of aggressive responses versus those which have stable levels of aggressive responses when exposed to the same stimulus

  7. Fish embryo and juvenile size under hypoxia in the mouth-brooding African cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.E.REARDON; L.J.CHAPMAN

    2012-01-01

    We used a field survey and a laboratory rearing experiment to (a) examine response (size and survival) to life-long hypoxia in offspring of the African maternal mouth-brooding cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae (Seegers) and (b) explore the degree to which developmental response can be environmentally-induced.Embryo size metrics were quantified in 9 field populations across a range of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations.In the laboratory,first generation (F1) broods of low-DO origin were reared under high or low DO.Brooding period was quantified for the mothers; and egg size,egg metabolic rate and juvenile size-at-release were quantified in their (F2) offspring.The F2 offspring were split and grown for 3 months post-release under high or low DO,and juvenile size and survival were quantified.In the field survey,across stages,embryos from low-DO field populations were shorter and weighed less than embryos from high-DO populations.In the laboratory experiment,F2 eggs and juveniles-at-release from mother's mouth did not differ in mass,length,survival regardless of development DO environment.However,juveniles diverged in size after leaving mother's mouth,exhibiting smaller size when grown under low DO.Size differences in embryo size across field populations and divergence in embryo size after release from the mother's mouthsupport predictions for smaller body size under hypoxia.There was no evidence for negative effects on survival of juveniles after 3 months.Brooding period was 16% shorter in females reared under low DO suggesting that hypoxia may accelerate embryo development.This work provides insights into how bearer fishes respond to hypoxic stress relative to fishes with no post-spawning parental care; a shorter brooding interval and smaller body size may provide an optimal solution to parent and embryo survival under hypoxia in brooding fishes.

  8. A genetic demographic analysis of Lake Malawi rock-dwelling cichlids using spatio-temporal sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husemann, Martin; Nguyen, Rachel; Ding, Baoqing; Danley, Patrick D

    2015-06-01

    We estimated the effective population sizes (Ne ) and tested for short-term temporal demographic stability of populations of two Lake Malawi cichlids: Maylandia benetos, a micro-endemic, and Maylandia zebra, a widespread species found across the lake. We sampled a total of 351 individuals, genotyped them at 13 microsatellite loci and sequenced their mitochondrial D-loop to estimate genetic diversity, population structure, demographic history and effective population sizes. At the microsatellite loci, genetic diversity was high in all populations. Yet, genetic diversity was relatively low for the sequence data. Microsatellites yielded mean Ne estimates of 481 individuals (±99 SD) for M. benetos and between 597 (±106.3 SD) and 1524 (±483.9 SD) individuals for local populations of M. zebra. The microsatellite data indicated no deviations from mutation-drift equilibrium. Maylandia zebra was further found to be in migration-drift equilibrium. Temporal fluctuations in allele frequencies were limited across the sampling period for both species. Bayesian Skyline analyses suggested a recent expansion of M. zebra populations in line with lake-level fluctuations, whereas the demographic history of M. benetos could only be estimated for the very recent past. Divergence time estimates placed the origin of M. benetos within the last 100 ka after the refilling of the lake and suggested that it split off the sympatric M. zebra population. Overall, our data indicate that micro-endemics and populations in less favourable habitats have smaller Ne , indicating that drift may play an important role driving their divergence. Yet, despite small population sizes, high genetic variation can be maintained. PMID:25891855

  9. The role of otolith size in hearing – Insights from cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Schulz-Mirbach

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Otolithic end organs in fishes function as accelerometers and are involved in the senses of balance and hearing (e.g. Popper et al. 2005. Otolith mass and shape are likely decisive factors influencing otolith motion, but while it is largely unknown how different shapes affect otolith movement relative to the sensory epithelium (Popper et al. 2005, greater otolith mass is predicted to result in enhanced stimulation of sensory hair cells and improved hearing (Lychakov and Rebane 2005. What few studies exist on this topic, however, yielded contradicting results in that they did or did not find a correlation between increased otolith mass and enhanced hearing (see Kéver et al. 2014. We investigated the relationship between otolith morphology (including 3D-models of otoliths based on high-resolution microCT imaging and otolith weight and hearing abilities in cichlids while comparing three species (Etroplus maculatus, Hemichromis guttatus, Steatocranus tinanti with different swimbladder morphology and hearing abilities (Schulz-Mirbach et al. 2014. We predicted Etroplus maculatus—the species that displays the best hearing sensitivities—to possess larger/heavier otoliths. As swimbladder extensions in this species are connected to the lagena, we further predicted to find heavier lagenar otoliths. Compared to H. guttatus and S. tinanti, E. maculatus showed the heaviest saccular otoliths, while lagenar otoliths were significantly thinner and lighter than in the former two species, apparently contradicting the hypothesis that the lagena and its otolith are primarily involved in improved hearing abilities. Our results support the idea that there is no ‘simple’ relationship between otolith weight, ancilliary auditory structures and hearing abilities. 3D-models of inner ears and otoliths may be ideally suited for future studies modeling complex otolith motion and thus, may provide a better understanding of how otolith morphology contributes to inner

  10. Mechanism of action of endosulfan as disruptor of gonadal steroidogenesis in the cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Cuña, Rodrigo H; Rey Vázquez, Graciela; Dorelle, Luciana; Rodríguez, Enrique M; Guimarães Moreira, Renata; Lo Nostro, Fabiana L

    2016-09-01

    The organochlorine pesticide endosulfan (ES) is used in several countries as a wide spectrum insecticide on crops with high commercial value. Due to its high toxicity to non-target animals, its persistence in the environment and its ability to act as an endocrine disrupting compound in fish, ES use is currently banned or restricted in many other countries. Previous studies on the cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus have shown that waterborne exposure to ES can lead to both decreased pituitary FSH content and histological alterations of testes. As gonadotropin-stimulated sex steroids release from gonads was inhibited by ES in vitro, the aim of the present study was to elucidate possible mechanisms of disruption of ES on gonadal steroidogenesis in C. dimerus, as well as compare the action of the active ingredient (AI) with that of currently used commercial formulations (CF). Testis and ovary fragments were incubated with ES (AI or CF) and/or steroidogenesis activators or precursors. Testosterone and estradiol levels were measured in the incubation media. By itself, ES did not affect hormone levels. Co-incubation with LH and the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin caused a decrease of the stimulated sex steroids release. When co-incubated with precursors dehydroandrostenedione and 17αhydroxyprogesterone, ES did not affect the increase caused by their addition alone. No differences were observed between the AI and CFs, suggesting that the effect on steroidogenesis disruption is mainly caused by the AI. Results indicate that action of ES takes place downstream of LH-receptor activation and upstream of the studied steroidogenic enzymes. PMID:27235598

  11. Sexual selection on color and behavior within and between cichlid populations: Implications for speciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael J.PAUERS; Jeffrey S.MCKINNON

    2012-01-01

    Sexual selection is widely viewed as playing a central role in hapiochromine cichlid speciation.Hypothetically,once divergent mate preferences evolve among populations of these fishes,reproductive isolation follows and the populations begin to behave as different species.Various studies have examined patterns of assortative mating among species and sometimes populations,but few have examined variation in directional preferences,especially among populations of the same species.We investigated mate choice behavior in two populations of Labeotropheus fuelleborni,a Lake Malawi endemic.We test whether mating.preferences between populations are based on the same traits and in the same direction as preferences within populations.We examine the potential contributions of two classes of trait,color patterns and behaviors,to reproductive isolation.When females chose between either two males of their own population,or two from another,female preferences were generally similar (for the female population) across the two contexts.Mate choice patterns differed between (female) populations for a measure of color,but only modestly for male behavior.In a separate experiment we simultaneously offered females a male of their own population and a male from a different population.In these trials,females consistently preferred males from their own population,which were also the males that displayed more frequently than their opponents,but not necessarily those with color traits suggested to be most attractive in the previous experiment.Thus directional preferences for chroma and related aspects of color may be important when females are presented with males of otherwise similar phenotypes,but may play little role in mediating assortative mating among populations with substantially different color patterns.A preference for male behavior could play some role in speciation if males preferentially court same-population females,as we have observed for the populations studied herein.

  12. Efficacy of an ototoxic aminoglycoside (gentamicin) on the differentiation of the inner ear of cichlid fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönleber, J.; Anken, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    Previous investigations revealed that the growth of fish inner ear otoliths depends on the amplitude and the direction of gravity, thus suggesting the existence of a (negative) feedback mechanism. In the course of these experiments, it was shown that altered gravity both affected otolith size (and thus the provision of the proteinacious matrix) as well as the incorporation of calcium. It is hitherto unknown, as of whether sensory hair cells are involved either in the regulation of otolith growth or in the provision of otolithic material (such as protein or inorganic components) or even both. The ototoxic aminoglycoside gentamicin (GM) damages hair cells in many vertebrates (and is therefore used for the treatment of Meniere's disease in humans). The present study was thus designed to determine as of whether vestibular sensory cells are needed for otolith growth by applying GM in order to induce a (functionally relevant) loss of these cells. Developing cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus were therefore immersed in 120 mg/l GM for 10 or 21 days. At the beginning and at the end of the experimental periods, the fish were incubated in the calcium-tracer alizarin complexone (AC). After the experiment, otoliths were dissected and the area grown during GM-exposure (i.e., the area enclosed by the two AC labellings) was determined planimetrically. The results showed that incubating the animals in a GM-solution had no effect on otolith growth, but the development of otolith asymmetry was affected. Ultrastructural examinations of the sensory hair cells revealed that they had obviously not been affected by GM-treatment (no degenerative morphological features observed). Overall, the present results suggest that hair cells are not affected by GM concerning their possible role in (general) otolith growth, but that these cells indeed might have transitionally been impaired by GM resulting in a decreased capacity of regulating otolith symmetry.

  13. Temperature and Ca2+-dependence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase in haddock, salmon, rainbow trout and zebra cichlid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Helene; Jessen, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    the enzyme or its membrane lipid environment is still a matter of discussion. In this study we compared the temperature dependence and Ca2+-dependence of SR Ca2+-ATPase in haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), salmon (Salmo, salar), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and zebra cichlid (Cichlasoma...... nigrofasciatum). The Arrhenius plot of zebra cichlid showed a break point at 20 degreesC, and the haddock Arrhenius plot was non-linear with pronounced changes in slope in the. temperature area, 6-14 degreesC. In Arrhenius plot from both salmon and rainbow trout a plateau exists with an almost constant SR Ca2......+- ATPase activity. The temperature range of the plateau was 14-21 and 18-25 degreesC in salmon and rainbow trout, respectively. Ca2+-dependence in the four different fish species investigated was very similar with half maximal activation (K-0.5) between 0.2 and 0.6 muM and half maximal inhibition (I-0...

  14. Evolution of opercle shape in cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika - adaptive trait interactions in extant and extinct species flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laura A B; Colombo, Marco; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Phenotype-environment correlations and the evolution of trait interactions in adaptive radiations have been widely studied to gain insight into the dynamics underpinning rapid species diversification. In this study we explore the phenotype-environment correlation and evolution of operculum shape in cichlid fishes using an outline-based geometric morphometric approach combined with stable isotope indicators of macrohabitat and trophic niche. We then apply our method to a sample of extinct saurichthyid fishes, a highly diverse and near globally distributed group of actinopterygians occurring throughout the Triassic, to assess the utility of extant data to inform our understanding of ecomorphological evolution in extinct species flocks. A series of comparative methods were used to analyze shape data for 54 extant species of cichlids (N = 416), and 6 extinct species of saurichthyids (N = 44). Results provide evidence for a relationship between operculum shape and feeding ecology, a concentration in shape evolution towards present along with evidence for convergence in form, and significant correlation between the major axes of shape change and measures of gut length and body elongation. The operculum is one of few features that can be compared in extant and extinct groups, enabling reconstruction of phenotype-environment interactions and modes of evolutionary diversification in deep time. PMID:26584885

  15. Repeated parallel evolution of parental care strategies within Xenotilapia, a genus of cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Kidd

    Full Text Available The factors promoting the evolution of parental care strategies have been extensively studied in experiment and theory. However, most attempts to examine parental care in an evolutionary context have evaluated broad taxonomic categories. The explosive and recent diversifications of East African cichlid fishes offer exceptional opportunities to study the evolution of various life history traits based on species-level phylogenies. The Xenotilapia lineage within the endemic Lake Tanganyika cichlid tribe Ectodini comprises species that display either biparental or maternal only brood care and hence offers a unique opportunity to study the evolution of distinct parental care strategies in a phylogenetic framework. In order to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships among 16 species of this lineage we scored 2,478 Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLPs across the genome. We find that the Ectodini genus Enantiopus is embedded within the genus Xenotilapia and that during 2.5 to 3 million years of evolution within the Xenotilapia clade there have been 3-5 transitions from maternal only to biparental care. While most previous models suggest that uniparental care (maternal or paternal arose from biparental care, we conclude from our species-level analysis that the evolution of parental care strategies is not only remarkably fast, but much more labile than previously expected.

  16. Modularity of the Oral Jaws Is Linked to Repeated Changes in the Craniofacial Shape of African Cichlids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Parsons

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The African cichlids of the East-African rift-lakes provide one of the most dramatic examples of adaptive radiation known. It has long been thought that functional decoupling of the oral and pharyngeal jaws in cichlids has facilitated their explosive evolution. Recent research has also shown that craniofacial evolution from radiations in lakes Victoria, Malawi, and Tanganyika has occurred along a shared primary axis of shape divergence, whereby the preorbital region of the skull changes in a manner that is, relatively independent from other head regions. We predicted that the preorbital region would comprise a variational module and used an extensive dataset from each lake that allowed us to test this prediction using a model selection approach. Our findings supported the presence of a preorbital module across all lakes, within each lake, and for Malawi, within sand and rock-dwelling clades. However, while a preorbital module was consistently present, notable differences were also observed among groups. Of particular interest, a negative association between patterns of variational modularity was observed between the sand and rock-dwelling clades, a patter consistent with character displacement. These findings provide the basis for further experimental research involving the determination of the developmental and genetic bases of these patterns of modularity.

  17. Induced cytochrome P450 1A activity in cichlid fishes from Guandu River and Jacarepagua Lake, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The induction of cytochrome P4501A-mediated activity (e.g. ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation, EROD) has been used as a biomarker for monitoring fish exposure to AhR-receptor ligands such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). In this study we found that hepatic EROD is induced in fish ('Nile tilapia', Oreochromis niloticus and 'acara', Geophagus brasiliensis) from the Guandu River (7-17-fold) and Jacarepagua Lake (7-fold), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Since both cichlid fish are consumed by the local population and the Guandu River is the main source of the drinking water supply for the greater Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area, pollution by cytochrome P4501A-inducing chemicals is a cause for concern and should be further investigated in sediments, water and biota. We additionally showed that EROD activity in the fish liver post-mitochondrial supernatant-simpler, cheaper and less time consuming to prepare than the microsomal fraction-is sufficiently sensitive for monitoring purposes. - Increased EROD activity in the liver of cichlid fishes indicated that Guandu River, the source of drinking water supply for Rio de Janeiro is polluted by CYP1A-inducing chemicals

  18. Induced cytochrome P450 1A activity in cichlid fishes from Guandu River and Jacarepagua Lake, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parente, Thiago E.M.; Oliveira, Ana C.A.X. de [Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, Escola Nacional de Saude Publica - FIOCRUZ, Av Brasil 4036, Predio de Expansao do Campus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21041-361 (Brazil); Paumgartten, Francisco J.R. [Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, Escola Nacional de Saude Publica - FIOCRUZ, Av Brasil 4036, Predio de Expansao do Campus, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21041-361 (Brazil)], E-mail: paum@ensp.fiocruz.br

    2008-03-15

    The induction of cytochrome P4501A-mediated activity (e.g. ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation, EROD) has been used as a biomarker for monitoring fish exposure to AhR-receptor ligands such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs). In this study we found that hepatic EROD is induced in fish ('Nile tilapia', Oreochromis niloticus and 'acara', Geophagus brasiliensis) from the Guandu River (7-17-fold) and Jacarepagua Lake (7-fold), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Since both cichlid fish are consumed by the local population and the Guandu River is the main source of the drinking water supply for the greater Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area, pollution by cytochrome P4501A-inducing chemicals is a cause for concern and should be further investigated in sediments, water and biota. We additionally showed that EROD activity in the fish liver post-mitochondrial supernatant-simpler, cheaper and less time consuming to prepare than the microsomal fraction-is sufficiently sensitive for monitoring purposes. - Increased EROD activity in the liver of cichlid fishes indicated that Guandu River, the source of drinking water supply for Rio de Janeiro is polluted by CYP1A-inducing chemicals.

  19. Alternative reproductive tactics in snail shell-brooding cichlids diverge in energy reserve allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kuerthy, Corinna; Tschirren, Linda; Taborsky, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Life history theory predicts that the amount of resources allocated to reproduction should maximize an individual's lifetime reproductive success. So far, resource allocation in reproduction has been studied mainly in females. Intraspecific variation of endogenous energy storage and utilization patterns of males has received little attention, although these patterns may vary greatly between individuals pursuing alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs). ARTs are characterized by systematic variation of behavioral, physiological, and often morphological traits among same-sex conspecifics. Some individuals may rely on previously accumulated reserves, because of limited foraging opportunities during reproduction. Others may be able to continue foraging during reproduction, thus relying on reserves to a lesser extent. We therefore predicted that, if male tactics involve such divergent limitations and trade-offs within a species, ARTs should correspondingly differ in energy reserve allocation and utilization. To test this prediction, we studied short-term and long-term reserve storage patterns of males in the shell-brooding cichlid Lamprologus callipterus. In this species, bourgeois males investing in territory defense, courtship, and guarding of broods coexist with two distinct parasitic male tactics: (1) opportunistic sneaker males attempting to fertilize eggs by releasing sperm into the shell opening when a female is spawning; and (2) specialized dwarf males attempting to enter the shell past the spawning female to fertilize eggs from inside the shell. Sneaker males differed from other male types by showing the highest amount of accumulated short-term and long-term fat stores, apparently anticipating their upcoming adoption of the nest male status. In contrast, nest males depleted previously accumulated energy reserves with increasing nest holding period, as they invest heavily into costly reproductive behaviors while not taking up any food. This conforms to a capital

  20. Nuclear and mitochondrial data reveal different evolutionary processes in the Lake Tanganyika cichlid genus Tropheus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturmbauer Christian

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes are notorious for their wealth of intra- and interspecific colour pattern diversity. In Lake Tanganyika, the endemic genus Tropheus represents the most impressive example for geographic variation in the pattern and hue of integument colouration, but the taxonomy of the over 100 mostly allopatric colour morphs remains to a large degree unresolved. Previous studies of mitochondrial DNA sequence data revealed polyphyly of the six nominally described species and complex phylogeographic patterns influenced by lake level fluctuations and population admixture, and suggested the parallel evolution of similar colour patterns in divergent evolutionary lineages. A gene tree of a rapidly radiating group may be subject to incomplete and stochastic lineage sorting, and to overcome this problem we used multi-locus, nuclear AFLP data in comparison with mtDNA sequences to study diversification, migration and introgression in Tropheus colour morphs in Lake Tanganyika. Results Significant incongruence between phylogenetic reconstructions from mitochondrial and AFLP data suggested incomplete sorting of mitochondrial haplotypes as well as frequent introgression between differentiated lineages. In contrast to the mitochondrial phylogeny, the AFLP phenogram was largely congruent with species classifications, colour pattern similarities, and in many cases also with the current geographic distribution of populations, and did not produce evidence of convergent colour pattern evolution. Homoplasy in the AFLP data was used to identify populations that were strongly affected by introgression. Conclusion Different evolutionary processes were distinguished by the combination of mitochondrial and AFLP data. Mitochondrial phylogeographic patterns retained signals of large-scale migration events triggered by historical, major lake level fluctuations, whereas AFLP data indicated genetic cohesion among local groups of populations resulting from

  1. Dactylogyrids (Monogenea) parasitic on cichlids from northern Brazil, with description of two new species of Sciadicleithrum and new host and geographical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, Fabiano; Scholz, Tomáš; Tavares-Dias, Marcos; Luque, José L

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of Sciadicleithrum Kritsky, Thatcher and Boeger, 1989 are described from two cichlids from the Araguarí River, State of Amapá, northern Brazil. Sciadicleithrum edgari n. sp. from Satanoperca jurupari (Heckel, 1840) differs from all congeneric species in the morphology (hook-shaped, with middle process and distally bifurcate) of the accessory piece of the male copulatory organ (MCO). Sciadiclethrum araguariensis n. sp. from Crenicichla labrina (Spix and Agassiz, 1831) can be distinguished from all other species by a Y-shaped accessory piece of MCO. In addition to the description of two new species, new host and geographical records of six dactylogyrid monogeneans from cichlid fishes are presented. PMID:26751887

  2. The role of the Yala swamp lakes in conservation of Lake Victoria region haplochromine cichlids: evidence from molecular genetic and trophic ecology studies

    OpenAIRE

    Abila, R.; Salzburger, W; Ndonga, M.F.; Owiti, D.O.; Barluenga, M.

    2006-01-01

    Lake Kanyaboli (Kenya), a satellite lake of Lake Victoria, has been suggested as a potential refugium for haplochromine cichlids that have gone extinct in Lake Victoria. We employed mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite DNA molecular markers as well as feeding ecology studies to re- evaluate the evolutionary and ecological significance of Lake Kanyaboli haplochromines. The mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite markers revealed high genetic diversity in the endangered Xystichromis phytophagus an...

  3. Genetic and morphological population differentiation in the rock-dwelling and specialized shrimp-feeding cichlid fish species Altolamprologus compressiceps from Lake Tanganyika, East Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Spreitzer, Maria Luise; Mautner, Selma; Makasa, Lawrence; Sturmbauer, Christian

    2011-01-01

    With about 250 endemic species, Lake Tanganyika contains an extraordinarily diverse cichlid fish fauna, and thus represents an ideal model system for the study of pathways and processes of speciation. The Lamprologini form the most species-rich tribe in Lake Tanganyika comprising about 100 species in seven genera, most of which are endemic to the lake. They are territorial substrate-breeders and represent a monophyletic tribe. By combined analysis of population genetics and geometric morphome...

  4. Evolution of a unique predatory feeding apparatus: functional anatomy, development and a genetic locus for jaw laterality in Lake Tanganyika scale-eating cichlids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertson R Craig

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While bilaterality is a defining characteristic of triploblastic animals, several assemblages have managed to break this symmetry in order to exploit the adaptive peaks garnered through the lateralization of behaviour or morphology. One striking example of an evolved asymmetry in vertebrates comes from a group of scale-eating cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika. Members of the Perissodini tribe of cichlid fishes have evolved dental and craniofacial asymmetries in order to more effectively remove scales from the left or right flanks of prey. Here we examine the evolution and development of craniofacial morphology and laterality among Lake Tanganyika scale-eating cichlids. Results Using both geometric and traditional morphometric methods we found that the craniofacial evolution in the Perissodini involved discrete shifts in skeletal anatomy that reflect differences in habitat preference and predation strategies. Further, we show that the evolutionary history of the Perissodini is characterized by an accentuation of craniofacial laterality such that certain taxa show elaborate sided differences in craniofacial shape consistent with the sub-partitioning of function between sides of the head during attacks. Craniofacial laterality in the scale-eating specialist Perissodus microlepis was found to be evident early in development and exhibited a unimodal distribution, which is contrary to the adult condition where jaw laterality has been described as a discrete, bimodal antisymmetry. Finally, using linkage and association analyses we identified a conserved locus for jaw handedness that segregates among East African cichlids. Conclusions We suggest that, during the evolution of the Perissodini, selection has accentuated a latent, genetically determined handedness of the craniofacial skeleton, enabling the evolution of jaw asymmetries in order to increase predation success. Continued work on the developmental genetic basis of

  5. Bentho-pelagic divergence of cichlid feeding architecture was prodigious and consistent during multiple adaptive radiations within African rift-lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W James Cooper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: How particular changes in functional morphology can repeatedly promote ecological diversification is an active area of evolutionary investigation. The African rift-lake cichlids offer a calibrated time series of the most dramatic adaptive radiations of vertebrate trophic morphology yet described, and the replicate nature of these events provides a unique opportunity to test whether common changes in functional morphology have repeatedly facilitated their ecological success. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Specimens from 87 genera of cichlid fishes endemic to Lakes Tanganyka, Malawi and Victoria were dissected in order to examine the functional morphology of cichlid feeding. We quantified shape using geometric morphometrics and compared patterns of morphological diversity using a series of analytical tests. The primary axes of divergence were conserved among all three radiations, and the most prevalent changes involved the size of the preorbital region of the skull. Even the fishes from the youngest of these lakes (Victoria, which exhibit the lowest amount of skull shape disparity, have undergone extensive preorbital evolution relative to other craniofacial traits. Such changes have large effects on feeding biomechanics, and can promote expansion into a wide array of niches along a bentho-pelagic ecomorphological axis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we show that specific changes in trophic anatomy have evolved repeatedly in the African rift lakes, and our results suggest that simple morphological alterations that have large ecological consequences are likely to constitute critical components of adaptive radiations in functional morphology. Such shifts may precede more complex shape changes as lineages diversify into unoccupied niches. The data presented here, combined with observations of other fish lineages, suggest that the preorbital region represents an evolutionary module that can respond quickly to natural selection when fishes

  6. Bentho-Pelagic Divergence of Cichlid Feeding Architecture Was Prodigious and Consistent during Multiple Adaptive Radiations within African Rift-Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    W. James Cooper; Kevin Parsons; Alyssa McIntyre; Brittany Kern; Alana McGee-Moore; R. Craig Albertson

    2010-01-01

    Background How particular changes in functional morphology can repeatedly promote ecological diversification is an active area of evolutionary investigation. The African rift-lake cichlids offer a calibrated time series of the most dramatic adaptive radiations of vertebrate trophic morphology yet described, and the replicate nature of these events provides a unique opportunity to test whether common changes in functional morphology have repeatedly facilitated their ecological success. ...

  7. Are accessory hearing structures linked to inner ear morphology? Insights from 3D orientation patterns of ciliary bundles in three cichlid species

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Ladich, Friedrich; Plath, Martin; Metscher, Brian D.; Heß, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cichlid fishes show considerable diversity in swim bladder morphology. In members of the subfamily Etroplinae, the connection between anterior swim bladder extensions and the inner ears enhances sound transmission and translates into an improved hearing ability. We tested the hypothesis that those swim bladder modifications coincide with differences in inner ear morphology and thus compared Steatocranus tinanti (vestigial swim bladder), Hemichromis guttatus (large swim bladder wit...

  8. Disturbance cues in freshwater prey fishes: Does urea function as an‘early warning cue’in juvenile convict cichlids and rainbow trout?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grant E. BROWN; Christopher D. JACKSON; Patrick H. MALKA; (E)lisa JACQUES; Marc-Andre COUTURIER

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater vertebrate and invertebrate prey species commonly rely on chemosensory information,including non-injury released disturbance cues,to assess local predation threats.We conducted laboratory studies to (1) determine if urea can function as a disturbance cue in juvenile convict cichlids and rainbow trout and (2) determine if the background level of urea influences the behavioral response to a subsequent pulse of urea ('background noise' hypothesis).In the first series of trials,juvenile cichlids and trout were exposed to urea at varying concentrations (0 to 0.5 mg L-1 for cichlids and 0 to 1.0 mg L-1 for trout).Our results suggest that both cichilds and trout exhibited functionally similar responses to urea and conspecific disturbance cues and that increasing the concentration of urea results in an increase intensity of antipredator behaviour.In the second series of trials,we pre-exposed cichlids or trout to intermediate or high concentrations of urea (or a distilled water control) and then tested for the response to a second pulse of urea at at intermediate or high concentrations (versus a distilled water control).Our results demonstrate that pre-exposure to urea reduces or eliminates the response to a second pulse of urea,supporting the background noise hypothesis.Together,our results suggest that pulses of urea,released by disturbed or stressed individuals,may function as an early warning signal in freshwater prey species [Current Zoology 58 (2):250-259,2012].

  9. Responses of the Mullet, Liza auratus and the Cichlid, Oreochromis niloticus from Lake Manzala (Egypt) to Heterophyd Infection

    OpenAIRE

    E.A. Hassan; M.F.M. Soliman; M.A. Ghobashy

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the occurrence of heterophyid infection in two well-known hosts of heterophyd in Egyptian lake (Manzala); the mullet, Liza auratus and the cichlid, Oreochromis niloticus was investigated. Furthermore, the potential factors that possibly affect the occurrence of the infection including host sex, length, weight and seasonal variation were considered. The pathological response of the two fish host to the infection was studied. Results showed that the prevalence, abundance and inte...

  10. Ecology and life history of an Amazon floodplain cichlid: the discus fish Symphysodon (Perciformes: Cichlidae

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    William G. R. Crampton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The discus fishes of the genus Symphysodon are popular ornamental cichlids that occur in floodplain lakes and flooded forests of the lowland Amazon Basin. These habitats are characterized by extreme seasonal fluctuations in the availability of food, shelter and dissolved oxygen, and also the densities of predators and parasites. Most aspects of discus biology are influenced by these fluctuating conditions. This paper reports an autoecological study of the western Amazonian discus S. haraldi (until recently classified as S. aequifasciatus. This species feeds predominantly on algal periphyton, fine organic detritus, plant matter, and small aquatic invertebrates. At high water it forages alone or in small groups in flooded forests. At low water it forms large aggregations in fallen tree crowns along lake margins. Breeding occurs at the beginning of the flood season, ensuring that the progeny are well grown before the next low water period. Symphysodon haraldi is an iteroparous partial spawner, reaches reproductive maturity within a year, and undertakes parental care of its eggs and larvae. The timing of spawning events, and/or the rate of brood survival, may be influenced by fluctuations in the flood level, resulting in a non-unimodal distribution of size classes for the subsequent 1+ cohort.Os acarás-disco do gênero Symphysodon são peixes ornamentais comumente encontrados em lagos e florestas alagadas das planícies inundadas da Amazônia. Estes habitats são caracterizados por uma variação sazonal extrema na disponibilidade de alimento, abrigo e oxigênio dissolvido, e também pela densidade de predadores e parasitas. A maioria dos aspectos da biologia do acará-disco são influenciados por esta variabilidade de condições sazonais. Este artigo apresenta um estudo autoecológico de S. haraldi (até recentemente classificado como S. aequifasciatus da Amazônia Ocidental. Os acarás-disco alimentam-se predominantemente de perifiton, detritos

  11. Reproductive success and female preference in the amazonian cichlid angel fish, Pterophyllum scalare (Lichtenstein, 1823

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    Maria do Socorro R. F. Cacho

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The angel fish, Pterophyllum scalare is a cichlid native to the Amazon Basin of Brazil and is exported as an ornamental fish. In this study the importance of the experience and previous reproductive success of males in mate selection was investigated. In order to investigate reproductive experience, six pairs of males (experienced and inexperienced and six females were used. Males were placed in an aquarium, where one female was released. Mate selection was verified by the time spent by a female near one of the males. To evaluate reproductive success, six pairs of males were tested, each pair consisting of a successful male and an unsuccessful one. Again, time spent with one of the males was considered as an indication of preference by the female. Each female was then paired with an unsuccessful male and their reproductive success was assessed. Females preferred larger, aggressive, territorial and experienced males. Correlations between male aggressiveness, aeration and egg survival were significant. During larval care, male aggressiveness was significantly related to larvae survival. Furthermore, intrabucal care and larval survival showed significant correlations with care provided by the experienced, mated and isolated fish. Survival of offspring resulted from mating with experienced and inexperienced males showed significant differences. Correlations between time spent by females with successful males during reproduction and survival rate of eggs and larvae were significant. Females assess the capacity and willingness of males in investing efforts to raise the offspring through their courtship behavior. Experienced and successful males are preferred by females and thereby achieve greater reproductive success.O acará bandeira, Pterophyllum scalareé um ciclídeo nativo da Bacia Amazônica do Brasil, eé exportado como espécie ornamental. Neste estudo foi investigada a importância da experiência dos machos e do sucesso na reprodu

  12. Acquisition of Lateralized Predation Behavior Associated with Development of Mouth Asymmetry in a Lake Tanganyika Scale-Eating Cichlid Fish.

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    Takeuchi, Yuichi; Hori, Michio; Tada, Shinya; Oda, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    The scale-eating cichlid Perissodus microlepis with asymmetric mouth is an attractive model of behavioral laterality: each adult tears off scales from prey fishes' left or right flanks according to the direction in which its mouth is skewed. To investigate the development of behavioral laterality and mouth asymmetry, we analyzed stomach contents and lower jaw-bone asymmetry of various-sized P. microlepis (22 ≤ SLLake Tanganyika. The shapes of the pored scales found in each specimen's stomach indicated its attack side preference. Early-juvenile specimens (SL<45 mm) feeding mainly on zooplankton exhibited slight but significant mouth asymmetry. As the fish acquired scale-eating (45 mm ≤ SL), attack side preference was gradually strengthened, as was mouth asymmetry. Among size-matched individuals, those with more skewed mouths ate more scales. These findings show that behavioral laterality in scale-eating P. microlepis is established in association with development of mouth asymmetry which precedes the behavioral acquisition, and that this synergistic interaction between physical and behavioral literalities may contribute to efficient scale-eating. PMID:26808293

  13. Genetic and environmental effects on the morphological asymmetry in the scale-eating cichlid fish, Perissodus microlepis.

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    Lee, Hyuk Je; Heim, Valentin; Meyer, Axel

    2015-10-01

    The scale-eating cichlid fish, Perissodus microlepis, from Lake Tanganyika are a well-known example of an asymmetry dimorphism because the mouth/head is either left-bending or right-bending. However, how strongly its pronounced morphological laterality is affected by genetic and environmental factors remains unclear. Using quantitative assessments of mouth asymmetry, we investigated its origin by estimating narrow-sense heritability (h (2) ) using midparent-offspring regression. The heritability estimates [field estimate: h (2)  = 0.22 ± 0.06, P = 0.013; laboratory estimate: h (2)  = 0.18 ± 0.05, P = 0.004] suggest that although variation in laterality has some additive genetic component, it is strongly environmentally influenced. Family-level association analyses of a putative microsatellite marker that was claimed to be linked to gene(s) for laterality revealed no association of this locus with laterality. Moreover, the observed phenotype frequencies in offspring from parents of different phenotype combinations were not consistent with a previously suggested single-locus two-allele model, but they neither were able to reject with confidence a random asymmetry model. These results reconcile the disputed mechanisms for this textbook case of mouth asymmetry where both genetic and environmental factors contribute to this remarkable case of morphological asymmetry. PMID:26664678

  14. Yolk-sac larval development of the substrate-brooding cichlid Archocentrus nigrofasciatus in relation to temperature.

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    Vlahos, Nikolaos; Vasilopoulos, Michael; Mente, Eleni; Hotos, George; Katselis, George; Vidalis, Kosmas

    2015-09-01

    In order to conserve and culture the cichlid fish Archocentrus nigrofasciatus, more information about its reproductive biology and its larval behavior and morphogenesis is necessary. Currently, temperatures ranging from 21 to 27 °C are used in ornamental aquaculture hatcheries. Lower temperatures are preferred to reduce the costs of water heating, and 23 °C is usually the selected temperature. However, there is limited information on culturing protocols for ornamental species and most of the information generated on this topic remains scarce. Thus, the present study examines the morphological development of Archocentrus nigrofasciatus during the yolk-sac period up to the age of 100 h post-hatching in relation to 2 temperature regimes used in ornamental aquaculture: a temperature of 27 °C (thermal optimum) and a decreased temperature of 23 °C (thermal tolerance). The results of this study suggest that the 27 °C temperature generates intense morphological changes in yolk-sac development in a shorter period. This has advantages as it reduces the time of yolk-sac larval development, and, thus, minimizes the transition phase to exogenous feeding and maximizes the efficiency at which yolk is converted into body tissues. The present paper provides necessary information to produce freshwater ornamental fish with better practices so as to increase larval survival and capitalize on time for growth. PMID:26201370

  15. Acquisition of Lateralized Predation Behavior Associated with Development of Mouth Asymmetry in a Lake Tanganyika Scale-Eating Cichlid Fish.

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    Yuichi Takeuchi

    Full Text Available The scale-eating cichlid Perissodus microlepis with asymmetric mouth is an attractive model of behavioral laterality: each adult tears off scales from prey fishes' left or right flanks according to the direction in which its mouth is skewed. To investigate the development of behavioral laterality and mouth asymmetry, we analyzed stomach contents and lower jaw-bone asymmetry of various-sized P. microlepis (22 ≤ SL<115 mm sampled in Lake Tanganyika. The shapes of the pored scales found in each specimen's stomach indicated its attack side preference. Early-juvenile specimens (SL<45 mm feeding mainly on zooplankton exhibited slight but significant mouth asymmetry. As the fish acquired scale-eating (45 mm ≤ SL, attack side preference was gradually strengthened, as was mouth asymmetry. Among size-matched individuals, those with more skewed mouths ate more scales. These findings show that behavioral laterality in scale-eating P. microlepis is established in association with development of mouth asymmetry which precedes the behavioral acquisition, and that this synergistic interaction between physical and behavioral literalities may contribute to efficient scale-eating.

  16. The B chromosomes of the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens harbour 18S rRNA gene copies

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    Martins Cesar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diverse plant and animal species have B chromosomes, also known as accessory, extra or supernumerary chromosomes. Despite being widely distributed among different taxa, the genomic nature and genetic behavior of B chromosomes are still poorly understood. Results In this study we describe the occurrence of B chromosomes in the African cichlid fish Haplochromis obliquidens. One or two large B chromosome(s occurring in 39.6% of the analyzed individuals (both male and female were identified. To better characterize the karyotype and assess the nature of the B chromosomes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH was performed using probes for telomeric DNA repeats, 18S and 5S rRNA genes, SATA centromeric satellites, and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs enriched in repeated DNA sequences. The B chromosomes are enriched in repeated DNAs, especially non-active 18S rRNA gene-like sequences. Conclusion Our results suggest that the B chromosome could have originated from rDNA bearing subtelo/acrocentric A chromosomes through formation of an isochromosome, or by accumulation of repeated DNAs and rRNA gene-like sequences in a small proto-B chromosome derived from the A complement.

  17. Acquisition of Lateralized Predation Behavior Associated with Development of Mouth Asymmetry in a Lake Tanganyika Scale-Eating Cichlid Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yuichi; Hori, Michio; Tada, Shinya; Oda, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    The scale-eating cichlid Perissodus microlepis with asymmetric mouth is an attractive model of behavioral laterality: each adult tears off scales from prey fishes’ left or right flanks according to the direction in which its mouth is skewed. To investigate the development of behavioral laterality and mouth asymmetry, we analyzed stomach contents and lower jaw-bone asymmetry of various-sized P. microlepis (22≤SL<115mm) sampled in Lake Tanganyika. The shapes of the pored scales found in each specimen’s stomach indicated its attack side preference. Early-juvenile specimens (SL<45mm) feeding mainly on zooplankton exhibited slight but significant mouth asymmetry. As the fish acquired scale-eating (45mm≤SL), attack side preference was gradually strengthened, as was mouth asymmetry. Among size-matched individuals, those with more skewed mouths ate more scales. These findings show that behavioral laterality in scale-eating P. microlepis is established in association with development of mouth asymmetry which precedes the behavioral acquisition, and that this synergistic interaction between physical and behavioral literalities may contribute to efficient scale-eating. PMID:26808293

  18. Rapid radiation, ancient incomplete lineage sorting and ancient hybridization in the endemic Lake Tanganyika cichlid tribe Tropheini.

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    Koblmüller, Stephan; Egger, Bernd; Sturmbauer, Christian; Sefc, Kristina M

    2010-04-01

    The evolutionary history of the endemic Lake Tanganyika cichlid tribe Tropheini, the sister group of the species flocks of Lake Malawi and the Lake Victoria region, was reconstructed from 2009 bp DNA sequence of two mitochondrial genes (ND2 and control region) and from 1293 AFLP markers. A period of rapid cladogenesis at the onset of the diversification of the Tropheini produced a multitude of specialized, predominantly rock-dwelling aufwuchs-feeders that now dominate in Lake Tanganyika's shallow habitat. Nested within the stenotopic rock-dwellers is a monophyletic group of species, which also utilize more sediment-rich habitat. Most of the extant species date back to at least 0.7 million years ago. Several instances of disagreement between AFLP and mtDNA tree topology are attributed to ancient incomplete lineage sorting, introgression and hybridization. A large degree of correspondence between AFLP clustering and trophic types indicated fewer cases of parallel evolution of trophic ecomorphology than previously inferred from mitochondrial data. PMID:19853055

  19. Responses of the Mullet, Liza auratus and the Cichlid, Oreochromis niloticus from Lake Manzala (Egypt to Heterophyd Infection

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    E.A. Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the occurrence of heterophyid infection in two well-known hosts of heterophyd in Egyptian lake (Manzala; the mullet, Liza auratus and the cichlid, Oreochromis niloticus was investigated. Furthermore, the potential factors that possibly affect the occurrence of the infection including host sex, length, weight and seasonal variation were considered. The pathological response of the two fish host to the infection was studied. Results showed that the prevalence, abundance and intensity of infection in the two fish host greatly affected by the factor considered in contradictory way. The responses to infection and the possible effect of the interaction between all the considered factors are discussed in details. In addition, metacercarial infection caused alterations in the histological architecture of the infected tissues and in the composition of the muscle proteins as well which was more pronounced in O. niloticus and L. auratus, respectively. In conclusion, many biological and environmental factors do affect the occurrence of heterophyid infection in addition to the anthropogenic activity. L. auratus was more susceptible to the infection as compared to O. niloticus from the same habitat.

  20. Changes in reproductive life-history strategies in response to nest density in a shell-brooding cichlid, Telmatochromis vittatus

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    Ota, Kazutaka; Hori, Michio; Kohda, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the appearance of a reproductively parasitic tactic varies, and how this variation affects territorial males of the Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish Telmatochromis vittatus, we examined the reproductive ecology of territorial males in Mtondwe and compared it with that of a neighboring Wonzye population, where nest density differs from that at Mtondwe. In Wonzye, with high nest density, male tactics change with their body size from a territorial to a non-territorial parasitic tactic called piracy in which they conquer several nests defended by territorial males and take over the nests while females are spawning. These "pirate" males could decrease the costs incurred by travelling among nests by exclusively targeting aggregations of nests in close proximity while avoiding separate nests. Territorial males in Wonzye sacrifice the potential higher attractiveness offered by large nests and instead compete for nests farther from neighbors on which pirates less frequently intrude. In contrast, the Mtondwe population had lower nest density and piracy was absent. Given that the success of piracy depends on the close proximity of nests, nest density is likely responsible for the observed variation in the occurrence of piracy between the two populations. Furthermore, in Mtondwe, territorial males competed for larger nests and were smaller than the territorial males in Wonzye. Thus, this lower nest density may free territorial males from the selection pressures for increased size caused by both defense against nest piracy and the need to develop into pirates as they grow.

  1. Structure and dynamics of myxosporean parasites component communities in two freshwater Cichlids in the Chari River (Republic of Chad).

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    Ousman, Abakar; Félix, Bilong Bilong Charles; Thomas, Njiné; Abraham, Fomena

    2007-03-01

    Myxosporean parasites of two freshwater Tilapia species from the Chari River, Chad Republic, Oreochromis niloticus and Sarotherodon galilaeus, were investigated from November 2001 to October 2002. A total of 360 specimens per Cichlid species were examined. Eleven parasite species were found in both cases with different prevalences. Myxobolus agolus, M. brachysporus, M. clarii, M. cichlidarum, M. heterosporus, M. tilapiae and M. camerounensis in O. niloticus) appeared common while M. equatorialis, M. nyongana (and M. camerounensis in S. galilaeus) were secondary; lastly M. israelensis (and M. kainjiae in O. niloticus) were rare. The gills, fins, eyes and teguments were preferential locations of cysts building pathogens while the kidneys then the gall bladder were most commonly infected by myxosporean spores. In the Chari ecosystem, no significant host sex and size effects were found for the parasite cystic load. A clear seasonal occurrence was observed for most of these pathogens. In the view of pathogenic control, this study raised the necessity in a farm fish station to identify the most important myxosporean species and the period of their potential demographic explosion. PMID:19069850

  2. Social status-dependent nest choice of territorial males under reproductive parasitism in a Lake Tanganyika cichlid Telmatochromis vittatus.

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    Ota, K; Kohda, M

    2011-03-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted to examine how territorial males of a Lake Tanganyika cichlid Telmatochromis vittatus balance the conflicting demands on nest choice between occupying large nests with more females and avoiding reproductive parasitism (nest piracy, which is adopted by the largest males in the population). Pirates less frequently intruded the nests farther from neighbours, perhaps due to the costs associated with travelling between nests. The field experiment showed that territorial male T. vittatus sacrificed the fitness benefits that large nests offer and instead prioritized occupying the nests farther from neighbours on which fewer pirates intruded. The field observations suggested that they adopt different strategies for nest choice according to their relative competitive ability to pirates; the large territorial males, who are size-matched to pirates and can defend their nests against them, compete for larger nests among the more-isolated nests, whereas subordinate territorial males, which are smaller than pirates and thus inferior to them, compete for the more-isolated nests among the less-isolated nests. These findings suggest that the territorial male T. vittatus chooses the more-isolated nests to avoid pirate males at the expense of occupying large nests. PMID:21366567

  3. The use of multiple sources of social information in contest behaviour: testing the social cognitive abilities of a cichlid fish

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    Takashi eHotta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Theory suggests that living in large social groups with dynamic social interactions often favours the evolution of enhanced cognitive abilities. Studies of how animals assess their own contest ability commonly focus on a single cognitive task, and little is known about the diversity or co-occurrence of cognitive abilities in social species. We examined how a highly social cichlid fish Julidochromis transcriptus uses four major cognitive abilities in contest situations; direct experience, winner/loser effects, social eavesdropping and transitive inference (TI. We conducted experiments in which fish assessed the social status of rivals after either direct physical contests or observed contests. Individuals used direct information from a previous physical encounter to re-establish dominance without additional contact, but winner/loser effects were not observed. Social eavesdropping alone was ruled out, but we found that transitive reasoning was used to infer social dominance of other individuals of unknown status. Our results suggest that in stable hierarchical social groups, estimations of contest ability, based on individual recognition pathways such as TI and direct experience, are more prevalent than social eavesdropping or winner/loser effects. We suggest that advanced cognitive abilities might be widespread among highly social fishes, but have previously gone undetected.

  4. Mechanisms of species divergence through visual adaptation and sexual selection:Perspectives from a cichlid model system

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    Martine E. MAAN, Ole SEEHAUSEN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The theory of ecological speciation suggests that assortative mating evolves most easily when mating preferences are directly linked to ecological traits that are subject to divergent selection. Sensory adaptation can play a major role in this process, because selective mating is often mediated by sexual signals: bright colours, complex song, pheromone blends and so on. When divergent sensory adaptation affects the perception of such signals, mating patterns may change as an immediate consequence. Alternatively, mating preferences can diverge as a result of indirect effects: assortative mating may be promoted by selection against intermediate phenotypes that are maladapted to their (sensory environment. For Lake Victoria cichlids, the visual environment constitutes an important selective force that is heterogeneous across geographical and water depth gradients. We investigate the direct and indirect effects of this heterogeneity on the evolution of female preferences for alternative male nuptial colours (red and blue in the genus Pundamilia. Here, we review the current evidence for divergent sensory drive in this system, extract general principles, and discuss future perspectives [Current Zoology 56 (3: 285–299, 2010].

  5. Genetic, comparative genomic, and expression analyses of the Mc1r locus in the polychromatic Midas cichlid fish (Teleostei, Cichlidae Amphilophus sp.) species group.

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    Henning, Frederico; Renz, Adina Josepha; Fukamachi, Shoji; Meyer, Axel

    2010-05-01

    Natural populations of the Midas cichlid species in several different crater lakes in Nicaragua exhibit a conspicuous color polymorphism. Most individuals are dark and the remaining have a gold coloration. The color morphs mate assortatively and sympatric population differentiation has been shown based on neutral molecular data. We investigated the color polymorphism using segregation analysis and a candidate gene approach. The segregation patterns observed in a mapping cross between a gold and a dark individual were consistent with a single dominant gene as a cause of the gold phenotype. This suggests that a simple genetic architecture underlies some of the speciation events in the Midas cichlids. We compared the expression levels of several candidate color genes Mc1r, Ednrb1, Slc45a2, and Tfap1a between the color morphs. Mc1r was found to be up regulated in the gold morph. Given its widespread association in color evolution and role on melanin synthesis, the Mc1r locus was further investigated using sequences derived from a genomic library. Comparative analysis revealed conserved synteny in relation to the majority of teleosts and highlighted several previously unidentified conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) in the upstream and downstream regions in the vicinity of Mc1r. The identification of the CNEs regions allowed the comparison of sequences from gold and dark specimens of natural populations. No polymorphisms were found between in the population sample and Mc1r showed no linkage to the gold phenotype in the mapping cross, demonstrating that it is not causally related to the color polymorphism in the Midas cichlid. PMID:20449580

  6. Parsing parallel evolution: ecological divergence and differential gene expression in the adaptive radiations of thick-lipped Midas cichlid fishes from Nicaragua.

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    Manousaki, Tereza; Hull, Pincelli M; Kusche, Henrik; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Franchini, Paolo; Harrod, Chris; Elmer, Kathryn R; Meyer, Axel

    2013-02-01

    The study of parallel evolution facilitates the discovery of common rules of diversification. Here, we examine the repeated evolution of thick lips in Midas cichlid fishes (the Amphilophus citrinellus species complex)-from two Great Lakes and two crater lakes in Nicaragua-to assess whether similar changes in ecology, phenotypic trophic traits and gene expression accompany parallel trait evolution. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we characterize transcriptome-wide differential gene expression in the lips of wild-caught sympatric thick- and thin-lipped cichlids from all four instances of repeated thick-lip evolution. Six genes (apolipoprotein D, myelin-associated glycoprotein precursor, four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 2, calpain-9, GTPase IMAP family member 8-like and one hypothetical protein) are significantly underexpressed in the thick-lipped morph across all four lakes. However, other aspects of lips' gene expression in sympatric morphs differ in a lake-specific pattern, including the magnitude of differentially expressed genes (97-510). Generally, fewer genes are differentially expressed among morphs in the younger crater lakes than in those from the older Great Lakes. Body shape, lower pharyngeal jaw size and shape, and stable isotopes (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) differ between all sympatric morphs, with the greatest differentiation in the Great Lake Nicaragua. Some ecological traits evolve in parallel (those related to foraging ecology; e.g. lip size, body and head shape) but others, somewhat surprisingly, do not (those related to diet and food processing; e.g. jaw size and shape, stable isotopes). Taken together, this case of parallelism among thick- and thin-lipped cichlids shows a mosaic pattern of parallel and nonparallel evolution. PMID:23057963

  7. Eco-morphological differentiation in Lake Magadi tilapia, an extremophile cichlid fish living in hot, alkaline and hypersaline lakes in East Africa.

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    Kavembe, Geraldine D; Kautt, Andreas F; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Meyer, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Ecological diversification through divergent selection is thought to be a major force during the process of adaptive radiations. However, the large sizes and complexity of most radiations such as those of the cichlids in the African Great Lakes make it impossible to infer the exact evolutionary history of any population divergence event. The genus Alcolapia, a small cichlid lineage endemic to Lakes Magadi and Natron in East Africa, exhibits phenotypes similar to some of those found in cichlids of the radiations of the African Great Lakes. The simplicity within Alcolapia makes it an excellent model system to investigate ecological diversification and speciation. We used an integrated approach including population genomics based on RAD-seq data, geometric morphometrics and stable isotope analyses to investigate the eco-morphological diversification of tilapia in Lake Magadi and its satellite lake Little Magadi. Additionally, we reconstructed the demographic history of the species using coalescent simulations based on the joint site frequency spectrum. The population in Little Magadi has a characteristically upturned mouth-possibly an adaptation to feeding on prey from the water surface. Eco-morphological differences between populations within Lake Magadi are more subtle, but are consistent with known ecological differences between its lagoons such as high concentrations of nitrogen attributable to extensive guano deposits in Rest of Magadi relative to Fish Springs Lagoon. All populations diverged simultaneously only about 1100 generations ago. Differences in levels of gene flow between populations and the effective population sizes have likely resulted in the inferred heterogeneous patterns of genome-wide differentiation. PMID:26547282

  8. Species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832 (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea) from cichlids from Zambezi and Limpopo river basins in Zimbabwe and South Africa: evidence for unexplored species richness.

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    Zahradníčková, Petra; Barson, Maxwell; Luus-Powell, Wilmien J; Přikrylová, Iva

    2016-09-01

    New findings on Gyrodactylus spp. parasitising African cichlids in southern Africa are presented, comprising data from Zimbabwe and South Africa. Morphometry of opisthaptoral hard parts in combination with nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences confirmed the presence of six species of Gyrodactylus von Nordmann, 1832. Three new species are described from fishes in Zimbabwe: Gyrodactylus chitandiri n. sp. from the gill arches of Coptodon rendalli (Boulenger) and Pseudocrenilabrus philander (Weber); Gyrodactylus occupatus n. sp. from the fins of Oreochromis niloticus (L.), Pharyngochromis acuticeps (Steindachner) and P. philander; and Gyrodactylus parisellei n. sp. from the fins of O. niloticus, P. philander and Tilapia sp. Gyrodactylus nyanzae Paperna, 1973 was also identified from the gills of O. niloticus and C. rendalli collected from two localities in Zimbabwe; these findings represent new host and locality records for this parasite. Gyrodactylus sturmbaueri Vanhove, Snoeks, Volckaert & Huyse, 2011 was identified from P. philander collected in South Africa and Zimbabwe thereby providing new host and locality records for this parasite. Finally, Gyrodactylus yacatli García-Vásquez, Hansen, Christison, Bron & Shinn, 2011 was collected from the fins of O. niloticus and P. philander studied in Zimbabwe; this represents the first record of this species from the continent of Africa. Notably, this study improves upon the knowledge of Gyrodactylus spp. parasitising cichlids from these southern African regions. All species studied were recorded from at least two different cichlid host species indicating trend for a wide range of Gyrodactylus hosts in Africa. Accordingly, this supports the idea of intensive host switching in the course of their evolution. PMID:27522367

  9. Variable light environments induce plastic spectral tuning by regional opsin coexpression in the African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Brian E; Lu, Jessica; Leips, Jeff; Cronin, Thomas W; Carleton, Karen L

    2015-08-01

    Critical behaviours such as predation and mate choice often depend on vision. Visual systems are sensitive to the spectrum of light in their environment, which can vary extensively both within and among habitats. Evolutionary changes in spectral sensitivity contribute to divergence and speciation. Spectral sensitivity of the retina is primarily determined by visual pigments, which are opsin proteins bound to a chromophore. We recently discovered that photoreceptors in different regions of the retina, which view objects against distinct environmental backgrounds, coexpress different pairs of opsins in an African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra. This coexpression tunes the sensitivity of the retinal regions to the corresponding backgrounds and may aid in detection of dark objects, such as predators. Although intraretinal regionalization of spectral sensitivity in many animals correlates with their light environments, it is unknown whether variation in the light environment induces developmentally plastic alterations of intraretinal sensitivity regions. Here, we demonstrate with fluorescent in situ hybridization and qPCR that the spectrum and angle of environmental light both influence the development of spectral sensitivity regions by altering the distribution and level of opsins across the retina. Normally, M. zebra coexpresses LWS opsin with RH2Aα opsin in double cones of the ventral but not the dorsal retina. However, when illuminated from below throughout development, adult M. zebra coexpressed LWS and RH2Aα in double cones both dorsally and ventrally. Thus, environmental background spectra alter the spectral sensitivity pattern that develops across the retina, potentially influencing behaviours and related evolutionary processes such as courtship and speciation. PMID:26175094

  10. Experimentally increased temperature and hypoxia affect stability of social hierarchy and metabolism of the Amazonian cichlid Apistogramma agassizii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhann, Daiani; Campos, Derek Felipe; Val, Adalberto Luis

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal of this study was to understand how changes in temperature and oxygen could influence social behaviour and aerobic metabolism of the Amazonian dwarf cichlid Apistogramma agassizii. Social hierarchies were established over a period of 96h by observing the social interactions, feeding behaviour and shelter use in groups of four males. In the experimental environment, temperature was increased to 29°C in the high-temperature treatment, and oxygen lowered to 1.0mg·L(-1)O2 in the hypoxia treatment. Fish were maintained at this condition for 96h. The control was maintained at 26°C and 6.6mg·L(-1)O2. After the experimental exposure, metabolism was measured as routine metabolic rate (RMR) and electron transport system (ETS) activity. There was a reduction in hierarchy stability at high-temperature. Aggression changed after environmental changes. Dominant and subdominant fish at high temperatures increased their biting, compared with control-dominant. In contrast, hypoxia-dominant fish decreased their aggressive acts compared with all other fish. Shelter use decreased in control and hypoxic dominant fish. Dominant fish from undisturbed environments eat more than their subordinates. There was a decrease of RMR in fish exposed to the hypoxic environment when compared with control or high-temperature fish, independent of social position. Control-dominant fish had higher RMR than their subordinates. ETS activity increased in fish exposed to high temperatures; however, there was no effect on social rank. Our study reinforces the importance of environmental changes for the maintenance of hierarchies and their characteristics and highlights that most of the changes occur in the dominant position. PMID:26387464

  11. Effect of hypergravity on the Ca/Sr composition of developing otoliths of larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R H; Ibsch, M; Breuer, J; Rahmann, H

    2001-02-01

    The amounts of calcium and strontium were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in saccular and utricular inner ear otoliths (sagittae and lapilli, respectively) of developing cichlid fish. These fish had been maintained for 22 days at 3-g hypergravity conditions within a centrifuge. During this time-span, the animals completed their ontogenetic development from hatch to the free-swimming stage. Neither the morphogenetic development nor the timely onset and gain of performance of the swimming behaviour was impaired by the experimental conditions. Experimental and control animals also did not differ concerning their size (total length). ICP-MS revealed that the otoliths contained significantly less calcium (in microg/otolith) after hyper-g exposure compared to parallelly raised 1-g control specimens (lapilli: 0.74+/-0.21 vs. 1.16+/-0.41; sagittae: 2.09+/-0.49 vs. 2.76+/-0.47). The content of strontium (in microg/otolith: lapilli: 0.0044+/-0.0023 vs. 0.0022+/-0.0013; sagittae: 0.0094+/-0.0026 vs. 0.0081+/-0.0016) and, consequently, the Sr/Ca ratio (Sr/Cax100) was increased (lapilli: 0.607+/-0.267 vs. 0.201+/-0.12; sagittae: 0.439+/-0.093 vs. 0.301+/-0.086). Since the calcium content can be taken as a proxy for otolith weight, and because parallelly undertaken morphometric investigations revealed smaller otoliths (maximum radius and surface area) due to hyper-g exposure, the results suggest that the growth of otoliths at hyper-g is slowed down. Since the concentration of trace elements incorporated into otoliths is likely based on the composition of the respective protein matrix, our findings suggest that the protein metabolism is affected by hypergravity. PMID:11223398

  12. Mutational changes of intraspecific agressiveness in the convict cichlid (Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum Guenther) after irradiation of parental spermatogonia and oogonia with different doses of X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The agonistic behavior of mated convict cichlids (Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum) derived from gonial germ cells which were exposed to 0 (controls), 250, 500, 1,000, or 2,000 R of X-rays was determined by counting the attacks delivered to subadult conspecifics during the first eight days after spawning. While no day effects and no interactions with sex and radiation dose were found, males were significantly more aggressive in the treatment groups than the corresponding females. The highest aggressivness appeared in F1 pairs derived from parental gonia irradiated with 250 R, and the lowest aggressiveness occurred in the 500-F1 group. These two treatment groups differed significantly from each other, whereas no further significant differences could be detected. F1 males derived from gonial X-irradiation with 750 R could not be mated successfully because they killed their own females. The changes of male aggressiveness reflect reversely the previously published results of changes in social cohesiveness of the individual cichlid fish. (author)

  13. Male mating preferences pre-date the origin of a female trait polymorphism in an incipient species complex of Lake Victoria cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierotti, M E R; Seehausen, O

    2007-01-01

    Disruptive sexual selection on colour patterns has been suggested as a major cause of diversification in the cichlid species flock of Lake Victoria. In Neochromis omnicaeruleus, a colour and sex determination polymorphism is associated with a polymorphism in male and female mating preferences. Theoretical work on this incipient species complex found conditions for rapid sympatric speciation by selection on sex determination and sexual selection on male and female colour patterns, under restrictive assumptions. Here we test the biological plausibility of a key assumption of such models, namely, the existence of a male preference against a novel female colour morph before its appearance in the population. We show that most males in a population that lacks the colour polymorphism exhibit a strong mating preference against the novel female colour morph and that reinforcement is not a likely explanation for the origin of such male preferences. Our results show that a specific condition required for the combined action of selection on sex determination and sexual selection to drive sympatric speciation is biologically justified. Finally, we suggest that Lake Victoria cichlids might share an ancestral female recognition scheme, predisposing colour monomorphic populations/species to similar evolutionary pathways leading to divergence of colour morphs in sympatry. PMID:17210017

  14. Sampling genetic diversity in the sympatrically and allopatrically speciating Midas cichlid species complex over a 16 year time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunje Paul ME

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Speciation often occurs in complex or uncertain temporal and spatial contexts. Processes such as reinforcement, allopatric divergence, and assortative mating can proceed at different rates and with different strengths as populations diverge. The Central American Midas cichlid fish species complex is an important case study for understanding the processes of speciation. Previous analyses have demonstrated that allopatric processes led to species formation among the lakes of Nicaragua as well as sympatric speciation that is occurring within at least one crater lake. However, since speciation is an ongoing process and sampling genetic diversity of such lineages can be biased by collection scheme or random factors, it is important to evaluate the robustness of conclusions drawn on individual time samples. Results In order to assess the validity and reliability of inferences based on different genetic samples, we have analyzed fish from several lakes in Nicaragua sampled at three different times over 16 years. In addition, this time series allows us to analyze the population genetic changes that have occurred between lakes, where allopatric speciation has operated, as well as between different species within lakes, some of which have originated by sympatric speciation. Focusing on commonly used genetic markers, we have analyzed both DNA sequences from the complete mitochondrial control region as well as nuclear DNA variation at ten microsatellite loci from these populations, sampled thrice in a 16 year time period, to develop a robust estimate of the population genetic history of these diversifying lineages. Conclusion The conclusions from previous work are well supported by our comprehensive analysis. In particular, we find that the genetic diversity of derived crater lake populations is lower than that of the source population regardless of when and how each population was sampled. Furthermore, changes in various estimates of

  15. Aggressive interactions between the invasive Rio Grande cichlid (Herichthys cyanoguttatus) and native bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), with notes on redspotted sunfish (Lepomis miniatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, O. Thomas; O' Connell, Martin T.; Schofield, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    The Rio Grande cichlid (Herichthys cyanoguttatus) has been established in the Greater New Orleans Metropolitan area for at least 20 years, and its effect on native fishes is unknown. Behavioral trials were performed to determine if aggressive interactions occur between invasive H. cyanoguttatus and native bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). When defending a territory as the resident, L. macrochirus were markedly aggressive, averaging 11.6 aggressive actions per lO-min behavioral trial. In contrast, L. macrochirus were extremely passive as invaders, with 0.5 aggressive actions per trial. Herichthys cyanoguttatus were equally aggressive as residents and as invaders, averaging 4.9 and 6.0 aggressive actions per trial, respectively. Herichthys cyanoguttatus interacted aggressively with native species whether they held territory or not, indicating that this invasive species may have fundamentally different strategies of aggression compared with native L. macrochirus. These differences may explain the continued success of H. cyanoguttatus as an invasive fish in southeastern Louisiana.

  16. Social cohesiveness of convict cichlid fish (Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum Guenther) after irradiation of parental spermatogonia and oogonia with different doses of x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparisons of social cohesiveness were made between F1 convict cichlids derived from gonial germ cells which were exposed to 0, 250, 500, 750, 1000, or 2000 R of x-rays. The cohesiveness was determined by counting the distribution of each ten fish of every F1 group among 12 equal squares within a shallow test tank measuring 80 by 60 by 20 cm. While an increase in cohesiveness was detected in F1 males, as compared to the controls after irradiation with 500 R, the cohesiveness of F1 females decreased after 750 and 2000 R. The increase in male cohesiveness may be associated with a reduction of intermale aggressiveness as found in previous studies

  17. Occurrence of Sciadicleithrum mexicanum Kritsky, Vidal-Martinez et Rodríguez-Canul, 1994 (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae) in the Cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus from a flooded quarry in Yucatan, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    E. F. Mendoza-Franco; V. Vidal-Martínez; R. Simá-Álvarez; R. Rodríguez-Canul; C. Vivas-Rodríguez; Scholz, T

    1995-01-01

    Cichlids, Cichlasoma urophthalmus, collected in a flooded quarry in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, from January through June 1992, had high levels of infection with the ancyrocephaline Sciadicleithrum mexicanum (Monogena: Dactylogyridade) in all montlhly samples. Neither occurrence nor maturation of the worms eshibited any pronounced monthly fluctuation. The infection rate was found to be sizedependent, greater in longer fish. The worms occurred on primary lamellae of gill filaments of all ar...

  18. Phylogeny and biogeography of 91 species of heroine cichlids (Teleostei: Cichlidae) based on sequences of the cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Gustavo A Concheiro; Rícan, Oldrich; Ortí, Guillermo; Bermingham, Eldredge; Doadrio, Ignacio; Zardoya, Rafael

    2007-04-01

    Heroini constitute the second largest tribe of Neotropical cichlids and show their greatest diversity in Mesoamerica. Although heroine species are morphologically and ecologically very diverse, they were all historically assigned to one single genus, Cichlasoma that was never formally revised from a phylogenetic point of view. Here, we present the most comprehensive molecular phylogeny of the tribe Heroini to date, based on the complete DNA sequence of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b, and the analysis of 204 individuals representing 91 species. Phylogenetic analyses did not support the monophyly of heroines because the genus Pterophyllum was placed as the sister group of all remaining heroines plus cichlasomatines. However, the recovered relative position of Pterophyllum was without strong statistical support. Within the remaining heroines, Hyspelecara and Hoplarchus are recovered with low support in a basal position with respect to a clade that includes Heros, Uaru, Mesonauta, and Symphysodon, and the circumamazonian (CAM) heroines. The first clade is restricted to South America. The largest clade of heroines, the CAM heroines, include more than 85% of the species within the tribe. This clade is mostly Mesoamerican, but also contains four species found in the Greater Antilles (Nandopsis), and three genera found in South America (the 'Heros' festae group, Australoheros, and Caquetaia). Up to eight major lineages can be recovered within the CAM heroines, but the phylogenetic relationships among them remain unresolved. Two large suprageneric groups can be distinguished, the amphilophines and the herichthyines. The amphilophines include Amphilophus, Archocentrus, Hypsophrys, Neetroplus, Parachromis, Petenia, and five additional unnamed genera (the 'Heros' istlanus group, the 'Amphilophus' calobrensis group, the 'Heros' urophthalmus group, the 'Heros' wesseli group, and the 'Heros' sieboldii group). The herichthyines include the crown-group herichthyines

  19. Hypoxia tolerance of two centrarchid sunfishes and an introduced cichlid from karstic Everglades wetlands of southern Florida, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, P.J.; Loftus, W.F.; Brown, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the hypoxia tolerance of three Everglades fishes, two native centrarchids (Lepomis gulosus and Lepomis marginatus) and a recently introduced cichlid (Hemichromis letourneuxi), were documented. Aquatic surface respiration (ASR) thresholds were lowest for H. letourneuxi, followed by L. gulosus, then L. marginatus. The ASR thresholds for L. marginatus were within ranges reported for small, freshwater tropical fishes, while those for L. gulosus were similar to swamp-adapted fishes. For H. letourneuxi, ASR thresholds were some of the lowest reported. All three species showed excellent tolerance of low dissolved oxygen levels when allowed access to the surface. When denied surface access, L. marginatus lost equilibrium at a higher oxygen tension than the other species. Overall, although all species easily tolerated hypoxia, H. letourneuxi appeared to be best equipped to deal with hypoxia, followed by L. gulosus, then L. marginatus. Hemichromis letourneuxi also exhibited more aggressive behaviours than the centrarchids. These results suggest that hypoxia is not likely to prevent H. letourneuxi from exploiting the seasonally inundated wetlands of south Florida while expanding its range there.

  20. Same school, different conduct: rates of multiple paternity vary within a mixed-species breeding school of semi-pelagic cichlid fish (Cyprichromis spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Caleb; Werdenig, Alexandra; Koblmüller, Stephan; Sefc, Kristina M

    2016-01-01

    Mating system variability is known to exist between and within species, often due to environmental influences. An open question is whether, vice versa, similar environmental conditions entail congruent mating behavior, for example in terms of multiple paternity, in species or populations sharing largely comparable breeding modes. This study employed microsatellite markers to investigate the incidence of multiple paternity in Cyprichromis coloratus and Cyprichromis leptosoma, two sympatric, closely related, mouthbrooding Lake Tanganyika cichlids with similar ecological and behavioral characteristics including the formation of open-water schools. Mouthbrooding females of both species were collected from the same mixed-species breeding school at the same time, minimizing environmental variation during courtship and mating. In C. coloratus, four of 12 broods had more than one sire, with a mean of 1.33 reconstructed sires per brood. C. leptosoma exhibited multiple paternity in 18 of 22 broods, with a mean of 2.59 or 2.86 reconstructed sires per brood according to the programs gerud and colony, respectively. In addition, two broods were found to contain offspring transplanted from another brood. There was no significant difference in brood size between species, but mean sire number did differ significantly. Hence, substantial similarity in reproductive behavior along with shared environmental conditions during courtship and spawning did not lead to equal rates of polyandry or sneaking in the two species. PMID:26811772

  1. Comparative support for the expensive tissue hypothesis: Big brains are correlated with smaller gut and greater parental investment in Lake Tanganyika cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Masahito; Husby, Arild; Kotrschal, Alexander; Hayward, Alexander; Buechel, Séverine D; Zidar, Josefina; Løvlie, Hanne; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-01-01

    The brain is one of the most energetically expensive organs in the vertebrate body. Consequently, the energetic requirements of encephalization are suggested to impose considerable constraints on brain size evolution. Three main hypotheses concerning how energetic constraints might affect brain evolution predict covariation between brain investment and (1) investment into other costly tissues, (2) overall metabolic rate, and (3) reproductive investment. To date, these hypotheses have mainly been tested in homeothermic animals and the existing data are inconclusive. However, there are good reasons to believe that energetic limitations might play a role in large-scale patterns of brain size evolution also in ectothermic vertebrates. Here, we test these hypotheses in a group of ectothermic vertebrates, the Lake Tanganyika cichlid fishes. After controlling for the effect of shared ancestry and confounding ecological variables, we find a negative association between brain size and gut size. Furthermore, we find that the evolution of a larger brain is accompanied by increased reproductive investment into egg size and parental care. Our results indicate that the energetic costs of encephalization may be an important general factor involved in the evolution of brain size also in ectothermic vertebrates. PMID:25346264

  2. Strong assortative mating by diet, color, size, and morphology but limited progress toward sympatric speciation in a classic example: Cameroon crater lake cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher H

    2013-07-01

    Models predict that sympatric speciation depends on restrictive parameter ranges, such as sufficiently strong disruptive selection and assortative mating, but compelling examples in nature have rarely been used to test these predictions. I measured the strength of assortative mating within a species complex of Tilapia in Lake Ejagham, Cameroon, a celebrated example of incipient sympatric adaptive radiation. This species complex is in the earliest stages of speciation: morphological and ecological divergence are incomplete, species differ primarily in breeding coloration, and introgression is common. I captured 27 mated pairs in situ and measured the diet, color, size, and morphology of each individual. I found strong assortative mating by color, size, head depth, and dietary source of benthic or pelagic prey along two independent dimensions of assortment. Thus, Ejagham Tilapia showed strong assortative mating most conducive to sympatric speciation. Nonetheless, in contrast to a morphologically bimodal Sarotherodon cichlid species pair in the lake, Ejagham Tilapia show more limited progress toward speciation, likely due to insufficient strength of disruptive selection on morphology estimated in a previous study (γ = 0.16). This supports the predicted dependence of sympatric speciation on strong assortment and strong disruptive selection by examining a potentially stalled example in nature. PMID:23815664

  3. Untangling the evolutionary history of a highly polymorphic species: introgressive hybridization and high genetic structure in the desert cichlid fish Herichtys minckleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Isabel S; Ornelas-Garcıa, Claudia Patricia; Leal-Cardin, Mariana; Ramírez, Tania; Barluenga, Marta

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the origin of biodiversity requires knowledge on the evolutionary processes that drive divergence and speciation, as well as on the processes constraining it. Intraspecific polymorphisms can provide insight into the mechanisms that generate and maintain phenotypic, behavioural and life history diversification, and can help us understand not only the processes that lead to speciation but also the processes that prevent local fixation of morphs. The 'desert cichlid' Herichtys minckleyi is a highly polymorphic species endemic to a biodiversity hotspot in northern Mexico, the Cuatro Ciénegas valley. This species is polymorphic in body shape and trophic apparatus, and eco-morphotypes coexist in small spring-fed lagoons across the valley. We investigated the genetic structure of these polymorphisms and their phylogeographic history by analysing the entire control region of the mitochondrial DNA and 10 nuclear microsatellite markers in several populations from different sites and morphs. We found two very divergent mitochondrial lineages that most likely predate the closing of the valley and are not associated with morphotypes or sites. One of these lineages is also found in the sister species Herichthys cyanoguttatus. Data from neutral microsatellite markers suggest that most lagoons or drainages constitute their own genetic cluster with sympatric eco-morphotypes forming panmictic populations. Alternative mechanisms such as phenotypic plasticity and a few loci controlled traits provide possible explanations for the sympatric coexistence of discrete nonoverlapping eco-morphotypes with apparent lack of barriers to gene flow within multiple lagoons and drainages. PMID:26175313

  4. Females of an African cichlid fish display male-typical social dominance behavior and elevated androgens in the absence of males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn, Suzy C P; Fraser, Eleanor J; Aubin-Horth, Nadia; Trainor, Brian C; Hofmann, Hans A

    2012-04-01

    Social environment can affect the expression of sex-typical behavior in both males and females. Males of the African cichlid species Astatotilapia burtoni have long served as a model system to study the neural, endocrine, and molecular basis of socially plastic dominance behavior. Here we show that in all-female communities of A. burtoni, some individuals acquire a male-typical dominance phenotype, including aggressive territorial defense, distinctive color patterns, and courtship behavior. Furthermore, dominant females have higher levels of circulating androgens than either subordinate females or females in mixed-sex communities. These male-typical traits do not involve sex change, nor do the social phenotypes in all-female communities differ in relative ovarian size, suggesting that factors other than gonadal physiology underlie much of the observed variation. In contrast to the well-studied situation in males, dominant and subordinate females do not differ in the rate of somatic growth. Dominant females are not any more likely than subordinates to spawn with an introduced male, although they do so sooner. These results extend the well known extraordinary behavioral plasticity of A. burtoni to the females of this species and provide a foundation for uncovering the neural and molecular basis of social dominance behavior while controlling for factors such as sex, gonadal state and growth. PMID:22285646

  5. Evolutionary relationships in the sand-dwelling cichlid lineage of lake tanganyika suggest multiple colonization of rocky habitats and convergent origin of biparental mouthbrooding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblmüller, Stephan; Salzburger, Walter; Sturmbauer, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The cichlid species flock of Lake Tanganyika is comprised of seven seeding lineages that evolved in step with changes of the lake environment. One seeding lineage diversified into at least six lineages within a short period of time. Our study focuses on the diversification of one of these lineages, the Ectodini, comprising highly specialized, sand- and rock-dwelling species. They display two distinct breeding styles: maternal and biparental mouthbrooding. By analyzing three mtDNA gene segments in 30 species representing all 13 described genera, we show that the Ectodini rapidly diversified into four clades at the onset of their radiation. The monotypic genus Grammatotria is likely to represent the most ancestral split, followed by the almost contemporary origin of three additional clades, the first comprising the benthic genus Callochromis, the second comprising the benthic genera Asprotilapia, Xenotilapia, Enantiopus, and Microdontochromis, and the third comprising the semi-pelagic genera Ophthalmotilapia, Cardiopharynx, Cyathopharynx, Ectodus, Aulonocranus, Lestradea, and Cunningtonia. Our study confirms the benthic and sand-dwelling life-style as ancestral. Rocky habitats were colonized independently in the Xenotilapia- and Ophthalmotilapia-clade. The Xenotilapia-clade comprises both maternal and biparental mouthbrooders. Their mode of breeding appears to be highly plastic: biparental mouthbrooding either evolved once in the common ancestor of the clade, to be reverted at least three times, or evolved at least five times independently from a maternally mouthbrooding ancestor. Furthermore, the genera Xenotilapia, Microdontochromis, Lestradea, and Ophthalmotilapia appeared paraphyletic in our analyses, suggesting the need of taxonomic revision. PMID:14743316

  6. Dietary habits of juveniles of the Mayan cichlid, Cichlasoma urophthalmus, in mangrove ponds of an offshore islet in Belize, Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Vaslet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Foraging habitats of juveniles of the Mayan cichlid, Cichlasoma urophthalmus (Günther, 1862, were investigated in two mangrove ponds located in Twin Cays offshore islet in Belize: Sink Hole pond (SH and Hidden Lake pond (HL. Sink Hole pond is a semiclosed body of water, whereas Hidden Lake pond is connected by a channel to adjacent seagrass beds that surround the islet. Gut contents of 21 juvenile C. urophthalmus (9.8-13.2 cm total length were analyzed, and five prey taxa were identified. In both mangrove ponds, C. urophthalmus were opportunistic carnivores and consumed primarily crustaceans. Plant material and detritus present in gut contents were most likely ingested incidentally when the fish foraged on small invertebrates. Carbon isotopic values of fish specimens from the two ponds were similar (mean ± SD of -19.2 ± 0.4‰ in SH and -19.4 ± 0.4‰ in HL, and were close to those of mangrove prey (mean ± SD = -20.2 ± 1.5‰, suggesting that this fish species forages in this habitat. Mixing models showed a higher contribution of mangrove food sources to the fish diet than seagrass food sources. This study reveals that young Mayan cichlids, inhabiting two Belize mangrove ponds, are generalists and opportunistic carnivores that forage on mangrove food sources and do not appear to move to adjacent seagrass beds to complement their diets. Understanding trophic linkages between aquatic consumers and food resources may contribute to better management of threatened coastal ecosystems.Habitats de alimentação de juvenis do ciclídeo-maia, Cichlasoma urophthalmus (Günther, 1862, foram investigados em duas lagoas de mangue localizadas nas ilhas Twin Cays em alto mar em Belize: Sink Hole Lake (SH e Hidden Lake (HL. Sink Hole é um corpo d'água parcialmente isolado, enquanto Hidden Lake é ligada por um canal com bancos de sargaços que cercam a ilhota. O conteúdo estomacal de 21 juvenil de C. urophthalmus (9,8-13,2 cm de comprimento total foram

  7. Genetic evidence for prevalence of alloparental care in a socially monogamous biparental cichlid fish, Perissodus microlepis, from Lake Tanganyika supports the "selfish shepherd effect" hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk Je; Heim, Valentin; Meyer, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Alloparental care - care for unrelated young - is rare in animals, and its ecological or evolutionary advantages or, alternative maladaptive nature, remain unclear. We investigate alloparental care in the socially monogamous cichlid fish Perissodus microlepis from Lake Tanganyika that exhibits bi-parental care. In a genetic parentage analysis, we discovered a surprisingly high percentage of alloparental care represented by brood mixing, extra-pair paternity and extra-pair maternity in all broods that we investigated. The percentage of nondescendant juveniles of other parents, i.e., brood mixing, ranged from 5% to 57% (mean = 28%). The distribution of genetic parentage also suggests that this socially monogamous species has, in fact, polygamous mating system. The prevalence of genetically mixed broods can be best explained by two, not mutually exclusive hypotheses on farming-out and fostering behaviors. In the majority of broods, the sizes of the parents' own (descendant) offspring were significantly larger than those of the adopted (nondescendant) juveniles, supporting the 'selfish shepherd effect' hypothesis, i.e., that foster parents preferentially accept unrelated "smaller or not larger" young since this would tend to lower the predation risks for their own larger offspring. There was also a tendency for larger parents particularly mothers, more so than smaller parents, to care predominantly for their own offspring. Larger parents might be better at defending against cuckoldry and having foreign young dumped into their broods through farming-out behavior. This result might argue for maladaptive effects of allopatric care for the foster parents that only larger and possibly more experienced pairs can guard against. It needs to be determined why, apparently, the ability to recognize one's own young has not evolved in this species. PMID:27217943

  8. Serotonergic outcome, stress and sexual steroid hormones, and growth in a South American cichlid fish fed with an L-tryptophan enriched diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandini, Leonel; Ramallo, Martín Roberto; Moreira, Renata Guimarães; Höcht, Christian; Somoza, Gustavo Manuel; Silva, Ana; Pandolfi, Matías

    2015-11-01

    Reared animals for edible or ornamental purposes are frequently exposed to high aggression and stressful situations. These factors generally arise from conspecifics in densely breeding conditions. In vertebrates, serotonin (5-HT) has been postulated as a key neuromodulator and neurotransmitter involved in aggression and stress. The essential amino acid L-tryptophan (trp) is crucial for the synthesis of 5-HT, and so, leaves a gateway for indirectly augmenting brain 5-HT levels by means of a trp-enriched diet. The cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus, locally known as chanchita, is an autochthonous, potentially ornamental species and a fruitful laboratory model which behavior and reproduction has been studied over the last 15years. It presents complex social hierarchies, and great asymmetries between subordinate and dominant animals in respect to aggression, stress, and reproductive chance. The first aim of this work was to perform a morphological description of chanchita's brain serotonergic system, in both males and females. Then, we evaluated the effects of a trp-supplemented diet, given during 4weeks, on brain serotonergic activity, stress and sexual steroid hormones, and growth in isolated specimens. Results showed that chanchita's brain serotonergic system is composed of several populations of neurons located in three main areas: pretectum, hypothalamus and raphe, with no clear differences between males and females at a morphological level. Animals fed with trp-enriched diets exhibited higher forebrain serotonergic activity and a significant reduction in their relative cortisol levels, with no effects on sexual steroid plasma levels or growth parameters. Thus, this study points to food trp enrichment as a "neurodietary'' method for elevating brain serotonergic activity and decreasing stress, without affecting growth or sex steroid hormone levels. PMID:26449161

  9. A test of genetic association among male nuptial coloration,female mating preference, and male aggression bias within a polymorphic population of cichlid fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inke van der SLUIJS; Peter D.DIJKSTRA; Charlotte M.LINDEYER; Bertanne VISSER; Alan M.SMITH; Ton G.G.GROOTHUIS; Jacques J.M.van ALPHEN

    2013-01-01

    Both inter-and intrasexual selection have been implicated in the origin and maintenance of species-rich taxa with diverse sexual traits.Simultaneous disruptive selection by female mate choice and male-male competition can,in theory,lead to speciation without geographical isolation if both act on the same male trait.Female mate choice can generate discontinuities in gene flow,while male-male competition can generate negative frequency-dependent selection stabilizing the male trait polymorphism.Speciation may be facilitated when mating preference and/or aggression bias are physically linked to the trait they operate on.We tested for genetic associations among female mating preference,male aggression bias and male coloration in the Lake Victoria cichlid Pundamilia.We crossed females from a phenotypically variable population with males from both extreme ends of the phenotype distribution in the same population (blue or red).Male offspring of a red sire were significantly redder than males of a blue sire,indicating that intra-population variation in male coloration is heritable.We tested mating preferences of female offspring and aggression biases of male offspring using binary choice tests.There was no evidence for associations at the family level between female mating preferences and coloration of sires,but dam identity had a significant effect on female mate preference.Sons of the red sire directed significantly more aggression to red than blue males,whereas sons of the blue sire did not show any bias.There was a positive correlation among individuals between male aggression bias and body coloration,possibly due to pleiotropy or physical linkage,which could facilitate the maintenance of color polymorphism.

  10. Occurrence of Sciadicleithrum mexicanum Kritsky, Vidal-Martinez et Rodríguez-Canul, 1994 (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae in the Cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus from a flooded quarry in Yucatan, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Mendoza-Franco

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Cichlids, Cichlasoma urophthalmus, collected in a flooded quarry in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, from January through June 1992, had high levels of infection with the ancyrocephaline Sciadicleithrum mexicanum (Monogena: Dactylogyridade in all montlhly samples. Neither occurrence nor maturation of the worms eshibited any pronounced monthly fluctuation. The infection rate was found to be sizedependent, greater in longer fish. The worms occurred on primary lamellae of gill filaments of all arches, with lower numbers of parasites attached to the fourth gill arch. Otherwise, there was no significant site preference of worms. Only minor histopathological changes were found at the sites of attachment, and these were restricted to the epithelial cells of the primary lamellae of thegill filaments. The lack of seasonal periodicity in this tropical monogenean is compared to seasonal cycles typical of temperate species.

  11. Incipient sympatric speciation in Midas cichlid fish from the youngest and one of the smallest crater lakes in Nicaragua due to differential use of the benthic and limnetic habitats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautt, Andreas F; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Torres-Dowdall, Julian; Meyer, Axel

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how speciation can occur without geographic isolation remains a central objective in evolutionary biology. Generally, some form of disruptive selection and assortative mating are necessary for sympatric speciation to occur. Disruptive selection can arise from intraspecific competition for resources. If this competition leads to the differential use of habitats and variation in relevant traits is genetically determined, then assortative mating can be an automatic consequence (i.e., habitat isolation). In this study, we caught Midas cichlid fish from the limnetic (middle of the lake) and benthic (shore) habitats of Crater Lake Asososca Managua to test whether some of the necessary conditions for sympatric speciation due to intraspecific competition and habitat isolation are given. Lake As. Managua is very small (<900 m in diameter), extremely young (maximally 1245 years of age), and completely isolated. It is inhabited by, probably, only a single endemic species of Midas cichlids, Amphilophus tolteca. We found that fish from the limnetic habitat were more elongated than fish collected from the benthic habitat, as would be predicted from ecomorphological considerations. Stable isotope analyses confirmed that the former also exhibit a more limnetic lifestyle than the latter. Furthermore, split-brood design experiments in the laboratory suggest that phenotypic plasticity is unlikely to explain much of the observed differences in body elongation that we observed in the field. Yet, neutral markers (microsatellites) did not reveal any genetic clustering in the population. Interestingly, demographic inferences based on RAD-seq data suggest that the apparent lack of genetic differentiation at neutral markers could simply be due to a lack of time, as intraspecific competition may only have begun a few hundred generations ago. PMID:27551387

  12. The effects of different predator species on antipredator behavior in the Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botham, M. S.; Kerfoot, C. J.; Louca, V.; Krause, J.

    2006-09-01

    Different types of predators often elicit different antipredator responses in a common type of prey. Alternatively, some prey species may adopt a general response, which provides limited protection from many different types of predator. The Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulata, is faced with a wide range of different predators throughout its range and is known to display varying levels of antipredator behavior depending on the predator assemblage. Pike cichlids, Crenicichla frenata, are regarded as the primary aquatic guppy predator in streams in the northern mountain range in Trinidad. As such, they are seen to be responsible for many of the differences in morphology, life history traits, and behavior between guppy populations from areas with few predators and those from areas with many pike cichlids. In this study we investigated how guppies responded when faced with different predator species using three common aquatic predators. We exposed shoals of ten guppies to one out of four treatments: no predator (control), pike cichlid, acara cichlid ( Aequidens pulcher), and wolf fish ( Hoplias malabaricus); and we made behavioral observations on both focal individuals and the shoal as a whole. Guppies showed significantly greater levels of predator inspection and shoaling behavior, foraged less, spent more time in the surface water, and stayed in significantly larger shoals when faced with pike cichlids than in other treatments. We discuss these results in the context of multiple predator effects.

  13. Adaptive behavioural syndromes due to strategic niche specialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergmüller Ralph

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Behavioural syndromes, i.e. consistent individual differences in behaviours that are correlated across different functional contexts, are a challenge to evolutionary reasoning because individuals should adapt their behaviour to the requirements of each situation. Behavioural syndromes are often interpreted as a result of constraints resulting in limited plasticity and inflexible behaviour. Alternatively, they may be adaptive if correlated ecological or social challenges functionally integrate apparently independent behaviours. To test the latter hypothesis we repeatedly tested helpers in the cooperative breeder Neolamprologus pulcher for exploration and two types of helping behaviour. In case of adaptive behavioural syndromes we predicted a positive relationship between exploration and aggressive helping (territory defence and a negative relationship between these behaviours and non-aggressive helping (territory maintenance. Results As expected, helpers engaging more in territory defence were consistently more explorative and engaged less in territory maintenance, the latter only when dominant breeders were present. Contrary to our prediction, there was no negative relationship between exploration and territory maintenance. Conclusion Our results suggest that the three behaviours we measured are part of behavioural syndromes. These may be adaptive, in that they reflect strategic specialization of helpers into one of two different life history strategies, namely (a to stay and help in the home territory in order to inherit the breeding position or (b to disperse early in order to breed independently.

  14. Fight for your breeding right: hierarchy re-establishment predicts aggression in a social queue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marian; Balshine, Sigal

    2011-04-23

    Social aggression is one of the most conspicuous features of animal societies, yet little is known about the causes of individual variation in aggression within social hierarchies. Recent theory suggests that when individuals form queues for breeding, variation in social aggression by non-breeding group members is related to their probability of inheriting breeding status. However, levels of aggression could also vary as a temporary response to changes in the hierarchy, with individuals becoming more aggressive as they ascend in rank, in order to re-establish dominance relationships. Using the group-living fish, Neolamprologus pulcher, we show that subordinates became more aggressive after they ascended in rank. Female ascenders exhibited more rapid increases in aggression than males, and the increased aggression was primarily directed towards group members of adjacent rather than non-adjacent rank, suggesting that social aggression was related to conflict over rank. Elevated aggression by ascenders was not sustained over time, there was no relationship between rank and aggression in stable groups, and aggression given by ascenders was not sex-biased. Together, these results suggest that the need to re-establish dominance relationships following rank ascension is an important determinant of variation in aggression in animal societies. PMID:20880857

  15. Cherax (Astaconephrops) pulcher, a new species of freshwater crayfish (Crustacea, Decapoda, Parastacidae) from the Kepala Burung (Vogelkop) Peninsula, Irian Jaya (West Papua), Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhaup, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A new species, Cherax (Astaconephrops) pulchersp. n., from Hoa Creek, close to the village Teminabuan in the southern-central part of the Kepala Burung (Vogelkop) Peninsula, West Papua, Indonesia, is described, figured and compared with the morphologically closest species, Cheraxboesemani Lukhaup & Pekny, 2008. PMID:26019660

  16. Functional coupling constrains craniofacial diversification in Lake Tanganyika cichlids

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuboi, Masahito; Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-01-01

    Functional coupling, where a single morphological trait performs multiple functions, is a universal feature of organismal design. Theory suggests that functional coupling may constrain the rate of phenotypic evolution, yet empirical tests of this hypothesis are rare. In fish, the evolutionary transition from guarding the eggs on a sandy/rocky substrate (i.e. substrate guarding) to mouthbrooding introduces a novel function to the craniofacial system and offers an ideal opportunity to test the ...

  17. Functional coupling constrains craniofacial diversification in Lake Tanganyika cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Masahito; Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-05-01

    Functional coupling, where a single morphological trait performs multiple functions, is a universal feature of organismal design. Theory suggests that functional coupling may constrain the rate of phenotypic evolution, yet empirical tests of this hypothesis are rare. In fish, the evolutionary transition from guarding the eggs on a sandy/rocky substrate (i.e. substrate guarding) to mouthbrooding introduces a novel function to the craniofacial system and offers an ideal opportunity to test the functional coupling hypothesis. Using a combination of geometric morphometrics and a recently developed phylogenetic comparative method, we found that head morphology evolution was 43% faster in substrate guarding species than in mouthbrooding species. Furthermore, for species in which females were solely responsible for mouthbrooding the males had a higher rate of head morphology evolution than in those with bi-parental mouthbrooding. Our results support the hypothesis that adaptations resulting in functional coupling constrain phenotypic evolution. PMID:25948565

  18. Mating system of the Amazonian cichlid angel fish, Pterophyllum scalare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, M S R F; Yamamoto, M E; Chellappa, S

    2007-02-01

    The species, Pterophyllum scalare distinguishes itself by its breeding behavior, involving competition for territory, sexual partners, courtship and parental care. The purpose of this study was to identify the mating system adopted by this species of fish. Twenty males and twenty females were observed under semi-natural and experimental conditions to test the hypothesis of serial monogamy. Under semi-natural conditions, after the third breeding cycle, the couples changed mates. Under experimental conditions, the couples changed partners after the first breeding cycle. Under experimental conditions, mate recognition was investigated through the preference of the females, indicated by the time they spent with the males. The females were available or not for courtship from new males, depending on their aggressiveness or submission. The larger and more aggressive males obtained new mating opportunities while the submissive males were rejected by the females. The mated fish were aggressive towards intruders in the presence of the mate, protecting their pair bond. In the interval between breeding cycles, the couples did not display aggression towards intruders, confirming the hypothesis of serial monogamy. Best mate selection by the females and the opportunity of new matings for both sexes influenced the reproductive success of this species. PMID:17505764

  19. The first complete mitochondrial genome of the Maylandia zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Dang, Xiao; Xu, Qiwu; Zhang, Dongya

    2016-09-01

    Maylandia zebra, a member of the family cichlid living in individual African lakes, are regarded as a significant evolution model. Recently the genome sequencing had been done, but there is no sufficient information about its mitochondria. Herein, we first assembled the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Maylandia zebra. It is a 16 582 bp long sequence with most mitogenome's characteristic structure, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 putative control region. The GC-content of our fresh sequence is 45.86%, similar to closely related species Oreochromis niloticus. The accuracy and utility of new determined mitogenome sequences can be verified by the phylogenetic analysis, based on whole mitogenome alignment with Neolamprologus brichardi, Pseudotropheus crabro, Oreochromis niloticu, which is closest relative to Maylandia zebra, and 6 others. Using the full mitogenome, we expect to address taxonomic issues and study the related evolution events. Moreover, this is the first report of the mitogenome of genus Maylandia. PMID:27158870

  20. Alternative reproductive tactics in snail shell-brooding cichlids diverge in energy reserve allocation

    OpenAIRE

    von Kuerthy, Corinna; Tschirren, Linda; Taborsky, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Life history theory predicts that the amount of resources allocated to reproduction should maximize an individual's lifetime reproductive success. So far, resource allocation in reproduction has been studied mainly in females. Intraspecific variation of endogenous energy storage and utilization patterns of males has received little attention, although these patterns may vary greatly between individuals pursuing alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs). ARTs are characterized by systematic vari...

  1. A link between host dispersal and parasite diversity in two sympatric cichlids of Lake Tanganyika

    OpenAIRE

    Grégoir, Arnout; Hablützel, Pascal István; Vanhove, Maarten; Pariselle, Antoine; Bamps, Jolien; VOLCKAERT Filip; Raeymaekers, Joost

    2015-01-01

    A major goal in ecology is to unravel how species assemblages emerge and how they are structured across the landscape. Host–parasite systems are particularly interesting in this context, as limited host dispersal may promote the differentiation of parasite communities. We examined whether the patterns of species diversity in Cichlidogyrus, a genus of monogenean parasitic flatworms with a direct life cycle, are consistent with the hypothesis that parasite diversity is driven by host dispers...

  2. Sexual selection promotes colonial breeding in shell-brooding cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuetz, Dolores; Ocana, Sabine Wirtz; Maan, martine E.; Taborsky, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Colonial species breed in densely aggregated territories containing no resources other than nest sites. This behaviour is usually explained by natural selection, for instance through benefits resulting from reduced predation risk. An alternative hypothesis suggests that, as in lek breeding systems,

  3. Sexual dimorphism and population divergence in the Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish genus Tropheus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitteroecker Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With about 120 colour morphs currently assigned to six nominal species, the genus Tropheus is an ideal model to study evolutionary divergence of populations in allopatry. The morphology of Tropheus has been described as relatively static, but reproductive constraints are sexually dimorphic due to mouthbrooding in females. We analysed phenotypic variation in six populations of T. moorii and one population of T. polli using geometric morphometrics to assess morphological differences among sexes in relation to the differentiation of populations and species. Results The mean shapes differed significantly between sexes, populations, and species even though within-sex variation exceeded the divergence among populations. The first principal component of Procrustes shape coordinates revealed differences between populations and species in mouth position and ventral head shape. The second principal component reflected sex-specific shape differences, mainly comprising a relatively larger female viscerocranium and, in particular, a larger buccal area. While shape variation between populations and between sexes was primarily located in the cranial region, within-sex variation was relatively uniform across all landmarks. Conclusions Deviations of the between-population and between-sex pattern of shape variation from that within sex indicate that the differences in head shape likely result from both adaptations to female mouthbrooding and population-specific foraging strategies.

  4. Assessment of Mercury Bioaccumulation in Zebra Cichlid (Cichlasoma Nigrofasciatum) Exposed to Sublethal Concentrations of Permethrin

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Banaee; Amal Beitsayah; Isar Jorabdoz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aquatic ecosystems are frequently subjected to contamination by toxic heavy metals and pesticides, yet very little is known about the influence of pesticides on bioaccumulation of heavy metals in aquatic organisms. Mercury is a toxic metal with no known biological benefit to organisms. Bioavailability of mercury in aquatic environments depends on biological and non-biological parameters including other pollutants. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to determine the ef...

  5. Cloning and functional analysis of promoters of three GnRH genes in a cichlid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) types, a key molecule for reproductive physiology, remain unclear. In the present study, we cloned the promoters of GnRH1, GnRH2, and GnRH3 genes in the tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus; and found putative binding sites for glucocorticoid receptors, Sp1, C/EBP, GATA, and Oct-1, but not for androgen receptors in all three GnRH promoters using computer analysis. The presence of binding sites for progesterone receptors in GnRH1, estrogen receptors in GnRH1 and GnRH2, and thyroid hormone receptors in GnRH1 and GnRH3 suggests direct action of steroid hormones on GnRH types. Our observation of SOX and LINE-like sequences exclusively in GnRH1, COUP in GnRH2, and retinoid X receptors in GnRH3 suggests their role in sexual differentiation, midbrain segmentation, and visual cue integration, respectively. Thus, the characteristic binding sites for nuclear receptors and transcription factors support the notion that each GnRH type is regulated differently and has distinct physiological roles

  6. Somatostatin and Somatostatin Receptor Gene Expression in Dominant and Subordinate Males of an African Cichlid Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Trainor, Brian C.; Hofmann, Hans A.

    2007-01-01

    Somatostatin is a neuropeptide best known for its inhibitory effects on growth hormone secretion and has recently been implicated in the control of social behavior. Several somatostatin receptor subtypes have been identified in vertebrates, but the functional basis for this diversity is still unclear. Here we investigate the expression levels of the somatostatin prepropeptide and two of its receptors, sstR2, and sstR3, in the brains of socially dominant and subordinate A. burtoni males using ...

  7. Social stimulation, nuptial colouration, androgens and immunocompetence in a sexual dimorphic cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter D.; Hekman, Renske; Schulz, Rudiger W.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2007-01-01

    The nature of the costs maintaining honesty of sexual signalling in inter- and intrasexual interactions remains a contentious issue. For carotenoid-based colour ornaments, it has been hypothesized that the honesty of the signal is enforced when carotenoid allocation to colour expression is traded of

  8. Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Color- and Trophic Polymorphisms in Cichlid Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Kusche, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    How the exuberant diversity on our planet arose is still a question of central interest in biology. Rapidly diversifying species complexes that experience adaptive radiation have always been prime study targets to infer the underlying mechanisms of divergence. Young species-rich systems that display ongoing diversification in multiple replicates are of particular relevance, because different stages of divergence are likely to be found, ranging from incipient speciation to stable species assem...

  9. Morphology and Efficiency of a Specialized Foraging Behavior, Sediment Sifting, in Neotropical Cichlid Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Hernán López-Fernández; Jessica Arbour; Stuart Willis; Crystal Watkins; Honeycutt, Rodney L.; Winemiller, Kirk O.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of relationships between morphology and ecological performance can help to reveal how natural selection drives biological diversification. We investigate relationships between feeding behavior, foraging performance and morphology within a diverse group of teleost fishes, and examine the extent to which associations can be explained by evolutionary relatedness. Morphological adaptation associated with sediment sifting was examined using a phylogenetic linear discriminant analysis...

  10. Sex-specific effects of postnatal testosterone on lateralization in cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Schaafsma, Sara M.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2011-01-01

    Lateralization is a fundamental principle in the organization of brain and behaviour in humans and nonhuman animals. To what extent lateralization is, in addition to genetic factors, under the influence of testosterone, which would also explain sex differences in laterality, is the topic of a long-standing debate. This debate is partly hampered by confusion between organizational and activating effects of testosterone. Here we focused on activating effects, less often studied than organizatio...

  11. Phylogeny and historical biogeography of trans-Andean cichlid fishes (Teleostei: Cichlidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musilová, Zuzana; Říčan, O.; Říčanová, Š.; Janšta, P.; Gahura, O.; Novák, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 3 (2015), s. 333-350. ISSN 1864-5755 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Andean uplift * Andinoacara * Mesoheros Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.593, year: 2014

  12. The Utility of Geometric Morphometrics to Elucidate Pathways of Cichlid Fish Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Michaela Kerschbaumer; Christian Sturmbauer

    2011-01-01

    Fishes of the family Cichlidae are famous for their spectacular species flocks and therefore constitute a model system for the study of the pathways of adaptive radiation. Their radiation is connected to trophic specialization, manifested in dentition, head morphology, and body shape. Geometric morphometric methods have been established as efficient tools to quantify such differences in overall body shape or in particular morphological structures and meanwhile found wide application in evolut...

  13. Successive invasion-mediated interspecific hybridizations and population structure in the endangered cichlid Oreochromis mossambicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Firmat

    Full Text Available Hybridization between invasive and native species accounts among the major and pernicious threats to biodiversity. The Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus, a widely used freshwater aquaculture species, is especially imperiled by this phenomenon since it is recognized by the IUCN as an endangered taxon due to genetic admixture with O. niloticus an invasive congeneric species. The Lower Limpopo and the intermittent Changane River (Mozambique drain large wetlands of potentially great importance for conservation of O. mossambicus, but their populations have remained unstudied until today. Therefore we aimed (1 to estimate the autochthonous diversity and population structure among genetically pure O. mossambicus populations to provide a baseline for the conservation genetics of this endangered species, (2 to quantify and describe genetic variation of the invasive populations and investigate the most likely factors influencing their spread, (3 to identify O. mossambicus populations unaffected by hybridization. Bayesian assignment tests based on 423 AFLP loci and the distribution of 36 species-specific mitochondrial haplotypes both indicate a low frequency of invasive and hybrid genotypes throughout the system, but nevertheless reveal evidence for limited expansion of two alien species (O. niloticus and O. andersonii and their hybrids in the Lower Limpopo. O. mossambicus populations with no traces of hybridization are identified. They exhibit a significant genetic structure. This contrasts with previously published estimates and provides rather promising auspices for the conservation of O. mossambicus. Especially, parts of the Upper Changane drainage and surrounding wetlands are identified as refugial zones for O. mossambicus populations. They should therefore receive high conservation priority and could represent valuable candidates for the development of aquaculture strains based on local genetic resources.

  14. TUCUNARELLA N. GEN. AND OTHER DACTYLOGYRIDS (MONOGENOIDEA) FROM CICHLID FISH (PERCIFORMES) FROM PERUVIAN AMAZONIA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F.; Scholz, Tomáš; Rozkošná, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 3 (2010), s. 491-498. ISSN 0022-3395 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : NEOTROPICAL MONOGENEA * ANCYROCEPHALINAE * PROPOSAL * GILLS * TREMATODES * TELEOSTEI Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.208, year: 2010

  15. Achelia shepherdi n. sp. and other Pycnogonida from Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, Jan H.

    1973-01-01

    Records of 10 species of shallow water Pycnogonida from Western Australia, Victoria, Tasmania, and New South Wales, including Achelia shepherdi n. sp., Parapallene avida Stock, 1973 (♀ new to science), and Anoplodactylus pulcher Carpenter, 1907 (new to Australia).

  16. Mitochondrial phylogeography of rock-dwelling cichlid fishes reveals evolutionary influence of historical lake level fluctuations of Lake Tanganyika, Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Verheyen, Erik; Rüber, Lukas; Snoeks, Jos; Meyer, Axel

    1996-01-01

    The East African Lakes Tanganyika, Malawi and Victoria each harbour hundreds of endemic invertebrate and vertebrate species. Inferences about the ecological and evolutionary processes responsible for the origin of these species flocks will only be possible when they are made within historical and comparative frameworks. Specifically, the relative importance of intrinsic characteristics and extrinsic factors may offer information about the processes that drive diversification and speciation in...

  17. Influence of season and pollution on the antioxidant defenses of the cichlid fish acará (Geophagus brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wilhelm Filho

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The livers of Geophagus brasiliensis collected from both a non-polluted site and a polluted site were analyzed for different antioxidant defenses, O2 consumption, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS levels, and histological damage. Compared to controls (116.6 ± 26.1 nmol g-1, TBARS levels were enhanced at the polluted site (284.2 ± 25.6 nmol g-1, as also was oxygen consumption (86.6 ± 11.3 and 128.5 ± 9.8 µmol O2 min-1 g-1, respectively. With respect to enzymatic antioxidants, increased catalase activities (8.7 ± 1.3 and 29.2 ± 2.4 mmol min-1 g-1, respectively, unchanged superoxide dismutase activities (767.2 ± 113.3 and 563.3 ± 70.2 U g-1, respectively, and diminished glutathione S-transferase activities (29.0 ± 3.2 and 14.9 ± 3.2 µmol min-1 g-1, respectively were detected. Reduced glutathione (1.91 ± 0.17 and 1.37 ± 0.25 mM, respectively, oxidized glutathione (1.50 ± 0.20 and 0.73 ± 0.17 mM, respectively, and total glutathione (3.40 ± 0.26 and 2.07 ± 0.27 mM, respectively concentrations were also below control values at the polluted site. Nevertheless, the observed ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activities (1.34 ± 0.11 and 16.7 ± 0.21 pmol min-1 mg-1, respectively showed enhanced values at the polluted site. The main histological damage observed in the hepatocytes from fish collected at the polluted site was characterized by heavy lipid infiltration. Fish collected at the end of spring showed higher O2 consumption, higher superoxide dismutase and glutathione S-transferase activities, and higher total and oxidized glutathione concentrations compared to the beginning of autumn. No seasonal changes were observed in catalase activities, glutathione or TBARS levels. Fish chronically exposed to relatively high pollution levels seem to be unable to set up adequate antioxidant defenses, probably due to severe injury to their hepatocytes. The higher antioxidant defenses found at the end of spring are probably related to the enhanced activities during high temperature periods in thermoconforming organisms.

  18. Temperature and Ca2+-dependence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase in haddock, salmon, rainbow trout and zebra cichlid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Helene; Jessen, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    Temperature dependence of Ca2+-ATPase from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in rabbit muscle has been widely studied, and it is generally accepted that a break point in Arrhenius plot exist at approximately 20 degreesC. Whether the break point arises as a result of temperature dependent changes in...

  19. Expression of arginine vasotocin in distinct preoptic regions is associated with dominant and subordinate behaviour in an African cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood, Anna K.; Wark, Abigail R.; Fernald, Russell D.; Hofmann, Hans A.

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides have widespread modulatory effects on behaviour and physiology and are associated with phenotypic transitions in a variety of animals. Arginine vasotocin (AVT) is implicated in mediating alternative male phenotypes in teleost fish, but the direction of the association differs among species, with either higher or lower AVT related to more territorial behaviour in different fishes. To clarify the complex relationship between AVT and alternative phenotype, we evaluated AVT expressi...

  20. Effect of lead nitrate on the liver of the cichlid fish (Oreochromis niloticus): a light microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khidr, Bothaina M; Mekkawy, Imam A A; Harabawy, Ahmed S A; Ohaida, Abdel Salam M I

    2012-09-15

    The adverse impacts of heavy metals on fish liver were evident with great variability among organs and species. The present study deals with the histological changes of the hepatocytes of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, following exposure to 2.5, 5, 10 ppm of lead nitrate for 1, 2, 3, 4 weeks. The present results revealed that lead nitrate exerts some histological effects on the hepatic tissue after exposure to the first concentration in the form of dilatation and congestion of the blood vessels, vacuolation of hepatic cells, proliferation of connective tissue and hepatic necrosis. Leucocyte aggregation-mostly lymphatic in nature-was seen infiltrating hepatic tissue. These alterations became more pronounced in liver of fishes exposed to second concentrations indicating more progressive signs of necrosis. The presence of eosinophilic oedematous areas surrounding some blood vessels was also observed. Finally, at the third concentration, in addition to the above alterations, melanomacrophages, which store lipofuscin at the site of necrosis, were observed. These histological results imply that the fish liver may serve as a target organ for the toxicity of sublethal concentrations of lead nitrate. PMID:24205754

  1. Apistogramma cinilabra sp. n. : description of a potentially endangered endemic cichlid species (Teleostei : Perciformes : Cichlidae) from the Departamenio Loreto, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Romer, U.; Duponchelle, Fabrice; Diaz, A. V.; Davilla, C. G.; Sirvas, S.; Catchay, C. D.; Renno, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    A new species of Apistogramma is described from Peru, based on a total of 35 specimens collected in a small forest lake in the wider catchment of the Rio Itaya about 80 kilometres south of Iquitos, Departamento Loreto (approximately 73 degrees 35' W / 04 degrees 24' S). Apistogramma cinilabra sp. n. is separated from all other Apistogramma species by the combination of (in adult males) strikingly red base of pectoral, red spots on chest, (in aggression and display) light ash-grey lips, except...

  2. Apistogramma ortegai (Teleostei: Cichlidae), a new species of cichlid fish from the Ampyiacu River in the Peruvian Amazon basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britzke, Ricardo; Oliveira, Claudio; Kullander, Sven O

    2014-01-01

    Apistogramma ortegai, new species, is described from small streams tributaries of the Ampiyacu River near Pebas, in eastern Peru. It belongs to the Apistogramma regani species group and is distinguished from all other species of Apistogramma by the combination of contiguous caudal spot to bar 7, presence of abdominal stripes, short dorsal-fin lappets in both sexes, absence of vertical stripes on the caudal fin, and reduced number of predorsal and prepelvic scales. PMID:25283927

  3. Visual discrimination of rotated 3D objects in Malawi cichlids (Pseudotropheus sp.): a first indication for form constancy in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluessel, V; Kraniotakes, H; Bleckmann, H

    2014-03-01

    Fish move in a three-dimensional environment in which it is important to discriminate between stimuli varying in colour, size, and shape. It is also advantageous to be able to recognize the same structures or individuals when presented from different angles, such as back to front or front to side. This study assessed visual discrimination abilities of rotated three-dimensional objects in eight individuals of Pseudotropheus sp. using various plastic animal models. All models were displayed in two choice experiments. After successful training, fish were presented in a range of transfer tests with objects rotated in the same plane and in space by 45° and 90° to the side or to the front. In one experiment, models were additionally rotated by 180°, i.e., shown back to front. Fish showed quick associative learning and with only one exception successfully solved and finished all experimental tasks. These results provide first evidence for form constancy in this species and in fish in general. Furthermore, Pseudotropheus seemed to be able to categorize stimuli; a range of turtle and frog models were recognized independently of colour and minor shape variations. Form constancy and categorization abilities may be important for behaviours such as foraging, recognition of predators, and conspecifics as well as for orienting within habitats or territories. PMID:23982620

  4. Social odors conveying dominance and reproductive information induce rapid physiological and neuromolecular changes in a cichlid fish

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, José M.; Barata, Eduardo N; Harris, Rayna M.; O’Connell, Lauren A.; Hofmann, Hans A.; Oliveira, Rui F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Social plasticity is a pervasive feature of animal behavior. Animals adjust the expression of their social behavior to the daily changes in social life and to transitions between life-history stages, and this ability has an impact in their Darwinian fitness. This behavioral plasticity may be achieved either by rewiring or by biochemically switching nodes of the neural network underlying social behavior in response to perceived social information. Independent of the proximate mechan...

  5. Culuwiya cichlidorum n. sp. (Digenea: Haploporidae) from the black-belt cichlid Vieja maculicauda (Pisces: Cichlidae) from Nicaragua

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aguirre-Macedo, M. L.; Scholz, Tomáš

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 6 (2005), s. 1379-1384. ISSN 0022-3395 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trematoda * Haploporidae * taxonomy Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.524, year: 2005

  6. Comparative support for the expensive tissue hypothesis: Big brains are correlated with smaller gut and greater parental investment in Lake Tanganyika cichlids

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuboi, Masahito; Husby, Arild; Kotrschal, Alexander; Hayward, Alexander; Buechel, Severine D.; Zidar, Josefina; Løvlie, Hanne; Kolm, Niclas

    2014-01-01

    The brain is one of the most energetically expensive organs in the vertebrate body. Consequently, the energetic requirementsof encephalization are suggested to impose considerable constraints on brain size evolution. Three main hypotheses concerninghow energetic constraints might affect brain evolution predict covariation between brain investment and (1) investment intoother costly tissues, (2) overall metabolic rate, and (3) reproductive investment. To date, these hypotheses have mainly been...

  7. Phylogeny of the Neotropical cichlid fish tribe Cichlasomatini (Teleostei: Cichlidae) based on morphological and molecular data, with the description of a new genus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musilová, Zuzana; Říčan, Oldřich; Novák, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2009), s. 234-247. ISSN 0947-5745 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Cichlasomatini * Andinoacara * Aequidens Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.850, year: 2009

  8. A sex-specific trade-off between mating preferences for genetic compatibility and body size in a cichlid fish with mutual mate choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuenken, Timo; Meuthen, Denis; Bakker, Theo C. M.; Baldauf, Sebastian A.

    2012-01-01

    Mating preferences for genetic compatibility strictly depend on the interplay of the genotypes of potential partners and are therein fundamentally different from directional preferences for ornamental secondary sexual traits. Thus, the most compatible partner is on average not the one with most pron

  9. Cichlid fishes in the Angolan headwaters region: molecular evidence of the ichthyofaunal contact between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musilová, Zuzana; Kalous, L.; Petrtýl, M.; Chaloupková, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2013). E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : FRESH-WATER FISHES * CENTRAL-AFRICA * EVOLUTION Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  10. Re-description of Apistogramma payaminonis KULLANDER, 1986, with descriptions of two new cichlid species of the genus Apistogramma (Teleostei, Perciformes, Geophaginae) from northern Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Romer, U.; Soares, D. P.; Davila, C. R. G.; Duponchelle, Fabrice; Renno, Jean-François; Hahn, I.

    2015-01-01

    Apistogramma payaminonis KULLANDER, 1986 is redescribed based on the only two type specimens available, and two new, closely-related Apistogramma species are described from Peru. Data from the original description of A. payaminonis are supplemented with information on phenotypic appearance, which is important for differentiating the taxon from several other species discovered in the last few years. Apistogramma feconat sp. n. is described from four specimens from the catchment of the Rio Tigr...

  11. Description of Apistogramma paulmuelleri sp n., a new geophagine cichlid species (Teleostei : Perciformes) from the Amazon river basin in Loreto, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Romer, U.; Beninde, J.; Duponchelle, Fabrice; Davila, C. R. G.; Diaz, A. V.; Renno, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    A new species of Apistogramma is described from Peru, based on a total of 28 specimens collected in a small forest stream in the catchment of a nameless tributary of the Rio Amazonas about 80 kilometres south of Iquitos, Departamento Loreto (approximately 73 degrees 34' W / 04 degrees 24' S). At first sight Apistogramma paulmuelleri sp. n. resembles A. regani, but is differentiated from the latter and all other Apistogramma species by the combination of a large band-like spot on the caudal-fi...

  12. Description of Apistogramma allpahuayo sp. n., a new dwarf cichlid species (Teleostei : Perciformes : Geophaginae) from in and around the Reserva Nacional Allpahuayo Mishana, Loreto, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Romer, U.; Beninde, J.; Duponchelle, Fabrice; Diaz, A. V.; Ortega, H.; Hahn, I.; Soares, D. P.; Cachay, C. D.; Davila, C. R. G.; Cornejo, S. S.; Renno, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    A new species of Apistogramma is described from Peru, based on a total of 51 specimens collected in small forest brooks in and around the Reserva Nacional Allpahuayo Mishana in the drainage of the Nanay river basin about 30 kilometres southwest of Iquitos, Departamento Loreto (approximately 73 degrees 25' W/03 degrees 59' S). Apistogramma allpahuayo sp. n. is distinguished from all other Apistogramma species by the combination of black w-shape marking on lower jaw, (in adult males) lyrate cau...

  13. Intersex and alterations in reproductive development of a cichlid, Tilapia guineensis, from a municipal domestic water supply lake (Eleyele) in Southwestern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeogun, Aina O; Ibor, Oju R; Adeduntan, Sherifat D; Arukwe, Augustine

    2016-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to develop and validate biomarker techniques for aquatic environmental monitoring of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in Nigeria aquatic ecosystems, using the Eleyele Lake, which is a major source of domestic water supply to Ibadan and its surrounding towns, as a model aquatic environment and Tilapia guineensis, as a model organism. A total of 55 male and 28 female fish were used for this study. No significant difference in condition factor was observed between the sexes. Evaluation of gross gonadal morphology of the sampled fish showed 33% intersex prevalence in the sampled population, of which respective 71 and 29% were males and females, with visible testis and ovary developing alongside phenotypic females and males. Plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and 17β-estradiol (E2) were performed, showing that male fish had significantly higher plasma LH and E2 concentrations, compared to females. Vitellogenin (Vtg) and zona radiata proteins (Zrp) mRNA levels were significantly higher in males, compared to female fish. Contaminant analysis revealed that PCB 81, 123, 138 and 196 were the only PCB congeners detected in sediment and fish muscle (PCB153 in sediment), while dieldrin was the only organochlorine compound (OC) detected in Eleyele sediment. These responses were used in a multivariate analysis, showing that two principal components were extracted and accounted for 74% of total variation in the dataset. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed that male fish variables were positively correlated with PCB congeners 18 and 123, while female fish showed positive correlations with congener 81, 138, 189, 196, indicating sex-specific pattern of association between PCBs concentrations and biomarker expression. In addition, strong positive correlation between male fish and LH, E2, FSH and Vtg was observed, while female fish positively correlated with 11-KT and GSI. These relationships suggest feminization and masculinization of male and female fish, respectively. PMID:26410712

  14. Male-male competition and speciation : aggression bias towards differently coloured rivals varies between stages of speciation in a Lake Victoria cichlid species complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P. D.; Seehausen, O.; Pierotti, M. E. R.; Groothuis, T. G. G.

    2007-01-01

    Sympatric speciation driven by sexual selection by female mate choice on a male trait is a much debated topic. The process is problematic because of the lack of negative frequency-dependent selection that can facilitate the invasion of a novel colour phenotype and stabilize trait polymorphism. It ha

  15. Brain acetylcholinesterase of jaguar cichlid (Parachromis managuensis): From physicochemical and kinetic properties to its potential as biomarker of pesticides and metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Marlyete Chagas de; Assis, Caio Rodrigo Dias; Silva, Luciano Clemente; Machado, Dijanah Cota; Silva, Kaline Catiely Campos; Lima, Ana Vitória Araújo; Carvalho, Luiz Bezerra; Bezerra, Ranilson de Souza; Oliveira, Maria Betânia Melo de

    2016-08-01

    This contribution aimed to characterize physicochemical and kinetic parameters of the brain cholinesterases (ChEs) from Parachromis managuensis and investigate the in vitro effects of pesticides and metal ions on its activity intending to propose as biomarker. This species is suitable for this investigation because (1) it was recently introduced in Brazil becoming invasive (no restrictions on capture) and (2) occupies the top of the food chain (being subject to bioaccumulation). The enzyme extract was exposed to 10 metal ions (Al(3+), Ba(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Hg(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Pb(2+), Fe(2+) and Zn(2+)) and ChEs selective inhibitors (BW284c51, Iso-OMPA, neostigmine and serine). The extract was also incubated with organophosphate (dichlorvos) and carbamate pesticides (carbaryl and carbofuran). Inhibition parameters (IC20, IC50 and ki) were determined. Selective inhibitors and kinetic parameters confirmed acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) -like as responsible for the ChE activities, most AChE. The IC50 values for pesticides were: 1.68μM (dichlorvos); 4.35μM (carbaryl) and 0.28μM (carbofuran). Most of the analyzed ions did not show significant effect at 1mM (p=0.05), whereas the following ions inhibited the enzyme activity in the order: Hg(2+)>Cu(2+)>Cd(2+)>Zn(2+). Mercury ion strongly inhibited the enzyme activity (IC20=0.7μM). The results about allow to conclude that P. managuensis brain AChE is a potential biomarker for heavy metals and pesticides under study, mainly for the carbamate carbofuran once it was capable to detect 6-fold lower levels than the limit concentration internationally recommended. PMID:27288599

  16. Persistence of Stomatepia mongo, an endemic cichlid fish of the Barombi Mbo crater lake, Southwestern Cameroon, with notes on its life history and behavior

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musilová, Z.; Indermaur, A.; Nyom, A. R. B.; Tropek, Robert; Martin, C.; Schliewen, U. K,.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, č. 3 (2014), s. 556-560. ISSN 0045-8511 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36098G Grant ostatní: Germany Research Foundation(DE) DFG SCHL567/1 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Stomatepia mongo Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.034, year: 2014 http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1643/CI-14-021

  17. A test of genetic association among male nuptial coloration, female mating preference, and male aggression bias within a polymorphic population of cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluijs, Inke; Dijkstra, Peter D.; Lindeyer, Charlotte M.; Visser, Bertanne; Smith, Alan M.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.; Seehausen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Both inter- and intrasexual selection have been implicated in the origin and maintenance of species-rich taxa with diverse sexual traits. Simultaneous disruptive selection by female mate choice and male-male competition can, in theory, lead to speciation without geographical isolation if both act on

  18. Relationships between morphology, diet and spatial distribution: testing the effects of intra and interspecific morphological variations on the patterns of resource use in two Neotropical Cichlids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia A. Sampaio

    Full Text Available Considering th e morphology, diet and spatial distribution of Satanoperca pappaterra and Crenicichla britskii (Perciformes: Cichlidae in the Upper Paraná River floodplain (Brazil, the following questions were investigated: (1 Could the body shape predict the use of trophic resources and habitat by C. britskii and S. pappaterra? (2 Could the relationship between morphology and use of trophic resources and habitat be also extended to the intraspecific scale? (3 What are the most important morphological traits used to predict the variation on diet and habitat occupation within and between species? We hypothesized that intra and interspecific differences in morphological patterns imply in different forms of resource exploitation and that the ecomorphological analysis enables the identification of trophic and spatial niche segregation. Fish samplings were performed in different types of habitats (rivers, secondary channels, connected and disconnected lagoons in the Upper Paraná River floodplain. Analyses of the stomach content was conducted to characterize the feeding patterns and twenty-two ecomorphological indices were calculated from linear morphological measurements and areas. A principal component analysis (PCA run with these indices evidenced the formation of two significant axes, revealing in the axis 1 an ecomorphological ordination according to the type of habitat, regardless the species. The individuals of both species exploiting lotic habitats tended to have morphological traits that enable rapid progressive and retrograde movements, braking and continuous swimming, whereas individuals found in lentic and semi-lotic habitats presented morphology adapted to a greater maneuverability and stabilization in deflections. On the other hand the axis 2 evidenced a segregation related to the feeding ecology, between S. pappaterra and C. britskii. The relationship between morphology and use of spatial and feeding resource was corroborated by the Mantel test performed at inter and intraspecific levels. Therefore the hypothesis was accepted suggesting that analyses incorporating both intraspecific and interspecific morphological variations can contribute to a greater understanding about the ecological structure of fish assemblages by providing evidences on the niche characteristics of each species. RESUMO Considerando a morfologia, a dieta e a distribuição espacial de Satanoperca pappaterra e Crenicichla britskii (Perciformes: Cichlidae na planície de inudação do alto rio Paraná (Brasil as seguintes questões foram investigadas: (1 A forma do corpo pode ser utilizada para predizer o uso dos recursos espaciais e tráficos por ambas as espécie? (2 As relações entre morfologia e uso dos recursos tráficos e espaciais podem ser estendidas à escala intraespecífica? (3 Quais são as características morfológicas utilizadas para predizer a variação na dieta e ocupação do em nível intra e interespecífico? Testou-se a hipótese de que diferenças intra e interespecíficas nos padrões morfológicos implicam em diferentes formas de exploração dos recursos, sendo que a partir de análises ecomorfológicas é possível identificar a segregação do nicho tráfico e espacial. Os peixes foram amostrados em diferentes tipos de hábitats (rios, canais secundários, lagoas conectadas e desconectadas na planície de inudação do alto rio Paraná. Análises de conteúdo estomacal foram realizadas a fim de caracterizar os padrões alimentares, enquanto vinte e dois índices ecomorfológicos foram calculados com base nas medidas morfométricas lineares e áreas. A análise de componentes principais (PCA realizada com os referidos índices evidenciou a formação de dois eixos significativos: no eixo 1 houve uma ordenação ecomorfológica de acordo com o tipo de hábitat explorado, independentemente da espécie considerada. Nesse sentido, indivíduos de ambas as espécie coletados em ambientes lóticos tenderam a apresentar características morfológicas que propiciam maior capacidade de movimentos progressivos e retrógrados, frenagens e natação contínua, enquanto os indivíduos encontrados em ambientes lênticos e semi-lóticos apresentaram morfologia adaptada à maior capacidade de manobrabilidade e estabilização em guinadas. Por outro lado, o eixo 2 evidenciou segregação ecomorfológica relacionada à dieta, revelando uma divergência entre S. pappaterra e C. britskii. Essa relação entre morfologia e uso dos recursos espacial e alimentar foi confirmada pela significância do teste de Mantel realizado em nível intra e interespecífico. Portanto, a hipótese pressuposta foi aceita, sugerindo que análises que incorporam variações morfológicas intra e interespecíficas podem contribuir para o maior entendimento sobre a estrutura das assembleias de peixes, propiciando evidências acerca das características do nicho de cada espécie.

  19. Not All Inner Ears are the Same: Otolith Matrix Proteins in the Inner Ear of Sub-Adult Cichlid Fish, Oreochromis Mossambicus, Reveal Insights Into the Biomineralization Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigele, Jochen; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2016-02-01

    The fish ear stones (otoliths) consist mainly of calcium carbonate and have lower amounts of a proteinous matrix. This matrix consists of macromolecules, which directly control the biomineralization process. We analyzed the composition of this proteinous matrix by mass spectrometry in a shotgun approach. For this purpose, an enhanced protein purification technique was developed that excludes any potential contamination of proteins from body fluids. Using this method we identified eight proteins in the inner ear of Oreochromis mossambicus. These include the common otolith matrix proteins (OMP-1, otolin-1, neuroserpin, SPARC and otoconin), and three proteins (alpha tectorin, otogelin and transferrin) not previously localized to the otoliths. Moreover, we were able to exclude the occurrence of two matrix proteins (starmaker and pre-cerebellin-like protein) known from other fish species. In further analyses, we show that the absence of the OMP starmaker corresponds to calcitic otoliths and that pre-cerebellin-like protein is not present at any stage during the development of the otoliths of the inner ear. This study shows O. mossambicus does not have all of the known otolith proteins indicating that the matrix proteins in the inner ear of fish are not the same across species. Further functional studies of the novel proteins we identified during otolith development are required. PMID:26559654

  20. Mitochondrial phylogeny of the Lamprologini, the major substrate spawning lineage of cichild fishes from Lake Tanganyika in Eastern Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Sturmbauer, Christian; Verheyen, Erik; Meyer, Axel

    1994-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika harbors the oldest, morphologically and behaviorally most diverse flock of cichlid species. While the cichlids in Lakes Malawi and Victoria breed their eggs exclusively by buccal incubatio(termed mouthbrooding ), the Tanganyikan cichlid fauna comprise mouthbrooding and substrate-spawning lineages (fish spawn on rocks, and never orally incubate eggs or wrigglers). The substrate-spawning tribe Lamprologini appears to occupy a key position that might allow one to elucidate the o...

  1. Anti-angiogenic and cytotoxicity studies of some medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kwok-Wen; Salhimi, Salizawati Muhamad; Majid, Amin Malik; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2010-06-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor formation and proliferation. The development of anti-angiogenic agents to block new blood vessel growth will inhibit metastasis and induce apoptosis of the cancer cells. Nine medicinal plants, Strobilanthes crispus, Phyllanthus niruri, Phyllanthus pulcher, Phyllanthus urinaria, Ailanthus malabarica, Irvingia malayana, Smilax myosotiflora, Tinospora crispa and blumea balsamifera were screened for anti-angiogenic properties using the rat aortic ring assay. Of these, the methanol extracts of Phyllanthus species and Irvingia malayana exhibited the highest activity. At 100 microg/mL, P. pulcher, P. niruri, P. urinaria and I. malayana recorded an inhibition of 78.8 %, 59.5 %, 56.7 % and 46.4 %, respectively, against rat aortic vascular growth. Their activities were further investigated by the tube formation assay involving human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on Matrigel. I. malayana, P. niruri and P. urinaria showed a significant decrease of 45.5, 37.9 and 35.6 %, respectively, whilst P. pulcher showed a much lower decrease of 15.5 % when compared with that of the rat aortic ring assay. All the plant extracts were evaluated for cytotoxicity on a panel of human cancer cell lines using the MTT assay. None of them displayed acute cytotoxicity. The HPLC of P. niruri, P. urinaria and P. pulcher indicated the extracts contained some identical chromatographic peaks of lignans. Further fractionation of I. malayana yielded betulinic acid reported in this plant for the first time and at 100 microg/mL it exhibited a 67.3 % inhibition of vessel outgrowth and 46.5 % inhibition of tube formation. PMID:20112179

  2. Efficacy of Thai Traditional Herb Extracts against Fish and Shrimp Pathogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Direkbusarakom, S.; Ezura, Y.; Yoshimizu, M.; Herunsalee, A.

    1998-01-01

    Sixteen species of Thai traditional herbs were selected for this study. They were Andrographis paniculata, Cassia alata, Clinacanthus nutans, Eclipta alba, Momordica charantia, Phyllanthus acidus, P. amarus, P. debilis, P. pulcher, P. reticulatus, P. urinaria, Psidium guajava, Tinospora cordifolia, T. crispa and white and red strains or Ocimum sanctum. Using an agar plate dilution method, they were tested for antibacterial activity against the pathogenic bacteria: Aeomonas hydrophila, a Strep...

  3. Using GIS Mapping of the Extent of Nearshore Rocky Reefs to Estimate the Abundance and Reproductive Output of Important Fishery Species

    OpenAIRE

    Claisse, Jeremy T.; Pondella, Daniel J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Sadd, James

    2012-01-01

    Kelp Bass (Paralabrax clathratus) and California Sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher) are economically and ecologically valuable rocky reef fishes in southern California, making them likely indicator species for evaluating resource management actions. Multiple spatial datasets, aerial and satellite photography, underwater observations and expert judgment were used to produce a comprehensive map of nearshore natural rocky reef habitat for the Santa Monica Bay region (California, USA). It was then...

  4. A new species and new records of parasitic wasps (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae of wood boring beetles from southern Western Ghats, Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. Sureshan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Pteromalidae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea parasitising wood boring beetles, Cleonymus kamijoi, and two species of Pteromalidae, Trigonoderus pulcher Walker and male of Heydenia tuberculata Sureshan are reported for the first time from the southern Western Ghats, Kerala. The genus Trigonoderus Westwood is reported for the first time from India and the male of Heydenia tuberculata Sureshan is reported and described for the first time.

  5. Functional Diversification within a Predatory Species Flock

    OpenAIRE

    Burress, Edward D.; Alejandro Duarte; Serra, Wilson S.; Marcelo Loueiro; Gangloff, Michael M.; Lynn Siefferman

    2013-01-01

    Ecological speciation is well-known from adaptive radiations in cichlid fishes inhabiting lentic ecosystems throughout the African rift valley and Central America. Here, we investigate the ecological and morphological diversification of a recently discovered lotic predatory Neotropical cichlid species flock in subtropical South America. We document morphological and functional diversification using geometric morphometrics, stable C and N isotopes, stomach contents and character evolution. Thi...

  6. Swimming Behavior and Calcium Incorporation into inner Ear Otoliths of Fish after vestibular Nerve Transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, E.; Anken, R.; Rahmann, H.

    Previous investigations on neonate swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) revealed that otolithic calcium incorporation (visualized using the calcium-tracer alizarin- complexone) and thus otolith growth had ceased after nerve transection, supporting a hypothesis according to which the gravity-dependent otolith growth is regulated neuronally. Subsequent investigations on larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) yielded contrasting results, repeatedly depending on the particular batch of cichlids investigated: Like neonate swordtails, type I cichlids revealed a stop of calcium incorporation after unilateral vestibular nerve transection. Their behaviour after transection was normal and the otolithic calcium incorporation in controls of the same batch was symmetrical. In type II cichlids, however, vestibular nerve transection had no effect on otolithic calcium incorporation. They behaved kinetotically after transection (this kind of kinetosis was qualitatively similar to the swimming behaviour exhibited by larval cichlids during microgravity in the course of parabolic aircraft flights). The otolithic calcium incorporation in control animals was asymmetrical. These results stongly suggest that the effects of vestibular nerve transection as well as the efficacy of the mechanism, which regulates otolith growth/otolithic calcium incorporation, are - depending on the particular batch of animals - genetically predispositioned. Thus, it is assumed that the mechanisms regulating otolith growth and equlibibrium differ in the two types of cichlid fish. This work was financially supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) e.V. (FKZ: 50 WB 9997).

  7. Swimming behaviour and calcium incorporation into inner ear otoliths of fish after vestibular nerve transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, E.; Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    Previous investigations on neonate swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) revealed that otolithic calcium incorporation (visualized using the calcium tracer alizarin complexone) and thus otolith growth had ceased after nerve transection, supporting a hypothesis according to which the gravity-dependent otolith growth is regulated neuronally. Subsequent investigations on larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) yielded contrasting results, repeatedly depending on the particular batch of cichlids investigated. Like most neonate swordtails, Type I cichlids revealed a stop of calcium incorporation after unilateral vestibular nerve transection. Their behaviour after transection was normal, and the otolithic calcium incorporation in controls of the same batch was symmetric. In Type II cichlids, however, vestibular nerve transection had no effect on otolithic calcium incorporation. They behaved kinetotically after transection (this kind of kinetosis was qualitatively similar to the swimming behaviour exhibited by larval cichlids during microgravity in the course of parabolic aircraft flights). The otolithic calcium incorporation in control animals was asymmetric. These results show that the effects of vestibular nerve transection as well as the efficacy of the mechanism, which regulates otolith growth/otolithic calcium incorporation, are - depending on the particular batch of animals - genetically predispositioned. In conclusion, the regulation of otolithic calcium incorporation is guided neuronally, in part via the vestibular nerve and, in part, via a further pathway, which remains to be addressed in the course of future investigations.

  8. Observation of embryonic and larval development of blood parrot cichlid fish Cichlasoma synspilum × C. citrinellum%红头丽体鱼×红魔丽体鱼杂交子一代胚胎发育及仔鱼形态学观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志景; 姜巨峰; 傅志茹; 吴会民; 刘肖莲; 夏苏东; 张振国; 郝爽; 冯守明

    2014-01-01

    对红头丽体鱼[Cichlasoma synspilum(♀)]×红魔丽体鱼[C. citrinellum(♂)]杂交子一代(F1)(俗称“血鹦鹉”)的胚胎及仔鱼形态发育进行观察,描述了各发育时期的发育时序和形态特征。平均受精率为(91.33±3.06)%,平均孵化率为(91.67±2.08)%;血鹦鹉的受精卵呈椭圆球形,黏性,有浅黄、白灰和红褐3种颜色,无油球,平均卵长径为(1.89±0.04)mm;发育过程可分为6个阶段:受精卵阶段、卵裂阶段、原肠期、神经胚期、器官形成期和孵出期,并进一步分为28个发育分期;在水温(30±0.5)℃下历时约52 h 36 min 完成孵化。初孵仔鱼全长(3.71±0.05)mm,卵黄长径为(1.74±0.09)mm,短径为(1.25±0.07)mm,于第3天开始摄食轮虫,孵出后第5天卵黄囊完全消失。第13天全长(11.86±1.02)mm,各鳍条基本形成,进入稚鱼期。%We observed the embryonic and larval development of hybrids between Cichlasoma synspilum( ♀)and C. citrinellum (♂). The average fertilization rate and hatching rate were(91. 33 ± 3. 06)% and(91. 67 ± 2. 08)% ,respectively. The oval-shaped and adhesive fertile egg had three colors such as light yellow,white-gray and red brown without oil globule. The average length of fer-tile egg was(1. 89 ± 0. 04)mm. The progress of embryonic development comprised six stages:zygote stage,cleavage stage,gastrula stage,neurula stage,organogenesis stage and hatching stage,each divided into 28 periods. At water temperature of(30 ± 0. 5)℃ , the hatching time was 52 h 36 min. The total length of newly hatched larvae was(3. 71 ± 0. 05)mm with yolk sac length of(1. 74 ± 0. 09)mm in long diameter and(1. 25 ± 0. 07)mm in short diameter. The larva started to ingest rotifers after 3 d,and the yolk sac was consumed completely 5 d later. On 13th day,the total length of the larvae was(11. 86 ± 1. 02)mm and most of fin rays appeared, indicating that the larvae turned into juveniles.

  9. Leaf micromorphology of some Phyllanthus L. species (Phyllanthaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solihani, N. S., E-mail: noorsolihani@gmail.com; Noraini, T., E-mail: norainitalip@gmail.com [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Azahana, A., E-mail: bell-azahana@yahoo.com [Department of Plant Science, Kulliyyah of Science, International Islamic University Malaysia, Kuantan Campus, Kuantan, Pahang (Malaysia); Nordahlia, A. S., E-mail: nordahlia@frim.gov.my [Forest Research Institute of Malaysia, 52109 Kepong, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Comparative leaf micromorphological study was conducted of five chosen Phyllanthus L. (Phyllanthaceae) species, namely P. acidus L., P. elegans Wall. ex Müll. Arg., P. emblica L., P. urinaria L. and P. pulcher Wall. ex Müll. Arg. The objective of this study is to identify the leaf micromorphological characteristics that can be used in species identification. The procedures involve examination under scanning electron microscope. Findings of this study have demonstrated variations in the leaf micromorphological characteristics such as in the types of waxes present on adaxial and abaxial epidermis surfaces, in the stomata and types of trichome. Common character present in all species studied are the presence of a thin film layer and buttress-like waxes on epidermal leaf surfaces. Diagnostics characters found in this study are the presence of papilla in P. elegens, amphistomatic stomata in P. urinaria and flaky waxes in P. pulcher. The result of this study has shown that leaf micromorphological characters have some taxonomic significance and can be used in identification of species in the genus Phyllanthus.

  10. Leaf micromorphology of some Phyllanthus L. species (Phyllanthaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative leaf micromorphological study was conducted of five chosen Phyllanthus L. (Phyllanthaceae) species, namely P. acidus L., P. elegans Wall. ex Müll. Arg., P. emblica L., P. urinaria L. and P. pulcher Wall. ex Müll. Arg. The objective of this study is to identify the leaf micromorphological characteristics that can be used in species identification. The procedures involve examination under scanning electron microscope. Findings of this study have demonstrated variations in the leaf micromorphological characteristics such as in the types of waxes present on adaxial and abaxial epidermis surfaces, in the stomata and types of trichome. Common character present in all species studied are the presence of a thin film layer and buttress-like waxes on epidermal leaf surfaces. Diagnostics characters found in this study are the presence of papilla in P. elegens, amphistomatic stomata in P. urinaria and flaky waxes in P. pulcher. The result of this study has shown that leaf micromorphological characters have some taxonomic significance and can be used in identification of species in the genus Phyllanthus

  11. Bone development in the jaw of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (Pisces: Cichlidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Koji; Okada, Norihiro

    2008-06-01

    East African cichlids have evolved feeding apparatus morphologies adapted to their diverse feeding behaviors. The evolution of the oral jaw morphologies is accomplished by the diversity of bone formation during development. To further understand this evolutionary process, we examined the skeletal elements of the jaw and their temporal and sequential emergence, categorized by developmental stages, using the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus as a model cichlid. We found that chondrogenesis started in Stage 17. The deposition of osteoid for the dermal bones commenced in Stage 18. The uptake of calcium dramatically shifted from the surface of larvae to the gills in Stage 20. The bone mineralization of the skeleton began in Stage 25. These data provide important information regarding the sequential events of craniofacial development in East African cichlids and lay the groundwork for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptation of jaw structure to feeding behavior. PMID:18430028

  12. Philometra mirabilis sp. n. (Nematoda: Philometridae), a new gonad-infecting parasite from the freshwater fish Cichla mirianae (Cichlidae) in Brazilian Amazon

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, František; Diggles, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 5 (2015), s. 1929-1932. ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : parasitic nematode * Dracunculoidea * cichlid fish * ovary * Amazon River basin * Brazil Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.098, year: 2014

  13. An overview of the Gyrodactylus (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) species parasitizing African catfishes, and their morphological and molecular diversity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přikrylová, I.; Blažek, Radim; Vanhove, M. P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 3 (2012), s. 1185-1200. ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Monogenea * South Africa * Lake Tanganyika * Cichlid fishes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.852, year: 2012

  14. Lower biodiversity of native fish but only marginally altered plankton biomass in tropical lakes hosting introduced piscivorous Cichla cf. ocellaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menezes, Rosemberg; Attayde, José Luiz; Lacerot, Gissell; Kosten, Sarian; Coimbra e Souza, Leonardo; S. Costa, Luciana; H. Van Nes, Egbert; Jeppesen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    We compared the species richness and abundance of fish, zooplankton and phytoplankton in nine mesotrophic coastal shallow lakes (Northeastern Brazil) with and without the exotic predator cichlid tucunaré or ‘peacock bass’ (Cichla cf. ocellaris). We hypothesized that the introduction of tucunaré w...

  15. Ancyrocephalidae (Monogenea) of Lake Tanganyika. IV. Cichlidogyrus parasitizing species of Bathybatini (Teleostei, Cichlidae) : reduced host-specificity in the deepwater realm ?

    OpenAIRE

    Pariselle, Antoine; Bukinga, F. M.; Van Steenberge, M.; Vanhove, M.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Tanganyika's biodiversity and endemicity sparked considerable scientific interest. Its monogeneans, minute parasitic flatworms, have received renewed attention. Their host-specificity and simple life cycle render them ideal for parasite speciation research. Because of the wide ecological and phylogenetic range of its cichlids, Lake Tanganyika is a "natural experiment" to contrast factors influencing monogenean speciation. Three representatives of Bathybatini (Bathybates minor, B. fasciat...

  16. Mitochondrial phylogeny and phylogeography of East African squeaker catfishes (Siluriformes: Synodontis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Axel

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Squeaker catfishes (Pisces, Mochokidae, Synodontis are widely distributed throughout Africa and inhabit a biogeographic range similar to that of the exceptionally diverse cichlid fishes, including the three East African Great Lakes and their surrounding rivers. Since squeaker catfishes also prefer the same types of habitats as many of the cichlid species, we hypothesized that the East African Synodontis species provide an excellent model group for comparative evolutionary and phylogeographic analyses. Results Our analyses reveal the existence of six major lineages of Synodontis in East Africa that diversified about 20 MYA from a Central and/or West African ancestor. The six lineages show a clear geographic patterning. Two lineages are endemic to Lake Tanganyika (plus one non-endemic representative, and these are the only two Synodontis lineages that diversified further into a small array of species. One of these species is the cuckoo catfish (S. multipunctatus, a unique brood parasite of mouthbrooding haplochromine cichlids, which seems to have evolved in parallel with the radiation of its cichlid host lineage, the Tropheini. We also detect an accelerated rate of molecular evolution in S. multipunctatus, which might be the consequence of co-evolutionary dynamics. Conclusion We conclude that the ancestral lineage of today's East African squeaker catfish fauna has colonized the area before the Great Lakes have formed. This ancestor diversified rapidly into at least six lineages that inhabit lakes and rivers in East Africa. Lake Tanganyika is the only lake harboring a small species flock of squeaker catfishes.

  17. Magadi tilapia ecological specialization: filling the early gap in the speciation continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Catarina; Faria, Rui

    2016-04-01

    Cichlid fish are well known for their high speciation rates, which are usually accompanied by spectacular and rapid diversification in eco-morphological and secondary sexual traits. This is best illustrated by the famous repeated explosive radiations in the African Great Lakes Tanganyika, Malawi and Victoria, each lake harbouring several hundreds of mostly endemic species. Correspondingly, cichlids diversified very rapidly in many other lakes across their range. Although the larger radiations, unparalleled in vertebrates, are certainly the most intriguing, they are also the most intricate and difficult to address because of their complex nature. This is where smaller, simpler systems may prove to be the most useful. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Kavembe et al. (2016) report very recent genetic diversification accompanied by ecological specialization in cichlids of the small and ecologically extreme Lake Magadi, in Kenya. Combining geometric morphometrics, stable isotope analysis, population genomics using RADSeq data and coalescent-based modelling techniques, the authors characterize the eco-morphological differences between genetically distinct populations of Magadi tilapia (Alcolapia grahami), which are consistent with the different environmental conditions they experience, and infer their history of divergence. The simplicity of the focal system and the use of a multidisciplinary approach make this work particularly important for our understanding of the early stages of speciation, in both cichlids and other organisms. PMID:27012820

  18. Pisces, Perciformes, Cichlidae, Apistogramma borellii (Regan, 1906): First record for state of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lanés, L. E. K.; L. Maltchik; Lucena, C. A. S.

    2010-01-01

    This note extends the distribution of the dwarf cichlid fish Apistogramma borellii, and is the first record of thespecies, and the genus for the state of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil, suggesting that the fish diversity of wetlands,although relatively high, is still poorly investigated in southern Brazil.

  19. Interspecific competition, predation, and the coexistence of three closely related neotropical armoured catfishes (Siluriformes-Callichthyidae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, J.H.A.

    1995-01-01

    Tropical ecosystems are renowned for their high biodiversity with many closely related species living together. Alpha diversity of tropical freshwater fishes is also extremely high, as exemplified by the cichlid fauna of the Great African lakes and the neotropical characins. Since Hutchinson in 1959

  20. The resilience and resistance of an ecosystem to a collapse of diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Downing, A.S.; Nes, van E.H.; Mooij, W.M.; Scheffer, M.

    2012-01-01

    Diversity is expected to increase the resilience of ecosystems. Nevertheless, highly diverse ecosystems have collapsed, as did Lake Victoria's ecosystem of cichlids or Caribbean coral reefs. We try to gain insight to this paradox, by analyzing a simple model of a diverse community where each competi

  1. The Resilience and Resistance of an Ecosystem to a Collapse of Diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Downing, A.S.; Van Nes, E.H.; Mooij, W.M.; Scheffer, M.

    2012-01-01

    Diversity is expected to increase the resilience of ecosystems. Nevertheless, highly diverse ecosystems have collapsed, as did Lake Victoria's ecosystem of cichlids or Caribbean coral reefs. We try to gain insight to this paradox, by analyzing a simple model of a diverse community where each competi

  2. Threatened fishes of the world: Coptodon walteri (Thys van den Audenaerde 1968 (Perciformes: Cichlidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konan Felix Koffi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coptodon walteri Thys van den Audenaerde 1968, an endemic cichlid of Ivory Coast and Liberia, is assessed as Near Threatened due to fishing pressure and loss of habitats, and aquatic pollution as a result of extensive clandestine gold mining in the bed of the Cavally River. There is an immediate need for developing conservation and management plans for this species.

  3. 1981 fisheries statistics, Lake Kariba - Zimbabwe waters

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, B.E.; Mandisodza, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The 1981 statistics of the open water fishery (sardine, Limnothrissa miodon , and tigerfish, Hydrocynus vittatus) and inshore fishery (cichlids, labeoa, mainly L. altivelis , distichoclids, mainly Distichodus schenga , tigerfish, H. vittatus , mormyrids, mainly Mormyrus longirostris and M. deliciosus , and catfish, Clarias gariepinus) in Lake Kariba are presented.

  4. Taxonomy, ecology and fishery of Lake Victoria haplochromine trophic groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, F.; Oijen, van M.J.P

    1990-01-01

    Based on ecological and morphological features, the 300 or more haplochromine cichlid species of Lake Victoria are classified into fifteen (sub)trophic groups. A key to the trophic groups, mainly based on external morphological characters, is presented. Of each trophic group a description is given c

  5. Visual sensitivities tuned by heterochronic shifts in opsin gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McFarland William N

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cichlid fishes have radiated into hundreds of species in the Great Lakes of Africa. Brightly colored males display on leks and vie to be chosen by females as mates. Strong discrimination by females causes differential male mating success, rapid evolution of male color patterns and, possibly, speciation. In addition to differences in color pattern, Lake Malawi cichlids also show some of the largest known shifts in visual sensitivity among closely related species. These shifts result from modulated expression of seven cone opsin genes. However, the mechanisms for this modulated expression are unknown. Results In this work, we ask whether these differences might result from changes in developmental patterning of cone opsin genes. To test this, we compared the developmental pattern of cone opsin gene expression of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, with that of several cichlid species from Lake Malawi. In tilapia, quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that opsin gene expression changes dynamically from a larval gene set through a juvenile set to a final adult set. In contrast, Lake Malawi species showed one of two developmental patterns. In some species, the expressed gene set changes slowly, either retaining the larval pattern or progressing only from larval to juvenile gene sets (neoteny. In the other species, the same genes are expressed in both larvae and adults but correspond to the tilapia adult genes (direct development. Conclusion Differences in visual sensitivities among species of Lake Malawi cichlids arise through heterochronic shifts relative to the ontogenetic pattern of the tilapia outgroup. Heterochrony has previously been shown to be a powerful mechanism for change in morphological evolution. We found that altering developmental expression patterns is also an important mechanism for altering sensory systems. These resulting sensory shifts will have major impacts on visual communication and could help

  6. Wild food plants used in the villages of the Lake Vrana Nature Park (northern Dalmatia, Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Łuczaj

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Croatia is a country of diverse plant use traditions, which are still insufficiently documented. The aim of this study was to document local traditions of using wild food plants around Lake Vrana (northern Dalmatia, Zadar region.  We interviewed 43 inhabitants of six traditional villages north of Lake Vrana. On average 12 species were listed, which in total produced an inventory of 55 food plants and 3 fungi taxa. Wild vegetables were most widely collected, particularly by older women who gathered the plants mainly when herding their flocks of sheep. Wild fruits and mushrooms were rarely collected. The former used to be an important supplementary food for children, or for everyone during times of food shortage, and the latter were relatively rare due to the dry climate and shortage of woods. The most commonly collected plants are wild vegetables: Cichorium intybus, Foeniculum vulgare, Sonchus oleraceus, Asparagus acutifolius, Papaver rhoeas, Rumex pulcher, Daucus carota, Allium ampeloprasum and Silene latifolia.

  7. Relação entre fator de condição relativo (Kn e abundância de ectoparasitos de brânquias, em duas espécies de ciclídeos da bacia do rio Paraná, Brasil = Relation between the relative condition factor (Kn and the abundance of gill ectoparasites in two species of cichlids from the Paraná river basin, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Hideki Yamada

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisados 33 espécimes de Satanoperca pappaterra, capturados entre março de 2004 e junho de 2005, na planície de inundação do alto rio Paraná e 33 espécimes de Crenicichla niederleinii, capturados entre novembro de 2005 e novembro de 2006, no reservatório de Itaipu. Ambos estavam parasitados por monogenéticos, pertencentes ao gênero Sciadicleithrum e por metacercárias de Ascocotyle sp. O fator de condição relativo (Kn não diferiu significativamente entre indivíduos parasitados e não-parasitados das duas espécies de hospedeiros. Apenas Sciadicleithrum sp.1 parasito de S. pappaterra apresentou correlação positiva e significativa entre o fator de condição relativo (Kn e a abundância de parasitismo. Por outro lado, Ascocotyle sp. de ambos os hospedeiros e Sciadicleithrum sp.2parasito de C. niederleinii não apresentaram correlações entre o Kn e a abundância de parasitismo.The study analyzed 33 specimens of Satanoperca pappaterra, captured from the Upper Paraná River floodplain between March 2004 and June of 2005, and 33 specimens of Crenicichla niederleinii captured from the Itaipu Reservoir between November 2005 and November 2006. Both were parasitized by monogeneans pertaining to the genus Sciadicleithrum and by metacercariae of Ascocotyle sp. The relative condition factor (Kn did not differ significantly between parasitized and unparasitized individuals from the two host species. Only Sciadicleithrum sp.1, parasite of S. pappaterra, presented positive and significant correlation between the relative condition factor (Kn and the abundance of parasitism. On the other hand, Ascocotyle sp. in both hosts and Sciadicleithrum sp.2 parasite of C. niederleiniidid not present correlations between the Kn and the abundance of parasitism.

  8. Functional Diversification within a Predatory Species Flock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burress, Edward D.; Duarte, Alejandro; Serra, Wilson S.; Loueiro, Marcelo; Gangloff, Michael M.; Siefferman, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Ecological speciation is well-known from adaptive radiations in cichlid fishes inhabiting lentic ecosystems throughout the African rift valley and Central America. Here, we investigate the ecological and morphological diversification of a recently discovered lotic predatory Neotropical cichlid species flock in subtropical South America. We document morphological and functional diversification using geometric morphometrics, stable C and N isotopes, stomach contents and character evolution. This species flock displays species-specific diets and skull and pharyngeal jaw morphology. Moreover, this lineage appears to have independently evolved away from piscivory multiple times and derived forms are highly specialized morphologically and functionally relative to ancestral states. Ecological speciation played a fundamental role in this radiation and our data reveal novel conditions of ecological speciation including a species flock that evolved: 1) in a piscivorous lineage, 2) under lotic conditions and 3) with pronounced morphological novelties, including hypertrophied lips that appear to have evolved rapidly. PMID:24278349

  9. A new species of Ergasilus (Copepoda: Ergasilidae) from Geophagus altifrons and G. argyrostictus (Perciformes: Cichlidae) in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda, Naraiana Lopes; Paschoal, Fabiano; Luque, José Luis

    2016-09-01

    A new species of ergasilid copepod, Ergasilus xinguensis n. sp., is described from females found on the gills of two cichlid fishes, Geophagus argyrostictus (Kullander, 1991) (type host) and G. altifrons (Heckel, 1840), from the Brazilian Amazon. The new species can be distinguished from congeners by the unique combination of the following characteristics: the cephalothorax is not inflated and is slightly constricted, the first antennulary segment bears 3 setae, maxillule with 3 unequal outer setae without minute process medially, maxilla has a large syncoxa with one seta near its basis, first and fourth legs are with a 3-segmented endopod, base of the exopod in leg 2 with a conspicuous bluntly-pointed projection and caudal ramus with two rows of curved conical spinules on ventral surface. The new species is the second member of Ergasilus von Nordmann, 1832 found on cichlids of the genus Geophagus (Heckel). PMID:27447219

  10. Convergent evolution of complex brains and high intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Gerhard

    2015-12-19

    Within the animal kingdom, complex brains and high intelligence have evolved several to many times independently, e.g. among ecdysozoans in some groups of insects (e.g. blattoid, dipteran, hymenopteran taxa), among lophotrochozoans in octopodid molluscs, among vertebrates in teleosts (e.g. cichlids), corvid and psittacid birds, and cetaceans, elephants and primates. High levels of intelligence are invariantly bound to multimodal centres such as the mushroom bodies in insects, the vertical lobe in octopodids, the pallium in birds and the cerebral cortex in primates, all of which contain highly ordered associative neuronal networks. The driving forces for high intelligence may vary among the mentioned taxa, e.g. needs for spatial learning and foraging strategies in insects and cephalopods, for social learning in cichlids, instrumental learning and spatial orientation in birds and social as well as instrumental learning in primates. PMID:26554042

  11. Ancient lakes as evolutionary reservoirs: evidence from the thalassoid gastropods of Lake Tanganyika.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Anthony Bruce; Glaubrecht, Matthias; Meyer, Axel

    2004-01-01

    Ancient lakes are often collectively viewed as evolutionary hot spots of diversification. East Africa s Lake Tanganyika has long been the subject of scientific interest owing to dramatic levels of endemism in species as diverse as cichlid fishes, paludomid gastropods, decapod and ostracod crustaceans and poriferans. It is the largest and deepest of the African rift lakes, and its endemic fauna has been presented with a stable inland environment for over 10 Myr, offering unique opportunities f...

  12. Genetic and Morphological Evidence Implies Existence of Two Sympatric Species in Cyathopharynx furcifer (Teleostei: Cichlidae) from Lake Tanganyika

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsumi Takahashi; Michio Hori

    2012-01-01

    Although the cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika are treated as a textbook example of adaptive radiation, many taxonomic problems remain unresolved. Cyathopharynx furcifer, which belongs to the currently monospecific genus Cyathopharynx, contains two colour morphs at the southern end of the lake: one has a yellow anal fin, and the other has a black anal fin. Some books for hobbyists of ornamental fish treat these morphs as different species, but taxonomic studies have neither mentioned the ex...

  13. Social status regulates growth rate: Consequences for life-history strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Hans A.; Benson, Mark E.; Fernald, Russell D.

    1999-01-01

    The life-history strategies of organisms are sculpted over evolutionary time by the relative prospects of present and future reproductive success. As a consequence, animals of many species show flexible behavioral responses to environmental and social change. Here we show that disruption of the habitat of a colony of African cichlid fish, Haplochromis burtoni (Günther) caused males to switch social status more frequently than animals kept in a stable environment. H. burtoni males can be eithe...

  14. Distribution of Oreochromis niloticus (L.) in the Ugandan waters of Lake Victoria

    OpenAIRE

    Akumu, J.K.O.

    1999-01-01

    The Lake Victoria fish fauna was dominated by cichlids before the establishment of the exotic species Oreochromis niloticus (L.) and Latus niloticus (L.). With the alterations in the ecology of Lake Victoria, changes may be expected to occur in the population dynamics of the fish species. In two zones of Lake Victoria, the size structure, distribution and abundance, condition factors, length-weight relationship and sex ratios of O. niloticus were determined. Larger fish were found in zone II ...

  15. Territorial aggression can be sensitive to the status of heterospecific intruders

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtonen, Topi K.; McCrary, Jeffrey K.; Meyer, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Territorial animals are known to be able to differentiate between intruding individuals posing a low or high threat and adjust their aggressive response accordingly. However, plastic territorial aggression based on recognising individuals with different attributes is typically assumed to be relevant only in the context of conspecific interactions. In this study, we investigated territorial aggression of neotropical cichlid fish in their natural habitat to assess whether responses to different...

  16. Development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in neotropical fish of the genus Apistogramma (Perciformes : Labroidei : Cichlidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Quérouil, Sophie; Diaz, A. V.; Garcia-Davila, C.; Romer, U.; Renno, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The South American genus of Cichlid fish Apistogramma comprises over 100 species, most of which are difficult to identify. There is a need to clarify species limits and evolutionary relationships, conduct fine-scale phylogeographic revision of some species complexes, and collect information on population conservation status. In addition, recent studies suggest that female mate choice may lead to reproductive isolation and potentially to sympatric speciation in some species. Highly variable bi...

  17. Trace metals in water and fish (Unga species, Pungu maclareni, catfish Clarias maclareni) from Lake Barombi Mbo, Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Sone, Brice Nkwelle

    2012-01-01

    Lake Barombi Mbo is an isolated oligotrophic lake situated in the volcanic range of West Cameroon and home to several endangered endemic cichlids. A fieldwork was carried out at the lake where water and fish samples were collected as part of an investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate (i) whether studied trace metals were present at levels exceeding ambient water criteria, (ii) link uptake of trace metals in gills and liver of fish to water chemistry, (iii) ac...

  18. Epicellular Apicomplexans: Parasites “On the Way In”

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartošová-Sojková, Pavla; Oppenheim, R.D.; Soldati-Favre, D.; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 9 (2015), e1005080. E-ISSN 1553-7374 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2261; GA ČR GBP505/12/G112; GA MŠk LH12104 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : host cell * cichlid fish * life cycle Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.057, year: 2013

  19. Gloquídio de Diplodon martensi (lhering (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Hyriidae e seu ciclo parasitário The glochidium of Diplodon martensi (lhering (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Hyriidae and its parasitic cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Dreher Mansur

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Conchological and anatomical studies of the glochidium of Diplodon martensi (lhering, 1893 were performed on samples collected in a small river, tributary from the Caí River, that belong to the Jacuí River sub-basin in south-eastern Brazil. The parasitic development of the glochidium was observed in laboratory on a small cichlid fish Gymnogeophagus gymnogenys (Hensel, 1870.

  20. Group size adjustment to ecological demand in a cooperative breeder

    OpenAIRE

    Zöttl, Markus; Frommen, Joachim G.; Taborsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Environmental factors can determine which group size will maximize the fitness of group members. This is particularly important in cooperative breeders, where group members often serve different purposes. Experimental studies are yet lacking to check whether ecologically mediated need for help will change the propensity of dominant group members to accept immigrants. Here, we manipulated the perceived risk of predation for dominant breeders of the cooperatively breeding cichlid fish Neolampro...

  1. Sea Urchin as an alternative feed for fish.

    OpenAIRE

    Omolo, S.O.

    1991-01-01

    The Objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of sea urchin stuff as an alternative fish food of Oreochromis niloticus during growth. This African cichlid is widely distributed where temperature and food are suitable for ill growth and reproduction. In many Countries, it was introduced for vegetation control, pond culture, and recreational and commercial fishing because of its excellent aqua culture potential, fast growth, omnivorous feeding habits and tolerance to low wate...

  2. Socio-economic aspects of Nabugabo satellite lakes, fisheries and their implications for management

    OpenAIRE

    Lubuulwa, M.; Namisi, P

    2005-01-01

    A number of fish species once native only to Lakes Victoria and Kyoga have considerably declined over the years, and in some cases disappeared, due to over exploitation, introduction of exotic species especially the Nile Perch, and environmental degradation resulting from human activities. Some of the species have been observed to survive in satellite lakes in the Victoria and Kyoga Lake basins. The Nabugabo satellite lakes contain the endemic Cichlid fish species, Oreochromis esculentus and ...

  3. Stability versus diversity of the dentition during evolutionary radiation in cyprinine fish

    OpenAIRE

    Pasco-Viel, Emmanuel; Yang, Lei; Veran, Monette; Balter, Vincent; Mayden, Richard L.; Laudet, Vincent; Viriot, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary radiations, especially adaptive radiations, have been widely studied but mainly for recent events such as in cichlid fish or Anolis lizards. Here, we investigate the radiation of the subfamily Cyprininae, which includes more than 1300 species and is estimated to have originated from Southeast Asia around 55 Ma. In order to decipher a potential adaptive radiation, within a solid phylogenetic framework, we investigated the trophic apparatus, and especially the pharyngeal dentition,...

  4. Repeated adaptive divergence of microhabitat specialization in avian feather lice

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Kevin P; Shreve Scott M; Smith Vincent S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Repeated adaptive radiations are evident when phenotypic divergence occurs within lineages, but this divergence into different forms is convergent when compared across lineages. Classic examples of such repeated adaptive divergence occur in island (for example, Caribbean Anolis lizards) and lake systems (for example, African cichlids). Host-parasite systems in many respects are analogous to island systems, where host species represent isolated islands for parasites whose l...

  5. Fecundity, growth, and survival of the angelfish Pterophyllum scalare (Perciformes: Cichlidae) under laboratory conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Armando A. Ortega-Salas; Isabel Cortés G.; Hugo Reyes-Bustamante

    2009-01-01

    The freshwater angelfishes (Pterophyllum) are South American cichlids that have become very popular among aquarists, yet scarce information on their culture and aquarium husbandry exists. We studied Pterophyllum scalare to analyze dietary effects on fecundity, growth, and survival of eggs and larvae during 135 days. Three diets were used: A) decapsulated cysts of Artemia, B) commercial dry fish food, and C) a mix diet of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis and the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The ...

  6. Comportamento reprodutivo do acará bandeira, Pterophyllum scalare Cuvier & Valenciennes (Osteichthyes, Cichlidae) Reproductive behaviour of Pterophyllum scalare Cuvier & Valenciennes (Osteichthyes, Cichlidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Maria do Socorro R.F Cacho; Maria Emília Yamamoto; Sathyabama Chellappa

    1999-01-01

    Acará bandeira, Pterophyllum scalare Cuvier & Valenciennes, 1831 is a Neotropical cichlid fish, which has not been studied under a scientific approach. The objective of this work was to identify and describe the reproductive behaviour involved in the various phases of its reproductive cycle, such as territorial disputes and its establishment, substrate selection for spawning, courtship and mating, selection of mate and parental care. Twenty males and ten females of the study species were obse...

  7. Biodiversity and sustainable management of a tropical wetland lake ecosystem: A case study of Lake Kanyaboli, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Rasowo, J.O.; Abila, R.; Manyala, J.

    2006-01-01

    Lake Kanyaboli and the surrounding Yala swamp wetland has been recognized as an important biodiversity hotspot. Recent population genetic and phylogenetic studies confirm the evolutionary importance of Lake Kanyaboli (Kenya) in preserving the cichlid fish fauna of Lake Victoria. The adjoining Yala swamp harbours the endangered swamp antelope Sitatunga (Tragecephalus spekii) and several papyrus endemic birds. The lake and adjoining swamp play a critical role in the livelihood of the local comm...

  8. Biodiversity and Sustainable Management of a Tropical Wetland Lake Ecosystem: a case study of Lake Kanyaboli, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Abila, R.

    2005-01-01

    Lake Kanyaboli and the surrounding Yala Swamp wetland have been recognized as an important biodiversity hotspot. Recent population, genetic and phylogenetic studies confirm the evolutionary importance of Lake Kanyaboli in preserving the cichlid fish fauna of Lake Victoria. The adjoining Yala Swamp harbours the endangered swamp antelope Sitatunga (Tragecephalus spekii) and several papyrus endemic birds. The lake and adjoining swamp play a critical role in the livelihood of...

  9. Reproductive biology of Chromidotilapia guntheri (Sauvage, 1882) (Cichlidae, Perciformes) in four coastal rivers (Ehania, Noé, Soumié and Eholié) of Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Boussou C.K.; Edia Edia O.; Konan Felix K.; Ouattara Mamadou; Ouattara Allassane; Gourène Germain

    2010-01-01

    The reproductive activities of a small Cichlid Chromidotilapia guntheri were investigated from July 2003 to March 2005 in four coastal rivers (Ehania, Eholié, Noé and Soumié), in the southeast of Côte d’Ivoire. Trends in gonadosomatic indices and reproductive stages of development suggested that C. guntheri is a multiple (fractional) spawner and breeds all year round with little fluctuation in spawning intensity. However, spawni...

  10. Temporal Dynamics of Reproduction of the Neotropical Fish, Crenicichla menezesi (Perciformes: Cichlidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Andréa Soares de Araújo; Wallace Silva do Nascimento; Maria Emília Yamamoto; Sathyabama Chellappa

    2012-01-01

    The reproductive biology and the gonadal development cycle of the Neotropical cichlid fish, Crenicichla menezesi, is described. This species exhibits sexual dimorphism only during the spawning season. First sexual maturity of females is attained earlier than the males. Both macroscopic and histological investigations of ovaries and testes revealed four stages of gonadal maturation. Mean batch fecundity of females was 372 (±10,41) of mature oocytes. This species is a partial spawner, with an e...

  11. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of the Victoria tilapia (Oreochromis variabilis) and Redbelly Tilapia (Tilapia zilli): genome characterization and phylogeny analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinaro, Zachary Omambia; Xue, Liangyi; Volatiana, Josies Ancella

    2016-07-01

    The Cichlid fishes have played an important role in evolutionary biology, population studies and aquaculture industry with East African species representing a model suited for studying adaptive radiation and speciation for cichlid genome projects in which closely related genomes are fast emerging presenting questions on phenotype-genotype relations. The complete mitochondrial genomes presented here are for two closely related but eco-morphologically distinct Lake Victoria basin cichlids, Oreochromis variabilis, an endangered native species and Tilapia zilli, an invasive species, both of which are important economic fishes in local areas. The complete mitochondrial genomes determined for O. variabilis and T. zilli are 16 626 and 16,619 bp, respectively. Both the mitogenomes contain 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and a non-coding control region, which are typical of vertebrate mitogenomes. Phylogenetic analyses of the two species revealed that though both lie within family Cichlidae, they are remotely related. PMID:27158785

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Pundamilia nyererei (Perciformes, Cichlidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lingyun; Song, Xiaolei; Chen, Xi; Dang, Xiao; Wang, Wenjing

    2016-09-01

    Pundamilia nyererei (Perciformes, Cichlidae) is a member of Cichlid fishes that lives in the Great Lakes of East Africa. Fishes of the Cichlidae family can adapt spectacular trophic radiations and provide good potential examples of vertebrate adaptive radiations. Here, we firstly assembled the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Pundamilia nyererei. The mitgenome was 16 761 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 putative control region. Most of these protein-coding genes started with a traditional ATG codon except for COX1, which initiated with an infrequent start codon GTG instead, and terminated with the mitochondrial stop codon (TAA/AGG/AGA) or a single T base. The mitogenome structural organization is identical to other Cichlid fish. The overall GC content is 45.25%, which is lower than the AT content. According to these new determined mitogenome sequences and 10 other species under the same family or order, we have constructed the species phylogenetic tree to verify the accuracy of newly assembled mitogenome sequences. We accept that by taking the advantage of full mitogenome, we can address taxonomic issue and study the related evolutionary events. Our current data are going to provide important resources for the research of Cichlid fishes mitochondrial evolution and energy metabolism. PMID:26260178

  13. Coevolutionary patterning of teeth and taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomquist, Ryan F; Parnell, Nicholas F; Phillips, Kristine A; Fowler, Teresa E; Yu, Tian Y; Sharpe, Paul T; Streelman, J Todd

    2015-11-01

    Teeth and taste buds are iteratively patterned structures that line the oro-pharynx of vertebrates. Biologists do not fully understand how teeth and taste buds develop from undifferentiated epithelium or how variation in organ density is regulated. These organs are typically studied independently because of their separate anatomical location in mammals: teeth on the jaw margin and taste buds on the tongue. However, in many aquatic animals like bony fishes, teeth and taste buds are colocalized one next to the other. Using genetic mapping in cichlid fishes, we identified shared loci controlling a positive correlation between tooth and taste bud densities. Genome intervals contained candidate genes expressed in tooth and taste bud fields. sfrp5 and bmper, notable for roles in Wingless (Wnt) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, were differentially expressed across cichlid species with divergent tooth and taste bud density, and were expressed in the development of both organs in mice. Synexpression analysis and chemical manipulation of Wnt, BMP, and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways suggest that a common cichlid oral lamina is competent to form teeth or taste buds. Wnt signaling couples tooth and taste bud density and BMP and Hh mediate distinct organ identity. Synthesizing data from fish and mouse, we suggest that the Wnt-BMP-Hh regulatory hierarchy that configures teeth and taste buds on mammalian jaws and tongues may be an evolutionary remnant inherited from ancestors wherein these organs were copatterned from common epithelium. PMID:26483492

  14. Comparative studies on the influence of "simulated weigthlessness" on fish otolith growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungs, Sonja; Hendrik Anken, Ralf; Li, Xiao-Yan; Hauslage, Jens; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding; Hilbig, Reinhard; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of all developing sensory systems. Concerning the vestibular organ of fish, it has been shown earlier that the growth of inner ear otoliths of developing Cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) and Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is slowed down by increased gravity (hypergravity) as an adaptation. Several studies proposed that otolith growth actively is adjusted via a feedback mechanism to produce a test mass of the appropriate physical capacity. Applying diminished gravity such as microgravity during spaceflight yielded an opposite effect, i.e., larger than normal otoliths in swordtails Xiphophorus helleri. Since there are no data on spaceflown early larval stages of the Cichlid fish and the Zebrafish available, these model organisms were subjected to simulated weightlessness using a submersed clinostat with one axis of rotation (O. mossambicus) and rotating-wall vessels (RWVs; O. mossambicus was maintained within a submersed RWV, which was recently developed at DLR, whereas D. rerio was kept within a modified RWV, developed by NASA). Developmental stages were subjected to clinorotation (60 rpm) and wall vessel rotation (Cichlid fish: 44 rpm; Zebrafish: 12.5 rpm; at these speeds, the larvae did neither sediment nor were they centrifuged away from the center of the RWVs) at a point of time when inner ear otolith mineralisation began. The experimental runs were discontinued when the animals hatched (O. mossambicus, stage 12, reached after 2-3 days at 22° C) or when they began to actively move within the devices (D. rerio, after 6 days at 28° C). After clinostat exposure, both utricular and saccular otoliths (Lapilli and Sagittae, respectively) of the Cichlids were significantly larger as compared to otoliths from the 1g controls. A similar result was obtained after wall vessel rotation for 3 and 6 days of the Zebrafish. These results support the idea that a feedback mechanism correlates the gravity level with the physical capacity

  15. Effects of simulated weightlessness on fish otolith growth: Clinostat versus Rotating-Wall Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brungs, Sonja; Hauslage, Jens; Hilbig, Reinhard; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Anken, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of developing sensory systems. It has been shown earlier that the growth of inner ear heavy stones (otoliths) of late-stage Cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) and Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) is slowed down by hypergravity, whereas microgravity during space flight yields an opposite effect, i.e. larger than 1 g otoliths, in Swordtail ( Xiphophorus helleri) and in Cichlid fish late-stage embryos. These and related studies proposed that otolith growth is actively adjusted via a feedback mechanism to produce a test mass of the appropriate physical capacity. Using ground-based techniques to apply simulated weightlessness, long-term clinorotation (CR; exposure on a fast-rotating Clinostat with one axis of rotation) led to larger than 1 g otoliths in late-stage Cichlid fish. Larger than normal otoliths were also found in early-staged Zebrafish embryos after short-term Wall Vessel Rotation (WVR; also regarded as a method to simulate weightlessness). These results are basically in line with the results obtained on Swordtails from space flight. Thus, the growth of fish inner ear otoliths seems to be an appropriate parameter to assess the quality of "simulated weightlessness" provided by a particular simulation device. Since CR and WVR are in worldwide use to simulate weightlessness conditions on ground using small-sized specimens, we were prompted to directly compare the effects of CR and WVR on otolith growth using developing Cichlids as model organism. Animals were simultaneously subjected to CR and WVR from a point of time when otolith primordia had begun to calcify both within the utricle (gravity perception) and the saccule (hearing); the respective otoliths are the lapilli and the sagittae. Three such runs were subsequently carried out, using three different batches of fish. The runs were discontinued when the animals began to hatch. In the course of all three runs performed, CR led to larger than normal lapilli, whereas WVR

  16. Relação entre fator de condição relativo (Kn e abundância de ectoparasitos de brânquias, em duas espécies de ciclídeos da bacia do rio Paraná, Brasil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i2.3625 Relation between the relative condition factor (Kn and the abundance of gill ectoparasites in two species of cichlids from the Paraná river basin, Brazil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v30i3.3625

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Cezar Pavanelli

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisados 33 espécimes de Satanoperca pappaterra, capturados entre março de 2004 e junho de 2005, na planície de inundação do alto rio Paraná e 33 espécimes de Crenicichla niederleinii, capturados entre novembro de 2005 e novembro de 2006, no reservatório de Itaipu. Ambos estavam parasitados por monogenéticos, pertencentes ao gênero Sciadicleithrum e por metacercárias de Ascocotyle sp. O fator de condição relativo (Kn não diferiu significativamente entre indivíduos parasitados e não-parasitados das duas espécies de hospedeiros. Apenas Sciadicleithrum sp.1 parasito de S. pappaterra apresentou correlação positiva e significativa entre o fator de condição relativo (Kn e a abundância de parasitismo. Por outro lado, Ascocotyle sp. de ambos os hospedeiros e Sciadicleithrum sp.2 parasito de C. niederleinii não apresentaram correlações entre o Kn e a abundância de parasitismo.The study analyzed 33 specimens of Satanoperca pappaterra, captured from the upper Paraná river floodplain between March 2004 and June of 2005, and 33 specimens of Crenicichla niederleinii captured from the Itaipu Reservoir between November 2005 and November 2006. Both were parasitized by monogeneans pertaining to the genus Sciadicleithrum and by metacercariae of Ascocotyle sp. The relative condition factor (Kn did not differ significantly between parasitized and unparasitized individuals from the two host species. Only Sciadicleithrum sp.1, parasite of S. pappaterra, presented positive and significant correlation between the relative condition factor (Kn and the abundance of parasitism. On the other hand, Ascocotyle sp. in both hosts and Sciadicleithrum sp.2 parasite of C. niederleinii did not present correlations between the Kn and the abundance of parasitism.

  17. The strong diachronous Muschelkalk/Keuper facies shift in the Central European Basin: implications from the type-section of the Erfurt Formation (Lower Keuper, Triassic) and basin-wide correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Matthias; Henniger, Matthias; Barnasch, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The transition from the shallow marine Upper Muschelkalk Sea to the Lower Keuper fluvial plain represents the most diachronous facies shift of the entire Germanic Triassic. The type-section of the fluvial Lower Keuper (Erfurt Formation) is described in detail for the first time including biostratigraphic dating of the Muschelkalk/Keuper boundary. The type-section is integrated into a NNE-SSW cross section through the Central European Basin, and the Muschelkalk/Keuper facies shift is constrained by high-resolution conodont and ceratite biostratigraphy. Thus, the fundamental changes in palaeogeography, shifts of facies belts and stratal pattern architecture are visualised. Forced by a rapid transgression from Tethyan waters, the shallow marine Upper Muschelkalk Sea attained its maximum flooding in the lower conodont zone 2 ( sequens/pulcher to philippi/robustus zones). Subsequent slow continuous regression to the South was accompanied by step-by-step progradation of coastal to fluvial plain environments of the Lower Keuper, culminating in a fluvial plain extending to South Germany. Based on stratal patterns, an improved sequence-stratigraphic interpretation for the Upper Muschelkalk/Lower Keuper interval is suggested. In combination with biostratigraphic arguments, the new sequence-stratigraphy points to a revised correlation of this interval within the Tethyan Triassic, incorporating the positions of the Anisian/Ladinian and Fassanian/Longobardian boundaries.

  18. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in Mbaa River and the impact on aquatic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajima, M N O; Nnodi, P C; Ogo, O A; Adaka, G S; Osuigwe, D I; Njoku, D C

    2015-12-01

    The bioaccumulation and toxic effects of heavy metals have caused ecological damage to aquatic ecosystem. In this study, concentration of heavy metals including zinc, lead, cadmium, iron, and copper were determined in the sediment and water as well as in the muscle, gill, and intestine of two fish species (Pelmatochromis guentheri and Pelmatochromis pulcher) of Mbaa River in Southeastern Nigeria. Samples were collected at three different spots from the river, and the level of heavy metals specified above were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) after a modified wet digestion process. The results indicated that sediment had the highest concentration of the heavy metals investigated while water had the lowest concentration. Fish tissues showed appreciable bioaccumulation of these metals as evidenced by a higher concentration profile when compared with that of water. Furthermore, the concentration of these heavy metals in water and their bioconcentration factor in the fish were above the recommended limit by WHO and FEPA, indicating that Mbaa River along Inyishi may not be suitable for drinking nor the fish safe for human consumption. The study also reveals the use of fish as bioindicator of aquatic environment. PMID:26597816

  19. Using GIS mapping of the extent of nearshore rocky reefs to estimate the abundance and reproductive output of important fishery species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claisse, Jeremy T; Pondella, Daniel J; Williams, Jonathan P; Sadd, James

    2012-01-01

    Kelp Bass (Paralabrax clathratus) and California Sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher) are economically and ecologically valuable rocky reef fishes in southern California, making them likely indicator species for evaluating resource management actions. Multiple spatial datasets, aerial and satellite photography, underwater observations and expert judgment were used to produce a comprehensive map of nearshore natural rocky reef habitat for the Santa Monica Bay region (California, USA). It was then used to examine the relative contribution of individual reefs to a regional estimate of abundance and reproductive potential of the focal species. For the reefs surveyed for fishes (i.e. 18 out of the 22 in the region, comprising 82% the natural rocky reef habitat 30%) was produced from a relatively small proportion of the regional reef area (c. 10%). Natural nearshore rocky reefs make up only 11% of the area in the newly designated MPAs in this region, but results provide some optimism that regional fisheries could benefit through an increase in overall reproductive output, if adequate increases in size structure of targeted species are realized. PMID:22272326

  20. Using GIS mapping of the extent of nearshore rocky reefs to estimate the abundance and reproductive output of important fishery species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy T Claisse

    Full Text Available Kelp Bass (Paralabrax clathratus and California Sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher are economically and ecologically valuable rocky reef fishes in southern California, making them likely indicator species for evaluating resource management actions. Multiple spatial datasets, aerial and satellite photography, underwater observations and expert judgment were used to produce a comprehensive map of nearshore natural rocky reef habitat for the Santa Monica Bay region (California, USA. It was then used to examine the relative contribution of individual reefs to a regional estimate of abundance and reproductive potential of the focal species. For the reefs surveyed for fishes (i.e. 18 out of the 22 in the region, comprising 82% the natural rocky reef habitat 30% was produced from a relatively small proportion of the regional reef area (c. 10%. Natural nearshore rocky reefs make up only 11% of the area in the newly designated MPAs in this region, but results provide some optimism that regional fisheries could benefit through an increase in overall reproductive output, if adequate increases in size structure of targeted species are realized.

  1. Using GIS Mapping of the Extent of Nearshore Rocky Reefs to Estimate the Abundance and Reproductive Output of Important Fishery Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claisse, Jeremy T.; Pondella, Daniel J.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Sadd, James

    2012-01-01

    Kelp Bass (Paralabrax clathratus) and California Sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher) are economically and ecologically valuable rocky reef fishes in southern California, making them likely indicator species for evaluating resource management actions. Multiple spatial datasets, aerial and satellite photography, underwater observations and expert judgment were used to produce a comprehensive map of nearshore natural rocky reef habitat for the Santa Monica Bay region (California, USA). It was then used to examine the relative contribution of individual reefs to a regional estimate of abundance and reproductive potential of the focal species. For the reefs surveyed for fishes (i.e. 18 out of the 22 in the region, comprising 82% the natural rocky reef habitat 30%) was produced from a relatively small proportion of the regional reef area (c. 10%). Natural nearshore rocky reefs make up only 11% of the area in the newly designated MPAs in this region, but results provide some optimism that regional fisheries could benefit through an increase in overall reproductive output, if adequate increases in size structure of targeted species are realized. PMID:22272326

  2. Boldness, aggression and exploration: evidence for a behavioural syndrome in male pentamorphic livebearing fish, Poecilia parae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey R. Bourne

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A body of evidence is being accumulated on consistent individual differences in behaviour for several animal taxa. Individuals of these species exhibit different levels of risk during competition over limited resources, and the resultant behavioural types perform better under different social and physical environmental conditions. We used approach distance to a model of a piscivore predator the pike cichlid (Crenicichla saxatilis to categorize male pentamorphic livebearing fish or pentas (Poecilia parae as bold, intermediate, and shy, and then tested the hypothesis that when behaviours are correlated, individuals express different behaviour types under different contexts. Our results for the most part corroborated the six predictions generated by the aforementioned hypothesis: (1 bold pentas explored a T-maze in the shortest time, and initially approached the chamber with a living pike cichlid instead of the one with the conspecific male; (2 intermediate pentas spent more time exploring the maze and exhibited no initial interest in the predator chamber nor the conspecific one; (3 shy individuals spent the most time exploring the maze, and initially approached the predator chamber, providing only partial support for this prediction because shy males did not initially approach the conspecific chamber; (4 approach distance from the pike cichlid predator model and time to explore the maze was positively correlated; (5 bold pentas exhibit highest levels of aggression toward conspecifics; and (6 bold individuals ingested the most conspecific fry. Our results lead to the conclusion that pentas exhibited a behavioural syndrome with bold fish being more aggressive, faster explorers of novel situations, and more cannibalistic than intermediate and shy individuals of the same population. Thus, penta males fall into a behavioural syndrome formally known as the proactive-reactive axis.

  3. A periodic pattern generator for dental diversity

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    Streelman J Todd

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodic patterning of iterative structures is a fundamental process during embryonic organization and development. Studies have shown how gene networks are employed to pattern butterfly eyespots, fly bristles and vertebrate epithelial appendages such as teeth, feathers, hair and mammary glands. Despite knowledge of how these features are organized, little is known about how diversity in periodic patterning is generated in nature. We address this problem through the molecular analysis of oral jaw dental diversity in Lake Malawi cichlids, where closely related species exhibit from 1 to 20 rows of teeth, with total teeth counts ranging from around 10 to 700. Results We investigate the expression of conserved gene networks (involving bmp2, bmp4, eda, edar, fgf8, pax9, pitx2, runx2, shh and wnt7b known to pattern iterative structures and teeth in other vertebrates. We show that spatiotemporal variation in expression pattern reflects adult morphological diversity among three closely related Malawi cichlid species. Combinatorial epithelial expression of pitx2 and shh appears to govern the competence both of initial tooth sites and future tooth rows. Epithelial wnt7b and mesenchymal eda are expressed in the inter-germ and inter-row regions, and likely regulate the spacing of these shh-positive units. Finally, we used chemical knockdown to demonstrate the fundamental role of hedgehog signalling and initial placode formation in the organization of the periodically patterned cichlid dental programme. Conclusion Coordinated patterns of gene expression differ among Malawi species and prefigure the future-ordered distribution of functional teeth of specific size and spacing. This variation in gene expression among species occurs early in the developmental programme for dental patterning. These data show how a complex multi-rowed vertebrate dentition is organized and how developmental tinkering of conserved gene networks during iterative

  4. Mercury biomagnification in the food web of Lake Tanganyika (Tanzania, East Africa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, L. [School of Environmental Studies and Department of Biology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L-3N6 (Canada)], E-mail: linda.campbell@queensu.ca; Verburg, Piet [National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 11-115, Hamilton 3251 (New Zealand); Dixon, D.G. [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue, Waterloo (Canada); Hecky, R.E. [Large Lakes Observatory, University of Minnesota, Duluth, 10 University Drive 204 RLBDuluth, MN 55812-2496 (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Lake Tanganyika is a globally important lake with high endemic biodiversity. Millions of people in the lake basin depend on several fish species for consumption. Due to the importance of fish consumption as an exposure route of mercury to humans, we sampled Lake Tanganyika in 2000 to assess total mercury concentrations and biomagnification of total mercury through the food web. Stable nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses of food web structure indicate a complex food web with overlapping omnivory with some specialist fish species. Stable nitrogen isotope analyses further confirm that mercury is biomagnifying through the Tanganyika food web at rates similar to those seen in Lakes Malawi and Victoria, the other two African Great Lakes. Most collected fish species and all invertebrate species had mercury concentrations below 0.2 {mu}g Hg/g wet weight. However, several fish species, Ctenochromis horei (average 0.15 {mu}g/g ww), Neolamprologus boulengeri (0.2 {mu}g/g ww) , Bathybates spp.spp. (0.21 {mu}g/g ww), Mastacembelus cunningtoni (0.22 {mu}g/g ww) and Clarias theodorae (0.22 {mu}g/g ww) approached or slightly exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO)'s recommended guideline of 0.2 {mu}g Hg/g for vulnerable populations with high rates of fish consumption. Two individuals of the piscivorous fish species Lates microlepis (0.54, 0.78 {mu}g/g ww) and a Polypterus congicus (1.3 {mu}g/g ww) exceeded the international marketing limit value of 0.5 {mu}g/g ww. Because C. theodorae and L. microlepis are also important market fish species, there is a need to monitor mercury concentrations in internationally marketed fish from Lake Tanganikya to ensure that those fish do not present a risk to human consumers.

  5. Reduction in predator defense in the presence of neighbors in a colonial fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska C Schädelin

    Full Text Available Predation pressure has long been considered a leading explanation of colonies, where close neighbors may reduce predation via dilution, alarming or group predator attacks. Attacking predators may be costly in terms of energy and survival, leading to the question of how neighbors contribute to predator deterrence in relationship to each other. Two hypotheses explaining the relative efforts made by neighbors are byproduct-mutualism, which occurs when breeders inadvertently attack predators by defending their nests, and reciprocity, which occurs when breeders deliberately exchange predator defense efforts with neighbors. Most studies investigating group nest defense have been performed with birds. However, colonial fish may constitute a more practical model system for an experimental approach because of the greater ability of researchers to manipulate their environment. We investigated in the colonial fish, Neolamprologus caudopunctatus, whether prospecting pairs preferred to breed near conspecifics or solitarily, and how breeders invested in anti-predator defense in relation to neighbors. In a simple choice test, prospecting pairs selected breeding sites close to neighbors versus a solitary site. Predators were then sequentially presented to the newly established test pairs, the previously established stimulus pairs or in between the two pairs. Test pairs attacked the predator eight times more frequently when they were presented on their non-neighbor side compared to between the two breeding sites, where stimulus pairs maintained high attack rates. Thus, by joining an established pair, test pairs were able to reduce their anti-predator efforts near neighbors, at no apparent cost to the stimulus pairs. These findings are unlikely to be explained by reciprocity or byproduct-mutualism. Our results instead suggest a commensal relationship in which new pairs exploit the high anti-predator efforts of established pairs, which invest similarly with or

  6. Mercury biomagnification in the food web of Lake Tanganyika (Tanzania, East Africa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake Tanganyika is a globally important lake with high endemic biodiversity. Millions of people in the lake basin depend on several fish species for consumption. Due to the importance of fish consumption as an exposure route of mercury to humans, we sampled Lake Tanganyika in 2000 to assess total mercury concentrations and biomagnification of total mercury through the food web. Stable nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses of food web structure indicate a complex food web with overlapping omnivory with some specialist fish species. Stable nitrogen isotope analyses further confirm that mercury is biomagnifying through the Tanganyika food web at rates similar to those seen in Lakes Malawi and Victoria, the other two African Great Lakes. Most collected fish species and all invertebrate species had mercury concentrations below 0.2 μg Hg/g wet weight. However, several fish species, Ctenochromis horei (average 0.15 μg/g ww), Neolamprologus boulengeri (0.2 μg/g ww) , Bathybates spp.spp. (0.21 μg/g ww), Mastacembelus cunningtoni (0.22 μg/g ww) and Clarias theodorae (0.22 μg/g ww) approached or slightly exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO)'s recommended guideline of 0.2 μg Hg/g for vulnerable populations with high rates of fish consumption. Two individuals of the piscivorous fish species Lates microlepis (0.54, 0.78 μg/g ww) and a Polypterus congicus (1.3 μg/g ww) exceeded the international marketing limit value of 0.5 μg/g ww. Because C. theodorae and L. microlepis are also important market fish species, there is a need to monitor mercury concentrations in internationally marketed fish from Lake Tanganikya to ensure that those fish do not present a risk to human consumers

  7. Species Composition and Some Observations on the Littoral Fishes Based on Beach-Seining in the Kigoma Region, Eastern Coast of Lake Tanganyika

    OpenAIRE

    BAYONA, John D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Fishes in the inshore waters of Lake Tanganyika were sampled in the Kigoma Region between June 1984 and May 1988, using a beach-seine. This study collected 78 fish species in 14 different families. Cichlids made up 55.1% of the identified species. All but 12 of these species were identified in the previous collections at Karago, Mkuyu and Myako by Japanese researchers. Therefore, from the combined collections, 132 species of fish (19 fluviatile, 75 littoral, 24 benthic, 8 pelagic and 6 bathyp...

  8. Feed training of peacock bass (Cichla sp.)

    OpenAIRE

    M.A.M Moura; KUBITZA F.; CYRINO J. E. P.

    2000-01-01

    The Amazonian cichlid peacock bass (Cichla sp.) is a highly marketable food and sport fish, therefore a suitable species for aquaculture. However, because of its piscivorous feeding preferences, the species does not accept dry feeds voluntarily, turning its intensive culture difficult and costly. This study aimed to wean fingerling peacock bass from inert moist food to dry diets. In a first experiment, 1,134 fingerlings weighting 0.27 g were divided in two 0.37 m³ hapas and fed ground fish fl...

  9. The Co-existence between Oreochromis niloticus and Lates niloticus in Lake Victoria (Kenya Sector).

    OpenAIRE

    Ogari, J.

    1990-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to try and find out why Lates niloticus and Oreochromis niloticus have managed to co-exist in Lake Victoria (Kenya sector). The study is considered to be of tremendous scientific value not only because lates has been accused of preying on the cichlid stocks in L.Victoria but also for considering suitable management approaches to maintain viable fishery resources on long-term basis. The results presented are preliminary and the final detailed results will be pr...

  10. The co-existence between Oreochromis niloticus and Lates niloticus in Lake Victoria (Kenya sector)

    OpenAIRE

    Ogari, J.

    1990-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to try and find out why Lates niloticus and Oreochromis nilolicus have managed to co-exist in Lake Victoria (Kenya sector). The study is considered to be of tremendous scientific value not only because Lates has been accused of preying on the cichlid stocks in L.Victoria but also for considering suitable management approaches to maintain viable fishery resources on long-term basis. The results presented are preliminary and the final detailed results will be pr...

  11. Acclimatization test of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus in Lebna reservoir (Cap Bon, Tunisia)

    OpenAIRE

    Derouiche, E.; Azaza, M.S; KRAIEM M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Ce travail consiste à tester l’acclimatation d’une espèce thermophile, le tilapia du Nil Oreochromis niloticus dans la retenue du barrage Lebna (Cap Bon), moyennant un système extensif de grossissement. Les résultats montrent que le tilapia introduit directement en pleine retenue a pu se maintenir et supporter les mauvaises conditions hivernales en adoptant une stratégie d’hibernation. Par ailleurs, avec le retour des conditions favorables (T>20°C), ce Cichlidé a montré une bonne condition, u...

  12. Ecology of Indian estuaries-XI. A preliminary survey of the fishery resources of the Ashtamudi estuarine system

    OpenAIRE

    Balakrishnan Nair, N.; Kumar, K. K.; Rajasekharan Nair, J.; Abdul Azis, P.K.; Dharmaraj, K.; M Arunachalam

    1983-01-01

    The fish fauna of the Ashtamudi, the second largest estuarine system in Kerala (8°53'-9°02' N Lat. and 76°31'-76°41' E Long.) is listed. 97 species belonging to 39 families have been recorded, ofwhich69 are commercially important contributing to the fisheries of the Ashtamudi Estuary. Mullets, cichlids and the glassy perchlets are the most abundant groups and contribute appreciably to the landings. Results revealed that the estuarine system supports a good capture fishery which is seasonal. M...

  13. The origin and age of haplochromine fishes in Lake Victoria, east Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagl, S.; Tichy, H; Mayer, W.E.; Takezaki, N.; Takahata, N; Klein, J.

    2000-01-01

    According to a widely held view, the more than 300 species of haplochromine cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria (LV), East Africa, originated from a single founder species in less than 12,000 years. This view, however, does not follow from the published geological and molecular evidence. The former does indeed suggest that the LV basin dried out less than 15,000 years ago, but it does not provide any information about the species that re-colonized the new lake or that remained in the rivers drain...

  14. Fish species diversity in the Victoria and Kyoga lake basins: their conservation and sustainable use

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Introduction of exotic fish species especially the Nile perch Lates niloticus, is believed to be responsible for the decline of fish species diversity in lakes Victoria, Kyoga and Nabugabo.About 60% of the haplochromine cichlids are thought to have become extinct from L. Victoria due to predation by the Nile perch. However there are many lakes satelite to the lakes Victoria and Kyoga basins which still have fish fauna similar to that of the main lakes. many of the satellite lakes are separate...

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of Protomelas annectens (Regan, 1922) (Perciformes: Cichlidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Zhongpu; Chen, Zaizhong; Leng, Xiangjun; Zhao, Yuming; Gao, Jianzhong; Chen, Xiaowu

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the complete mitogenome sequence of Protomelas annectens Regan 1922 has been sequenced by next-generation sequencing method. The assembled mitogenome consisting of 16 583 bp, includes 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs genes and 1 control region. The overall base composition of P. annectens is 27.41% for A, 30.07% for C, 15.88% for G, 26.64% for T and shows 94% identity to threadfin cichlid, Petrochromis trewavasae. These data will provide useful molecular information for phylogenetic relationships within the family Cichlidae species. PMID:26358538

  16. Effects of Feeding Frequency on Growth Performance and Survival Rate of Angel Fish, Pterophyllum scalare (Perciformes: Cichlidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Milad Kasiri; Amin Farahi; Mohammad Sudagar

    2011-01-01

    The freshwater angel fish (Pterophyllum scalare Schultze, 1823) is South American cichlid become very popular among aquarists. There is little information on their culture and aquarium husbandry. In this study growth performance and survival rate of angelfish subjected to different feeding frequencies were evaluated. Four groups of angel fish juveniles (0.87 ± 0.01 g; 3.98 ± 0.08 mm) were fed either four meals per day (F1), two meals per day (F2), one meal per day (F3) and every other day (F4...

  17. Spatial and seasonal patterns in the feeding habits of juvenile Lates niloticus (L.) in the Mwanza Gulf of Lake Victoria

    OpenAIRE

    Katunzi, E.F.B.; Densen, van, W.L.T.; Wanink, J.H.; White, F

    2006-01-01

    Flexibility in the feeding habits of juvenile Nile perch (1¿30 cm total length) was studied from September 1988 to September 1989 at four sites (depth range: 1¿25 m) in the Mwanza Gulf of Lake Victoria. During this period haplochromine cichlids were virtually absent in the area. We looked at the combined effects of predator size, season and habitat. Stomach content analysis showed that with increase in size, the diet of Nile perch shifted from zooplankton and midge larvae, to macro-invertebra...

  18. Reproductive biology of Catla catla in the Udawalawe reservoir, Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Athukorala, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The reproductive biology of Catla catla (Hamilton-Buchanan) in the Udawalawe reservoir was studied from June 2007 to December 2008. Samples of eggs from Indian major carp C. catla were collected from fish landed in the reservoir and analysed in the laboratory to assess the reproductive characteristics. C. catla. Cirrhinus mrigala, exotic Cichlids and Labeo rohita accounted for 62.2%, 21.0%, 12% and 1.0% respectively of the total landings in the Udawalawe reservoir during the study period. Gon...

  19. Swimming behaviour of the upside-down swimming catfish ( Synodontis nigriventris) at high-quality microgravity - A drop-tower experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R.; Hilbig, R.

    2009-07-01

    The catfish Synodontis nigriventris often shows a unique swimming behaviour in being oriented upside-down. When swimming near a (e.g., vertical) substrate, however, the animals orient themselves with their ventral side towards this substrate. This tendency is called ventral substrate response (VSR). The VSR does not only override the upside-down swimming behaviour but also the dorsal light response and the ventral light response. In the course of an earlier drop-tower experiment performed at ZARM (Bremen, Germany) using cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus), we had observed that about 90% of the animals revealed sensorimotor disorders (kinetotic swimming) due to the almost complete lack of gravity as a cue for orientation. In order to further assess the importance of the VSR for postural control in S. nigriventris when being located near a substrate, we subjected catfish in relatively small chambers to drop-tower flights. In contrast to our results regarding cichlid fish, S. nigriventris showed no kinetotic behaviour. This clearly suggests that the VSR overrides even vestibular input and possibly represents the most important single behavioural response in this species.

  20. Preliminary fish survey of Lac Tseny in northwestern Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noromalala Raminosoa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We surveyed the fish fauna of Lac Tseny, in the Sofia Region of northwestern Madagascar, during October 2010 by observing commercial catches and targeted netting of areas used by endemic species. We recorded seven native fish species at the lake, including three endemic cichlids, a herring and a catfish. We confirmed the continued survival of the Critically Endangered Paretroplus menarambo, as well as the presence of a Paretroplus taxon that may be new to science. The commercial fishery in the lake is sustained by introduced tilapiines and the native Savagella robusta. The three endemic cichlids (Paretroplus spp. were not targeted by commercial fishermen, but when caught in small numbers were retained for domestic consumption. Submerged trees in the west of the lake restrict fishing with nets and probably provide important habitat for P. menarambo. Priority next steps at the lake include (i additional surveys and biological studies of the endemic fish species and the Critically Endangered Madagascar big-headed turtle, Erymnochelys madagascariensis, (ii clarification of the taxonomic status of Paretroplus cf. kieneri and, should it prove a new taxon, its formal scientific description, and (iii continued engagement with fishing communities and authorities to promote practices that benefit livelihoods and the survival of threatened fish species.

  1. Development of the embryo, larva and early juvenile of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (Pisces: Cichlidae). Developmental staging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Koji; Okada, Norihiro

    2007-05-01

    We described the developmental stages for the embryonic, larval and early juvenile periods of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus to elucidate sequential events of craniofacial development. Craniofacial development of cichlids, especially differentiation and morphogenesis of the pharyngeal skeleton, progresses until about 30 days postfertilization (dpf). Because there is no comprehensive report describing the sequential processes of craniofacial development up to 30 dpf, we newly defined 32 stages using a numbered staging system. For embryonic development, we defined 18 stages (stages 1-18), which were grouped into seven periods named the zygote, cleavage, blastula, gastrula, segmentation, pharyngula and hatching periods. For larval development, we defined seven stages (stages 19-25), which were grouped into two periods, early larval and late larval. For juvenile development until 30 dpf, we defined seven stages (stages 26-32) in the early juvenile period. This developmental staging system for Nile tilapia O. niloticus will benefit researchers investigating skeletogenesis throughout tilapia ontogeny and will also facilitate comparative evolutionary developmental biology studies of haplochromine cichlids, which comprise the species flocks of Lakes Malawi and Victoria. PMID:17501907

  2. Otter Signs on the Islands of the Lake Malawi National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadongola W.K.

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Lake Malawi National Park (LMNP was established in 1980 and is the newest in the country. It is situated in the productive southern end of Lake Malawi which is the southernmost basin in the Great African Rift Lakes System. It contains the most diverse community of freshwater fishes (cichlids and cyprinids in the world. Most of the fish species are endemic not only to Lake Malawi but to LMNP in particular. Besides the land mass which makes up the terrestrial part of the park in the Nankumba Peninsula, there are thirteen islands scattered all over the place. The park extends 100m from the shoreline of both the landmass and the islands into the waters. Almost entirely, the shoreline is rocky with very steep slopes and deep waters. The park was instituted primarily to conserve beautifully coloured, highly demanded, ornamental rock-dwelling cichlids locally known as mbuna. Besides the fish, the lake, and the park in particular, is also a good habitat of both Sub-Saharan Otters: the Cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis and the spotted-necked otter (Lutra maculicollis. This can be attributed to the purity of the water of the lake as well as the rivers in the lake's catchment area and the availability of both crabs and fish which form a good proportion of the otters' diets respectively.

  3. Oogenesis in Laetacara araguaiae (Ottoni and Costa, 2009) (Labriformes: Cichlidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos-Silva, Amanda Pereira; de Siqueira-Silva, Diógenes Henrique; Ninhaus-Silveira, Alexandre; Veríssimo-Silveira, Rosicleire

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to analyze the oogenesis of adult females of the cichlid fish Laetacara araguaiae. The specimens' gonads were removed and processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. Oogenesis in L. araguaiae showed the following characteristics: a germinal epithelium with three types of oogonia (A-undifferentiated, A-differentiated and B-oogonia), oocytes at meiotic prophase stage and ovarian follicle formation. Oocytes showing primary growth with pre-vitellogenic and cortical alveolus were observed. Similar to data for other cichlids, oocytes in secondary growth or vitellogenesis were characterized by the initial deposition of yolk microgranules. The event that characterizes the maturation stage is nucleolus migration, also called the germinal vesicle, to the oocyte periphery in the direction of the micropyle. The follicular complex undergoes several changes throughout the oocyte stages. To the best of our knowledge this study is the first to describe L. araguaiae oogenesis. Moreover, this study is the first step to better understand the reproductive biology of this species, which shows great potential for use as an ornamental fish. PMID:26351016

  4. Morphological distinctness despite large-scale phenotypic plasticity—analysis of wild and pond-bred juveniles of allopatric populations of Tropheus moorii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschbaumer, Michaela; Postl, Lisbeth; Koch, Martin; Wiedl, Thomas; Sturmbauer, Christian

    2011-02-01

    Cichlids are an excellent model to study explosive speciation and adaptive radiation. Their evolutionary success has been attributed to their ability to undergo rapid morphological changes related to diet, and their particular breeding biology. Relatively minor changes in morphology allow for exploitation of novel food resources. The importance of phenotypic plasticity and genetically based differences for diversification was long recognized, but their relationship and relative magnitude remained unclear. We compared morphology of individuals of four wild populations of the Lake Tanganyika cichlid Tropheus moorii with their pond-raised F1 offspring. The magnitude of morphological change via phenotypic plasticity between wild and pond-bred F1 fish exceeds pairwise population differences by a factor of 2.4 (mean Mahalanobis distances). The genetic and environmental effects responsible for among population differentiation in the wild could still be recognized in the pond-bred F1 fish. All four pond populations showed the same trends in morphological change, mainly in mouth orientation, size and orientation of fins, and thickness of the caudal peduncle. As between population differentiation was lower in the wild than differentiation between pond-raised versus wild fish, we suggest the narrow ecological niche and intense interspecific competition in rock habitats is responsible for consistent shape similarity, even among long-term isolated populations.

  5. Variation in the visual habitat may mediate the maintenance of color polymorphism in a poeciliid fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L Hurtado-Gonzales

    Full Text Available The conspicuousness of animal signals is influenced by their contrast against the background. As such, signal conspicuousness will tend to vary in nature because habitats are composed of a mosaic of backgrounds. Variation in attractiveness could result in variation in conspecific mate choice and risk of predation, which, in turn, may create opportunities for balancing selection to maintain distinct polymorphisms. We quantified male coloration, the absorbance spectrum of visual pigments and the photic environment of Poecilia parae, a fish species with five distinct male color morphs: a drab (i.e., grey, a striped, and three colorful (i.e., blue, red and yellow morphs. Then, using physiological models, we assessed how male color patterns can be perceived in their natural visual habitats by conspecific females and a common cichlid predator, Aequidens tetramerus. Our estimates of chromatic and luminance contrasts suggest that the three most colorful morphs were consistently the most conspicuous across all habitats. However, variation in the visual background resulted in variation in which morph was the most conspicuous to females at each locality. Likewise, the most colorful morphs were the most conspicuous morphs to cichlid predators. If females are able to discriminate between conspicuous prospective mates and those preferred males are also more vulnerable to predation, variable visual habitats could influence the direction and strength of natural and sexual selection, thereby allowing for the persistence of color polymorphisms in natural environments.

  6. OMNIHAB - a controlled environmental system for application in gravitational biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Ralf; Hilbig, Reinhard; Anken, Ralf; Lebert, Michael; Häder, Donat

    Several "closed" habitats have been designed in the past for experiments with unicellular organisms as well as with multicellular animals and plants under long-term microgravity. Some of these environmental systems were flown successfully. The bioregenerative C.E.B.A.S.- Minimodul allowed the maintenance of higher plants (Ceratophyllum sp.), mollusks (Biomphalaria glabrata) and fish (swordtail Xiphophorus helleri, cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus) under spaceflight conditions (STS-89, STS-90 Neurolab, STS-107). A much simpler and smaller system, the OMEGAHAB, was successfully employed on the FOTON M-3 flight, containing cichlid fish larvae and unicellular algae (Euglena gracilis). Further aquatic habitats are under development (e.g., AquaHab, another aquatic research module especially dedicated to ground based, application-oriented research). These systems tend to be specialized, minimal ecosystems with limited research potential. Therefore, we propose to develop a controlled, multi-modular hardware to increase the diversity of experimental species to be flown together. Currently, a variety of plant and animal species are used as model systems. Combining as many of them as possible (and conducting a most effective sample-sharing among the different working groups) will strongly improve the cost-benefit ratio and thus effectiveness of a space- flight experiment in utilising limited resources at the maximum. The concept of OMNIHAB, an aquatic life support system comprising exchangeable modules, will be presented at the meeting.

  7. Evidence of a specialized feeding niche in a Late Triassic ray-finned fish: evolution of multidenticulate teeth and benthic scraping in † Hemicalypterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sarah Z.

    2015-04-01

    Fishes have evolved to exploit multiple ecological niches. Extant fishes in both marine (e.g., rabbitfishes, surgeonfishes) and freshwater systems (e.g., haplochromine cichlids, characiforms) have evolved specialized, scoop-like, multidenticulate teeth for benthic scraping, feeding primarily on algae. Here, I report evidence of the oldest example of specialized multidenticulate dentition in a ray-finned fish, † Hemicalypterus weiri, from the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation of southeastern Utah (˜210-205 Ma), USA. † H. weiri is a lower actinopterygian species that is phylogenetically remote from modern fishes, and has evolved specialized teeth that converge with those of several living teleost fishes (e.g., characiforms, cichlids, acanthurids, siganids), with a likely function of these teeth being to scrape algae off a rock substrate. This finding contradicts previously held notions that fishes with multicuspid, scoop-like dentition were restricted to teleosts, and indicates that ray-finned fishes were diversifying into different trophic niches and exploring different modes of feeding earlier in their history than previously thought, fundamentally altering our perceptions of the ecological roles of fishes during the Mesozoic.

  8. First record of Contracaecum spp. (Nematoda : Anisakidae in fish-eating birds from Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barson

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Endoparasites of fish-eating birds, Phalacrocorax africanus, P. carbo, Anhinga melanogaster and Ardea cinerea collected from Lake Chivero near Harare, Zimbabwe, were investigated. Adult Contracaecum spp. were found in the gastrointestinal tract (prevalence 100% in P. africanus, P. carbo and A. melanogaster; 25 % in A. cinerea. Parasite intensity was 11-24 (mean 19 in P. africanus, 4-10 (mean 7 in P. carbo, 4-56 (mean 30 in A. melanogaster and 2 (mean 0.5 in A. cinerea. The cormorants fed mainly on cichlid fishes and carp; the darters and the grey herons on cichlids. All these fishes are intermediate hosts of Contracaecum spp. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that Contracaecum rudolphii infected both cormorant species and darters; C. carlislei infected only the cormorants while C. tricuspis and C. microcephalum infected only the darters. Parasites from the grey heron were not identified to species because they were still developing larvae. These parasites are recorded in Zimbabwe for the first time.

  9. Predator Avoidance in Extremophile Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Plath

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extreme habitats are often characterized by reduced predation pressures, thus representing refuges for the inhabiting species. The present study was designed to investigate predator avoidance of extremophile populations of Poecilia mexicana and P. sulphuraria that either live in hydrogen sulfide-rich (sulfidic springs or cave habitats, both of which are known to have impoverished piscine predator regimes. Focal fishes that inhabited sulfidic springs showed slightly weaker avoidance reactions when presented with several naturally occurring predatory cichlids, but strongest differences to populations from non-sulfidic habitats were found in a decreased shoaling tendency with non-predatory swordtail (Xiphophorus hellerii females. When comparing avoidance reactions between P. mexicana from a sulfidic cave (Cueva del Azufre and the adjacent sulfidic surface creek (El Azufre, we found only slight differences in predator avoidance, but surface fish reacted much more strongly to the non-predatory cichlid Vieja bifasciata. Our third experiment was designed to disentangle learned from innate effects of predator recognition. We compared laboratory-reared (i.e., predator-naïve and wild-caught (i.e., predator-experienced individuals of P. mexicana from a non-sulfidic river and found no differences in their reaction towards the presented predators. Overall, our results indicate (1 that predator avoidance is still functional in extremophile Poecilia spp. and (2 that predator recognition and avoidance reactions have a strong genetic basis.

  10. Neurosecretory neurons of the nucleus preopticus (NPO) express salmon GnRH mRNA and show reproduction phase-related variation in the female Indian major carp, Cirrhinus cirrhosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharkar, Amul J; Mazumdar, Minakshi; Singru, Praful S; Subhedar, Nishikant

    2008-10-01

    We studied the expression of sGnRH mRNA in the neurons of the nucleus preopticus (NPO) of the Indian major carp, Cirrhinus cirrhosus, and their correlation with the reproductive status of the fish. Non-radioisotopic in situ hybridization histochemistry protocol employing biotinylated-oligonucleotide probes complementary to salmon GnRH, cichlid GnRH I, catfish GnRH, chicken GnRH II (from cichlid and catfish), and mammalian GnRH, were applied to the sections through the POA of the female Indian major carp Cirrhinus cirrhosus. Incubation with the probe complimentary to salmon GnRH (sGnRH) mRNA from salmon, produced distinct hybridization signal in the cytosol of several neurosecretory neurons of the magnocellular and parvocellular subdivisions of the NPO of the fish collected during February-April (preparatory phase) and May-June (prespawning phase). However, no signal was detected in the NPO of fish collected during July-August (spawning phase). Application of other antisense probes, or sense probe for salmon GnRH mRNA, produced no signal. We suggest that NPO neurons in C. cirrhosus may express sGnRH mRNA, produce GnRH peptide, and play a role in regulation of pituitary-ovary axis. PMID:18664387

  11. Development of habitat suitability criteria for Neotropical stream fishes and an assessment of their transferability to streams with different conservation status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Barreto Teresa

    Full Text Available We assessed the preference of 10 fish species for depth and velocity conditions in forested streams from southeastern Brazil using habitat suitability criteria (HSC curves. We also tested whether preference patterns observed in forested streams can be transferred to deforested streams. We used data from fish sampled in 62 five-meter sites in three forested streams to construct preference curves. Astyanax altiparanae, A. fasciatus, Knodus moenkhausii, and Piabina argentea showed a preference for deep slow habitats, whereas Aspidoras fuscoguttatus, Characidium zebra, Cetopsorhamdia iheringi, Pseudopimelodus pulcher, and Hypostomus nigromaculatus showed an opposite pattern: preference for shallow fast habitats. Hypostomus ancistroides showed a multimodal pattern of preference for depth and velocity. To evaluate whether patterns observed in forested streams may be transferred to deforested streams, we sampled 64 five-meters sites in three deforested streams using the same methodology. The preference for velocity was more consistent than for depth, as success in the transferability criterion was 86% and 29% of species, respectively. This indicates that velocity is a good predictor of species abundance in streams, regardless of their conditionNeste estudo avaliamos a preferência de 10 espécies de peixes por condições de profundidade e fluxo em riachos florestados do sudeste do Brasil por meio do critério de adequabilidade de habitat (habitat suitability criteria - curvas HSC. Testamos também se os padrões de preferência observados nos riachos florestados podem ser transferidos para riachos desmatados. Foram realizadas amostragens da ictiofauna em 62 trechos de cinco metros de extensão em três riachos florestados para a construção das curvas de preferência. Astyanax altiparanae, A. fasciatus, Knodus moenkhausii e Piabina argentea apresentaram preferência por habitats lentos e profundos, enquanto Aspidoras fuscoguttatus, Characidium zebra

  12. First insights into the diversity of gill monogeneans of 'Gnathochromis' and Limnochromis (Teleostei, Cichlidae) in Burundi: do the parasites mirror host ecology and phylogenetic history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmentová, Nikol; Gelnar, Milan; Koblmüller, Stephan; Vanhove, Maarten P M

    2016-01-01

    Monogenea is one of the most species-rich groups of parasitic flatworms worldwide, with many species described only recently, which is particularly true for African monogeneans. For example, Cichlidogyrus, a genus mostly occurring on African cichlids, comprises more than 100 nominal species. Twenty-two of these have been described from Lake Tanganyika, a famous biodiversity hotspot in which many vertebrate and invertebrate taxa, including monogeneans, underwent unique and spectacular radiations. Given their often high degrees of host specificity, parasitic monogeneans were also used as a potential tool to uncover host species relationships. This study presents the first investigation of the monogenean fauna occurring on the gills of endemic 'Gnathochromis' species along the Burundese coastline of Lake Tanganyika. We test whether their monogenean fauna reflects the different phylogenetic position and ecological niche of 'Gnathochromis' pfefferi and Gnathochromis permaxillaris. Worms collected from specimens of Limnochromis auritus, a cichlid belonging to the same cichlid tribe as G. permaxillaris, were used for comparison. Morphological as well as genetic characterisation was used for parasite identification. In total, all 73 Cichlidogyrus individuals collected from 'G.' pfefferi were identified as C. irenae. This is the only representative of Cichlidogyrus previously described from 'G.' pfefferi, its type host. Gnathochromis permaxillaris is infected by a species of Cichlidogyrus morphologically very similar to C. gillardinae. The monogenean species collected from L. auritus is considered as new for science, but sample size was insufficient for a formal description. Our results confirm previous suggestions that 'G.' pfefferi as a good disperser is infected by a single monogenean species across the entire Lake Tanganyika. Although G. permaxillaris and L. auritus are placed in the same tribe, Cichlidogyrus sp. occurring on G. permaxillaris is morphologically more

  13. Physiological responses to salinity increase in blood parrotfish (Cichlasoma synspilum ♀ × Cichlasoma citrinellum ♂).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Yanming; Huang, Xizhi; Kong, Hui; Lu, Weiqun; Wang, Youji

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of adding salt to water on the physiological parameters of the blood parrot cichlid (Cichlasoma synspilum ♀ × Cichlasoma citrinellum ♂). The blood parrot cichlid is a popular species in the aquarium trade because of its behaviour and beauty. Salt is usually added to water during the culture or transportation of this fish. However, the manner by which the fish adjusts its physiological responses to salinity change is unclear. The effects of salinity on serum osmolality, immune-related enzyme activities, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activities in the gill, skin carotenoid content and oxygen consumption were analysed. Blood parrotfish individuals were transferred from freshwater to water with four salinity levels (0.16, 2.5, 5 and 7.5 ‰) for 168 h, and physiological responses were evaluated at 0, 6, 12, 24 and 168 h. Results showed no significant differences in serum acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase activities, skin carotenoid content and oxygen consumption rate among the different groups. However, the serum osmolality at 6 h was significantly elevated. Moreover, salinity increase stimulated superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity from 0 to 6 h. SOD activity increased from 6 to 24 h but significantly reduced at 168 h when the fish were exposed to salt water. The SOD activity in the salinity 2.5 ‰ group recovered the initial level, whereas those in the salinity 5 and 7.5 ‰ groups decreased to levels lower than the initial level. The gill Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity significantly declined with time and salinity increase. Thus, adding an appropriate amount of salt can save energy consumption during osmoregulation and temporarily enhance the antioxidant activity of blood parrotfish. However, this strategy is insufficient for long-term culture. Therefore, adding salt to water only provides short-term benefit to blood parrot cichlid during transportation. PMID:27536529

  14. Genetic and Morphological Evidence Implies Existence of Two Sympatric Species in Cyathopharynx furcifer (Teleostei: Cichlidae from Lake Tanganyika

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    Tetsumi Takahashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika are treated as a textbook example of adaptive radiation, many taxonomic problems remain unresolved. Cyathopharynx furcifer, which belongs to the currently monospecific genus Cyathopharynx, contains two colour morphs at the southern end of the lake: one has a yellow anal fin, and the other has a black anal fin. Some books for hobbyists of ornamental fish treat these morphs as different species, but taxonomic studies have neither mentioned the existence nor addressed the status of these colour morphs. In the present paper, we analysed these two colour morphs using mitochondrial, microsatellite, morphometric, and meristic data sets. Both molecular and morphological data allowed clear discrimination between these morphs, suggesting the existence of two distinct sympatric species. Three taxonomic species have been described in this genus, and only C. furcifer is currently considered valid. Observations of type specimens of these three nominal species will be needed to determine the scientific names of these colour morphs.

  15. A revision of the genus Astatoreochromis (Teleostei, Cichlidae, East–Africa

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    Jos Snoeks

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A taxonomic revision of the cichlid genus Astatoreochromis is presented. Eighteen meristic and 23 morphometric measurements were taken on 185 individuals, including type specimens. While fin counts separate populations from the Lake Victoria region (Astatoreochromis alluaudi from those of the Rusizi and Malagarazi rivers in the Lake Tanganyika basin (A. vanderhorsti and A. straeleni respectively, clear differentiation was not detected between the latter two. Mann-Whitney U-tests on specimens of comparable size from the two Tanganyika populations revealed significant differences in specimens 75 mm SL and Astatoreochromis vanderhorsti is herein considered a junior synonym of A. straeleni. A redescription of the two valid species of Astatoreochromis, A. alluaudi and A.straeleni, is provided.

  16. Feeding of two Cichlidae species (Perciformes in an hypertrophic urban lake

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    Yafe Alejandro

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Diet of two cichlid species, Cichlasoma facetum (Jenyns, 1842, and Gymnogeophagus rhabdotus Hensel, 1870, was studied in Rodó Lake, an urban hypertrophic lake in Uruguay. The stomach contents from 192 individuals of C. facetum and 202 of G. rhabdotus, obtained through seasonal sampling in the year 2000, were analyzed. The occurrence frequency and the alimentary importance index of each food item were calculated for each season and size class in both species. Cichlasoma facetum fed upon insects (mainly chironomid larvae and pupae, fish (Cnesterodon decemmaculatus Jenyns, 1842, and vegetals (algae, periphyton and macrophytes debris; large individuals also fed upon the freshwater shrimp Palaemonetes argentinus Nobili, 1901. Gymnogeophagus rhabdotus consumed zooplankton (mainly copepods, vegetals (algae and detritus and Chironomidae larvae in a lesser extent.

  17. On endocytosis of foreign ferritin and occurrence of phagolysosomes in fish heart endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leknes, Ingvar Leiv

    2016-04-01

    In the present study the ultrastructure and function of the endothelial cells enveloping the muscle trabeculae in heart in two teleosts, platyfish and firemouth cichlid, are described and discussed. These cells displayed a structure making them able to take up large amounts of foreign ferritin particles from the blood stream. The ferritin particles were assembled into huge phagolysosomes. Large amounts of Prussian blue were precipitated throughout these lysosomes when treated with acid ferrohexacyanide solution. The occurrence of Prussian blue precipitations in the control heart endothelial cells after Schmorl's solution, suggests that these cells normally contain undigestible material, a finding which strengthens the view that this tissue is involved in blood clearance in the present species. In conclusion, these heart endothelial cells seem able to perform a very efficient blood clearance of scavenger and foreign macromolecules and particles in the present species. PMID:26852295

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Metriaclima zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Song, Xiao-Lei; Chen, Ling-Yun; Li, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Cichlid fish from East Africa are remarkable for phenotypic and behavioral diversity on a backdrop of genomic similarity. Metriaclima zebra is a member of the Cichlidae family. Here, we reported the complete mitogenome sequence of M. zebra, which was 16 582 bp and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on complete mitogenomes of M. zebra and 11 closely related Cichlidae species to approve the accuracy. The complete mitochondrial genome of the M. zebra would provide more information for the research of M. zebra and the evolution of Cichlidae family. PMID:26273916

  19. Introgression in Lake Malaŵi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauffer, Jay R.; Madsen, Henry; Rollinson, David

    2014-01-01

    For the last 15 years, we have studied the relationships among cichlid snail-eating fishes, intermediate snail-host density, and the prevalence of human infection of Schistosoma haematobium in Lake Malaŵi and concluded that the increase of human infection is correlated with the decrease in snail......-eating fishes in the shallow waters of the lake. We postulated that a strain of S. haematobium from other parts of Africa, which was introduced into the Cape Maclear region of Lake Malaŵi by tourists, was compatible with Bulinus nyassanus-which is a close relative of B. truncatus, and interbred with the......, will impact on transmission of urogenital schistosomiasis within the local communities and on tourists who visit Lake Malaŵi....

  20. Otolith Growth and macular Carbonic Anhydrase Reactivity in larval Fish after Development at simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, U.; Hilbig, R.; Anken, R.

    Otolith growth in terms of mineralisation mainly depends on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). CA is located in specialized, mitochondria-rich macular cells (ionocytes), which are involved in the endolymphatic ion exchange, and the enzyme is responsible for the provision of the pH-value necessary for otolithic calcium carbonate deposition. Since it has been shown earlier that hypergravity slows down inner ear otolith growth in developing fish via a down-regulation of CA reactivity, we were prompted to elucidate whether (simulated) microgravity would possibly yield opposite effects. Therefore, larval siblings of cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) were housed in a submersed, two-dimensional clinostat (tube) during their development. Subsequently, the "physical capacity" (i.e., size) of the otoliths was measured, CA was histochemically demonstrated in ionocytes, and enzyme reactivity was determined densitometrically. The respective data will be communicated at the meeting. Acknowledgement: This work was financially supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) (FKZ: 50 WB 9997).

  1. The asymmetrical growth of otoliths in fish is affected by hypergravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R. H.; Kappel, T.; Rahmann, H.

    1999-12-01

    Size and asymmetry (size difference between the left and the right side) of inner ear otoliths of larval cichlid fish were determined after a long-term stay at moderate hypergravity conditions (3 g; centrifuge), in the course of which the animals completed their ontogenetic development from hatch to freely swimming. Both the normal morphogenetic development as well as the timely onset and gain of performance of the swimming behaviour was not impaired by the experimental conditions. However, both utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) were significantly smaller after hyper- g exposure as compared to parallely raised 1 g control specimens. The asymmetry of sagittae was significantly increased in the experimental animals, whereas the respective asymmetry concerning lapilli was pronouncedly decreased in comparison to the 1 g controls. These findings suggest, that the growth and the development of bilateral asymmetry of otoliths is guided by the environmental gravity vector.

  2. Morphometric variation of the Herichthys bartoni (Bean, 1892 species group (Teleostei: Cichlidae: How many species comprise H. labridens (Pellegrin, 1903?

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    Omar Mejía

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cichlids of the tribe Heroini have long been a source of taxonomical conflict. In particular, the species included in the Herichthys bartoni group have failed to be recovered as monophyletic in different molecular studies. In this paper we use traditional and geometric morphometrics to evaluate morphological variation in the species included in the H. bartoni complex in order to evaluate the number of species it contains. An update of a previously published DNA barcoding study suggests the existence of three genetic clusters that included the six recognized species analyzed in this study, none of them recovered as monophyletic. On the other hand, geometric morphometrics arise as a useful tool to discriminate species due that traditional morphometrics showed a high overlap in the characters analyzed that prevents the proposal of diagnostic characters.

  3. Sciadicleithrum juruparii n. sp. (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) from the gills of Satanoperca jurupari (Heckel) (Osteichthyes: Cichlidae) in the Guamá River, Amazon Delta, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Marly de Fátima Carvalho; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento; Santos, Cláudia Portes

    2012-06-01

    Sciadicleithrum juruparii n. sp. is described from the gills of the Neotropical cichlid fish Satanoperca jurupari (Heckel) caught in the Guamá River, in the delta of the Amazon River, at Belém, Pará State, Brazil. Diagnostic characters of the new species are a basally articulated male copulatory organ with clockwise coils and an accessory piece; a ventral bar with a median process; similar hooklets; vagina in the form of a sclerotised tube; and a sinistral vaginal aperture with a sclerotised papilla lying in a small surface depression. It is the only species of Sciadicleithrum Kritsky, Thatcher & Boeger, 1989 with a medial projection on the ventral bar. PMID:22581249

  4. Organochlorine Pesticides (OCPs) in Sediment and Fish of Two Tropical Water Bodies Under Different Land Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Garro, Demián; Burgos Chan, Adriana M; Rendón-von Osten, Jaime

    2016-07-01

    In this study we quantified and compared bioaccumulated OCPs in target fish species Cichlasoma urophthalmus (Mayan cichlid) and Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia) and sediment in two lentic systems neighboring areas with different land use (Xnoha = agricultural/Mocu = nature reserve). Fish at both sites showed the same number of pesticide compounds (17) while in sediment were 17 and 20, respectively. ∑chlordane concentrations were significantly higher in Xnoha in both fish and sediment (1.0 and 0.17 µg/g, respectively). Here higher concentrations of o,p'DDT were found in fish than in sediments, this was similarly demonstrated in Mocu but to a lesser extent. The proportion of endosulfan sulfate was lower in Xnoha (product. Detected concentrations of ∑DDT and chlordane exceed international permissible limits. Results indicate that OCPs were present in both aquatic systems regardless of the differences in land use. PMID:27209546

  5. Cooling water of power plant creates "hot spots" for tropical fishes and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, Sebastian; Kochmann, Judith; Kuhn, Thomas; Dörge, Dorian D; Plath, Martin; Miesen, Friedrich W; Klimpel, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Thermally altered water bodies can function as "hot spots" where non-native species are establishing self-sustaining populations beyond their tropical and subtropical native regions. Whereas many tropical fish species have been found in these habitats, the introduction of non-native parasites often remains undetected. Here, n = 77 convict cichlids (Amatitlania nigrofasciata) were sampled by electro-fishing at two sites from a thermally altered stream in Germany and examined for parasite fauna and feeding ecology. Stomach content analysis suggests an opportunistic feeding strategy of A. nigrofasciata: while plant material dominated the diet at the warm water inlet (∼30 °C), relative contributions of insects, plants, and crustaceans were balanced 3 km downstream (∼27 °C). The most abundant non-native parasite species was the tropical nematode Camallanus cotti with P = 11.90 % and P = 80.00 % at the inlet and further downstream, respectively. Additionally, nematode larvae of Anguillicoloides crassus and one specimen of the subtropical species Bothriocephalus acheilognathi were isolated. A. nigrofasciata was also highly infected with the native parasite Acanthocephalus anguillae, which could be linked to high numbers of the parasite's intermediate host Asellus aquaticus. The aim of this study was to highlight the risk and consequences of the release and establishment of ornamental fish species for the introduction and spread of non-indigenous metazoan parasites using the convict cichlid as a model species. Furthermore, the spread of non-native parasites into adjacent fish communities needs to be addressed in the future as first evidence of Camallanus cotti in native fish species was also found. PMID:26374537

  6. Evidence of elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners in commonly consumed fish from Eleyele Reservoir, Southwestern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeogun, Aina O; Adedara, Isaac A; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution of water, which is a source of cheap and affordable protein in the form of fish on which the population depends on, is of great concern globally. The present study assesses the levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) congeners in sediments and six commonly consumed cichlid species from Eleyele Reservoir, Southwestern Nigeria. The results indicate that the concentrations of heavier PCB congeners are higher than the lighter congeners in both sediment and fish tissue. The predominant PCB congeners in the sediment samples from this site were PCBs 8, 44, 114, 101, 189, 196, 206 and 209. The concentration of PCB congeners increased with increasing molecular weight from hepta-PCB to deca-PCB in all fish species. The trend in accumulation of total PCBs in fish was as follows: Tilapia guineensis (2,531.1 ± 74.6 ng/g) > Sarotherodon galilaeus (1178.7 ± 68.5 ng/g) > Oreochromis niloticus > (891.8 ± 49.6 ng/g) > Tilapia zillii (832.8 ± 38.2 ng/g) > Hemichromis fasciatus (475.7 ± 28.5 ng/g) > Sarotherodon melanotheron (333.2 ± 26.1 ng/g). In summary, data from this study shows that the levels of PCBs in cichlid species from Eleyele Reservoir are higher than the threshold level of 0.023-0.047 ng g(-1) recommended by United States Environmental Protection Agency. Such elevated PCB levels present significant health implications for human consumers and a threat to the resident fish communities. PMID:23859942

  7. The origin and age of haplochromine fishes in Lake Victoria, east Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagl, S; Tichy, H; Mayer, W E; Takezaki, N; Takahata, N; Klein, J

    2000-05-22

    According to a widely held view, the more than 300 species of haplochromine cichlid fishes in Lake Victoria (LV), East Africa, originated from a single founder species in less than 12,000 years. This view, however, does not follow from the published geological and molecular evidence. The former does indeed suggest that the LV basin dried out less than 15,000 years ago, but it does not provide any information about the species that re-colonized the new lake or that remained in the rivers draining the area. The molecular evidence is inconclusive with respect to the origin of the LV haplochromines because cichlids from critical regions around LV were not adequately sampled; and as far as the age of the LV haplochromines is concerned, it in fact led to an estimate of 250,000-750,000 years old. In the present study, mitochondrial DNA (control region) variation was determined by heteroduplex and sequencing analyses of more than 670 specimens collected at widely distributed East African riverine and lacustrine localities. The analyses revealed the existence of seven haplogroups (I-VII) distinguishable by characteristic substitutions. All endemic LV samples tested fell into one of these haplogroups (V) which, however, was also found to be present at various other localities, both riverine and lacustrine, outside LV. Within this haplogroup, four subgroups (VA through VD) could be distinguished, two of which (VB and VC) were represented in LV and at other localities. The great majority of the LV haplochromine species could be classified as belonging to the VC subgroup, which was found only in LV and in the rivers draining into it. Hence, while the endemic haplochromine species of LV could not have originated from a single founding population, the lake does harbour a large species flock which probably arose in situ. PMID:10874756

  8. A PRELIMINARY ANNOTATED CHECKLIST OF THE PAPILIONIDAE OF LAOS WITH NOTES ON TAXONOMY, PHENOLOGY, DISTRIBUTION AND VARIATION (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Cotton

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available 63 Papilionid taxa of Laos are reported representing 60 biological species. Of these, the occurrence of Papilio elephenor is unproven, and that of Papilio krishna is refuted, leaving 58 species confirmed for Laos. Notes on their taxonomy, distribution, phenology and variation are given. The following synonymies or changes of status are herewith listed:Graphium antiphates itamputi is regarded as a separate subspecies from pompilius stat. rev.Papilio tamerlanus timur Ney, 1911 is a synonym of Papilio alebion mullah Alphéraky, 1897, syn. nov. The following combinations are therefore proposed for the collective species: Graphium mullah mullah (Alphéraky, 1897 comb. nov. applies to the Sichuan population; Graphium mullah chungianus (Murayama, 1961 comb. nov., for the Taiwanese subspecies; and Graphium mullah kooichii (Morita, 1996 comb. nov. for the Lao subspecies.The true type of Papilio arycles sphinx Fruhstorfer, 1899 is identified, and arycleoides Fruhstorfer, 1902 placed in synonymy, syn. nov.Teinopalpus imperialis bhumipoli Nakano & Sukkit, 1985, T. i. gerritesi Nakano, 1995, T. i. gillesi Turlin, 1991, and T. i. hakkaorum Schäffler 2004 are shown to be synonyms of Teinopalpus imperialis imperatrix de Nicéville, 1899, syn. nov.Atrophaneura varuna liziensis Zhao, 1997 is synonymized with A. varuna astorion (Westwood, 1842 syn. nov.The names elegans Chou et al., 2000, pulcher Chou et al., 2000 and longimacula Wang & Niu, 2002 are sunk as synonyms of Papilio bianor bianor syn. nov.Papilio bianor significans Fruhstorfer, 1902 is regarded as a valid subspecies (stat. rev. and the ranges of Papilio bianor gladiator Fruhstorfer, [1902] and ganesa Doubleday, 1842 are clarified.Papilio noblei de Nicéville, [1889] is shown to be monotypic, and haynei Tytler, 1926 is sunk as a synonym syn. nov.Papilio hipponous siamensis Godfrey, 1916 is synonymized with pitmani Elwes & de Nicéville, [1887] syn. nov.The taxon imitata Monastyrskii & Devyatkin, 2003

  9. Modul.LES: a multi-compartment, multi-organism aquatic life support system as experimental platform for research in ∆g

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, Reinhard; Anken, Ralf; Grimm, Dennis

    In view of space exploration and long-term satellite missions, a new generation of multi-modular, multi-organism bioregenerative life support system with different experimental units (Modul.LES) is planned, and subunits are under construction. Modul.LES will be managed via telemetry and remote control and therefore is a fully automated experimental platform for different kinds of investigations. After several forerunner projects like AquaCells (2005), C.E.B.A.S. (1998, 2003) or Aquahab (OHB-System AG the Oreochromis Mossambicus Eu-glena Gracilis Aquatic Habitat (OmegaHab) was successfully flown in 2007 in course of the FOTON-M3 Mission. It was a 3 chamber controlled life support system (CLSS), compris-ing a bioreactor with the green algae Euglena gracilis, a fish chamber with larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus and a filter chamber with biodegrading bacteria. The sensory super-vision of housekeeping management was registered and controlled by telemetry. Additionally, all scientific data and videos of the organisms aboard were stored and sequentially transmitted to relay stations. Based on the effective performance of OmegaHab, this system was chosen for a reflight on Bion-M1 in 2012. As Bion-M1 is a long term mission (appr. 4 weeks), this CLSS (OmegaHab-XP) has to be redesigned and refurbished with enhanced performance. The number of chambers has been increased from 3 to 4: an algae bioreactor, a fish tank for adult and larval fish (hatchery inserted), a nutrition chamber with higher plants and crustaceans and a filter chamber. The OmegaHab-XP is a full automated system with an extended satellite downlink for video monitoring and housekeeping data acquisition, but no uplink for remote control. OmegaHab-XP provides numerous physical and chemical parameters which will be monitored regarding the state of the biological processes and thus enables the automated con-trol aboard. Besides the two basic parameters oxygen content and temperature, products of the

  10. A new genus and species of Heroini (Perciformes: Cichlidae from the early Eocene of southern South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Alano Perez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lumbrera Formation is the uppermost unit of the Salta Group, which crops out in northwestern Argentina. The paleoenvironment of the Lumbrera Formation is interpreted as a perennial lake deposited under temperate climatic conditions during the early to middle Eocene. Its fossil content is made up of palynomorphs, insects, crocodiles, turtles, lizards, and mammals, besides an ichthyofauna formed by cichlids, poeciliids and dipnoans. †Plesioheros chauliodus is described based on a single individual from this formation, which was fossilized as a lateral view impression (missing anal and caudal fins. It can be distinguished from other cichlids by a moderately deep body, enlarged anterior dentary teeth bearing subapical cusp, a low abdominal vertebral count (10, five canal openings in the dentary, and XI + 12 dorsal-fin rays. A phylogenetic analysis, using the matrix by Kullander (1998, recovered †Plesioheros within Heroini. This species was recovered most closely related to Australoheros and to the deep-bodied South American heroins. The occurrence of an Eocene Heroini, as well as of other cichlid lineages in the same stratigraphical level, is evidence of an ancient diversification in this family. This ancient age supports the hypothesis that the Cichlidae originated on Gondwana.A Formação Lumbrera é a unidade do topo do Grupo Salta, aflorante na região noroeste da Argentina. O paleoambiente da Formação Lumbrera tem sido interpretado como um lago perene depositado sob um clima temperado durante o início do Eoceno. Seu conteúdo fóssil é formado por palinomorfos, insetos, crocodilos, tartarugas, lagartos, mamíferos, além de uma ictiofauna que inclui ciclídeos, poeciliídeos e dipnóicos. †Plesioheros chauliodus é descrito com base em um único indivíduo coletado nesta formação, preservado como impressão em vista lateral (faltando as nadadeiras anal e caudal. Ele pode ser distinguido de outros ciclídeos por um corpo

  11. Bothriocephalus pearsei n. sp. (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea) from cenote fishes of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, T; Vargas-Vázquez, J; Moravec, F

    1996-10-01

    The cestode Bothriocephalus pearsei n. sp. is described from the intestine of the cichlid Cichlasoma urophthalmus (Günther) from cenote (= sinkhole) Zaci near Valladolid, Yucatan, Mexico. The pimelodid catfish Rhamdia guatemalensis Günther, which also harbored conspecific cestodes, seems to represent accidental or postcyclic host of B. pearsei. The new species differs from congeners mainly by the morphology of the scolex, which is clavate, with the maximum width in its middle part, has a distinct but weakly muscular apical disc; 2 short and wide bothria distinctly demarcated in their anterior part, becoming indistinct posteriorly in the middle part of the scolex, and 2 elongate, lateral grooves. In addition to the scolex morphology, the new species can be differentiated from Bothriocephalus species parasitizing North American freshwater fishes as follows: B. claviceps (Goeze, 1782), a specific parasite of eels in the Holarctic, B. cuspidatus Cooper, 1917, occurring mostly in perciform fishes in North America, B. musculosus Baer, 1937 found in the cichlid Cichlasoma biocellata (Regan) (= C. octofasciatum (Regan)), and B. texomensis Self, 1954, described from Hiodon alosoides (Rafinesque), are much larger, with strobilae consisting of relatively short and very wide proglottids versus small-sized strobila (length 26-32 mm) composed of about 70 proglottids, which are only slightly wider than they are long (ratio 1:1-3), rectangular, or even longer than wide in the last proglottids in B. pearsei. Bothriocephalus formosus Mueller and Van Cleave, 1932, described from Percopsis omiscomaycus (Walbaum) in the USA, can be distinguished from B. pearsei, besides the different shape of the scolex, by the distribution of vitelline follicles, which are not separated into 2 lateral fields and are present along the midline of proglottids in the former species. Bothriocephalus acheilognathi, a widely distributed parasite of fishes of many families, in particular of cyprinids

  12. Characterization of a novel hepadnavirus in the white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) from the Great Lakes Region of the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Cassidy M.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Cornman, Robert S.; Conway, Carla M.; Winton, James R.; Blazer, Vicki S.

    2015-01-01

    The white sucker Catostomus commersonii is a freshwater teleost often utilized as a resident sentinel. Here, we sequenced the full genome of a hepatitis B-like virus that infects white suckers from the Great Lakes Region of the USA. Dideoxysequencing confirmed the white sucker hepatitis B virus (WSHBV) has a circular genome (3542 bp) with the prototypical codon organization of hepadnaviruses. Electron microscopy demonstrated that complete virions of approximately 40 nm were present in the plasma of infected fish. Compared to avi- and orthohepadnaviruses, sequence conservation of the core, polymerase and surface proteins was low and ranged from 16-27% at the amino acid level. An X protein homologue common to the orthohepadnaviruses was not present. The WSHBV genome included an atypical, presumptively non-coding region absent in previously described hepadnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed WSHBV as distinct from previously documented hepadnaviruses. The level of divergence in protein sequences between WSHBV other hepadnaviruses, and the identification of an HBV-like sequence in an African cichlid provide evidence that a novel genus of the family Hepadnaviridae may need to be established that includes these hepatitis B-like viruses in fishes. Viral transcription was observed in 9.5% (16 of 169) of white suckers evaluated. The prevalence of hepatic tumors in these fish was 4.9%, of which only 2.4% were positive for both virus and hepatic tumors. These results are not sufficient to draw inferences regarding the association of WSHBV and carcinogenesis in white sucker.

  13. Spectral tuning by opsin coexpression in retinal regions that view different parts of the visual field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Brian E; Loew, Ellis R; Cronin, Thomas W; Carleton, Karen L

    2014-12-22

    Vision frequently mediates critical behaviours, and photoreceptors must respond to the light available to accomplish these tasks. Most photoreceptors are thought to contain a single visual pigment, an opsin protein bound to a chromophore, which together determine spectral sensitivity. Mechanisms of spectral tuning include altering the opsin, changing the chromophore and incorporating pre-receptor filtering. A few exceptions to the use of a single visual pigment have been documented in which a single mature photoreceptor coexpresses opsins that form spectrally distinct visual pigments, and in these exceptions the functional significance of coexpression is unclear. Here we document for the first time photoreceptors coexpressing spectrally distinct opsin genes in a manner that tunes sensitivity to the light environment. Photoreceptors of the cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra, mix different pairs of opsins in retinal regions that view distinct backgrounds. The mixing of visual pigments increases absorbance of the corresponding background, potentially aiding the detection of dark objects. Thus, opsin coexpression may be a novel mechanism of spectral tuning that could be useful for detecting prey, predators and mates. However, our calculations show that coexpression of some opsins can hinder colour discrimination, creating a trade-off between visual functions. PMID:25377457

  14. Monogeneans of freshwater fishes from cenotes (sinkholes) of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.

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    Mendoza-Franco, E F; Scholz, T; Vivas-Rodríguez, C; Vargas-Vázquez, J

    1999-01-01

    During a survey of the parasites of freshwater fishes from cenotes (sinkholes) of the Yucatan Peninsula the following species of monogeneans were found on cichlid, pimelodid, characid and poeciliid fishes: Sciadicleithrum mexicanum Kritsky, Vidal-Martinez et Rodriguez-Canul, 1994 from Cichlasoma urophthalmus (Günther) (type host), Cichlasoma friedrichsthali (Heckel), Cichlasoma octofasciatum (Regan), and Cichlasoma synspilum Hubbs, all new host records; Sciadicleithrum meekii Mendoza-Franco, Scholz et Vidal-Martínez, 1997 from Cichlasoma meeki (Brind); Urocleidoides chavarriai (Price, 1938) and Urocleidoides travassosi (Price, 1938) from Rhamdia guatemalensis (Günther); Urocleidoides costaricensis (Price et Bussing, 1967), Urocleidoides heteroancistrium (Price et Bussing, 1968), Urocleidoides anops Kritsky et Thatcher, 1974, Anacanthocotyle anacanthocotyle Kritsky et Fritts, 1970, and Gyrodactylus neotropicalis Kritsky et Fritts, 1970 from Astyanax fasciatus; and Gyrodactylus sp. from Gambusia yucatana Regan. Urocleidoides chavarriai, U. travassosi, U. costaricensis, U. heteroancistrium, U. anops, Anacanthocotyle anacanthocotyle and Gyrodactylus neotropicalis are reported from North America (Mexico) for the first time. These findings support the idea about the dispersion of freshwater fishes and their monogenean parasites from South America through Central America to southeastern Mexico, following the emergence of the Panamanian isthmus between 2 and 5 million years ago. PMID:10730199

  15. Ascocotyle (A.) nunezae n. sp. (Digenea: Heterophyidae) from Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, T; Vargas-Vázquez, J; Vidal-Martínez, V M; Aguirre-Macedo, L

    1997-02-01

    A new heterophyid species, Ascocotyle (Ascocotyle) nunezae n. sp., is described from adults found in the intestine of naturally infected heron, Casmerodius albus (type host), from the coastal lagoon of Celestún. Yucatan, Mexico, and a domestic chick (Gallus gallus), experimentally infected with metacercariae from Cichlasoma octofasciatum. The new species is characterized mainly by the number (32-37) and arrangement of circumoral spines, which form I complete row of 25-27 circumoral spines and 6-10 accessory spines on the dorsal side, and by the morphology of the ventrogenital sac with a large gonotyl, consisting of 2 indistinctly separated lobes of vesicular tissue. Ascocotyle (A.) nunezae is placed into the nominotypical subgenus Ascocotyle because of the presence of uterine loops at the pharyngeal region and position of vitelline follicles. However, it differs distinctly from other members of this subgenus by the presence of long intestinal ceca reaching posterior to the ventral sucker. Cichlids of the genus Cichlasoma from cenotes, lakes, and the river Río Hondo in the Yucatan Peninsula were natural second intermediate hosts of A. (A.) nunezae, with metacercariae encysted on their gills. Cichlasoma meeki (Brind) was the most heavily infected fish host (total prevalence 75%; mean intensity 11 +/- 9). PMID:9057711

  16. The Casiquiare river acts as a corridor between the Amazonas and Orinoco river basins: biogeographic analysis of the genus Cichla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, S C; Nunes, M; Montaña, C G; Farias, I P; Ortí, G; Lovejoy, N R

    2010-03-01

    The Casiquiare River is a unique biogeographic corridor between the Orinoco and Amazonas basins. We investigated the importance of this connection for Neotropical fishes using peacock cichlids (Cichla spp.) as a model system. We tested whether the Casiquiare provides a conduit for gene flow between contemporary populations, and investigated the origin of biogeographic distributions that span the Casiquiare. Using sequences from the mitochondrial control region of three focal species (C. temensis, C. monoculus, and C. orinocensis) whose distributions include the Amazonas, Orinoco, and Casiquiare, we constructed maximum likelihood phylograms of haplotypes and analyzed the populations under an isolation-with-migration coalescent model. Our analyses suggest that populations of all three species have experienced some degree of gene flow via the Casiquiare. We also generated a mitochondrial genealogy of all Cichla species using >2000 bp and performed a dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA) to reconstruct the historical biogeography of the genus. This analysis, when combined with the intraspecific results, supports two instances of dispersal from the Amazonas to the Orinoco. Thus, our results support the idea that the Casiquiare connection is important across temporal scales, facilitating both gene flow and the dispersal and range expansion of species. PMID:20149086

  17. A Combined Morphometric and Molecular Approach to Identifying Metacercariae of Euclinostomum heterostomum (Digenea: Clinostomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffara, Monica; Locke, Sean A; Cristanini, Cecilia; Davidovich, Nadav; Markovich, Michal Perry; Fioravanti, Maria L

    2016-04-01

    Metacercariae of species of Euclinostomum have been found encysted in kidney, liver, and muscles of several fish species, while adults occur in the mouth, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and upper esophagus of fish-eating birds. The aim of this work was to gather molecular and morphological data from the type species, Euclinostomum heterostomum, as a starting point for needed revisions of the genus. Metacercariae were collected from cichlids in Lake Kinneret, Israel, and all were identified as E. heterostomum based on morphology. This identification was further confirmed by principal components analyses that revealed no partitions in morphometric resemblance, indicating that the material represents a single species, and that the specimens were morphometrically similar to other descriptions of E. heterostomum. In phylogenetic analysis of concatenated partial internal transcribed spacer 1 and 2, 5.8S rDNA, and partial cytochrome c oxidase I barcode sequences, the isolates of Euclinostomum obtained in this study form a single, monophyletic group separate from recently published data from Euclinostomum sp. from Thailand and from Clinostomum species, which are also monophyletic. The morphological and molecular data reported in the present work can provide a useful point of reference for future studies. PMID:26762958

  18. Conservation, development, and function of a cement gland-like structure in the fish Astyanax mexicanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottin, Karen; Hyacinthe, Carole; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-10-01

    The larvae of the fish Astyanax mexicanus transiently develop a flat and adhesive structure on the top of their heads that we have called "the casquette" (cas, meaning "hat"). We hypothesized that the cas may be a teleostean homolog of the well-studied Xenopus cement gland, despite their different positions and structures. Here we show that the cas has an ectodermal origin, secretes mucus, expresses bone morphogenic protein 4 (Bmp4) and pituitary homeobox 1/2 (Pitx1/2), is innervated by the trigeminal ganglion and serotonergic raphe neurons, and has a role in the control and the development of the larval swimming behavior. These developmental, connectivity, and behavioral functional data support a level of deep homology between the frog cement gland and the Astyanax cas and suggest that attachment organs can develop in varied positions on the head ectoderm by recruitment of a Bmp4-dependent developmental module. We also show that the attachment organs of the cichlid Tilapia mariae larvae display some of these features. We discuss the possibility that these highly diversified attachment glands may be ancestral to chordates and have been lost repetitively in many vertebrate classes. PMID:20855623

  19. Capillariosis in breeder discus (Symphysodon aequifasciatus in Iran

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    Rahmati-Holasoo Hooman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The global ornamental fish trade is a rapidly growing industry. Cultivation and propagation of ornamental fishes have been increasing in the last 20 years in Iran. Discus (Symphysodon aequifasciatus from Cichlidae is one of the most popular and expensive aquarium fish. In the past few years farming of this fish has been well developed in Iran. Two breeder discus fish (Symphysodon aequifasciatus from two different propagation centres (with high mortality with signs of anorexia, loss of balance, moribundity and darkness in skin colour were referred to Laboratory of Aquatic Diseases of Veterinary Faculty, University of Tehran. After the survey of ectoparasites, necropsy was performed under aseptic conditions; bacterial culture on standard media was done and the alimentary canal was extruded. In both fish no ectoparasite was detected and no bacteria from these cases grew on the standard media. In internal survey 5 and 25 nematodes were detected in each fish. A high number of free eggs were observed in intestine of fish. Regarding morphological characteristics of the nematodes and their eggs, they were identified as Capillaria sp. Treatment of other fish with levamisole was effective and the loss was terminated. Some helminthes like Capillaria pterophylli Heinze, 1933, can cause a high mortality in cichlid aquarium fishes. This study showed that infection with some species of Capillaria could cause a heavy loss in ornamental fish from Cichlidae. Diagnosis of parasites of these fishes can help us to prevent high mortalities.

  20. Influence of long-term hyper-gravity on the reactivity of succinic acid dehydrogenase and NADPH-diaphorase in the central nervous system of fish: a histochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    In the course of a densitometric evaluation, the histochemically demonstrated reactivity of succinic acid dehydrogenase (SDH) and of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPHD) was determined in different brain nuclei of two teleost fish (cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus, swordtail fish Xiphophorus helleri), which had been kept under 3g hyper-gravity for 8 days. SDH was chosen since it is a rate limiting enzyme of the Krebs cycle and therefore it is regarded as a marker for metabolic and neuronal activity. NADPHD reactivity reflects the activity of nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous intercellular messenger that has been suggested to play a major role in several different in vivo models of neuronal plasticity including learning. Within particular vestibulum-connected brain centers, significant effects of hyper-gravity were obtained, e.g., in the magnocellular nucleus, a primary vestibular relay ganglion of the brain stem octavolateralis area, in the superior rectus subdivision of the oculomotoric nucleus and within cerebellar eurydendroid cells, which in teleosts possibly resemble the deep cerebellar nucleus of higher vertebrates. Non-vestibulum related nuclei did not respond to hypergravity in a significant way. The effect of hyper-gravity found was much less distinct in adult animals as compared to the circumstances seen in larval fish (Anken et al., Adv. Space Res. 17, 1996), possibly due to a development correlated loss of neuronal plasticity.

  1. Reproductive biology of Chromidotilapia guntheri (Sauvage, 1882 (Cichlidae, Perciformes in four coastal rivers (Ehania, Noé, Soumié and Eholié of Côte d’Ivoire in West Africa

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    Boussou C.K.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The reproductive activities of a small Cichlid Chromidotilapia guntheri were investigated from July 2003 to March 2005 in four coastal rivers (Ehania, Eholié, Noé and Soumié, in the southeast of Côte d’Ivoire. Trends in gonadosomatic indices and reproductive stages of development suggested that C. guntheri is a multiple (fractional spawner and breeds all year round with little fluctuation in spawning intensity. However, spawning activities were more intensive in August and September. The estimated mean standard length at first maturity did not differ significantly between rivers. It was, in the overall population, 85.53 mm SL for males and 100.13 mm SL for females. In general, the sex ratio differed from 1:1 with the predominance of the males in rivers, standard length classes, seasons and the entire population. Absolute fecundity (F varied from a minimum of 70 to a maximum of 470 eggs. The range of variation in the relative fecundity was from 3066 to 9135 eggs per kilogram of fish in the total population. Fecundity did not differ extensively between rivers. The absolute fecundity relations to fish standard length (SL and eviscerated weight (We were best described in the whole population by the following equations: F = 0.00069 × SL2.72 and F = 2.54 × We1.15, respectively. Moreover, there was no relationship between absolute fecundity and oocyte diameter.

  2. Spatial segregation of freshwater fish in an intermittent Cuban stream.

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    José Luis Ponce de León

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The spatial segregation of fish species is related to the use of available resources in every river or lake segment. In this work the spatial distribution of four endemic and one introduced freshwater fish species from the Govea stream, in Havana Province, Cuba was studied between june and november of 2005. Both, the effect of sun incidence and the segregation in the water column were analyzed. Gambusia punctata Poey, 1854 feeds on invertebrates, mainly on the surface zone, while herbivores like Girardinus metallicus Poey, 1854 are found in the intermediate zone more frequently. The detritivores like Limia vittata Guichenot, 1853 and Plecostomus commersoni Valenciennes, 1836, and the omnivorous cichlid Nandopsis tetracanthus (Cuvier y Valenciennes, 1831, were found mostly at the bottom. Differences in the mean number of individuals were found for most species in same-depth transects except for N. tetracanthus. In zones exposed to direct sunlight G. metallicus, L. vittata and P. commersoni were found more abundant, whereas G. punctata was mainly noticed in shade areas.

  3. Gill monogeneans of Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Oreochromis leucostictus (Trewavas, 1933) in Lake Naivasha, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindoria, Nehemiah Mogoi; Mungai, Lewis Kamau; Yasindi, Andrew Wamalwa; Otachi, Elick Onyango

    2016-04-01

    An investigation of gill monogeneans from the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and the blue spotted tilapia Oreochromis leucostictus (50 individuals per species) was done between the months of November 2014 to February 2015 in Lake Naivasha, Kenya. Standard parasitological procedures were used to examine fish gills for the presence of monogeneans. The observed monogeneans were collected, preliminarily identified using identification keys, quantified and fixed in 4 % formalin for morphological studies and absolute ethanol for molecular studies. Four parasite species comprising of three species of the genus Cichlidogyrus and one species of the genus Scutogyrus were recovered. Cichlidogyrus sclerosus and Cichlidogyrus tilapiae infested both fish species but the C. sclerosus was most prevalent in O. leucostictus (Prevalence (P) = 100 %, Mean intensity (MI) = 3.4) and C. tilapiae in O. niloticus (P = 8 %, MI = 4). Cichlidogyrus tilapiae had a P = 12 % and MI = 5.0 and a P = 6 % and MI = 3.0 in O. niloticus and O. leucostictus, respectively. Cichlidogyrus halli (P = 4 %, MI = 15.5) and Scutogyrus gravivaginus (P = 2 %, MI = 1.0) were only found in O. leucostictus. This is the first time that these monogeneans have been identified from Lake Naivasha, Kenya, presenting new geographical records. It was concluded that Ancyrocephalids (Cichilidogyrus spp.) dominated the two cichlid fish species in Lake Naivasha, Kenya. PMID:26691859

  4. Integrated cytogenetics and genomics analysis of transposable elements in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Guilherme; Kocher, Thomas; Eickbush, Thomas; Simões, Rafael P; Martins, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    Integration of cytogenetics and genomics has become essential to a better view of architecture and function of genomes. Although the advances on genomic sequencing have contributed to study genes and genomes, the repetitive DNA fraction of the genome is still enigmatic and poorly understood. Among repeated DNAs, transposable elements (TEs) are major components of eukaryotic chromatin and their investigation has been hindered even after the availability of whole sequenced genomes. The cytogenetic mapping of TEs in chromosomes has proved to be of high value to integrate information from the micro level of nucleotide sequence to a cytological view of chromosomes. Different TEs have been cytogenetically mapped in cichlids; however, neither details about their genomic arrangement nor appropriated copy number are well defined by these approaches. The current study integrates TEs distribution in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus genome based on cytogenetic and genomics/bioinformatics approach. The results showed that some elements are not randomly distributed and that some are genomic dependent on each other. Moreover, we found extensive overlap between genomics and cytogenetics data and that tandem duplication may be the major mechanism responsible for the genomic dynamics of TEs here analyzed. This paper provides insights in the genomic organization of TEs under an integrated view based on cytogenetics and genomics. PMID:26860923

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome of the hybrid of Oreochromis niloticus (♀) × Oreochromis aureus (♂).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xin; Yi, Tan; Chen, Tao; Bin, Shi-Yu

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome of the hybrid of Oreochromis niloticus (♀) × Oreochromis aureus (♂) was determined using PCR-based method. The mitogenome was 16,663 bp in length, containing the same gene order and an identical number of genes or regions with the other Cichlid fishes, including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and 1 putative control region. The overall composition of the mitogenome was 30.92% C, 27.98% A, 25.54% T, 15.56% G, with a slight AT bias of 53.52% occurs in the hybrid mitogenome. All the protein-coding genes were initiated by typical ATG codon, except for COX1 gene with the initiation codon GTG. Eight genes end with the complete stop codon TAA or TAG, while the COX2, COX3, ND3, ND4 and Cytb genes terminated with an incomplete stop codon T. The complete mitochondrial genome of Oreochromis niloticus (♀) × Oreochromis aureus (♂) may provide important DNA molecular data for further elucidation of evolutionary mechanisms in the hybrid fish of Cichlidae. PMID:25259464

  6. The social status of the male Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) influences testis structure and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, Frank; Kurth, Thomas; Meissner, Stefan; Standke, Andrea; Hoppe, Markus; Zieschang, Freia; Reitmayer, Christine; Göbel, Andy; Kretzschmar, Georg; Gutzeit, Herwig O

    2012-01-01

    Dominant and territorial behaviour are known social phenomena in cichlids and social stress influences reproduction and growth. The gonadotropic hormones trigger spermatogenesis and subordinate males have typically lower levels of gonadotropins than dominant males. In this study, we compared testis morphology and gene expression of dominant and subordinate Nile tilapia males (d- and s-males) in socially stable communities. The d-males had the highest gonadosomatic index but they were not the largest animals in the majority of studied cases. Long-term d-males showed large groups of Leydig cells and hyperplasia of the tunica albuginea due to numerous cytochrome-P450-11β-hydroxylase (Cyp11b) expressing myoid cells. Increased Cyp11b expression in d-males was reflected by elevated 11-ketotestosterone plasma values. However, immunofluorescence microscopy and expression analysis of selected genes revealed that most s-males conserved their capability for spermatogenesis and are, therefore, ready for reproduction when the social environment changes. Moreover, in s-males gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR showed increased transcript levels for germ line-specific genes (vasa, sox2 and dmc1) and Sertoli-specific genes (amh, amhrII and dmrt1) whereas gene expression of key factors for steroid production (sf1 and cyp11b) were reduced. The Nile tilapia is a promising model to study social cues and gonadotropic signals on testis development in vertebrates. PMID:22031714

  7. A Molecular Perspective on Systematics, Taxonomy and Classification Amazonian Discus Fishes of the Genus Symphysodon

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    Manuella Villar Amado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the goal of contributing to the taxonomy and systematics of the Neotropical cichlid fishes of the genus Symphysodon, we analyzed 336 individuals from 24 localities throughout the entire distributional range of the genus. We analyzed variation at 13 nuclear microsatellite markers, and subjected the data to Bayesian analysis of genetic structure. The results indicate that Symphysodon is composed of four genetic groups: group PURPLE—phenotype Heckel and abacaxi; group GREEN—phenotype green; group RED—phenotype blue and brown; and group PINK—populations of Xingú and Cametá. Although the phenotypes blue and brown are predominantly biological group RED, they also have substantial contributions from other biological groups, and the patterns of admixture of the two phenotypes are different. The two phenotypes are further characterized by distinct and divergent mtDNA haplotype groups, and show differences in mean habitat use measured as pH and conductivity. Differences in mean habitat use is also observed between most other biological groups. We therefore conclude that Symphysodon comprises five evolutionary significant units: Symphysodon discus (Heckel and abacaxi phenotypes, S. aequifasciatus (brown phenotype, S. tarzoo (green phenotype, Symphysodon sp. 1 (blue phenotype and Symphysodon sp. 2 (Xingú group.

  8. Parker's sneak-guard model revisited: why do reproductively parasitic males heavily invest in testes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Kazutaka; Kohda, Masanori; Hori, Michio; Sato, Tetsu

    2011-10-01

    Alternative reproductive tactics are widespread in males and may cause intraspecific differences in testes investment. Parker's sneak-guard model predicts that sneaker males, who mate under sperm competition risk, invest in testes relatively more than bourgeois conspecifics that have lower risk. Given that sneakers are much smaller than bourgeois males, sneakers may increase testes investment to overcome their limited sperm productivity because of their small body sizes. In this study, we examined the mechanism that mediates differential testes investment across tactics in the Lake Tanganyika cichlid fish Lamprologus callipterus. In the Rumonge population of Burundi, bourgeois males are small compared with those in other populations and have a body size close to sneaky dwarf males. Therefore, if differences in relative testis investment depend on sperm competition, the rank order of relative testis investment should be dwarf males > bourgeois males in Rumonge = bourgeois males in the other populations. If differences in relative testis investment depend on body size, the rank order of relative testes investment should be dwarf males > bourgeois males in Rumonge > bourgeois males in the other populations. Comparisons of relative testis investment among the three male groups supported the role of sperm competition, as predicted by the sneak-guard model. Nevertheless, the effects of absolute body size on testes investment should be considered to understand the mechanisms underlying intraspecific variation in testes investment caused by alternative reproductive tactics.

  9. FISH PRODUCTION ESTIMATES FOR GBEDIKERE LAKE, BASSA, KOGI STATE, NIGERIA

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    Samuel Olusegun Adeyemi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Annual estimates of the fish caught by local fishermen in randomly selected fishing villages adjacent to Gbedikere Lake were determined using Catch Assessment (CAS. The studies were carried out within two seasons of low water (February and high water (September periods between 2006 to 2008. Annual fish catch varied from 537.4 mts to 576.9 mts at high water. Mean catch per boat ranged from 7.40 kg to 10.60 kg among the landing sites. A total of 12 fish species were identified belonging to ten families. The catches were dominated by the cichlids with Orechromis niloticus dominating the overall catch compositions. Production estimate was compared with the catches obtained through experimental gill-net sampling and potential fish yield estimates using Ryder’s Morpho - Edaphic Index (MEI as modified by Henderson and Welcomme (1974. Contributions of the gears in use were also done with cast nets ranking above others (29%, followed by the set net (25%, hook and lines (16.6%, traps (16.6%, clap net (8.3%. Management measures were suggested.

  10. Electronmicroscopic Investigations on the Role of Vesicle-like Bodies in Inner Ear Maculae for Fish Otolith Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsch, M.; Vöhringer, P.; Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    The presence, morphology and possible origin of vesicle-like bodies (VBs) within the inner ear otolithic membrane of developmental stages of cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus and adult swordtail fish Xiphophorus helleri was analysed by means of transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively) employing various fixation procedures. The VBs are believed to be involved in the formation of the otolith (or statolith in birds and mammals) regarding the supply of the otolith's organic material. Increasing the osmolarity of the fixation medium decreased the number of VBs seen. Decalcification ended up in a complete disappearance of the VBs. Whilst a fixation with glutaraldehyde followed by OS04 fixation yielded numerous VBs, only few of them were observed when the tissue was fixed with glutaraldehyde and OSO4 simultaneously. Therefore, the results strongly suggest that the VBs are fixative (i.e., glutaraldehyde) induced artifacts, so-called blisters. With this, the supply of an oto- or statolith's organic material remains obscure. Possibly, it is provided by secretion from the supporting cells as has been hypothesized earlier

  11. Effects of hypergravity on the development of cell number and asymmetry in fish brain nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R. H.; Werner, K.; Rahmann, H.

    Larval cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) siblings were subjected to 3g hypergravity (hg) and total darkness for 21 days during development and subsequently processed for conventional histology. Further siblings reared at 1g and alternating light/dark (12h:12h) conditions served as contros. Cell number counts of the visual Nucleus isthmi (Ni) versus the vestibular Nucleus magnocellularis (Nm) revealed that in experimental animals total cell number was decreased in the Ni, possibly due to retarded growth as a result of the lack of visual input whereas no effect was observed in the Nm. Calculating the percentual asymmetry in cell number (i.e., right vs. the left side of the brain), no effects of hg/darkness were seen in the Ni, whereas asymmetry was slightly increased in the Nm. Since the asymmetry of inner ear otoliths is decreased under hg, this finding may indicate efferent vestibular action of the CNS on the level of the Nm by means of a feedback mechanism.

  12. Social and ecological regulation of a decision-making circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeister, H; Whitaker, K W; Hofmann, H A; Preuss, T

    2010-12-01

    Ecological context, sensory inputs, and the internal physiological state are all factors that need to be integrated for an animal to make appropriate behavioral decisions. However, these factors have rarely been studied in the same system. In the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni, males alternate between two phenotypes based on position in a social hierarchy. When dominant (DOM), fish display bright body coloration and a wealth of aggressive and reproductive behavioral patterns that make them conspicuous to predators. Subordinate (SUB) males, on the other hand, decrease predation risk by adopting cryptic coloration and schooling behavior. We therefore hypothesized that DOMs would show enhanced startle-escape responsiveness to compensate for their increased predation risk. Indeed, behavioral responses to sound clicks of various intensities showed a significantly higher mean startle rate in DOMs compared with SUBs. Electrophysiological recordings from the Mauthner cells (M-cells), the neurons triggering startle, were performed in anesthetized animals and showed larger synaptic responses to sound clicks in DOMs, consistent with the behavioral results. In addition, the inhibitory drive mediated by interneurons (passive hyperpolarizing potential [PHP] cells) presynaptic to the M-cell was significantly reduced in DOMs. Taken together, the results suggest that the likelihood for an escape to occur for a given auditory stimulus is higher in DOMs because of a more excitable M-cell. More broadly, this study provides an integrative explanation of an ecological and social trade-off at the level of an identifiable decision-making neural circuit. PMID:20926612

  13. Demographic responses of Heterocypris incongruens (Ostracoda related to stress factors of competition, predation and food

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    Rocio Fernandez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterocypris incongruens is a widely distributed ostracod which can maintain its populations under stressful conditions such as those in temporary ponds and under low-quality diets, for example, detritus. It often co-occurs with cladocerans and fish living in shallow water bodies. Nevertheless, little is known about its response to the presence of predators, its consumption capacity of cyanobacteria typically present in eutrophic systems, and its interaction with other species in similar habits. We studied here the demographic responses of H. incongruens fed the green alga Scenedesmus acutus, two strains of Microcystis cf. aeruginosa and Limnothrix sp. Experiments were conducted separately and together in the presence of the cladoceran Simocephalus vetulus and the cichlid fish, Oreochromis kairomones. The ostracod maintained growth in all treatments, the reproductive output decreased on dietary Limnothrix sp., and its life expectancy was significantly lower with the toxic strain of Microcystis. The coexistence of both crustacean species increased the rate of population growth (~ 0.33 day-1 of S. vetulus and life expectancy (36-44 days of H. incongruens on the test diets compared with controls (23-33 days. Our study suggests facilitation affects the interaction between the two microcrustaceans, especially on poor quality cyanobacterial diets.

  14. Stability versus diversity of the dentition during evolutionary radiation in cyprinine fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco-Viel, Emmanuel; Yang, Lei; Veran, Monette; Balter, Vincent; Mayden, Richard L; Laudet, Vincent; Viriot, Laurent

    2014-04-01

    Evolutionary radiations, especially adaptive radiations, have been widely studied but mainly for recent events such as in cichlid fish or Anolis lizards. Here, we investigate the radiation of the subfamily Cyprininae, which includes more than 1300 species and is estimated to have originated from Southeast Asia around 55 Ma. In order to decipher a potential adaptive radiation, within a solid phylogenetic framework, we investigated the trophic apparatus, and especially the pharyngeal dentition, as teeth have proved to be important markers of ecological specialization. We compared two tribes within Cyprininae, Poropuntiini and Labeonini, displaying divergent dental patterns, as well as other characters related to their trophic apparatus. Our results suggest that the anatomy of the trophic apparatus and diet are clearly correlated and this explains the difference in dental patterns observed between these two tribes. Our results illustrate the diversity of mechanisms that account for species diversity in this very diverse clade: diversification of dental characters from an ancestral pattern on the one hand, conservation of a basal synapomorphy leading to ecological specialization on the other hand. By integrating morphological, ecological and phylogenetic analyses, it becomes possible to investigate ancient radiation events that have shaped the present diversity of species. PMID:24523268

  15. Rapid phenotypic evolution during incipient speciation in a continental avian radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Leonardo; Benites, Pilar; Lougheed, Stephen C.; Lijtmaer, Darío A.; Di Giacomo, Adrián S.; Eaton, Muir D.; Tubaro, Pablo L.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive radiations have helped shape how we view animal speciation, particularly classic examples such as Darwin's finches, Hawaiian fruitflies and African Great Lakes cichlids. These ‘island’ radiations are comparatively recent, making them particularly interesting because the mechanisms that caused diversification are still in motion. Here, we identify a new case of a recent bird radiation within a continentally distributed species group; the capuchino seedeaters comprise 11 Sporophila species originally described on the basis of differences in plumage colour and pattern in adult males. We use molecular data together with analyses of male plumage and vocalizations to understand species limits of the group. We find marked phenotypic variation despite lack of mitochondrial DNA monophyly and few differences in other putatively neutral nuclear markers. This finding is consistent with the group having undergone a recent radiation beginning in the Pleistocene, leaving genetic signatures of incomplete lineage sorting, introgressive hybridization and demographic expansions. We argue that this apparent uncoupling between neutral DNA homogeneity and phenotypic diversity is expected for a recent group within the framework of coalescent theory. Finally, we discuss how the ecology of open habitats in South America during the Pleistocene could have helped promote this unique and ongoing radiation. PMID:22130601

  16. Fecundity, growth, and survival of the angelfish Pterophyllum scalare (Perciformes: Cichlidae) under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Salas, Armando A; Cortés G, Isabel; Reyes-Bustamante, Hugo

    2009-09-01

    The freshwater angelfishes (Pterophyllum) are South American cichlids that have become very popular among aquarists, yet scarce information on their culture and aquarium husbandry exists. We studied Pterophyllum scalare to analyze dietary effects on fecundity, growth, and survival of eggs and larvae during 135 days. Three diets were used: A) decapsulated cysts of Artemia, B) commercial dry fish food, and C) a mix diet of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis and the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The initial larval density was 100 organisms in each 40 L aquarium. With diet A, larvae reached a maximum weight of 3.80 g, a total length of 6.3 cm, and a height of 5.8 cm; with diet B: 2.80 g, 4.81 cm, and 4.79 cm, and with diet C: 3.00 g, 5.15 cm, and 5.10 cm, respectively. Significant differences were observed between diet A, and diet B and C, but no significantly differences were observed between diets B and C. Fecundity varied from 234 to 1,082 eggs in 20 and 50 g females, respectively. Egg survival ranged from 87.4% up to 100%, and larvae survival (80 larvae/40 L aquarium) from 50% to 66.3% using diet B and A, respectively. Live food was better for growing fish than the commercial balanced food diet. Fecundity and survival are important factors in planning a good production of angelfish. PMID:19928467

  17. Effects of Feeding Frequency on Growth Performance and Survival Rate of Angel Fish, Pterophyllum scalare (Perciformes: Cichlidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Kasiri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The freshwater angel fish (Pterophyllum scalare Schultze, 1823 is South American cichlid become very popular among aquarists. There is little information on their culture and aquarium husbandry. In this study growth performance and survival rate of angelfish subjected to different feeding frequencies were evaluated. Four groups of angel fish juveniles (0.87 ± 0.01 g; 3.98 ± 0.08 mm were fed either four meals per day (F1, two meals per day (F2, one meal per day (F3 and every other day (F4 for 90 days. Final live weight and specific growth rate (SGR values of group F1 and F2 were significantly higher than those of the other groups (P 0.05 in survival rate among the treatments. The best feed conversion ration (FCR was obtained from four daily feeding (F1 (P 0.05 among experimental groups. In conclusion, the best results in growth performance were obtained by feeding four meals per day (F1 and two meals per day (F2, so they were recommended for angel fish feeding.

  18. Inner Ear Otolith Growth in larval Fish after Development at simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, U.; Hilbig, R.; Anken, R.

    It has been shown earlier that hypergravity slows down inner ear otolith growth in developing fish via a down-regulation of carbonic anhydrase reactivity as an adaptation towards altered environmental gravity We were thus prompted to elucidate whether clinorotation would possibly yield opposite effects Therefore larval siblings of cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus were housed in a submersed two-dimensional clinostat Two tubes with different diameters were used 10 5 mm large tube LT and 3 5 mm small tube ST experimental time-span 10 and 7 days respectively After the experiments otoliths were dissected and their size area grown during the experiments was determined planimetrically In case of the LT-clinorotated fish both utricular and saccular otoliths lapilli and sagittae respectively were significantly smaller than those of the 1g-controls In contrast ST-maintenance resulted in significantly larger otoliths lapilli only no statistical significant difference regarding sagittae observed The results from LT-clinorotation therefore indicate that the animals had in fact received hypergravity whereas the ST-data are to be interpreted as being effected by simulated microgravity conditions In conclusion otolith growth is affected by the gravitational vector in a dose-dependent manner Acknowledgement This work was financially supported by the German Aerospace Center DLR FKZ 50 WB 9997

  19. Modular color evolution facilitated by a complex nanostructure in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Chad M; Maia, Rafael; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2015-02-01

    The way in which a complex trait varies, and thus evolves, is critically affected by the independence, or modularity, of its subunits. How modular designs facilitate phenotypic diversification is well studied in nonornamental (e.g., cichlid jaws), but not ornamental traits. Diverse feather colors in birds are produced by light absorption by pigments and/or light scattering by nanostructures. Such structural colors are deterministically related to the nanostructures that produce them and are therefore excellent systems to study modularity and diversity of ornamental traits. Elucidating if and how these nanostructures facilitate color diversity relies on understanding how nanostructural traits covary, and how these traits map to color. Both of these remain unknown in an evolutionary context. Most dabbling ducks (Anatidae) have a conspicuous wing patch with iridescent color caused by a two-dimensional photonic crystal of small (100-200 nm) melanosomes. Here, we ask how this complex nanostructure affects modularity of color attributes. Using a combination of electron microscopy, spectrophotometry, and comparative methods, we show that nanostructural complexity causes functional decoupling and enables independent evolution of different color traits. These results demonstrate that color diversity is facilitated by how nanostructures function and may explain why some birds are more color-diverse than others. PMID:25494613

  20. On the role of carbonic anhydrase in the early phase of fish otolith mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, M.; Anken, R.

    2006-01-01

    The first step in the formation of fish otoliths, calcified structures which are responsible for the internalization of gravitational information, is based on the action of so-called Tether- (T-) cells. These T-cells appear during the very early development of the inner ear and persist only a few hours. They are characterized by a kinocilium, which is in contrast to the kinocilium of the later developing sensory hair cells not mechanosensory, but binds seeding particles containing glycogen, thereby localizing otolith formation (otolith seeding). Beating cilia distributed throughout the ear agitate seeding particles, thereby inhibiting premature agglutination. In the later development, a protein matrix is formed and mineralization/crystallization takes place. Since the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CAH) plays a prominent role in otolith mineralization (it provides carbonate for CaCO3 precipitation), we were prompted to investigate histochemically using larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus), whether CAH might be present as early as T-cells. Indeed, CAH was present in T-cells with prominent amounts of reaction product being located along the kinocilia and around the seeding particles. These results strongly indicate that kinocilia of T-cells act as structural guides for CAH/bicarbonate transportation towards the early otoliths’ calcification sites. Besides its role in calcification, CAH in the very early stage of otolith seeding may moreover aid in the accretion process of the precursor particles.

  1. Fish Otolith Growth in 1g and 3g Depends on the Gravity Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R. H.; Werner, K.; Breuer, J.; Rahmann, H.

    Size and asymmetry (size difference between the left and the right side) as well as calcium (Ca) content of inner ear otoliths of larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus were determined after a long-term stay at hypergravity conditions (3g; centrifuge). Both utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) were significantly smaller after hyper-g exposure as compared to parallely raised 1g-control specimens and the absolute amount of otolith-Ca was diminished. The asymmetry of sagittae was significantly increased in the experimental animals, whereas the respective asymmetry concerning lapilli was markedly decreased. In the course of another experiment, larvae were raised in aquarium hatch baskets, from which one was placed directly above aeration equipment, which resulted in random water circulation shifting the fish around (``shifted'' specimens). The lapillar asymmetry of the ``stationary'' specimens showed a highly significant increase during early development when larvae were forced to lay on their sides due to their prominent yolk-sacs. In later developmental stages, when they began to swim freely, a dramatic decrease in lapillar asymmetry was apparent. Taken together with own previous findings according to which otolith growth stops after vestibular nerve transection, the results presented here suggest that the growth and the development of bilateral asymmetry of otoliths is guided by the environmental gravity vector, obviously involving a feedback loop between the brain and the inner ear

  2. Endolymphatic calcium supply for fish otolith growth takes place via the proximal portion of the otocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsch, M; Anken, R; Beier, M; Rahmann, H

    2004-09-01

    The presence of calcium within the utricle of larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus was analysed by means of energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy. Electron-spectroscopic imaging and electron energy loss spectra revealed discrete calcium precipitations that were more numerous in the proximal endolymph than in the distal endolymph, clearly indicating a decreasing proximo-distal gradient. This decreasing proximo-distal gradient was also present within the proximal endolymph between the sensory epithelium and the otolith. Further calcium particles covered the peripheral proteinaceous layer of the otolith. They were especially pronounced at the proximal surface of the otolith indicating that otolithic calcium incorporation takes place here. Other calcium precipitates accumulated at the macular junctions clearly supporting an earlier assumption according to which the endolymph is supplied with calcium via a paracellular pathway. The present results clearly show that the apical region of the macular epithelium is involved in the release of calcium and that the calcium supply of the otoliths takes place via the proximal endolymph. PMID:15300493

  3. Vesicular bodies in fish maculae are artifacts not contributing to otolith growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsch, M; Anken, R H; Vöhringer, P; Rahmann, H

    2001-03-01

    The presence, morphology and possible origin of vesicle-like bodies (VBs) within the inner ear macular otolithic membrane of developmental stages of cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus and neonate (i.e. functionally fully developed except the reproductive organs) swordtail fish Xiphophorus helleri were analyzed by means of transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively) employing various fixation procedures. Some authors believe that these VBs are involved in the formation of the organic phase of inner ear otoliths (or statoliths in birds and mammals). Decreasing the osmolarity of the fixation medium from a value rather close to that of native fresh water fish tissue (i.e. 250 mOsm and 290--300 mOsm, respectively) to a value of fixatives mostly employed in TEM studies (ca. 190 mOsm), the amount of VBs increased and the components of sensory inner ear tissue increasingly dilated. Whilst a conventional prefixation with aldehydes followed by osmium tetroxide postfixation yielded numerous VBs, only few of them were observed when the tissue was fixed with aldehydes and osmium tetroxide simultaneously. Therefore, the results demonstrate that inner ear sensory epithelia are extremely sensitive to altering fixation media. On this background it must be concluded that VBs are fixative (i.e. glutaraldehyde) induced artificial structures, so-called membrane blisters. Thus, the protein matrix of otoliths (and possibly that of statoliths in higher vertebrates) is rather provided by secretion processes than by the release of vesicles. PMID:11223298

  4. On the influence of altered gravity on the growth of fish inner ear otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Marion

    1999-09-01

    Inner ear stones (otoliths) of developing cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) were marked with the calcium tracer alizarin-complexone (AC) at 1g-earth gravity before and after a long-term (20 days) stay of the animals at moderate hypergravity conditions (3g; centrifuge). AC deposition at the otoliths resulted in two fluorescence bands, which enclosed the area grown during exposure to altered gravity. This area was measured with regard to size and asymmetry (size difference between the left and the right stones). Both utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) were significantly smaller after hyper-g exposure as compared to parallely raised 1g-control specimens. The asymmetry concerning the lapilli was pronouncedly decreased in comparison to the 1g-controls. These findings suggest, that the growth and the development of bilateral asymmetry of otoliths is guided by the environmental gravity vector. Some of the hyper-g animals revealed a kinetotic behaviour at the transfer from hyper-g to normal 1g-earth gravity conditions, which was qualitatively similar to the behaviour observed in previous experiments at the transfer from 1g to microgravity in the course of parabolic aircraft flights. The lapillar asymmetry of kinetotic samples was found to be significantly higher than that of normally behaving experimental specimens. This result supports an earlier theoretical concept, according to which human static space sickness might be based on asymmetric utricular otoliths.

  5. Morphometry of fish inner ear otoliths after development at 3g hypergravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R H; Kappel, T; Rahmann, H

    1998-07-01

    Size and asymmetry (size difference between the left and right sides) of inner ear otoliths of larval cichlid fish were determined after a long-term stay in moderate hypergravity conditions (3g; centrifuge), in the course of which the animals completed their ontogenetic development from hatch to freely swimming. Neither the normal morphogenetic development nor the timely onset and gain of performance of swimming behaviour were impaired by the experimental conditions. However, both utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) were significantly smaller after hyper-g exposure compared to 1g control specimens raised in parallel. The asymmetry of sagittae was significantly increased in the experimental animals, whereas the respective asymmetry of lapilli was pronouncedly decreased compared with the 1g controls. These findings suggest that growth and development of bilateral asymmetry of otoliths are guided by the environmental gravity vector. Some of the hyper-g animals revealed a kinetotic behaviour on transfer to normal 1g earth conditions, which was similar to the behaviour observed in previous experiments on the transfer from 1g to microgravity (parabolic aircraft flights). The lapillar asymmetry of kinetotic samples was found to be significantly higher than that of normally behaving experimental specimens. No differences in asymmetry of sagittae were obtained between the two groups. This supports an earlier theoretical concept, according to which human static space sickness might be based on asymmetric utricular otoliths. PMID:9726679

  6. Influence of hypergravity on fish inner ear otoliths: I. Developmental growth profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R. H.; Beier, M.; Rahmann, H.

    Inner ear stones (otoliths) of larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus were marked with the calcium-tracer alizarin-complexone (AC) at 1g earth gravity before and after a 3, 7, 14 or 21 days stay of the animals at hypergravity conditions (hg; 3g, centrifuge). After the experiment, the otoliths' area between the two AC-labellings was measured with regard to size and asymmetry (size difference between the left and the right stones). Both utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) continued growing in a linear way at hg, but growth was significantly slowed down as compared to parallely raised 1g-control specimens. In case of bilateral asymmetry between the corresponding otoliths its formation in hg-animals became reduced as compared to the 1g controls. The reduction of asymmetry was much more pronounced in the sagittae than in the lapilli. The latter result supports an earlier hypothesis, according to which especially a low sagittal asymmetry has a functional advantage. In general, the results strongly suggest that otolith growth is continuously regulated in dependence of the environmental gravity vector.

  7. Influence of hypergravity on fish inner ear otoliths: II. Incorporation of calcium and kinetotic behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, M.; Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    Larval siblings of cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) were subjected to hypergravity (hg; 3g, 14 days) during development. Following the transfer to 1g (i.e., stopping the centrifuge) they were seperated into normally and kinetotically swimming individuals (the latter performed spinning movements). During hg, the animals were maintained in aquarium water containing alizarin-complexone (AC), a fluorescent calcium tracer. Densitometric measurements of AC uptake into inner ear otoliths (optical density of AC/μm 2) revealed that the kinetotic individuals had incorporated significantly more AC/calcium than the normally behaving fish. Since the amount of otolithic calcium can be taken as an approximation for otolith weight, the present results indicate that the otoliths of kinetotically swimming samples were heavier than those of the normally behaving larvae, thus exhibiting a higher absolute weight asymmetry of the otoliths between the right vs. the left side of the body. This supports an earlier concept according to which otolith (or statolith) asymmetry is the cause for kinetoses such as human static space sickness.

  8. Calcium-tracers disclose the site of biomineralization in inner ear otoliths of fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, M.; Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    Since changing gravity (concerning direction and amplitude) strongly affects inner ear otolith growth and otolithic calcium incorporation in developing fish, it was the aim of the present study to locate the site of mineralization in order to gain cues and insights into the provenance of the otoliths inorganic compounds. Therefore, larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) were incubated in the calcium-tracer alizarin complexone (AC; red fluorescence). After maintenance in aquarium water for various periods (1, 2, 3, 6, 9 and 12 h; 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 15, 29, 36 and 87 d), the animals were incubated in the calcium-tracer calcein (CAL; green fluorescence). AC thus labeled calcium being incorporated at the beginning of the experiment and would subsequently accompany calcium in the course of a possible dislocation, whereas CAL visualized calcium being deposited right at the end of the test. Subsequently, the otoliths were analyzed using a laser scanning microscope and it was shown that the initial site of calcium incorporation was located directly adjacent to the sensory epithelium and the otolithic membrane. Later, calcium deposits were also found on further regions of the otoliths' surface area, where they had been shifted to in the course of dislocation. This finding strongly indicates that the sensory epithelium plays a prominent role in otolithic biomineralization, which is in full agreement with an own electron microscopical study [ELGRA News 23 (2003) 63].

  9. Effect of long-term microgravity on the mineralisation of inner ear otoliths of fish - a spaceflight study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Ralf

    The "heavy bodies" (i.e., statoliths or otoliths, mainly made up of calcium carbonate and protein) in the inner ears of vertebrates transform the physical parameter "gravity" to biological signals needed for postural control. It has been shown earlier that hypergravity slows down inner ear otolith growth in developing fish (via a down-regulation of carbonic anhydrase reactivity) as an adaptation towards altered environmental gravity. We were thus prompted to elucidate whether long-term microgravity would possibly yield opposite effects. Therefore, larval siblings of cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) were housed in a bioregenerative life support system (OMEGAHAB) using green algae (Euglena gracilis) for oxygen supply. The experiment was successfully flown on the FOTON M-3 mission. Prior to launch, otoliths were stained with a fluorescent calcium tracer (Alizarin Complexone). This treatment both allowed an assessment of otolith growth (size) after recovery as well as an analysis of relocations of calcium deposits. Calcium and strontium contents were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results will be communicated at the meeting. Acknowledgement: This work was financially supported by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) (FKZ: 50 WB 0527).

  10. Studying fish social behavior and cognition: implications for fish welfare and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui F Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Within vertebrates teleost fish are the most diverse and plastic taxa in terms of social behavior. With over 29,000 species described so far, one can find all different types of social organization, mating systems and parental care types. Moreover, it is relatively common to find variation of these characters within closely related species, which makes them suitable for comparative studies on the evolution of social behavior (e.g. variation in mating systems and parental care type in African cichlids. Fish are also champions of social plasticity, as can be illustrated by the flexible patterns of sexual expression, as in the case of protrandrous and protogynous sex-change, simultaneous hermaphroditism and intra-sexual variation in the form of discrete alternative male phenotypes. Complex cognitive abilities used in social interactions have also evolved in fish, such as individual recognition, transitive inference and social learning. Therefore, teleosts offer unique opportunities to study both the evolution and the function of social behavior and cognition. In this talk I will summarize the work that our lab has been doing to establish zebrafish as a model organism for the study of social behavior and cognition and I will illustrate how knowledge on this are can be applied to fish welfare and to conservation issues.

  11. Mammalian metabolic rates in the hottest fish on earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chris M; Brix, Kevin V; De Boeck, Gudrun; Bergman, Harold L; Bianchini, Adalto; Bianchini, Lucas F; Maina, John N; Johannsson, Ora E; Kavembe, Geraldine D; Papah, Michael B; Letura, Kisipan M; Ojoo, Rodi O

    2016-01-01

    The Magadi tilapia, Alcolapia grahami, a small cichlid fish of Lake Magadi, Kenya lives in one of the most challenging aquatic environments on earth, characterized by very high alkalinity, unusual water chemistry, and extreme O2, ROS, and temperature regimes. In contrast to most fishes which live at temperatures substantially lower than the 36-40 °C of mammals and birds, an isolated population (South West Hot Springs, SWHS) of Magadi tilapia thrives in fast-flowing hotsprings with daytime highs of 43 °C and night-time lows of 32 °C. Another population (Fish Springs Lagoon, FSL) lives in a lagoon with fairly stable daily temperatures (33-36 °C). The upper critical temperatures (Ctmax) of both populations are very high; moreover the SWHS tilapia exhibit the highest Ctmax (45.6 °C) ever recorded for a fish. Routine rates of O2 consumption (MO2) measured on site, together with MO2 and swimming performance at 25, 32, and 39 °C in the laboratory, showed that the SWHS tilapia exhibited the greatest metabolic performance ever recorded in a fish. These rates were in the basal range of a small mammal of comparable size, and were all far higher than in the FSL fish. The SWHS tilapia represents a bellwether organism for global warming. PMID:27257105

  12. Radiation-induced mutations in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray-induced mutations in teleostean fish were studied from the point of social behavior. A significant reduction in male aggression was found in the postirradiated F1 generation after the irradiation of parental oogonia and spermatogonia, with 2 x 500 R (24 hr apart) of x-rays, but did not alter the aggression of F1 females. A study on backcross generation of irradiated line fitted with a two-factor model of dominant genetic factors, high- and low-aggressive, which co-acted additively in repressing the male aggression. Social cohesiveness was compared between F1 convict cichlides (C. nigrofasciatum) exposed by 0, 250, 500, 750, 1000, and 2000 R of x-rays. The best response was observed in males with 500 R and in females with 750 R. While an increase in cohesiveness was observed in F1 males with 500 R, the cohesiveness of F1 females decreased with 750 and 200 R, suggesting that the increase in male was associated with a reduction of inter-male aggression. A new ''guppy male courtship activity test'' was carried out in the offsprings of irradiated guppy, maintained in seawater and in freshwater. The mean values of both the frequency and the duration of four behavioral traits of the male guppy increased in postirradiated F1 generation of the seawater substrain but were unchanged in that of freshwater's. In F2 generation the mean values of the same behavioral characters decreased in both seawater and freshwater substrains. (Nakanishi, T.)

  13. Sociable Weavers Increase Cooperative Nest Construction after Suffering Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Gavin M.; Meiden, Laura Vander

    2016-01-01

    The major transitions in evolution rely on the formation of stable groups that are composed of previously independent units, and the stability of these groups requires both cooperation and reduced conflict. Conflict over group resources may be common, as suggested by work in both cichlids and humans that has investigated how societies resolve conflict regarding investment in group resources, i.e. public goods. We investigated whether sociable weavers (Philetairus socius) use aggressive behaviors to modulate the cooperative behavior of group mates. We find that the individuals that build the communal thatch of the nest, i.e. the individuals most at risk of exploitation, are the most aggressive individuals. We show that individuals that invest in interior chamber maintenance, possibly a more selfish behavior, suffer relatively more aggression. After suffering aggression individuals significantly increase cooperative construction of the communal nest thatch. We show that cooperative individuals target aggression towards selfish individuals, and the individuals suffering aggression perform cooperative behaviors subsequent to suffering aggression. In addition to other evolutionary mechanisms, these results suggest that aggression, possibly via the pay-to-stay mechanism, is possibly being used to maintain a public good. PMID:26982704

  14. The C.E.B.A. Mini Module on the STS-107 Mission: Data of Ground Experiments and Preliminary Results of the third Spaceflight of an Artificial Aquatic Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluem, V.; Paris, F.; Bungart, S.

    The C.E.B.A.S MINI MODULE is the miniaturized version of an artificial aquatic ecosystem consisting of four subcomponents: a ZOOLOGICAL COMPONENT (aquarium for animals), a BOTANICAL COMPONENT (higher water plant bioreactor), a MICROBIAL COMPONENT (bacteria filter) and an ELECTRONICAL COMPONENT (data acquisition, control unit). It has a total volume of 8.6 liters and contains the ovoviviparous teleost Xiphophorus helleri (swordtail), larvae of the ovuliparous cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus, the pulmonate water snail Biomphalaria glabrata, the rootless (non-graivitropic) higher water plant Ceratophyllum demersum (hornweed) and special strains of ammonia oxidizing bacteria. This device was already flown twice successfully in space with the space shuttle missions STS- 89 and STS-90 (NEUROLAB) in 1998. It will fly a third time with the STS-107-mission the launch of which has been repeatedly shifted December 222, April 2001, October 2001) and is now finally scheduled for June 2002. The main focus of scientific interest in the past missions were system performance, reproductive biology (reproductive function of adult females including endocrine system, fertilization, gonadal development in juveniles), vestibular and immunological research in X. helleri, embryology and shell formation in B. glabrata, general morphology and physiology of C. demersum and groth rates of the bacteria. The standard load of the system were 4 adult and 200 neonate X. helleri, 30 adult B. glabrata and 30 g of C. demersum. The evaluation of these experiments showed that all reproductive functions and the immune system of the fishes snails remained undisturbed in space, that the snails developed normally and exhibited no disturbance of shell formation and that the plants showed growth and photosynthesis rates comparable to those on Earth. So, as a logical continuation, the main topics for the STS-107 mission are the remaining important questions in X. helleri biology: puberty, male sexual

  15. Testing Convergence Versus History: Convergence Dominates Phenotypic Evolution for over 150 Million Years in Frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Daniel S; Morlon, Hélène; Wiens, John J

    2016-01-01

    Striking evolutionary convergence can lead to similar sets of species in different locations, such as in cichlid fishes and Anolis lizards, and suggests that evolution can be repeatable and predictable across clades. Yet, most examples of convergence involve relatively small temporal and/or spatial scales. Some authors have speculated that at larger scales (e.g., across continents), differing evolutionary histories will prevent convergence. However, few studies have compared the contrasting roles of convergence and history, and none have done so at large scales. Here we develop a two-part approach to test the scale over which convergence can occur, comparing the relative importance of convergence and history in macroevolution using phylogenetic models of adaptive evolution. We apply this approach to data from morphology, ecology, and phylogeny from 167 species of anuran amphibians (frogs) from 10 local sites across the world, spanning ~160 myr of evolution. Mapping ecology on the phylogeny revealed that similar microhabitat specialists (e.g., aquatic, arboreal) have evolved repeatedly across clades and regions, producing many evolutionary replicates for testing for morphological convergence. By comparing morphological optima for clades and microhabitat types (our first test), we find that convergence associated with microhabitat use dominates frog morphological evolution, producing recurrent ecomorphs that together encompass all sampled species in each community in each region. However, our second test, which examines whether and how much species differ from their inferred optima, shows that convergence is incomplete: that is, phenotypes of most species are still somewhat distant from the estimated optimum for each microhabitat, seemingly because of insufficient time for more complete adaptation (an effect of history). Yet, these effects of history are related to past ecologies, and not clade membership. Overall, our study elucidates the dominant drivers of

  16. Mastacembelid eels support Lake Tanganyika as an evolutionary hotspot of diversification

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    Bills Roger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lake Tanganyika (LT is the oldest of the African Rift Lakes and is one of the richest freshwater ecosystems on Earth, with high levels of faunal diversity and endemism. The endemic species flocks that occur in this lake, such as cichlid fishes, gastropods, catfish and crabs, provide unique comparative systems for the study of patterns and processes of speciation. Mastacembelid eels (Teleostei: Mastacembelidae are a predominately riverine family of freshwater fish, occurring across Africa and Asia, but which also form a small species flock in LT. Methods Including 25 species across Africa, plus Asian representatives as outgroups, we present the first molecular phylogenetic analysis for the group, focusing particularly on the evolutionary history and biodiversity of LT mastacembelid eels. A combined matrix of nuclear and mitochondrial genes based on 3118 bp are analysed implementing different phylogenetic methods, including Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood. Results LT Mastacembelus are recovered as monophyletic, and analyses reveal the rapid diversification of five main LT lineages. Relaxed molecular clock dates provide age estimates for the LT flock at ~7-8 Myr, indicating intralacustrine diversification, with further speciation events coinciding with periods of lower lake level. Our analyses also reveal as yet undescribed diversity of lacustrine and riverine species. A Southern-Eastern African clade, that is younger than the LT flock, is also recovered, while West African taxa are basal members of the African mastacembelid clade. Conclusions That the LT species flock of mastacembelid eels appears to have colonised and immediately diversified soon after the formation of the lake, supports the view of LT as an evolutionary hotspot of diversification. We find evidence for biogeographic clades mirroring a similar pattern to other ichthyological faunas. In addition, our analyses also highlight a split of African and Asian

  17. Morphology of Gnathostoma spp. isolated from natural hosts in Sinaloa, Mexico.

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    Diaz Camacho, Sylvia P; Willms, Kaethe; Ramos, Magda Zazueta; del Carmen de la Cruz Otero, Maria; Nawa, Yukifumi; Akahane, Hiroshige

    2002-07-01

    Gnathostomosis is an emerging public health problem in Sinaloa, Mexico, where an increasing number of human cases have been diagnosed since 1989. The present study was carried out to determine the presence of the parasite in other natural hosts from the area. Birds, fish, opossums and raccoons were captured from local dams and lagoons. The flesh from bird and fish specimens was ground and examined under a 100 W light bulb. Larvae were processed for light and electron microscopy. A total of 368 advanced stage 3 (AL3) larvae were found in 300 ichthyophagous birds, with Egretta alba exhibiting the highest infection rate. A total of 4,156 fish were examined, of which six species were infected with AL3 larvae: Arius guatemalensis (blue sea catfish), Dormitator latifrons (Pacific fat sleeper), Gobiomorus sp. (fat sleeper), Oreochromis sp. (Nile tilapia), Cichlasoma beani (Sinaloan cichlid or green guapote) and Eleotris picta (spotted sleeper). Twenty larvae from birds were used to infect domestic cats and dogs. Young adult worms were recovered from the stomach of a cat with a 17 day infection and from a dog with a 35 day infection. Larvae exhibited four rows of hooklets on the head bulb, whereas the young adults had nine rows of hooklets. The cuticular spines of adult worms along the body evolved from single-pointed, bi- or trifurcated spines. Nuclei were counted in intestinal cells examined in serial sections of larvae recovered from a great heron and a fish, in which a mean of 1.6 nuclei/cell was found, corresponding to data published for Gnathostoma binucleatum. Although the external morphology of both larvae and adults are in agreement with previous descriptions of Gnathostoma spinigerum, the results indicate that natural host infections in Sinaloa may be caused by either G. spinigerum or G. binucleatum. PMID:12107456

  18. Comparative biochemistry of Giardia, Hexamita and Spironucleus: Enigmatic diplomonads.

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    Lloyd, David; Williams, Catrin F

    2014-10-01

    The diplomonad genera are here represented by three highly diverse species, both free-living (Hexamita inflata), and parasitic (Spironucleus vortens and Giardia intestinalis). All three are moderately aerotolerant flagellates, inhabiting environments where O2 tensions are low and fluctuating. Many diplomonads are opportunistic pathogens of avian, terrestrial and aquatic animals. Hexamitids inhabit deep waters and sediments of lakes and marine basins, S. vortens commonly infects the intestinal tract of ornamental fish, particularly of cichlids and cyprinids, and G. intestinalis, the upper intestinal tracts of humans as well as domestic and farm animals. Despite these very different habitats, their known physiological and biochemical characteristics are similar, but they do differ in significant respects as their lifestyles and life cycles demand. They have efficient O2 scavenging systems, and are highly effective at countering rapid O2 fluctuations, or clustering away from its source (except for G. intestinalis when attached to the jejunal villi). Their core metabolic pathways (glycolysis using pyrophosphate), incomplete tricarboxylic acid cycle (lacking α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase), and amino acid metabolism (with an alternative energy-generating arginine dihydrolase pathway as a possibility in some cases), largely conform to those of other protists inhabiting low-O2 environments. Mitochondrial evolutionary reduction to give hydrogenosomes as seen in Spironucleus spp. has proceeded further to its minimal state in the mitosomes of G. intestinalis. Understanding of essential redox reactions and the maintentence of redox state, especially in the infective encysted stage of G. intestinalis provide increasing possibilities for parasite control. To this aim a plethora of new synthetic chemicals and natural products (especially those from garlic, Allium sativum) show promise as replacements for the highly effective (but potentially toxic to higher organisms) 5

  19. The molecular basis of color vision in colorful fish: Four Long Wave-Sensitive (LWS opsins in guppies (Poecilia reticulata are defined by amino acid substitutions at key functional sites

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    Ward Pam R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparisons of functionally important changes at the molecular level in model systems have identified key adaptations driving isolation and speciation. In cichlids, for example, long wavelength-sensitive (LWS opsins appear to play a role in mate choice and male color variation within and among species. To test the hypothesis that the evolution of elaborate coloration in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata is also associated with opsin gene diversity, we sequenced long wavelength-sensitive (LWS opsin genes in six species of the family Poeciliidae. Results Sequences of four LWS opsin genes were amplified from the guppy genome and from mRNA isolated from adult guppy eyes. Variation in expression was quantified using qPCR. Three of the four genes encode opsins predicted to be most sensitive to different wavelengths of light because they vary at key amino acid positions. This family of LWS opsin genes was produced by a diversity of duplication events. One, an intronless gene, was produced prior to the divergence of families Fundulidae and Poeciliidae. Between-gene PCR and DNA sequencing show that two of the guppy LWS opsins are linked in an inverted orientation. This inverted tandem duplication event occurred near the base of the poeciliid tree in the common ancestor of Poecilia and Xiphophorus. The fourth sequence has been uncovered only in the genus Poecilia. In the guppies surveyed here, this sequence is a hybrid, with the 5' end most similar to one of the tandem duplicates and the 3' end identical to the other. Conclusion Enhanced wavelength discrimination, a possible consequence of opsin gene duplication and divergence, might have been an evolutionary prerequisite for color-based sexual selection and have led to the extraordinary coloration now observed in male guppies and in many other poeciliids.

  20. Repeated adaptive divergence of microhabitat specialization in avian feather lice

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    Johnson Kevin P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeated adaptive radiations are evident when phenotypic divergence occurs within lineages, but this divergence into different forms is convergent when compared across lineages. Classic examples of such repeated adaptive divergence occur in island (for example, Caribbean Anolis lizards and lake systems (for example, African cichlids. Host-parasite systems in many respects are analogous to island systems, where host species represent isolated islands for parasites whose life cycle is highly tied to that of their hosts. Thus, host-parasite systems might exhibit interesting cases of repeated adaptive divergence as seen in island and lake systems. The feather lice of birds spend their entire life cycle on the body of the host and occupy distinct microhabitats on the host: head, wing, body and generalist. These microhabitat specialists show pronounced morphological differences corresponding to how they escape from host preening. We tested whether these different microhabitat specialists were a case of repeated adaptive divergence by constructing both morphological and molecular phylogenies for a diversity of avian feather lice, including many examples of head, wing, body and generalist forms. Results Morphological and molecular based phylogenies were highly incongruent, which could be explained by rampant convergence in morphology related to microhabitat specialization on the host. In many cases lice from different microhabitat specializations, but from the same group of birds, were sister taxa. Conclusions This pattern indicates a process of repeated adaptive divergence of these parasites within host group, but convergence when comparing parasites across host groups. These results suggest that host-parasite systems might be another case in which repeated adaptive radiations could be relatively common, but potentially overlooked, because morphological convergence can obscure evolutionary relationships.

  1. Extreme positive selection on a new highly-expressed larval glycoprotein (LGP) gene in Galaxias fishes (Osmeriformes: Galaxiidae).

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    Wallis, Lise J; Wallis, Graham P

    2011-01-01

    We describe the intron-exon structure and DNA/protein sequences of a new larval glycoprotein (LGP) gene from nine species of galaxiid fish. The gene has a distant similarity to Danio THP (Tamm-Horsfall urinary glycoprotein; uromodulin) and cichlid SPP120 (seminal plasma glycoprotein) due to conserved features of its zona pellucida (ZP) domain, including eight highly conserved cysteines and a consensus furin cleavage site. Using a combination of 454 sequencing of cDNA and exon-primed intron-spanning sequencing of genomic DNA, we obtained full sequences of the coding region (996 bp) and its intervening sequences (1,459 bp). LGP shows an exceptionally strong signal of positive selection over the entire coding region, as evidenced by d(N)/d(S) values >1. Across nine species of Galaxias, 87/332 (26%) amino acid residues are variable, compared with 9/386 (2%) for mitochondrial cytochrome b (cytb) in the same group of species. Across 36 interspecific pairwise comparisons, genetic distances are in all cases larger for coding region than for introns, by a factor of 2.4-fold on average. Reading frame, gene structure, splice sites, and many ZP motifs are conserved across all species. Together with the fact that the gene is expressed in all species, these results argue clearly against the possibility of a pseudogene. We show by 454 sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction that the transcript is abundant (ca. 0.5%) in newly hatched larvae and appears to be almost absent from a range of adult tissues. We postulate that the strong Darwinian evolution exhibited by this protein may reflect some type of immunoprotection at this vulnerable larval stage. PMID:20696791

  2. Continuous 1.3-million-year record of East African hydroclimate, and implications for patterns of evolution and biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Robert P; Scholz, Christopher A; Cohen, Andrew S; King, John W; Brown, Erik T; Ivory, Sarah J; Johnson, Thomas C; Deino, Alan L; Reinthal, Peter N; McGlue, Michael M; Blome, Margaret W

    2015-12-22

    The transport of moisture in the tropics is a critical process for the global energy budget and on geologic timescales, has markedly influenced continental landscapes, migratory pathways, and biological evolution. Here we present a continuous, first-of-its-kind 1.3-My record of continental hydroclimate and lake-level variability derived from drill core data from Lake Malawi, East Africa (9-15° S). Over the Quaternary, we observe dramatic shifts in effective moisture, resulting in large-scale changes in one of the world's largest lakes and most diverse freshwater ecosystems. Results show evidence for 24 lake level drops of more than 200 m during the Late Quaternary, including 15 lowstands when water levels were more than 400 m lower than modern. A dramatic shift is observed at the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), consistent with far-field climate forcing, which separates vastly different hydroclimate regimes before and after ∼800,000 years ago. Before 800 ka, lake levels were lower, indicating a climate drier than today, and water levels changed frequently. Following the MPT high-amplitude lake level variations dominate the record. From 800 to 100 ka, a deep, often overfilled lake occupied the basin, indicating a wetter climate, but these highstands were interrupted by prolonged intervals of extreme drought. Periods of high lake level are observed during times of high eccentricity. The extreme hydroclimate variability exerted a profound influence on the Lake Malawi endemic cichlid fish species flock; the geographically extensive habitat reconfiguration provided novel ecological opportunities, enabling new populations to differentiate rapidly to distinct species. PMID:26644580

  3. Continuous 1.3-million-year record of East African hydroclimate, and implications for patterns of evolution and biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Robert P.; Scholz, Christopher A.; Cohen, Andrew S.; King, John W.; Brown, Erik T.; Ivory, Sarah J.; Johnson, Thomas C.; Deino, Alan L.; Reinthal, Peter N.; McGlue, Michael M.; Blome, Margaret W.

    2015-12-01

    The transport of moisture in the tropics is a critical process for the global energy budget and on geologic timescales, has markedly influenced continental landscapes, migratory pathways, and biological evolution. Here we present a continuous, first-of-its-kind 1.3-My record of continental hydroclimate and lake-level variability derived from drill core data from Lake Malawi, East Africa (9-15° S). Over the Quaternary, we observe dramatic shifts in effective moisture, resulting in large-scale changes in one of the world's largest lakes and most diverse freshwater ecosystems. Results show evidence for 24 lake level drops of more than 200 m during the Late Quaternary, including 15 lowstands when water levels were more than 400 m lower than modern. A dramatic shift is observed at the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT), consistent with far-field climate forcing, which separates vastly different hydroclimate regimes before and after ∼800,000 years ago. Before 800 ka, lake levels were lower, indicating a climate drier than today, and water levels changed frequently. Following the MPT high-amplitude lake level variations dominate the record. From 800 to 100 ka, a deep, often overfilled lake occupied the basin, indicating a wetter climate, but these highstands were interrupted by prolonged intervals of extreme drought. Periods of high lake level are observed during times of high eccentricity. The extreme hydroclimate variability exerted a profound influence on the Lake Malawi endemic cichlid fish species flock; the geographically extensive habitat reconfiguration provided novel ecological opportunities, enabling new populations to differentiate rapidly to distinct species.

  4. The Fragility of Individual-Based Explanations of Social Hierarchies: A Test Using Animal Pecking Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The standard approach in accounting for hierarchical differentiation in biology and the social sciences considers a hierarchy as a static distribution of individuals possessing differing amounts of some valued commodity, assumes that the hierarchy is generated by micro-level processes involving individuals, and attempts to reverse engineer the processes that produced the hierarchy. However, sufficient experimental and analytical results are available to evaluate this standard approach in the case of animal dominance hierarchies (pecking orders). Our evaluation using evidence from hierarchy formation in small groups of both hens and cichlid fish reveals significant deficiencies in the three tenets of the standard approach in accounting for the organization of dominance hierarchies. In consequence, we suggest that a new approach is needed to explain the organization of pecking orders and, very possibly, by implication, for other kinds of social hierarchies. We develop an example of such an approach that considers dominance hierarchies to be dynamic networks, uses dynamic sequences of interaction (dynamic network motifs) to explain the organization of dominance hierarchies, and derives these dynamic sequences directly from observation of hierarchy formation. We test this dynamical explanation using computer simulation and find a good fit with actual dynamics of hierarchy formation in small groups of hens. We hypothesize that the same dynamic sequences are used in small groups of many other animal species forming pecking orders, and we discuss the data required to evaluate our hypothesis. Finally, we briefly consider how our dynamic approach may be generalized to other kinds of social hierarchies using the example of the distribution of empty gastropod (snail) shells occupied in populations of hermit crabs. PMID:27410230

  5. Cobalt Chloride Treatment Used to Ablate the Lateral Line System Also Impairs the Olfactory System in Three Freshwater Fishes.

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    Julie M Butler

    Full Text Available Fishes use multimodal signals during both inter- and intra-sexual displays to convey information about their sex, reproductive state, and social status. These complex behavioral displays can include visual, auditory, olfactory, tactile, and hydrodynamic signals, and the relative role of each sensory channel in these complex multi-sensory interactions is a common focus of neuroethology. The mechanosensory lateral line system of fishes detects near-body water movements and is implicated in a variety of behaviors including schooling, rheotaxis, social communication, and prey detection. Cobalt chloride is commonly used to chemically ablate lateral line neuromasts, thereby eliminating water-movement cues to test for mechanosensory-mediated behavioral functions. However, cobalt acts as a nonspecific calcium channel antagonist and could potentially disrupt function of all superficially located sensory receptor cells, including those for chemosensing. Here, we examined whether CoCl2 treatment used to ablate the lateral line system also impairs olfaction in three freshwater fishes, the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni, goldfish Carassius auratus, and the Mexican blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus. To examine the impact of CoCl2 on the activity of peripheral receptors, we quantified DASPEI fluorescence intensity of the olfactory epithelium from fish exposed to control and CoCl2 solutions. In addition, we examined brain activation in olfactory processing regions of A. burtoni immersed in either control or cobalt solutions. All three species exposed to CoCl2 had decreased DASPEI staining of the olfactory epithelium, and in A. burtoni, cobalt treatment caused reduced neural activation in olfactory processing regions of the brain. To our knowledge this is the first empirical evidence demonstrating that the same CoCl2 treatment used to ablate the lateral line system also impairs olfactory function. These data have important implications for the use of

  6. Comportamento reprodutivo do acará bandeira, Pterophyllum scalare Cuvier & Valenciennes (Osteichthyes, Cichlidae Reproductive behaviour of Pterophyllum scalare Cuvier & Valenciennes (Osteichthyes, Cichlidae

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    Maria do Socorro R.F Cacho

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Acará bandeira, Pterophyllum scalare Cuvier & Valenciennes, 1831 is a Neotropical cichlid fish, which has not been studied under a scientific approach. The objective of this work was to identify and describe the reproductive behaviour involved in the various phases of its reproductive cycle, such as territorial disputes and its establishment, substrate selection for spawning, courtship and mating, selection of mate and parental care. Twenty males and ten females of the study species were observed in the laboratory, over a period of six consecutive months. Behaviour descriptions resulting from these observations were analysed and the results show that the reproductive males are very agressive in the initial phase of reproduction. Agressiveness is a constant variable in encounters between territorial fishes, and possession of territory is of fundamental importance for reproduction of this species. Males with established territories were those which very successful in atracting the females during courtship. The selection of the females were influenced by the possession of territory, the type of substrate available for spawning and the body size. The fish preferred aquatic plants with broad leaves as an adequate substrate for spawning. It was observed that there was a short-term biparental care, before the eggs hatched, during which period the males played an important role in protecting them. After the eggs hatched, the male continued to protect the hatchling in his mouth, but played a lesser role, possibly to seek other females for mating so as to increase his reproductive output. Selection of a good mate by the female and the high degree of parental care were the factors which influence the reproductive success of the study species.

  7. Introductions de nouvelles espèces de poissons dans les eaux douces tropicales : objectifs et conséquences

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    LÉVÊQUE C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Les introductions d'espèces dans les milieux aquatiques tropicaux ont d'abord eu pour motivation de développer la pêche sportive pour les émigrants européens. Actuellement, les principaux objectifs sont d'améliorer la pêche artisanale locale et de développer l'aquaculture. L'introduction de poissons pélagiques de la famille des clupéidés dans divers lacs naturels ou de barrage apparaît comme un succès, car elle a permis de développer la pêche de manière significative, sans dommages apparents pour la faune indigène. Par contre, l'introduction de prédateurs a toujours eu des conséquences négatives sur la faune autochtone, et divers exemples sont donnés dont la truite (Salmo trutta Linnaeus, 1758 en Australie et dans le lac Titicaca, et le capitaine (Lates niloticus Linnaeus, 1758 dans le lac Victoria. Les introductions de tilapias donnent lieu à des bilans plus mitigés, généralement positifs lorsque les cichlidés sont introduits dans des milieux pauvres en espèces autochtones, alors que des disparitions d'espèces ont été constatées pour les introductions réalisées dans les milieux déjà riches en espèces. L'exemple des lacs malgaches montre les conséquences d'introductions successives de diverses espèces sur la faune ichtyologique et la pêche.

  8. Fish inner ear otolith size and bilateral asymmetry during development.

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    Anken, R H; Werner, K; Ibsch, M; Rahmann, H

    1998-07-01

    Size and bilateral asymmetry (i.e. size difference between the left and the right hand side) of inner ear otoliths of larval mouthbreeding cichlid fish were determined during the ontogenetic development of larvae from hatching to the free swimming stage. Animals of two batches were raised in aquarium hatch baskets. The basket containing one batch was placed directly above aeration equipment, resulting in random water circulation within the basket, which constantly shifted the specimens around ('shifted' specimens). The second batch of animals was raised in parallel without shifting. Due to the weight of the yolk-sacs, these animals lay on their sides until the yolk-sacs were resorbed ('stationary' specimens). The groups of larvae did not differ from one another in respect of individual general development, nor in otolith size. Contrasting results were obtained regarding bilateral otolith asymmetry: In both shifted and stationary animals, asymmetry of utricular and saccular otoliths (lapilli and sagittae, respectively) ranged at comparatively low values throughout development. However, by comparison with shifted individuals, lapillar asymmetry of stationary animals showed a highly significant increase during early development when larvae were forced to lay on their sides due to their prominent yolk-sacs. In later developmental stages, when they began to swim freely, a dramatic decrease in lapillar asymmetry was apparent. These findings indicate that development of lapillar asymmetry depends on the direction of the acting gravity vector relative to the positioning of the larvae, suggesting that the size (or mass) of a given otolith is regulated via a feedback mechanism. PMID:9682810

  9. Carbonic anhydrase is not the only factor regulating otolith mineralization in fish in dependence of the gravitational environment

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    Beier, M.; Anken, R.

    2006-01-01

    Earlier experiments have shown, that fish otolith growth and mineralization is slowed down by hypergravity (hg). The enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CAH) provides carbonate and, thus, plays a major role in otolith calcification. Indeed, CAH reactivity in inner ear maculae is downregulated by hg. The following experiment was designed in order to elucidate as of whether CAH is the only factor regulating otolith mineralization in dependence of the gravity vector: A first group of larval cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) was reared in normal aquarium water at 1 g (1 g-Aq). A second group received hg (3 g, 7 days) as a physical factor to decrease CAH reactivity (3 g-Aq). A third group (1 g-AZ) was (at 1 g) treated with azetazolamide (AZ; 1 g/l), an inhibitor of CAH (the AZ-concentration used resulted in a complete inhibition of CAH as had been proven by a biochemical assessment of enzyme activity). The last group was maintained both in AZ and at hg (3 g-AZ). Both the saccular and utricular otoliths (sagittae and lapilli, respectively) of the 1 g-AZ group showed a decrease in otolith growth (surface area) as compared to the 1 g-Aq animals (1 g-AZ < 1 g-Aq). Similar results were obtained when comparing 3 g-Aq with 1 g-Aq samples (3 g-Aq < 1 g-Aq). Regarding sagittae, AZ treatment had no significant additional effect on otolith mineralization under hg (3 g-AZ = 1 g-AZ). In case of lapilli, however, growth received a further reduction when reared in 3 g-AZ (i.e., 3 g-AZ < 1 g-AZ). Thus, in lapilli, hg and AZ added their effects on otolith growth. This finding clearly indicates that hg does not only act on otolith growth via a regulation of CAH activity.

  10. Calcium-Tracers disclose the Site of Biomineralisation in inner Ear Otoliths of Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, M.; Anken, R.; Rahmann, H.

    Since changing gravity (concerning direction and amplitude) strongly affects inner ear otolith growth and otolithic calcium incorporation in developing fish, it was the aim of the present study to locate the site of mineralisation in order to gain cues and insights into the provenance of the otoliths inorganic compounds. Therefore, larval cichlid fish ( reochromis mossambicus) were incubated in theO calcium-tracer alizarin complexone (AC; red fluorescence). After maintenance in aquarium water for various periods (1h, 2h, 3h, 6h, 9h, 12h, 1d, 2d, 3d, 5d, 6d, 7d, 15d, 29d, 36d and 87d), the animals were incubated in the calcium-tracer calcein (CAL; green fluorescence). AC thus labelled calcium being incorporated at the beginning of the experiment and would subsequently accompany calcium in the course of a possible dislocation, whereas CAL visualized calcium being deposited right at the end of the test. Subsequently, the otoliths were analysed using a laser-scanning microscope and it was shown that the initial site of calcium incorporation was located directly adjacent to the sensory epithelium and the otolithic membrane. Later, calcium deposits were also found on further regions of the otoliths' surface area, where they had been shifted to in the course of dislocation. This finding strongly indicates that the sensory epithelium plays a prominent role in otolithic biomineralisation, which is in full agreement with an electron microscopical study (Ibsch et al., this issue). Future studies will address the question, as of whether either the sensory epithelium is directly involved in the provision of calcium (and possibly further inorganic compounds of the otoliths) or, in contrast, that the otoliths' proteinacious matrix exclusively exhibits nucleation centers for calcium incorporation in an area adjacent to the receptor epithelium. This work was financially supported by the German A erospace Center (DLR) e.V. (FKZ: 50 WB 9997).

  11. Genetic alterations as determined by quantitative morphological, viability and social behavioral traits in postirradiation generations of an inbred strain of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus (Guenther)(Pisces: Poecliidae), induced by 1000 R of X-rays to spermatogonia and oogonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spermatogonia and oogonia were X-irradiated with 258 mC/kg in neonatal platyfish. This procedure corresponds to an exposure of immature spermatogonia and oogonia. The postirradiation (PI) F2 generation was compared with controls of the same origin regarding viability characters (brood size, postnatal mortality, and sex ratio), quantitative morphological (number of vertebrae, body proportions) and social behavioral traits (cohesiveness of both sexes, male sexual and agonistic behavior patterns). Each of 5 pairs of F2 fish were used as the founders for a one-year lasting population experiment in which the fish had been subjected to either mutation pressure through derivation from irradiated spermatogonia and oogonia as mentioned above or to selection pressure through predation by the convict cichlid, Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum, or to a combination of both in order to compare the outcome of this experiment with that of a control population. The PI F2 exhibited a higher mortality rate than the controls. A unidirectional shift of the mean values of the quantitative morphological characters towards a more compact fish was observed in the postirradiation generations. The social cohesiveness of PI F2 was higher than that of the controls. Male sexual activity was enhanced in PI F2, and there was a similar trend to higher intraspecific aggressiveness among PI F2 males. The single effects of mutation and selection pressures were beneficial in so far as the number of individuals and the biomass were enhanced, while a combination of both was deleterious endangering the population to extinction. Contrary to expectation, the coefficient of variation for the quantitative morphological traits was higher in the controls than in the Pi F2. (author)

  12. An integrated closed system for fish-plankton aquaculture in Amazonian fresh water.

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    Gilles, S; Ismiño, R; Sánchez, H; David, F; Núñez, J; Dugué, R; Darias, M J; Römer, U

    2014-08-01

    A prototype of an integrated closed system for fish-plankton aquaculture was developed in Iquitos (Peruvian Amazonia) in order to cultivate the Tiger Catfish, Pseudoplatystoma punctifer (Castelnau, 1855). This freshwater recirculating system consisted of two linked sewage tanks with an intensive rearing unit (a cage) for P. punctifer placed in the first, and with a fish-plankton trophic chain replacing the filters commonly used in clear water closed systems. Detritivorous and zooplanktivorous fishes (Loricariidae and Cichlidae), maintained without external feeding in the sewage volume, mineralized organic matter and permitted the stabilization of the phytoplankton biomass. Water exchange and organic waste discharge were not necessary. In this paper we describe the processes undertaken to equilibrate this ecosystem: first the elimination of an un-adapted spiny alga, Golenkinia sp., whose proliferation was favored by the presence of a small rotifer, Trichocerca sp., and second the control of this rotifer proliferation via the introduction of two cichlid species, Acaronia nassa Heckel, 1840 and Satanoperca jurupari Heckel, 1840, in the sewage part. This favored some development of the green algae Nannochloris sp. and Chlorella sp. At that time we took the opportunity to begin a 3-month rearing test of P. punctifer. The mean specific growth rate and feed conversion ratio (FCR) of P. punctifer were 1.43 and 1.27, respectively, and the global FCR, including fish in the sewage part, was 1.08. This system has proven to be suitable for growing P. punctifer juveniles out to adult, and provides several practical advantages compared with traditional recirculating clear water systems, which use a combination of mechanical and biological filters and require periodic waste removal, leading to water and organic matter losses. PMID:24849417

  13. Facial Recognition in a Discus Fish (Cichlidae): Experimental Approach Using Digital Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Shun; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Kohda, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    A number of mammals and birds are known to be capable of visually discriminating between familiar and unfamiliar individuals, depending on facial patterns in some species. Many fish also visually recognize other conspecifics individually, and previous studies report that facial color patterns can be an initial signal for individual recognition. For example, a cichlid fish and a damselfish will use individual-specific color patterns that develop only in the facial area. However, it remains to be determined whether the facial area is an especially favorable site for visual signals in fish, and if so why? The monogamous discus fish, Symphysopdon aequifasciatus (Cichlidae), is capable of visually distinguishing its pair-partner from other conspecifics. Discus fish have individual-specific coloration patterns on entire body including the facial area, frontal head, trunk and vertical fins. If the facial area is an inherently important site for the visual cues, this species will use facial patterns for individual recognition, but otherwise they will use patterns on other body parts as well. We used modified digital models to examine whether discus fish use only facial coloration for individual recognition. Digital models of four different combinations of familiar and unfamiliar fish faces and bodies were displayed in frontal and lateral views. Focal fish frequently performed partner-specific displays towards partner-face models, and did aggressive displays towards models of non-partner’s faces. We conclude that to identify individuals this fish does not depend on frontal color patterns but does on lateral facial color patterns, although they have unique color patterns on the other parts of body. We discuss the significance of facial coloration for individual recognition in fish compared with birds and mammals. PMID:27191162

  14. Marine and inland fishes of St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands: an annotated checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Vaniz, William F; Jelks, Howard L

    2014-01-01

    An historical account is given for the ichthyological research at St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands, followed by an annotated list of 544 species of mostly marine shore fishes known or reported from the island to depths of 200 m. Color photographs are included for 103 of these species. Collections made at Buck Island Reef National Monument with the ichthyocide rotenone in 2001 and 2005 increased the known ichthyofauna by about 80 species. The rational for inclusion of each species in the checklist is given, with remarks for those species for which additional documentation or voucher specimens are needed. Reports of species known or presumed to have been based on misidentifications are discussed. Of the total marine fish fauna of the island, 404 species (75%) are restricted to the western Atlantic Ocean, (223 of these species are essentially Caribbean endemics that do not occur south of the Amazon River outflow), and no St. Croix endemic species are known. An additional 17 species (3.2%) also occur at mid-Atlantic islands, 57 species (10.6 %) are limited to both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and 40 species (7.4%) have circumtropical distributions. The four most species-rich families are the Gobiidae (47 species), Serranidae (groupers and sea basses, 41), Labridae (wrasses and parrotfishes, 31), and Labrisomidae (scaly blennies, 27). Literature reports of Mosquitofish, Gambusia sp., from St. Croix apparently were based on misidentifications of a different introduced poeciliid genus. Four species of the amphidromus goby genus Sicydium occur in St. Croix inland waters, together with three established introduced species (one cichlid and two poeciliids). Also included are one catfish (Ictaluridae) and three sunfishes (Centrarchidae) known only from ponds. The Lionfish, Pterois volitans, the only introduced marine species, was first reported from St. Croix in 2008 and is now common despite control efforts. PMID:24871150

  15. United theory of biological evolution:Disaster-forced evolution through Supernova, radioactive ash fall-outs, genome instability, and mass extinctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshikazu Ebisuzaki; Shigenori Maruyama

    2015-01-01

    scale) also has been undergoing in cichlid fishes and great African apes in the last several tens of thousand years in the current African rift valley, including the origin of humankind due to the radioactive ash fall-outs by continental alkaline volcanism.

  16. Social Transitions Cause Rapid Behavioral and Neuroendocrine Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruska, Karen P

    2015-08-01

    In species that form dominance hierarchies, there are often opportunities for low-ranking individuals to challenge high-ranking ones, resulting in a rise or fall in social rank. How does an animal rapidly detect, process, and then respond to these social transitions? This article explores and summarizes how these social transitions can rapidly (within 24 h) impact an individual's behavior, physiology, and brain, using the African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, as a model. Male A. burtoni form hierarchies in which a few brightly-colored dominant males defend territories and spawn with females, while the remaining males are subordinate, more drab-colored, do not hold a territory, and have minimal opportunities for reproduction. These social phenotypes are plastic and reversible, meaning that individual males may switch between dominant and subordinate status multiple times within a lifetime. When the social environment is manipulated to create males that either ascend (subordinate to dominant) or descend (dominant to subordinate) in rank, there are rapid changes in behavior, circulating hormones, and levels of gene expression in the brain that reflect the direction of transition. For example, within minutes, males ascending in status show bright coloration, a distinct eye-bar, increased dominance behaviors, activation of brain nuclei in the social behavior network, and higher levels of sex steroids in the plasma. Ascending males also show rapid changes in levels of neuropeptide and steroid receptors in the brain, as well as in the pituitary and testes. To further examine hormone-behavior relationships in this species during rapid social ascent, the present study also measured levels of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone, estradiol, progestins, and cortisol in the plasma during the first week of social ascent and tested for correlations with behavior. Plasma levels of all steroids were rapidly increased at 30 min after social ascent, but were not correlated with

  17. The Mechanosensory Lateral Line System Mediates Activation of Socially-Relevant Brain Regions during Territorial Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Julie M.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Animals use multiple senses during social interactions and must integrate this information in the brain to make context-dependent behavioral decisions. For fishes, the largest group of vertebrates, the mechanosensory lateral line system provides crucial hydrodynamic information for survival behaviors, but little is known about its function in social communication. Our previous work using the African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, provided the first empirical evidence that fish use their lateral line system to detect water movements from conspecifics for mutual assessment and behavioral choices. It is unknown, however, where this socially-relevant mechanosensory information is processed in the brain to elicit adaptive behavioral responses. To examine for the first time in any fish species which brain regions receive contextual mechanosensory information, we quantified expression of the immediate early gene cfos as a proxy for neural activation in sensory and socially-relevant brain nuclei from lateral line-intact and -ablated fish following territorial interactions. Our in situ hybridization results indicate that in addition to known lateral line processing regions, socially-relevant mechanosensory information is processed in the ATn (ventromedial hypothalamus homolog), Dl (putative hippocampus homolog), and Vs (putative medial extended amygdala homolog). In addition, we identified a functional network within the conserved social decision-making network (SDMN) whose co-activity corresponds with mutual assessment and behavioral choice. Lateral line-intact and –ablated fight winners had different patterns of co-activity of these function networks and group identity could be determined solely by activation patterns, indicating the importance of mechanoreception to co-activity of the SDMN. These data show for the first time that the mechanosensory lateral line system provides relevant information to conserved decision-making centers of the brain during

  18. Composition, abundance and diversity of the Family Cichlidae in Oyan Dam, Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLANIYI ALABA OLOPADE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Olopade OA, Rufai OP. 2014. Composition, abundance and diversity of the Family Cichlidae in Oyan Dam, Ogun State, Nigeria. Biodiversitas 15: 195-199.This study was conducted to determine status of the family Cichlidae in Oyan Dam, Nigeria, during the wet and dry seasons of 2011. Samples were collected using multi-mesh gillnets ranging between 30 mm to 80 mm. Simpson's Diversity Index was used to determine the species richness, while dominance and evenness were given by Shannon's index. A total of 547 individuals were caught from Imala (S1 and Ibaro (S2 sites of the dam. Species collected include Sarotherodon galilaeus (42.60%, Oreochromis niloticus (17.92%, Tilapia zillii (25.41%, Hemichromis fasciatus (10.61% and Tilapia mariae (3.48%. Juveniles and sub-adults and adults were among the catch, the sizes were as big as 12.85±0.29cm SL, 109.22±6.00g BW in Tilapia zillii and small as 6.09±0.05cm SL and 8.07±0.15g BW in Hemichromis fasciatus. The diversity indexes showed that the diversity of Cichlids was lower in the two sites observed in Oyan Dam. The estimates of diversity indexes showed lower value for site 1 (0.284 than for site 2 (0.294; Simpson's diversity index was 0.716 for site 1 and 0.703 for site 2 while reciprocal indexes for site 1(3.521 was slightly lower than site 2 (3.367. Shannon-Wiener’s Index recorded in the site 1 (1.36 was slightly lower than site 2 (1.37. Pielou’s Index value recorded for site 1 was 0.845 and 0.852 for site 2. Sarotherodon galilaeus, Oreochromis niloticus, Tilapia zillii and Tilapia mariae exhibited a positive allometric growth pattern while only Hemichromis fasciatus showed a negative allometric growth.

  19. Feed training of peacock bass (Cichla sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOURA M. A. M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Amazonian cichlid peacock bass (Cichla sp. is a highly marketable food and sport fish, therefore a suitable species for aquaculture. However, because of its piscivorous feeding preferences, the species does not accept dry feeds voluntarily, turning its intensive culture difficult and costly. This study aimed to wean fingerling peacock bass from inert moist food to dry diets. In a first experiment, 1,134 fingerlings weighting 0.27 g were divided in two 0.37 m³ hapas and fed ground fish flesh with 35% success. Then, 1.3 g fish were pooled, stocked in six 25 L cages and fed two pellet sequences with 80%, 60%, 40%, 20% and 0% ground fish flesh (GFF. One sequence was flavored with 10% krill meal (Euphausia sp.. Training success of fish fed the GFF-00 diet flavored with krill reached 12%ª compared to 11.6%ª (p < 0.05 for diets without krill meal. A second experiment was set up with 969, 1.5 g fish, trained with GFF with 39.8% success. After the feed training period, 2.2 g fish were then fed a sequence of moist pellets containing 80%, 60% and 45% GFF. Fish trained to feed on moist pellets with 45% ground fish were pooled and stocked into nine 25 L cages. Fish were weaned to dry pellets without ground fish flesh (GFF-00 using three diet sequences: 1 dry pellets; 2 moist pellets; and 3 dry pellets flavored with 4% cod liver oil; all three diets contained 30, 10 and 0% GFF. The three sequences yielded, respectively 30.8%ª, 23.6%ª, and 24.7%ª (p < 0.05 fish feeding on GFF-00. There were no apparent beneficial effects of increasing moisture or addition of cod liver oil as flavor enhancers in the weaning diets. This study revealed the feasibility of training peacock bass to accept dry pellets, but feeding young fish ground fish flesh seemed to be a major bottleneck in improving feed training success.

  20. Does improved hearing result in altered inner ear morphology?

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    Tanja Schulz-Mirbach

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The sense of hearing plays an important role for fishes to obtain information about their (acoustic environment (e.g. Popper 2011, Fay 2011. In numerous taxa, ancillary auditory structures like swimbladder modifications evolved, leading to an improved audition (Braun and Grande 2008. Despite a profound knowledge of inner ear diversity and ancillary auditory structures (for an overview see Schulz-Mirbach and Ladich 2015, Ladich 2015, the relationship between the morphology of these structures and hearing abilities remains to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that swimbladder modifications coincide with differences in inner ear morphology, using cichlids as a model because they show considerable intrafamilial diversity in swimbladder morphology and hearing capabilities (Schulz-Mirbach et al. 2012, 2014. We compared Steatocranus tinanti (vestigial swimbladder, Hemichromis guttatus (large swimbladder without extensions, and Etroplus maculatus (intimate connection between swimbladder and inner ears by applying immunostaining together with confocal imaging for the investigation of sensory epithelia, and high-resolution, contrast enhanced microCT imaging for characterizing inner ears in 3D. Compared to S. tinanti and H. guttatus, inner ears of E. maculatus showed an enlargement of all three maculae, and a particularly large lacinia of the macula utriculi. While our analysis of orientation patterns of ciliary bundles on the three macula types using artificially flattened maculae uncovered rather similar orientation patterns of ciliary bundles, interspecific differences became apparent when illustrating the orientation patterns on the 3D models of the maculae: differences in the shape and curvature of the lacinia of the macula utriculi, and the anterior arm of the macula lagenae resulted in an altered arrangement of ciliary bundles. Our results imply that improved hearing in E. maculatus is associated not only with swimbladder modifications but

  1. Identification of Distant Agouti-Like Sequences and Re-Evaluation of the Evolutionary History of the Agouti-Related Peptide (AgRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Västermark, Åke; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Houle, Michael E.; Fredriksson, Robert; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2012-01-01

    The Agouti-like peptides including AgRP, ASIP and the teleost-specific A2 (ASIP2 and AgRP2) peptides have potent and diverse functional roles in feeding, pigmentation and background adaptation mechanisms. There are contradictory theories about the evolution of the Agouti-like peptide family as well the nomenclature. Here we performed comprehensive mining and annotation of vertebrate Agouti-like sequences. We identified A2 sequences from salmon, trout, seabass, cod, cichlid, tilapia, gilt-headed sea bream, Antarctic toothfish, rainbow smelt, common carp, channel catfish and interestingly also in lobe-finned fish. Moreover, we surprisingly found eight novel homologues from the kingdom of arthropods and three from fungi, some sharing the characteristic C-x(6)-C-C motif which are present in the Agouti-like sequences, as well as approximate sequence length (130 amino acids), positioning of the motif sequence and sharing of exon-intron structures that are similar to the other Agouti-like peptides providing further support for the common origin of these sequences. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the AgRP sequences cluster basally in the tree, suggesting that these sequences split from a cluster containing both the ASIP and the A2 sequences. We also used a novel approach to determine the statistical evidence for synteny, a sinusoidal Hough transform pattern recognition technique. Our analysis shows that the teleost AgRP2 resides in a chromosomal region that has synteny with Hsa 8, but we found no convincing synteny between the regions that A2, AgRP and ASIP reside in, which would support that the Agouti-like peptides were formed by whole genome tetraplodization events. Here we suggest that the Agouti-like peptide genes were formed through classical subsequent gene duplications where the AgRP is the most distantly related to the three other members of that group, first splitting from a common ancestor to ASIP and A2, and then later the A2 split from ASIP followed by a

  2. A microsatellite-based linkage map of salt tolerant tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus x Oreochromis spp. and mapping of sex-determining loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tilapia is the common name for a group of cichlid fishes and is one of the most important aquacultured freshwater food fish. Mozambique tilapia and its hybrids, including red tilapia are main representatives of salt tolerant tilapias. A linkage map is an essential framework for mapping QTL for important traits, positional cloning of genes and understanding of genome evolution. Results We constructed a consensus linkage map of Mozambique tilapia and red tilapia using 95 individuals from two F1 families and 401 microsatellites including 282 EST-derived markers. In addition, we conducted comparative mapping and searched for sex-determining loci on the whole genome. These 401 microsatellites were assigned to 22 linkage groups. The map spanned 1067.6 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 3.3 cM. Comparative mapping between tilapia and stickleback, medaka, pufferfish and zebrafish revealed clear homologous relationships between chromosomes from different species. We found evidence for the fusion of two sets of two independent chromosomes forming two new chromosome pairs, leading to a reduction of 24 chromosome pairs in their ancestor to 22 pairs in tilapias. The XY sex determination locus in Mozambique tilapia was mapped on LG1, and verified in five families containing 549 individuals. The major XY sex determination locus in red tilapia was located on LG22, and verified in two families containing 275 individuals. Conclusions A first-generation linkage map of salt tolerant tilapia was constructed using 401 microsatellites. Two separate fusions of two sets of two independent chromosomes may lead to a reduction of 24 chromosome pairs in their ancestor to 22 pairs in tilapias. The XY sex-determining loci from Mozambique tilapia and red tilapia were mapped on LG1 and LG22, respectively. This map provides a useful resource for QTL mapping for important traits and comparative genome studies. The DNA markers linked to the sex

  3. 3D tooth microwear texture analysis in fishes as a test of dietary hypotheses of durophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Mark A.; Darras, Laurent P. G.

    2016-03-01

    An understanding of how extinct animals functioned underpins our understanding of past evolutionary events, including adaptive radiations, and the role of functional innovation and adaptation as drivers of both micro- and macroevolution. Yet analysis of function in extinct animals is fraught with difficulty. Hypotheses that interpret molariform teeth in fishes as evidence of durophagous (shell-crushing) diets provide a good example of the particular problems inherent in the methods of functional morphology. This is because the assumed close coupling of form and function upon which the approach is based is weakened by, among other things, behavioural flexibility and the absence of a clear one to one relationship between structures and functions. Here we show that ISO 25178-2 standard parameters for surface texture, derived from analysis of worn surfaces of molariform teeth of fishes, vary significantly between species that differ in the amount of hard-shelled prey they consume. Two populations of the Sheepshead Seabream (Archosargus probatocephalus) were studied. This fish is not a dietary specialist, and one of the populations is known to consume more vegetation and less hard-shelled prey than the other; this is reflected in significant differences in their microwear textures. The Archosargus populations differ significantly in their microwear from the specialist shell-crusher Anarhichas lupus (the Atlantic Wolffish). Multivariate analysis of these three groups of fishes lends further support to the relationship between diet and tooth microwear, and provides robust validation of the approach. Application of the multivariate models derived from microwear texture in Archosargus and Anarhichas to a third fish species—the cichlid Astatoreochromis alluaudi—successfully separates wild caught fish that ate hard-shelled prey from lab-raised fish that did not. This cross-taxon validation demonstrates that quantitative analysis of tooth microwear texture can

  4. Região de heterocromatina constitutiva em Geophagus brasiliensis (Quoy e Gaimard,1824(Perciformes: Cichlidae do sistema lacustre do médio rio Doce (MG. DOI: 10.7902/ecb.v2i1.20 Constitutive heterochromatin region in Geophagus brasiliensis (QUOY E GAIMARD,1824(PERDIFORMES: CICHLIDAE from lake system of the medium Doce river (MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula A. Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A família Cichlidae pertence à ordem Perciformes, uma das famílias com maior riqueza de espécies entre os vertebrados. Geophagus brasiliensis é o ciclídeo com maior distribuição nas lagoas do médio rio Doce. Estudos citogenéticos sugerem que esse sistema de lagoas favoreceu a diferenciação citogenética de varias espécies de peixes, num intervalo de tempo relativamente curto. O cariótipo dessa espécie é caracterizado por 2n=48 com blocos de heterocromatinas nas regiões centroméricas em quase todos os cromossomos. O objetivo desse trabalho foi caracterizar a população do médio rio Doce a partir do bandeamento de heterocromatinas. Foram coletados 18 espécimes de G. brasiliensis em três lagoas. O resultado da Banda C apresentou marcações nas regiões centroméricas de quase todos os cromossomos. No braço menor de um cromossomo submetacêntrico observou-se uma marcação apenas nos indivíduos do sexo masculino. Marcações na região intersticial foram encontradas nessa população, sendo essa uma característica exclusiva desse sistema lacustre.The family Cichlidae belongs to the order Perciformes, and is one of the families with the highest species richness among vertebrates. Geophagus brasiliensis is the cichlid with the widest distribution in the lakes of the middle Rio Doce. Cytogenetic studies suggest that this system of lakes favors the cytogenetic differentiation of various fish species over a relatively short time. The karyotype of this species is characterized by a diploid number of 2n=48, with blocks of heterocrhomatin in the centromeric regions and almost all of the chromosomes. The objective of this work was to characterize the population of the Rio Doce through the use of heterochromatin bandings. 18 specimens of G. brasiliensis were collected in three lakes. The results of C-Banding present markings in the centromeric regions of almost all of the chromosomes. One

  5. Otolith asymmetry and kinetotic behaviour of fish at high-quality microgravity: A drop-tower experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R.; Forster, A.; Baur, U.; Feucht, I.; Hilbig, R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been repeatedly shown earlier that some fish of a given batch reveal motion sickness (a kinetosis) at the transition from hypergravity to (low quality) microgravity in the course of parabolic aircraft flight (PF) experiments. Since it is unknown, whether this behaviour is exclusively induced by microgravity or rather by changing accelerations as they occur during PFs, larval cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) were subjected to high-quality microgravity (ca. 4.7 s) in the drop-tower at ZARM, Bremen (Germany). The percentual ratios of the various types of behaviour (normal swimming and kinetotic swimming; kinetotic specimens revealed looping responses/LR or spinning movements/SM) highly differed from those observed in the course of PFs. Whereas kinetoses were exhibited by some 90% of the individuals who had experienced flights at ZARM (SM: 22%; LR: 69%; n = 156 animals), only a rather small proportion of all animals had shown a kinetotic behaviour during PFs (SM: 14%; LR: 10%; n = 71 animals; Hilbig, R., Anken, R., Rahmann, H. On the origin of susceptibility to kinetotic swimming behaviour in fish: a parabolic aircraft flight study. J. Vestib. Res. 12, 185-189, 2003). Thus, the percentual ratio of spinning animals is in a roughly comparable range both during PF and drop-tower microgravity, whereas looping responses are extremely frequently exhibited during exposure to the drop-tower microgravity environment. Since the release of the drop-capsule (total mass of the capsule used: 491 kg) will inevitably lead to a brisk longitudinal compression of the entire setup, many animals will have been provoked to perform a C-start escape response, which - during microgravity - was not discontinued and thus resulted in loop-swimming (like the looping observed during STS-89; Anken, R., Hilbig, R., Ibsch, M., Rahmann, H. Readaptation of fish to 1G after long-term microgravity: behavioural results from the STS 89 mission. Adv. Space Res. 25, 2019-2023, 2000). In striking

  6. Kinetotic behaviour and otolith asymmetry of fish under "low quality microgravity" - a drop-tower experiment at 0.03-0.05g

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Ralf; Knie, Miriam; Hilbig, Reinhard; Anken, Ralf

    We have shown earlier that some fish of a given batch reveal motion sickness (a kinetosis) at the transition from earth gravity to diminished gravity. The percentual ratios of the various types of behaviour (normal swimming and kinetotic swimming; kinetotic specimens revealed looping responses/LR or spinning movements/SM), however, highly differed depending on the quality of diminished gravity. Whereas kinetoses were exhibited by some 90 In striking contrast to the results gained using PF specimens, according to which otolith asymmetry (differences in the size and calcium incorporation of the inner ear stones between the left and right side of the body) was significantly higher in kinetotic specimens as compared to normally swimming fish, a comparable asymmetry between kinetotically and normally swimming drop-tower samples (HQM) could statistically not be verified. The present study was designed to further elucidate the role of otolith asymmetry concerning an individually different susceptibility to kinetoses. In order to test, whether the differing results between the PF and the drop-tower experiment were based exclusively on the differing quality of diminished gravity, or, if further parameters of the PF and the drop-tower environment (e.g., vibrations and changing accelerations during PFs or the brisk compression of the drop-capsule at its release) need to be taken into consideration to explain the earlier results, drop-tower flights were performed at LQM. This simulation of PF "micro"gravity was carried out in housing larval cichlid fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) within a centrifuge at 0.03-0.05g during the drop-tower flights. The percentual ratios of the swimming behaviour at drop-tower LQM ranged between those of PF LQM and (drop-tower) HQM. This indicates that many normally swimming fish during PFs use cues other than the residual gravity (e.g., vibrations detected by the lateral line organ) for orientation. Furthermore, looping responses seem to be

  7. Sites of calcium uptake of fish otoliths correspond with macular regions rich of carbonic anhydrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, M.; Anken, R.; Hilbig, R.

    2006-01-01

    Based on pharmacological data, it has been suggested that the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CAH) plays a prominent role in the mineralization of fish otoliths. To directly test this proposal, the topographical distribution of CAH was histochemically analyzed in the utricular and saccular maculae of larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus. Further investigations were focussed on the sites of otolithic calcium uptake using the fluorescent calcium tracer alizarin-complexone (AC). Both in the utricle and the saccule, CAH-reactivity was prominent in regions on both sides of the sensory macula (centrifugal (cf) and centripetal (cp) areas), which reportedly contain ionocytes, specialized cells regulating the ionic composition of the endolymph. (The terms centrifugal and centripetal were chosen instead of lateral and medial, because the saccule is positioned perpendicular to the utricle; “lateral” and “medial” thus do not allow an unambiguous allocation of the respective regions.) In the saccule, the size of cf and cp did not differ from each other, whereas, in the utricle, cp was considerably larger as compared to cf (CAH-reactivity per μm2 was nearly identical in both areas of both endorgans). AC-incubation resulted in a fluorescent band on the proximal surface of the otoliths (this surface lies next to the sensory epithelium). In saccular otoliths (sagittae), the area of the band did not differ between centrifugal and centripetal otolith regions, whereas in the utricular otoliths (lapilli), the area of the centripetal AC-band was larger in size as compared to the centrifugal one (AC-fluorescence per μm2 did not differ between the areas analyzed in both types of otoliths). These results strongly suggest that calcium/carbonate uptake of otoliths takes place especially in those regions of their proximal face which are located adjacent to CAH-rich areas of the macular epithelium. It is thus concluded that CAH is directly involved in otolith calcification. The

  8. Aquatic Biodiversity in the Amazon: Habitat Specialization and Geographic Isolation Promote Species Richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, James S.; Carvalho, Tiago P.; Petry, Paulo; Holder, Meghan A.; Maxime, Emmanuel L.; Espino, Jessica; Corahua, Isabel; Quispe, Roberto; Rengifo, Blanca; Ortega, Hernan; Reis, Roberto E.

    2011-01-01

    Simple Summary The immense rainforest ecosystems of tropical America represent some of the greatest concentrations of biodiversity on the planet. Prominent among these are evolutionary radiations of freshwater fishes, including electric eels, piranhas, stingrays, and a myriad of small-bodied and colorful tetras, cichlids, and armored catfishes. In all, the many thousands of these forms account for nearly 10% of all the vertebrate species on Earth. This article explores the complimentary roles that ecological and geographic filters play in limiting dispersal in aquatic species, and how these factors contribute to the accumulation of species richness over broad geographic and evolutionary time scales. Abstract The Neotropical freshwater ichthyofauna has among the highest species richness and density of any vertebrate fauna on Earth, with more than 5,600 species compressed into less than 12% of the world's land surface area, and less than 0.002% of the world's total liquid water supply. How have so many species come to co-exist in such a small amount of total habitat space? Here we report results of an aquatic faunal survey of the Fitzcarrald region in southeastern Peru, an area of low-elevation upland (200–500 m above sea level) rainforest in the Western Amazon, that straddles the headwaters of four large Amazonian tributaries; the Juruá (Yurúa), Ucayali, Purús, and Madre de Dios rivers. All measures of fish species diversity in this region are high; there is high alpha diversity with many species coexisting in the same locality, high beta diversity with high turnover between habitats, and high gamma diversity with high turnover between adjacent tributary basins. Current data show little species endemism, and no known examples of sympatric sister species, within the Fitzcarrald region, suggesting a lack of localized or recent adaptive divergences. These results support the hypothesis that the fish species of the Fitzcarrald region are relatively ancient

  9. 3D tooth microwear texture analysis in fishes as a test of dietary hypotheses of durophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An understanding of how extinct animals functioned underpins our understanding of past evolutionary events, including adaptive radiations, and the role of functional innovation and adaptation as drivers of both micro- and macroevolution. Yet analysis of function in extinct animals is fraught with difficulty. Hypotheses that interpret molariform teeth in fishes as evidence of durophagous (shell-crushing) diets provide a good example of the particular problems inherent in the methods of functional morphology. This is because the assumed close coupling of form and function upon which the approach is based is weakened by, among other things, behavioural flexibility and the absence of a clear one to one relationship between structures and functions. Here we show that ISO 25178-2 standard parameters for surface texture, derived from analysis of worn surfaces of molariform teeth of fishes, vary significantly between species that differ in the amount of hard-shelled prey they consume. Two populations of the Sheepshead Seabream (Archosargus probatocephalus) were studied. This fish is not a dietary specialist, and one of the populations is known to consume more vegetation and less hard-shelled prey than the other; this is reflected in significant differences in their microwear textures. The Archosargus populations differ significantly in their microwear from the specialist shell-crusher Anarhichas lupus (the Atlantic Wolffish). Multivariate analysis of these three groups of fishes lends further support to the relationship between diet and tooth microwear, and provides robust validation of the approach. Application of the multivariate models derived from microwear texture in Archosargus and Anarhichas to a third fish species—the cichlid Astatoreochromis alluaudi—successfully separates wild caught fish that ate hard-shelled prey from lab-raised fish that did not. This cross-taxon validation demonstrates that quantitative analysis of tooth microwear texture can

  10. The Mecyclothorax beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Moriomorphini of Tahiti, Society Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Liebherr

    2013-08-01

    similar species are often distributed on different massifs suggesting that vicariance associated with erosional valley formation has facilitated speciation, however several instances in which sister species occupy sympatric distributions on the same ridge system demonstrate that speciation may also occur across extremely localized landscapes. Such localized differentiation is facilitated by the low vagility of these small-bodied, flightless predators whose fragmented populations can persist and diverge within spatially limited habitat patches. The intense philopatry of Tahitian Mecyclothorax spp. coupled with the highly dissected landscape has produced the geographically densest adaptive radiation on Earth. This radiation has occurred very rapidly, with species durations averaging 300,000 yr; a speciation rate similar to that observed in Hawaiian Oliarus planthoppers and Laupala crickets, and East African Rift lake cichlid fishes.

  11. Limits of principal components analysis for producing a common trait space: implications for inferring selection, contingency, and chance in evolution.

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    Kevin J Parsons

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Comparing patterns of divergence among separate lineages or groups has posed an especially difficult challenge for biologists. Recently a new, conceptually simple methodology called the "ordered-axis plot" approach was introduced for the purpose of comparing patterns of diversity in a common morphospace. This technique involves a combination of principal components analysis (PCA and linear regression. Given the common use of these statistics the potential for the widespread use of the ordered axis approach is high. However, there are a number of drawbacks to this approach, most notably that lineages with the greatest amount of variance will largely bias interpretations from analyses involving a common morphospace. Therefore, without meeting a set of a priori requirements regarding data structure the ordered-axis plot approach will likely produce misleading results. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Morphological data sets from cichlid fishes endemic to Lakes Tanganyika, Malawi, and Victoria were used to statistically demonstrate how separate groups can have differing contributions to a common morphospace produced by a PCA. Through a matrix superimposition of eigenvectors (scale-free trajectories of variation identified by PCA we show that some groups contribute more to the trajectories of variation identified in a common morphospace. Furthermore, through a set of randomization tests we show that a common morphospace model partitions variation differently than group-specific models. Finally, we demonstrate how these limitations may influence an ordered-axis plot approach by performing a comparison on data sets with known alterations in covariance structure. Using these results we provide a set of criteria that must be met before a common morphospace can be reliably used. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that a common morphospace produced by PCA would not be useful for producing biologically meaningful results unless a

  12. The Mechanosensory Lateral Line System Mediates Activation of Socially-Relevant Brain Regions during Territorial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Julie M; Maruska, Karen P

    2016-01-01

    Animals use multiple senses during social interactions and must integrate this information in the brain to make context-dependent behavioral decisions. For fishes, the largest group of vertebrates, the mechanosensory lateral line system provides crucial hydrodynamic information for survival behaviors, but little is known about its function in social communication. Our previous work using the African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, provided the first empirical evidence that fish use their lateral line system to detect water movements from conspecifics for mutual assessment and behavioral choices. It is unknown, however, where this socially-relevant mechanosensory information is processed in the brain to elicit adaptive behavioral responses. To examine for the first time in any fish species which brain regions receive contextual mechanosensory information, we quantified expression of the immediate early gene cfos as a proxy for neural activation in sensory and socially-relevant brain nuclei from lateral line-intact and -ablated fish following territorial interactions. Our in situ hybridization results indicate that in addition to known lateral line processing regions, socially-relevant mechanosensory information is processed in the ATn (ventromedial hypothalamus homolog), Dl (putative hippocampus homolog), and Vs (putative medial extended amygdala homolog). In addition, we identified a functional network within the conserved social decision-making network (SDMN) whose co-activity corresponds with mutual assessment and behavioral choice. Lateral line-intact and -ablated fight winners had different patterns of co-activity of these function networks and group identity could be determined solely by activation patterns, indicating the importance of mechanoreception to co-activity of the SDMN. These data show for the first time that the mechanosensory lateral line system provides relevant information to conserved decision-making centers of the brain during territorial

  13. The fish fauna of Brokopondo Reservoir, Suriname, during 40 years of impoundment

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    Jan H. Mol

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated long-term changes in the fish fauna of Brokopondo Reservoir, Suriname, the first large reservoir (1560 km² that was created in tropical rainforest. Before closure of the dam in 1964, the fish fauna of Suriname River had 172 species, high diversity and high evenness. The riverine fauna was dominated by small-sized species, but no single species was dominant in numbers. Large catfishes were dominant in biomass. Species were evenly distributed over riverine habitats: rapids, tributaries and main channel. Four years after closure of the dam, only 62 fish species were collected from Brokopondo Reservoir, but the composition of the fish fauna was still changing. The reservoir fauna in 1978 was very similar to the reservoir fauna in 2005, indicating that a stable equilibrium had been reached 14 years after closure of the dam. The reservoir fauna had 41 species, low diversity and low evenness. Most species of Suriname River and its tributaries with strict habitat requirements did not survive in Brokopondo Reservoir. Fish community structure was different among four habitats of Brokopondo Reservoir. The open-water habitat (10 species was dominated by the piscivores Serrasalmus rhombeus, Acestrorhynchus microlepis and Cichla ocellaris and their prey Bryconops melanurus and two Hemiodus species. B. melanurus fed on zooplankton, Culicinae pupae and terrestrial invertebrates. Hemiodus fed on fine flocculent detritus, demonstrating that the detritus-based food chain was still important in late stages of reservoir development. Serrasalmus rhombeus also fed on peccaries that drowned when swimming across the large reservoir in rough weather. The shore community (27 species was dominated by seven cichlids, but early stages and juveniles of the open-water species S. rhombeus and B. melanurus also occurred in the shore habitat. Fish biomass in the shore habitat was 66.5±59.9 kg ha-1. The cichlid Geophagus surinamensis and the characid B. melanurus

  14. Biologia reprodutiva de Heros efasciatus Heckel, 1840 (Pisces, Cichlidae na Reserva de Desenvolvimento Sustentável Amanã-AM, visando seu manejo sustentável Reproductive biology of Heros efasciatus Heckel,1840 (Pisces, Cichlidae in the Amanã Sustainable Reserve (Amazonas, Brazil, aiming at sustainable management of the species

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    Jana Menegassi del Favero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o principal objetivo de fornecer ferramentas para auxiliar na implementação do manejo sustentável de peixes ornamentais na Reserva de Desenvolvimento Sustentável Amanã, Amazonas, foi realizado o estudo da biologia reprodutiva de Heros efasciatus Heckel, 1840, um ciclídeo com potencial ornamental e com poucos trabalhos sobre a sua biologia e ecologia, apesar de já ser comercializado em algumas regiões amazônicas. Coletas bimestrais foram realizadas de fevereiro de 2006 a janeiro de 2007 em dez igarapés contribuintes do Lago Amanã e Urini, sendo utilizados três aparelhos de pesca (rede de arrasto, rapiché e armadilha tipo matapi e ainda galhadas artificiais nas amostragens realizadas próximas aos lagos. Foram capturados 140 exemplares de H. efasciatus, sendo 50 fêmeas, 42 machos, e 46 indivíduos cujo sexo não foi identificado devido ao pequeno tamanho. O tipo de crescimento encontrado foi isométrico, sendo que o maior indivíduo observado apresentava 174 mm e o menor 14 mm. Os resultados encontrados auxiliarão na adoção de medidas de manejo, como a determinação de tamanhos mínimos de captura, superiores aos tamanhos médios de maturação (97 mm para as fêmeas e o estabelecimento de períodos de defeso durante a época de sua reprodução (outubro a janeiro. A pequena abundância de indivíduos da espécie, quando comparada com o total de exemplares capturados (apenas 0,07% e a baixa fecundidade média, de 2502 ovócitos, indica que se deve trabalhar anualmente apenas com um pequeno número de indivíduos, a fim de garantir a continuidade do estoque.The aim if the present work is to supply basic information that may help the management of ornamental fishes in the Amanã Sustainable Reserve, State of Amazonas, Brazi. A study of the reproductive biology of Heros efasciatus, a cichlid fish with ornamental potential, was performed using specimens collected bi-monthly between February 2006 and January 2007 in ten creeks

  15. Reproductive and population parameters of discus fish Symphysodon aequifasciatus Pellegrin, 1904 (Perciformes: Cichlidae from Piagaçu-Purus Sustainable Development Reserve (RDS-PP, lower Purus River, Amazonas, Brazil

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    Felipe Rossoni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ornamental discus fish Symphysodon aequifasciatus Pellegrin, 1904, is a popular endemic cichlid species from the Amazon basin, however scientific information concerning biology and ecology in its natural habitat is scarce despite its importance on the international aquarium trade. In this study we evaluated reproductive parameters of S. aequifasciatus in natural habitat in Piagaçu-Purus Sustainable Development Reserve (RDS-PP, lower Purus River, Brazilian Amazon. Males are more frequent in the larger size classes and this might be related to the complex breeding behavior known for S. aequifasciatus. Values of L50 for both sexes corresponded to more than 60% of the maximum attained length which may indicate that energy allocation for somatic growth takes longer in S. aequifasciatus than in other species. Average fecundity for female discus was 1490, ranging from 950 to 1892 oocytes and its correlations with standard length and total weight were very low, probably due to the highly compressed discus' body shape. Egg size distribution showed four types of patterns, indicating one to four modes besides the reserve oocytes group. Our results indicate that S. aequifasciatus shows total spawning, in the beginning of flooding period, with the peculiar capacity of releasing multiple egg batches as a strategy that potentially enhances reproductive success.O acará-disco (Symphysodon aequifasciatus Pellegrin, 1904 é uma espécie popular de ciclídeo endêmico da bacia amazônica, porém são poucas as informações científicas sobre biologia e ecologia em seu habitat natural, apesar de sua importância no comércio internacional de aquário. Neste estudo avaliamos parâmetros reprodutivos de S. aequifasciatus em vida livre na Reserva de Desenvolvimento Sustentável Piagaçu-Purus (RDS-PP, baixo rio Purus, Amazonas, Brasil. Os machos são mais frequentes em classes de comprimento maiores, o que provavelmente está relacionado com o complexo

  16. Two new species of Apistogramma Regan (Teleostei: Cichlidae from the rio Trombetas, Pará State, Brazil

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    Sven O Kullander

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Apistogramma angayuara is described from the rio Trombetas close to the cachoeira Vira Mundo where it is found in association with rapids. It is assigned to the A. pertensis species group, distinguished by the following characters in combination: three prominent stripes composed of dark spots along the sides of the abdomen, 2 vs. 3 postlachrymal infraorbital pores, 5 vs. 4 dentary pores, low dorsal fin in adult males, and presence of a caudal spot. It is the smallest species of Apistogramma reported so far, with the largest male 24.7 mm SL and the largest female 22.7 mm SL, and the first cichlid species found with a significant proportion of rhizopods in the stomach content. Apistogramma salpinction is described from lentic habitats at the margin of road BR-163, circa 70 km from Cachoeira Porteira village, in a swamp most probably connected to the igarapé Caxipacoré. It is compared to members of the Apistogramma cacatuoides group with which it shares prolonged anterior dorsal fin lappets and marginal caudal fin streamers in adult males. It is distinguished from all other species of Apistogramma by the color pattern which includes a lateral band and abdominal stripes that become darker and have much lighter interspaces on the caudal peduncle, and a caudal spot that is divided into elongated blotches continuing the lateral band and upper two abdominal stripes, respectively.Apistogramma angayuara é descrita para o rio Trombetas próximo à cachoeira Vira Mundo, onde é encontrada associada com corredeiras. É a menor espécie de Apistogramma até agora registrada, com o maior macho atingindo 24,7 mm CP, e a maior fêmea 22,7 mm CP. Trata-se do primeiro registro de uma espécie de ciclideo com grande quantidade de rizopodos em seu conteúdo estomacal. Apistogramma angayuara pertence ao grupo A. pertensis e difere das demais espécies deste grupo pela seguinte combinação de caracteres: três conspícuas séries de pontos escuros ao longo da regi

  17. Lista sistemática de la ictiofauna en la Reserva de la Biosfera La Encrucijada, Chiapas, México A checklist of the ichthyofauna from La Encrucijada Biosphere Reserve, Chiapas, México

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    Adán E. Gómez-González

    2012-09-01

    last 2 species are reported for the first time in the Mexican pacific; the presence of the exotic cichlid Oreochromis niloticus is also reported. The best represented families in species richness were Carangidae (14, Sciaenidae (11, Gobiidae (10 and Ariidae (9. Based on its ecogeographical derivation, 4 species (2.6% are freshwater primary; 13 (8.5% freshwater secondary, and 134 (88.9% peripheral; the last group is ecologically composed by 3 catadromous species (2%, 11 estuarine residents (7.2%, 56 marine euryhalines (36.6% and 66 marine stenohalines (43.1%. Biogeographically, 91.2% of the species are distributed in Eastern Pacific, 47.7% are from the Californian province, 65.4% from Cortés province, 80.4% from Panamian province, and 41.2% from Peruvian province. Comparatively, the REBIEN contains the highest fish richness in all the estuarine-lagoon systems along the Mexican Pacific.

  18. VARIATIONS IN THE NUTRITIONAL COMPOSITION OF THE HEAD AND BONE FLOURS OF TILAPIA (OREOCHROMIS MOSSAMBICUS ADAPTED TO ESTUARINE AND FRESHWATER ENVIRONMENTS

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    Vignesh. R

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of fish and fish by products assures various health benefits, but on the other hand the fish processing wastes if not discarded properly pose a serious environment threat. Tilapias are commonly available cichlid fishes which are considered to possess various biological importance. The objective of the work is to analyze and compare the similarities and differences in the nutritional quality of the exotic fish Oreochromis mossambicus found in brackish water and fresh water environments. The estuary adapted tilapia and freshwater tilapia was collected and processed as head and bone flours. The samples were further analyzed and the results in 100 g of Estuarine Tilapia Head Flour (ETHF was composed of moisture (5.87 ± 0.003%, protein (32.06 ± 0.02% total lipids (0.202 ±0.003 %, carbohydrates (1.44 ± 0.005% and ash (1.15 ± 0.006%. The results in 100 g of Estuarine Tilapia Bone Flour (ETBF was found as moisture (4.20 ± 0.006%, protein (31.48 ± 0.07%, total lipids (0.217 ± 0.002, carbohydrates (0.13 ± 0.004% and ash (0.89 ±0.004%. The proximate content in Freshwater Tilapia Head Flour (FTHF ranged as moisture (5.79 ± 0.01%, protein (32.50 ± 0.02%, total lipids (0.202 ± 0.009%, carbohydrates (1.54 ± 0.02% and ash (1.16 ± 0.003. The proximate content in Freshwater Tilapia Bone Flour (FTBF ranged as moisture (5.77 ± 0.01%, protein (32.58 ± 0.03%, total lipids (0.200 ± 0.005%, carbohydrates (1.48 ± 0.02% and ash (1.23 ± 0.01%. The fatty acid occurring in the highest proportions was alpha linolenic acid both ETHF (2.492±0.003mg and ETBF (2.374±0.002mg. The fatty acid composition in FTHF occurring in the highest proportion was palmitic acid (0.983±0.002mg and in FTBF the highest proportion was found in stearic acid (0.785±0.005mg. In the amino acid analysis, the highest values were recorded in phenyl alanine for ETHF (1.986±0.002% and lysine in ETBF (1.364±0.003%. Phenyl alanine content was found higher in both FTHF (1

  19. Preliminary examination of food web structure of Nicola Lake (Taim Hydrological System, south Brazil using dual C and N stable isotope analyses

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    Alexandre M. Garcia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Taim Ecological Reserve is located within the Taim Hydrological System and was created to protect a heterogeneous and productive landscape harboring exceptional biological diversity in southern Brazil. Using stable isotope ratio analyses of carbon (delta13C and nitrogen (delta15N, we provide a preliminary description of the food web structure, including estimates of production sources supporting fish populations and vertical trophic structure, within a representative lake of this system. A total of 21 organisms (5 macrophytes, 3 mollusks and 13 adult fishes representing 16 species were collected for isotope analysis. Fishes had delta13C values ranging from -24.30º/oo to -28.31º/oo , showing concordance with the range of values observed for macrophytes (-25.49 to -27.10º/oo, and suggesting that these plants could be a major carbon source supporting these fishes. delta13C signatures of Corbicula (-30.81º/oo and Pomacea (-24.26º/oo indirectly suggest that phytoplankton and benthic algae could be alternative carbon sources for some consumers. Nitrogen isotope ratios indicated approximately three consumer trophic levels. The pearl cichlid Geophagus brasiliensis was a primary consumer. Two catfishes (Trachelyopterus lucenai and Loricariichthys anus were secondary consumers. Two congeneric pike cichclids (Crenicichla lepidota and C. punctata, a catfish (Pimelodus maculatus and the characids Astyanax fasciatus and Oligosarcus robustus were tertiary consumers. Further studies including additional primary producers and consumers and greater sample numbers should be conducted to provide a more complete and detailed description of food web structure and dynamics within the reserve.A Estação Ecológica do Taim está inserida dentro do Sistema Hidrológico do Taim e foi criada para proteger uma região heterogênea e produtiva no sul do Brasil, abrigando uma diversidade biológica excepcional. A partir da análise de isótopos estáveis do carbono

  20. The development of the Middle Triassic tectonical controlled Germanic Basin of Central Europe and the palaeoenvironmental related distribution of marine and terrestrial reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2010-05-01

    comparison to convergent developed sirenia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, (in review). Diedrich, 2010b. The vertebrate fauna of the Lower Ladinian (Middle Triassic) from Lamerden (Germany) and contribution to the palaeoecology, anatomy and palaeogeography of the Germanic Basin reptiles. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, (in review). Diedrich, 2010c. The palaeogeographic reconstructions of the Middle Triassic tectonical controlled carbonatic Germanic Basin of Central Europe - a northern Tethys connected cratonic marine Basin - coastal basin margin mappings by the use of reptile footprint rich intertidal and sabkha environments. Abstract, Fifth International Conference on the Geology of the Tethys Realm, Quena-Luxor,Egypt), 3-5. Diedrich, in prep. The shallow marine fish and sauropterygian reptile vertebrate fauna of the Germanic Basin from the atavus/pulcher Bonebeds in the Bad Sulza Fm (Illyrian, Middle Triassic) of Bad Sulza (Central Germany). Diedrich, C. and Trostheide, F. 2007. Auf den Spuren der terresten Muschelkalksaurier und aquatischen Sauropterygier vom obersten Röt bis zum Mittleren Muschelkalk (Unter-/Mitteltrias) von Sachsen-Anhalt. Abhandlungen und Berichte für Naturkunde, 30, 5-56. Föhlisch, K. 2007. Überlieferungen seismischer Aktivität im Unteren Muschelkalk. Beiträge zur Geologie Thüringens, N.F. 14, 55-83. Furrer, H. 1995. The Kalkschieferzone (Upper Meride estone Ladinian) near Meride (Canton Ticino, Southern Switzerland) and the evolution of a Middle Triassic intraplatform basin. Eclogae geolicae Helvetiae, 88(3), 827-852. Hagdorn, H. 1990. Das Muschelkalk/Keuper-Bonebed von Crailsheim. In: Weidert, W. K. (Ed.), Klassische Fundstellen der Paläontologie, Band 2. 78-88. Goldschneck-Verlag, Stuttgart. Hagdorn, H., E. Nitsch, Aigner, T. and Simon, T. 2009. Field guide 6th international Triassic field workshop (Pan-European Correlation of the Triassic) Triassic of Southwest Germany. September 7-11, 2009, www