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Sample records for chronically txnrd 1-deficient

  1. COMMD1-deficient dogs accumulate copper in hepatocytes and provide a good model for chronic hepatitis and fibrosis.

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    Robert P Favier

    Full Text Available New therapeutic concepts developed in rodent models should ideally be evaluated in large animal models prior to human clinical application. COMMD1-deficiency in dogs leads to hepatic copper accumulation and chronic hepatitis representing a Wilson's disease like phenotype. Detailed understanding of the pathogenesis and time course of this animal model is required to test its feasibility as a large animal model for chronic hepatitis. In addition to mouse models, true longitudinal studies are possible due to the size of these dogs permitting detailed analysis of the sequence of events from initial insult to final cirrhosis. Therefore, liver biopsies were taken each half year from five new born COMMD1-deficient dogs over a period of 42 months. Biopsies were used for H&E, reticulin, and rubeanic acid (copper staining. Immunohistochemistry was performed on hepatic stellate cell (HSC activation marker (alpha-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA, proliferation (Ki67, apoptosis (caspase-3, and bile duct and liver progenitor cell (LPC markers keratin (K 19 and 7. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western Blots were performed on gene products involved in the regenerative and fibrotic pathways. Maximum copper accumulation was reached at 12 months of age, which coincided with the first signs of hepatitis. HSCs were activated (α-SMA from 18 months onwards, with increasing reticulin deposition and hepatocytic proliferation in later stages. Hepatitis and caspase-3 activity (first noticed at 18 months increased over time. Both HGF and TGF-β1 gene expression peaked at 24 months, and thereafter decreased gradually. Both STAT3 and c-MET showed an increased time-dependent activation. Smad2/3 phosphorylation, indicative for fibrogenesis, was present at all time-points. COMMD1-deficient dogs develop chronic liver disease and cirrhosis comparable to human chronic hepatitis, although at much higher pace. Therefore they represent a genetically-defined large animal model to test clinical

  2. Commensal microbiota contributes to chronic endocarditis in TAX1BP1 deficient mice.

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    Satoko Nakano

    Full Text Available Tax1-binding protein 1 (Tax1bp1 negatively regulates NF-κB by editing the ubiquitylation of target molecules by its catalytic partner A20. Genetically engineered TAX1BP1-deficient (KO mice develop age-dependent inflammatory constitutions in multiple organs manifested as valvulitis or dermatitis and succumb to premature death. Laser capture dissection and gene expression microarray analysis on the mitral valves of TAX1BP1-KO mice (8 and 16 week old revealed 588 gene transcription alterations from the wild type. SAA3 (serum amyloid A3, CHI3L1, HP, IL1B and SPP1/OPN were induced 1,180-, 361-, 187-, 122- and 101-fold respectively. WIF1 (Wnt inhibitory factor 1 exhibited 11-fold reduction. Intense Saa3 staining and significant I-κBα reduction were reconfirmed and massive infiltration of inflammatory lymphocytes and edema formation were seen in the area. Antibiotics-induced 'germ free' status or the additional MyD88 deficiency significantly ameliorated TAX1BP1-KO mice's inflammatory lesions. These pathological conditions, as we named 'pseudo-infective endocarditis' were boosted by the commensal microbiota who are usually harmless by their nature. This experimental outcome raises a novel mechanistic linkage between endothelial inflammation caused by the ubiquitin remodeling immune regulators and fatal cardiac dysfunction.

  3. Decay-accelerating factor 1 deficiency exacerbates leptospiral-induced murine chronic nephritis and renal fibrosis.

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    María F Ferrer

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a global zoonosis caused by pathogenic Leptospira, which can colonize the proximal renal tubules and persist for long periods in the kidneys of infected hosts. Here, we characterized the infection of C57BL/6J wild-type and Daf1-/- mice, which have an enhanced host response, with a virulent Leptospira interrogans strain at 14 days post-infection, its persistence in the kidney, and its link to kidney fibrosis at 90 days post-infection. We found that Leptospira interrogans can induce acute moderate nephritis in wild-type mice and is able to persist in some animals, inducing fibrosis in the absence of mortality. In contrast, Daf1-/- mice showed acute mortality, with a higher bacterial burden. At the chronic stage, Daf1-/- mice showed greater inflammation and fibrosis than at 14 days post-infection and higher levels at all times than the wild-type counterpart. Compared with uninfected mice, infected wild-type mice showed higher levels of IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13, with similar levels of α-smooth muscle actin, galectin-3, TGF-β1, IL-17, IFN-γ, and lower IL-12 levels at 90 days post-infection. In contrast, fibrosis in Daf1-/- mice was accompanied by high expression of α-smooth muscle actin, galectin-3, IL-10, IL-13, and IFN-γ, similar levels of TGF-β1, IL-12, and IL-17 and lower IL-4 levels. This study demonstrates the link between Leptospira-induced murine chronic nephritis with renal fibrosis and shows a protective role of Daf1.

  4. Decay-accelerating factor 1 deficiency exacerbates leptospiral-induced murine chronic nephritis and renal fibrosis.

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    Ferrer, María F; Scharrig, Emilia; Alberdi, Lucrecia; Cedola, Maia; Pretre, Gabriela; Drut, Ricardo; Song, Wen-Chao; Gomez, Ricardo M

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a global zoonosis caused by pathogenic Leptospira, which can colonize the proximal renal tubules and persist for long periods in the kidneys of infected hosts. Here, we characterized the infection of C57BL/6J wild-type and Daf1-/- mice, which have an enhanced host response, with a virulent Leptospira interrogans strain at 14 days post-infection, its persistence in the kidney, and its link to kidney fibrosis at 90 days post-infection. We found that Leptospira interrogans can induce acute moderate nephritis in wild-type mice and is able to persist in some animals, inducing fibrosis in the absence of mortality. In contrast, Daf1-/- mice showed acute mortality, with a higher bacterial burden. At the chronic stage, Daf1-/- mice showed greater inflammation and fibrosis than at 14 days post-infection and higher levels at all times than the wild-type counterpart. Compared with uninfected mice, infected wild-type mice showed higher levels of IL-4, IL-10 and IL-13, with similar levels of α-smooth muscle actin, galectin-3, TGF-β1, IL-17, IFN-γ, and lower IL-12 levels at 90 days post-infection. In contrast, fibrosis in Daf1-/- mice was accompanied by high expression of α-smooth muscle actin, galectin-3, IL-10, IL-13, and IFN-γ, similar levels of TGF-β1, IL-12, and IL-17 and lower IL-4 levels. This study demonstrates the link between Leptospira-induced murine chronic nephritis with renal fibrosis and shows a protective role of Daf1.

  5. Thioredoxin reductase-1 (TxnRd1) mediates curcumin-induced radiosensitization of squamous carcinoma cells

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    Javvadi, Prashanthi; Hertan, Lauren; Kosoff, Rachelle; Datta, Tatini; Kolev, Johann; Mick, Rosemarie; Tuttle, Stephen W; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin, a plant polyphenol, is a widely studied chemopreventive agent with demonstrated antitumor activities in preclinical studies and low toxicity profiles in multiple clinical trials against human malignancies. We previously demonstrated that curcumin radiosensitizes cervical tumor cells without increasing the cytotoxic effects of radiation on normal human fibroblasts. Here we report that an inhibitory activity of curcumin on the anti-oxidant enzyme Thioredoxin Reductase-1 (TxnRd1) is re...

  6. Strain background modifies phenotypes in the ATP8B1-deficient mouse

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    S. Shah; U.R. Sanford; J.C. Vargas; H. Xu; A. Groen; C.C. Paulusma; J.P. Grenert; L. Pawlikowska; S. Sen; R.P.J. Oude Elferink; L.N. Bull

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in ATP8B1 (FIC1) underlie cases of cholestatic disease, ranging from chronic and progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis) to intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis). The ATP8B1-deficient mouse serves as an animal model of human ATP8B1 deficie

  7. Genetics Home Reference: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

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    ... genetic conditions treated or managed? What is genetic testing? How can I find a genetics professional in my area? Other Names for This Condition De Vivo disease encephalopathy due to GLUT1 deficiency G1D glucose ...

  8. Cited1 deficiency suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis.

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    Valérie Méniel

    Full Text Available Conditional deletion of Apc in the murine intestine alters crypt-villus architecture and function. This process is accompanied by multiple changes in gene expression, including upregulation of Cited1, whose role in colorectal carcinogenesis is unknown. Here we explore the relevance of Cited1 to intestinal tumorigenesis. We crossed Cited1 null mice with Apc(Min/+ and AhCre(+Apc(fl/fl mice and determined the impact of Cited1 deficiency on tumour growth/initiation including tumour multiplicity, cell proliferation, apoptosis and the transcriptome. We show that Cited1 is up-regulated in both human and murine tumours, and that constitutive deficiency of Cited1 increases survival in Apc(Min/+ mice from 230.5 to 515 days. However, paradoxically, Cited1 deficiency accentuated nearly all aspects of the immediate phenotype 4 days after conditional deletion of Apc, including an increase in cell death and enhanced perturbation of differentiation, including of the stem cell compartment. Transcriptome analysis revealed multiple pathway changes, including p53, PI3K and Wnt. The activation of Wnt through Cited1 deficiency correlated with increased transcription of β-catenin and increased levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin. Hence, immediately following deletion of Apc, Cited1 normally restrains the Wnt pathway at the level of β-catenin. Thus deficiency of Cited1 leads to hyper-activation of Wnt signaling and an exaggerated Wnt phenotype including elevated cell death. Cited1 deficiency decreases intestinal tumourigenesis in Apc(Min/+ mice and impacts upon a number of oncogenic signaling pathways, including Wnt. This restraint imposed by Cited1 is consistent with a requirement for Cited1 to constrain Wnt activity to a level commensurate with optimal adenoma formation and maintenance, and provides one mechanism for tumour repression in the absence of Cited1.

  9. SNP in TXNRD2 Associated With Radiation-Induced Fibrosis: A Study of Genetic Variation in Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism and Signaling

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    Edvardsen, Hege, E-mail: hege.edvardsen@rr-research.no [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Landmark-Høyvik, Hege [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Reinertsen, Kristin V. [National Resource Centre for Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Zhao, Xi [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Grenaker-Alnæs, Grethe Irene; Nebdal, Daniel [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Syvänen, Ann-Christine [Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Rødningen, Olaug [Department of Medical Genetics, OUS Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway); Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens [Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Ahus University Hospital (Norway); Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Fosså, Sophie D. [K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); National Resource Centre for Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Kristensen, Vessela N. [Department of Genetics, Institute for Cancer Research, OUS Radiumhospitalet, Oslo (Norway); K. G. Jebsen Breast cancer centre, Institute for Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Department of Clinical Molecular Biology (EpiGen), Division of Medicine, Ahus University Hospital (Norway)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to identify noninvasive markers of treatment-induced side effects. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated after irradiation, and genetic variation in genes related to ROS metabolism might influence the level of radiation-induced adverse effects (AEs). Methods and Materials: 92 breast cancer (BC) survivors previously treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy were assessed for the AEs subcutaneous atrophy and fibrosis, costal fractures, lung fibrosis, pleural thickening, and telangiectasias (median follow-up time 17.1 years). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 203 genes were analyzed for association to AE grade. SNPs associated with subcutaneous fibrosis were validated in an independent BC survivor material (n=283). The influence of the studied genetic variation on messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression level of 18 genes previously associated with fibrosis was assessed in fibroblast cell lines from BC patients. Results: Subcutaneous fibrosis and atrophy had the highest correlation (r=0.76) of all assessed AEs. The nonsynonymous SNP rs1139793 in TXNRD2 was associated with grade of subcutaneous fibrosis, the reference T-allele being more prevalent in the group experiencing severe levels of fibrosis. This was confirmed in another sample cohort of 283 BC survivors, and rs1139793 was found significantly associated with mRNA expression level of TXNRD2 in blood. Genetic variation in 24 ROS-related genes, including EGFR, CENPE, APEX1, and GSTP1, was associated with mRNA expression of 14 genes previously linked to fibrosis (P≤.005). Conclusion: Development of subcutaneous fibrosis can be associated with genetic variation in the mitochondrial enzyme TXNRD2, critically involved in removal of ROS, and maintenance of the intracellular redox balance.

  10. Pannexin 1 deficiency can induce hearing loss.

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    Zhao, Hong-Bo; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Chen, Jin

    Gap junctions play a critical role in hearing. Connexin gap junction gene mutations can induce a high incidence of hearing loss. Pannexin (Panx) gene also encodes gap junction proteins in vertebrates. Panx1 is a predominant pannexin isoform and has extensive expression in the cochlea. Here, we report that deletion of Panx1 in the cochlea could produce a progressive hearing loss. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) recording showed that hearing loss was moderate to severe and severe at high-frequencies. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), which reflects the activity of active cochlear mechanics that can amply acoustic stimulation to enhance hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity, was also reduced. We further found that Panx1 deficiency could activate Caspase-3 cell apoptotic pathway in the cochlea to cause hair cells and other types of cells degeneration. These data indicate that like connexins Panx1 deficiency can also induce hearing loss. These data also suggest that pannexins play important rather than redundant roles in the cochlea and hearing.

  11. Sustained beta-cell dysfunction but normalized islet mass in aged thrombospondin-1 deficient mice.

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    Carl Johan Drott

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islet endothelial cells have in recent years been shown to support beta-cell mass and function by paracrine interactions. Recently, we identified an islets endothelial-specific glycoprotein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, that showed to be of importance for islet angiogenesis and beta-cell function in young mice. The present study aimed to investigate long-term consequences for islet morphology and beta-cell function of TSP-1 deficiency. Islet and beta-cell mass were observed increased at 10-12 weeks of age in TSP-1 deficient mice, but were normalized before 16 weeks of age when compared to wild-type controls. Islet vascularity was normal in 10-12 and 16-week-old TSP-1 deficient animals, whereas islets of one-year-old animals lacking TSP-1 were hypervascular. Beta-cell dysfunction in TSP-1 deficient animals was present at similar magnitudes between 10-12 and 52 weeks of age, as evaluated by glucose tolerance tests. The insulin secretion capacity in vivo of islets in one-year-old TSP-1 deficient animals was only ∼15% of that in wild-type animals. Using a transplantation model, we reconstituted TSP-1 in adult TSP-deficient islets. In contrast to neonatal TSP-1 deficient islets that we previously reported to regain function after TSP-1 reconstitution, adult islets failed to recover. We conclude that TSP-1 deficiency in islets causes changing vascular and endocrine morphological alterations postnatally, but is coupled to a chronic beta-cell dysfunction. The beta-cell dysfunction induced by TSP-1 deficiency is irreversible if not substituted early in life.

  12. Metformin administration induces hepatotoxic effects in paraoxonase-1-deficient mice.

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    García-Heredia, Anabel; Riera-Borrull, Marta; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Cabré, Noemí; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Metformin is the first-line pharmacological treatment of diabetes. In these patients, metformin reduces body weight and decreases the risk of diabetes-related complications such as cardiovascular disease. However, whether metformin elicits beneficial effects on liver histology is a controversial issue and, as yet, there is no consensus. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1), an enzyme synthesized mainly by the liver, degrades lipid peroxides and reduces oxidative stress. PON1 activities are decreased in chronic liver diseases. We evaluated the effects of metformin in the liver of PON1-deficient mice which, untreated, present a mild degree of liver steatosis. Metformin administration aggravated inflammation in animals given a standard mouse chow and in those fed a high-fat diet. Also, it was associated with a higher degree of steatosis in animals fed a standard chow diet. This report is a cautionary note regarding the prescription of metformin for the treatment of diabetes in patients with concomitant liver impairment.

  13. Quantitative proteomics suggests metabolic reprogramming during ETHE1 deficiency

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    Sahebekhtiari, Navid; Thomsen, Michelle M.; Sloth, Jens Jørgen;

    2016-01-01

    of the disorder are becoming clear, the molecular effects are not well defined. Therefore, for further elucidating the effects of ETHE1-deficiency, we performed a large scale quantitative proteomics study on liver tissue from ETHE1-deficient mice. Our results demonstrated a clear link between ETHE1-deficiency...

  14. Nitroglycerin tolerance in caveolin-1 deficient mice.

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    Mao Mao

    Full Text Available Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3 activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1 is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48-72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50% of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%, and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations. In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation.

  15. Nitroglycerin tolerance in caveolin-1 deficient mice.

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    Mao, Mao; Varadarajan, Sudhahar; Fukai, Tohru; Bakhshi, Farnaz R; Chernaya, Olga; Dudley, Samuel C; Minshall, Richard D; Bonini, Marcelo G

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate tolerance developed after persistent nitroglycerin (GTN) exposure limits its clinical utility. Previously, we have shown that the vasodilatory action of GTN is dependent on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/NOS3) activity. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is known to interact with NOS3 on the cytoplasmic side of cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains (caveolae) and to inhibit NOS3 activity. Loss of Cav-1 expression results in NOS3 hyperactivation and uncoupling, converting NOS3 into a source of superoxide radicals, peroxynitrite, and oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that nitrate tolerance induced by persistent GTN treatment results from NOS3 dysfunction and vascular toxicity. Exposure to GTN for 48-72 h resulted in nitrosation and depletion (>50%) of Cav-1, NOS3 uncoupling as measured by an increase in peroxynitrite production (>100%), and endothelial toxicity in cultured cells. In the Cav-1 deficient mice, NOS3 dysfunction was accompanied by GTN tolerance (>50% dilation inhibition at low GTN concentrations). In conclusion, GTN tolerance results from Cav-1 modification and depletion by GTN that causes persistent NOS3 activation and uncoupling, preventing it from participating in GTN-medicated vasodilation.

  16. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review

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    Annio Posar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1 deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity; and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches. During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment.

  17. NHE1 deficiency in liver: Implications for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Prasad, Vikram, E-mail: prasadvm@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Chirra, Shivani [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States); Kohli, Rohit [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Shull, Gary E. [Department of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, and Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (United States)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • FXR, PGC1α and PPARγ levels are upregulated in NHE1 deficient livers. • NHE1 deficiency downregulates expression of pro-lipogenic genes in liver. • Chronic exposure to high-fat diet upregulates hepatic NHE1 expression. • Loss of NHE1 better preserves hepatic insulin signaling in high-fat diet-fed mice. - Abstract: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD is closely associated with the dysregulation of lipid homeostasis. Diet-induced hepatic steatosis, which can initiate NAFLD progression, has been shown to be dramatically reduced in mice lacking the electroneutral Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger NHE1 (Slc9a1). In this study, we investigated if NHE1 deficiency had effects in liver that could contribute to the apparent protection against aberrant lipid accumulation. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses of wild-type and NHE1-null livers revealed an expression profile that strongly suggested attenuation of both de novo lipogenesis and hepatic stellate cell activation, which is implicated in liver fibrosis. This included upregulation of the farnesoid X receptor FXR, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARγ, its co-activator PGC1α, and sestrin 2, an antioxidant protein involved in hepatic metabolic homeostasis. Furthermore, expression levels of the pro-lipogenic liver X receptor LXRα, and acetyl CoA carboxylases 1 and 2 were downregulated. These changes were associated with evidence of reduced cellular stress, which persisted even upon exposure to a high-fat diet, and the better preservation of insulin signaling, as evidenced by protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation (Ser473). These results indicate that NHE1 deficiency may protect against NAFLD pathogenesis, which is significant given the availability of highly specific NHE1 inhibitors.

  18. GLUT-1 deficiency without epilepsy - an exceptional case

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    Overweg-Plandsoen, WCG; Groener, JEM; Onkenhout, W; Brouwer, OF; Bakker, HD; De Vivo, DC

    2003-01-01

    The GLUT-1 deficiency is a metabolic disorder caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier as a result of a defect in the glucose-transport protein. Patients present with epileptic seizures, delayed development, ataxia and hypotonia, and in many cases acquired microcephaly.

  19. RNA-sequencing of WFS1-deficient pancreatic islets.

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    Ivask, Marilin; Hugill, Alison; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-04-01

    Wolfram syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, is caused by mutations in theWFS1gene.WFS1encodes an endoplasmic reticulum resident transmembrane protein. TheWfs1-null mice exhibit progressive insulin deficiency and diabetes. The aim of this study was to describe the insulin secretion and transcriptome of pancreatic islets inWFS1-deficient mice.WFS1-deficient (Wfs1KO) mice had considerably less pancreatic islets than heterozygous (Wfs1HZ) or wild-type (WT) mice. Wfs1KOpancreatic islets secreted less insulin after incubation in 2 and 10 mmol/L glucose and with tolbutamide solution compared toWTand Wfs1HZislets, but not after stimulation with 20 mmol/L glucose. Differences in proinsulin amount were not statistically significant although there was a trend that Wfs1KOhad an increased level of proinsulin. After incubation in 2 mmol/L glucose solution the proinsulin/insulin ratio in Wfs1KOwas significantly higher than that ofWTand Wfs1HZRNA-seq from pancreatic islets found melastatin-related transient receptor potential subfamily member 5 protein gene (Trpm5) to be downregulated inWFS1-deficient mice. Functional annotation ofRNAsequencing results showed thatWFS1 deficiency influenced significantly the pathways related to tissue morphology, endocrine system development and function, molecular transport network. PMID:27053292

  20. Fatty Acyl-CoA Reductase 1 Deficiency

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    Charles N Swisher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Erlangen, Germany; Calgary, CA; and Kafranbel, Syria, identified mutations in the gene, fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 (FAR1 deficiency, adding to three other genes involved in plasmalogen biosynthesis, in two families affected by severe intellectual disability, early-onset epilepsy, microcephaly, congenital cataracts, growth retardation, and spasticity.

  1. Refractory absence epilepsy associated with GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Susan

    2011-05-01

    GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS) is a disorder of cerebral glucose transport associated with early infantile epilepsy and microcephaly. We report two boys who presented with refractory absence epilepsy associated with hypoglycorrhachia, both of whom have genetically confirmed GLUT-1 DS. We propose that these children serve to expand the phenotype of GLUT-1 DS and suggest that this condition should be considered as a cause of refractory absence seizures in childhood.

  2. Allelic variations of glut-1 deficiency syndrome: the chinese experience.

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    Liu, Yanyan; Bao, Xinhua; Wang, Dong; Fu, Na; Zhang, Xiaoying; Cao, Guangna; Song, Fuying; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Yuehua; Qin, Jiong; Yang, Hong; Engelstad, Kristin; De Vivo, Darryl C; Wu, Xiru

    2012-07-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by infantile onset seizures, development delay, movement disorders, and acquired microcephaly. The phenotype includes allelic variants such as intermittent ataxia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and alternating hemiplegia of childhood with or without epilepsy. Dystonias involve allelic variants of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Three Chinese patients presented with paroxysmal behavioral disturbance, weakness, ataxia (especially after fasting), and exercise intolerance. Electroencephalogram findings did not correlate with clinical manifestations. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging produced normal results or mild hypomyelination. Hypoglycorrhachia was evident in all cases. Cerebrospinal fluid glucose ranged from 1.63-2.45 mmol/L. Erythrocyte 3-O-methyl-d-glucose uptake was decreased to 58% in patient 1. Three SLC2A1 disease-causing mutations (761delA, P383H, and R400C) were observed. No patient tolerated ketogenic diets. Two patients responded to frequent meals with snacks. Cerebrospinal fluid evaluation constitutes the diagnostic testing permitting early treatment of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment improve prognoses. PMID:22704013

  3. SMARCB1 (INI-1)-deficient carcinomas of the sinonasal tract.

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    Bishop, Justin A; Antonescu, Cristina R; Westra, William H

    2014-09-01

    SMARCB1 (INI-1) is a tumor-suppressor gene located on chromosome 22q11.2. Its gene product is ubiquitously expressed in nuclei of all normal tissues. SMARCB1 gene inactivation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a diverse group of malignant neoplasms that tend to share "rhabdoid" cytomorphology. This group of SMARCB1-deficient tumors is now further expanded by a subset of carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract. SMARCB1 immunostaining was performed on 142 sinonasal carcinomas. Tumors that showed loss of expression were further characterized for SMARCB1 deletions by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Nine of 142 (6%) primary sinonasal carcinomas showed loss of SMARCB1 expression by immunohistochemistry. Five patients were women, and patients ranged in age from 33 to 78 years (mean 59 y). The SMARCB1-deficient tumors were characterized by nests, sheets, and cords of cells without any histologic evidence of specific (eg, squamous or glandular) differentiation. The tumors comprised varying proportions of basaloid and rhabdoid cells. The SMARCB1-deficient carcinomas had been diagnosed as nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinomas (n=3), sinonasal undifferentiated carcinomas (n=2), myoepithelial carcinoma (n=2), nonintestinal adenocarcinoma (n=1), and carcinoma, not otherwise specified (n=1). Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed SMARCB1 deletions in 6 of 8 (75%) carcinomas. The SMARCB1-deficient carcinomas did not harbor human papillomavirus or NUT-1 alterations. Six patients presented with T4 disease, 5 patients developed local recurrences and/or distant metastases, and 4 died of their disease. Inactivation of the SMARCB1 tumor-suppressor gene appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of a subset of sinonasal carcinomas, further expanding the family of SMARCB1-deficient neoplasms and further delineating a bewildering group of poorly/undifferentiated, aggressive carcinomas arising at this site. The ability to detect SMARCB1 loss by

  4. Fan1 deficiency results in DNA interstrand cross-link repair defects, enhanced tissue karyomegaly, and organ dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongthip, Supawat; Bellani, Marina; Gregg, Siobhan Q; Sridhar, Sunandini; Conti, Brooke A; Chen, Yanglu; Seidman, Michael M; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2016-03-15

    Deficiency of FANCD2/FANCI-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1) in humans leads to karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN), a rare hereditary kidney disease characterized by chronic renal fibrosis, tubular degeneration, and characteristic polyploid nuclei in multiple tissues. The mechanism of how FAN1 protects cells is largely unknown but is thought to involve FAN1's function in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair. Here, we describe a Fan1-deficient mouse and show that FAN1 is required for cellular and organismal resistance to ICLs. We show that the ubiquitin-binding zinc finger (UBZ) domain of FAN1, which is needed for interaction with FANCD2, is not required for the initial rapid recruitment of FAN1 to ICLs or for its role in DNA ICL resistance. Epistasis analyses reveal that FAN1 has cross-link repair activities that are independent of the Fanconi anemia proteins and that this activity is redundant with the 5'-3' exonuclease SNM1A. Karyomegaly becomes prominent in kidneys and livers of Fan1-deficient mice with age, and mice develop liver dysfunction. Treatment of Fan1-deficient mice with ICL-inducing agents results in pronounced thymic and bone marrow hypocellularity and the disappearance of c-kit(+) cells. Our results provide insight into the mechanism of FAN1 in ICL repair and demonstrate that the Fan1 mouse model effectively recapitulates the pathological features of human FAN1 deficiency.

  5. HSF1-deficiency affects gait coordination and cerebellar calbindin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenwerth, Marc; Estrada, Veronica; Stahr, Anna; Müller, Hans Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in cell homeostasis and protect against cell damage. They were previously identified as key players in different ataxia models. HSF1 is the main transcription factor for HSP activation. HSF1-deficient mice (HSF1-/-) are known to have deficiencies in motor control test. However, little is known about effects of HSF1-deficiency on locomotor, especially gait, coordination. Therefore, we compared HSF-deficient (HSF1-/-) mice and wildtype littermates using an automated gait analysis system for objective assessment of gait coordination. We found significant changes in gait parameters of HSF1-/- mice reminiscent of cerebellar ataxia. Immunohistochemical analyses of a cerebellum revealed co-localization of HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis of a potential interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin in Purkinje cells. Calbindin levels were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, respectively. While quantitative PCR revealed no differences in calbindin mRNA levels between HSF1+/+ and HSF1-/- mice, calbindin protein levels, however, were significantly decreased in a cerebellum of HSF1-/- mice. A pathway analysis supports the hypothesis of an interconnection between HSF1 and calbindin. In summary, the targeted deletion of HSF1 results in changes of locomotor function associated with changes in cerebellar calbindin protein levels. These findings suggest a role of HSF1 in regular Purkinje cell calcium homeostasis. PMID:27173427

  6. Fat and carbohydrate metabolism during exercise in phosphoglucomutase type 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni;

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoglucomutase type 1 (PGM1) deficiency is a rare metabolic myopathy in which symptoms are provoked by exercise.......Phosphoglucomutase type 1 (PGM1) deficiency is a rare metabolic myopathy in which symptoms are provoked by exercise....

  7. Robust food anticipatory activity in BMAL1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie S Pendergast

    Full Text Available Food availability is a potent environmental cue that directs circadian locomotor activity in rodents. Even though nocturnal rodents prefer to forage at night, daytime food anticipatory activity (FAA is observed prior to short meals presented at a scheduled time of day. Under this restricted feeding regimen, rodents exhibit two distinct bouts of activity, a nocturnal activity rhythm that is entrained to the light-dark cycle and controlled by the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN and a daytime bout of activity that is phase-locked to mealtime. FAA also occurs during food deprivation, suggesting that a food-entrainable oscillator (FEO keeps time in the absence of scheduled feeding. Previous studies have demonstrated that the FEO is anatomically distinct from the SCN and that FAA is observed in mice lacking some circadian genes essential for timekeeping in the SCN. In the current study, we optimized the conditions for examining FAA during restricted feeding and food deprivation in mice lacking functional BMAL1, which is critical for circadian rhythm generation in the SCN. We found that BMAL1-deficient mice displayed FAA during restricted feeding in 12hr light:12hr dark (12L:12D and 18L:6D lighting cycles, but distinct activity during food deprivation was observed only in 18L:6D. While BMAL1-deficient mice also exhibited robust FAA during restricted feeding in constant darkness, mice were hyperactive during food deprivation so it was not clear that FAA consistently occurred at the time of previously scheduled food availability. Taken together, our findings suggest that optimization of experimental conditions such as photoperiod may be necessary to visualize FAA in genetically modified mice. Furthermore, the expression of FAA may be possible without a circadian oscillator that depends on BMAL1.

  8. DJ-1 deficiency impairs glutamate uptake into astrocytes via the regulation of flotillin-1 and caveolin-1 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Mo; Cha, Seon-Heui; Choi, Yu Ree; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang Myun

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Although the cause of PD is still poorly understood, mutations in many genes including SNCA, parkin, PINK1, LRRK2, and DJ-1 have been identified in the familial forms of PD. It was recently proposed that alterations in lipid rafts may cause the neurodegeneration shown in PD. Here, we observe that DJ-1 deficiency decreased the expression of flotillin-1 (flot-1) and caveolin-1 (cav-1), the main protein components of lipid rafts, in primary astrocytes and MEF cells. As a mechanism, DJ-1 regulated flot-1 stability by direct interaction, however, decreased cav-1 expression may not be a direct effect of DJ-1, but rather as a result of decreased flot-1 expression. Dysregulation of flot-1 and cav-1 by DJ-1 deficiency caused an alteration in the cellular cholesterol level, membrane fluidity, and alteration in lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis. Moreover, DJ-1 deficiency impaired glutamate uptake into astrocytes, a major function of astrocytes in the maintenance of CNS homeostasis, by altering EAAT2 expression. This study will be helpful to understand the role of DJ-1 in the pathogenesis of PD, and the modulation of lipid rafts through the regulation of flot-1 or cav-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for PD. PMID:27346864

  9. Mice with Sort1 deficiency display normal cognition but elevated anxiety-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Chun-Rui; Li, Jia-Yi; Luo, Hai-Yun; Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to stressful life events plays a central role in the development of mood disorders in vulnerable individuals. However, the mechanisms that link mood disorders to stress are poorly understood. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has long been implicated in positive regulation of depression and anxiety, while its precursor (proBDNF) recently showed an opposing effect on such mental illnesses. P75(NTR) and sortilin are co-receptors of proBDNF, however, the role of these receptors in mood regulation is not established. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of sortilin in regulating mood-related behaviors and its role in the proBDNF-mediated mood abnormality in mice. We found that sortilin was up-regulated in neocortex (by 78.3%) and hippocampus (by 111%) of chronically stressed mice as assessed by western blot analysis. These changes were associated with decreased mobility in the open field test and increased depression-like behavior in the forced swimming test. We also found that sortilin deficiency in mice resulted in hyperlocomotion in the open field test and increased anxiety-like behavior in both the open field and elevated plus maze tests. No depression-like behavior in the forced swimming test and no deficit in spatial cognition in the Morris water maze test were found in the Sort1-deficient mice. Moreover, the intracellular and extracellular levels of mature BDNF and proBDNF were not changed when sortilin was absent in vivo and in vitro. Finally, we found that both WT and Sort1-deficient mice injected with proBDNF in lateral ventricle displayed increased depression-like behavior in the forced swimming test but not anxiety-like behaviors in the open field and elevated plus maze tests. The present study suggests that sortilin functions as a negative regulator of mood performance and can be a therapeutic target for the treatment of mental illness. PMID:27118371

  10. Thrombospondin1 deficiency reduces obesity-associated inflammation and improves insulin sensitivity in a diet-induced obese mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is prevalent worldwide and is associated with insulin resistance. Advanced studies suggest that obesity-associated low-grade chronic inflammation contributes to the development of insulin resistance and other metabolic complications. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein that is up-regulated in inflamed adipose tissue. A recent study suggests a positive correlation of TSP1 with obesity, adipose inflammation, and insulin resistance. However, the direct effect of TSP1 on obesity and insulin resistance is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role of TSP1 in mediating obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance by using TSP1 knockout mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male TSP1-/- mice and wild type littermate controls were fed a low-fat (LF or a high-fat (HF diet for 16 weeks. Throughout the study, body weight and fat mass increased similarly between the TSP1-/- mice and WT mice under HF feeding conditions, suggesting that TSP1 deficiency does not affect the development of obesity. However, obese TSP1-/- mice had improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin sensitivity compared to the obese wild type mice. Macrophage accumulation and inflammatory cytokine expression in adipose tissue were reduced in obese TSP1-/- mice. Consistent with the local decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, systemic inflammation was also decreased in the obese TSP1-/- mice. Furthermore, in vitro data demonstrated that TSP1 deficient macrophages had decreased mobility and a reduced inflammatory phenotype. CONCLUSION: TSP1 deficiency did not affect the development of high-fat diet induced obesity. However, TSP1 deficiency reduced macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue and protected against obesity related inflammation and insulin resistance. Our data demonstrate that TSP1 may play an important role in regulating macrophage function and mediating obesity-induced inflammation and insulin

  11. GABA transporter-1 deficiency confers schizophrenia-like behavioral phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Yu

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of schizophrenia remains poorly understood. The hyper-dopamine and hypo-NMDA receptor hypotheses have been the most enduring ideas. Recently, emerging evidence implicates alterations of the major inhibitory system, GABAergic neurotransmission in the schizophrenic patients. However, the pathophysiological role of GABAergic system in schizophrenia still remains dubious. In this study, we took advantage of GABA transporter 1 (GAT1 knockout (KO mouse, a unique animal model with elevated ambient GABA, to study the schizophrenia-related behavioral abnormalities. We found that GAT1 KO mice displayed multiple behavioral abnormalities related to schizophrenic positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Moreover, GAT1 deficiency did not change the striatal dopamine levels, but significantly enhanced the tonic GABA currents in prefrontal cortex. The GABA(A receptor antagonist picrotoxin could effectively ameliorate several behavioral defects of GAT1 KO mice. These results identified a novel function of GAT1, and indicated that the elevated ambient GABA contributed critically to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Furthermore, several commonly used antipsychotic drugs were effective in treating the locomotor hyperactivity in GAT1 KO mice, suggesting the utility of GAT1 KO mice as an alternative animal model for studying schizophrenia pathogenesis and developing new antipsychotic drugs.

  12. Aged PROP1 deficient dwarf mice maintain ACTH production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor O Nasonkin

    Full Text Available Humans with PROP1 mutations have multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD that typically advance from growth insufficiency diagnosed in infancy to include more severe growth hormone (GH deficiency and progressive reduction in other anterior pituitary hormones, eventually including adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH deficiency and hypocortisolism. Congenital deficiencies of GH, prolactin, and thyroid stimulating hormone have been reported in the Prop1(null (Prop1(-/- and the Ames dwarf (Prop1(df/df mouse models, but corticotroph and pituitary adrenal axis function have not been thoroughly investigated. Here we report that the C57BL6 background sensitizes mutants to a wasting phenotype that causes approximately one third to die precipitously between weaning and adulthood, while remaining homozygotes live with no signs of illness. The wasting phenotype is associated with severe hypoglycemia. Circulating ACTH and corticosterone levels are elevated in juvenile and aged Prop1 mutants, indicating activation of the pituitary-adrenal axis. Despite this, young adult Prop1 deficient mice are capable of responding to restraint stress with further elevation of ACTH and corticosterone. Low blood glucose, an expected side effect of GH deficiency, is likely responsible for the elevated corticosterone level. These studies suggest that the mouse model differs from the human patients who display progressive hormone loss and hypocortisolism.

  13. Dlic1 deficiency impairs ciliogenesis of photoreceptors by destabilizing dynein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanshan Kong; Xinrong Du; Chao Peng; Yiming Wu; Huirong Li; Xi Jin; Ling Hou

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein 1 is fundamentally important for transporting a variety of essential cargoes along microtubules within eukaryotic cells.However,in mammals,few mutants are available for studying the effects of defects in dynein-controlled processes in the context of the whole organism.Here,we deleted mouse Dlic1 gene encoding DLIC1,a subunit of the dynein complex.Dlic1-/-mice are viable,but display severe photoreceptor degeneration.Ablation of Dlic1 results in ectopic accumulation of outer segment (OS) proteins,and impairs OS growth and ciliogenesis of photoreceptors by interfering with Rabll-vesicle trafficking and blocking efficient OS protein transport from Golgi to the basal body.Our studies show that Dlic1 deficiency partially blocks vesicle export from endoplasmic reticulum (ER),but seems not to affect vesicle transport from the ER to Golgi.Further mechanistic study reveals that lack of Dlic1 destabilizes dynein subunits and alters the normal subcellular distribution of dynein in photoreceptors,probably due to the impaired transport function of dynein.Our results demonstrate that Dlic1 plays important roles in ciliogenesis and protein transport to the OS,and is required for photoreceptor development and survival.The Dlic1-/-mice also provide a new mouse model to study human retinal degeneration.

  14. Intestinal Irradiation and Fibrosis in a Th1-Deficient Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linard, Christine, E-mail: christine.linard@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Billiard, Fabienne; Benderitter, Marc [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Changes in the Th1/Th2 immune balance may play a role in increasing the incidence of radiation-induced toxicity. This study evaluates the consequences of Th1 deficiency on intestinal response (fibrosis and T cell trafficking) to abdominal irradiation and examines in mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) the differential involvement of the two Th1 pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, in controlling this balance in mice. Methods and Materials: Using T-bet-deficient mice (T-bet{sup -/-}), we evaluated the mRNA and protein expression of the Th1 pathways (IFN-{gamma}, T-bet/STAT1, and IL-12/STAT4) and the CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} populations in ileal mucosa and MLN during the first 3 months after 10 Gy abdominal irradiation. Results: The T-bet-deficient mice showed an increased fibrotic response to radiation, characterized by higher TGF-{beta}1, col3a1 expression, and collagen deposition in mucosa compared with wild-type mice. This response was associated with drastically lower expression of IFN-{gamma}, the hallmark Th1 cytokine. Analysis of the Th1 expression pathways, T-bet/STAT1 and IL-12/STAT4, showed their equal involvement in the failure of Th1 polarization. A minimal IFN-{gamma} level depended on the IL-23-p19/STAT4 level. In addition, the radiation-induced deficiency in the priming of Th1 by IFN-{gamma} was related to the defective homing capacity of CD8{sup +} cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: Irradiation induces Th2 polarization, and the Th2 immune response may play a role in potentiating irradiation-induced intestinal collagen deposition.

  15. Evidence of adrenal failure in aging Dax1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheys, Joshua O; Heaton, Joanne H; Hammer, Gary D

    2011-09-01

    Dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1 (Dax1) is an orphan nuclear receptor essential for development and function of the mammalian adrenal cortex and gonads. DAX1 was cloned as the gene responsible for X-linked AHC, which is characterized by adrenocortical failure necessitating glucocorticoid replacement. Contrary to these human data, young mice with genetic Dax1 knockout (Dax1(-/Y)) exhibit adrenocortical hyperfunction, consistent with the historic description of Dax1 as a transcriptional repressor that inhibits steroidogenic factor 1-dependent steroidogenesis. This paradox of molecular function and two apparently opposite phenotypes associated with Dax1 deficiency in mice and humans is compounded by the recent observations that under certain circumstances, Dax1 can serve as a transcriptional activator of steroidogenic factor 1. The recently revealed role of Dax1 in embryonic stem cell pluripotency, together with the observation that its expression in the adult adrenal is restricted to the subcapsular cortex, where presumptive undifferentiated progenitor cells reside, has led us to reexamine the phenotype of Dax1(-/Y) mice in order to reconcile the conflicting mouse and human data. In this report, we demonstrate that although young Dax1(-/Y) mice have enhanced steroidogenesis and subcapsular adrenocortical proliferation, as these mice age, they exhibit declining adrenal growth, decreasing adrenal steroidogenic capacity, and a reversal of their initial enhanced hormonal sensitivity. Together with a marked adrenal dysplasia in aging mice, these data reveal that both Dax1(-/Y) mice and patients with X-linked AHC exhibit adrenal failure that is consistent with adrenocortical subcapsular progenitor cell depletion and argue for a significant role of Dax1 in maintenance of these cells.

  16. Altered microglia morphology and higher resilience to stress-induced depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Sabine; Brioschi, Simone; Dieni, Sandra; Frings, Lars; Masuch, Annette; Blank, Thomas; Biber, Knut

    2016-07-01

    Microglia are suggested to be involved in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Indeed changes in microglia morphology have been reported in different mouse models of depression. A crucial regulatory system for microglia function is the well-defined CX3C axis. Thus, we aimed to clarify the role of microglia and CX3CR1 in depressive behavior by subjecting CX3CR1-deficient mice to a particular chronic despair model (CDM) paradigm known to exhibit face validity to major depressive disorder. In wild-type mice we observed the development of chronic depressive-like behavior after 5days of repetitive swim stress. 3D-reconstructions of Iba-1-labeled microglia in the dentate molecular layer revealed that behavioral effects were associated with changes in microglia morphology towards a state of hyper-ramification. Chronic treatment with the anti-depressant venlafaxine ameliorated depression-like behavior and restored microglia morphology. In contrast, CX3CR1 deficient mice showed a clear resistance to either (i) stress-induced depressive-like behavior, (ii) changes in microglia morphology and (iii) antidepressant treatment. Our data point towards a role of hyper-ramified microglia in the etiology of chronic depression. The lack of effects in CX3CR1 deficient mice suggests that microglia hyper-ramification is controlled by neuron-microglia signaling via the CX3C axis. However, it remains to be elucidated how hyper-ramified microglia contribute to depressive-like behavior. PMID:26576722

  17. Autophagy resolves early retinal inflammation in Igf1-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Vaquero-Villanueva, Laura; Hurlé, Juan M.; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Valverde, Ángela M.

    2016-01-01

    provides new evidence in a mouse model of IGF-1 deficiency that autophagy is an adaptive response that might confer protection against persistent inflammation in the retina during ageing. PMID:27483352

  18. Reduced cellular DNA repair capacity after environmentally relevant arsenic exposure. Influence of Ogg1 deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, Jordi; Peremartí, Jana; Annangi, Balasubramnayam [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); Marcos, Ricard, E-mail: ricard.marcos@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, ISCIII, Madrid (Spain); Hernández, Alba, E-mail: alba.hernandez@uab.es [Grup de Mutagènesi, Departament de Genètica i de Microbiologia, Facultat de Biociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, ISCIII, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Repair ability under long-term exposure to arsenic was tested using the comet assay. • Effects were measured under Ogg1 wild-type and deficient backgrounds. • Exposed cells repair less efficiency the DNA damage induced by SA, KBrO{sub 3}, MMA{sup III} or UVC radiation. • Oxidative damage and Ogg1 deficient background exacerbate repair deficiencies. • Overexpression of the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt acts as adaptive mechanism. - Abstract: Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminant known to affect millions of people worldwide. Our previous work demonstrated that chronic sub-toxic i-As concentrations were able to induce biologically significant levels of genotoxic and oxidative DNA damage that were strongly influenced by the Ogg1 genotype. In order to study the nature of the observed levels of damage and the observed differences between MEF Ogg1{sup +/+} and Ogg1{sup −/−} genetic backgrounds, the genotoxic and oxidative DNA repair kinetics of 18-weeks exposed MEF cells were evaluated by the comet assay. Results indicate that MEF Ogg1{sup +/+} and Ogg1{sup −/−} cells chronically exposed to i-As repair the DNA damage induced by arsenite, potassium bromide and UVC radiation less efficiently than control cells, being that observation clearly more pronounced in MEF Ogg1{sup −/−} cells. Consequently, exposed cells accumulate a higher percentage of unrepaired DNA damage at the end of the repair period. As an attempt to eliminate i-As associated toxicity, chronically exposed MEF Ogg1{sup −/−} cells overexpress the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt. This adaptive response confers cells a significant resistance to i-As-induced cell death, but at expenses of accumulating high levels of DNA damage due to their repair impairment. Overall, the work presented here evidences that i-As chronic exposure disrupts the normal cellular repair function, and that oxidative DNA damage—and Ogg1 deficiency

  19. Reduced cellular DNA repair capacity after environmentally relevant arsenic exposure. Influence of Ogg1 deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Repair ability under long-term exposure to arsenic was tested using the comet assay. • Effects were measured under Ogg1 wild-type and deficient backgrounds. • Exposed cells repair less efficiency the DNA damage induced by SA, KBrO3, MMAIII or UVC radiation. • Oxidative damage and Ogg1 deficient background exacerbate repair deficiencies. • Overexpression of the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt acts as adaptive mechanism. - Abstract: Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a genotoxic and carcinogenic environmental contaminant known to affect millions of people worldwide. Our previous work demonstrated that chronic sub-toxic i-As concentrations were able to induce biologically significant levels of genotoxic and oxidative DNA damage that were strongly influenced by the Ogg1 genotype. In order to study the nature of the observed levels of damage and the observed differences between MEF Ogg1+/+ and Ogg1−/− genetic backgrounds, the genotoxic and oxidative DNA repair kinetics of 18-weeks exposed MEF cells were evaluated by the comet assay. Results indicate that MEF Ogg1+/+ and Ogg1−/− cells chronically exposed to i-As repair the DNA damage induced by arsenite, potassium bromide and UVC radiation less efficiently than control cells, being that observation clearly more pronounced in MEF Ogg1−/− cells. Consequently, exposed cells accumulate a higher percentage of unrepaired DNA damage at the end of the repair period. As an attempt to eliminate i-As associated toxicity, chronically exposed MEF Ogg1−/− cells overexpress the arsenic metabolizing enzyme As3mt. This adaptive response confers cells a significant resistance to i-As-induced cell death, but at expenses of accumulating high levels of DNA damage due to their repair impairment. Overall, the work presented here evidences that i-As chronic exposure disrupts the normal cellular repair function, and that oxidative DNA damage—and Ogg1 deficiency—exacerbates this phenomenon. The observed cell

  20. SOCS-1 deficiency does not prevent diet-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emanuelli, Brice; Macotela, Yazmin; Boucher, Jérémie;

    2008-01-01

    of leptin and the macrophage marker CD68 in white adipose tissue and of SREBP1c and FAS in liver. HFD also induced hyperglycemia in SOCS-1 deficient mice with impairment of glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Thus, despite the role of SOCS proteins in obesity-related insulin resistance, SOCS-1 deficiency...

  1. IEX-1 deficiency induces browning of white adipose tissue and resists diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohd; Javed, Ammar A; Chandra, David; Ramsey, Haley E; Shah, Dilip; Khan, Mohammed F; Zhao, Liping; Wu, Mei X

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of obesity and insulin resistance. However, the primary mediators that affect energy homeostasis remain ill defined. Here, we report an unexpected role for immediate early response gene X-1 (IEX-1), a downstream target of NF-κB, in energy metabolism. We found that IEX-1 expression was highly induced in white adipose tissue (WAT) in both epidydmal and subcutaneous depots but not in interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD). Null mutation of IEX-1 protected mice against HFD-induced adipose and hepatic inflammation, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. Unexpectedly, IEX-1 knockout (IEX-1(-/-)) mice gained markedly less weight on HFD for 20 weeks as compared to wild-type (WT) littermates (37 ± 3 versus 48 ± 2 gm) due to increased energy expenditure. Mechanistically, we showed that IEX-1 deficiency induced browning and activated thermogenic genes program in WAT but not in BAT by promoting alternative activation of adipose macrophages. Consequently, IEX-1(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced thermogenesis (24 ± 0.1 versus 22 ± 0.1 kcal/hour/kg in WT mice) explaining increased energy expenditure and lean phenotype in these mice. In conclusion, the present study suggests that IEX-1 is a novel physiological regulator of energy homeostasis via its action in WAT. PMID:27063893

  2. PD-L1 Deficiency within Islets Reduces Allograft Survival in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxia Ma

    Full Text Available Islet transplantation may potentially cure type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. However, immune rejection, especially that induced by the alloreactive T-cell response, remains a restraining factor for the long-term survival of grafted islets. Programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1 is a negative costimulatory molecule. PD-L1 deficiency within the donor heart accelerates allograft rejection. Here, we investigate whether PD-L1 deficiency in donor islets reduces allograft survival time.Glucose Stimulation Assays were performed to evaluate whether PD-L1 deficiency has detrimental effects on islet function. Islets isolated from PDL1-deficient mice or wild- type (WT mice (C57BL/6j were implanted beneath the renal capsule of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic BALB/c mice. Blood glucose levels and graft survival time after transplantation were monitored. Moreover, we analyzed the residual islets, infiltrating immune cells and alloreactive cells from the recipients.PD-L1 deficiency within islets does not affect islet function. However, islet PD-L1 deficiency increased allograft rejection and was associated with enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration and recipient T-cell alloreactivity.This is the first report to demonstrate that PD-L1 deficiency accelerated islet allograft rejection and regulated recipient alloimmune responses.

  3. Strategies to Rescue the Consequences of Inducible Arginase-1 Deficiency in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ballantyne, Laurel L.; Yuan Yan Sin; Tim St Amand; Joshua Si; Steven Goossens; Lieven Haenebalcke; Haigh, Jody J; Lianna Kyriakopoulou; Andreas Schulze; Funk, Colin D

    2015-01-01

    Arginase-1 catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, which is the final step of the urea cycle used to remove excess ammonia from the body. Arginase-1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia in mice and man with severe lethal consequences in the former and progressive neurological impairment to varying degrees in the latter. In a tamoxifen-induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model, mice succumb to the enzyme deficiency within 2 weeks after inducing the knockout and retain

  4. Circadian rhythms and food anticipatory behavior in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luuk, Hendrik; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-08-10

    The dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) has been proposed as a candidate for the neural substrate of a food-entrainable oscillator. The existence of a food-entrainable oscillator in the mammalian nervous system was inferred previously from restricted feeding-induced behavioral rhythmicity in rodents with suprachiasmatic nucleus lesions. In the present study, we have characterized the circadian rhythmicity of behavior in Wfs1-deficient mice during ad libitum and restricted feeding. Based on the expression of Wfs1 protein in the DMH it was hypothesized that Wfs1-deficient mice will display reduced or otherwise altered food anticipatory activity. Wfs1 immunoreactivity in DMH was found almost exclusively in the compact part. Restricted feeding induced c-Fos immunoreactivity primarily in the ventral and lateral aspects of DMH and it was similar in both genotypes. Wfs1-deficiency resulted in significantly lower body weight and reduced wheel-running activity. Circadian rhythmicity of behavior was normal in Wfs1-deficient mice under ad libitum feeding apart from elongated free-running period in constant light. The amount of food anticipatory activity induced by restricted feeding was not significantly different between the genotypes. Present results indicate that the effects of Wfs1-deficiency on behavioral rhythmicity are subtle suggesting that Wfs1 is not a major player in the neural networks responsible for circadian rhythmicity of behavior.

  5. Heat shock protein B1-deficient mice display impaired wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Crowe

    Full Text Available There is large literature describing in vitro experiments on heat shock protein (hspB1 but understanding of its function in vivo is limited to studies in mice overexpressing human hspB1 protein. Experiments in cells have shown that hspB1 has chaperone activity, a cytoprotective role, regulates inflammatory gene expression, and drives cell proliferation. To investigate the function of the protein in vivo we generated hspB1-deficient mice. HspB1-deficient fibroblasts display increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6, compared to wild-type cells, but reduced proliferation. HspB1-deficient fibroblasts exhibit reduced entry into S phase and increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p27(kip1 and p21(waf1. The expression of hspB1 protein and mRNA is also controlled by the cell cycle. To investigate the physiological function of hspB1 in regulating inflammation and cell proliferation we used an excisional cutaneous wound healing model. There was a significant impairment in the rate of healing of wounds in hspB1-deficient mice, characterised by reduced re-epithelialisation and collagen deposition but also increased inflammation. HspB1 deficiency augments neutrophil infiltration in wounds, driven by increased chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1 expression. This appears to be a general mechanism as similar results were obtained in the air-pouch and peritonitis models of acute inflammation.

  6. Strategies to rescue the consequences of inducible arginase-1 deficiency in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel L Ballantyne

    Full Text Available Arginase-1 catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, which is the final step of the urea cycle used to remove excess ammonia from the body. Arginase-1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia in mice and man with severe lethal consequences in the former and progressive neurological impairment to varying degrees in the latter. In a tamoxifen-induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model, mice succumb to the enzyme deficiency within 2 weeks after inducing the knockout and retain <2 % enzyme in the liver. Standard clinical care regimens for arginase-1 deficiency (low-protein diet, the nitrogen-scavenging drug sodium phenylbutyrate, ornithine supplementation either failed to extend lifespan (ornithine or only minimally prolonged lifespan (maximum 8 days with low-protein diet and drug. A conditional, tamoxifen-inducible arginase-1 transgenic mouse strain expressing the enzyme from the Rosa26 locus modestly extended lifespan of neonatal mice, but not that of 4-week old mice, when crossed to the inducible arginase-1 knockout mouse strain. Delivery of an arginase-1/enhanced green fluorescent fusion construct by adeno-associated viral delivery (rh10 serotype with a strong cytomegalovirus-chicken β-actin hybrid promoter rescued about 30% of male mice with lifespan prolongation to at least 6 months, extensive hepatic expression and restoration of significant enzyme activity in liver. In contrast, a vector of the AAV8 serotype driven by the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter led to weaker liver expression and did not rescue arginase-1 deficient mice to any great extent. Since the induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model displays a much more severe phenotype when compared to human arginase-1 deficiency, these studies reveal that it may be feasible with gene therapy strategies to correct the various manifestations of the disorder and they provide optimism for future clinical studies.

  7. Autoantibody-Mediated Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis in Rasgrp1-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Andrew; Fortwendel, Jarrod R; Gebb, Sarah A; Barrington, Robert A

    2016-07-15

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare lung syndrome caused by the accumulation of surfactants in the alveoli. The most prevalent clinical form of PAP is autoimmune PAP (aPAP) whereby IgG autoantibodies neutralize GM-CSF. GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that promotes the differentiation, survival, and activation of alveolar macrophages, the cells responsible for surfactant degradation. IgG-mediated neutralization of GM-CSF thereby inhibits alveolar macrophage homeostasis and function, leading to surfactant accumulation and innate immunodeficiency. Importantly, there are no rodent models for this disease; therefore, underlying immune mechanisms regulating GM-CSF-specific IgG in aPAP are not well understood. In this article, we identify that autoimmune-prone Rasgrp1-deficient mice develop aPAP: 1) Rasgrp1-deficient mice exhibit reduced pulmonary compliance and lung histopathology characteristic of PAP; 2) alveolar macrophages from Rasgrp1-deficient mice are enlarged and exhibit reduced surfactant degradation; 3) the concentration of GM-CSF-specific IgG is elevated in both serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from Rasgrp1-deficient mice; 4) GM-CSF-specific IgG is capable of neutralizing GM-CSF bioactivity; and 5) Rasgrp1-deficient mice also lacking CD275/ICOSL, a molecule necessary for conventional T cell-dependent Ab production, have reduced GM-CSF-specific autoantibody and do not develop PAP. Collectively, these studies reveal that Rasgrp1-deficient mice, to our knowledge, represent the first rodent model for aPAP. PMID:27279372

  8. YAP promotes malignant progression of Lkb1-deficient lung adenocarcinoma through downstream regulation of survivin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Gao, Yijun; Li, Fuming; Tong, Xinyuan; Ren, Yan; Han, Xiangkun; Yao, Shun; Long, Fei; Yang, Zhongzhou; Fan, Hengyu; Zhang, Lei; Ji, Hongbin

    2015-11-01

    The serine/threonine kinase LKB1 is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that governs diverse cellular processes, including growth, polarity, and metabolism. Somatic-inactivating mutations in LKB1 are observed in about 15% to 30% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). LKB1 inactivation confers lung adenocarcinomas (ADC) with malignant features that remain refractory to therapeutic intervention. YAP activation has been linked to LKB1 deficiency, but the role of YAP in lung ADC formation and progression is uncertain. In this study, we showed that ectopic expression of YAP in type II alveolar epithelial cells led to hyperplasia in mouse lungs. YAP overexpression in the Kras(G12D) lung cancer mouse model accelerated lung ADC progression. Conversely, YAP deletion dramatically delayed the progression of lung ADC in LKB1-deficient Kras(G12D) mice. Mechanistic studies identified the antiapoptotic oncoprotein survivin as the downstream mediator of YAP responsible for promoting malignant progression of LKB1-deficient lung ADC. Collectively, our findings identify YAP as an important contributor to lung cancer progression, rationalizing YAP inhibition in the context of LKB1 deficiency as a therapeutic strategy to treat lung ADC.

  9. Effect of Glucose Load on Attention and Seizures in Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2010-01-01

    Thirteen patients with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut-1 DS) had repeated measures of attention, memory, fine-motor coordination and well-being during a 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test in a study at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, and Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY.

  10. Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome with Carbohydrate-Responsive Symptoms but without Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, Anne; Assmann, Birgit; Klepper, Joerg; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. The main symptoms are epilepsy, developmental delay, movement disorders, and deceleration of head circumference. A ketogenic diet has been shown to be effective in controlling epilepsy in GLUT1-DS. We report a female…

  11. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome: The expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Leen (Wilhelmina); J. Klepper (Joerg); M.M. Verbeek (Marcel); M. Leferink (Maike); T. Hofste (Tom); B.G.M. van Engelen (Baziel); R.A. Wevers (Ron); T. Arthur (Todd); N. Bahi-Buisson (Nadia); D. Ballhausen (Diana); J. Bekhof (Jolita); P. van Bogaert (Patrick); I. Carrilho (Inês); B. Chabrol (Brigitte); M.P. Champion (Michael); J. Coldwell (James); P. Clayton (Peter); E. Donner (Elizabeth); A. Evangeliou (Athanasios); F. Ebinger (Friedrich); K. Farrell (Kevin); R.J. Forsyth (Rob); C.G.E.L. de Goede (Christian); S. Gross (Stephanie); S. Grünewald (Sonja); H. Holthausen (Hans); S. Jayawant (Sandeep); K. Lachlan (Katherine); V. Laugel (Vincent); K. Leppig (Kathy); M.J. Lim (Ming); G.M.S. Mancini (Grazia); A.D. Marina; L. Martorell (Loreto); J. McMenamin (Joe); M.E.C. Meuwissen (Marije); H. Mundy (Helen); N.O. Nilsson (Nils); A. Panzer (Axel); B.T. Poll-The; C. Rauscher (Christian); C.M.R. Rouselle (Christophe); I. Sandvig (Inger); T. Scheffner (Thomas); E. Sheridan (Eamonn); N. Simpson (Neil); P. Sykora (Parol); R. Tomlinson (Richard); J. Trounce (John); D.W.M. Webb (David); B. Weschke (Bernhard); H. Scheffer (Hans); M.A. Willemsen (Michél)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractGlucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing an

  12. Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome : the expanding clinical and genetic spectrum of a treatable disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, Wilhelmina G.; Klepper, Joerg; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Leferink, Maike; Hofste, Tom; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Wevers, Ron A.; Arthur, Todd; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Ballhausen, Diana; Bekhof, Jolita; van Bogaert, Patrick; Carrilho, Ines; Chabrol, Brigitte; Champion, Michael P.; Coldwell, James; Clayton, Peter; Donner, Elizabeth; Evangeliou, Athanasios; Ebinger, Friedrich; Farrell, Kevin; Forsyth, Rob J.; de Goede, Christian G. E. L.; Gross, Stephanie; Grunewald, Stephanie; Holthausen, Hans; Jayawant, Sandeep; Lachlan, Katherine; Laugel, Vincent; Leppig, Kathy; Lim, Ming J.; Mancini, Grazia; Della Marina, Adela; Martorell, Loreto; McMenamin, Joe; Meuwissen, Marije E. C.; Mundy, Helen; Nilsson, Nils O.; Panzer, Axel; Poll-The, Bwee T.; Rauscher, Christian; Rouselle, Christophe M. R.; Sandvig, Inger; Scheffner, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Simpson, Neil; Sykora, Parol; Tomlinson, Richard; Trounce, John; Webb, David; Weschke, Bernhard; Scheffer, Hans; Willemsen, Michel A.

    2010-01-01

    Glucose transporter-1 deficiency syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene in the majority of patients and results in impaired glucose transport into the brain. From 2004-2008, 132 requests for mutational analysis of the SLC2A1 gene were studied by automated Sanger sequencing and multiplex

  13. ATP8B1 deficiency; Pathophysiology and treatment of a cholestatic syndrome with extrahepatic symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stapelbroek, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    ATP8B1 deficiency is a severe and clinically highly variable hereditary disorder that is primarily characterized by intrahepatic cholestasis. It generally presents as a permanent disorder, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1), or with intermittent cholestasis (benign recurren

  14. Movement disorders in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome respond to the modified Atkins diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Mewasingh, L.; Verbeek, M.M.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Movement disorders are a prominent feature of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS). First-choice treatment is a ketogenic diet, but compliance is poor. We have investigated the effect of the modified Atkins diet as an alternative treatment for movement disorders in

  15. Galactose supplementation in phosphoglucomutase-1 deficiency; review and outlook for a novel treatable CDG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.

    2014-01-01

    We recently redefined phosphoglucomutase-1 deficiency not only as an enzyme defect, involved in normal glycogen metabolism, but also an inborn error of protein glycosylation. Phosphoglucomutase-1 is a key enzyme in glycolysis and glycogenesis by catalyzing in the bidirectional transfer of phosphate

  16. Rereplication in emi1-deficient zebrafish embryos occurs through a Cdh1-mediated pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara E Robu

    Full Text Available Disruption of early mitotic inhibitor 1 (Emi1 interferes with normal cell cycle progression and results in early embryonic lethality in vertebrates. During S and G2 phases the ubiquitin ligase complex APC/C is inhibited by Emi1 protein, thereby enabling the accumulation of Cyclins A and B so they can regulate replication and promote the transition from G2 phase to mitosis, respectively. Depletion of Emi1 prevents mitotic entry and causes rereplication and an increase in cell size. In this study, we show that the developmental and cell cycle defects caused by inactivation of zebrafish emi1 are due to inappropriate activation of APC/C through its cofactor Cdh1. Inhibiting/slowing progression into S-phase by depleting Cdt1, an essential replication licensing factor, partially rescued emi1 deficiency-induced rereplication and the increased cell size. The cell size effect was enhanced by co-depletion of cell survival regulator p53. These data suggest that the increased size of emi1-deficient cells is either directly or indirectly caused by the rereplication defects. Moreover, enforced expression of Cyclin A partially ablated the rereplicating population in emi1-deficient zebrafish embryos, consistent with the role of Cyclin A in origin licensing. Forced expression of Cyclin B partially restored the G1 population, in agreement with the established role of Cyclin B in mitotic progression and exit. However, expression of Cyclin B also partially inhibited rereplication in emi1-deficient embryos, suggesting a role for Cyclin B in regulating replication in this cellular context. As Cyclin A and B are substrates for APC/C-Cdh1 - mediated degradation, and Cdt1 is under control of Cyclin A, these data indicate that emi1 deficiency-induced defects in vivo are due to the dysregulation of an APC/C-Cdh1 molecular axis.

  17. Wfs1-deficient mice display altered function of serotonergic system and increased behavioural response to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanel eVisnapuu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene make humans more susceptible to mood disorders. Besides that, mood disorders are associated with alterations in the activity of serotonergic and noradrenergic systems. Therefore, in this study, the effects of imipramine, an inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT and noradrenaline (NA reuptake, and paroxetine, a selective inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, were studied in tests of behavioural despair. The tail suspension test (TST and forced swimming test (FST were performed in Wfs1-deficient mice. Simultaneously, gene expression and monoamine metabolism studies were conducted to evaluate changes in 5-HT- and NA-ergic systems of Wfs1-deficient mice. The basal immobility time of Wfs1-deficient mice in TST and FST did not differ from that of their wild-type littermates. However, a significant reduction of immobility time in response to lower doses of imipramine and paroxetine was observed in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice, but not in their wild-type littermates. In gene expression studies, the levels of 5-HT transporter (SERT were significantly reduced in the pons of homozygous animals. Monoamine metabolism was assayed separately in the dorsal and ventral striatum of naive mice and mice exposed for 30 minutes tobrightly lit motility boxes. We found that this aversive challenge caused a significant increase in the levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA, a metabolite of 5-HT, in the ventral and dorsal striatum of wild-type mice, but not in their homozygous littermates. Taken together, the blunted 5-HT metabolism and reduced levels of SERT are a likely reason for the elevated sensitivity of these mice to the action of imipramine and paroxetine. These changes in the pharmacological and neurochemical phenotype of Wfs1-deficient mice may help to explain the increased susceptibility of Wolfram syndrome patients to depressive states.

  18. Bleomycin-Treated Chimeric Thy1-Deficient Mice with Thy1-Deficient Myofibroblasts and Thy-Positive Lymphocytes Resolve Inflammation without Affecting the Fibrotic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazit Y. Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung fibrosis is characterized by abnormal accumulation of fibroblasts in the interstitium of the alveolar space. Two populations of myofibroblasts, distinguished by Thy1 expression, are detected in human and murine lungs. Accumulation of Thy1-negative (Thy1− myofibroblasts was shown in the lungs of humans with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and of bleomycin-treated mice. We aimed to identify genetic changes in lung myofibroblasts following Thy1 crosslinking and assess the impact of specific lung myofibroblast Thy1-deficiency, in vivo, in bleomycin-injured mouse lungs. Thy1 increased in mouse lung lymphocytes following bleomycin injury but decreased in myofibroblasts when fibrosis was at the highest point (14 days, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Using gene chip analysis, we detected that myofibroblast Thy1 crosslinking mediates downregulation of genes promoting cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation, and reduces production of extracellular matrix (ECM components, while concurrently mediating the upregulation of genes known to foster inflammation and immunological functions. Chimeric Thy1-deficient mice with Thy1+ lymphocytes and Thy1− myofibroblasts showed fibrosis similar to wild-type mice and an increased number of CD4/CD25 regulatory T cells, with a concomitant decrease in inflammation. Lung myofibroblasts downregulate Thy1 expression to increase their proliferation but to diminish the in vivo inflammatory milieu. Inflammation is not essential for evolution of fibrosis as was previously stated.

  19. MTO1-deficient mouse model mirrors the human phenotype showing complex I defect and cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lore Becker

    Full Text Available Recently, mutations in the mitochondrial translation optimization factor 1 gene (MTO1 were identified as causative in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis and respiratory chain defect. Here, we describe an MTO1-deficient mouse model generated by gene trap mutagenesis that mirrors the human phenotype remarkably well. As in patients, the most prominent signs and symptoms were cardiovascular and included bradycardia and cardiomyopathy. In addition, the mutant mice showed a marked worsening of arrhythmias during induction and reversal of anaesthesia. The detailed morphological and biochemical workup of murine hearts indicated that the myocardial damage was due to complex I deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, neurological examination was largely normal in Mto1-deficient mice. A translational consequence of this mouse model may be to caution against anaesthesia-related cardiac arrhythmias which may be fatal in patients.

  20. Fan1 deficiency results in DNA interstrand cross-link repair defects, enhanced tissue karyomegaly, and organ dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Thongthip, Supawat; Bellani, Marina; Gregg, Siobhan Q.; Sridhar, Sunandini; Conti, Brooke A.; Chen, Yanglu; Seidman, Michael M.; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Thongthip et al. describe a FANCD2/FANCI-associated nuclease 1 (Fan1)-deficient mouse and show that FAN1 is required for cellular and organismal resistance to DNA interstrand cross-links. Karyomegaly becomes prominent in the kidneys and livers of Fan1-deficient mice with age, and mice develop liver dysfunction.

  1. Brain microsomal fatty acid elongation is increased in abcd1-deficient mouse during active myelination phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masashi; Kawamichi, Misato; Shimura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Watanabe, Shiro; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2015-12-01

    The dysfunction of ABCD1, a peroxisomal ABC protein, leads to the perturbation of very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism and is the cause of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Abcd1-deficient mice exhibit an accumulation of saturated VLCFAs, such as C26:0, in all tissues, especially the brain. The present study sought to measure microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain of wild-type (WT) and abcd1-deficient mice during the course of development. The fatty acid elongation activity in the microsomal fraction was measured by the incorporation of [2-(14)C]malonyl-CoA into fatty acids in the presence of C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA. Cytosolic fatty acid synthesis activity was completely inhibited by the addition of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). The microsomal fatty acid elongation activity in the brain was significantly high at 3 weeks after birth and decreased substantially at 3 months after birth. Furthermore, we detected two different types of microsomal fatty acid elongation activity by using C16:0-CoA or C20:0-CoA as the substrate and found the activity toward C20:0-CoA in abcd1-deficient mice was higher than the WT 3-week-old animals. These results suggest that during the active myelination phase the microsomal fatty acid elongation activity is stimulated in abcd1-deficient mice, which in turn perturbs the lipid composition in myelin. PMID:26108493

  2. ATP8B1 deficiency; Pathophysiology and treatment of a cholestatic syndrome with extrahepatic symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Stapelbroek, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    ATP8B1 deficiency is a severe and clinically highly variable hereditary disorder that is primarily characterized by intrahepatic cholestasis. It generally presents as a permanent disorder, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (PFIC1), or with intermittent cholestasis (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 (BRIC1)). Currently there is no effective medical therapy, and most patients need invasive surgery such as partial biliary drainage (PBD) or liver transplantation....

  3. Abnormal Patterns of Lipoprotein Lipase Release into the Plasma in GPIHBP1-deficient Mice*

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Michael M.; Yin, Liya; Beigneux, Anne P.; Davies, Brandon S. J.; Gin, Peter; Estrada, Kristine; Melford, Kristan; Bishop, Joseph R.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Fong, Loren G.; Bensadoun, André; Young, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    GPIHBP1-deficient mice (Gpihbp1–/–) exhibit severe chylomicronemia. GPIHBP1 is located within capillaries of muscle and adipose tissue, and expression of GPIHBP1 in Chinese hamster ovary cells confers upon those cells the ability to bind lipoprotein lipase (LPL). However, there has been absolutely no evidence that GPIHBP1 actually interacts with LPL in vivo. Heparin is known to release LPL from its in vivo binding sites, allowing it to enter the plasma. After an injection ...

  4. Aberrant recombination and repair during immunoglobulin class switching in BRCA1-deficient human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkman, Andrea; Qvist, Per; Du, Likun;

    2015-01-01

    machinery. A shift to the use of microhomology-based, alternative end-joining (A-EJ) and increased frequencies of intra-S region deletions as well as insertions of inverted S sequences were observed at the recombination junctions amplified from BRCA1-deficient human B cells. Furthermore, increased use of...... underlying BRCA1’s function in maintaining genome stability and tumor suppression but may also point to a previously unrecognized role of BRCA1 in B-cell lymphomagenesis....

  5. Heat Shock Transcription Factor 1-Deficiency Attenuates Overloading-Associated Hypertrophy of Mouse Soleus Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoyuki Koya; Sono Nishizawa; Yoshitaka Ohno; Ayumi Goto; Akihiro Ikuta; Miho Suzuki; Tomotaka Ohira; Tatsuro Egawa; Akira Nakai; Takao Sugiura; Yoshinobu Ohira; Toshitada Yoshioka; Moroe Beppu; Katsumasa Goto

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs) in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on t...

  6. Transdifferentiation of lung adenocarcinoma in mice with Lkb1 deficiency to squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xiangkun; Li, Fuming; Fang, Zhaoyuan; Gao, Yijun; Li, Fei; Fang, Rong; Yao, Shun; Sun, Yihua; Li, Li; Zhang, Wenjing; Ma, Huimin; Xiao, Qian; Ge, Gaoxiang; Fang, Jing; Wang, Hongda

    2014-01-01

    Lineage transition in adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of non-small cell lung cancer, as implicated by clinical observation of mixed ADC and SCC pathologies in adenosquamous cell carcinoma, remains a fundamental yet unsolved question. Here we provide in vivo evidence showing the transdifferentiation of lung cancer from ADC to SCC in mice: Lkb1-deficient lung ADC progressively transdifferentiates into SCC, via a pathologically mixed mAd-SCC intermediate. We find that redu...

  7. Metabolic Effects of CX3CR1 Deficiency in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Shah

    Full Text Available The fractalkine (CX3CL1-CX3CR1 chemokine system is associated with obesity-related inflammation and type 2 diabetes, but data on effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency on metabolic pathways is contradictory. We examined male C57BL/6 Cx3cr1-/- mice on chow and high-fat diet to determine the metabolic effects of Cx3cr1 deficiency. We found no difference in body weight and fat content or feeding and energy expenditure between Cx3cr1-/- and WT mice. Cx3cr1-/- mice had reduced glucose intolerance assessed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests at chow and high-fat fed states, though there was no difference in glucose-stimulated insulin values. Cx3cr1-/- mice also had improved insulin sensitivity at hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, with higher glucose infusion rate, rate of disposal, and hepatic glucose production suppression compared to WT mice. Enhanced insulin signaling in response to acute intravenous insulin injection was demonstrated in Cx3cr1-/- by increased liver protein levels of phosphorylated AKT and GSK3β proteins. There were no differences in adipose tissue macrophage populations, circulating inflammatory monocytes, adipokines, lipids, or inflammatory markers. In conclusion, we demonstrate a moderate and reproducible protective effect of Cx3cr1 deficiency on glucose intolerance and insulin resistance.

  8. Aquaporin-1 Deficiency Protects Against Myocardial Infarction by Reducing Both Edema and Apoptosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Weng, Zhiyong; Yao, Chenjuan; Song, Yuanlin; Ma, Tonghui

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have determined that AQP1 plays an important role in edema formation and resolution in various tissues via water transport across the cell membrane. The aim of this research was to determine both if and how AQP1 is associated with cardiac ischemic injury, particularly the development of edema following myocardial infarction (MI). AQP1+/+ and AQP1-/- mice were used to create the MI model. Under physiological conditions, AQP1-/- mice develop normally; however, in the setting of MI, they exhibit cardioprotective properties, as shown by reduced cardiac infarct size determined via NBT staining, improved cardiac function determined via left ventricular catheter measurements, decreased AQP1-dependent myocardial edema determined via water content assays, and decreased apoptosis determined via TUNEL analysis. Cardiac ischemia caused by hypoxia secondary to AQP1 deficiency stabilized the expression of HIF-1α in endothelial cells and subsequently decreased microvascular permeability, resulting in the development of edema. The AQP1-dependent myocardial edema and apoptosis contributed to the development of MI. AQP1 deficiency protected cardiac function from ischemic injury following MI. Furthermore, AQP1 deficiency reduced microvascular permeability via the stabilization of HIF-1α levels in endothelial cells and decreased cellular apoptosis following MI. PMID:26348407

  9. Inherited MST1 deficiency underlies susceptibility to EV-HPV infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Crequer

    Full Text Available Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV is characterized by persistent cutaneous lesions caused by a specific group of related human papillomavirus genotypes (EV-HPVs in otherwise healthy individuals. Autosomal recessive (AR EVER1 and EVER2 deficiencies account for two thirds of known cases of EV. AR RHOH deficiency has recently been described in two siblings with EV-HPV infections as well as other infectious and tumoral manifestations. We report here the whole-exome based discovery of AR MST1 deficiency in a 19-year-old patient with a T-cell deficiency associated with EV-HPV, bacterial and fungal infections. MST1 deficiency has recently been described in seven patients from three unrelated kindreds with profound T-cell deficiency and various viral and bacterial infections. The patient was also homozygous for a rare ERCC3 variation. Our findings broaden the clinical range of infections seen in MST1 deficiency and provide a new genetic etiology of susceptibility to EV-HPV infections. Together with the recent discovery of RHOH deficiency, they suggest that T cells are involved in the control of EV-HPVs, at least in some individuals.

  10. A distinct response to endogenous DNA damage in the development of Nbs1-deficient cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Li; Yun-Gui Yang; Yunzhou Gao; Zhao-Qi Wang; Wei-Min Tong

    2012-01-01

    Microcephaly is a clinical characteristic for human nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS,mutated in NBS1 gene),a chromosomal instability syndrome.However,the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains elusive.In the present study,we demonstrate that neuronal disruption ofNBS (Nbn in mice) causes microcephaly characterized by the reduction of cerebral cortex and corpus cailosum,recapitulating neuronal anomalies in human NBS.Nbs1-deficient neocortex shows accumulative endogenous DNA damage and defective activation ofAtaxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR)-Chk1 pathway upon DNA damage.Notably,in contrast to massive apoptotic cell death in Nbs1-deficient cerebella,activation of p53 leads to a defective neuroprogenitor proliferation in neocortex,likely via specific persistent induction of hematopoietic zinc finger (Hzf) that preferentially promotes p53-mediated cell cycle arrest whilst inhibiting apoptosis.Moreover,Trp53 mutations substantially rescue the microcephaly in Nbs1-deficient mice.Thus,the present results reveal the first clue that developing neurons at different regions of brain selectively respond to endogenous DNA damage,and underscore an important role for Nbs1 in neurogenesis.

  11. Nat1 Deficiency Is Associated with Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Exercise Intolerance in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indumathi Chennamsetty

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We recently identified human N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 as an insulin resistance (IR gene. Here, we examine the cellular mechanism linking NAT2 to IR and find that Nat1 (mouse ortholog of NAT2 is co-regulated with key mitochondrial genes. RNAi-mediated silencing of Nat1 led to mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by increased intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial fragmentation as well as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, biogenesis, mass, cellular respiration, and ATP generation. These effects were consistent in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, C2C12 myoblasts, and in tissues from Nat1-deficient mice, including white adipose tissue, heart, and skeletal muscle. Nat1-deficient mice had changes in plasma metabolites and lipids consistent with a decreased ability to utilize fats for energy and a decrease in basal metabolic rate and exercise capacity without altered thermogenesis. Collectively, our results suggest that Nat1 deficiency results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which may constitute a mechanistic link between this gene and IR.

  12. Bach1 Deficiency and Accompanying Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 Do Not Influence Aging or Tumorigenesis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Ota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress contributes to both aging and tumorigenesis. The transcription factor Bach1, a regulator of oxidative stress response, augments oxidative stress by repressing the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 gene (Hmox1 and suppresses oxidative stress-induced cellular senescence by restricting the p53 transcriptional activity. Here we investigated the lifelong effects of Bach1 deficiency on mice. Bach1-deficient mice showed longevity similar to wild-type mice. Although HO-1 was upregulated in the cells of Bach1-deficient animals, the levels of ROS in Bach1-deficient HSCs were comparable to those in wild-type cells. Bach1−/−; p53−/− mice succumbed to spontaneous cancers as frequently as p53-deficient mice. Bach1 deficiency significantly altered transcriptome in the liver of the young mice, which surprisingly became similar to that of wild-type mice during the course of aging. The transcriptome adaptation to Bach1 deficiency may reflect how oxidative stress response is tuned upon genetic and environmental perturbations. We concluded that Bach1 deficiency and accompanying overexpression of HO-1 did not influence aging or p53 deficiency-driven tumorigenesis. Our results suggest that it is useful to target Bach1 for acute injury responses without inducing any apparent deteriorative effect.

  13. Arterial dysfunction but maintained systemic blood pressure in cavin-1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Swärd

    Full Text Available Caveolae are omega-shaped plasma membrane micro-domains that are abundant in cells of the vascular system. Formation of caveolae depends on caveolin-1 and cavin-1 and lack of either protein leads to loss of caveolae. Mice with caveolin-1 deficiency have dysfunctional blood vessels, but whether absence of cavin-1 similarly leads to vascular dysfunction is not known. Here we addressed this hypothesis using small mesenteric arteries from cavin-1-deficient mice. Cavin-1-reporter staining was intense in mesenteric arteries, brain arterioles and elsewhere in the vascular system, with positive staining of both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Arterial expression of cavin-1, -2 and -3 was reduced in knockout (KO arteries as was expression of caveolin-1, -2 and -3. Caveolae were absent in the endothelial and smooth muscle layers of small mesenteric arteries as determined by electron microscopy. Arginase, a negative regulator of nitric oxide production, was elevated in cavin-1 deficient arteries as was contraction in response to the α1-adrenergic agonist cirazoline. Detailed assessment of vascular dimensions revealed increased media thickness and reduced distensibility, arguing that enhanced contraction was due to increased muscle mass. Contrasting with increased α1-adrenergic contraction, myogenic tone was essentially absent and this appeared to be due in part to increased nitric oxide production. Vasomotion was less frequent in the knock-out vessels. In keeping with the opposing influences on arterial resistance of increased agonist-induced contractility and reduced myogenic tone, arterial blood pressure was unchanged in vivo. We conclude that deficiency of cavin-1 affects the function of small arteries, but that opposing influences on arterial resistance balance each other such that systemic blood pressure in unstressed mice is well maintained.

  14. CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency: New form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosho, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Carbohydrate sulfotransferase 14/dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase-1 (CHST14/D4ST1) deficiency represents a specific form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) caused by recessive loss-of-function mutations in CHST14. The disorder has been independently termed "adducted thumb-clubfoot syndrome", "EDS, Kosho type", and "EDS, musculocontractural type". To date, 31 affected patients from 21 families have been described. Clinically, CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency is characterized by multiple congenital malformations (craniofacial features including large fontanelle, hypertelorism, short and downslanting palpebral fissures, blue sclerae, short nose with hypoplastic columella, low-set and rotated ears, high palate, long philtrum, thin upper lip vermilion, small mouth, and micro-retrognathia; multiple congenital contractures including adduction-flexion contractures and talipes equinovarus as well as other visceral or ophthalmological malformations) and progressive multisystem fragility-related complications (skin hyperextensibility, bruisability, and fragility with atrophic scars; recurrent dislocations; progressive talipes or spinal deformities; pneumothorax or pneumohemothorax; large subcutaneous hematomas; and diverticular perforation). Etiologically, multisystem fragility is presumably caused by impaired assembly of collagen fibrils resulting from loss of dermatan sulfate (DS) in the decorin glycosaminoglycan side chain that promotes electrostatic binding between collagen fibrils. This is the first reported human disorder that specifically affects biosynthesis of DS. Its clinical characteristics indicate that CHST14/D4ST1 and, more fundamentally, DS, play a critical role in fetal development and maintenance of connective tissues in multiple organs. Considering that patients with CHST14/D4ST1 deficiency develop progressive multisystem fragility-related manifestations, establishment of a comprehensive and detailed natural history and health-care guidelines as well as further elucidation

  15. 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like 1 (OASL1) deficiency suppresses central nervous system damage in a murine MOG-induced multiple sclerosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Young; Sim, Chan Kyu; Cho, Yeon Sook; Sohn, Min; Kim, Young-Joon; Lee, Myeong Sup; Suh, Sang Won

    2016-08-15

    Type I Interferon (IFN-I) is critical for antiviral and antitumor defense. Additionally, IFN-I has been used for treating multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Recently, we reported that 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like 1 (OASL1) negatively regulates IFN-I production upon viral infection and tumor challenge. Therefore, OASL1 deficient (Oasl1(-)(/)(-)) mice are resistant to viral infections and tumor challenge. In this study, we examined whether OASL1 plays a negative role in the development of autoimmune MS by using Oasl1(-)(/)(-) mice and a murine MS model, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Oasl1(-)(/)(-) mice showed enhanced resistance to EAE development compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Additionally, EAE-induced Oasl1(-)(/)(-) mice showed fewer infiltrated immune cells such as T cells and macrophages in the CNS and less CNS inflammation, compared to WT mice. Collectively, these results indicate that OASL1 deficiency suppresses the development of MS-like autoimmunity and suggest that negative regulators of IFN-I could be good therapeutic targets for treating MS in humans. PMID:27297771

  16. Self-antigen recognition by TGFβ1-deficient T cells causes their activation and systemic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Bommireddy, Ramireddy; Pathak, Leena J; Martin, Jennifer; Ormsby, Ilona; Engle, Sandra J; Gregory P. Boivin; Babcock, George F.; Eriksson, Anna U.; Singh, Ram R; DOETSCHMAN, THOMAS

    2006-01-01

    To investigate whether the multifocal inflammatory disease in TGFβ1-deficient mice is caused by self-antigen (self-Ag)-specific autoreactive T cells, or whether it is caused by antigen independent, spontaneous hyperactivation of T cells, we have generated Tgfb1−/− and Tgfb1−/− Rag1−/− mice expressing the chicken OVA-specific TCR transgene (DO11.10). On a Rag1-sufficient background, Tgfb1−/− DO11.10 mice develop a milder inflammation than do Tgfb1−/− mice, and their T cells display a less acti...

  17. JNK1 Deficiency Does Not Enhance Muscle Glucose Metabolism in Lean Mice*

    OpenAIRE

    Witczak, CA; Hirshman, MF; Jessen, N.; Fujii, N; Seifert, M.; Brandauer, J; Hotamisligil, GS; Goodyear, LJ

    2006-01-01

    Mice deficient in c‐jun‐NH2‐terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) exhibit decreased fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, and protection against obesity‐induced insulin resistance, suggesting increased glucose disposal into skeletal muscle. Thus, we assessed whether JNK1 deficiency enhances muscle glucose metabolism. Ex vivo insulin or contraction‐induced muscle [³H]‐2‐deoxyglucose uptake was not altered in JNK1 knockout mice, demonstrating that JNK1 does not regulate blood glucose levels via direct a...

  18. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome effectively treated with modified Atkins diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlandt, Edda; Karall, Daniela; Jud, Veronika; Baumgartner, Sara Sigl; Zotter, Sibylle; Rostasy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    This is a report on the successful treatment of a 6-year-old girl with genetically proven glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) with modified Atkins diet (MAD). GLUT1-DS is an inborn disorder of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier, which leads to energy deficiency of the brain with a broad spectrum of neurological symptoms including therapy-resistant epilepsy. Usually classical ketogenic diet (KD) is the standard treatment for patients with GLUT1-DS. Treatment with MAD, a variant of KD, for an observation period of 17 months resulted in improvement of seizures, alertness, cognitive abilities, and electroencephalography in this patient.

  19. Virulence Criteria for Brucella abortus Strains as Determined by Interferon Regulatory Factor 1-Deficient Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Jinkyung; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Thomas A Ficht; Gary A Splitter

    2002-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 1-deficient (IRF-1−/−) mice infected with virulent Brucella abortus 2308 at 5 × 105 CFU developed acute hepatitis similar to many natural hosts but, unlike natural hosts, IRF-1−/− mice were unable to resolve infection and died. In contrast, IRF-1−/− mice survived when infected at 5 × 105 CFU with several attenuated Brucella strains (S19, RB51, cbp, and cyd). The survival of infected IRF-1−/− mice is likely a function of the level of virulence of each Brucella stra...

  20. Delayed Adrenarche may be an Additional Feature of Immunoglobulin Super Family Member 1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulle, Severine Van; Craen, Margarita; Callewaert, Bert; Joustra, Sjoerd; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Wit, Jan Maarten; Turgeon, Marc Olivier; Bernard, Daniel J; Schepper, Jean De

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin super family member 1 (IGSF1) deficiency syndrome is characterized by central hypothyroidism, delayed surge in testosterone during puberty, macro-orchidism, and in some cases, hypoprolactinemia and/or transient growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Our patient was a 19-year-old male adolescent who had been treated since the age of 9 years with GH and thyroxine for an idiopathic combined GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) deficiency. His GH deficiency proved to be transient, but deficiencies of TSH and PRL persisted, and he had developed macro-orchidism since the end of puberty. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and PROP1 and POU1F1 sequencing were normal. A disharmonious puberty (delayed genital and pubic hair development, bone maturation, and pubertal growth spurt, despite normal testicular growth) was observed as well as a delayed adrenarche, as reflected by very low dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and delayed pubarche. Direct sequencing of the IGSF1 gene revealed a novel hemizygous mutation, c.3127T>C, p.Cys1043Arg. Pathogenicity of the mutation was demonstrated in vitro. Male children with an idiopathic combined GH, PRL, and TSH deficiency, showing persistent central hypothyroidism but transient GH deficiency upon retesting at adult height, should be screened for mutations in the IGSF1 gene, especially when macro-orchidism and/or hypoprolactinemia are present. We suspect that delayed adrenarche, as a consequence of PRL deficiency, might be part of the clinical phenotype of patients with IGSF1 deficiency. PMID:26757742

  1. Partial absence of pleuropericardial membranes in Tbx18- and Wt1-deficient mice.

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    Julia Norden

    Full Text Available The pleuropericardial membranes are fibro-serous walls that separate the pericardial and pleural cavities and anchor the heart inside the mediastinum. Partial or complete absence of pleuropericardial membranes is a rare human disease, the etiology of which is poorly understood. As an attempt to better understand these defects, we wished to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms directing the separation of pericardial and pleural cavities by pleuropericardial membranes in the mouse. We found by histological analyses that both in Tbx18- and Wt1-deficient mice the pleural and pericardial cavities communicate due to a partial absence of the pleuropericardial membranes in the hilus region. We trace these defects to a persisting embryonic connection between these cavities, the pericardioperitoneal canals. Furthermore, we identify mesenchymal ridges in the sinus venosus region that tether the growing pleuropericardial membranes to the hilus of the lung, and thus, close the pericardioperitoneal canals. In Tbx18-deficient embryos these mesenchymal ridges are not established, whereas in Wt1-deficient embryos the final fusion process between these tissues and the body wall does not occur. We suggest that this fusion is an active rather than a passive process, and discuss the interrelation between closure of the pericardioperitoneal canals, lateral release of the pleuropericardial membranes from the lateral body wall, and sinus horn development.

  2. GLUT-1 DEFICIENCY: FROM PATHOPHYSILOGY AND GENETICS TO ABROAD CLINICAL SPECTRUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Arsov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The classical GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS, De Vivo disease was described over 2 decades ago as a metabolic encephalopathy characterized by developmental delay, secondary microcephaly paroxysmal neurological symptoms (epilepsy and movement disorders. The biochemical parameters of this disease, used in diagnosis, are low levels of glucose in the cerebrospinal fluid, normal level of glucose in the blood and consequent low ratio of cerebrospinal fluid vs. blood glucose levels (<40-45%. So far, more than 200 cases of the classical GLUT-1 DS have been described in the literature. Genetic research demonstrated that this disease is caused by mutations in SLC2A1 gene coding for GLUT-1, a transporter of glucose across the blood brain barrier. Over the last few years the clinical spectrum of GLUT-1 deficiencywas expanded to include other rare diseases such as paroxysmal exertional dyskinesia and early-onset absence epilepsy, but also some more common diseases such as idiopathic generalised epilepsy (1-2%. GLUT-1 deficiency is an important pathophysiological basis of these diseases as early diagnosis (aided by DNA mutation testing and treatment (ketogenic diet could lead to improved disease outcomes.

  3. Plasminogen activator inhibitor with very long half-life (VLHL PAI-1) can reduce bleeding in PAI-1-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankun, Jerzy; Skrzypczak-Jankun, Ewa

    2013-08-01

    This review summarizes our current knowledge of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) deficiency and proposes some novel treatments for this condition. PAI-1 is a fast acting inhibitor of tissue and urokinase plasminogen activators (tPA and uPA). PAI-1 controls/slows clot lysis triggered by tPA activated plasminogen. PAI-1 deficiency was once considered to be an extremely rare disorder characterized by frequent and prolonged bleeding episodes. PAI-1 deficiency is now thought to be more frequent than initially reported and is known to be caused by mutations in the PAI-1 gene that produce a dysfunctional PAI-1 protein or slow the secretion of PAI-1 into the circulation. PAI-1 deficiency is characterized by hyperfibrinolysis that results in frequent bleeding episodes. Patients with this condition form normal blood clots that are quickly lysed by unopposed tPA-activated plasmin. Spontaneous bleeding is rare in PAI-1 deficient patients, but moderate hemorrhaging of the knees, elbows, nose, and gums can be triggered by mild trauma. Additionally, prolonged bleeding after surgery is common and menstrual bleeding may be severe. Moderate PAI-1 deficiency is associated with a lifelong bleeding tendency, but severe deficiencies can be life-threatening. The diagnosis of this disorder remains challenging due to the lack of a clear definition of PAI-1 deficiency as well as a lack of standardized tests. Patients with mild PAI-1 deficiency may be treated with antifibrinolytic agents (ε-aminocaproic acid or tranexamic acid); however, not all patients respond well to these treatments. These patients may be treated with wild-type PAI-1; however, this molecule quickly converts into its inactive form. We propose to use PAI-1 with an extended half-life to treat these patients. PMID:23988002

  4. Genetic KCa3.1-deficiency produces locomotor hyperactivity and alterations in cerebral monoamine levels.

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    Kate Lykke Lambertsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The calmodulin/calcium-activated K(+ channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the open field test, KCa3.1-deficiency increased horizontal activity, as KCa3.1(-/- mice travelled longer distances (≈145% of KCa3.1(+/+ and at higher speed (≈1.5-fold of KCa3.1(+/+. Working memory in the Y-maze was reduced by KCa3.1-deficiency. Motor coordination on the rotarod and neuromuscular functions were unchanged. In KCa3.1(-/- mice, HPLC analysis revealed that turn-over rates of serotonin were reduced in frontal cortex, striatum and brain stem, while noradrenalin turn-over rates were increased in the frontal cortex. Dopamine turn-over rates were unaltered. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels were unaltered. Intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg/kg of the KCa3.1/KCa2-activator SKA-31 reduced rearing and turning behavior in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice, while 30 mg/kg SKA-31 caused strong sedation in 50% of the animals of either genotypes. KCa3.1(-/- mice were hyperactive (≈+60% in their home cage and SKA-31-administration reduced nocturnal physical activity in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: KCa3.1-deficiency causes locomotor hyperactivity and altered monoamine levels in selected brain regions, suggesting a so far unknown functional link of KCa3.1 channels to behavior and monoaminergic neurotransmission in mice. The tranquilizing effects of low-dose SKA-31 raise the possibility to use KCa3.1/KCa2 channels as novel pharmacological targets for the treatment of neuropsychiatric hyperactivity disorders.

  5. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance.

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    Birgitte Holst

    Full Text Available Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here, we identify the lipid binding BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs domain protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1 as a key component early in the biogenesis of secretory vesicles in GH-producing cells. Both PICK1-deficient Drosophila and mice displayed somatic growth retardation. Growth retardation was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported by electron microscopy showing prominent reduction in secretory vesicle number. Evidence was also obtained for impaired insulin secretion associated with decreased glucose tolerance. PICK1 localized in cells to immature secretory vesicles, and the PICK1 BAR domain was shown by live imaging to associate with vesicles budding from the TGN and to possess membrane-sculpting properties in vitro. In mouse pituitary, PICK1 co-localized with the BAR domain protein ICA69, and PICK1 deficiency abolished ICA69 protein expression. In the Drosophila brain, PICK1 and ICA69 co-immunoprecipitated and showed mutually dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus for vesicular storage of GH and possibly other hormones. The data link two BAR domain proteins to membrane remodeling processes in the secretory pathway of

  6. PICK1 deficiency impairs secretory vesicle biogenesis and leads to growth retardation and decreased glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Madsen, Kenneth L; Jansen, Anna M;

    2013-01-01

    Secretory vesicles in endocrine cells store hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and insulin before their release into the bloodstream. The molecular mechanisms governing budding of immature secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent maturation remain unclear. Here...... was rescued in flies by reintroducing PICK1 in neurosecretory cells producing somatotropic peptides. PICK1-deficient mice were characterized by decreased body weight and length, increased fat accumulation, impaired GH secretion, and decreased storage of GH in the pituitary. Decreased GH storage was supported...... dependent expression. Finally, both in a Drosophila model of type 2 diabetes and in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice, we observed up-regulation of PICK1 mRNA expression. Our findings suggest that PICK1, together with ICA69, is critical during budding of immature secretory vesicles from the TGN and thus...

  7. Delayed onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Olig1 deficient mice.

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    Xiaoli Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Olig1 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor that is essential for oligodendrogenesis and efficient remyelination. However, its role in neurodegenerative disorders has not been well-elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the effects of Olig1 deficiency on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS. We show that the mean disease onset of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced EAE in Olig1(-/- mice is significantly slower than wide-type (WT mice (19.8 ± 2.2 in Olig1(-/- mice and 9.5 ± 0.3 days in WT mice. In addition, 10% of Olig1(-/- mice did not develop EAE by the end of the observation periods (60 days. The severity of EAE, the extent of demyelination, and the activation of microglial cells and astrocytes in spinal cords, were significantly milder in Olig1(-/- mice compared with WT mice in the early stage. Moreover, the visual function, as assessed by the second-kernel of multifocal electroretinograms, was better preserved, and the number of degenerating axons in the optic nerve was significantly reduced in Olig1(-/- mice. Interestingly, Olig1 deficiency had no effect on T cell response capability, however, it reduced the expression of myelin proteins such as MOG, myelin basic protein (MBP and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG. The expression of Olig2 remained unchanged in the optic nerve and brain, and it was reduced in the spinal cord of Olig1(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that the Olig1 signaling pathways may be involved in the incidence rate and the severity of neurological symptoms in MS.

  8. HSulf-1 deficiency dictates a metabolic reprograming of glycolysis and TCA cycle in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Susmita; Roy, Debarshi; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Khurana, Ashwani; Chini, Eduardo; Yang, Lifeng; Baddour, Joelle; Stilles, Katherine; Padmabandu, Seth; Leung, Sam; Kalloger, Steve; Gilks, Blake; Lowe, Val; Dierks, Thomas; Hammond, Edward; Dredge, Keith; Nagrath, Deepak; Shridhar, Viji

    2015-10-20

    Warburg effect has emerged as a potential hallmark of many cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms that led to this metabolic state of aerobic glycolysis, particularly in ovarian cancer (OVCA) have not been completely elucidated. HSulf-1 predominantly functions by limiting the bioavailability of heparan binding growth factors and hence their downstream signaling. Here we report that HSulf-1, a known putative tumor suppressor, is a negative regulator of glycolysis. Silencing of HSulf-1 expression in OV202 cell line increased glucose uptake and lactate production by upregulating glycolytic genes such as Glut1, HKII, LDHA, as well as metabolites. Conversely, HSulf-1 overexpression in TOV21G cells resulted in the down regulation of glycolytic enzymes and reduced glycolytic phenotype, supporting the role of HSulf-1 loss in enhanced aerobic glycolysis. HSulf-1 deficiency mediated glycolytic enhancement also resulted in increased inhibitory phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) thus blocking the entry of glucose flux into TCA cycle. Consistent with this, metabolomic and isotope tracer analysis showed reduced glucose flux into TCA cycle. Moreover, HSulf-1 loss is associated with lower oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and impaired mitochondrial function. Mechanistically, lack of HSulf-1 promotes c-Myc induction through HB-EGF-mediated p-ERK activation. Pharmacological inhibition of c-Myc reduced HB-EGF induced glycolytic enzymes implicating a major role of c-Myc in loss of HSulf-1 mediated altered glycolytic pathway in OVCA. Similarly, PG545 treatment, an agent that binds to heparan binding growth factors and sequesters growth factors away from their ligand also blocked HB-EGF signaling and reduced glucose uptake in vivo in HSulf-1 deficient cells. PMID:26378042

  9. Activation of Molecular Signatures for Antimicrobial and Innate Defense Responses in Skin with Transglutaminase 1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneda, Takashi; Imai, Yasutomo; Uchiyama, Ryosuke; Jitsukawa, Orie; Yamanishi, Kiyofumi

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1) are a major cause of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCIs) that are associated with defects in skin barrier structure and function. However, the molecular processes induced by the transglutaminase 1 deficiency are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to uncover those processes by analysis of cutaneous molecular signatures. Gene expression profiles of wild-type and Tgm1-/-epidermis were assessed using microarrays. Gene ontology analysis of the data showed that genes for innate defense responses were up-regulated in Tgm1-/-epidermis. Based on that result, the induction of Il1b and antimicrobial peptide genes, S100a8, S100a9, Defb14, Camp, Slpi, Lcn2, Ccl20 and Wfdc12, was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. A protein array revealed that levels of IL-1β, G-CSF, GM-CSF, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL9 and CCL2 were increased in Tgm1-/-skin. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand genes, Hbegf, Areg and Ereg, were activated in Tgm1-/-epidermis. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of an epidermal extract from Tgm1-/-mice was significantly increased against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In the epidermis of ichthyosiform skins from patients with TGM1 mutations, S100A8/9 was strongly positive. The expression of those antimicrobial and defense response genes was also increased in the lesional skin of an ARCI patient with TGM1 mutations. These results suggest that the up-regulation of molecular signatures for antimicrobial and innate defense responses is characteristic of skin with a transglutaminase 1 deficiency, and this autonomous process might be induced to reinforce the defective barrier function of the skin. PMID:27442430

  10. Derivative chromosome 1 and GLUT1 deficiency syndrome in a sibling pair

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    Akarsu Nurten

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imbalances constitute a major cause of congenital and developmental abnormalities. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is caused by various de novo mutations in the facilitated human glucose transporter 1 gene (1p34.2 and patients with this syndrome have been diagnosed with hypoglycorrhachia, mental and developmental delay, microcephaly and seizures. Furthermore, 1q terminal deletions have been submitted in the recent reports and the absence of corpus callosum has been related to the deletion between C1orf100 and C1orf121 in 1q44. Results This study reports on a sibling pair with developmental delay, mental retardation, microcephaly, hypotonia, epilepsy, facial dysmorphism, ataxia and impaired speech. Chromosome analysis revealed a derivative chromosome 1 in both patients. FISH and MCB analysis showed two interstitial deletions at 1p34.2 and 1q44. SNP array and array-CGH analysis also determined the sizes of deletions detailed. The deleted region on 1p34.2 encompasses 33 genes, among which is GLUT1 gene (SLC2A1. However, the deleted region on 1q44 includes 59 genes and distal-proximal breakpoints were located in the ZNF672 gene and SMYD3 gene, respectively. Conclusion Haploinsufficiency of GLUT1 leads to GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, consistent with the phenotype in patients of this study. Conversely, in the deleted region on 1q44, none of the genes are related to findings in these patients. Additionally, the results confirm previous reports on that corpus callosal development may depend on the critical gene(s lying in 1q44 proximal to the SMYD3 gene.

  11. IL-12Rβ1 deficiency in two of fifty children with severe tuberculosis from Iran, Morocco, and Turkey.

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    Stéphanie Boisson-Dupuis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In the last decade, autosomal recessive IL-12Rβ1 deficiency has been diagnosed in four children with severe tuberculosis from three unrelated families from Morocco, Spain, and Turkey, providing proof-of-principle that tuberculosis in otherwise healthy children may result from single-gene inborn errors of immunity. We aimed to estimate the fraction of children developing severe tuberculosis due to IL-12Rβ1 deficiency in areas endemic for tuberculosis and where parental consanguinity is common. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We searched for IL12RB1 mutations in a series of 50 children from Iran, Morocco, and Turkey. All children had established severe pulmonary and/or disseminated tuberculosis requiring hospitalization and were otherwise normally resistant to weakly virulent BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria. In one child from Iran and another from Morocco, homozygosity for loss-of-function IL12RB1 alleles was documented, resulting in complete IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Despite the small sample studied, our findings suggest that IL-12Rβ1 deficiency is not a very rare cause of pediatric tuberculosis in these countries, where it should be considered in selected children with severe disease. SIGNIFICANCE: This finding may have important medical implications, as recombinant IFN-γ is an effective treatment for mycobacterial infections in IL-12Rβ1-deficient patients. It also provides additional support for the view that severe tuberculosis in childhood may result from a collection of single-gene inborn errors of immunity.

  12. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 deficiency reduces spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice fed a high-fat diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Sundaram, Sneha

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-produced pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to obesity and cancer. This 2×2 experiment was designed to investigate effects of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) deficiency on pulmonary metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in MCP-1 deficient and wild-type mice fed a modified AIN93G diet containing 16% and 45% of energy from corn oil, respectively. The high-fat diet significantly increased the number and size (cross-sectional area and volume) of lung metastases compared to the AIN93G control diet. Deficiency in MCP-1 reduced lung metastases by 37% in high-fat diet-fed mice; it reduced metastatic cross-sectional area by 46% and volume by 69% compared to wild-type mice. Adipose and plasma concentrations of MCP-1 were significantly higher in high-fat diet-fed wild-type mice than in their AIN93G-fed counterparts; they were not detectable in MCP-1 deficient mice regardless of diet. Plasma concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 were significantly higher in MCP-1 deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. We conclude that adipose-produced MCP-1 contributes to high-fat diet-enhanced metastasis. While MCP-1 deficiency reduces metastasis, the elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors in the absence of MCP-1 may support the metastatic development and growth of LLC in MCP-1 deficient mice. PMID:27028862

  13. Effects of PARP-1 Deficiency on Th1 and Th2 Cell Differentiation

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    M. Sambucci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available T cell differentiation to effector Th cells such as Th1 and Th2 requires the integration of multiple synergic and antagonist signals. Poly(ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational modification of proteins catalyzed by Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs. Recently, many reports showed that PARP-1, the prototypical member of the PARP family, plays a role in immune/inflammatory responses. Consistently, its enzymatic inhibition confers protection in several models of immune-mediated diseases, mainly through an inhibitory effect on NF-κB (and NFAT activation. PARP-1 regulates cell functions in many types of immune cells, including dendritic cells, macrophages, and T and B lymphocytes. Our results show that PARP-1KO cells displayed a reduced ability to differentiate in Th2 cells. Under both nonskewing and Th2-polarizing conditions, naïve CD4 cells from PARP-1KO mice generated a reduced frequency of IL-4+ cells, produced less IL-5, and expressed GATA-3 at lower levels compared with cells from wild type mice. Conversely, PARP-1 deficiency did not substantially affect differentiation to Th1 cells. Indeed, the frequency of IFN-γ+ cells as well as IFN-γ production, in nonskewing and Th1-polarizing conditions, was not affected by PARP-1 gene ablation. These findings demonstrate that PARP-1 plays a relevant role in Th2 cell differentiation and it might be a target to be exploited for the modulation of Th2-dependent immune-mediated diseases.

  14. Annexin A1 Deficiency does not Affect Myofiber Repair but Delays Regeneration of Injured Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikina, Evgenia; Defour, Aurelia; Melikov, Kamran; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Gebert, Claudia; Pfeifer, Karl; Chernomordik, Leonid V; Jaiswal, Jyoti K

    2015-01-01

    Repair and regeneration of the injured skeletal myofiber involves fusion of intracellular vesicles with sarcolemma and fusion of the muscle progenitor cells respectively. In vitro experiments have identified involvement of Annexin A1 (Anx A1) in both these fusion processes. To determine if Anx A1 contributes to these processes during muscle repair in vivo, we have assessed muscle growth and repair in Anx A1-deficient mouse (AnxA1-/-). We found that the lack of Anx A1 does not affect the muscle size and repair of myofibers following focal sarcolemmal injury and lengthening contraction injury. However, the lack of Anx A1 delayed muscle regeneration after notexin-induced injury. This delay in muscle regeneration was not caused by a slowdown in proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, lack of Anx A1 lowered the proportion of differentiating myoblasts that managed to fuse with the injured myofibers by days 5 and 7 after notexin injury as compared to the wild type (w.t.) mice. Despite this early slowdown in fusion of Anx A1-/- myoblasts, regeneration caught up at later times post injury. These results establish in vivo role of Anx A1 in cell fusion required for myofiber regeneration and not in intracellular vesicle fusion needed for repair of myofiber sarcolemma. PMID:26667898

  15. B cell-specific S1PR1 deficiency blocks prion dissemination between secondary lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Simon W F; Proia, Richard L; Brinkmann, Volker; Mabbott, Neil A

    2012-05-15

    Many prion diseases are peripherally acquired (e.g., orally or via lesions to skin or mucous membranes). After peripheral exposure, prions replicate first upon follicular dendritic cells (FDC) in the draining lymphoid tissue before infecting the brain. However, after replication upon FDC within the draining lymphoid tissue, prions are subsequently propagated to most nondraining secondary lymphoid organs (SLO), including the spleen, by a previously underdetermined mechanism. The germinal centers in which FDC are situated produce a population of B cells that can recirculate between SLO. Therefore, we reasoned that B cells were ideal candidates by which prion dissemination between SLO may occur. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)1 stimulation controls the egress of T and B cells from SLO. S1PR1 signaling blockade sequesters lymphocytes within SLO, resulting in lymphopenia in the blood and lymph. We show that, in mice treated with the S1PR modulator FTY720 or with S1PR1 deficiency restricted to B cells, the dissemination of prions from the draining lymph node to nondraining SLO is blocked. These data suggest that B cells interacting with and acquiring surface proteins from FDC and recirculating between SLO via the blood and lymph mediate the initial propagation of prions from the draining lymphoid tissue to peripheral tissues. PMID:22504650

  16. A novel MCPH1 isoform complements the defective chromosome condensation of human MCPH1-deficient cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Gavvovidis

    Full Text Available Biallelic mutations in MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly (MCPH with the cellular phenotype of defective chromosome condensation. MCPH1 encodes a multifunctional protein that notably is involved in brain development, regulation of chromosome condensation, and DNA damage response. In the present studies, we detected that MCPH1 encodes several distinct transcripts, including two major forms: full-length MCPH1 (MCPH1-FL and a second transcript lacking the six 3' exons (MCPH1Δe9-14. Both variants show comparable tissue-specific expression patterns, demonstrate nuclear localization that is mediated independently via separate NLS motifs, and are more abundant in certain fetal than adult organs. In addition, the expression of either isoform complements the chromosome condensation defect found in genetically MCPH1-deficient or MCPH1 siRNA-depleted cells, demonstrating a redundancy of both MCPH1 isoforms for the regulation of chromosome condensation. Strikingly however, both transcripts are regulated antagonistically during cell-cycle progression and there are functional differences between the isoforms with regard to the DNA damage response; MCPH1-FL localizes to phosphorylated H2AX repair foci following ionizing irradiation, while MCPH1Δe9-14 was evenly distributed in the nucleus. In summary, our results demonstrate here that MCPH1 encodes different isoforms that are differentially regulated at the transcript level and have different functions at the protein level.

  17. Sod1 deficiency reduces incubation time in mouse models of prion disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Akhtar

    Full Text Available Prion infections, causing neurodegenerative conditions such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep and BSE in cattle are characterised by prolonged and variable incubation periods that are faithfully reproduced in mouse models. Incubation time is partly determined by genetic factors including polymorphisms in the prion protein gene. Quantitative trait loci studies in mice and human genome-wide association studies have confirmed that multiple genes are involved. Candidate gene approaches have also been used and identified App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 as affecting incubation times. In this study we looked for an association between App, Il1-r1 and Sod1 representative SNPs and prion disease incubation time in the Northport heterogeneous stock of mice inoculated with the Chandler/RML prion strain. No association was seen with App, however, significant associations were seen with Il1-r1 (P = 0.02 and Sod1 (P<0.0001 suggesting that polymorphisms at these loci contribute to the natural variation observed in incubation time. Furthermore, following challenge with Chandler/RML, ME7 and MRC2 prion strains, Sod1 deficient mice showed highly significant reductions in incubation time of 20, 13 and 24%, respectively. No differences were detected in Sod1 expression or activity. Our data confirm the protective role of endogenous Sod1 in prion disease.

  18. Modified Atkins diet therapy for a case with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Ito, Yasushi; Ishigaki, Keiko; Ohinata, Junko; Osawa, Makiko

    2008-03-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT-1 DS), giving rise to impaired glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier, is characterized by infantile seizures, complex motor disorders, global developmental delay, acquired microcephaly, and hypoglycorrhachia. GLUT-1 DS can be treated effectively with a ketogenic diet because it can provide an alternative fuel for brain metabolism; however, the excessive restriction of food intake involved frequently makes it difficult for patients to initiate or continue the diet. Recently, the modified Atkins diet, which is much less restrictive in terms of the total calorie and protein intake than the classical ketogenic diet, has been shown to be effective and well tolerated in children with intractable epilepsy. We successfully introduced the modified Atkins diet to a 7-year-old boy with GLUT-1 DS, whose caregivers refused ketogenic diet treatment because of strong concerns over restricting the diet. The modified Atkins diet should be considered for patients with GLUT-1 DS as an alternative to the traditional ketogenic diet.

  19. Occurrence of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome in patients treated with ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm-Pettersen, Anette; Nakken, Karl O; Haavardsholm, Kathrine Cammermeyer; Selmer, Kaja Kristine

    2014-03-01

    Glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is a treatable metabolic encephalopathy caused by a mutation in the SLC2A1 gene. This mutation causes a compromised transport of glucose across the blood-brain barrier. The treatment of choice is ketogenic diet, with which most patients become seizure-free. At the National Centre for Epilepsy, we have, since 2005, offered treatment with ketogenic diet (KD) and modified Atkins diet (MAD) to children with difficult-to-treat epilepsy. As we believe many children with GLUT1-DS are unrecognized, the aim of this study was to search for patients with GLUT1-DS among those who had been responders (>50% reduction in seizure frequency) to KD or MAD. Of the 130 children included, 58 (44%) were defined as responders. Among these, 11 were already diagnosed with GLUT1-DS. No mutations in the SLC2A1 gene were detected in the remaining patients. However, the clinical features of these patients differed considerably from the patients diagnosed with GLUT1-DS. While 9 out of 10 patients with GLUT1-DS became seizure-free with dietary treatment, only 3 out of the 33 remaining patients were seizure-free with KD or MAD treatment. We therefore conclude that a seizure reduction of >50% following dietary treatment is not a suitable criterion for identifying patients with GLUT1-DS, as these patients generally achieve complete seizure freedom shortly after diet initiation.

  20. Cholestasis and hypercholesterolemia in SCD1-deficient mice fed a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.T. Flowers; A.K. Groen; A.T. Oler; M.P. Keller; Y. Choi; K.L. Schueler; O.C. Richards; H. Lan; M. Miyazaki; F. Kuipers; C.M. Kendziorski; J.M. Ntambi; A.D. Attie

    2006-01-01

    Stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1-deficient (SCD1(-/-)) mice have impaired MUFA synthesis. When maintained on a very low-fat (VLF) diet, SCD1(-/-) mice developed severe hypercholesterolemia, characterized by an increase in apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins and the appearance of lipoprot

  1. Selective resistance to the PARP inhibitor olaparib in a mouse model for BRCA1-deficient metaplastic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Linda; van Miltenburg, Martine H.; Michalak, Ewa M.; Braumuller, Tanya M.; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Drenth, Anne Paulien; de Korte-Grimmerink, Renske; Gogola, Ewa; Szuhai, Karoly; Schlicker, Andreas; Bin Ali, Rahmen; Pritchard, Colin; Huijbers, Ivo J.; Berns, Anton; Rottenberg, Sven; Jonkers, Jos

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare histological breast cancer subtype characterized by mesenchymal elements and poor clinical outcome. A large fraction of MBCs harbor defects in breast cancer 1 (BRCA1). As BRCA1 deficiency sensitizes tumors to DNA cross-linking agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, we sought to investigate the response of BRCA1-deficient MBCs to the PARP inhibitor olaparib. To this end, we established a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) for BRCA1-deficient MBC by introducing the MET proto-oncogene into a BRCA1-associated breast cancer model, using our novel female GEMM ES cell (ESC) pipeline. In contrast to carcinomas, BRCA1-deficient mouse carcinosarcomas resembling MBC show intrinsic resistance to olaparib caused by increased P-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux transporter expression. Indeed, resistance could be circumvented by using another PARP inhibitor, AZD2461, which is a poor Pgp substrate. These preclinical findings suggest that patients with BRCA1-associated MBC may show poor response to olaparib and illustrate the value of GEMM-ESC models of human cancer for evaluation of novel therapeutics. PMID:26100884

  2. Variability in the effect of antidepressants upon Wfs1-deficient mice is dependent on the drugs' mechanism of actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimets, Riin; Raud, Sirli; Loomets, Maarja; Visnapuu, Tanel; Volke, Vallo; Reimets, Ain; Plaas, Mario; Vasar, Eero

    2016-07-15

    There is significant comorbidity between mood disorders and diabetes. Wolfram syndrome-related to deficient WFS1 gene function-causes diabetes and mood disorders in humans. Mice lacking the Wfs1 gene display impaired emotional behaviour and glucose metabolism. Various antidepressant drugs are used for alleviating the symptoms of mood disorders. For this study the tail suspension test and locomotor activity test were used to compare the effects of different antidepressants upon homozygous Wfs1-deficient, heterozygous Wfs1-deficient and wild-type mice. Mouse glucose metabolism was concurrently studied using the glucose tolerance test. We showed that ketamine(10mg/kg),NMDA antagonist, escitalopram(2.5-10mg/kg), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor(SSRI), and amitriptyline(10mg/kg), noradrenaline and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, elicited a stronger antidepressant-like effect in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. The effect of noradrenaline and serotonin reuptake inhibitor desipramine(10 and 20mg/kg) did not differ between genotypes. The dopamine and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor bupropion(5-20mg/kg) had no significant antidepressant-like effect upon any genotype. Amitriptyline and desipramine potentiated a glucose elevation, escitalopram and bupropion did not affect glucose concentrations, and ketamine improved impaired glucose metabolism in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that SSRIs are the drugs of choice for the treatment of depressive symptoms in diabetic patients. The efficacy of ketamine for these patients remains to be established. Nonetheless, employing the mechanism of action of ketamine that affected glucose metabolism positively, could be an approach for development of improved antidepressants. Wfs1-deficient mice are likely the good animal model to develop new antidepressants more suitable for depressed patients with diabetes. PMID:27080063

  3. Marrow Adipose Tissue Expansion Coincides with Insulin Resistance in MAGP1-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walji, Tezin A; Turecamo, Sarah E; Sanchez, Alejandro Coca; Anthony, Bryan A; Abou-Ezzi, Grazia; Scheller, Erica L; Link, Daniel C; Mecham, Robert P; Craft, Clarissa S

    2016-01-01

    Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) is an endocrine organ with the potential to influence skeletal remodeling and hematopoiesis. Pathologic MAT expansion has been studied in the context of severe metabolic challenge, including caloric restriction, high fat diet feeding, and leptin deficiency. However, the rapid change in peripheral fat and glucose metabolism associated with these models impedes our ability to examine which metabolic parameters precede or coincide with MAT expansion. Microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP1) is a matricellular protein that influences cellular processes by tethering signaling molecules to extracellular matrix structures. MAGP1-deficient (Mfap2 (-/-)) mice display a progressive excess adiposity phenotype, which precedes insulin resistance and occurs without changes in caloric intake or ambulation. Mfap2 (-/-) mice were, therefore, used as a model to associate parameters of metabolic disease, bone remodeling, and hematopoiesis with MAT expansion. Marrow adiposity was normal in Mfap2 (-/-) mice until 6 months of age; however, by 10 months, marrow fat volume had increased fivefold relative to wild-type control at the same age. Increased gonadal fat pad mass and hyperglycemia were detectable in Mfap2 (-/-) mice by 2 months, but peaked by 6 months. The development of insulin resistance coincided with MAT expansion. Longitudinal characterization of bone mass demonstrated a disconnection in MAT volume and bone volume. Specifically, Mfap2 (-/-) mice had reduced trabecular bone volume by 2 months, but this phenotype did not progress with age or MAT expansion. Interestingly, MAT expansion in the 10-month-old Mfap2 (-/-) mice was associated with modest alterations in basal hematopoiesis, including a shift from granulopoiesis to B lymphopoiesis. Together, these findings indicate MAT expansion is coincident with insulin resistance, but not excess peripheral adiposity or hyperglycemia in Mfap2 (-/-) mice; and substantial MAT accumulation does

  4. Diversion of aspartate in ASS1-deficient tumours fosters de novo pyrimidine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Shiran; Adler, Lital; Yizhak, Keren; Sarver, Alona; Silberman, Alon; Agron, Shani; Stettner, Noa; Sun, Qin; Brandis, Alexander; Helbling, Daniel; Korman, Stanley; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Dimmock, David; Ulitsky, Igor; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Ruppin, Eytan; Erez, Ayelet

    2015-11-19

    Cancer cells hijack and remodel existing metabolic pathways for their benefit. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS1) is a urea cycle enzyme that is essential in the conversion of nitrogen from ammonia and aspartate to urea. A decrease in nitrogen flux through ASS1 in the liver causes the urea cycle disorder citrullinaemia. In contrast to the well-studied consequences of loss of ASS1 activity on ureagenesis, the purpose of its somatic silencing in multiple cancers is largely unknown. Here we show that decreased activity of ASS1 in cancers supports proliferation by facilitating pyrimidine synthesis via CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase complex) activation. Our studies were initiated by delineating the consequences of loss of ASS1 activity in humans with two types of citrullinaemia. We find that in citrullinaemia type I (CTLN I), which is caused by deficiency of ASS1, there is increased pyrimidine synthesis and proliferation compared with citrullinaemia type II (CTLN II), in which there is decreased substrate availability for ASS1 caused by deficiency of the aspartate transporter citrin. Building on these results, we demonstrate that ASS1 deficiency in cancer increases cytosolic aspartate levels, which increases CAD activation by upregulating its substrate availability and by increasing its phosphorylation by S6K1 through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Decreasing CAD activity by blocking citrin, the mTOR signalling, or pyrimidine synthesis decreases proliferation and thus may serve as a therapeutic strategy in multiple cancers where ASS1 is downregulated. Our results demonstrate that ASS1 downregulation is a novel mechanism supporting cancerous proliferation, and they provide a metabolic link between the urea cycle enzymes and pyrimidine synthesis.

  5. Heat shock transcription factor 1-deficiency attenuates overloading-associated hypertrophy of mouse soleus muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Koya

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1, and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on the left soleus was performed by cutting the distal tendons of gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles for 4 weeks. The right muscle served as the control. Soleus muscles from both hindlimbs were dissected 2 and 4 weeks after the operation. Hypertrophy of soleus muscle in HSF1-null mice was partially inhibited, compared with that in wild-type (C57BL/6J mice. Absence of HSF1 partially attenuated the increase of muscle wet weight and fiber cross-sectional area of overloaded soleus muscle. Population of Pax7-positive muscle satellite cells in HSF1-null mice was significantly less than that in wild-type mice following 2 weeks of overloading (p<0.05. Significant up-regulations of interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor mRNAs were observed in HSF1-null, but not in wild-type, mice following 2 weeks of overloading. Overloading-related increases of IL-6 and AFT3 mRNA expressions seen after 2 weeks of overloading tended to decrease after 4 weeks in both types of mice. In HSF1-null mice, however, the significant overloading-related increase in the expression of IL-6, not ATF3, mRNA was noted even at 4th week. Inhibition of muscle hypertrophy might be attributed to the greater and prolonged enhancement of IL-6 expression. HSF1 and/or HSF1-mediated stress response may, in part, play a key role in loading-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  6. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption.

  7. Chronotype and stability of spontaneous locomotor activity rhythm in BMAL1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Martina; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2015-02-01

    Behavior, physiological functions and cognitive performance change over the time of the day. These daily rhythms are either externally driven by rhythmic environmental cues such as the light/dark cycle (masking) or controlled by an internal circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which can be entrained to the light/dark cycle. Within a given species, there is genetically determined variability in the temporal preference for the onset of the active phase, the chronotype. The chronotype is the phase of entrainment between external and internal time and is largely regulated by the circadian clock. Genetic variations in clock genes and environmental influences contribute to the distribution of chronotypes in a given population. However, little is known about the determination of the chronotype, the stability of the locomotor rhythm and the re-synchronization capacity to jet lag in an animal without a functional endogenous clock. Therefore, we analyzed the chronotype of BMAL1-deficient mice (BMAL1-/-) as well as the effects of repeated experimental jet lag on locomotor activity rhythms. Moreover, light-induced period expression in the retina was analyzed to assess the responsiveness of the circadian light input system. In contrast to wild-type mice, BMAL1-/- showed a significantly later chronotype, adapted more rapidly to both phase advance and delay but showed reduced robustness of rhythmic locomotor activity after repeated phase shifts. However, photic induction of Period in the retina was not different between the two genotypes. Our findings suggest that a disturbed clockwork is associated with a late chronotype, reduced rhythm stability and higher vulnerability to repeated external desynchronization. PMID:25216070

  8. Olfactomedin 1 Deficiency Leads to Defective Olfaction and Impaired Female Fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Diao, Honglu; Zhao, Fei; Xiao, Shuo; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Dudley, Elizabeth A; Mattson, Mark P; Ye, Xiaoqin

    2015-09-01

    Olfactomedin 1 (OLFM1) is a glycoprotein highly expressed in the brain. Olfm1(-/-) female mice were previously reported to have reduced fertility. Previous microarray analysis revealed Olfm1 among the most highly upregulated genes in the uterine luminal epithelium upon embryo implantation, which was confirmed by in situ hybridization. We hypothesized that Olfm1 deficiency led to defective embryo implantation and thus impaired fertility. Indeed, Olfm1(-/-) females had defective embryo implantation. However, Olfm1(-/-) females rarely mated and those that mated rarely became pregnant. Ovarian histology indicated the absence of corpora lutea in Olfm1(-/-) females, indicating defective ovulation. Superovulation using equine chorionic gonadotropin-human chorionic gonadotropin rescued mating, ovulation, and pregnancy, and equine chorionic gonadotropin alone rescued ovulation in Olfm1(-/-) females. Olfm1(-/-) females had a 13% reduction of hypothalamic GnRH neurons but comparable basal serum LH levels and GnRH-induced LH levels compared with wild-type controls. These results indicated no obvious local defects in the female reproductive system and a functional hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Olfm1(-/-) females were unresponsive to the effects of male bedding stimulation on pubertal development and estrous cycle. There were 41% fewer cFos-positive cells in the mitral cell layer of accessory olfactory bulb upon male urine stimulation for 90 minutes. OLFM1 was expressed in the main and accessory olfactory systems including main olfactory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, main olfactory bulb, and accessory olfactory bulb, with the highest expression detected in the axon bundles of olfactory sensory neurons. These data demonstrate that defective fertility in Olfm1(-/-) females is most likely a secondary effect of defective olfaction. PMID:26107991

  9. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption. PMID:27228994

  10. PTRF/Cavin-1 Deficiency Causes Cardiac Dysfunction Accompanied by Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Cardiac Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Takehiro; Kasahara, Takeru; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Naito, Daisuke; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the PTRF/Cavin-1 gene cause congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 4 (CGL4) associated with myopathy. Additionally, long-QT syndrome and fatal cardiac arrhythmia are observed in patients with CGL4 who have homozygous PTRF/Cavin-1 mutations. PTRF/Cavin-1 deficiency shows reductions of caveolae and caveolin-3 (Cav3) protein expression in skeletal muscle, and Cav3 deficiency in the heart causes cardiac hypertrophy with loss of caveolae. However, it remains unknown how loss of PTRF/Cavin-1 affects cardiac morphology and function. Here, we present a characterization of the hearts of PTRF/Cavin-1-null (PTRF−/−) mice. Electron microscopy revealed the reduction of caveolae in cardiomyocytes of PTRF−/− mice. PTRF−/− mice at 16 weeks of age developed a progressive cardiomyopathic phenotype with wall thickening of left ventricles and reduced fractional shortening evaluated by echocardiography. Electrocardiography revealed that PTRF−/− mice at 24 weeks of age had low voltages and wide QRS complexes in limb leads. Histological analysis showed cardiomyocyte hypertrophy accompanied by progressive interstitial/perivascular fibrosis. Hypertrophy-related fetal gene expression was also induced in PTRF−/− hearts. Western blotting analysis and quantitative RT-PCR revealed that Cav3 expression was suppressed in PTRF−/− hearts compared with that in wild-type (WT) ones. ERK1/2 was activated in PTRF−/− hearts compared with that in WT ones. These results suggest that loss of PTRF/Cavin-1 protein expression is sufficient to induce a molecular program leading to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiomyopathy, which is partly attributable to Cav3 reduction in the heart. PMID:27612189

  11. Olfactomedin 1 Deficiency Leads to Defective Olfaction and Impaired Female Fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Diao, Honglu; Zhao, Fei; Xiao, Shuo; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Dudley, Elizabeth A; Mattson, Mark P; Ye, Xiaoqin

    2015-09-01

    Olfactomedin 1 (OLFM1) is a glycoprotein highly expressed in the brain. Olfm1(-/-) female mice were previously reported to have reduced fertility. Previous microarray analysis revealed Olfm1 among the most highly upregulated genes in the uterine luminal epithelium upon embryo implantation, which was confirmed by in situ hybridization. We hypothesized that Olfm1 deficiency led to defective embryo implantation and thus impaired fertility. Indeed, Olfm1(-/-) females had defective embryo implantation. However, Olfm1(-/-) females rarely mated and those that mated rarely became pregnant. Ovarian histology indicated the absence of corpora lutea in Olfm1(-/-) females, indicating defective ovulation. Superovulation using equine chorionic gonadotropin-human chorionic gonadotropin rescued mating, ovulation, and pregnancy, and equine chorionic gonadotropin alone rescued ovulation in Olfm1(-/-) females. Olfm1(-/-) females had a 13% reduction of hypothalamic GnRH neurons but comparable basal serum LH levels and GnRH-induced LH levels compared with wild-type controls. These results indicated no obvious local defects in the female reproductive system and a functional hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Olfm1(-/-) females were unresponsive to the effects of male bedding stimulation on pubertal development and estrous cycle. There were 41% fewer cFos-positive cells in the mitral cell layer of accessory olfactory bulb upon male urine stimulation for 90 minutes. OLFM1 was expressed in the main and accessory olfactory systems including main olfactory epithelium, vomeronasal organ, main olfactory bulb, and accessory olfactory bulb, with the highest expression detected in the axon bundles of olfactory sensory neurons. These data demonstrate that defective fertility in Olfm1(-/-) females is most likely a secondary effect of defective olfaction.

  12. Marrow Adipose Tissue Expansion Coincides with Insulin Resistance in MAGP1-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walji, Tezin A; Turecamo, Sarah E; Sanchez, Alejandro Coca; Anthony, Bryan A; Abou-Ezzi, Grazia; Scheller, Erica L; Link, Daniel C; Mecham, Robert P; Craft, Clarissa S

    2016-01-01

    Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) is an endocrine organ with the potential to influence skeletal remodeling and hematopoiesis. Pathologic MAT expansion has been studied in the context of severe metabolic challenge, including caloric restriction, high fat diet feeding, and leptin deficiency. However, the rapid change in peripheral fat and glucose metabolism associated with these models impedes our ability to examine which metabolic parameters precede or coincide with MAT expansion. Microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP1) is a matricellular protein that influences cellular processes by tethering signaling molecules to extracellular matrix structures. MAGP1-deficient (Mfap2 (-/-)) mice display a progressive excess adiposity phenotype, which precedes insulin resistance and occurs without changes in caloric intake or ambulation. Mfap2 (-/-) mice were, therefore, used as a model to associate parameters of metabolic disease, bone remodeling, and hematopoiesis with MAT expansion. Marrow adiposity was normal in Mfap2 (-/-) mice until 6 months of age; however, by 10 months, marrow fat volume had increased fivefold relative to wild-type control at the same age. Increased gonadal fat pad mass and hyperglycemia were detectable in Mfap2 (-/-) mice by 2 months, but peaked by 6 months. The development of insulin resistance coincided with MAT expansion. Longitudinal characterization of bone mass demonstrated a disconnection in MAT volume and bone volume. Specifically, Mfap2 (-/-) mice had reduced trabecular bone volume by 2 months, but this phenotype did not progress with age or MAT expansion. Interestingly, MAT expansion in the 10-month-old Mfap2 (-/-) mice was associated with modest alterations in basal hematopoiesis, including a shift from granulopoiesis to B lymphopoiesis. Together, these findings indicate MAT expansion is coincident with insulin resistance, but not excess peripheral adiposity or hyperglycemia in Mfap2 (-/-) mice; and substantial MAT accumulation does

  13. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease due to IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency in Three Iranian Children

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    Shokouh azam SARRAFZADEH

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD is a rare inheritance syndrome, characterized by a disseminated infection with mycobacterium in children following BCG vaccination at birth. Regarding the vaccination program in Iran, it may consider as a public health problem. The pathogenesis of MSMD is dependent on either insufficient production of IFN-gamma (γ or inadequate response to it. Here, we want to introduce three cases including two siblings and one girl from two unrelated families with severe mycobacterial infections referred to Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute (IAARI, from 2013 to 2015; their MSMD was confirmed by both cytokine assessment and genetic analysis. Regarding the clinical features of the patients, cell proliferation against a mitogen and BCG antigen was ordered in a lymphocyte transformation test (LTT setting. ELISA was performed for the measurement of IL-12p70 and IFN- γ in whole blood samples activated by BCG + recombinant human IFN-γ and BCG + recombinant human IL-12, respectively. In contrast to mitogen, the antigen-dependent proliferation activity of the patients’ leukocytes was significantly lower than that in normal range. We identified a homozygous mutation in IL12RB1 gene for two kindred who had a homozygous mutation affecting an essential splice site. For the third patient, a novel frameshift deletion in IL12RB1 gene was found. The genetic study results confirmed the impaired function of stimulated lymphocytes to release IFN-γ following stimulation with BCG+IL-12 while the response to rhIFN-γ for IL-12p70 production was relatively intact. Our findings show that cellular and molecular assessments are needed for precise identification of immunodeficiency disorders especially those without clear-cut diagnostic criteria. Keywords: Mendelian, IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency, Interfron-gamma, Interleukin 12, Mycobacterium

  14. Fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 deficiency sensitizes mice to the behavioral changes induced by lipopolysaccharide

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    Kelley Keith W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between fractalkine (CX3CL1 and fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 regulate microglial activation in the CNS. Recent findings indicate that age-associated impairments in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 are directly associated with exaggerated microglial activation and an impaired recovery from sickness behavior after peripheral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which an acute LPS injection causes amplified and prolonged microglial activation and behavioral deficits in CX3CR1-deficient mice (CX3CR1-/-. Methods CX3CR1-/- mice or control heterozygote mice (CX3CR1+/- were injected with LPS (0.5 mg/kg i.p. or saline and behavior (i.e., sickness and depression-like behavior, microglial activation, and markers of tryptophan metabolism were determined. All data were analyzed using Statistical Analysis Systems General Linear Model procedures and were subjected to one-, two-, or three-way ANOVA to determine significant main effects and interactions. Results LPS injection caused a prolonged duration of social withdrawal in CX3CR1-/- mice compared to control mice. This extended social withdrawal was associated with enhanced mRNA expression of IL-1β, indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO in microglia 4 h after LPS. Moreover, elevated expression of IL-1β and CD14 was still detected in microglia of CX3CR1-/- mice 24 h after LPS. There was also increased turnover of tryptophan, serotonin, and dopamine in the brain 24 h after LPS, but these increases were independent of CX3CR1 expression. When submitted to the tail suspension test 48 and 72 h after LPS, an increased duration of immobility was evident only in CX3CR1-/- mice. This depression-like behavior in CX3CR1-/- mice was associated with a persistent activated microglial phenotype in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Conclusions Taken together, these data indicate that a deficiency of CX3CR1

  15. Trps1 deficiency inhibits the morphogenesis of secondary hair follicles via decreased Noggin expression

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    Sun, Yujing [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan Wen Hua Xi Road 44, Jinan 250012 (China); Nakanishi, Masako; Sato, Fuyuki; Oikawa, Kosuke [First Department of Pathology, Wakayama Medical University School of Medicine, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan); Muragaki, Yasuteru, E-mail: ymuragak@wakayama-med.ac.jp [First Department of Pathology, Wakayama Medical University School of Medicine, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama 641-0012 (Japan); Zhou, Gengyin, E-mail: zhougy@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan Wen Hua Xi Road 44, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • The number of secondary hair follicles is reduced by half in Trps1 KO embryonic skin compared to wild-type skin. • Noggin expression is significantly decreased and BMP signaling is promoted in Trps1 KO embryonic skin. • Treatment with a Noggin or BMP inhibitor rescued the decreased number of hair follicles in Trps1 KO skin graft cultures. • Cell proliferation and apoptosis of the epidermis were normalized by Noggin treatment. - Abstract: A representative phenotype of patients with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is sparse hair. To understand the developmental defects of these patient’s hair follicles, we analyzed the development of hair follicles histologically and biochemically using Trps1 deficient (KO) mice. First, we compared the numbers of primary hair follicles in wild-type (WT) and KO embryos at different developmental stages. No differences were observed in the E14.5 skins of WT and KO mice. However, at later time points, KO fetal skin failed to properly develop secondary hair follicles, and the number of secondary hair follicles present in E18.5 KO skin was approximately half compared to that of WT skin. Sonic hedgehog expression was significantly decreased in E17.5 KO skin, whereas no changes were observed in Eda/Edar expression in E14.5 or E17.5 skins. In addition, Noggin expression was significantly decreased in E14.5 and E17.5 KO skin compared to WT skin. In parallel with the suppression of Noggin expression, BMP signaling was promoted in the epidermal cells of KO skins compared to WT skins as determined by immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated Smad1/5/8. The reduced number of secondary hair follicles was restored in skin graft cultures treated with a Noggin and BMP inhibitor. Furthermore, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis in KO skin was rescued by Noggin treatment. Taken together, we conclude that hair follicle development in Trps1 KO embryos is impaired directly or indirectly by decreased Noggin

  16. Oxidative stress markers and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a patient with GLUT1 deficiency treated with modified Atkins diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Yuri; Okumura, Akihisa; Hayashi, Masaharu; Mori, Harushi; Takahashi, Satoru; Yanagihara, Keiko; Miyata, Rie; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Mimaki, Takashi; Abe, Shinpei; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2012-05-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is an inborn error of glucose transport across blood-tissue barriers, and the modified Atkins diet is an effective and well-tolerated treatment. To investigate the effects of the modified Atkins diet, we examined the cerebrospinal fluid markers and performed phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a patient with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome before and after the modified Atkins diet. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of the oxidative stress markers, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and hexanoyl-lysine adduct, were markedly increased above the cutoff index and were normalized 18 months after the modified Atkins diet. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements showed 18% increase of PCr/γ-ATP ratio after the modified Atkins diet. These results suggest that the modified Atkins diet may reduce oxidative stress in the brain and improve energy reserve capacity, which is important in sustaining electrophysiological activities essential for performing brain functions.

  17. Parkinson phenotype in aged PINK1-deficient mice is accompanied by progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in absence of neurodegeneration.

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    Suzana Gispert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is an adult-onset movement disorder of largely unknown etiology. We have previously shown that loss-of-function mutations of the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 (PTEN induced putative kinase 1 cause the recessive PARK6 variant of PD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Now we generated a PINK1 deficient mouse and observed several novel phenotypes: A progressive reduction of weight and of locomotor activity selectively for spontaneous movements occurred at old age. As in PD, abnormal dopamine levels in the aged nigrostriatal projection accompanied the reduced movements. Possibly in line with the PARK6 syndrome but in contrast to sporadic PD, a reduced lifespan, dysfunction of brainstem and sympathetic nerves, visible aggregates of alpha-synuclein within Lewy bodies or nigrostriatal neurodegeneration were not present in aged PINK1-deficient mice. However, we demonstrate PINK1 mutant mice to exhibit a progressive reduction in mitochondrial preprotein import correlating with defects of core mitochondrial functions like ATP-generation and respiration. In contrast to the strong effect of PINK1 on mitochondrial dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster and in spite of reduced expression of fission factor Mtp18, we show reduced fission and increased aggregation of mitochondria only under stress in PINK1-deficient mouse neurons. CONCLUSION: Thus, aging Pink1(-/- mice show increasing mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in impaired neural activity similar to PD, in absence of overt neuronal death.

  18. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficient mice are protected from angiotensin II-induced fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Beier, Juliane I.; Kaiser, J. Phillip; Guo, Luping; Martínez-Maldonado, Manuel; Arteel, Gavin E.

    2011-01-01

    PAI-1 has been shown to be both profibrotic and antifibrotic in animal models of hepatic fibrosis. Although these models have similarities to human fibrotic liver disease, no rodent model completely recapitulates the clinical situation; indeed, transaminase values in most models of hepatic fibrosis are much higher than in chronic liver diseases in humans. Here, wild-type and PAI-1−/− mice were administered AngII (500 ng/kg/min) for 4 weeks. ECM accumulation was evaluated by Sirius red stainin...

  19. Pancreas-Specific Sirt1-Deficiency in Mice Compromises Beta-Cell Function without Development of Hyperglycemia.

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    Andreia V Pinho

    Full Text Available Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1 has been reported to be a critical positive regulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. The effects on islet cells and blood glucose levels when Sirt1 is deleted specifically in the pancreas are still unclear.This study examined islet glucose responsiveness, blood glucose levels, pancreatic islet histology and gene expression in Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice that have loss of function and loss of expression of Sirt1 specifically in the pancreas.We found that in the Pdx1Cre; Sirt1ex4F/F mice, the relative insulin positive area and the islet size distribution were unchanged. However, beta-cells were functionally impaired, presenting with lower glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This defect was not due to a reduced expression of insulin but was associated with a decreased expression of the glucose transporter Slc2a2/Glut2 and of the Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor (Glp1r as well as a marked down regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones that participate in the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR pathway. Counter intuitively, the Sirt1-deficient mice did not develop hyperglycemia. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP cells were the only other islet cells affected, with reduced numbers in the Sirt1-deficient pancreas.This study provides new mechanistic insights showing that beta-cell function in Sirt1-deficient pancreas is affected due to altered glucose sensing and deregulation of the UPR pathway. Interestingly, we uncovered a context in which impaired beta-cell function is not accompanied by increased glycemia. This points to a unique compensatory mechanism. Given the reduction in PP, investigation of its role in the control of blood glucose is warranted.

  20. STEAROYL-CoA DESATURASE-1 DEFICIENCY ATTENUATES OBESITY AND INSULIN RESISTANCE IN LEPTIN-RESISTANT OBESE MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Makoto; Sampath, Harini; Liu, Xueqing; Flowers, Matthew T.; Chu, Kiki; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Ntambi, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity and adiposity greatly increase the risk for secondary conditions such as insulin resistance. Mice deficient in the enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) are lean and protected from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. In order to determine the effect of SCD1 deficiency on various mouse models of obesity, we introduced a global deletion of the Scd1 gene into leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, leptin-resistant Agouti (Ay/a) mice, and high-fat diet-fed obese (DIO) mice. SCD1 deficien...

  1. Sensitivity to oxidative stress in DJ-1-deficient dopamine neurons: an ES- derived cell model of primary Parkinsonism.

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    Cecile Martinat

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD is the selective loss of dopamine neurons in the ventral midbrain. Although the cause of neurodegeneration in PD is unknown, a Mendelian inheritance pattern is observed in rare cases, indicating a genetic factor. Furthermore, pathological analyses of PD substantia nigra have correlated cellular oxidative stress and altered proteasomal function with PD. Homozygous mutations in DJ-1 were recently described in two families with autosomal recessive Parkinsonism, one of which is a large deletion that is likely to lead to loss of function. Here we show that embryonic stem cells deficient in DJ-1 display increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and proteasomal inhibition. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species in toxin-treated DJ-1-deficient cells initially appears normal, but these cells are unable to cope with the consequent damage that ultimately leads to apoptotic death. Furthermore, we find that dopamine neurons derived from in vitro-differentiated DJ-1-deficient embryonic stem cells display decreased survival and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. These data are consistent with a protective role for DJ-1, and demonstrate the utility of genetically modified embryonic stem cell-derived neurons as cellular models of neuronal disorders.

  2. Intrauterine Growth Retardation (IUGR) as a Novel Condition of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Estal, I; de la Garza, R G; Castilla-Cortázar, I

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is an anabolic hormone with several biological activities, such as proliferation, mitochondrial protection, cell survival, tissue growth and development, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antifibrogenic and antiaging. This hormone plays an important role in embryological and postnatal states, being essential for normal foetal and placental growth and differentiation. During gestation, the placenta is one of the major sources of IGF-1, among other hormones. This intrauterine organ expresses IGF-1 receptors and IGF-1 binding proteins (IGFBPs), which control IGF-1 activities. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is the second most frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, defined as the inability to achieve the expected weight for gestational age. Different studies have revealed that IUGR infants have placental dysfunction and low circulating levels of insulin, IGF-1, IGF-2 and IGFBPs. Such data suggest that IGF-1 deficiency in gestational state may be one of the major causes of foetal growth retardation. The aim of this review is to study the epidemiology, physiopathology and possible causes of IUGR. Also, it intends to study the possible role of the placenta as an IGF-1 target organ. The purpose is to establish if IUGR could be considered as a novel condition of IGF-1 deficiency and if its treatment with low doses of IGF-1 could be a suitable therapeutic strategy. PMID:26634242

  3. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  4. CYP1B1 deficiency ameliorates obesity and glucose intolerance induced by high fat diet in adult C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaocong; Huang, Tingting; Li, Lu; Tang, Yumeng; Tian, Yatao; Wang, Suqing; Fan, Cuifang

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) expression increases in multi-potential mesenchymal stromal cells C3H10T1/2 during adipogenesis, which parallel with PPARγ, a critical transcriptional factor in adipogenic process. To assess the role of CYP1B1 in fatty acid metabolism, adult C57BL/6J wild-type and CYP1B1 deficiency mice were fed with high fat diets (HFD) for 6 weeks. CYP1B1 deficiency attenuated HFD-induced obesity when compared with their wild type counterparts, and improve glucose tolerance. The reduction in body weight gain and white adipose tissue in CYP1B1 deficient mice exhibited coordinate decreases in fatty acid synthesis (PPARγ, CD36, FAS, SCD-1) and increases in fatty acid oxidation (UCP-2, CPT-1a) when compared with wild type ones. Lower hepatocyte TG contents were consistent with hepatic Oil-Red-O staining in the CYP1B1 deficiency mice. AMPK, a nutrient sensors for energy homeostasis, was activated in both fat pad and liver by CYP1B1 deficiency. However, in vitro system, knock down CYP1B1 in C3H10T1/2 cells does not abolish adipogenesis induced by adipogenic agents IDM (Insulin, Dexamethasone, Methylisobutylxanthine). Our in vivo and in vitro findings of CYP1B1 deficiency in fat metabolism suggest a complex regulation network between CYP1B1 and energy homeostasis. PMID:26064443

  5. Polychlorinated biphenyl-induced VCAM-1 expression is attenuated in aortic endothelial cells isolated from caveolin-1 deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to environmental contaminants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is a critical mediator for adhesion and uptake of monocytes across the endothelium in the early stages of atherosclerosis development. The upregulation of VCAM-1 by PCBs may be dependent on functional membrane domains called caveolae. Caveolae are particularly abundant in endothelial cell membranes and involved in trafficking and signal transduction. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of caveolae in PCB-induced endothelial cell dysfunction. Primary mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs) isolated from caveolin-1-deficient mice and background C57BL/6 mice were treated with coplanar PCBs, such as PCB77 and PCB126. In addition, siRNA gene silencing technique was used to knockdown caveolin-1 in porcine vascular endothelial cells. In MAECs with functional caveolae, VCAM-1 protein levels were increased after exposure to both coplanar PCBs, whereas expression levels of VCAM-1 were not significantly altered in cells deficient of caveolin-1. Furthermore, PCB-induced monocyte adhesion was attenuated in caveolin-1-deficient MAECs. Similarly, siRNA silencing of caveolin-1 in porcine endothelial cells confirmed the caveolin-1-dependent VCAM-1 expression. Treatment of cells with PCB77 and PCB126 resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2), and pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 diminished the observed PCB-induced increase in monocyte adhesion. These findings suggest that coplanar PCBs induce adhesion molecule expression, such as VCAM-1, in endothelial cells, and that this response is regulated by caveolin-1 and functional caveolae. Our data demonstrate a critical role of functional caveolae in the activation and dysfunction of endothelial cells by coplanar PCBs.

  6. Adaptation to HIF-1 deficiency by upregulation of the AMP/ATP ratio and phosphofructokinase activation in hepatomas

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    Airley Rachel E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIF-1 deficiency has marked effects on tumour glycolysis and growth. We therefore investigated the consequences of HIF-1 deficiency in mice, using the well established Hepa-1 wild-type (WT and HIF-1β-deficient (c4 model. These mechanisms could be clinically relevant, since HIF-1 is now a therapeutic target. Methods Hepa-1 WT and c4 tumours grown in vivo were analysed by 18FDG-PET and 19FDG Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for glucose uptake; by HPLC for adenine nucleotides; by immunohistochemistry for GLUTs; by immunoblotting and by DIGE followed by tandem mass spectrometry for protein expression; and by classical enzymatic methods for enzyme activity. Results HIF-1β deficient Hepa-1 c4 tumours grew significantly more slowly than WT tumours, and (as expected showed significantly lower expression of many glycolytic enzymes. However, HIF-1β deficiency caused no significant change in the rate of glucose uptake in c4 tumours compared to WT when assessed in vivo by measuring fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG uptake. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated less GLUT-1 in c4 tumours, whereas GLUT-2 (liver type was similar to WT. Factors that might upregulate glucose uptake independently of HIF-1 (phospho-Akt, c-Myc were shown to have either lower or similar expression in c4 compared to WT tumours. However the AMP/ATP ratio was 4.5 fold higher (p Conclusions Despite their defective HIF-1 and consequent down-regulation of glycolytic enzyme expression, Hepa-1 c4 tumours maintain glucose uptake and glycolysis because the resulting low [ATP] high [AMP] allosterically activate PFK-1. This mechanism of resistance would keep glycolysis functioning and also result in activation of AMP-Kinase and growth inhibition; it may have major implications for the therapeutic activity of HIF inhibitors in vivo. Interestingly, this control mechanism does not involve transcriptional control or proteomics, but rather the classical activation and inhibition mechanisms

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitor upregulates peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and inhibits apoptotic cell death in abcd1-deficient glial cells.

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    Jaspreet Singh

    Full Text Available In X-ALD, mutation/deletion of ALD gene (ABCD1 and the resultant very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA derangement has dramatically opposing effects in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. While loss of Abcd1 in astrocytes produces a robust inflammatory response, the oligodendrocytes undergo cell death leading to demyelination in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD. The mechanisms of these distinct pathways in the two cell types are not well understood. Here, we investigated the effects of Abcd1-knockdown and the subsequent alteration in VLCFA metabolism in human U87 astrocytes and rat B12 oligodendrocytes. Loss of Abcd1 inhibited peroxisomal β-oxidation activity and increased expression of VLCFA synthesizing enzymes, elongase of very long chain fatty acids (ELOVLs (1 and 3 in both cell types. However, higher induction of ELOVL's in Abcd1-deficient B12 oligodendrocytes than astrocytes suggests that ELOVL pathway may play a prominent role in oligodendrocytes in X-ALD. While astrocytes are able to maintain the cellular homeostasis of anti-apoptotic proteins, Abcd1-deletion in B12 oligodendrocytes downregulated the anti-apototic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and cell survival (phospho-Erk1/2 proteins, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bim, Bax and Bid leading to cell loss. These observations provide insights into different cellular signaling mechanisms in response to Abcd1-deletion in two different cell types of CNS. The apoptotic responses were accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial-caspase-9-dependent mechanism in Abcd1-deficient oligodendrocytes. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA corrected the VLCFA derangement both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the oligodendrocytes loss. These observations provide a proof-of principle that HDAC inhibitor SAHA may have a therapeutic potential for X-ALD.

  8. Perilipin1 deficiency in whole body or bone marrow-derived cells attenuates lesions in atherosclerosis-prone mice.

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    Xiaojing Zhao

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the role of perilipin 1 (Plin1 in whole body or bone marrow-derived cells on atherogenesis.Accumulated evidence have indicated the role of Plin1 in atherosclerosis, however, these findings are controversial. In this study, we showed that Plin1 was assembled and colocalized with CD68 in macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE-/- mice. We further found 39% reduction of plaque size in the aortic roots of Plin1 and ApoE double knockout (Plin1-/-ApoE-/- females compared with ApoE-/- female littermates. In order to verify whether this reduction was macrophage-specific, the bone marrow cells from wild-type or Plin1 deficient mice (Plin1-/- were transplanted into LDL receptor deficient mice (LDLR-/-. Mice receiving Plin1-/- bone marrow cells showed also 49% reduction in aortic atherosclerotic lesions compared with LDLR-/- mice received wild-type bone marrow cells. In vitro experiments showed that Plin1-/- macrophages had decreased protein expression of CD36 translocase and an enhanced cholesterol ester hydrolysis upon aggregated-LDL loading, with unaltered expression of many other regulators of cholesterol metabolism, such as cellular lipases, and Plin2 and 3. Given the fundamental role of Plin1 in protecting LD lipids from lipase hydrolysis, it is reasonably speculated that the assembly of Plin1 in microphages might function to reduce lipolysis and hence increase lipid retention in ApoE-/- plaques, but this pro-atherosclerotic property would be abrogated on inactivation of Plin1.Plin1 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells may be responsible for reduced atherosclerotic lesions in the mice.

  9. Chronic Diarrhea

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    ... infections that cause chronic diarrhea be prevented? Chronic Diarrhea What is chronic diarrhea? Diarrhea that lasts for more than 2-4 ... represent a life-threatening illness. What causes chronic diarrhea? Chronic diarrhea has many different causes; these causes ...

  10. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3 related (ATR protein kinase inhibition is synthetically lethal in XRCC1 deficient ovarian cancer cells.

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    Rebeka Sultana

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3 Related (ATR protein kinase is a key sensor of single-stranded DNA associated with stalled replication forks and repair intermediates generated during DNA repair. XRCC1 is a critical enzyme in single strand break repair and base excision repair. XRCC1-LIG3 complex is also an important contributor to the ligation step of the nucleotide excision repair response. METHODS: In the current study, we investigated synthetic lethality in XRCC1 deficient and XRCC1 proficient Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO and human ovarian cancer cells using ATR inhibitors (NU6027. In addition, we also investigated the ability of ATR inhibitors to potentiate cisplatin cytotoxicity in XRCC1 deficient and XRCC1 proficient CHO and human cancer cells. Clonogenic assays, alkaline COMET assays, γH2AX immunocytochemistry, FACS for cell cycle as well as FITC-annexin V flow cytometric analysis were performed. RESULTS: ATR inhibition is synthetically lethal in XRCC1 deficient cells as evidenced by increased cytotoxicity, accumulation of double strand DNA breaks, G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased apoptosis. Compared to cisplatin alone, combination of cisplatin and ATR inhibitor results in enhanced cytotoxicity in XRCC1 deficient cells compared to XRCC1 proficient cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provides evidence that ATR inhibition is suitable for synthetic lethality application and cisplatin chemopotentiation in XRCC1 deficient ovarian cancer cells.

  11. In a model of Batten disease, palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 deficiency is associated with brown adipose tissue and thermoregulation abnormalities.

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    Alfia Khaibullina

    Full Text Available Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a deficiency of palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1. We have previously shown that children with INCL have increased risk of hypothermia during anesthesia and that PPT1-deficiency in mice is associated with disruption of adaptive energy metabolism, downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we hypothesized that Ppt1-knockout mice, a well-studied model of INCL that shows many of the neurologic manifestations of the disease, would recapitulate the thermoregulation impairment observed in children with INCL. We also hypothesized that when exposed to cold, Ppt1-knockout mice would be unable to maintain body temperature as in mice thermogenesis requires upregulation of Pgc-1α and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp-1 in brown adipose tissue. We found that the Ppt1-KO mice had lower basal body temperature as they aged and developed hypothermia during cold exposure. Surprisingly, this inability to maintain body temperature during cold exposure in Ppt1-KO mice was associated with an adequate upregulation of Pgc-1α and Ucp-1 but with lower levels of sympathetic neurotransmitters in brown adipose tissue. In addition, during baseline conditions, brown adipose tissue of Ppt1-KO mice had less vacuolization (lipid droplets compared to wild-type animals. After cold stress, wild-type animals had significant decreases whereas Ppt1-KO had insignificant changes in lipid droplets compared with baseline measurements, thus suggesting that Ppt1-KO had less lipolysis in response to cold stress. These results uncover a previously unknown phenotype associated with PPT1 deficiency, that of altered thermoregulation, which is associated with impaired lipolysis and neurotransmitter release to brown adipose tissue during cold exposure. These findings suggest that INCL should be added to the list of

  12. Adaptation to HIF-1 deficiency by upregulation of the AMP/ATP ratio and phosphofructokinase activation in hepatomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIF-1 deficiency has marked effects on tumour glycolysis and growth. We therefore investigated the consequences of HIF-1 deficiency in mice, using the well established Hepa-1 wild-type (WT) and HIF-1β-deficient (c4) model. These mechanisms could be clinically relevant, since HIF-1 is now a therapeutic target. Hepa-1 WT and c4 tumours grown in vivo were analysed by 18FDG-PET and 19FDG Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for glucose uptake; by HPLC for adenine nucleotides; by immunohistochemistry for GLUTs; by immunoblotting and by DIGE followed by tandem mass spectrometry for protein expression; and by classical enzymatic methods for enzyme activity. HIF-1β deficient Hepa-1 c4 tumours grew significantly more slowly than WT tumours, and (as expected) showed significantly lower expression of many glycolytic enzymes. However, HIF-1β deficiency caused no significant change in the rate of glucose uptake in c4 tumours compared to WT when assessed in vivo by measuring fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated less GLUT-1 in c4 tumours, whereas GLUT-2 (liver type) was similar to WT. Factors that might upregulate glucose uptake independently of HIF-1 (phospho-Akt, c-Myc) were shown to have either lower or similar expression in c4 compared to WT tumours. However the AMP/ATP ratio was 4.5 fold higher (p < 0.01) in c4 tumours, and phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1) activity, measured at prevailing cellular ATP and AMP concentrations, was up to two-fold higher in homogenates of the deficient c4 cells and tumours compared to WT (p < 0.001), suggesting that allosteric PFK activation could explain their normal level of glycolysis. Phospho AMP-Kinase was also higher in the c4 tumours. Despite their defective HIF-1 and consequent down-regulation of glycolytic enzyme expression, Hepa-1 c4 tumours maintain glucose uptake and glycolysis because the resulting low [ATP] high [AMP] allosterically activate PFK-1. This mechanism of resistance would keep glycolysis

  13. Cholestasis and hypercholesterolemia in SCD1-deficient mice fed a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Matthew T; Groen, Albert K; Oler, Angie Tebon; Keller, Mark P; Choi, Younjeong; Schueler, Kathryn L; Richards, Oliver C; Lan, Hong; Miyazaki, Makoto; Kuipers, Folkert; Kendziorski, Christina M; Ntambi, James M; Attie, Alan D

    2006-12-01

    Stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1-deficient (SCD1(-/-)) mice have impaired MUFA synthesis. When maintained on a very low-fat (VLF) diet, SCD1(-/-) mice developed severe hypercholesterolemia, characterized by an increase in apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins and the appearance of lipoprotein X. The rate of LDL clearance was decreased in VLF SCD1(-/-) mice relative to VLF SCD1(+/+) mice, indicating that reduced apoB-containing lipoprotein clearance contributed to the hypercholesterolemia. Additionally, HDL-cholesterol was dramatically reduced in these mice. The presence of increased plasma bile acids, bilirubin, and aminotransferases in the VLF SCD1(-/-) mice is indicative of cholestasis. Supplementation of the VLF diet with MUFA- and PUFA-rich canola oil, but not saturated fat-rich hydrogenated coconut oil, prevented these plasma phenotypes. However, dietary oleate was not as effective as canola oil in reducing LDL-cholesterol, signifying a role for dietary PUFA deficiency in the development of this phenotype. These results indicate that the lack of SCD1 results in an increased requirement for dietary unsaturated fat to compensate for impaired MUFA synthesis and to prevent hypercholesterolemia and hepatic dysfunction. Therefore, endogenous MUFA synthesis is essential during dietary unsaturated fat insufficiency and influences the dietary requirement of PUFA.

  14. Subtle alterations of excitatory transmission are linked to presynaptic changes in the hippocampus of PINK1-deficient mice.

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    Feligioni, Marco; Mango, Dalila; Piccinin, Sonia; Imbriani, Paola; Iannuzzi, Filomena; Caruso, Alessandra; De Angelis, Francesca; Blandini, Fabio; Mercuri, Nicola B; Pisani, Antonio; Nisticò, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Homozygous or heterozygous mutations in the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene have been linked to early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Several neurophysiological studies have demonstrated alterations in striatal synaptic plasticity along with impaired dopamine release in PINK1-deficient mice. Using electrophysiological methods, here we show that PINK1 loss of function causes a progressive increase of spontaneous glutamate-mediated synaptic events in the hippocampus, without influencing long-term potentiation. Moreover, fluorescence analysis reveals increased neurotrasmitter release although our biochemical results failed to detect which presynaptic proteins might be engaged. This study provides a novel role for PINK1 beyond the physiology of nigrostriatal dopaminergic circuit. Specifically, PINK1 might contribute to preserve synaptic function and glutamatergic homeostasis in the hippocampus, a brain region underlying cognition. The subtle changes in excitatory transmission here observed might be a pathogenic precursor to excitotoxic neurodegeneration and cognitive decline often observed in PD. Using electrophysiological and fluorescence techniques, we demonstrate that lack of PINK1 causes increased excitatory transmission and neurotransmitter release in the hippocampus, which might lead to the cognitive decline often observed in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26850695

  15. CX3CR1 deficiency alters hippocampal-dependent plasticity phenomena blunting the effects of enriched environment

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    Laura eMaggi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years several evidence demonstrated that some features of hippocampal biology, like neurogenesis, synaptic transmission, learning and memory performances are deeply modulated by social, motor and sensorial experiences. Fractalkine/CX3CL1 is a transmembrane chemokine abundantly expressed in the brain by neurons, where it modulates glutamatergic transmission and long-term plasticity processes regulating the intercellular communication between glia and neurons, being its specific receptor CX3CR1 expressed by microglia. In this paper we investigated the role of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling on experience-dependent hippocampal plasticity processes. At this aim wt and CX3CR1GFP/GFP mice were exposed to long-lasting-enriched environment (EE and the effects on hippocampal functions were studied by electrophysiological recordings of long-term potentiation (LTP of synaptic activity, behavioral tests of learning and memory in the Morris water maze paradigm and analysis of neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG.We found that CX3CR1 deficiency increases hippocampal plasticity and spatial memory blunting the potentiating effects of EE. In contrast, exposure to EE increased the number and migration of neural progenitors in the DG of both wt and CX3CR1GFP/GFP mice. These data indicate that CX3CL1/CX3CR1-mediated signaling is crucial for a normal experience-dependent modulation of hippocampal functions.

  16. Pannexin-1 Deficient Mice Have an Increased Susceptibility for Atrial Fibrillation and Show a QT-Prolongation Phenotype

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    Stella Petric

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Pannexin-1 (Panx1 is an ATP release channel that is ubiquitously expressed and coupled to several ligand-gated receptors. In isolated cardiac myocytes, Panx1 forms large conductance channels that can be activated by Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Here we characterized the electrophysiological function of these channels in the heart in vivo, taking recourse to mice with Panx1 ablation. Methods: Cardiac phenotyping of Panx1 knock-out mice (Panx1-/- was performed by employing a molecular, cellular and functional approach, including echocardiography, surface and telemetric ECG recordings with QT analysis, physical stress testing and quantification of heart rate variability. In addition, an in vivo electrophysiological study entailed programmed electrical stimulation using an intracardiac octapolar catheter. Results: Panx1 deficiency results in a higher incidence of AV-block, delayed ventricular depolarisation, significant prolongation of QT- and rate corrected QT-interval and a higher incidence of atrial fibrillation after intraatrial burst stimulation. Conclusion: Panx1 seems to play an important role in murine cardiac electrophysiology and warrants further consideration in the context of hereditary forms of atrial fibrillation.

  17. Successful Gene Therapy in the RPGRIP1-deficient Dog: a Large Model of Cone–Rod Dystrophy

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    Lhériteau, Elsa; Petit, Lolita; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Guihal, Caroline; François, Achille; Guyon, Richard; Provost, Nathalie; Lemoine, Françoise; Papal, Samantha; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    For the development of new therapies, proof-of-concept studies in large animal models that share clinical features with their human counterparts represent a pivotal step. For inherited retinal dystrophies primarily involving photoreceptor cells, the efficacy of gene therapy has been demonstrated in canine models of stationary cone dystrophies and progressive rod–cone dystrophies but not in large models of progressive cone–rod dystrophies, another important cause of blindness. To address the last issue, we evaluated gene therapy in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1)-deficient dog, a model exhibiting a severe cone–rod dystrophy similar to that seen in humans. Subretinal injection of AAV5 (n = 5) or AAV8 (n = 2) encoding the canine Rpgrip1 improved photoreceptor survival in transduced areas of treated retinas. Cone function was significantly and stably rescued in all treated eyes (18–72% of those recorded in normal eyes) up to 24 months postinjection. Rod function was also preserved (22–29% of baseline function) in four of the five treated dogs up to 24 months postinjection. No detectable rod function remained in untreated contralateral eyes. More importantly, treatment preserved bright- and dim-light vision. Efficacy of gene therapy in this large animal model of cone–rod dystrophy provides great promise for human treatment. PMID:24091916

  18. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

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    Oosterveer Maaike H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/- mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and quantified lipogenic and lipolytic activities in fat tissues of CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice fed a high-fat (HF or a high-fat/fish oil (HF/FO diet as compared to animals receiving a low-fat chow diet. Comparison between HF diet and HF/FO diet allowed to investigate the influence of dietary fat quality on adipose tissue biology in relation to CB1 functioning. Results The adiposity-resistant phenotype of the CB1-/- mice was characterized by reduced fat mass and adipocyte size in HF and HF/FO-fed CB1-/- mice in parallel to a significant increase in energy expenditure as compared to CB1+/+ mice. The expression levels of adipocyte differentiation and proliferation markers were however maintained in these animals. Consistent with unaltered lipogenic gene expression, the fatty acid synthesis rates in adipose tissues from CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice were unchanged. Whole-body and adipose-specific lipoprotein lipase (LPL activities were also not altered in CB1-/- mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that protection against diet-induced adiposity in CB1-deficient mice is not related to changes in adipocyte function per se, but rather results from increased energy dissipation by oxidative and non-oxidative pathways.

  19. Heterozygous ambra1 deficiency in mice: a genetic trait with autism-like behavior restricted to the female gender.

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    Dere, Ekrem; Dahm, Liane; Lu, Derek; Hammerschmidt, Kurt; Ju, Anes; Tantra, Martesa; Kästner, Anne; Chowdhury, Kamal; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    Autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) are heterogeneous, highly heritable neurodevelopmental conditions affecting around 0.5% of the population across cultures, with a male/female ratio of approximately 4:1. Phenotypically, ASD are characterized by social interaction and communication deficits, restricted interests, repetitive behaviors, and reduced cognitive flexibility. Identified causes converge at the level of the synapse, ranging from mutation of synaptic genes to quantitative alterations in synaptic protein expression, e.g., through compromised transcriptional or translational control. We wondered whether reduced turnover and degradation of synapses, due to deregulated autophagy, would lead to similar phenotypical consequences. Ambra1, strongly expressed in cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, is a positive regulator of Beclin1, a principal player in autophagosome formation. While homozygosity of the Ambra1 null mutation causes embryonic lethality, heterozygous mice with reduced Ambra1 expression are viable, reproduce normally, and lack any immediately obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, comprehensive behavioral characterization of these mice revealed an autism-like phenotype in Ambra1 (+/-) females only, including compromised communication and social interactions, a tendency of enhanced stereotypies/repetitive behaviors, and impaired cognitive flexibility. Reduced ultrasound communication was found in adults as well as pups, which achieved otherwise normal neurodevelopmental milestones. These features were all absent in male Ambra1 (+/-) mice. As a first hint explaining this gender difference, we found a much stronger reduction of Ambra1 protein in the cortex of Ambra1 (+/-) females compared to males. To conclude, Ambra1 deficiency can induce an autism-like phenotype. The restriction to the female gender of autism-generation by a defined genetic trait is unique thus far and warrants further investigation. PMID:24904333

  20. Heterozygous Ambra1 deficiency in mice: A genetic trait with autism-like behavior restricted to the female gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem eDere

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are heterogeneous, highly heritable neurodevelopmental conditions affecting around 0.5% of the population across cultures, with a male/female ratio of ~4:1. Phenotypically, ASD are characterized by social interaction and communication deficits, restricted interests, repetitive behaviors, and reduced cognitive flexibility. Identified causes converge at the level of the synapse, ranging from mutation of synaptic genes to quantitative alterations in synaptic protein expression, e.g. through compromised transcriptional or translational control. We wondered whether reduced turnover and degradation of synapses, due to deregulated autophagy, would lead to similar phenotypical consequences. Ambra1, strongly expressed in cortex, hippocampus and striatum, is a positive regulator of Beclin1, a principal player in autophagosome formation. While homozygosity of the Ambra1 null mutation causes embryonic lethality, heterozygous mice with reduced Ambra1 expression are viable, reproduce normally, and lack any immediately obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, comprehensive behavioral characterization of these mice revealed an autism-like phenotype in Ambra1+/- females only, including compromised communication and social interactions, a tendency of enhanced stereotypies/repetitive behaviors, and impaired cognitive flexibility. Reduced ultrasound communication was found in adults as well as pups which achieved otherwise normal neurodevelopmental milestones. These features were all absent in male Ambra1+/- mice. As a first hint explaining this gender difference, we found a much stronger reduction of Ambra1 protein in the cortex of Ambra1+/- females compared to males. To conclude, Ambra1 deficiency can induce an autism-like phenotype. The restriction to the female gender of autism-generation by a defined genetic trait is unique thus far and warrants further investigation.

  1. Effects of IKAP/hELP1 deficiency on gene expression in differentiating neuroblastoma cells: implications for familial dysautonomia.

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    Rachel Cohen-Kupiec

    Full Text Available Familial dysautonomia (FD is a developmental neuropathy of the sensory and autonomous nervous systems. The IKBKAP gene, encoding the IKAP/hELP1 subunit of the RNA polymerase II Elongator complex is mutated in FD patients, leading to a tissue-specific mis-splicing of the gene and to the absence of the protein in neuronal tissues. To elucidate the function of IKAP/hELP1 in the development of neuronal cells, we have downregulated IKBKAP expression in SHSY5Y cells, a neuroblastoma cell line of a neural crest origin. We have previously shown that these cells exhibit abnormal cell adhesion when allowed to differentiate under defined culture conditions on laminin substratum. Here, we report results of a microarray expression analysis of IKAP/hELP1 downregulated cells that were grown on laminin under differentiation or non-differentiation growth conditions. It is shown that under non-differentiation growth conditions, IKAP/hELP1 downregulation affects genes important for early developmental stages of the nervous system, including cell signaling, cell adhesion and neural crest migration. IKAP/hELP1 downregulation during differentiation affects the expression of genes that play a role in late neuronal development, in axonal projection and synapse formation and function. We also show that IKAP/hELP1 deficiency affects the expression of genes involved in calcium metabolism before and after differentiation of the neuroblastoma cells. Hence, our data support IKAP/hELP1 importance in the development and function of neuronal cells and contribute to the understanding of the FD phenotype.

  2. Parental origin impairment of synaptic functions and behaviors in cytoplasmic FMRP interacting protein 1 (Cyfip1) deficient mice.

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    Chung, Leeyup; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Li; Towers, Aaron J; Cao, Xinyu; Kim, Il Hwan; Jiang, Yong-hui

    2015-12-10

    CYFIP1 maps to the interval between proximal breakpoint 1 (BP1) and breakpoint 2 (BP2) of chromosomal 15q11-q13 deletions that are implicated in the Angelman (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). There is only one breakpoint (BP3) at the distal end of deletion. CYFIP1 is deleted in AS patients with the larger class I deletion (BP1 to BP3) and the neurological presentations in these patients are more severe than that of patients with class II (BP2 to BP3) deletion. The haploinsufficiency of CYFIP1 is hypothesized to contribute to more severe clinical presentations in class I AS patients. The expression of CYFIP1 is suggested to be bi-allelic in literature but the possibility of parental origin of expression is not completely excluded. We generated and characterized Cyfip1 mutant mice. Homozygous Cyfip1 mice were early embryonic lethal. However, there was a parental origin specific effect between paternal Cyfip1 deficiency (m+/p-) and maternal deficiency (m-/p+) on both synaptic transmissions and behaviors in hippocampal CA1 synapses despite no evidence supporting the parental origin difference for the expression. Both m-/p+ and m+/p- showed the impaired input-output response and paired-pulse facilitation. While the long term-potentiation and group I mGluR mediated long term depression induced by DHPG was not different between Cyfip1 m-/p+ and m+/p- mice, the initial DHPG induced response was significantly enhanced in m-/p+ but not in m+/p- mice. m+/p- but not m-/p+ mice displayed increased freezing in cued fear conditioning and abnormal transitions in zero-maze test. The impaired synaptic transmission and behaviors in haploinsufficiency of Cyfip1 mice provide the evidence supporting the role of CYFIP1 modifying the clinical presentation of class I AS patients and in human neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26474913

  3. IDO1 Deficiency Does Not Affect Disease in Mouse Models of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis.

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    Karen Put

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1 is an immune-modulatory enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of tryptophan (Trp to kynurenine (Kyn and is strongly induced by interferon (IFN-γ. We previously reported highly increased levels of IFN-γ and corresponding IDO activity in patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH, a hyper-inflammatory syndrome. On the other hand, IFN-γ and IDO were low in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA, an autoinflammatory syndrome. As HLH can occur as a complication of sJIA, the opposing levels of both IFN-γ and IDO are remarkable. In animal models for sJIA and HLH, the role of IFN-γ differs from being protective to pathogenic. In this study, we aimed to unravel the role of IDO1 in the pathogenesis of sJIA and HLH.Wild-type and IDO1-knockout (IDO1-KO mice were used in 3 models of sJIA or HLH: complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA-injected mice developed an sJIA-like syndrome and secondary HLH (sHLH was evoked by either repeated injection of unmethylated CpG oligonucleotide or by primary infection with mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV. An anti-CD3-induced cytokine release syndrome was used as a non-sJIA/HLH control model.No differences were found in clinical, laboratory and hematological features of sJIA/HLH between wild-type and IDO1-KO mice. As IDO modulates the immune response via induction of regulatory T cells and inhibition of T cell proliferation, we investigated both features in a T cell-triggered cytokine release syndrome. Again, no differences were observed in serum cytokine levels, percentages of regulatory T cells, nor of proliferating or apoptotic thymocytes and lymph node cells.Our data demonstrate that IDO1 deficiency does not affect inflammation in sJIA, sHLH and a T cell-triggered cytokine release model. We hypothesize that other tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes like IDO2 and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO might compensate for the lack of IDO1.

  4. Phospho1 deficiency transiently modifies bone architecture yet produces consistent modification in osteocyte differentiation and vascular porosity with ageing.

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    Javaheri, B; Carriero, A; Staines, K A; Chang, Y-M; Houston, D A; Oldknow, K J; Millan, J L; Kazeruni, Bassir N; Salmon, P; Shefelbine, S; Farquharson, C; Pitsillides, A A

    2015-12-01

    PHOSPHO1 is one of principal proteins involved in initiating bone matrix mineralisation. Recent studies have found that Phospho1 KO mice (Phospho1-R74X) display multiple skeletal abnormalities with spontaneous fractures, bowed long bones, osteomalacia and scoliosis. These analyses have however been limited to young mice and it remains unclear whether the role of PHOSPHO1 is conserved in the mature murine skeleton where bone turnover is limited. In this study, we have used ex-vivo computerised tomography to examine the effect of Phospho1 deletion on tibial bone architecture in mice at a range of ages (5, 7, 16 and 34 weeks of age) to establish whether its role is conserved during skeletal growth and maturation. Matrix mineralisation has also been reported to influence terminal osteoblast differentiation into osteocytes and we have also explored whether hypomineralised bones in Phospho1 KO mice exhibit modified osteocyte lacunar and vascular porosity. Our data reveal that Phospho1 deficiency generates age-related defects in trabecular architecture and compromised cortical microarchitecture with greater porosity accompanied by marked alterations in osteocyte shape, significant increases in osteocytic lacuna and vessel number. Our in vitro studies examining the behaviour of osteoblast derived from Phospho1 KO and wild-type mice reveal reduced levels of matrix mineralisation and modified osteocytogenic programming in cells deficient in PHOSPHO1. Together our data suggest that deficiency in PHOSPHO1 exerts modifications in bone architecture that are transient and depend upon age, yet produces consistent modification in lacunar and vascular porosity. It is possible that the inhibitory role of PHOSPHO1 on osteocyte differentiation leads to these age-related changes in bone architecture. It is also intriguing to note that this apparent acceleration in osteocyte differentiation evident in the hypomineralised bones of Phospho1 KO mice suggests an uncoupling of the interplay

  5. Protective effects of selenium on oxidative damage and oxidative stress related gene expression in rat liver under chronic poisoning of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhao; Wang, Zhou; Li, Jian-jun; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Ping-chuan; Dong, Lu; Chen, Jing-hong; Chen, Qun; Zhang, Xiao-tian; Wang, Zhi-lun

    2013-08-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic metalloid existing widely in the environment, and chronic exposure to it through contaminated drinking water has become a global problem of public health. The present study focused on the protective effects of selenium on oxidative damage of chronic arsenic poisoning in rat liver. Rats were divided into four groups at random and given designed treatments for 20 weeks. The oxidative damage of liver tissue was evaluated by lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes. Oxidative stress related genes were detected to reflect the liver stress state at the molecular level. Compared to the control and Na2SeO3 groups, the MDA content in liver tissue was decreased and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were increased in the Na2SeO3 intervention group. The mRNA levels of SOD1, CAT, GPx and Txnrd1 were increased significantly (Pcauses oxidative damage in the rat liver, and Na2SeO3 protects liver cells by adjusting the expression of oxidative stress related genes to improve the activities of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23603382

  6. Protective effects of selenium on oxidative damage and oxidative stress related gene expression in rat liver under chronic poisoning of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhao; Wang, Zhou; Li, Jian-jun; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Ping-chuan; Dong, Lu; Chen, Jing-hong; Chen, Qun; Zhang, Xiao-tian; Wang, Zhi-lun

    2013-08-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic metalloid existing widely in the environment, and chronic exposure to it through contaminated drinking water has become a global problem of public health. The present study focused on the protective effects of selenium on oxidative damage of chronic arsenic poisoning in rat liver. Rats were divided into four groups at random and given designed treatments for 20 weeks. The oxidative damage of liver tissue was evaluated by lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes. Oxidative stress related genes were detected to reflect the liver stress state at the molecular level. Compared to the control and Na2SeO3 groups, the MDA content in liver tissue was decreased and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were increased in the Na2SeO3 intervention group. The mRNA levels of SOD1, CAT, GPx and Txnrd1 were increased significantly (Ptreatment group. The expressions of HSP70 and HO-1 were significantly (Ptreatment group. The results indicate that long-term intake of NaAsO2 causes oxidative damage in the rat liver, and Na2SeO3 protects liver cells by adjusting the expression of oxidative stress related genes to improve the activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  7. NT-3 protein levels are enhanced in the hippocampus of PRG1-deficient mice but remain unchanged in PRG1/LPA2 double mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Sandra; Sommer, Babette; Kröber, Andrea; Nitsch, Robert; Schwegler, Herbert; Vogt, Johannes; Roskoden, Thomas

    2016-01-26

    The plasticity-related gene 1 (PRG1) modulates bioactive lipids at the postsynaptic density and is a novel player in neuronal plasticity and regulation of glutamatergic transmission at principal neurons. PRG1, a neuronal molecule, is highly expressed during development and regeneration processes at the postsynaptic density, modulates synaptic lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) levels and is related to epilepsy and brain injury. In the present study, we analyzed the interaction between the synaptic molecules PRG1 and LPA2R with other plasticity-related molecules the neurotrophins. The protein levels of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 were measured using ELISA in hippocampal tissue of homozygous (PRG(-/-)) and heterozygous (PRG(+/-)) PRG1 deficient mice and compared to their wild type (PRG(+/+)/WT) littermates. In the hippocampus, protein levels of NT-3 were significantly increased in PRG(-/-) mice (compared to WT-litters) while protein levels of NGF and BDNF were not affected. Since PRG1 deficiency leads to increased neuronal excitability and higher hippocampal network activity, which may well influence neurotrophin levels, we further assessed PRG1 deficient mice on an LPA2-receptor (LPA2R) deficient background, reported to normalize hippocampal over-excitability in PRG1(-/-) mice. However, on an LPA2R deficient background, protein levels of NT-3 in PRG1(-/-) mice (PRG1(-/-)/LPA2R(-/-)) were not significantly different when compared to WT animals. Since PRG1 deficient mice showed over-excitability in glutamatergic neurons. This was normalized by additional LPA2R deletion, and we conclude the increased NT3-levels were directly or indirectly attributable to increased hippocampal network activity, possibly exerting a protective effect against over-excitability.

  8. ILDR1 deficiency causes degeneration of cochlear outer hair cells and disrupts the structure of the organ of Corti: a mouse model for human DFNB42

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    Qing Sang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1 is a poorly characterized gene that was first identified in lymphoma cells. Mutations in ILDR1 are responsible for DFNB42, but the pathogenesis of hearing loss caused by ILDR1 mutations remains to be elucidated. To explore the role of ILDR1 in hearing, we created Ildr1 knockout mice. In heterozygous mice, ILDR1 expression was found in outer hair cells (OHCs and inner hair cells (IHCs of the organ of Corti. ILDR1-deficient mice are profoundly deaf by postnatal day 21 (P21. No significant difference was observed in the supporting cells and IHCs of ILDR1-deficient mice, but progressive degeneration of OHCs occurred at P15 and disruption of the tunnel running through the organ of Corti was noticeable at P21. By P28, there were no OHCs visible in any of the turns of the organ of Corti, and the tunnel of the organ of Corti was entirely destroyed. ILDR1 deficiency affects expression of tricellulin in vivo, and this provides a possible explanation to hearing loss. To further elucidate the mechanism of deafness related to ILDR1 deficiency, we pursued a differential proteomic approach to comprehensively assess differential protein expression in the cochleae of Ildr1+/− and Ildr1−/− mice at P21. Altogether, 708 proteins were up-regulated (fold change >1.5 and 114 proteins were down-regulated (fold change <0.5 in the Ildr1−/− mice compared with Ildr1+/− mice. Gene ontology classification indicated that a number of differentially expressed proteins are involved in cell adhesion, protein and vesicle-mediated transport, cell death, membrane organization, and cellular homeostasis. A few of these proteins are closely related to hearing development. Taken together, our data suggest that ILDR1 is important for the survival of OHCs and provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of human deafness DFNB42 deafness.

  9. 4PS/insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice.

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    Patti, M E; Sun, X J; Bruening, J C; Araki, E; Lipes, M A; White, M F; Kahn, C R

    1995-10-20

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) is the major cytoplasmic substrate of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptors. Transgenic mice lacking IRS-1 are resistant to insulin and IGF-1, but exhibit significant residual insulin action which corresponds to the presence of an alternative high molecular weight substrate in liver and muscle. Recently, Sun et al. (Sun, X.-J., Wang, L.-M., Zhang, Y., Yenush, L. P., Myers, M. G., Jr., Glasheen, E., Lane, W.S., Pierce, J. H., and White, M. F. (1995) Nature 377, 173-177) purified and cloned 4PS, the major substrate of the IL-4 receptor-associated tyrosine kinase in myeloid cells, which has significant structural similarity to IRS-1. To determine if 4PS is the alternative substrate of the insulin receptor in IRS-1-deficient mice, we performed immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase assays using specific antibodies to 4PS. Following insulin stimulation, 4PS is rapidly phosphorylated in liver and muscle, binds to the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase, and activates the enzyme. Insulin stimulation also results in the association of 4PS with Grb 2 in both liver and muscle. In IRS-1-deficient mice, both the phosphorylation of 4PS and associated PI 3-kinase activity are enhanced, without an increase in protein expression. Immunodepletion of 4PS from liver and muscle homogenates removes most of the phosphotyrosine-associated PI 3-kinase activity in IRS-1-deficient mice. Thus, 4PS is the primary alternative substrate, i.e. IRS-2, which plays a major role in physiologic insulin signal transduction via both PI 3-kinase activation and Grb 2/Sos association. In IRS-1-deficient mice, 4PS/IRS-2 provides signal transduction to these two major pathways of insulin signaling.

  10. Relation between increased anxiety and reduced expression of alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of GABA(A) receptors in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raud, Sirli; Sütt, Silva; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Innos, Jürgen; Kõks, Sulev; Vasar, Eero

    2009-08-28

    Mutations in the coding region of the WFS1 gene cause Wolfram syndrome, a rare multisystem neurodegenerative disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance. In clinical studies a relation between mutations in the Wfs1 gene and increased susceptibility for mood disorders has been established. According to our previous studies, mice lacking Wfs1 gene displayed increased anxiety in stressful environment. As the GABA-ergic system plays a significant role in the regulation of anxiety, we analyzed the expression of GABA-related genes in the forebrain structures of wild-type and Wfs1-deficient mice. Experimentally naïve Wfs1-deficient animals displayed a significant down-regulation of alpha1 (Gabra1) and alpha2 (Gabra2) subunits of GABA(A) receptors in the temporal lobe and frontal cortex. Exposure of wild-type mice to the elevated plus-maze decreased levels of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes in the temporal lobe. A similar tendency was also established in the frontal cortex of wild-type animals exposed to behavioral test. In Wfs1-deficient mice the elevated plus-maze exposure did not induce further changes in the expression of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes. By contrast, the expression of Gad1 and Gad2 genes, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of GABA, was not significantly affected by the exposure of mice to the elevated plus-maze or by the invalidation of Wfs1 gene. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that increased anxiety of Wfs1-deficient mice is probably linked to reduced expression of Gabra1 and Gabra2 genes in the frontal cortex and temporal lobe. PMID:19477223

  11. Transcompartmental reversal of single fibre hyperexcitability in juxtaparanodal Kv1.1-deficient vagus nerve axons by activation of nodal KCNQ channels.

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    Glasscock, Edward; Qian, Jing; Kole, Matthew J; Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2012-08-15

    Kv1.1 channels cluster at juxtaparanodes of myelinated axons in the vagus nerve, the primary conduit for parasympathetic innervation of the heart. Kcna1-null mice lacking these channels exhibit neurocardiac dysfunction manifested by atropine-sensitive atrioventricular conduction blocks and bradycardia that may culminate in sudden death. To evaluate whether loss of Kv1.1 channels alters electrogenic properties within the nerve, we compared the intrinsic excitability of single myelinated A- and Aδ-axons from excised cervical vagus nerves of young adult Kcna1-null mice and age-matched, wild-type littermate controls. Although action potential shapes and relative refractory periods varied little between genotypes, Kv1.1-deficient large myelinated A-axons showed a fivefold increase in susceptibility to 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-induced spontaneous ectopic firing. Since the repolarizing currents of juxtaparanodal Kv1 channels and nodal KCNQ potassium channels both act to dampen repetitive activity, we examined whether augmenting nodal KCNQ activation could compensate for Kv1.1 loss and reverse the spontaneous hyperexcitability in Kv1.1-deficient A-axons. Application of the selective KCNQ opener flupirtine raised A-axon firing threshold while profoundly suppressing 4-AP-induced spontaneous firing, demonstrating a functional synergy between the two compartments. We conclude that juxtaparanodal Kv1.1-deficiency causes intrinsic hyperexcitability in large myelinated axons in vagus nerve which could contribute to autonomic dysfunction in Kcna1-null mice, and that KCNQ openers reveal a transcompartmental synergy between Kv1 and KCNQ channels in regulating axonal excitability. PMID:22641786

  12. Inflammatory mediator TAK1 regulates hair follicle morphogenesis and anagen induction shown by using keratinocyte-specific TAK1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sayama

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1 is a member of the NF-kappaB pathway and regulates inflammatory responses. We previously showed that TAK1 also regulates keratinocyte growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether TAK1 has any role in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. To examine this possibility, we studied the role of TAK1 in mouse hair follicle development and cycling as an instructive model system. By comparing keratinocyte-specific TAK1-deficient mice (Map3k7(fl/flK5-Cre with control mice, we found that the number of hair germs (hair follicles precursors in Map3k7(fl/flK5-Cre mice was significantly reduced at E15.5, and that subsequent hair follicle morphogenesis was retarded. Next, we analyzed the role of TAK1 in the cyclic remodeling in follicles by analyzing hair cycle progression in mice with a tamoxifen-inducible keratinocyte-specific TAK1 deficiency (Map3k7(fl/flK14-Cre-ER(T2. After active hair growth (anagen was induced by depilation, TAK1 was deleted by topical tamoxifen application. This resulted in significantly retarded anagen development in TAK1-deficient mice. Deletion of TAK1 in hair follicles that were already in anagen induced premature, apoptosis-driven hair follicle regression, along with hair follicle damage. These studies provide the first evidence that the inflammatory mediator TAK1 regulates hair follicle induction and morphogenesis, and is required for anagen induction and anagen maintenance.

  13. LKB1 deficiency enhances sensitivity to energetic stress induced by erlotinib treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells

    OpenAIRE

    Whang, Young Mi; Park, Serk In; Trenary, Irina A.; Egnatchik, Robert A.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Kaufman, Jacob M.; Carbone, David P.; Young, Jamey D.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11 or LKB1) is mutated in 20–30% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient tumors. Loss of LKB1-AMPK signaling confers sensitivity to metabolic inhibition or stress-induced mitochondrial insults. We tested the hypothesis that loss of LKB1 sensitizes NSCLC cells to energetic stress induced by treatment with erlotinib. LKB1-deficient cells exhibited enhanced sensitivity to erlotinib in vitro and in vivo that was associated with alterations...

  14. The role of SLC2A1 mutations in myoclonic astatic epilepsy and absence epilepsy, and the estimated frequency of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Johannesen, Katrine Marie; Ek, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    The first mutations identified in SLC2A1, encoding the glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1) protein of the blood-brain barrier, were associated with severe epileptic encephalopathy. Recently, dominant SLC2A1 mutations were found in rare autosomal dominant families with various forms of epilepsy...... of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome in the Danish population. One hundred twenty patients with MAE, 50 patients with absence epilepsy, and 37 patients with unselected epilepsies, intellectual disability (ID), and/or various movement disorders were screened for mutations in SLC2A1. Mutations in SLC2A1 were...

  15. Gamma-H2AX upregulation caused by Wip1 deficiency increases depression-related cellular senescence in hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Wen-Yue; Hu, Wei-Yan; Yang, Lu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei-Yuan; Yang, Ya-Shu; Liu, Si-Cheng; Zhang, Feng-Lan; Mei, Rong; Xing, Da; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The PP2C family member Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1) critically regulates DNA damage response (DDR) under stressful situations. In the present study, we investigated whether Wip1 expression was involved in the regulation of DDR-induced and depression-related cellular senescence in mouse hippocampus. We found that Wip1 gene knockout (KO) mice showed aberrant elevation of hippocampal cellular senescence and of γ-H2AX activity, which is known as a biomarker of DDR and cellular senescence, indicating that the lack of Wip1-mediated γ-H2AX dephosphorylation facilitates cellular senescence in hippocampus. Administration of the antidepressant fluoxetine had no significant effects on the increased depression-like behaviors, enriched cellular senescence, and aberrantly upregulated hippocampal γ-H2AX activity in Wip1 KO mice. After wildtype C57BL/6 mice were exposed to the procedure of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), cellular senescence and γ-H2AX activity in hippocampus were also elevated, accompanied by the suppression of Wip1 expression in hippocampus when compared to the control group without CUMS experience. These CUMS-induced symptoms were effectively prevented following fluoxetine administration in wildtype C57BL/6 mice, with the normalization of depression-like behaviors. Our data demonstrate that Wip1-mediated γ-H2AX dephosphorylation may play an important role in the occurrence of depression-related cellular senescence. PMID:27686532

  16. Persistent Activation of NF-κB in BRCA1-Deficient Mammary Progenitors Drives Aberrant Proliferation and Accumulation of DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Andrea; Lau, Rosanna; Cabrita, Miguel A; Nolan, Emma; Crooks, Peter A; Visvader, Jane E; Pratt, M A Christine

    2016-07-01

    Human BRCA1 mutation carriers and BRCA1-deficient mouse mammary glands contain an abnormal population of mammary luminal progenitors that can form 3D colonies in a hormone-independent manner. The intrinsic cellular regulatory defect in these presumptive breast cancer precursors is not known. We have discovered that nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) (p52/RelB) is persistently activated in a subset of BRCA1-deficient mammary luminal progenitors. Hormone-independent luminal progenitor colony formation required NF-κB, ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), and the inhibitor of kappaB kinase, IKKα. Progesterone (P4)-stimulated proliferation resulted in a marked enhancement of DNA damage foci in Brca1(-/-) mouse mammary. In vivo, NF-κB inhibition prevented recovery of Brca1(-/-) hormone-independent colony-forming cells. The majority of human BRCA1(mut/+) mammary glands showed marked lobular expression of nuclear NF-κB. We conclude that the aberrant proliferative capacity of Brca1(-/-) luminal progenitor cells is linked to the replication-associated DNA damage response, where proliferation of mammary progenitors is perpetuated by damage-induced, autologous NF-κB signaling. PMID:27292187

  17. AAV gene transfer delays disease onset in a TPP1-deficient canine model of the late infantile form of Batten disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Martin L.; Tecedor, Luis; Chen, Yonghong; Williamson, Baye G.; Lysenko, Elena; Wininger, Fred A.; Young, Whitney M.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Whiting, Rebecca E. H.; Coates, Joan R.; Davidson, Beverly L.

    2016-01-01

    The most common form of the childhood neurodegenerative disease late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (also called Batten disease) is caused by deficiency of the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1) resulting from mutations in the TPP1 gene. We tested whether TPP1 gene transfer to the ependyma, the epithelial lining of the brain ventricular system, in TPP1-deficient dogs would be therapeutically beneficial. A one-time administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) expressing canine TPP1 (rAAV.caTPP1) resulted in high expression of TPP1 predominantly in ependymal cells and secretion of the enzyme into the cerebrospinal fluid leading to clinical benefit. Diseased dogs treated with rAAV.caTPP1 showed delays in onset of clinical signs and disease progression, protection from cognitive decline, and extension of life span. By immunostaining and enzyme assay, recombinant protein was evident throughout the brain and spinal cord, with correction of the neuropathology characteristic of the disease. This study in a naturally occurring canine model of TPP1 deficiency highlights the utility of AAV transduction of ventricular lining cells to accomplish stable secretion of recombinant protein for broad distribution in the central nervous system and therapeutic benefit. PMID:26560358

  18. Dermatan Sulfate Epimerase 1-Deficient Mice Have Reduced Content and Changed Distribution of Iduronic Acids in Dermatan Sulfate and an Altered Collagen Structure in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarana, M.; Kalamajski, S.; Kongsgaard, M.;

    2009-01-01

    -derived chains. DS-epi1-deficient mice are smaller than their wild-type littermates but otherwise have no gross macroscopic alterations. The lack of DS-epi1 affects the chondroitin/dermatan sulfate in many proteoglycans, and the consequences for skin collagen structure were initially analyzed. We found...... that the skin collagen architecture was altered, and electron microscopy showed that the DS-epi1-null fibrils have a larger diameter than the wild-type fibrils. The altered chondroitin/dermatan sulfate chains carried by decorin in skin are likely to affect collagen fibril formation and reduce the tensile...... of adjacent iduronic acids are greatly decreased in skin decorin and biglycan chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, along with a parallel decrease in iduronic-2-O-sulfated-galactosamine-4-O-sulfated structures. Both iduronic acid blocks and iduronic acids surrounded by glucuronic acids are also decreased in versican...

  19. Pre-symptomatic activation of antioxidant responses and alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C1-deficient murine brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry E Kennedy

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused in most cases by mutations in the NPC1 gene. NPC1-deficiency is characterized by late endosomal accumulation of cholesterol, impaired cholesterol homeostasis, and a broad range of other cellular abnormalities. Although neuronal abnormalities and glial activation are observed in nearly all areas of the brain, the most severe consequence of NPC1-deficiency is a near complete loss of Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum. The link between cholesterol trafficking and NPC pathogenesis is not yet clear; however, increased oxidative stress in symptomatic NPC disease, increases in mitochondrial cholesterol, and alterations in autophagy/mitophagy suggest that mitochondria play a role in NPC disease pathology. Alterations in mitochondrial function affect energy and neurotransmitter metabolism, and are particularly harmful to the central nervous system. To investigate early metabolic alterations that could affect NPC disease progression, we performed metabolomics analyses of different brain regions from age-matched wildtype and Npc1 (-/- mice at pre-symptomatic, early symptomatic and late stage disease by (1H-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolic profiling revealed markedly increased lactate and decreased acetate/acetyl-CoA levels in Npc1 (-/- cerebellum and cerebral cortex at all ages. Protein and gene expression analyses indicated a pre-symptomatic deficiency in the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, and an upregulation of glycolytic gene expression at the early symptomatic stage. We also observed a pre-symptomatic increase in several indicators of oxidative stress and antioxidant response systems in Npc1 (-/- cerebellum. Our findings suggest that energy metabolism and oxidative stress may present additional therapeutic targets in NPC disease, especially if intervention can be started at an early stage of the disease.

  20. [Chronicity, chronicization, systematization of delusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapet, P; Fernandez, C; Galtier, M C; Gisselmann, A

    1984-05-01

    Chronicity in psychopathology is indicative of a term, a decay. Chronicization only leads the way to this term. Here, chronicization is taken literally as an inscription in the time course of delusions. The mechanism of systematization seems to be a central mark in the approach to chronic delusions. It is not an alienation or an irreversible closing but an attempted accommodation with reality in the life of psychotic subjects, irrespective of the delusional structure. The role of therapy and drug treatment as a follow-up may in that case assume another meaning.

  1. Phenotypic complementation of genetic immunodeficiency by chronic herpesvirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDuff, Donna A; Reese, Tiffany A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Weiss, Leslie A; Song, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Carrero, Javier A; Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Israel, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Colonna, Marco; Edelson, Brian T; Sibley, L David; Stallings, Christina L; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the presentation of hereditary immunodeficiencies may be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Patients with mutations in HOIL1 (RBCK1) present with amylopectinosis-associated myopathy with or without hyper-inflammation and immunodeficiency. We report that barrier-raised HOIL-1-deficient mice exhibit amylopectin-like deposits in the myocardium but show minimal signs of hyper-inflammation. However, they show immunodeficiency upon acute infection with Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii or Citrobacter rodentium. Increased susceptibility to Listeria was due to HOIL-1 function in hematopoietic cells and macrophages in production of protective cytokines. In contrast, HOIL-1-deficient mice showed enhanced control of chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis or murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), and these infections conferred a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Surprisingly, chronic infection with MHV68 complemented the immunodeficiency of HOIL-1, IL-6, Caspase-1 and Caspase-1;Caspase-11-deficient mice following Listeria infection. Thus chronic herpesvirus infection generates signs of auto-inflammation and complements genetic immunodeficiency in mutant mice, highlighting the importance of accounting for the virome in genotype-phenotype studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04494.001 PMID:25599590

  2. MD-1 deficiency attenuates dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis through modulating the function of colonic lamina propria dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huaqin; Zhang, Guqin; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Wei; Shang, Jian; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhao, Qiu; Li, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Available evidence suggests that both dysregulated innate and adaptive immune pathways contribute to the aberrant intestinal inflammatory response in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Myeloid Differentiation 1 (MD-1), also known as Lymphocyte Antigen 86 (Ly86), a secreted protein interacting with radioprotective 105 (RP105), plays an important role in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway. Previous studies showed that MD-1 may be involved in the (patho) physiological regulation of the innate immune system and inflammation. In this study, we reported for the first time that MD-1 mRNA expression was up-regulated in both human IBD patients and DSS-treated WT mice. We showed that MD-1(-/-) mice were less susceptible to the development of colitis than WT controls as demonstrated by significantly reduced weight loss, disease activity index, colon histological scores, cellular infiltration and expression of inflammatory mediators. In addition, mucosal barrier function seemed to be intact in response to the loss of MD-1. Finally, lamina propria dendritic cells (LPDCs) from the colon of MD-1(-/-) mice after DSS exposure not only decreased in number but also significantly down-regulated the expression of surface maturation co-stimulatory molecules MHC-II, CD40 and CD86 compared with those from WT mice. Taken together, our results reveal that MD-1 deficiency is of critical importance in down-regulating induction and progression of DSS colitis, thereby suggesting that MD-1 might be a target for future interventional therapies of IBD.

  3. PINK1 Deficiency Decreases Expression Levels of mir-326, mir-330, and mir-3099 during Brain Development and Neural Stem Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Insup; Woo, Joo Hong; Jou, Ilo

    2016-01-01

    PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) is a Parkinson's disease (PD) gene. We examined miRNAs regulated by PINK1 during brain development and neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation, and found that lvels of miRNAs related to tumors and inflammation were different between 1-day-old-wild type (WT) and PINK1-knockout (KO) mouse brains. Notably, levels of miR-326, miR-330 and miR-3099, which are related to astroglioma, increased during brain development and NSC differentiation, and were significantly reduced in the absence of PINK1. Interestingly, in the presence of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), which pushes differentiation of NSCs into astrocytes, miR-326, miR-330, and miR-3099 levels in KO NSCs were also lower than those in WT NSCs. Furthermore, mimics of all three miRNAs increased expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) during differentiation of KO NSCs, but inhibitors of these miRNAs decreased GFAP expression in WT NSCs. Moreover, these miRNAs increased the translational efficacy of GFAP through the 3'-UTR of GFAP mRNA. Taken together, these results suggest that PINK1 deficiency reduce expression levels of miR-326, miR-330 and miR-3099, which may regulate GFAP expression during NSC differentiation and brain development. PMID:26924929

  4. Profile of mecasermin for the long-term treatment of growth failure in children and adolescents with severe primary IGF-1 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Fintini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Danilo Fintini, Claudia Brufani, Marco CappaEndocrinology Unit, “Bambino Gesù” Children’s Hospital-IRCCS, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHI or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 deficiency (IGFD is characterized by deficit of IGF-1 production due to alteration of response of growth hormone (GH receptor to GH. This syndrome is due to mutation of GH receptor or IGF-1 gene and patients affected showed no response to GH therapy. The only treatment is recombinant IGF-1 (mecasermin, which has been available since 1986, but approved in the United States by the US Food and Drug Administration only in 2005 and in Europe by the European Medicines Agency in 2007. To date, few studies are available on long-term treatment with mecasermin in IGFD patients and some of them have a very small number of subjects. In this review we discuss briefly clinical features of severe primary IGFD, laboratory findings, and indications for treatment. Results of long-term therapy with rhIGF1 (mecasermin in patients affected by severe primary IGFD and possible side effects are explained.Keywords: mecasermin, therapy, Laron syndrome, IGF-1

  5. Fast-twitch skeletal muscle fiber adaptation to SERCA1 deficiency in a Dutch Improved Red and White calf pseudomyotonia case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorotea, Tiziano; Grünberg, Walter; Murgiano, Leonardo; Plattet, Philippe; Drögemüller, Cord; Mascarello, Francesco; Sacchetto, Roberta

    2015-11-01

    Missense mutations in ATP2A1 gene, encoding SERCA1 protein, cause a muscle disorder designed as congenital pseudomyotonia (PMT) in Chianina and Romagnola cattle or congenital muscular dystonia1 (CMD1) in Belgian Blue cattle. Although PMT is not life-threatening, CMD1 affected calves usually die within a few weeks of age as a result of respiratory complication. We have recently described a muscular disorder in a double muscle Dutch Improved Red and White cross-breed calf. Mutation analysis revealed an ATP2A1 mutation identical to that described in CMD1, even though clinical phenotype was quite similar to that of PMT. Here, we provide evidence for a deficiency of mutated SERCA1 in PMT affected muscles of Dutch Improved Red and White calf, but not of its mRNA. The reduced expression of SERCA1 is selective and not compensated by the SERCA2 isoform. By contrast, pathological muscles are characterized by a broad distribution of mitochondrial markers in all fiber types, not related to intrinsic features of double muscle phenotype and by an increased expression of sarcolemmal calcium extrusion pump. Calcium removal mechanisms, operating in muscle fibers as compensatory response aimed at lowering excessive cytoplasmic calcium concentration caused by SERCA1 deficiency, could explain the difference in severity of clinical signs. PMID:26482047

  6. Different molecular mechanisms involved in spontaneous and oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial fragmentation in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP-1)-deficient fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beersel, Guillaume; Tihon, Eliane; Demine, Stéphane; Hamer, Isabelle; Jadot, Michel; Arnould, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    NCLs (neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses) form a group of eight inherited autosomal recessive diseases characterized by the intralysosomal accumulation of autofluorescent pigments, called ceroids. Recent data suggest that the pathogenesis of NCL is associated with the appearance of fragmented mitochondria with altered functions. However, even if an impairement in the autophagic pathway has often been evoked, the molecular mechanisms leading to mitochondrial fragmentation in response to a lysosomal dysfunction are still poorly understood. In this study, we show that fibroblasts that are deficient for the TPP-1 (tripeptidyl peptidase-1), a lysosomal hydrolase encoded by the gene mutated in the LINCL (late infantile NCL, CLN2 form) also exhibit a fragmented mitochondrial network. This morphological alteration is accompanied by an increase in the expression of the protein BNIP3 (Bcl2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa interacting protein 3) as well as a decrease in the abundance of mitofusins 1 and 2, two proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion. Using RNAi (RNA interference) and quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial morphology, we show that the inhibition of BNIP3 expression does not result in an increase in the reticulation of the mitochondrial population in LINCL cells. However, this protein seems to play a key role in cell response to mitochondrial oxidative stress as it sensitizes mitochondria to antimycin A-induced fragmentation. To our knowledge, our results bring the first evidence of a mechanism that links TPP-1 deficiency and oxidative stress-induced changes in mitochondrial morphology. PMID:23249249

  7. [Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) disease and interleukin 12 receptor β1 deficiency: clinical experience of two familial and one sporadic case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Alexis; Pérez, Amir; Risco, Migdy; Gallo, Silvanna

    2014-08-01

    BCG disease has been reported in primary and secondary immunodeficiency and as Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Diseases (MSMD). Investigation of this syndrome has led to the identifications of a series of genetic, inherited defects in the IL-12/IFN-γ axis. MSMD-causing mutations have been found in seven autosomal and two X-linked genes. In these patients, local or disseminated vaccine BCG infections are common. We report a clinical series including two infants with left axillary adenitis ipsilateral to the site of neonatal BCG immunization; one of them member of a family with two previously reported cases and a single sporadic case. All of them were diagnosed sequentially in Puerto Montt, Chile. The aim of this report is to notify the first Chilean disseminated BCG patients without previous immunodeficiency, in whom it was possible to identify an underlying immunodeficiency, although specific tests for IL-12/IFN-γ axis was no performed in our country. Clinical suspicion and international collaboration permitted to confirm IL12-Rβ1 deficiency in 2 of 3 familial cases and a sporadic case.

  8. Chronic cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods may relieve symptoms in people. However, the benefit of a low-fat diet has not been proven. Alternative Names Cholecystitis - chronic Images Cholecystitis, CT scan Cholecystitis, cholangiogram Cholecystolithiasis Gallstones, cholangiogram Cholecystogram References Wang ...

  9. Chronic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Lunch Lines FDA Cracks Down on Antibacterial Soaps Health Tip: Schedule a Back-to-School Dental ... the Professional Version Meningitis Introduction to Meningitis Acute Bacterial Meningitis Viral Meningitis Noninfectious Meningitis Recurrent Meningitis Chronic ...

  10. ALMS1-deficient fibroblasts over-express extra-cellular matrix components, display cell cycle delay and are resistant to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Zulato

    Full Text Available Alström Syndrome (ALMS is a rare genetic disorder (483 living cases, characterized by many clinical manifestations, including blindness, obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiomyopathy. ALMS is caused by mutations in the ALMS1 gene, encoding for a large protein with implicated roles in ciliary function, cellular quiescence and intracellular transport. Patients with ALMS have extensive fibrosis in nearly all tissues resulting in a progressive organ failure which is often the ultimate cause of death. To focus on the role of ALMS1 mutations in the generation and maintenance of this pathological fibrosis, we performed gene expression analysis, ultrastructural characterization and functional assays in 4 dermal fibroblast cultures from ALMS patients. Using a genome-wide gene expression analysis we found alterations in genes belonging to specific categories (cell cycle, extracellular matrix (ECM and fibrosis, cellular architecture/motility and apoptosis. ALMS fibroblasts display cytoskeleton abnormalities and migration impairment, up-regulate the expression and production of collagens and despite the increase in the cell cycle length are more resistant to apoptosis. Therefore ALMS1-deficient fibroblasts showed a constitutively activated myofibroblast phenotype even if they do not derive from a fibrotic lesion. Our results support a genetic basis for the fibrosis observed in ALMS and show that both an excessive ECM production and a failure to eliminate myofibroblasts are key mechanisms. Furthermore, our findings suggest new roles for ALMS1 in both intra- and extra-cellular events which are essential not only for the normal cellular function but also for cell-cell and ECM-cell interactions.

  11. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  13. CXC-chemokine regulation and neutrophil trafficking in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in P-selectin/ICAM-1 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crockett Elahé T

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neutrophil adhesion and migration are critical in hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury (I/R. P-selectin and the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 can mediate neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions, neutrophil migration, and the interactions of neutrophils with hepatocytes in the liver. Despite very strong preclinical data, recent clinical trials failed to show a protective effect of anti-adhesion therapy in reperfusion injury, indicating that the length of injury might be a critical factor in neutrophil infiltration. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the role of P-selectin and ICAM-1 in neutrophil infiltration and liver injury during early and late phases of liver I/R. Methods Adult male wild-type and P-selectin/ICAM-1-deficient (P/I null mice underwent 90 minutes of partial liver ischemia followed by various periods of reperfusion (6, 15 h, and a survival study. Liver injury was assessed by plasma level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT and histopathology. The plasma cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6, MIP-2 and KC, were measured by ELISA. Results Reperfusion caused significant hepatocellular injury in both wild-type and P/I null mice as was determined by plasma ALT levels and liver histopathology. The injury was associated with a marked neutrophil infiltration into the ischemic livers of both wild-type and P/I null mice. Although the levels of ALT and neutrophil infiltration were slightly lower in the P/I null mice compared with the wild-type mice the differences were not statistically significant. The plasma cytokine data of TNF-α and IL-6 followed a similar pattern to ALT data, and no significant difference was found between the wild-type and P/I null groups. In contrast, a significant difference in KC and MIP-2 chemokine levels was observed between the wild-type and P/I null mice. Additionally, the survival study showed a trend towards increased survival in the P/I null group. Conclusion While ICAM-1 and P

  14. Chronic pain - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  15. Low back pain - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  16. Chronic motor tic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  17. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Chronic Pelvic Pain Home For Patients Search FAQs Chronic Pelvic Pain ... Pain FAQ099, August 2011 PDF Format Chronic Pelvic Pain Gynecologic Problems What is chronic pelvic pain? What ...

  18. Employees with Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Chronic Pain By Beth Loy, Ph.D. Preface Introduction Information ... at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Chronic Pain How prevalent is chronic pain? Chronic pain has ...

  19. Chronic coughing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic coughing was acknowledged to result from pathological state of the respiratory organs. Cardiac diseases could be accompanied by coughing as well. It was recommended to perform x-ray examinations, including biomedical radiography of the chest, computerized tomography, scintiscanning with 67Ga-citrate, bronchi examination in order to exclude heart disease. The complex examination permitted to detect localization and type of the changes in the lungs and mediastinum, to distinguish benign tumor from malignant one

  20. Chronic Insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Buysse, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Ms. F, a 42-year-old divorced woman, presents for evaluation of chronic insomnia. She complains of difficulty falling asleep, often 30 minutes or longer, and difficulty maintaining sleep during the night, with frequent awakenings that often last 30 minutes or longer. These symptoms occur nearly every night, with only one or two “good” nights per month. She typically goes to bed around 10:00 p.m. to give herself adequate time for sleep, and she gets out of bed around 7:00 a.m. on work days and...

  1. Chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... 2012_CKD_GL.pdf . McCullough PA. Interface between renal disease ... patients with kidney failure. N Engl J Med . 2010;362(14):1312- ...

  2. The HDAC inhibitor SAHA improves depressive-like behavior of CRTC1-deficient mice: possible relevance for treatment-resistant depression

    KAUST Repository

    Meylan, Elsa M.

    2016-03-09

    Major depression is a highly complex disabling psychiatric disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. Despite the availability of several classes of antidepressants, a substantial percentage of patients are unresponsive to these medications. A better understanding of the neurobiology of depression and the mechanisms underlying antidepressant response is thus critically needed. We previously reported that mice lacking CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) exhibit a depressive-like phenotype and a blunted antidepressant response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. In this study, we similarly show that Crtc1‒/‒ mice are resistant to the antidepressant effect of chronic desipramine in a behavioral despair paradigm. Supporting the blunted response to this tricyclic antidepressant, we found that desipramine does not significantly increase the expression of Bdnf and Nr4a1-3 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of Crtc1‒/‒ mice. Epigenetic regulation of neuroplasticity gene expression has been associated with depression and antidepressant response, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been shown to have antidepressant-like properties. Here, we show that unlike conventional antidepressants, chronic systemic administration of the HDAC inhibitor SAHA partially rescues the depressive-like behavior of Crtc1‒/‒ mice. This behavioral effect is accompanied by an increased expression of Bdnf, but not Nr4a1-3, in the prefrontal cortex of these mice, suggesting that this epigenetic intervention restores the expression of a subset of genes by acting downstream of CRTC1. These findings suggest that CRTC1 alterations may be associated with treatment-resistant depression, and support the interesting possibility that targeting HDACs may be a useful therapeutic strategy in antidepressant development.

  3. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia , and other conditions . Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Key Points Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease ... chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease in which too many myelocytes ...

  4. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, L; Thomsen, S F; Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls;

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is a common condition in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Little is known about the incidence, prevalence and determinants of CMH in younger individuals....

  5. Chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sachdeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic urticaria (CU is a disturbing allergic condition of the skin. Although frequently benign, it may sometimes be a red flag sign of a serious internal disease. A multitude of etiologies have been implicated in the causation of CU, including physical, infective, vasculitic, psychological and idiopathic. An autoimmune basis of most of the ′idiopathic′ forms is now hypothesized. Histamine released from mast cells is the major effector in pathogenesis and it is clinically characterized by wheals that have a tendency to recur. Laboratory investigations aimed at a specific etiology are not always conclusive, though may be suggestive of an underlying condition. A clinical search for associated systemic disease is strongly advocated under appropriate circumstances. The mainstay of treatment remains H1 antihistaminics. These may be combined with complementary pharmacopeia in the form of H2 blockers, doxepin, nifedipine and leukotriene inhibitors. More radical therapy in the form of immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide may be required for recalcitrant cases. Autologous transfusion and alternative remedies like acupuncture have prospects for future. A stepwise management results in favorable outcomes. An update on CU based on our experience with patients at a tertiary care centre is presented.

  6. Neuromodulation of chronic headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martelletti, Paolo; Jensen, Rigmor H; Antal, Andrea;

    2013-01-01

    The medical treatment of patients with chronic primary headache syndromes (chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, chronic cluster headache, hemicrania continua) is challenging as serious side effects frequently complicate the course of medical treatment and some patients may be even...

  7. Untying chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Häuser, Winfried; Wolfe, Frederik; Henningsen, Peter; Schmutzer, Gabriele; Brähler, Elmar; Hinz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic pain is a major public health problem. The impact of stages of chronic pain adjusted for disease load on societal burden has not been assessed in population surveys. Methods: A cross-sectional survey with 4360 people aged ≥ 14 years representative of the German population was conducted. Measures obtained included demographic variables, presence of chronic pain (based on the definition of the International Association for the Study of Pain), chronic pain stages (by chronic ...

  8. Chronic pain after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsborg, B.; Nikolajsen, L.; Kehlet, H.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a well-known adverse effect of surgery, but the risk of chronic pain after gynaecological surgery is less established. METHOD: This review summarizes studies on chronic pain following hysterectomy. The underlying mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic...... post-hysterectomy pain are discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Chronic pain is reported by 5-32% of women after hysterectomy. A guideline is proposed for future prospective studies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  9. Chronic pain after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsborg, B; Nikolajsen, L; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a well-known adverse effect of surgery, but the risk of chronic pain after gynaecological surgery is less established. METHOD: This review summarizes studies on chronic pain following hysterectomy. The underlying mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic...... post-hysterectomy pain are discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Chronic pain is reported by 5-32% of women after hysterectomy. A guideline is proposed for future prospective studies. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar...

  10. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Nepper-Christensen, Steen;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults.......To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults....

  11. Chronic Diarrhea in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can include cramping abdominal pain nausea or vomiting fever chills bloody stools Children with chronic diarrhea who have ... can include cramping, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, fever, chills, or bloody stools. Children with chronic diarrhea who ...

  12. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyneuropathy - chronic inflammatory; CIDP; Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy; Guillain-Barré - CIDP ... CIDP is one cause of damage to nerves outside the brain or spinal cord ( peripheral neuropathy ). Polyneuropathy ...

  13. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett RM. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 274. Engleberg NC. Chronic ...

  14. "Chronic Lyme Disease"

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area "Chronic Lyme Disease" What is "chronic Lyme disease?" Lyme disease is an infection caused by ... J Med 357:1422-30, 2008). How is Lyme disease treated? For early Lyme disease, a short ...

  15. Predicting the Response to Intravenous Immunoglobulins in an Animal Model of Chronic Neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Johannes; Mathys, Christian; Mausberg, Anne K.; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a disabling autoimmune disorder of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) are effective in CIDP, but the treatment response varies greatly between individual patients. Understanding this interindividual variability and predicting the response to IVIg constitute major clinical challenges in CIDP. We previously established intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 deficient non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice as a novel animal model of CIDP. Here, we demonstrate that similar to human CIDP patients, ICAM-1 deficient NOD mice respond to IVIg treatment by clinical and histological measures. Nerve magnetic resonance imaging and histology demonstrated that IVIg ameliorates abnormalities preferentially in distal parts of the sciatic nerve branches. The IVIg treatment response also featured great heterogeneity allowing us to identify IVIg responders and non-responders. An increased production of interleukin (IL)-17 positively predicted IVIg treatment responses. In human sural nerve biopsy sections, high numbers of IL-17 producing cells were associated with younger age and shorter disease duration. Thus, our novel animal model can be utilized to identify prognostic markers of treatment responses in chronic inflammatory neuropathies and we identify IL-17 production as one potential such prognostic marker. PMID:27711247

  16. Prostaglandins and chronic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Tomohiro; Narumiya, Shuh

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is the basis of various chronic illnesses including cancer and vascular diseases. However, much has yet to be learned how inflammation becomes chronic. Prostaglandins (PGs) are well established as mediators of acute inflammation, and recent studies in experimental animals have provided evidence that they also function in transition to and maintenance of chronic inflammation. One role PGs play in such processes is amplification of cytokine signaling. As such, PGs can facil...

  17. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic Inflammatory polyneuropathies are an important group of neuromuscular disorders that present chronically and progress over more than 8 weeks, being referred to as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Despite tremendous progress in elucidating disease pathogenesis, the exact triggering event remains unknown. Our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of CIDP and its variants continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treat...

  18. Chronic granulomatous disease associated with chronic glomerulonephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frifelt, J J; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Valerius, Niels Henrik;

    1985-01-01

    A boy with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) developed glomerulonephritis at the age of 12 years. The glomerulonephritis progressed to terminal uraemia at age 15 when maintenance haemodialysis was started. The clinical course was complicated by pulmonary aspergillosis and Pseudomonas septicaemia...

  19. Identification of BRCA1-deficient ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Anne-Bine; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Rasmussen, Anders Aamann;

    2011-01-01

    . Design. BRCA1-immunohistochemistry (IHC), fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and methylation analyses were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded ovarian cancer tissue. Sample: 54 ovarian cancers; 15 BRCA1 cancers, 4 BRCA2 cancers, 10 cancers from patients with a family history...... but no mutation detected, and 25 ovarian cancers with unknown BRCA1 status. Results. Abnormal BRCA1 IHC was found to indicate BRCA mutations with a sensitivity of 80%, a specificity of 93%, and an estimated positive predictive value of 73%. FISH analyses supported the diagnosis in most cases. Methylation analyses...... could indicate BRCA deficiency in combination with one of the other methods. Conclusions. BRCA1 IHC is a promising screening method for BRCA1 mutation detection....

  20. Chronic penile strangulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Roberto I.; Silvia I Lopes; Roberto N. Lopes

    2003-01-01

    Chronic penile strangulation is exceedingly rare with only 5 cases previously reported. We report an additional case of progressive penile lymphedema due to chronic intermittent strangulation caused by a rubber band applied to the penile base for 6 years. A 49-year-old man presented incapacity to exteriorize the glans penis. For erotic purposes, he had been using a rubber-enlarging band placed in the penile base for 6 years. With chronic use, he noticed that his penis swelled. Physical examin...

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    NR Anthonisen

    2007-01-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are...

  2. Chronic diseases in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rončević Nevenka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prevalence of chronic diseases in adolescence is constantly increasing, especially in the last two decades. Adolescence is a period of important changes: body growth and development, sexual development, development of cognitive abilities, change in family relations and between peers, formation of personal identity and personal system of values, making decisions on future occupation etc. Chronic diseases in adolescence. Chronic disorders affect all development issues and represent an additional burden for adolescents. The interaction between chronic disorders and various development issues is complex and two-way: the disease may affect development, and development may affect the disease. Developmental, psychosocial and family factors are of great importance in the treatment of adolescents with chronic disorders. Chronic disorders affect all aspects of adolescent life, including relations with peers, school, nutrition, learning, traveling, entertainment, choice of occupation, plans for the future. Physicians should keep in mind that chronic diseases and their treatment represent only one aspect of person's life. Adolescents with chronic diseases have other needs as well, personal priorities, social roles and they expect these needs to be recognized and respected. Adolescent health care should be adjusted to the life style of adolescents.

  3. Managing your chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your chronic back pain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Managing chronic pain means finding ways to make your back pain tolerable so you can live your life. You may not be able to ...

  4. Chronic gastritis - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbanova, Mariya; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main aetiologic factor for chronic gastritis worldwide. The degree of inflammation and the evolution of this form of chronic gastritis can vary largely depending on bacterial virulence factors, host susceptibility factors and environmental conditions. Autoimmune gastritis is another cause of chronic inflammation in the stomach, which can occur in all age groups. This disease presents typically with vitamin B12 deficiency and pernicious anaemia. The presence of anti-parietal cell antibodies is highly specific for the diagnosis. The role of H. pylori as a trigger for autoimmune gastritis remains uncertain. Other rare conditions for chronic gastritis are chronic inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease or on the background of lymphocytic or collagenous gastroenteropathies. PMID:25439069

  5. [Chronic migraine: treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Julio

    2012-04-10

    We define chronic migraine as that clinical situation in which migraine attacks appear 15 or more days per month. Until recently, and in spite of its negative impact, patients with chronic migraine were excluded of the clinical trials. This manuscript revises the current treatment of chronic migraine. The first step should include the avoidance of potential precipitating/aggravating factors for chronic migraine, mainly analgesic overuse and the treatment of comorbid disorders, such as anxiety and depression. The symptomatic treatment should be based on the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and triptans (in this case ergotamine-containing medications. Preventive treatment includes a 'transitional' treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents or steroids, while preventive treatment exerts its actions. Even though those medications efficacious in episodic migraine prevention are used, the only drugs with demonstrated efficacy in the preventive treatment of chronic migraine are topiramate and pericranial infiltrations of Onabotulinumtoxin A. PMID:22532241

  6. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People About NINDS NINDS Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... en Español What is Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)? Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a neurological ...

  7. Stages of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  8. Stages of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana phytochelatin synthase 2 is constitutively active in vivo and can rescue the growth defect of the PCS1-deficient cad1-3 mutant on Cd-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnlenz, Tanja; Schmidt, Holger; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Clemens, Stephan

    2014-08-01

    Phytochelatins play a key role in the detoxification of metals in plants and many other eukaryotes. Their formation is catalysed by phytochelatin synthases (PCS) in the presence of metal excess. It appears to be common among higher plants to possess two PCS genes, even though in Arabidopsis thaliana only AtPCS1 has been demonstrated to confer metal tolerance. Employing a highly sensitive quantification method based on ultraperformance electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we detected AtPCS2-dependent phytochelatin formation. Overexpression of AtPCS2 resulted in constitutive phytochelatin accumulation, i.e. in the absence of metal excess, both in planta and in a heterologous system. This indicates distinct enzymatic differences between AtPCS1 and AtPCS2. Furthermore, AtPCS2 was able to partially rescue the Cd hypersensitivity of the AtPCS1-deficient cad1-3 mutant in a liquid seedling assay, and, more importantly, when plants were grown on soil spiked with Cd to a level that is close to what can be found in agricultural soils. No rescue was found in vertical-plate assays, the most commonly used method to assess metal tolerance. Constitutive AtPCS2-dependent phytochelatin synthesis suggests a physiological role of AtPCS2 other than metal detoxification. The differences observed between wild-type plants and cad1-3 on Cd soil demonstrated: (i) the essentiality of phytochelatin synthesis for tolerating levels of Cd contamination that can naturally be encountered by plants outside of metal-rich habitats, and (ii) a contribution to Cd accumulation under these conditions.

  10. Chronicity and control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whyte, Susan Reynolds

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a way of framing the study of ‘noncommunicable diseases’ within the more general area of chronic conditions. Focusing on Africa, it takes as points of departure the situation in Uganda, and the approach to health issues developed by a group of European and African colleagues...... over the years. It suggests a pragmatic analysis that places people's perceptions and practices within a field of possibilities shaped by policy, health care systems, and life conditions. In this field, the dimensions of chronicity and control are the distinctive analytical issues. They lead...... on to consideration of patterns of sociality related to chronic conditions and their treatment....

  11. Chronic Condition Data Warehouse

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Chronic Condition Data Warehouse (CCW) provides researchers with Medicare and Medicaid beneficiary, claims, and assessment data linked by beneficiary across...

  12. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Sleep About Us About Sleep Key Sleep Disorders Sleep ... Sheets Data & Statistics Projects and Partners Resources Events Sleep and Chronic Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  13. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  14. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Already a member? Log In or Sign Up Home About Us Support the ACPA Contact Us Shop ... for Understanding Pain September is Pain Awareness Month Home Pain Management Tools Videos What Is Chronic Pain? ...

  15. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chronic pain there may be no apparent physical injury or illness to explain it. The physician and ... expected period of healing for an illness or injury. You can experience pain even if you are ...

  16. Chronic rhinosinusitis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Whitney W; Lee, Robert J; Schleimer, Robert P; Cohen, Noam A

    2015-12-01

    There are a variety of medical conditions associated with chronic sinonasal inflammation, including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and cystic fibrosis. In particular, CRS can be divided into 2 major subgroups based on whether nasal polyps are present or absent. Unfortunately, clinical treatment strategies for patients with chronic sinonasal inflammation are limited, in part because the underlying mechanisms contributing to disease pathology are heterogeneous and not entirely known. It is hypothesized that alterations in mucociliary clearance, abnormalities in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, and tissue remodeling all contribute to the chronic inflammatory and tissue-deforming processes characteristic of CRS. Additionally, the host innate and adaptive immune responses are also significantly activated and might be involved in pathogenesis. Recent advancements in the understanding of CRS pathogenesis are highlighted in this review, with special focus placed on the roles of epithelial cells and the host immune response in patients with cystic fibrosis, CRS without nasal polyps, or CRS with nasal polyps. PMID:26654193

  17. Chronic penile strangulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Roberto I

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic penile strangulation is exceedingly rare with only 5 cases previously reported. We report an additional case of progressive penile lymphedema due to chronic intermittent strangulation caused by a rubber band applied to the penile base for 6 years. A 49-year-old man presented incapacity to exteriorize the glans penis. For erotic purposes, he had been using a rubber-enlarging band placed in the penile base for 6 years. With chronic use, he noticed that his penis swelled. Physical examination revealed lymphedema of the penis, phimosis and a stricture in the penile base. The patient was submitted to circumcision and the lymphedema remained stable 10 months postoperatively. Chronic penile incarceration usually causes penile lymphedema and urinary disturbance. Treatment consists of removal of foreign devices and surgical treatment of lymphedema.

  18. Chronic Conditions Dashboard

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Chronic Conditions Dashboard presents statistical views of information on the prevalence, utilization and Medicare spending for Medicare beneficiaries with...

  19. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... after a period of time the spinal cord has changed, after a period of time there are ... absence of an apparent cause. But chronic pain has a physiological or neurological basis even when we ...

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  1. Chronic Conditions Chartbook

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Chronic Conditions among Medicare Beneficiaries is a chartbook prepared by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and created to provide an overview of...

  2. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain Awareness Toolkits Partners for Understanding Pain September is Pain Awareness Month Home Pain Management Tools Videos What Is ...

  3. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  4. Chronic dysimmune neuropathies: Beyond chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadilkar Satish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of chronic dysimmune neuropathies has widened well beyond chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP. Pure motor (multifocal motor neuropathy, sensorimotor with asymmetrical involvement (multifocal acquired demylinating sensory and motor neuropathy, exclusively distal sensory (distal acquired demyelinating sensory neuropathy and very proximal sensory (chronic immune sensory polyradiculopathy constitute the variants of CIDP. Correct diagnosis of these entities is of importance in terms of initiation of appropriate therapy as well as prognostication of these patients. The rates of detection of immune-mediated neuropathies with monoclonal cell proliferation (monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, multiple myeloma, etc. have been facilitated as better diagnostic tools such as serum immunofixation electrophoresis are being used more often. Immune neuropathies associated with malignancies and systemic vasculitic disorders are being defined further and treated early with better understanding of the disease processes. As this field of dysimmune neuropathies will evolve in the future, some of the curious aspects of the clinical presentations and response patterns to different immunosuppressants or immunomodulators will be further elucidated. This review also discusses representative case studies.

  5. Idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Cordier Jean-François; Marchand Eric

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (ICEP) is characterized by subacute or chronic respiratory and general symptoms, alveolar and/or blood eosinophilia, and peripheral pulmonary infiltrates on chest imaging. Eosinophilia is present in most cases, usually in excess of 1000/mm3. In absence of significant blood eosinophilia, a diagnosis of ICEP is supported by the demonstration of bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophilia. ICEP is typically associated with eosinophil counts higher than ...

  6. Experimental chronic periodontitis morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis of periodontium tissue in a model of chronic periodontitis was studied. Adult Wistar rats wereused in a model; chronic periodontitis was developed through mastication-related loading decrease. Histological assessmentof periodontium tissue was conducted at Days 7, 14, 21 and 30. It was demonstrated that dystrophic tissue changes prevailover the inflammatory one in this particular experimental model. The structural elements of periodontium were involved intothe pathologic process ...

  7. Hypertension in Chronic Glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihm, Chun-Gyoo

    2015-12-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), which includes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proliferative forms of GN such as IgA nephropathy, increases the risk of hypertension. Hypertension in chronic GN is primarily volume dependent, and this increase in blood volume is not related to the deterioration of renal function. Patients with chronic GN become salt sensitive as renal damage including arteriolosclerosis progresses and the consequent renal ischemia causes the stimulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system(RAAS). Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system also contributes to hypertension in chronic GN. According to the KDIGO guideline, the available evidence indicates that the target BP should be ≤140mmHg systolic and ≤90mmHg diastolic in chronic kidney disease patients without albuminuria. In most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro-and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130mmHg systolic and ≤80mmHg diastolic is suggested. The use of agents that block the RAAS system is recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/ 24 h. The combination of a RAAS blockade with a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic may be effective in attaining the target BP, and in reducing the amount of urinary protein excretion in patients with chronic GN. PMID:26848302

  8. 1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征一例报告及文献复习%To report one case of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶小飞; 赵忠礼; 杨斌

    2012-01-01

    目的 总结1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征的临床特点、实验室检查、分子遗传学诊断及生酮饮食治疗疗效.方法 报告1例以痫样发作为首发的1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征病例.检索国内外相关文献,共检索出明确诊断的1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征32例,进行文献复习.结果 包括作者报告1例患者,共33例,男19例,女14例.临床特点:27/33例有痫样发作,发作年龄2个月至35岁之间.大多发作年龄在6个月以内.25/33例有共济失调,大多数轻中度共济失调,少部分患者共济失调影响行走及日常生活.24/33例肌张力障碍.14/33例有小头畸形.实验室检查:30/33例患者进行了脑脊液糖检查,23 - 56mg/dl之间,平均34.2±4.7mg/dl.脑脊液糖/血糖0.24 -0.57之间,平均0.38±0.07.21/33例患者进行了红细胞摄取3-0-甲基-D-葡萄糖的能力检查,结果显示红细胞摄取3-O-甲基-D-葡萄糖的能力较正常对照下降约50%左右.29/33例进行了脑电图检查,发现痫样放电25例,表现为多灶性棘波、棘慢波.32/33例患者进行了GLUT1 - DS基因SLC2A1筛查,发现12例错义突变,2例无义突变,2例插入突变,16例缺失或剪切住点突变.治疗:所有癫痫患者均进行了抗癫痫药物治疗,痫样发作均难以控制.28/33例患者(25例癫痫患者和3例发作性运动障碍)进行了生酮饮食治疗.24例癫痫患者的痫样发作完全控制,1例痫样发作明显缓解.3例发作性运动障碍明显改善.结论 1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征临床以难治性痫样发作、语言智能发育落后、脑脊液糖/血糖明显降低为特点,常规抗癫痫药物难以控制痫样发作,生酮饮食能够控制痫样发作,并对语言、认知、运动障碍均有改善作用.%Objective: To summary the clinical characteristics, laboratory examination, molecular genetics diagnose and effects of ketogenic diet in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1 -DS

  9. E2f1-deficient NOD/SCID mice have dry mouth due to a change of acinar/duct structure and the down-regulation of AQP5 in the salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Keitaro; Narita, Takanori; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Okabayashi, Ken; Ito, Tatsuro; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice have been used as a model for dry mouth. NOD mice lacking the gene encoding E2f1, a transcription factor, develop hyposalivation more rapidly progressively than control NOD mice. However, the model mice are associated with an underlying disease such as diabetes. We have now established E2f1-deficient NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency disease (NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-)) mice to avoid the development of diabetes (Matsui-Inohara et al., Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 234(12):1525-1536, 2009). In this study, we investigated the pathophysiological features of dry mouth using NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. In NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice, the volume of secreted saliva stimulated with pilocarpine is about one third that of control NOD/SCID mice. In behavioral analysis, NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice drank plenty of water when they ate dry food, and the frequency and time of water intake were almost double compared with control NOD/SCID mice. Histological analysis of submandibular glands with hematoxylin-eosin stain revealed that NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice have more ducts than NOD/SCID mice. In western blot analysis, the expression of aquaporin 5 (AQP5), a marker of acinar cells, in parotid and in submandibular glands of NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice was lower than in NOD/SCID mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of parotid and submandibular acini revealed that the localization of AQP5 in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice differs from that in NOD/SCID mice; AQP5 was leaky and diffusively localized from the apical membrane to the cytosol in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. The ubiquitination of AQP5 was detected in submandibular glands of NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. These findings suggest that the change of acinar/duct structure and the down-regulation of AQP5 in the salivary gland cause the pathogenesis of hyposalivation in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice.

  10. 1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征临床特征并文献复习%The clinical feature of glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段丽芬; 王惠萍; 孙莹; 杨艳飞; 周玲

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features of glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome(GLUT1-DS) and summarize the characteristics of GLUT1-DS through reviewing related references.Methods The clinical data including manifestation,cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose,electroencephalogram,MRI and gene mutation of a patient with GLUT1-DS was collected and the related literatures were reviewed.Results The patient was a 6 years old boy.The patient,whose seizures occurred at the age of 9 month-old and prolonged to 6 year-old,attacked before breakfast.Physical examination showed microcephaly with head circumference 47.5 cm.Laboratory tests showed that CSF glucose decreased (1.87 mmol/L) and CSF-serum ratio was 0.36.And meantime the MRI was normal and electroencephalogram showed general spike and slow wave complex paroxysm.Mutation of SLC2A1 gene,c.350_385del,was found in the patient.There were 219 cases with GLUT1-DS had been reported and the age of onset was 15.69 months.In 219 patients,159 cases (72%) suffered seizures,105 cases (47%) had motor abnormalities,61 cases (27%) suffered intellectual disability.The CSF glucose values were (1.92±0.31) mmol/L,CSF-serum ratio was 0.36±0.07.SLC2A1 gene mutations were detected in 183 patients(96%)in which missense mutation was the most mutation.Conclusion A wide range of phenotypes of GLUT1-DS include seizures,motor abnormalities,mental retardation.The diagnosis is confirmed when CSF glucose and CSF-serum ratio are continuously decreased which in the absence of meningitis.The SLC2A1 gene should be detected in suspicion of GLUTI-DS patients.Early diagnosis and treatment may improve the prognosis of those GLUTI-DS patients.%目的 探讨1型葡萄糖转运体缺陷综合征(glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome,GLUT1-DS)的临床特征并进行文献复习.方法 对1例GLUT1-DS患儿的临床资料、脑脊液葡萄糖、脑电图、MRI和基因突变特点进行分析,并进行文献复习.结果 患儿,男,6岁1

  11. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  12. Management of chronic paronychia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Relhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic paronychia is an inflammatory disorder of the nail folds of a toe or finger presenting as redness, tenderness, and swelling. It is recalcitrant dermatoses seen commonly in housewives and housemaids. It is a multifactorial inflammatory reaction of the proximal nail fold to irritants and allergens. Repeated bouts of inflammation lead to fibrosis of proximal nail fold with poor generation of cuticle, which in turn exposes the nail further to irritants and allergens. Thus, general preventive measures form cornerstone of the therapy. Though previously anti-fungals were the mainstay of therapy, topical steroid creams have been found to be more effective in the treatment of chronic paronychia. In recalcitrant cases, surgical treatment may be resorted to, which includes en bloc excision of the proximal nail fold or an eponychial marsupialization, with or without nail plate removal. Newer therapies and surgical modalities are being employed in the management of chronic paronychia. In this overview, we review recent epidemiological studies, present current thinking on the pathophysiology leading to chronic paronychia, discuss the challenges chronic paronychia presents, and recommend a commonsense approach to management.

  13. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T;

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  14. Chronic daily headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayyaz Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Daily Headache is a descriptive term that includes disorders with headaches on more days than not and affects 4% of the general population. The condition has a debilitating effect on individuals and society through direct cost to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. To successfully manage chronic daily headache syndromes it is important to exclude secondary causes with comprehensive history and relevant investigations; identify risk factors that predict its development and recognise its sub-types to appropriately manage the condition. Chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and medication overuse headache accounts for the vast majority of chronic daily headaches. The scope of this article is to review the primary headache disorders. Secondary headaches are not discussed except medication overuse headache that often accompanies primary headache disorders. The article critically reviews the literature on the current understanding of daily headache disorders focusing in particular on recent developments in the treatment of frequent headaches.

  15. Omalizumab for chronic urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivyanskiy, Ilya; Sand, Carsten; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2012-01-01

    urticaria. We present a case series of 19 patients with chronic urticaria treated in a university department with omalizumab and give an overview of the existing literature comprising an additional 59 cases as well as a total of 139 patients enrolled in two randomized controlled trials comparing omalizumab...... with placebo. The collective evidence points to omalizumab as a safe and effective treatment option for patients with chronic urticaria who do not sufficiently respond to standard therapy as recommended by existing guidelines.......Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that blocks the high-affinity Fc receptor of IgE. Omalizumab has been approved for the treatment of moderate to severe asthma; however, there is currently more and more data showing promising results in the management also of chronic...

  16. Chronic urticaria: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Malcolm W; Tan, Kian Teo

    2007-10-01

    Chronic urticaria is an umbrella term, which encompasses physical urticarias, chronic "idiopathic" urticaria and urticarial vasculitis. It is important to recognize patients with physical urticarias as the investigation and treatment differs in important ways from patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria or urticarial vasculitis. Although relatively uncommon, urticarial vasculitis is an important diagnosis to make and requires histological confirmation by biopsy. Underlying systemic disease and systemic involvement, especially of the kidneys, should be sought. It is now recognized that chronic "idiopathic" urticaria includes a subset with an autoimmune basis caused by circulating autoantibodies against the high affinity IgE receptor (FceR1) and less commonly against IgE. Although the autologous serum skin test has been proven useful in prompting search for and characterization of circulating wheal-producing factors in chronic urticaria, its specificity as a screening test for presence of functional anti-FceR1 is low, and confirmation by demonstration of histamine-releasing activity in the patient's serum must be the benchmark test in establishing this diagnosis. Improved screening tests are being sought; for example, ability of the chronic urticaria patient's serum to evoke expression of CD 203c on donor human basophils is showing some promise. The strong association between autoimmune thyroid disease and autoimmune urticaria is also an area of ongoing research. Drug treatment continues to be centered on the H1 antihistamines, and the newer second-generation compounds appear to be safe and effective even in off-label dosage. Use of systemic steroids should be confined to special circumstances such as tapering regimens for acute flare-ups. Use of leukotriene antagonists is becoming popular, but the evidence for efficacy is conflicting. Cyclosporin is also effective and can be used in selected cases of autoimmune urticaria, and it is also effective in non

  17. Chronic lead poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, K.; Straub, P.W.

    1974-02-19

    A detailed description is given of the complex pathological picture observed in the case of a worker with 30 years' occupational exposure to lead in an accumulator factory (evolution of the disease, clinical findings, autopsy). In spite of a typical clinical picture, lead is not held responsible for the terminal encephalopathy, in view of the fact that Alzheimer's syndrome was discovered at autopsy. However, the neurovegetative asthenia and progressive kidney disease without hypertonia, but with uraemia, which preceded the encephalopathy are in all probability due to chronic lead poisoning. The article discusses the diagnosis and symptomatology of chronic lead poisoning, encephalopathy and kidney disease.

  18. Omalizumab for chronic urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivyanskiy, Ilya; Sand, Carsten; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2012-01-01

    urticaria. We present a case series of 19 patients with chronic urticaria treated in a university department with omalizumab and give an overview of the existing literature comprising an additional 59 cases as well as a total of 139 patients enrolled in two randomized controlled trials comparing omalizumab......Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that blocks the high-affinity Fc receptor of IgE. Omalizumab has been approved for the treatment of moderate to severe asthma; however, there is currently more and more data showing promising results in the management also of chronic...

  19. Chronic unilateral vestibular loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, K A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic unilateral vestibular loss is a condition defined by the presence of reduced function of the peripheral vestibular system on one side, which has generally persisted for 3 or more months. The deficit is demonstrated by a reduction of the vestibular-ocular reflex either at the bedside or on laboratory testing. Though some patients with chronic vestibular loss have disabling symptoms, others are asymptomatic. Causes include a viral/postviral disorder, Menière's disease, structural lesions, ischemia, and trauma. Any other systemic or genetic disorder would be expected to involve both sides at some point. PMID:27638074

  20. Clinical and genetic characteristics of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome%葡萄糖转运子1缺乏综合征的临床特点与基因突变分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕燕; 包新华; 王爽; 符娜; 刘晓燕; 宋福英; 杨艳玲; 吴晔; 张月华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical and SLC2A1 gene mutation characteristics of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome.Method The detailed clinical manifestations of six cases were recorded.The laboratory tests including EEG,MRI,blood chemistry,and lumbar puncture were performed.SLC2A1 gene mutations were analyzed by PCR,DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA).Result Patient 1,2 and 3 had classical clinical symptoms including infantile onset seizures,development delay.Patient 4,5 and 6 had non-classical clinical symptoms including paroxysmal behavior disturbance,weakness,ataxia,lethargy,especially after fasting or exercise,without severe seizures.The plasma glucose levels were normal.The CSF glucose levels decreased in all the six cases,ranged from 1.10 mmol/L to 2.45 mmol/L,the mean level was 1.68 mmol/L.The CSF glucose/plasma glucose ratios decreased,ranged from 0.16 to 0.51,the mean ratio was 0.34.Four patients had normal EEG.Two patients had focal and diffuse epileptiform discharge,and one of them also had paroxysmal occipital or generalized high-amplitude slow waves during awake and sleep time.MRI abnormalities were found in three patients,patient 1 with mild brain atrophy,patient 3 with bilateral ventricle plump,and patient 4 with high signals in T2 in the frontal and occipital white matter,interpreted as hypomyelination.SLC2A1 gene mutations were found in six cases.Patient 1 has large scale deletion in exon 2.In patient 2 to 6,the mutations were c.741 G>A (E247K),599delA,761delA,c.1148 C >A (P383H),c.1198 C >T (R400C) respectively.Two patients were treated with ketogenic diet.The seizures disappeared and development became normal.Three patients responded to frequent meals with snacks.One patient refused any treatments,the symptoms continued to exist.Conclusion The clinical manifestations of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome are varied.The common symptoms included infantile onset seizures and various

  1. [Histaminergic angioedema and chronic urticaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacard, Florence; Nosbaum, Audrey; Bensaid, Benoit; Nicolas, Jean-François; Augey, Frédéric; Goujon, Catherine; Bérard, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Most angioedemas are histaminergic and correspond to deep urticarial swelling. Recurrent histaminergic angioedema led to the diagnosis of chronic urticaria, even when there are no superficial associated hives. Chronic urticaria is a benign disease, and autoimmune in 40 % of cases. The occurrence of angioedema in chronic urticaria is not a sign of severity. The occurrence of angioedema in chronic urticaria is associated with a longer duration of urticarial disease. NSAIDs and/or systemic corticotherapy are classic triggers of angioedema in chronic urticaria. In the absence of clinical endpoints, there is no need to make further assessment in chronic urticaria good responders to antihistamines.

  2. The Chronic Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Iben M; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who are already...

  3. Chronic fatigue syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.B.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Bleijenberg, G.

    2006-01-01

    During the past two decades, there has been heated debate about chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) among researchers, practitioners, and patients. Few illnesses have been discussed so extensively. The existence of the disorder has been questioned, its underlying pathophysiology debated, and an effective

  4. Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers by Body Location Childhood Cancers Adolescent & Young Adult Cancers Metastatic Cancer Recurrent Cancer Research NCI’s Role in ... on the hands and feet. Muscle pain. Itching. Diarrhea . Stages of Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Key Points There is no standard staging system ...

  5. CHRONIC PROBLEM FAMILIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    STONE, EDWARD

    THE REPORT POINTS OUT THAT, IN GENERAL, CHRONIC PROBLEM PARENTS GREW UP IN ENVIRONMENTS OF EMOTIONAL IMPOVERISHMENT, INCONSISTENCY, CONFUSION, AND DISORDER, OFTEN WITH DEPRIVATION OF FOOD, CLOTHING, AND SHELTER. THESE PARENTS CATEGORIZE PEOPLE AS THOSE WHO GIVE AND THOSE WHO TAKE. THEY BLAME THEIR PROBLEMS ON EXTERNAL CIRCUMSTANCES NOT UNDER THEIR…

  6. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... manageable, but chronic pain is different. And because it is different, we need to think about it in very different ways. Ed Covington, M.D.: ... no apparent physical injury or illness to explain it. The physician and the patient are accustomed to ...

  7. Chronic Pain: Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the treatment. Treatment With chronic pain, the goal of treatment is to reduce pain and improve ... some treatments used for chronic pain. Less invasive psychotherapy, relaxation therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also ...

  8. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) . This recommendation ...

  9. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page ... Symptoms What's the Clinical Course of CFS? Chronic fatigue syndrome can be misdiagnosed or overlooked because its ...

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vijayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec to FVC (forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure, hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity, bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia, stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

  11. Defining and Measuring Chronic Conditions

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-05-20

    This podcast is an interview with Dr. Anand Parekh, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, and Dr. Samuel Posner, Preventing Chronic Disease Editor in Chief, about the definition and burden of multiple chronic conditions in the United States.  Created: 5/20/2013 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/20/2013.

  12. Chronic complicated osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourteen patients with prior trauma and/or surgery of the lower extremity and suspected active chronic osteomyelitis underwent MR imaging. Eleven patients also underwent In-111 scanning. All patients had surgical confirmation, MR imaging could assess the extent of abnormal marrow and distinguish abnormal marrow due to granulation tissue from active osteomyelitis. The presence and extent of soft-tissue infection could be determined and distinguished from bone involvement in spite of tissue distortion. The course and origin of sinus tracts could be followed. MR imaging was more sensitive to active infection than In-111 scanning. All 11 cases of active osteomyelitis were correctly diagnosed with MR imaging. In-111 scans were positive in only five of the eight cases of active infection in which scans were obtained. MR imaging is useful in chronic complicated osteomyelitis

  13. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  14. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franques, J; Azulay, J-P; Pouget, J; Attarian, S

    2010-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a demyelinating chronic neuropathy of immune origin whose diagnosis is based upon clinical, biological and electrophysiological data; previously critical to the diagnosis the nerve biopsy is now restricted to the rare situations where accurate diagnosis cannot be reached using these data alone. CIDP are mainly idiopathic, but a few associated diseases must be sought for as they require specific attention. Such associated diseases must particularly be discussed when the manifestations are severe or resistant to immunomodulating or immunosuppressive agents. Indeed, idiopathic CIDP are usually responsive to these treatments. The effectiveness of these treatments is limited by the importance of the secondary axonal loss. The dependence or the resistance may sometimes justify the association of several immunomodulating treatments. A single randomized controlled trial support the use of cytotoxic drugs and none with rituximab.

  15. Acetaminophen for Chronic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ennis, Zandra Nymand; Dideriksen, Dorthe; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke;

    2016-01-01

    conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. All studies were conducted in patients with hip- or knee osteoarthritis and six out of seven studies had observation periods of less than three months. All included studies showed no or little efficacy with dubious clinical relevance. In conclusion, there is little......Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is the most commonly used analgesic worldwide and recommended as first-line treatment in all pain conditions by WHO. We performed a systematic literature review to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen when used for chronic pain conditions. Applying three broad search...... evidence to support the efficacy of acetaminophen treatment in patients with chronic pain conditions. Assessment of continuous efficacy in the many patients using acetaminophen worldwide is recommended. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  16. Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovrenski Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA is a cavitary, infectious process of lung parenchyma with slow progressive course. Vascular invasion and dissemination to other organs are unusual. Case report. We presented a 25-year old man with bilineal acute leukaemia who developed pulmonary and systemic symptoms. Chest CT showed nodular consolidations and cavitary lesions in both lungs. Bronchial biopsy revealed necrotic hyphae but it was negative for Aspergillus by culture. Serum was positive for antibodies to Aspergillus, but it was negative for antigens. A thoracoscopic lung biopsy of the upper left lobe revealed necrosis of lung tissue, with acute and chronic inflammation of the cavity wall and the presence of hyphae consistent with Aspergillus species. Conclusion. Although confirmation of the diagnosis is difficult, a combination of characteristic clinical, radiological and histological findings and either serological results positive for Aspergillus or the isolation of Aspergillus from respiratory samples are highly indicative of CNPA.

  17. Chronic cough in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Johana B Castro; Pine, Harold S

    2013-08-01

    The management of chronic cough, a common complaint in children, is challenging for most health care professionals. Millions of dollars are spent every year on unnecessary testing and treatment. A rational approach based on a detailed interview and a thorough physical examination guides further intervention and management. Inexpensive and simple homemade syrups based on dark honey have proved to be an effective measure when dealing with cough in children. PMID:23905830

  18. Chronic Cough in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, David S.

    1982-01-01

    Persistent cough in children is a symptom, and the cause should be ascertained. Reactive airways disease is the most common reason for chronic cough in children over three to six months of age, especially at night. Under three months, the cause is likely to be more serious. Cough often disturbs parents more than the child, and physicians should consider parents' need for sleep and relief when deciding whether or not to prescribe cough suppressants. Investigations depend on the child's age, th...

  19. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history sta...

  20. Chronic pneumonitis of infancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Katsumi; Kamata, Noriko; Okazaki, Eiwa [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, 3-18-22 Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677 (Japan); Moriyama, Sachiko; Funata, Nobuaki [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, 3-18-22 Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677 (Japan); Takita, Junko; Yamada, Hideo; Takayama, Naohide [Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, 3-18-22 Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677 (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Chronic pneumonitis of infancy (CPI) is a very rare lung disease in infants and young children. We report a 33-day-old infant with CPI, focusing on the radiologic aspects of the disease. Chest radiographs showed variable and non-specific appearances including ground-glass shadowing, consolidation, volume loss, and hyperinflation. Dense alveolar opacities progressed as CPI advanced. The radiologic features of our case reflected pathologic changes. (orig.)

  1. Renal failure (chronic)

    OpenAIRE

    Clase, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is characterised by a gradual and sustained decline in renal clearance or glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Continued progression of renal failure will lead to renal function too low to sustain healthy life. In developed countries, such people will be offered renal replacement therapy in the form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Requirement for dialysis or transplantation is termed end-stage renal disease (ESRD).Diabetes, glomerulonephritis, hypertension, pyelone...

  2. Chronic alloantibody mediated rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R. Neal; Colvin, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Alloantibodies clearly cause acute antibody mediated rejection, and all available evidence supports their pathogenic etiology in the development of chronic alloantibody mediated rejection (CAMR). But the slow evolution of this disease, the on-going immunosuppression, the variations in titer of alloantibodies, and variation in antigenic targets all complicate identifying which dynamic factors are most important clinically and pathologically. This review highlights the pathological factors rela...

  3. Approaching chronic cough

    OpenAIRE

    Poulose, Vijo; Tiew, Pei Yee; How, Choon How

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cough is one of the most common reasons for referral to a respiratory physician. Although fatal complications are rare, it may cause considerable distress in the patient’s daily life. Western and local data shows that in patients with a normal chest radiograph, the most common causes are postnasal drip syndrome, postinfectious cough, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and cough variant asthma. Less common causes are the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, smoker’s cough an...

  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Peter J; Burney, Peter G J; Silverman, Edwin K; Celli, Bartolome R; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wouters, Emiel F M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with high global morbidity and mortality. COPD is characterized by poorly reversible airway obstruction, which is confirmed by spirometry, and includes obstruction of the small airways (chronic obstructive bronchiolitis) and emphysema, which lead to air trapping and shortness of breath in response to physical exertion. The most common risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking, but other environmental factors, such as exposure to indoor air pollutants - especially in developing countries - might influence COPD risk. Not all smokers develop COPD and the reasons for disease susceptibility in these individuals have not been fully elucidated. Although the mechanisms underlying COPD remain poorly understood, the disease is associated with chronic inflammation that is usually corticosteroid resistant. In addition, COPD involves accelerated ageing of the lungs and an abnormal repair mechanism that might be driven by oxidative stress. Acute exacerbations, which are mainly triggered by viral or bacterial infections, are important as they are linked to a poor prognosis. The mainstay of the management of stable disease is the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, whereas corticosteroids are beneficial primarily in patients who have coexisting features of asthma, such as eosinophilic inflammation and more reversibility of airway obstruction. Apart from smoking cessation, no treatments reduce disease progression. More research is needed to better understand disease mechanisms and to develop new treatments that reduce disease activity and progression. PMID:27189863

  5. Imaging of chronic osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis is made on the basis of clinical, radiologic and histologic findings. The role of imaging in patients with known chronic osteomyelitis is to detect and to delineate areas of active infection. To correctly interpret the imaging findings, it is essential to take both the individual clinical findings and previous imaging studies into account. Reliable signs of active infection are bone marrow abscess, sequestra and sinus tract formation. Only the combined evaluation of bony changes together with alterations of the adjacent soft tissues provides good diagnostic accuracy. Projection radiography gives an overview of the condition of the bone, which provides the basis for follow-up and the selection of further imaging modalities. Computed tomography can be used to evaluate even discrete or complex bony alterations and to guide percutaneous biopsy or drainage. Magnetic resonance imaging achieves the best diagnostic sensitivity and specificity and provides superior contrast as well as anatomical resolution in both bone marrow and soft tissues. In this paper the features and clinical relevance of imaging in primary chronic osteomyelitis, posttraumatic osteomyelitis, tuberculous spondylitis and osteomyelitis of the diabetic foot are reviewed, with particular respect to MRI. (orig.)

  6. Chronic arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alan H

    2002-03-10

    Symptomatic arsenic poisoning is not often seen in occupational exposure settings. Attempted homicide and deliberate long-term poisoning have resulted in chronic toxicity. Skin pigmentation changes, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, gastrointestinal symptoms, anemia, and liver disease are common. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension with bleeding esophageal varices, splenomegaly, and hypersplenism may occur. A metallic taste, gastrointestinal disturbances, and Mee's lines may be seen. Bone marrow depression is common. 'Blackfoot disease' has been associated with arsenic-contaminated drinking water in Taiwan; Raynaud's phenomenon and acrocyanosis also may occur. Large numbers of persons in areas of India, Pakistan, and several other countries have been chronically poisoned from naturally occurring arsenic in ground water. Toxic delirium and encephalopathy can be present. CCA-treated wood (chromated copper arsenate) is not a health risk unless burned in fireplaces or woodstoves. Peripheral neuropathy may also occur. Workplace exposure or chronic ingestion of arsenic-contaminated water or arsenical medications is associated with development of skin, lung, and other cancers. Treatment may incklude the use of chelating agents such as dimercaprol (BAL), dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), and dimercaptopanesulfonic acid (DMPS).

  7. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2015-10-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  8. Chronic radiation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akleyev, Alexander V. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation). Clinical Dept.

    2014-04-01

    Comprehensive analysis of chronic radiation syndrome, covering epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathoanatomy, diagnosis and treatment. Based on observations in a unique sample of exposed residents of the Techa riverside villages in the Urals. Casts new light on the condition. Of value for all practitioners and researchers with an interest in chronic radiation syndrome. This book covers all aspects of chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) based on observations in a unique sample of residents of the Techa riverside villages in the southern Urals who were exposed to radioactive contamination in the 1950s owing to releases of liquid radioactive wastes from Mayak Production Association, which produced plutonium for weapons. In total, 940 cases of CRS were diagnosed in this population and these patients were subjected to detailed analysis. The opening chapters address the definition and classification of CRS, epidemiology and pathogenesis, covering molecular and cellular mechanisms, radioadaptation, and the role of tissue reactions. The pathoanatomy of CRS during the development and recovery stages is discussed for all organ systems. Clinical manifestations of CRS at the different stages are then described in detail and the dynamics of hematopoietic changes are thoroughly examined. In the following chapters, principles of diagnosis (including assessment of the exposure doses to critical organs) and differential diagnosis from a wide range of other conditions are discussed and current and potential treatment options, described. The medical and social rehabilitation of persons with CRS is also covered. This book, which casts new light on the condition, will be of value for all practitioners and researchers with an interest in CRS.

  9. Refractory chronic cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Edvinsson, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor H;

    2014-01-01

    for clinical and research use. The preparation of the final consensus followed three stages. Internal between authors, a larger between all European Headache Federation members and finally an international one among all investigators that have published clinical studies on cluster headache the last five years......Chronic cluster headache (CCH) often resists to prophylactic pharmaceutical treatments resulting in patients' life damage. In this rare but pragmatic situation escalation to invasive management is needed but framing criteria are lacking. We aimed to reach a consensus for refractory CCH definition...

  10. Chronic granulomatous disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Pradeep

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2½-year-old child presented with multiple discrete granulomatous lesions on the face and flexural regions since the age of 2 months along with lymphadenopathy. The patient also had recurrent bouts of pyodermas and respiratory tract infections. Biopsy of the lesion showed necrosis of tissue with suppuration and histiocytes but no evidence of tuberculosis, fungal infections or atypical mycobacteria. Lymph node biopsy also showed necrosis with suppuration but no infective organism. Nitroblue tetrazolium test was negative indicating that the neutrophils failed to oxidize the dye. We are reporting here a rare case of chronic granulomatous disease.

  11. Pathogenesis of chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, A P; Greaves, M

    2009-06-01

    Chronic urticaria is defined as the presence of urticaria (hives) for at least 6 weeks with the assumption that it occurs daily or close to it. If we eliminate physical urticarias and urticarial vasculitis from consideration, the remainder can be divided into autoimmune chronic urticaria (45%) and idiopathic chronic urticaria (55%). The autoimmune subgroup is associated with the IgG anti-IgE receptor alpha subunit in 35-40% of patients and IgG anti-IgE in an additional 5-10%. These autoantibodies have been shown to activate blood basophils and cutaneous mast cells in vitro with augmentation of basophil activation by complement and release of C5a, in particular. Binding methods (immunoblot and ELISA) yield positives in many autoimmune diseases as well as occasional normal subjects or patients with other forms of urticaria but most such sera are non-functional. Activation of basophils or mast cells causing histamine release is quite specific for chronic urticaria and defines the autoimmune subgroup. Although pathogenicity is not formally proven, the antibodies cause wealing upon intradermal injection, and removal of the autoantibody leads to remission. A cellular infiltrate is seen to be characterized by mast cell degranulation and infiltration of CD4+ T lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. The intensity of the infiltrate and clinical severity of the disease (including accompanying angio-oedema) is more severe in the autoimmune subpopulation. This latter group also has a higher evidence of human leucocyte antigen DR alleles associated with autoimmunity and a 25% incidence of antithyroid antibodies with diagnosed hypothyroidism in some. Hypo-responsiveness of patients' basophils to anti-IgE and hyperresponsiveness to serum defines another subpopulation (at least 50%) that overlaps the idiopathic and autoimmune subgroups. Hypo-responsiveness to anti-IgE has been shown to be associated with elevated levels of cytoplasmic phosphatases that

  12. Sexuality and chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Elaine E

    2013-11-01

    Sexual function is often affected in individuals living with chronic illness and their partners, and multiple comorbidities increase the likelihood of sexual dysfunction. This review focuses on the areas of cardiovascular disease, respiratory conditions, and cancer, all areas for which there are practical, evidence-based strategies to guide sexual counseling. Although nurses have been reluctant to address the topic of sexuality in practice, a growing number of studies suggest that patients want nurses to address their concerns and provide resources to them. Thus, nurses must be proactive in initiating conversations on sexual issues to fill this gap in practice. PMID:24066783

  13. Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Said, Gérard; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired polyneuropathy presumably of immunological origin. It is characterized by a progressive or a relapsing course with predominant motor deficit. The diagnosis rests on the association of non-length-dependent predominantly motor...... deficit following a progressive or a relapsing course associated with increased CSF protein content. The demonstration of asymmetrical demyelinating features on nerve conduction studies is needed for diagnosis. The outcome depends on the amplitude of axon loss associated with demyelination. CIDP must...... be differentiated from acquired demyelinative neuropathies associated with monoclonal gammopathies. CIDP responds well to treatment with corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchanges, at least initially....

  14. [Chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskitalo, Paula; Remes-Pakarinen, Terhi; Vähäsalo, Paula; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Kröger, Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis is an autoinflammatory disease occurring mainly in children and adolescents, typically involving recurrent or persistent osteitic foci. The symptom is bone pain, possibly accompanied by soft tissue tenderness. Some patients exhibit symptoms of systemic inflammation. The. precise etiology of the disease is not known, but an imbalance of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is presumed to play a role in the development of the disease. While an anti-inflammatory analgesic is in most cases sufficient to calm down the osteitis, the use of corticosteroids, anti- TNF-a inhibitors or bisphosphonates is required in some cases. PMID:26939487

  15. Chronic granulomatous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Pradeep S; Moorthy, Prasanna K; Suprakasan, S; Jayapalan, Sabeena; Preethi, K

    2005-01-01

    A 2(1/2)-year-old child presented with multiple discrete granulomatous lesions on the face and flexural regions since the age of 2 months along with lymphadenopathy. The patient also had recurrent bouts of pyodermas and respiratory tract infections. Biopsy of the lesion showed necrosis of tissue with suppuration and histiocytes but no evidence of tuberculosis, fungal infections or atypical mycobacteria. Lymph node biopsy also showed necrosis with suppuration but no infective organism. Nitroblue tetrazolium test was negative indicating that the neutrophils failed to oxidize the dye. We are reporting here a rare case of chronic granulomatous disease. PMID:16394414

  16. Late and chronic Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donta, Sam T

    2002-03-01

    This article reviews the late and chronic manifestations of Lyme disease. Special attention is given to the chronic manifestations of the disease, detailing its pathogenesis, clinical spectrum, and laboratory criteria for the diagnosis. Based on experimental evidence and experience, approaches to the successful treatment of the late and chronic disease are outlined. Much additional work is needed to improve the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of the disease, its diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Hyperphosphatemia of Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hruska, Keith A.; Mathew, Suresh; Lund, Richard; Qiu, Ping; Pratt, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Observational studies have determined hyperphosphatemia to be a cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Mechanistic studies have elucidated that hyperphosphatemia is a direct stimulus to vascular calcification, which is one cause of morbid cardiovascular events contributing to the excess mortality of chronic kidney disease. This review describes the pathobiology of hyperphosphatemia that develops as a consequence of positive phosphate balance in chronic kidney disease and the me...

  18. [Psychosomatic approach for chronic migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    From psychosomatic view point, the psychological or social stresses and depressive or anxiety disorders are very important factors in the course and the maintenance for migraine patients. These factors are very complex, and often lead the migraine becoming chronic. In the psychosomatic approach, not only the physical assessment for chronic migraine but also the assessments for stress and mental states are done. As the psychosomatic therapies for chronic migraine, autogenic training, biofeedback therapy and cognitive therapy are effective. PMID:22277516

  19. Chronic urticaria: new management options

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberger, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is defined as episodic or daily hives lasting for at least 6 weeks and impairs quality of life. Two main subtypes include chronic idiopathic (spontaneous) urticaria and inducible (physical) urticaria, but some patients have urticarial vasculitis. “Autoimmune chronic urticaria” implies the presence of histamine releasing or mast cell activating autoantibodies to IgE or FcϵRI, the high affinity receptor on mast cells and basophils. In patients not readily controlled with label...

  20. Chronic wound management and research

    OpenAIRE

    Romanelli M

    2014-01-01

    Marco Romanelli Wound Healing Research Unit, Division of Dermatology, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyI would like to share with you a new open access peer-reviewed journal – Chronic Wound Care Management and Research, published by Dove Medical Press. Chronic Wound Care Management and Research is an international, peer-reviewed, open-access online journal publishing original research, case reports, reviews, editorials, and commentaries on the management of chronic wounds and...

  1. Obstructive Jaundice in Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hollands, M. J.; Little, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Significant obstructive jaundice in chronic pancreatitis is generally considered to be rare. Eleven of 57 consecutive patients with proven chronic pancreatitis have developed significant obstructive jaundice of more than transient duration. Eight presented as jaundice complicating known pancreatitis and three as jaundice of unknown cause. Life table analysis showed a steady rise in the risk of developing jaundice up to the end of 10 years from the onset of chronic pancreatitis. Jaundice was f...

  2. Diagnostic dilemmas in chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubi, E; Grattan, C; Zuberbier, T

    2015-06-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI)/Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2) LEN)/European Dermatology Forum (EDF)/World Allergy Organization (WAO) recently published updated recommendations for the classification, diagnosis and management of chronic urticaria (CU). This article discusses several cases of CU that provide examples of how the recommendations in the guidelines can be implemented in the diagnosis of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) (also called chronic idiopathic urticaria [CIU]), chronic inducible urticaria (CINDU) or CU with comorbidities.

  3. Idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordier Jean-François

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Idiopathic chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (ICEP is characterized by subacute or chronic respiratory and general symptoms, alveolar and/or blood eosinophilia, and peripheral pulmonary infiltrates on chest imaging. Eosinophilia is present in most cases, usually in excess of 1000/mm3. In absence of significant blood eosinophilia, a diagnosis of ICEP is supported by the demonstration of bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophilia. ICEP is typically associated with eosinophil counts higher than lymphocyte counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage. ICEP is a rare disorder of unknown cause. Its exact prevalence remains unknown. ICEP may affect every age group but is rare in childhood. It is twice as frequent in women as in men. One third to one half of the ICEP patients have a history of asthma. The mainstay of treatment of ICEP is systemic corticosteroids. Response to oral corticosteroid therapy is dramatic and has led to the consideration of corticosteroid challenge as a diagnostic test for ICEP. Nevertheless, relapses or development of severe asthma are frequent when tapering or withdrawing treatment. Long-term oral corticosteroid therapy is necessary in up to half of the patients.

  4. The chronic leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jacobs

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available The slow progression of both chronic granulocytic and lymphocytic leukaemia, when compared to their acute counterparts, has been used as an argument to support less aggressive therapy or even, in some instances, a watch-and-wait policy. This conservative approach is bolstered by a number of observations including the ease with which haematologic control can initially be achieved, the older age of patients with the lymphocytic variant and the paucity of controlled data showing that long disease-free survival or cure can result from the use of aggressive treatment. Given these circumstances, it is not surprising that many such individuals are managed outside specialised centres using a variety of agents and schedules, both of which may, on occasions, be inappropriate. Accumulating evidence suggests a need to reconsider these practices since cure is now possible in selected patients with chronic granulocytic leukaemia while the use of multi-drug regimens in the lymphatic form can significantly improve survival. These advances are the result of carefully conducted clinical trials involving many individuals the world over and constitute the basis fo r advocating early referral to those institutions where all the necessary expertise is available.

  5. Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tram T.; Martin, Paul

    2001-12-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) accounts for 40% of cases of chronic liver disease in the United States and is now the most common indication for liver transplantation. Estimates suggest that 4 million people (1.8%) of the American population are or have been infected with HCV. Currently, the treatment of choice for patients with chronic HCV infection is recombinant interferon alfa with ribavirin. Pegylated interferons are a promising new development, and in combination with ribavirin, they will rapidly become the standard of care. The goals of therapy are to slow disease progression, improve hepatic histology, reduce infectivity, and reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Sustained virologic response, which generally implies the absence of viremia for 6 months or more following completion of therapy, is increasingly being regarded as a cure, with evidence of slowing or even regression of fibrosis on follow-up liver biopsy. A number of factors have been shown to be predictive of a sustained response, including viral genotype other than 1, low serum HCV RNA levels, absence of cirrhosis, younger age, female gender, and shorter duration of infection. Disease severity as assessed by liver biopsy, comorbidities, and possible contraindications to therapy should be weighed in the decision to begin treatment. Counseling patients regarding transmission, natural history, and drug and alcohol abstinence also should be included in management. Close monitoring should be done during treatment for side effects of interferon, including depression and bone marrow suppression. Hemolytic anemia is the major side effect of ribavirin. PMID:11696276

  6. Refractory chronic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martelletti, Paolo; Katsarava, Zaza; Lampl, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the clinical definition of refractory Chronic Migraine (rCM) is still far to be concluded. The importance to create a clinical framing of these rCM patients resides in the complete disability they show, in the high risk of serious adverse events from acute and preventative drugs and...... of these patients, the correct application of innovative therapeutic techniques and lastly aim to be acknowledged as clinical entity in the next definitive version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3 (ICHD-3 beta).......The debate on the clinical definition of refractory Chronic Migraine (rCM) is still far to be concluded. The importance to create a clinical framing of these rCM patients resides in the complete disability they show, in the high risk of serious adverse events from acute and preventative drugs...... and in the uncontrolled application of therapeutic techniques not yet validated.The European Headache Federation Expert Group on rCM presents hereby the updated definition criteria for this harmful subset of headache disorders. This attempt wants to be the first impulse towards the correct identification...

  7. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  8. Molecular genetics of chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and atypical chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bing; Gale, Robert Peter; Xiao, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    According to the 2008 World Health Organization classification, chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and atypical chronic myeloid leukemia are rare diseases. The remarkable progress in our understanding of the molecular genetics of myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms has made it clear that there are some specific genetic abnormalities in these 3 rare diseases. At the same time, there is considerable overlap among these disord...

  9. Folate Deficiency in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishna Rajesh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, While there has been a spurt of interest in genetic alterations associated with pancreatitis in the past few years, interest in the role of environmental factors has largely focused on alcoholism and smoking with insufficient attention being paid to the contributions of nutritional deficiency, and the role of environmental toxins in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Braganza and Dormandy [1] argue convincingly about the role played by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (especially CYP1A enzyme induction by xenobiotics and the resultant oxidative stress, as also the now increasingly recognized reductive stress posed by the metabolites in initiating pancreatic injury. Their article underlines the important part played by the deficiency of methyl and thiol molecules in different stages of the progression of pancreatic damage. Furthermore, they attempt to establish a link between environmental and genetic factors and bring in a holistic view on the etiopathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. We have recently demonstrated lower plasma methionine levels in two cohorts of chronic pancreatitis patients; one of tropical chronic pancreatitis and the other, of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis as compared to healthy controls [2] which suggests that deficiency of methyl groups may be a factor in various forms of pancreatitis. Similarly, we have shown lower red cell glutathione levels in chronic pancreatitis patients with tropical chronic pancreatitis and alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, indicating deficiency of thiol molecules. In addition, we have demonstrated significantly higher levels of plasma total homocysteine in chronic pancreatitis patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, our study has shown that there is a deficiency of red cell folate in the majority of chronic pancreatitis patients, more so in tropical chronic pancreatitis; and that folate deficiency appeared to be the key factor in hyperhomocysteinemia in chronic pancreatitis patients

  10. Chronic diseases and mental disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, P.F.M.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Peters, L.; Rijken, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve a better understanding of the relationship between chronic medical illness and mental distress. Therefore, the association between chronic medical illness and mental distress was analysed, taking into account the modifying effects of generic disease characteristi

  11. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reductio...

  12. Chronic sleep reduction in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the results of this thesis, it can be concluded that sleep problems and chronic sleep reduction have a high impact on adolescents’ daytime functioning. Additionally, this research shows that gradual sleep extension can improve adolescents’ sleep and especially their chronic sleep reduction. This approach has beneficial effects on adolescents’ depressive symptoms and their cognitive performance.

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... What you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  14. Program for the Chronically Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, Arline; Schnarr, Barbara

    The program for chronically ill students in the Detroit public schools is described. Forms are presented listing needed information and implications for teachers of the following conditions: diabetes, sickle cell anemia, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, hemophilia, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, leukemia, and cystic fibrosis. The…

  15. Chronic hypophosphatemic osteopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppers, B.; Schmid, L.; Hofmann, E.; Sauer, E.

    1980-07-01

    The process of chronic hypophosphatemic vitamine D-resistant rickets is described by observation of two cases. With the male patient - our first case - the disease was sporadic and had not been recognized for a long time. In his early adulthood it manifested itself as Umbauzonen (pseudofractures) in the larger context of active osteomalacia. It was possible to observe the pseudofractures before and while the patient was medicamentously treated. High doses of vitamine D 3 and dosage of phosphate mitigated the complaints although with respect to the radiological, scintigraphical, humoral and histological findings there was only slow improvement or no improvement at all. The patient's daughter is affected by the disease as well. In her case the pathological signs of her bones became better when treated with vitamine D 3.

  16. [Treatment of chronic polyarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, D; Hasler, P; Tyndall, A

    1997-11-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease involving progressive destruction of multiple joints and, in the later stages, significant mortality. Worldwide, 1% of the population is afflicted. Despite new insights into the autoimmune mechanisms during the last decade a cure has not been found, although pain, disability and general suffering can be alleviated via several therapeutic approaches when carefully coordinated. Early use of immunosuppressive therapy with DMARDs (disease modifying antirheumatic drugs), while avoiding their side effects, is critical for disease control. Counselling within a good doctor-patient relationship, with the additional help of physiotherapy and ergotherapy, increases the patient's capacity to cope with the disease. Hand and joint surgery, skillfully performed, decreases pain and disability. Newer strategies of immunosuppression, while encouragingly effective, are only short term. These experimental agents are more expensive, they are associated with side effects and their future place in RA therapy has yet to be defined. PMID:9454312

  17. Approaching chronic cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Vijo; Tiew, Pei Yee; How, Choon How

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cough is one of the most common reasons for referral to a respiratory physician. Although fatal complications are rare, it may cause considerable distress in the patient’s daily life. Western and local data shows that in patients with a normal chest radiograph, the most common causes are postnasal drip syndrome, postinfectious cough, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and cough variant asthma. Less common causes are the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, smoker’s cough and nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis. A detailed history-taking and physical examination will provide a diagnosis in most patients, even at the primary care level. Some cases may need further investigations or specialist referral for diagnosis. PMID:26892615

  18. 'Chronic' identities in mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Peter, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The term 'chronicity' is still widely used in psychiatric discourse and practice. A category employed in political, administrative and therapeutic contexts, it guides practitioners' beliefs and actions. This paper attempts a review of the attitudes and procedures that result as a consequence of identifying 'chronically' disturbed identities in clinical practice. An essentially social, relational and materialist understanding of mental illness is used to highlight the kind of thinking underlying the notion of 'chronic' identities in day-to-day psychiatric routines. Problematising the notions of singularity and expressiveness, as well as mind/body- and self/other-distinctions, it claims the category itself is responsible for creating a 'chronic' kind of being. A spatial metaphor is presented in the conclusion, illustrating a mental strategy by which we can re-shape our thinking about 'chronic' identities. It attempts to describe how the shift from an epistemological to a praxeographic approach could build a more complete understanding of mental illness. PMID:23528064

  19. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-01-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease.

  20. Chronic Cough in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient education: Chronic cough in adults (Beyond the Basics) Authors Ronald C ... and helps to prevent infection. However, sometimes a cough can become a chronic condition. A chronic cough ...

  1. Treatment Options by Stage (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  3. Treatment Options for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  4. General Information about Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  6. Integration of healthcare rehabilitation in chronic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Anne; Høst, Dorte; Schnor, Helle;

    2010-01-01

    of rehabilitation programmes in four conditions. DESCRIPTION OF CARE PRACTICE: FOUR MULTIDISCIPLINARY REHABILITATION INTERVENTION PROGRAMMES, ONE FOR EACH CHRONIC CONDITION: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, type 2 diabetes, chronic heart failure, and falls in elderly people were developed and implemented...... during the project period. The chronic care model was used as a framework for support of implementing and integration of the four rehabilitation programmes. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION: The chronic care model provided support for implementing rehabilitation programmes for four chronic conditions...

  7. EBV CHRONIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Racciatti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The infection from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV or virus of infectious mononucleosis, together with other herpesviruses’ infections, represents a prototype of persistent viral infections characterized by the property of the latency. Although the reactivations of the latent infection are associated with the resumption of the viral replication and eventually with the “shedding”, it is still not clear if this virus can determine chronic infectious diseases, more or less evolutive. These diseases could include some pathological conditions actually defined as “idiopathic”and characterized by the “viral persistence” as the more credible pathogenetic factor. Among the so-called idiopathic syndromes, the “chronic fatigue syndrome” (CFS aroused a great interest around the eighties of the last century when, just for its relationship with EBV, it was called “chronic mononucleosis” or “chronic EBV infection”.

    Today CFS, as defined in 1994 by the CDC of Atlanta (USA, really represents a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a chronic course, where reactivation and remission phases

  8. [Mnemonic complaints and chronic migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Lasaosa, S; Viloria-Alebesque, A; Morandeira-Rivas, C; Lopez Del Val, L J; Bellosta-Diago, E; Velazquez-Benito, A

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Patients with chronic migraine often report lower cognitive performance, which affects their quality of life. AIMS. To analyse whether the mnemonic capacity of patients with chronic migraine is altered or not. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients with chronic migraine evaluated consecutively in our unit, and paired by age (18-60 years) and gender with a control group consisting of cognitively healthy volunteers. The following cognitive instruments were administered: Folstein Minimental State Examination (MMSE), Memory Alteration Test (M@T), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and working memory. RESULTS. A total of 30 patients with chronic migraine were included (mean age: 49.33 ± 10.05 years) paired with a control group of 30 healthy volunteers (mean age: 44.83 ± 10.91 years). The mean elapsed time since onset of the patients with chronic migraine was 4.47 ± 2.74 years. On performing a comparative analysis between the two groups, significant differences were found with overall lower scores in the group of patients with chronic migraine in the MoCA (24.16 versus 29), M@T (43.76 versus 48.8) and working memory tests (17.5 versus 24.26). Performance in the MMSE was similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS. Patients with chronic migraine can have lower cognitive performance regardless of distracting elements, such as pharmacological factors or psychiatric comorbidity, since chronic migraine can be understood as yet another element within the spectrum of chronic pain. PMID:23884868

  9. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Chronic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Fukuda, Asami; Kusunoki, Yuji; Narato, Ritsuko; Saito, Hitoshi; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is one of the leading causes of severe pulmonary hypertension. According to previously reported studies in the pertinent literature, chronic inflammatory conditions may be implicated in the development of CTEPH. We herein describe the case of a 56-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CTEPH in association with chronic infection. The patient had experienced five episodes of pneumonia in the five years prior to the diagnosis of CTEPH. Blood tests from the previous five years of outpatient follow-up demonstrated that the C-reactive protein level was slightly elevated. This case suggests that a relationship exists between chronic inflammation and CTEPH, and furthermore, may contribute towards elucidating the pathophysiology of CTEPH. PMID:27250055

  10. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... of adults who have ever been diagnosed with emphysema: 3.4 million Percent of adults who have ...

  11. Chronic paronychia in a hairdresser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allouni, A; Yousif, A; Akhtar, S

    2014-09-01

    Chronic paronychia is a common occupational disease. It is multifactorial and affects a number of different groups of workers. However, the condition is not described as affecting hairdressers although hairdressing is associated with a range of other occupation-related hand conditions. We report an unusual case of chronic paronychia in a female hairdresser which occurred as a consequence of a hair shaft penetrating beneath the nail fold. Personal hygiene with thorough removal of any hairs that have penetrated the epidermis and wearing clean gloves can prevent the condition. We suggest that clinicians should be aware of the types of occupation and mechanisms involved in patients developing chronic paronychia. PMID:24985481

  12. Autoimmunity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischner, M; Prokocimer, M; Zolberg, A; Shaklai, M

    1988-08-01

    Seventy-nine patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia were evaluated for the presence of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies. One patient has polymyositis and two additional patients presented with features suggestive of pernicious anaemia and chronic active hepatitis. The Coombs' direct test was positive in 7% and immune thrombocytopenia was present in 8.1% of patients. Five (7%) patients had M-protein in the serum. No increased frequency of other autoantibodies was noted in our study group. We conclude that the propensity to develop antibodies is restricted only to the haematopoietic system and that there is no increased frequency of non-haematological autoimmune diseases in chronic lymphatic leukaemia. PMID:3249703

  13. Prevalence of chronic conditions – Chronic Airflow Obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Ireland and Northern Ireland Population Health Observatory (INIsPHO)

    2012-01-01

    IPH has estimated and forecast clinical diagnosis rates of CAO among adults for the years 2010, 2015 and 2020. In the Republic of Ireland, the data are based on the Survey of Lifestyle, Attitudes and Nutrition (SLÁN) 2007. The data describe the number of people who report that they have experienced doctor-diagnosed chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive lung (pulmonary) disease, or emphysema in the previous 12 months (annual clinical diagnosis). Data is available by age and sex for each Loca...

  14. [Chronic pain in geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennes, B

    2001-06-01

    Pain is frequent in communicative or no-communicative, ambulatory, institutionalized or hospitalized veterans. It is associated with severe comorbidity so much more than chronic pain could be neglected and expressed of atypical manner or masked by the absence of classical symptoms in particular in case of dementia or of sensory disorders. Pain detection by clinic examination or by pain assessment's methods and adequate approach by pharmacological and non pharmacological therapies are essential for correct pain management. On pharmacological plan, the strategy of the O.M.S. landings is applicable owing to a more particular attention to secondary effects and drugs interactions. AINS must be manipulated with prudence. There are no reasons to exclude opioides from the therapeutic arsenal but with a reduction of the starting doses, a regular adaptation and a very attentive survey. In drugs of landing 2, tramadol reveals itself as efficient and better tolerated as the codeine and dextropropoxyphene has to be to avoid. The obtaining of a satisfactory result depends on a regular assessment of the pain in a context of polydisciplinar approach (physicians, nurses, paramedicals, other care givers).

  15. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is COPD? Español COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary (PULL-mun- ... can clog them. Normal Lungs and Lungs With COPD Figure A shows the location of the lungs ...

  16. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Normal bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissue What is chronic lymphocytic leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... body, including the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  17. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia? Next Topic Normal bone marrow and blood What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... their treatment is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  18. Chronic urticaria: new management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is defined as episodic or daily hives lasting for at least 6 weeks and impairs quality of life. Two main subtypes include chronic idiopathic (spontaneous) urticaria and inducible (physical) urticaria, but some patients have urticarial vasculitis. "Autoimmune chronic urticaria" implies the presence of histamine releasing or mast cell activating autoantibodies to IgE or FcϵRI, the high affinity receptor on mast cells and basophils. In patients not readily controlled with labeled dosages of second generation H1 receptor antagonists (antihistamines), there is evidence for reduction of urticaria using up to 4 fold increases in labeled dosages. The biologic modifier, omalizumab, helps to reduce lesions of chronic urticaria within 1-2 weeks. PMID:25383135

  19. Chronic Conditions among Medicare Beneficiaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data used in the chronic condition reports are based upon CMS administrative enrollment and claims data for Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in the...

  20. Treatment of chronic inflammatory neuropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Eftimov

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the efficacy of existing and alternative treatments in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and explores predictors of treatment response in patients with CIDP treated with corticosteroids. The efficacy of intra

  1. Nitazoxanide for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, Kristiana; Gluud, Christian; Grevstad, Berit;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C infection is a disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis C virus. The estimated number of chronically infected people with hepatitis C virus worldwide is about 150 million people. Every year, another three to four million people acquire the infection. Chronic hepatitis C......) and ribavirin was the approved standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C. In 2011, first-generation direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have been licensed, for use in combination with peginterferon and ribavirin for treating hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection. Nitazoxanide is another antiviral drug with broad...... antiviral activity and may have potential as an effective alternative, or an addition to standard treatment for the treatment of the hepatitis C virus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of nitazoxanide in people with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane...

  2. Management of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Richard L; Roberts, Timothy T; Papaliodis, Dean N; Mulligan, Michael T; Dubin, Andrew H

    2014-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain results from a complex interplay of mechanical, biochemical, psychological, and social factors. Effective management is markedly different from that of acute musculoskeletal pain. Understanding the physiology of pain transmission, modulation, and perception is crucial for effective management. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies such as psychotherapy and biofeedback exercises can be used to manage chronic pain. Evidence-based treatment recommendations have been made for chronic pain conditions frequently encountered by orthopaedic surgeons, including low back, osteoarthritic, posttraumatic, and neuropathic pain. Extended-release tramadol; select tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and anticonvulsants; and topical medications such as lidocaine, diclofenac, and capsaicin are among the most effective treatments. However, drug efficacy varies significantly by indication. Orthopaedic surgeons should be familiar with the widely available safe and effective nonnarcotic options for chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24486756

  3. How to investigate: Chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, Matthew; Shenker, Nicholas

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pain is defined as an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience persisting longer than the normal process of healing, usually longer than 3 months. About a fifth of the world's population is believed to suffer from chronic pain. In Europe, chronic pain accounts for nearly 500 m lost working days, and it costs the European economy >€34 billion (£28 billion) every year. Establishing a reliable diagnosis is the primary challenge in evaluating a patient with chronic pain. Common diagnoses not to miss include seronegative spondyloarthritides, endocrine abnormalities including severe vitamin D deficiency and polymyalgia rheumatica. Once important or treatable diagnoses have been ruled out, the history can be used as a tool to establish a therapeutic plan for shared decision-making using the biopsychosocial model. Onward referral to pain clinics can be helpful for more involved patient management, but often good outcomes are achieved with the support of primary care. PMID:26096090

  4. Chronic cough and pulmonary infiltrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case of chronic cough and pulmonary infiltrates, in patient feminine of 66 years who she consults for scheme of cough with mucous expectoration that it increases with the exhibition to the powder and the cold

  5. Chronic folliculitis in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Kumarasinghe S; Kumarasinghe M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic folliculitis (CF) is a chronic infection of hair follicles leading to atrophy and loss of the affected hairs. This study was done on 51 patients with CF presenting at the Dermatology Clinic at General Hospital Matara, Sri Lanka, to identify specific clinical features and aetiological factors, and to study histopathology. Pus cultures were done on 25 cases. Biopsies were done on 6 patients. CF was commoner in males (59%); 76% were under 34 years, and 39% had occupa...

  6. Chronic diseases and mental disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Verhaak, P.F.M.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; L. Peters; Rijken, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve a better understanding of the relationship between chronic medical illness and mental distress. Therefore, the association between chronic medical illness and mental distress was analysed, taking into account the modifying effects of generic disease characteristics (concerning course, control and possible stressful consequences), physical quality of life indicators and social and relationship problems. Panel data from the Dutch national Panel of Patients w...

  7. Occupational chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Oyvind; Würtz, Else Toft; Aasen, Tor Brøvig;

    2014-01-01

    Occupational-attributable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presents a substantial health challenge. Focusing on spirometric criteria for airflow obstruction, this review of occupational COPD includes both population-wide and industry-specific exposures.......Occupational-attributable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presents a substantial health challenge. Focusing on spirometric criteria for airflow obstruction, this review of occupational COPD includes both population-wide and industry-specific exposures....

  8. Chronic giardiasis of the stomach.

    OpenAIRE

    Quincey, C.; James, P.D.; Steele, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Two cases of chronic giardiasis of the stomach diagnosed from gastric mucosal biopsy specimens are reported. The first case was associated with an acute-on-chronic gastritis and Helicobacter-like organisms, and the second with an adenocarcinoma of the stomach. In both cases the trophozoites had been missed in earlier biopsy specimens. As far as is known this is the first report of giardiasis of the stomach.

  9. Therapeutic Vaccines for Chronic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Combadiere, Béhazine; Debre, Patrice

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to prevent severe complications of a chronic infection by reinforcing host defenses when some immune control, albeit insufficient, can already be demonstrated and when a conventional antimicrobial therapy either is not available or has limited efficacy. We focus on the rationale and challenges behind this still controversial strategy and provide examples from three major chronic infectious diseases-human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and human papillomavirus-for which the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines is currently being evaluated.

  10. Nutrition in Chronic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Silva; Sara Gomes; Armando Peixoto; Paulo Torres-Ramalho; Hélder Cardoso; Rosa Azevedo; Carla Cunha; Guilherme Macedo

    2015-01-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition is a transversal condition to all stages of chronic liver disease. Early recognition of micro or macronutrient deficiencies is essential, because the use of nutritional supplements reduces the risk of complications. The diet of patients with chronic liver disease is based on a standard diet with supplements addition as necessary. Restrictions may be harmful and should be individualized. Treatment management should aim to maintain an adequate protein and caloric...

  11. Chronic Anorexia Nervosa: Medical Mimic

    OpenAIRE

    Borson, Soo; Katon, Wayne

    1981-01-01

    While anorexia nervosa is typically construed as an acute, dramatic disorder of younger women, long-term follow-up studies indicate that morbidity is chronic or relapsing in 30 percent to 50 percent of cases and sometimes leads to death. In older patients or those with atypical clinical features or obscure complications, chronic starvation may mimic other diseases, and rigid adherence to current diagnostic criteria may impede recognition and appropriate treatment. Anorexia nervosa should be v...

  12. Autoimmunity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Lischner, M.; Prokocimer, M.; Zolberg, A.; Shaklai, M.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-nine patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia were evaluated for the presence of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies. One patient has polymyositis and two additional patients presented with features suggestive of pernicious anaemia and chronic active hepatitis. The Coombs' direct test was positive in 7% and immune thrombocytopenia was present in 8.1% of patients. Five (7%) patients had M-protein in the serum. No increased frequency of other autoantibodies was noted in our study ...

  13. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bergh, Peter Y K; Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2013-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common autoimmune neuropathy. The diagnosis depends on the clinical presentation with a progressive or relapsing course over at least 2 months and electrophysiological evidence of primary demyelination. Whereas typical CIDP is quite easily recognizable because virtually no other neuropathies present with both distal and proximal motor and sensory deficit, atypical CIDP, focal and multifocal variants in particular, may represent a difficult diagnostic challenge. CIDP very likely is an underdiagnosed condition as suggested also by a positive correlation between prevalence rates and sensitivity of electrophysiological criteria. Since no 'gold standard' diagnostic marker exists, electrophysiological criteria have been optimized to be at the same time as sensitive and as specific as possible. Additional supportive laboratory features, such as increased spinal fluid protein, MRI abnormalities of nerve segments, and in selected cases nerve biopsy lead to the correct diagnosis in the large majority of the cases. Objective clinical improvement following immune therapy is also a useful parameter to confirm the diagnosis. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of CIDP remain poorly understood, but the available evidence for an inflammatory origin is quite convincing. Steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange (PE) have been proven to be effective treatments. IVIG usually leads to rapid improvement, which is useful in severely disabled patients. Repeat treatment over regular time intervals for many years is often necessary. The effect of steroids is slower and the side-effect profile may be problematic, but they may induce disease remission more frequently than IVIG. An important and as of yet uncompletely resolved issue is the evaluation of long-term outcome to determine whether the disease is still active and responsive to treatment.

  14. Immunopathology of chronic rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kato

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS is a heterogeneous disease characterized by local inflammation of the upper airways and sinuses which persists for at least 12 weeks. CRS can be divided into two phenotypes dependent on the presence of nasal polyps (NPs; CRS with NPs (CRSwNP and CRS without NPs (CRSsNP. Immunological patterns in the two diseases are known to be different. Inflammation in CRSsNP is rarely investigated and limited studies show that CRSsNP is characterized by type 1 inflammation. Inflammation in CRSwNP is well investigated and CRSwNP in Western countries shows type 2 inflammation and eosinophilia in NPs. In contrast, mixed inflammatory patterns are found in CRSwNP in Asia and the ratio of eosinophilic NPs and non-eosinophilic NPs is almost 50:50 in these countries. Inflammation in eosinophilic NPs is mainly controlled by type 2 cytokines, IL-5 and IL-13, which can be produced from several immune cells including Th2 cells, mast cells and group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s that are all elevated in eosinophilic NPs. IL-5 strongly induces eosinophilia. IL-13 activates macrophages, B cells and epithelial cells to induce recruitment of eosinophils and Th2 cells, IgE mediated reactions and remodeling. Epithelial derived cytokines, TSLP, IL-33 and IL-1 can directly and indirectly control type 2 cytokine production from these cells in eosinophilic NPs. Recent clinical trials showed the beneficial effect on eosinophilic NPs and/or asthma by monoclonal antibodies against IL-5, IL-4Rα, IgE and TSLP suggesting that they can be therapeutic targets for eosinophilic CRSwNP.

  15. Neurovascular Unit in Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Mihaela Radu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a debilitating condition with major socioeconomic impact, whose neurobiological basis is still not clear. An involvement of the neurovascular unit (NVU has been recently proposed. In particular, the blood-brain barrier (BBB and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB, two NVU key players, may be affected during the development of chronic pain; in particular, transient permeabilization of the barrier is suggested by several inflammatory- and nerve-injury-based pain models, and we argue that the clarification of molecular BBB/BSCB permeabilization events will shed new light in understanding chronic pain mechanisms. Possible biases in experiments supporting this theory and its translational potentials are discussed. Moving beyond an exclusive focus on the role of the endothelium, we propose that our understanding of the mechanisms subserving chronic pain will benefit from the extension of research efforts to the NVU as a whole. In this view, the available evidence on the interaction between analgesic drugs and the NVU is here reviewed. Chronic pain comorbidities, such as neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, are also discussed in view of NVU changes, together with innovative pharmacological solutions targeting NVU components in chronic pain treatment.

  16. Guideline of Chronic Urticaria Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Lauren M; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2016-09-01

    Urticaria is a relatively common condition that if chronic can persist for weeks, months or years and affect quality of life significantly. The etiology is often difficult to determine, especially as it becomes chronic. Many cases of chronic urticaria are thought to be autoimmune, although there is no consensus that testing for autoimmunity alters the diagnostic or management strategies or outcomes. Many times, urticaria is easily managed with antihistamines and/or short courses of oral corticosteroids, but too often control is insufficient and additional therapies must be added. For years, immune modulating medications, such as cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil, have been used in cases refractory to antihistamines and oral corticosteroids, although the evidence supporting their efficacy and safety has been limited. Omalizumab was recently approved for the treatment of chronic urticaria unresponsive to H1-antagonists. This IgG anti-IgE monoclonal antibody has been well demonstrated to safely and effectively control chronic urticaria at least partially in approximately 2/3 of cases. However, the mechanism of action and duration of treatment for omalizumab is still unclear. It is hoped that as the pathobiology of chronic urticaria becomes better defined, future therapies that target specific mechanistic pathways will be developed that continue to improve the management of these often challenging patients.

  17. Voice in chronic hemodialyzed individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radish Kumar Balasubramanium

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chronic hemodialysis affects various body systems, one of which is the respiratory system. Since respiration is the prime source for speech, vocal dysfunctions are expected to be present in patients with chronic hemodialysis. The present study attempts to shed light on the changes in acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of voice, if any, in patients with chronic hemodialysis. Materials and Methods: Phonation of sustained vowel/a/sample was subjected to acoustic analysis using VAGHMI software. Sustained duration of/a/,/s/, and/z/ was recorded for the purpose of aerodynamic analysis. The independent t test was employed to find the significant difference between the two groups. Results: Chronic hemodialyzed subjects showed significant deviation in frequency, perturbation, and aerodynamic measures when compared to normal subjects. These results are discussed with respect to the underlying pathophysiology. Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed that subjects with chronic hemodialysis exhibit clinical evidence of voice disorders. Vocal deviations in chronic hemodialyzed subjects are explained due to the influence of the renal system on the respiratory and the phonatory system and the negative fluid balance effect of hemodialysis.

  18. Guideline of Chronic Urticaria Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Lauren M; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2016-09-01

    Urticaria is a relatively common condition that if chronic can persist for weeks, months or years and affect quality of life significantly. The etiology is often difficult to determine, especially as it becomes chronic. Many cases of chronic urticaria are thought to be autoimmune, although there is no consensus that testing for autoimmunity alters the diagnostic or management strategies or outcomes. Many times, urticaria is easily managed with antihistamines and/or short courses of oral corticosteroids, but too often control is insufficient and additional therapies must be added. For years, immune modulating medications, such as cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil, have been used in cases refractory to antihistamines and oral corticosteroids, although the evidence supporting their efficacy and safety has been limited. Omalizumab was recently approved for the treatment of chronic urticaria unresponsive to H1-antagonists. This IgG anti-IgE monoclonal antibody has been well demonstrated to safely and effectively control chronic urticaria at least partially in approximately 2/3 of cases. However, the mechanism of action and duration of treatment for omalizumab is still unclear. It is hoped that as the pathobiology of chronic urticaria becomes better defined, future therapies that target specific mechanistic pathways will be developed that continue to improve the management of these often challenging patients. PMID:27334777

  19. Chronic Cough in Otorhinolaryngologic Routine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palheta Neto, Francisco Xavier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The chronic cough is sometimes manifested as an imprecise symptom, but of great importance for both the diagnosis and the prognosis. In an otorhinolaryngologic approach, several illnesses that can occur with it can be numbered, including 2 of the 3 main causes of chronic cough. Objective: To identify the main otorhinolaryngologic diseases showing the chronic cough as one of their manifestations. Method: A literature's revision was performed in several scientific articles, specialized books and consultation in Birene and Scielo databases. Literature's revision: cough production in the upper airways is usually associated with an inflammatory reaction by stimulating sensitive receptors of these areas or by mechanic stimulus. The main cause of the chronic cough in the otorhinolaryngology day-to-day is the post-nasal drip, gathering together by itself 02 of the most common diseases: rhinitis and sinusitis. Laryngitis as a result of gastroesophageal reflux (GER stands out in the index of chronic cough etiology, but it is not as severe as GER . Neoplasias are also somewhat frequent causes of cough, and the difficulty in diagnosing the cough cause is common in this disease group. Motility disorder, laryngeal irritation persistence, parasitic disease and injuries by inhalation of toxic products were also found as a cause of cough for longer than 03 months. Conclusion:Chronic cough is a frequent and important finding in otorhinolaryngology and cannot be underestimated, and a careful anamnesis is the best way to determine the etiology and perform a correct treatment for the patient's disease.

  20. Diagnosis and management of chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, V.; TOSKES, P.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis represents a condition that is challenging for clinicians secondary to the difficulty in making an accurate diagnosis and the less than satisfactory means of managing chronic pain. This review emphasises the various manifestations that patients with chronic pancreatitis may have and describes recent advances in medical and surgical therapy. It is probable that many patients with chronic abdominal pain are suffering from chronic pancreatitis that is not appreciated. As the...

  1. [Chronic illness and contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarikoski, S

    1987-01-01

    In recent years sterilization that can cause problems of the psyche and marital life has been recommended much less frequently with respect to chronic diseases. As regards heart and hypertensive diseases pregnancy is always contraindicated in case of 3rd and 4th disease categories and sterilization is recommended according to the New York Heart Association. As far as 1st and 2nd category patients are concerned if the load carrying capacity is normal pregnancy could be undertaken. Combination pills are not recommended for contraception because they can cause fluid retention or increase the risk of thrombosis. If the patient has a higher-than-normal risk of developing thrombosis or infection, for instance, those who wear pacemakers only tablets containing progesterone or subdermal capsule implants can be used. In those with blood pressure problems the additional use of the IUD is also advised. Among diseases of neurological and psychic origin the effect of hormonal contraceptives is weakened by antiepileptics, but even in such cases older combination pills of larger doses of active ingredients can be employed. Migraine is exacerbated in 1/3 of patients; here IUDs can be used. Even the contraceptive tablets themselves can induce depression. In psychosis methods requiring regular attention can be easily forgotten, therefore the IUD is the most suitable device. In diabetes progesterone and other progestogens reduce insulin response, harm carbohydrate metabolism; therefore in young people the IUD is preferred an in older women with children even sterilization can be employed. Hormonal tablets must not be used in hyperlipidemia and liver diseases. Caution must be exercised in hyperthyroidism and in endocrine disorders (e.g., Cushing's syndrome); if it is accompanied by blood pressure disorders appropriate treatment is required. In kidney diseases pregnancy is contraindicated if it is accompanied by blood pressure increase or a higher level of creatine. On the other hand

  2. Chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: shifting boundaries and attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, A R

    1998-09-28

    The subjective symptom of "fatigue" is one of the most widespread in the general population and is a major source of healthcare utilization. Prolonged fatigue is often associated with neuropsychological and musculoskeletal symptoms that form the basis of several syndromal diagnoses including chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and neurasthenia, and is clearly not simply the result of a lack of force generation from the muscle. Current epidemiologic research in this area relies predominantly on self-report data to document the prevalence and associations of chronic fatigue. Of necessity, this subjective data source gives rise to uncertain diagnostic boundaries and consequent divergent epidemiologic, clinical, and pathophysiologic research findings. This review will highlight the impact of the case definition and ascertainment methods on the varying prevalence estimates of chronic fatigue syndrome and patterns of reported psychological comorbidty. It will also evaluate the evidence for a true postinfective fatigue syndrome.

  3. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  4. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly.

  5. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  6. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  7. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  8. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran;

    2014-01-01

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...... food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids...

  9. [Neurosurgical treatment of chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, D; Blond, S; Mertens, P; Lanteri-Minet, M

    2015-02-01

    Neurosurgical treatment of pain used two kind of techniques: 1) Lesional techniques interrupt the transmission of nociceptive neural input by lesionning the nociceptive pathways (drezotomy, cordotomy, tractotomy…). They are indicated to treat morphine-resistant cancer pain and few cases of selected neuropathic pain. 2) Neuromodulation techniques try to decrease pain by reinforcing inhibitory and/or to limit activatory mechanisms. Chronic electrical stimulation of the nervous system (peripheral nerve stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, motor cortex stimulation…) is used to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Intrathecal infusion of analgesics (morphine, ziconotide…), using implantable pumps, allows to increase their efficacy and to reduce their side effects. These techniques can improve, sometimes dramatically, selected patients with severe and chronic pain, refractory to all other treatments. The quality of the analgesic outcome depends on the relevance of the indications. PMID:25681114

  10. Aminoadamantanes for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamers, Mieke H; Broekman, Mark; Drenth, Joost Ph;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Around 3% of the world's population (approximately 160 million people) are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus. The proportion of infected people who develop clinical symptoms varies between 5% and 40%. Combination therapy with pegylated interferon-alpha plus ribavirin...... response in genotype 1 infected patients to at least 70%. There is therefore an unmet need for drugs that can achieve a higher proportion of sustained virological response. Aminoadamantanes are antiviral drugs used for treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial...... and harmful effects of aminoadamantanes for patients with chronic hepatitis C infection by conducting a systematic review with meta-analyses of randomised clinical trials, as well as trial sequential analyses. SEARCH METHODS: We conducted electronic searches of the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled...

  11. Chronic diseases in elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Wraae, Kristian; Gudex, Claire;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: prevalence estimates for chronic diseases and associated risk factors are needed for priority setting and disease prevention strategies. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the self-reported and clinical prevalence of common chronic disorders in elderly men. STUDY......-reported data on risk factors and disease prevalence were compared with data from hospital medical records. RESULTS: physical inactivity, smoking and excessive alcohol intake were reported by 27, 22 and 17% of the study population, respectively. Except for diabetes, all the chronic diseases investigated......, including hypertension, musculoskeletal and respiratory diseases were underreported by study participants. Erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism were substantially underreported in the study population even though these diseases were found to affect 48 and 21% of the participants, respectively. CONCLUSIONS...

  12. Increased adiposity in annexin A1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rand T Akasheh

    Full Text Available Production of Annexin A1 (ANXA1, a protein that mediates the anti-inflammatory action of glucocorticoids, is altered in obesity, but its role in modulation of adiposity has not yet been investigated. The objective of this study was to investigate modulation of ANXA1 in adipose tissue in murine models of obesity and to study the involvement of ANXA1 in diet-induced obesity in mice. Significant induction of ANXA1 mRNA was observed in adipose tissue of both C57BL6 and Balb/c mice with high fat diet (HFD-induced obesity versus mice on chow diet. Upregulation of ANXA1 mRNA was independent of leptin or IL-6, as demonstrated by use of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and IL-6 KO mice. Compared to WT mice, female Balb/c ANXA1 KO mice on HFD had increased adiposity, as indicated by significantly elevated body weight, fat mass, leptin levels, and adipocyte size. Whereas Balb/c WT mice upregulated expression of enzymes involved in the lipolytic pathway in response to HFD, this response was absent in ANXA1 KO mice. A significant increase in fasting glucose and insulin levels as well as development of insulin resistance was observed in ANXA1 KO mice on HFD compared to WT mice. Elevated plasma corticosterone levels and blunted downregulation of 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in adipose tissue was observed in ANXA1 KO mice compared to diet-matched WT mice. However, no differences between WT and KO mice on either chow or HFD were observed in expression of markers of adipose tissue inflammation. These data indicate that ANXA1 is an important modulator of adiposity in mice, with female ANXA1 KO mice on Balb/c background being more susceptible to weight gain and diet-induced insulin resistance compared to WT mice, without significant changes in inflammation.

  13. RasGrf1 deficiency delays aging in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Borrás, Consuelo; Monleón, Daniel; López-Grueso, Raul; Gambini, Juan; Orlando, Leonardo; Federico V Pallardó; Santos, Eugenio; Viña, José; Font de Mora, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    RasGRF1 is a Ras-guanine nucleotide exchange factor implicated in a variety of physiological processes including learning and memory and glucose homeostasis. To determine the role of RASGRF1 in aging, lifespan and metabolic parameters were analyzed in aged RasGrf1−/− mice. We observed that mice deficient for RasGrf1−/− display an increase in average and most importantly, in maximal lifespan (20% higher than controls). This was not due to the role of Ras in cancer because tumor-free survival w...

  14. Altered pupillary light reflex in PACAP receptor 1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelund, Anna; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Harrison, Adrian; Luuk, Hendrik; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-05-01

    The pupillary light reflex (PLR) is regulated by the classical photoreceptors, rods and cones, and by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin. IpRGCs receive input from rods and cones and project to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN), which is the primary visual center involved in PLR. Mice lacking either the classical photoreceptors or melanopsin exhibit some changes in PLR, whereas the reflex is completely lost in mice deficient of all three photoreceptors. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is co-stored with melanopsin in ipRGCs and mediates light signaling to the brain via the specific PACAP receptor 1 (PAC1R). Here, we examined the occurrence of PACAP and PAC1R in the mouse OPN, and studied if lack of PAC1R affected the PLR. PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibers were shown in the mouse OPN, and by in situ hybridization histochemistry, we demonstrated the presence of PAC1R mRNA. Mice lacking PAC1R exhibited a significantly attenuated PLR compared to wild type mice upon light stimulation, and the difference became more pronounced as light intensity was increased. Our findings accord well with observations of the PLR in the melanopsin-deficient mouse. We conclude that PACAP/PAC1R signaling is involved in the sustained phase of the PLR at high irradiances.

  15. Altered pupillary light reflex in PACAP receptor 1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Anna; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Harrison, Adrian Paul;

    2012-01-01

    The pupillary light reflex (PLR) is regulated by the classical photoreceptors, rods and cones, and by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin. IpRGCs receive input from rods and cones and project to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN......), which is the primary visual center involved in PLR. Mice lacking either the classical photoreceptors or melanopsin exhibit some changes in PLR, whereas the reflex is completely lost in mice deficient of all three photoreceptors. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP...

  16. MAN1B1 deficiency: an unexpected CDG-II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Rymen

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG are a group of rare metabolic diseases, due to impaired protein and lipid glycosylation. In the present study, exome sequencing was used to identify MAN1B1 as the culprit gene in an unsolved CDG-II patient. Subsequently, 6 additional cases with MAN1B1-CDG were found. All individuals presented slight facial dysmorphism, psychomotor retardation and truncal obesity. Generally, MAN1B1 is believed to be an ER resident alpha-1,2-mannosidase acting as a key factor in glycoprotein quality control by targeting misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD. However, recent studies indicated a Golgi localization of the endogenous MAN1B1, suggesting a more complex role for MAN1B1 in quality control. We were able to confirm that MAN1B1 is indeed localized to the Golgi complex instead of the ER. Furthermore, we observed an altered Golgi morphology in all patients' cells, with marked dilatation and fragmentation. We hypothesize that part of the phenotype is associated to this Golgi disruption. In conclusion, we linked mutations in MAN1B1 to a Golgi glycosylation disorder. Additionally, our results support the recent findings on MAN1B1 localization. However, more work is needed to pinpoint the exact function of MAN1B1 in glycoprotein quality control, and to understand the pathophysiology of its deficiency.

  17. Consequences of SOS1 deficiency: Intracellular physiology and transcription

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, OhDong

    2010-06-01

    As much as there is known about the function of the sodium/proton antiporter SOS1 in plants, recent studies point towards a more general role for this protein. The crucial involvement in salt stress protection is clearly one of its functions –confined to the N-terminus, but the modular structure of the protein includes a segment with several domains that are functionally not studied but comprise more than half of the protein’s length. Additional functions of the protein appear to be an influence on vesicle trafficking, vacuolar pH and general ion homeostasis during salt stress. Eliminating SOS1 leads to the expression of genes that are not strictly salinity stress related. Functions that are regulated in sos1 mutants included pathogen responses, and effects on circadian rhythm.

  18. Roentgenofunctional diagnosis of chronic enterocolitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonovich, V.B.; Khashem, U.Kh. (Tsentral' nyj Inst. Usovershenstvovaniya Vrachej, Moscow (USSR))

    The paper is concerned with the findings of multimodality roentgenofunctional diagnosis of chronic enterocolitis in 100 patients. A radiofunctional study was performed under the conditions of X-ray TV and videomagnetic recording of the stomach, duodenum and small intestine using barium swallow. Simultaneously the gall bladder and bile ducts condition was studied. All the patients underwent colon examination with the help of a contrast enema (primary double contrast examination) and 24 h after taking barium swallow and food. The study showed that changes in the small intestine in chronic enterocolitis were combined with a certain regularity of those in the stomach, duodenum, colon and gall bladder.

  19. Radiodiagnosis of posttraumatic chronic osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    163 patients with posttraumatic chronic osteomyelitis were observed. Osteomyelitis developed after an open fracture in the absence of osteosynthesis in 9 cases only. In the rest 154 cases of osteomyelitis some type of osteosynthesis was used for fracture treatment. The X-ray signs of posttraumatic chronic osteomyelitis are varied. Correct and early recognition of this pathology requires a clear-cut idea of its features with relation to the nature of fracture, the type of osteosynthesis and peculiarity of reparative processes. It requires multiple use of various X-ray methods of which the main are roentgenography, tomography and fistulography

  20. Management of chronic visceral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne E; Farmer, Adam D; Olesen, Søren S;

    2016-01-01

    Despite marked differences in underlying pathophysiology, the current management of visceral pain largely follows the guidelines derived from the somatic pain literature. The effective management of patients with chronic visceral pain should be multifaceted, including both pharmacological......' symptoms, adopting an empathic approach and taking time to educate patients. To optimize treatment and outcomes in chronic visceral pain we need to move away from approaches exclusively based on dealing with peripheral nociceptive input toward more holistic strategies, taking into account alterations...... in central pain processing....

  1. CHRONIC PANNICULITIS-case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Drljević,

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The case shows chronic panniculitis in a thirty-year-old female patient without general symptoms. The disease is very rare and its etiology is unknown. Clinical picture is characterized by subcutaneous, erythematous nodules on lower legs, sometimes occuring on the trunk. The diagnosis was based on anamnesis, clinical and laboratory findings,and dermatopathology.

  2. Gene polymorphisms in chronic periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Laine; B.G. Loos; W. Crielaard

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to conduct a review of the literature for gene polymorphisms associated with chronic periodontitis (CP) susceptibility. A comprehensive search of the literature in English was performed using the keywords: periodontitis, periodontal disease, combined with the words genes, mutation, or polym

  3. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  4. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  5. Metformin in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological...

  6. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  7. Mucociliary clearance in chronic sinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    Birdi, Surinder Mohan; Singh, Sunder; Singh, Ajit

    1998-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance is an important defence mechanism of upper and lower respiratory tracts. Any disturbance in the mechanism leads to stagnation of secretions and secondary infection with prolonged mucociliary clearance time. The present study was undertaken to establish normal mucociliary clearance time in our region and to evaluate its diagnostic and prognostic potential in chronic sinusitis of variable duration with and without obstructive diseases.

  8. Multiculturalism, chronic illness, and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, N E; Zola, I K

    1993-05-01

    To gain at least an initial understanding of the underlying beliefs and attitudes in a cross-cultural situation, we believe that the three key points discussed in this paper should prove a significant point of departure: 1. Traditional beliefs about the cause of chronic illness or disability will play a significant role in determining family and community attitudes toward individuals with a disability and will influence when, how, and why medical input is sought. 2. The expectation of survival on the part of parents and community will have an effect on the amount of time, energy, and cooperation shown by family and community for the individual who has an impairment. 3. The expectations by family and community for the social role(s) and individual with a chronic illness or disability will hold will affect a broad range of issues, including education, social integration, and independence. Furthermore, although chronic illness and disability are often considered as issues distinct from the full range of problems encountered in society for immigrant and minority groups, in fact, these issues could not be more closely tied. The frequently discussed concerns within the ethnic and minority community about the role of the family, integration and acculturation, social articulation with the greater American society, stress, cross-cultural misunderstanding, and outright prejudice can all compound the problems encountered for the chronically ill or disabled individual in a multicultural society. PMID:8479830

  9. Chronic pain in Rehabilitation Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; van Wilgen, C.P.; Schrier, E.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the chronicity of pain in non-specific pain syndromes is discussed. Experts in the study of pain with several professional backgrounds in rehabilitation are the authors of this paper. Clinical experience and literature form the basis of the paper. Non-specific low back pain and Complex

  10. Electroacupuncture treatment of chronic insomniacs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Jing-wen; WANG Chu-huai; LIAO Xin-xue; YAN Ying-shuo; HU Yue-hua; RAO Zhong-dong; WEN Ming; ZENG Xiao-xiang; LAI Xin-sheng

    2009-01-01

    Background Due to the quick rhythm of life and work pressure, more and more people suffer from sleep quality problems. In this study, we investigated the effect of electroacupuncture on sleep quality of chronic insomniacs and the safety of electroacupuncture therapy.Methods Four courses of electroacupuncture treatment were applied to 47 patients. With pre-treatment and post-treatment self-control statistical method, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) scores were used for evaluating sleep quality. Polysomnogram was used for detecting insomniacs' changes in sleep architecture. The safety of electroacupuncture was evaluated by monitoring the self-designed adverse events and side effects during treatment and post-treatment.Results Electroacupuncture considerably improved insomniacs' sleep quality and social function during the daytime.Electroacupuncture had certain repairing effect on the disruption in sleep architecture. At the same time,electroacupuncture prolonged slow wave sleep (SWS) time and relatively rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) time.There was no hangover, addiction or decrements in vigilance during the daytime (incidence rate was 0). However,insomnia rebound rate was about 23% within one month.Conclusions These results suggest that electroacupuncture has beneficial effect on sleep quality improvement in the patients with chronic insomnia, which may be associated with repairing sleep architecture, reconstructing sleep continuity,as well as prolonging SWS time and REM sleep time. Electroacupuncture treatment for chronic insomnia is safe.Therefore, electroacupuncture therapy could be a promising avenue of treatment for chronic insomnia.

  11. Pregabalin for Pain Treatment in Chronic Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren Schou; Bowense, S; Wilder-Smith, Oliver;

    2011-01-01

    Intractable pain usually dominates the clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Slowing of electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythmicity has been associated with abnormal cortical pain processing in other chronic pain disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectral distribution...

  12. Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms and subsequent cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, H.; Farkas, Dora Kormendine; Christiansen, C.F.;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, including essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), are at increased risk of new hematologic malignancies, but their risk of nonhematologic malignancies remains unknown. In the present study, we...

  13. Helping a Child Manage a Chronic Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160011.html Helping a Child Manage a Chronic Illness Feeling they have control over their ... News) -- Children and teens who feel confident handling a chronic illness on their own appear better able ...

  14. Chronic Condition Public Use File (PUF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Chronic Conditions Public Use Files (PUF) with information from Medicare claims. The CMS Chronic Conditions PUF is an aggregated file in...

  15. Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Webinars Tips & Stories Links & Resources Learn About Chronic Kidney Disease Kidney Glossary Ask Our Expert Toll-Free Helpline: ... Questions What You Can Do Download all the chronic kidney disease information presented here. Preview Our CKD Booklets Stage ...

  16. Epclusa Approved for Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_159609.html Epclusa Approved for Chronic Hepatitis C Combination drug treats six major forms of ... to treat the six major strains of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). Epclusa combines sofosbuvir, FDA-approved ...

  17. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Who's at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Who's at Risk? More ... explore this possibility Related Links Disability and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Print page View page in: Español (Spanish) ...

  18. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is the most common skin diseases, characterized by chronic cutaneous lesions which severely debilitates patients in several aspects of their everyday life. Vitamin D is known to exert several actions in the immune system and to influence function and differentiation of mast cells, central role players in the pathogenesis of chronic idiopathic urticaria. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D levels and susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urt...

  19. Oriental Medical Treatment of chronic Acalculous Cholecystitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hae-Yeon Lee; Jung-Han Park; Hyun-Seok Cho; Jung-Chul Kim; Tae-Hyun Baik; Jong-Seong Wi

    2004-01-01

    Chronic acalculous cholecystitis gets possession of about 12 to 13 percent of patients with chronic cholecystitis. Pathologically it is characterised by chronic inflammation and thickening of the gallbladder wall but doesn't come across stones. Clinical symptoms are vague and include abdominal discomfort and distension, nausea, flatulence and intolerance of fatty foods. A patient on chronic acalculous cholecystitis diagnosed from his clinical symtoms and abdominal ultrasonogram was treated by...

  20. Fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin Gözübüyükoğulları; Duru Tabanlıoğlu Onan; Nuran Allı

    2014-01-01

    Background and Design: The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out with the participation of 100 chronic urticaria patients and 61 control group patients. Chronic urticaria patients were investigated for the etiology of urticaria and the autologous serum skin test was performed in those patients. Both the chronic urticaria patients and the controls were evaluated for fibromyalgi...

  1. A CLINICAL STUDY OF CHRONIC DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, S; Kumar, S.; Agarwal, A K

    1991-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurological status of chronic depressive states have not been resolved as yet. Recent classificatory systems ICD-X and DSM-III-R have included chronic depression under affective disorders and have done away with the category of neurotic depression. The present study was undertaken with the aims of (a) to study clinical variables associated with major subtypes of chronic depression (chronic major depression and dysthymia) and (b) to investigate personality characteristics and life eve...

  2. Chronic daily headache: biochemical and neurotransmitter abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Gallai, Virgilio; Sarchielli, Paola; Genco, Sergio; Alberti, Andrea; D'Andrea, Giovanni

    2000-01-01

    Although chronic daily headache (CDH) represents one of the most relevant complaints of patients in headache centers, the mechanisms underlying the chronicization of head pain are poorly understood. Experimental animal models of chronic pain suggest the involvement of a functional disturbance of several neuronal pathways. The disturbances include an abnormal excitability of nociceptive fibers supplying pain-sensitive structures in the brain responsible for peripheral sensitization (chronic ne...

  3. [Dutch language area definition of chronic fatigue].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korenromp, I.H.; Meeus, M.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic fatigue is a frequent but unspecific characteristic of many diseases. However, a clear definition of 'chronic fatigue' is still lacking. The Flemish-Dutch Research Group - Chronic Fatigue (VNO-CHROVER) has taken the opportunity to formulate such a definition that can be widely applied. This

  4. Chinese medicinal herbs for chronic hepatitis B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J; McIntosh, H; Lin, Haili

    2001-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B is a serious health problem worldwide. Chinese medicinal herbs are widely used for treatment of chronic hepatitis B in China and many clinical trials have been conducted. This systematic review is to assess the efficacy and safety of Chinese medicinal herbs for chronic hepatitis...

  5. Managing chronic pain in family practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Librach, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Pain is common in family practice. In dealing with chronic pain, both the family physician and the patient often have problems in defining and in understanding the origin of chronic pain and in providing effective pain relief. This article explores a practical, holistic approach to understanding and managing chronic pain.

  6. Implications of bacterial biofilms in chronic rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Tamashiro

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of sessile form of bacteria with particular features, known as biofilm, has given new insights to the understanding of pathogenesis of several chronic diseases, including Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS. In this article we review the main characteristics of biofilms, describe the current methods used to demonstrate biofilms in chronic rhinosinusitis and discuss the future directions of research in the field.

  7. Chronic pain management: nonpharmacological therapies for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ku-Lang; Fillingim, Roger; Hurley, Robert W; Schmidt, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    Nonpharmacologic therapies have become a vital part of managing chronic pain (CP). Although these can be used as stand-alone therapies, nonpharmacologic treatments often are used to augment and complement pharmacologic treatments (ie, multimodal therapy). Nonpharmacologic approaches can be classified as behavioral, cognitive, integrative, and physical therapies. Core principles in developing a treatment plan are explaining the nature of the CP condition, setting appropriate goals, and developing a comprehensive treatment approach and plan for adherence. Clinicians should become familiar with these interventions so that they can offer patients flexibility in the pain management approach. Effective noninvasive treatment modalities for CP include behavioral therapy for short-term pain relief; cognitive behavioral therapy for reducing long-term pain and disability; hypnosis as adjunctive therapy; guided imagery, diaphragmatic breathing, and muscle relaxation, especially for cancer-related pain; mindfulness-based stress reduction for patients with chronic low back pain; acupuncture for multiple pain conditions; combination manipulation, manual therapy, endurance exercise, stretching, and strengthening for chronic neck pain; animal-assisted therapy; and S-adenosyl-L-methionine for joint pain. Guidelines for use of these treatment modalities are based on expert panel recommendations in combination with data from randomized controlled trials. PMID:25970869

  8. Bone morbidity in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, Sarah; Ocias, Lukas Frans; Vestergaard, Hanne;

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the classical Philadelphia chromosome-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms including essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and primary myelofibrosis often suffer from comorbidities, in particular, cardiovascular diseases and thrombotic events. Apparently, there is also...... neoplasms. Chronic inflammation has been suggested to explain the initiation of clonal development and progression in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Decreased bone mineral density and enhanced fracture risk are well-known manifestations of many chronic systemic inflammatory diseases. As opposed to...... systemic mastocytosis (SM) where pathogenic mechanisms for bone manifestations probably involve effects of mast cell mediators on bone metabolism, the mechanisms responsible for increased fracture risk in other chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are not known....

  9. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Zografos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship.

  10. [Immunological changes in chronic osteomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensi Alvarez, V; Cartón Sánchez, J A; Maradona Hidalgo, J A; López-Larrea, C; Arribas Castrillo, J M

    1992-11-01

    We have studied several aspects of cellular and humoral immunity in 19 patients with chronic osteomyelitis (CO) compared with 11 healthy controls of similar characteristics. Patients with CO showed significantly higher values of GSR, reactive protein C (RPC), IgG and lymphocytes CD3+ and lower values of the CD4+/CD3+ ratio, as well as an hypoergic response to 7 antigens in the different cutaneous hypersensibility tests, compared with healthy controls. The rate of "in vitro" blastic stimulation by different lectins was significantly lower in the group of patients, compared with controls. These changes in the cellular immunity are not correlated with the extent, chronicity and prognosis of the disease, although we did not performed sequential studies of the immunitary condition. None of these immunological markers seem to be a better predictor of the bone infectious activity than the traditional GSR or RPC. PMID:1467399

  11. Vouchers for chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jennifer J; Segal, Leonie

    2008-08-01

    This paper explores the economic implications of vouchers for chronic disease management with respect to achieving objectives of equity and efficiency. Vouchers as a payment policy instrument for health care services have a set of properties that suggest they may address both demand-side and supply-side issues, and contribute to equity and efficiency. They provide a means whereby health care services can be targeted at selected groups, enabling consumer choice of provider, and encouraging competition in the supply of health services. This analysis suggests that, when structured appropriately, vouchers can support consumers to choose services that will meet their health care needs and encourage competition among providers. Although they may not be appropriate across the entire health care system, there are features of vouchers that make them a potentially attractive option, especially for the management of chronic disease.

  12. Chronic folliculitis in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasinghe S

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic folliculitis (CF is a chronic infection of hair follicles leading to atrophy and loss of the affected hairs. This study was done on 51 patients with CF presenting at the Dermatology Clinic at General Hospital Matara, Sri Lanka, to identify specific clinical features and aetiological factors, and to study histopathology. Pus cultures were done on 25 cases. Biopsies were done on 6 patients. CF was commoner in males (59%; 76% were under 34 years, and 39% had occupational exposure to possible irritants. Thirty five precent admitted of scrubbing legs with rough objects. Ichthyosis vulgaris was evident in 47%. All pus cultures revealed Staphylococcus aureus. Clinical features and histopathological features were similar to those described by Harman (1968. Rough scrubbing, ichthyosis and occupational exposure to irritants may be aetiologically relevant.

  13. Melatonin in Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Andrei; Kurganova, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by epiphysis and extrapineal structures. It performs several functions including chronobiotic, antioxidant, oncostatic, immune modulating, normothermal, and anxiolytic functions. Melatonin affects the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract, participates in reproduction and metabolism, and body mass regulation. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated melatonin efficacy in relation to pain syndromes. The present paper reviews the studies on melatonin use in fibromyalgia, headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic back pain, and rheumatoid arthritis. The paper discusses the possible mechanisms of melatonin analgesic properties. On one hand, circadian rhythms normalization results in sleep improvement, which is inevitably disordered in chronic pain syndromes, and activation of melatonin adaptive capabilities. On the other hand, there is evidence of melatonin-independent analgesic effect involving melatonin receptors and several neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26984272

  14. Clinicomicrobiological study of chronic paronychia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guha P

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 261 digits affected in 100 patients of chronic paronychia were studied for clinical features. The bacteriological and mycological flora have been examined in 25 cases of the above 100 cases which were most severely affected. Aerobic bacteria were found in all cases. Staphylococcus aureus was seen in 60 percent. Klebsiella in 16 percent, Escherichia coli in 12 percent, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 12 percent, Proteus mirabillis in 8 percent, Staphylococcus epidermidis in 4 percent and Streptococcus viridans in 4 percent. Culture for fungus revealed Candida albicans in 64 percent and other species such as C. krusei, C. stellatoides, C. viswanathi, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis were present in 1 case each. No fungus was detected in 4 cases(16percent. The present investigation was designed to compare the bacterial and mycotic flora of the nail folds of patients of chronic paronychia with that of western countries.

  15. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension....... In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...

  16. Chronic radiation enteritis and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gwilym James; Brooke, Rachael; De Silva, Aminda Niroshan

    2013-07-01

    Radiation enteritis is defined as the loss of absorptive capacity of the intestine following irradiation, which is most commonly seen after radiotherapy for pelvic and abdominal malignancies. It is divided into acute and chronic forms and usually presents with diarrhea and malabsorption. Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE). We reviewed the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of CRE and CRE with malnutrition in this article. Functional short bowel syndrome as a cause of malnutrition in CRE is also considered. The diagnostic work-up includes serum markers, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging and the exclusion of alternative diagnoses such as recurrent malignancy. Management options of CRE include dietary manipulation, anti-motility agents, electrolyte correction, probiotics, parenteral nutrition, surgical resection and small bowel transplantation. Treatment may also be required for coexisting conditions including vitamin B12 deficiency, bile acid malabsorption and depression.

  17. Lithium clearance in chronic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P;

    1989-01-01

    1. Lithium clearance measurements were made in 72 patients with chronic nephropathy of different aetiology and moderate to severely reduced renal function. 2. Lithium clearance was strictly correlated with glomerular filtration rate, and there was no suggestion of distal tubular reabsorption of...... lithium or influence of osmotic diuresis. 3. Fractional reabsorption of lithium was reduced in most patients with glomerular filtration rates below 25 ml/min. 4. Calculated fractional distal reabsorption of sodium was reduced in most patients with glomerular filtration rates below 50 ml/min. 5. Lithium...... lithium clearance may be a measure of the delivery of sodium and water from the renal proximal tubule. With this assumption it was found that adjustment of the sodium excretion in chronic nephropathy initially takes place in the distal parts of the nephron (loop of Henle, distal tubule and collecting duct...

  18. Insomnia and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Don; Anstead, Michael I; Ho, Julia; Phillips, Barbara A

    2009-09-01

    Insomnia is highly prevalent in patients with chronic disease including chronic heart failure (CHF) and is a significant contributing factor to fatigue and poor quality of life. The pathophysiology of CHF often leads to fatigue, due to nocturnal symptoms causing sleep disruption, including cough, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and nocturia. Inadequate cardiac function may lead to hypoxemia or poor perfusion of the cerebrum, skeletal muscle, or visceral body organs, which result in organ dysfunction or failure and may contribute to fatigue. Sleep disturbances negatively affect all dimensions of quality of life and is related to increased risk of comorbidities, including depression. This article reviews insomnia in CHF, cardiac medication side-effects related to sleep disturbances, and treatment options. PMID:18758945

  19. Ghrelin in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai W. Cheung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD often exhibit symptoms of anorexia and cachexia, which are associated with decreased quality of life and increased mortality. Chronic inflammation may be an important mechanism for the development of anorexia, cachexia, renal osteodystrophy, and increased cardiovascular risk in CKD. Ghrelin is a gastric hormone. The biological effects of ghrelin are mediated through the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR. The salutary effects of ghrelin on food intake and meal appreciation suggest that ghrelin could be an effective treatment for anorexic CKD patients. In addition to its appetite-stimulating effects, ghrelin has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties. The known metabolic effects of ghrelin and the potential implications in CKD will be discussed in this review. The strength, shortcomings, and unanswered questions related to ghrelin treatment in CKD will be addressed.

  20. Biomarkers in chronic adult hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitchen Neil D

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Awareness of the importance of chronic adult hydrocephalus has been raised again with the recent emergence of epidemiological studies. It is estimated that between 5 and 10% of patients suffering from dementia might, in fact, have chronic hydrocephalus. Although, surgical diversion of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF represents the only known procedure able to treat the symptoms of this condition, the selection of surgical patients has always been problematic. In the last 40 years, we have become wiser in using appropriate diagnostic tests for the selection of these patients; however, the area of biological markers has so far been overlooked in this condition, in contrast to that for other neurodegenerative disorders and dementias. Biomarkers are biological substances that may be used to indicate either the onset or the presence, and the progression of a clinical condition, being closely linked to its pathophysiology. In such a setting they might assist in the more appropriate selection of patients for shunt surgery. In this article, we have reviewed research carried out in the last 25 years regarding the identification of serum and CSF biomarkers for chronic hydrocephalus, discussed the potential for each one, and finally discussed the limitations for use, as well as future directions and possibilities in this field. It is concluded that tumour-necrosis factor, tau protein, lactate, sulfatide and neurofilament triple protein are the most promising CSF markers for chronic hydrocephalus. At present however, none of these meet the criteria required to justify a change clinical practice. In the future, collaborative multi-centre projects will be needed to obtain more substantial data that overcome the problems that arise from small individual and uncoordinated studies.

  1. Treatment of chronic inflammatory neuropathies

    OpenAIRE

    Schaik, van, I.N.; Eftimov, F.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the efficacy of existing and alternative treatments in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and explores predictors of treatment response in patients with CIDP treated with corticosteroids. The efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in CIDP and MMN was confirmed in meta-analyses. In CIDP, IVIg efficacy was similar to the efficacy of plasma exchange, prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone. ...

  2. Uveitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J J

    1990-01-01

    About 20% of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis develop uveitis which is frequently bilateral. Risk factors for uveitis are: female gender, pauciarticular onset of arthritis, presence of circulating antinuclear antibodies, and the antigens HLA-DW5 and HLA-DPw2. The visual prognosis in patients with uveitis is good in 25% and fair in 50%. The remaining 25% develop cataract and/or glaucoma. The management of glaucoma is unsatisfactory, but the results of cataract surgery by lensectomy are good.

  3. Gene polymorphisms in chronic periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Laine, Marja L; Loos, Bruno G.; Crielaard, W.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to conduct a review of the literature for gene polymorphisms associated with chronic periodontitis (CP) susceptibility. A comprehensive search of the literature in English was performed using the keywords: periodontitis, periodontal disease, combined with the words genes, mutation, or polymorphism. Candidate gene polymorphism studies with a case-control design and reported genotype frequencies in CP patients were searched and reviewed. There is growing evidence that polymorphisms in ...

  4. Conversations with chronic schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R

    1979-02-01

    An account is given of some of the topics discussed during a small informal weekly open group meeting of chronic schizophrenic patients, based on occasional notes compiled over eleven years. The main feature of the patients' condition as displayed was poverty--clinical, social, behavioural, material and financial--and certain features suggested an organic aetiology. Reasons are given for considering that the patients' condition was predominantly caused by schizophrenia rather than by institutionalism.

  5. Chronic Psychosocial Stress and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Spruill, Tanya M.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and behavioral factors do not fully explain the development of hypertension, and there is increasing evidence suggesting that psychosocial factors may also play an important role. Exposure to chronic stress has been hypothesized as a risk factor for hypertension, and occupational stress, stressful aspects of the social environment, and low socioeconomic status have each been studied extensively. The study of discrimination is a more recent and rapidly growing area of investigation and...

  6. Multiple chronic benign pulmonary nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalifa, L G; Schimmel, D H; Gamsu, G

    1976-11-01

    Four cases are discussed in which were found unusual multiple chronic pulmonary nodules: leiomyomatous hamartomas, rheumatoid nodules, multiple histoplasmomas, and possible multiple plasma cell granulomas (hyalinizing pulmonary nodules). In each case the initial impression of metastic malignancy was countered by more than 2 years' observation, during which time the lesions appeared to be benign. Histologic examination is necessary to exclude malignancy, although a definitive diagnosis may be difficult to establish. PMID:981596

  7. Chronic Inflammation in Cancer Development

    OpenAIRE

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Molls, Michael; Radons, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory mediators exert pleiotropic effects in the development of cancer. On the one hand, inflammation favors carcinogenesis, malignant transformation, tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic spread; on the other hand inflammation can stimulate immune effector mechanisms that might limit tumor growth. The link between cancer and inflammation depends on intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Both pathways result in the activation of transcription factors such as NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-...

  8. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT CHRONIC INSOMNIA

    OpenAIRE

    G.A Dian Puspitha Candra

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is defined as difficulty to start sleeping, maintain it, or low quality sleeping, if the condition persist for more than one month, it is called chronic insomnia. Diagnosis is made through anamnesa and sleep wake diaries, aktigraphy, polisomnography. Pharmachologycally drugs that have been used to treat insomnia are benzodiazepin reseptor agonis, antihistamine, antidepressant. Non pharmacological ways include behavioural intervention for insomnia, give significant result in decreasin...

  9. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, J D; Morton, D. G.; Neoptolemos, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis is very important as the management and prognosis of these two diseases is different. In most patients with pancreatic disease, the diagnosis can be established but there is a subgroup of patients in whom it is difficult to differentiate between these conditions because the clinical presentation is often similar and currently available diagnostic tests may be unable to distinguish between an inflammatory or neoplast...

  10. Chronic Infection and Severe Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Tara F; Kraft, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Chronic bacterial infection is implicated in both the development and severity of asthma. The atypical bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae have been identified in the airways of asthmatics and correlated with clinical features such as adult onset, exacerbation risks, steroid sensitivity, and symptom control. Asthmatic patients with evidence of bacterial infection may benefit from antibiotic treatment directed towards these atypical organisms. Examination of the airway microbiome may identify microbial communities that confer risk for or protection from severe asthma. PMID:27401621

  11. Nitric oxide and chronic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Grisham

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to play an important role in modulating the inflammatory response by virtue of its ability to affect bloodflow, leukocyte function and cell viability. The objective of this study was to assess the role that NO may play in mediating the mucosal injury and inflammation in a model of chronic granulomatous colitis using two pharmacologically different inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Chronic granulomatous colitis with liver and spleen inflammation was induced in female Lewis rats via the subserosal (intramural injection of peptidoglycan/polysaccharide (PG/PS derived from group A streptococci. Chronic NOS inhibition by oral administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (15 µmol/kg/day or amino-guanidine (AG (15 µmol/ kg/day was found to attenuate the PG/PS-induced increases in macroscopic colonic inflammation scores and colonic myeloperoxidase activity. Only AG -- not L-NAME – attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in colon dry weight. Both L-NAME and AG significantly attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in spleen weight whereas neither was effective at significantly attenuating the PG/PS-induced increases in liver weight. Although both L-NAME and AG inhibited NO production in vivo, as measured by decreases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels, only AG produced significantly lower values (38±3 versus 83±8 µM, respectively, P<0.05. Finally, L-NAME, but not AG, administration significantly increased mean arterial pressure from 83 mmHg in colitic animals to 105 mmHg in the PG/PS+ L-NAME-treated animals (P<0.05. It is concluded that NO may play an important role in mediating some of the pathophysiology associated with this model of chronic granulomatous colitis.

  12. Comprehensive management of chronic pain in haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, G; Tachdjian, R; Baumann, K; Panopoulos, G

    2014-03-01

    Chronic pain, most often due to haemophilic arthropathy, is a pervasive problem in persons with haemophilia (PWH) that adversely impacts function and quality of life. PWH with inhibitors and older PWH may be especially vulnerable to progressive arthropathy and resulting chronic pain. The development of chronic pain from acute pain involves a complex interplay of biological and psychosocial factors that may all contribute to the perpetuation of chronic pain and the outcome of therapy. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, an individualized, multimodal approach to chronic pain management is proposed, as it is in individuals without haemophilia who have chronic pain. Pharmacological treatment is central to the management of chronic pain and must be modified based on pain intensity, ongoing response to therapy and the risk for adverse events. Non-pharmacological interventions, including physiotherapy, complementary treatments and surgical (e.g. orthopaedic) or other invasive procedures, may be integral to chronic pain management in this population. Ongoing psychosocial assessment is critical to identify those factors that may be contributing to the perpetuation of chronic pain or acting as barriers to effective management. Additional study is needed to identify optimal pharmacological treatments for chronic pain in PWH based on the unique pathophysiology of haemophilic arthropathy and on risk profile. Systematic determination of the particular psychosocial factors impacting the experience and management of chronic pain in PWH would likewise add value to the treatment of this pervasive problem.

  13. Acute and chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Peter S; Leach, Amanda J

    2009-12-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a common illness in young children. OM has historically been associated with frequent and severe complications. Nowadays it is usually a mild condition that often resolves without treatment. For most children, progression to tympanic membrane perforation and chronic suppurative OM is unusual (low-risk populations); this has led to reevaluation of many interventions that were used routinely in the past. Evidence from a large number of randomized controlled trials can help when discussing treatment options with families. Indigenous children in the United States, Canada, Northern Europe, Australia, and New Zealand experience more OM than other children. In some places, Indigenous children continue to suffer from the most severe forms of the disease. Communities with more than 4% of the children affected by chronic tympanic membrane perforation have a major public health problem (high-risk populations). Higher rates of invasive pneumococcal disease, pneumonia, and chronic suppurative lung disease (including bronchiectasis) are also seen. These children will often benefit from effective treatment of persistent (or recurrent) bacterial infection. PMID:19962027

  14. Chronic Hemodialysis in Small Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novljan, Gregor; Rus, Rina R; Premru, Vladimir; Ponikvar, Rafael; Battelino, Nina

    2016-06-01

    When peritoneal dialysis is inapplicable, chronic hemodialysis (HD) becomes the only available treatment option in small children. Due to small patient size, central venous catheters (CVC) are mainly used for vascular access. Over the past 4 years, four children weighing less than 15 kg received chronic HD in our unit. A total of 848 dialysis sessions were performed. Altogether, 21 catheters were inserted. In all but one occasion, uncuffed catheters were used. Catheter revision was performed 15 times during the study period, either due to infection or catheter malfunction. The median number of catheter revisions and the median line survival was 3.0/patient-year and 53 days (range; 6-373 days), respectively. There were 14 episodes of catheter related infections requiring 11 CVC revisions (78.6%). The median rate of line infections was 2.8/patient-year. Chronic HD in small children is demanding and labor intensive. Issues pertain mainly to CVCs and limit its long-term use. PMID:27312919

  15. THROMBOENDARTERECTOMY FOR CHRONIC PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Ren; Pi-xiong Su; Chao-ji Zhang; Song Gu; Heng Zhang; Chen Wang

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the improving reliability and safety of thromboendarterectomy and perioperative management for chronic pulmonary thromboembolism. Methods The clinical data of 12 cases with chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, who underwent thromboendarterec tomy assisted by low flow or circulation arrest with deep hypothermia, were reviewed retrospectively. Results Pulmonary artery pressure decreased 20 to 40 mmHg immediately after surgical procedures in 9 cases. The postoperative pulmonary edema at various degrees happened in 12 cases, among them, 1 died of severe lung infection and pulmonary re-embolism at 19 days postoperation. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography and angiography of 11 cases indicated that the original obstruction of pulmonary artery disappeared. During the follow-up period of 2 months to 5 years, the clinical symptoms and activity was improved. Conclusion Thromboendarterectomy is an effective treatment for chronic pulmonary thromboembolism. The outcome of the surgical procedure needs to be further investigated and followed up regularly according to an evaluative system, because it might be influenced by multiple factors.

  16. Ultrasonography in chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka E-mail: jadranka.buturovic@mf.uni-lj.si; Visnar-Perovic, Alenka

    2003-05-01

    Many chronic renal diseases lead to the final common state of decrease in renal size, parenchymal atrophy, sclerosis and fibrosis. The ultrasound image show a smaller kidney, thinning of the parenchyma and its hyperechogenicity (reflecting sclerosis and fibrosis). The frequency of renal cysts increases with the progression of the disease. Ultrasound generally does not allow for the exact diagnosis of an underlying chronic disease (renal biopsy is usually required), but it can help to determine an irreversible disease, assess prognosis and avoid unnecessary diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. The main exception in which the ultrasound image does not show a smaller kidney with parenchymal atrophy is diabetic nephropathy, the leading cause of chronic and end-stage renal failure in developed countries in recent years. In this case, both renal size and parenchymal thickness are preserved until end-stage renal failure. Doppler study of intrarenal vessels can provide additional information about microvascular and parenchymal lesions, which is helpful in deciding for or against therapeutic intervention and timely planning for optimal renal replacement therapy option.

  17. Pericytes in chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jessica E; Johnson, Jill R

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are mesenchymal cells embedded within the abluminal surface of the endothelium of microvessels such as capillaries, pre-capillary arterioles, post-capillary and collecting venules, where they maintain microvascular homeostasis and participate in angiogenesis. In addition to their roles in supporting the vasculature and facilitating leukocyte extravasation, pericytes have been recently investigated as a subpopulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) due to their capacity to differentiate into numerous cell types including the classic MSC triad, i.e. osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Other studies in models of fibrotic inflammatory disease of the lung have demonstrated a vital role of pericytes in myofibroblast activation, collagen deposition and microvascular remodelling, which are hallmark features of chronic lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. Further studies into the mechanisms of the pericyte-to-myofibroblast transition and migration to fibrotic foci will hopefully clarify the role of these cells in chronic lung disease and confirm the importance of pericytes in human fibrotic pulmonary disease. PMID:25034005

  18. Chronic Daily Headache - A Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Daily Headache (CDH generally refers to frequent headache occuring more than 15 days/month for over three months. Such headaches may be primary or secondary - the latter referring to headaches related to identifiable intra and extracranial vascular or other pathologies or systemic illnesses. The primary type may be subclassified as short and long lasting ones, depending upon whether the headache spells are more or less than four hours in duration. The present review would deal with the four major types of long lasting primary CDH which include Chronic migraine (CM, Chronic tension type headache (CTTH, New daily persistent headache (NDPH and Hemicrania continua (HC. The first part of the article would focus on the clinical pattern recognising features of these types. The relationship of medication overuse to CM would be critically evaluated. In the second part, the status of CDH in the recently proposed classification of headache disorders by the International Headache Society would be briefly evaluated. In the next section the clinical Profile or CDH in Indian patients would be highlighted based on available published data. Lastly, the pathophysiology of this vexing condition would be discussed specially in relation to CM and postulating on how it may evolve from episodic migraine.

  19. Widespread pain in chronic epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienimäki, Tuomo; Siira, Pertti; Vanharanta, Heikki

    2011-10-01

    We studied the associations of widespread pain with other pain and functional measures among patients with chronic epicondylitis. A total of 190 patients (66% females) participated in the study; with a mean age 43.7, mean duration of symptoms 48weeks, chronic lateral (n=160) and medial (n=30) epicondylitis. We analysed clinical status, grip strength and cubital pain thresholds and interviewed pain and disability, leisure time physical activity, strenuous hobby activities for arms, duration of symptoms, other systemic and upper extremity disorders, arm operations, and work ability. The location of pain was analysed using a whole-body pain drawing, categorized into three groups; the highest of which was classified as widespread pain. A total of 85 patients (45%) reported widespread pain. It was highly associated with female gender, high pain scores, decreased grip strength and pain thresholds (p<0.001 for all), with increased number of positive manual tests, low level of hobby strain for arms and physical activity, long duration of symptoms, and sick leave (p for all <0.05). It was also related to upper extremity disorders and arm surgery, but not with operated epicondylitis, other systemic diseases, workload or work ability. In addition, 39% of patients without other disease reported widespread pain. Widespread pain is common in chronic epicondylitis with and without other diseases, and is related to high pain scores, decreased function of the arm, long duration of symptoms, sick leave, and with a low level of physical activity. PMID:21565536

  20. [Behavioral treatment for chronic insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiko; Yamagami, Toshiko

    2002-01-01

    The efficacy of non-pharmacological intervention for chronic insomnia has been proven by several meta-analytic reviews, an NIH report, an American Academy of Sleep Medicine review, and numerous clinical trials. Behavior therapy for chronic insomnia consists of relaxation, stimulus control, sleep restriction, cognitive restructuring and sleep hygiene education, which has produced reliable and durable changes in total sleep time, sleep onset latency, number and duration of awakening. These studies also showed that the post-treatment effect of behavior therapy is equal to that of hypnotic therapy, and that these effects were maintained for 6 months on follow-up assessment. Elderly insomniac patients would gain considerable benefit from behavioral treatments because there are no adverse physical effects as there are from pharmacological therapy. The authors present the basic theory, techniques of behavior therapy for insomnia, and the results of two important key meta-analytic reviews. Any behavioral approach such as convenient education, self-care enhancement by bibliotherapy, and individual face-to-face counseling, seem to be fruitful not only for American but also Japanese insomnia patients. Nonetheless, there are no currently actual intervention studies using behavior therapy in Japan. We have discussed the methodology of intervention study and published a behavioral self-help manual for people with sleep problems. Development of a behavioral approach to chronic insomnia seemed to be very beneficial and a useful contribution to mental health services. PMID:12373807

  1. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap: asthmatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic obstructive asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slats, Annelies; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are different disease entities. They are both clinical diagnoses, with diagnostic tools to discriminate between one another. However, especially in older patients (>55 years) it seems more difficult to differentiate between asthma and COPD. This has led to the definition of a new phenotype called asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, our understanding of ACOS is at a very preliminary stage, as most research has involved subjects with existing diagnoses of asthma or COPD from studies with different definitions for ACOS. This has led to different and sometimes opposing results between studies on several features of ACOS, also depending on the comparison with COPD alone, asthma alone or both, which are summarized in this review.We suggest not using the term ACOS for a patient with features of both asthma and COPD, but to describe a patient with chronic obstructive airway disease as completely as possible, with regard to characteristics that determine treatment response (e.g. eosinophilic inflammation) and prognosis (such as smoking status, exacerbation rate, fixed airflow limitation, hyperresponsiveness, comorbidities). This will provide a far more clinically relevant diagnosis, and would aid in research on treatment in more homogenous groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. More research is certainly needed to develop more evidence-based definitions for this patient group and to evaluate biomarkers, which will help to further classify these patients, treat them more adequately and unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanism. PMID:26596632

  2. Chronic migraine: risk factors, mechanisms and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Arne; Schulte, Laura H

    2016-08-01

    Chronic migraine has a great detrimental influence on a patient's life, with a severe impact on socioeconomic functioning and quality of life. Chronic migraine affects 1-2% of the general population, and about 8% of patients with migraine; it usually develops from episodic migraine at an annual conversion rate of about 3%. The chronification is reversible: about 26% of patients with chronic migraine go into remission within 2 years of chronification. The most important modifiable risk factors for chronic migraine include overuse of acute migraine medication, ineffective acute treatment, obesity, depression and stressful life events. Moreover, age, female sex and low educational status increase the risk of chronic migraine. The pathophysiology of migraine chronification can be understood as a threshold problem: certain predisposing factors, combined with frequent headache pain, lower the threshold of migraine attacks, thereby increasing the risk of chronic migraine. Treatment options include oral medications, nerve blockade with local anaesthetics or corticoids, and neuromodulation. Well-defined diagnostic criteria are crucial for the identification of chronic migraine. The International Headache Society classification of chronic migraine was recently updated, and now allows co-diagnosis of chronic migraine and medication overuse headache. This Review provides an up-to-date overview of the classification of chronic migraine, basic mechanisms and risk factors of migraine chronification, and the currently established treatment options. PMID:27389092

  3. The association between endometriosis and chronic endometritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akie Takebayashi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between endometriosis and chronic endometritis. METHODS: Endometrial specimens were obtained from 71 patients, 34 with endometriosis (endometriosis group and 37 without endometriosis (non-endometriosis group, who underwent hysterectomy, and the specimens were immunostained for the plasmacyte marker CD138. The rate of chronic endometritis was compared between the endometriosis group and the non-endometriosis group. Furthermore, the 71 patients were also divided into two groups, 28 with chronic endometritis (chronic endometritis group and 43 without chronic endometritis (non-chronic endometritis group. Logistic regression analysis was performed with variables including age, body mass index (BMI, gravidity and parity, and diagnoses of leiomyoma, adenomyosis, and endometriosis on pathology to examine the independent effect of each variable on chronic endometritis. Patients suffering from cervical invasive carcinoma, endometrial carcinoma, and endometrial polyps or treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, progestins, or oral contraceptives before surgery were excluded. RESULTS: Chronic endometritis was identified in 52.94% of the endometriosis group and 27.02% of the non-endometriosis group (p<0.05. Logistic regression analysis revealed that endometriosis was associated with chronic endometritis. CONCLUSIONS: This result suggests a strong association between endometriosis and chronic endometritis.

  4. Chronic pelvic pain: comorbidity between chronic musculoskeletal pain and vulvodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Biasi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pelvic pain (CPP is a common condition that has a major impact on the quality of life of both men and women. Male CPP is usually attributable to well-defined urogenital conditions (most frequently infectious/non infectious prostatic diseases or musculoskeletal or bowel diseases, whereas the features of female CPP are much more complex and are of particular clinical and epidemiological importance. It is a multifactorial syndrome that can be due to diseases of the urogenital, gastrointestinal, or musculoskeletal systems, or to neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders. It is not always easy to identify its predominant pathogenesis, although it often occurs as a central sensitization syndrome triggered by an initial stimulus which is no longer detectable and only manifests itself clinically through pain. In this respect, there are some very interesting relationships between vulvodynia and fibromyalgic syndrome, as identified in a preliminary study of women with chronic musculoskeletal pain in which it was demonstrated that vulvar pain plays an important role, although it is often overlooked and undiagnosed.

  5. Nonpharmacologic Management of Chronic Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maness, David L; Khan, Muneeza

    2015-12-15

    Insomnia affects 10% to 30% of the population with a total cost of $92.5 to $107.5 billion annually. Short-term, chronic, and other types of insomnia are the three major categories according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd ed. The criteria for diagnosis are difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or early awakening despite the opportunity for sleep; symptoms must be associated with impaired daytime functioning and occur at least three times per week for at least one month. Factors associated with the onset of insomnia include a personal or family history of insomnia, easy arousability, poor self-reported health, and chronic pain. Insomnia is more common in women, especially following menopause and during late pregnancy, and in older adults. A comprehensive sleep history can confirm the diagnosis. Psychiatric and medical problems, medication use, and substance abuse should be ruled out as contributing factors. Treatment of comorbid conditions alone may not resolve insomnia. Patients with movement disorders (e.g., restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder), circadian rhythm disorders, or breathing disorders (e.g., obstructive sleep apnea) must be identified and treated appropriately. Chronic insomnia is associated with cognitive difficulties, anxiety and depression, poor work performance, decreased quality of life, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Insomnia can be treated with nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies. Nonpharmacologic therapies include sleep hygiene, cognitive behavior therapy, relaxation therapy, multicomponent therapy, and paradoxical intention. Referral to a sleep specialist may be considered for refractory cases. PMID:26760592

  6. Chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP have recently emerged as a novel eliciting factor for chronic urticaria (CU. The possible association between HP and CU has enormous potential, as eradicating HP could cure CU. Aims and Objectives: We conducted a study to assess the prevalence of HP infection and effect of bacterium eradication on skin lesions in patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU. Settings and Design: Four hundred sixty patients of CU attending the allergy clinic, SMS hospital, Jaipur during the period February 6, 2004, to February 6, 2006, were screened for possible eliciting factors. Patients with CIU were enrolled and others were excluded. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight patients of CIU and similar number of age and sex matched controls, attending the allergy clinic, SMS Hospital, Jaipur were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent endoscopy with antral biopsy for urease and histopathology to identify HP-associated gastritis. Infected patients were given HP eradication therapy. Eradication of bacterium was confirmed by fecal antigen assay. Subjective response to treatment was judged using chronic urticaria quality-of-life questionnaire (CU-Q 2 oL while objective response to treatment was judged by need for ′rescue medication′ (antihistaminics. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi square and paired′t′ test for their level of significance. Results: HP associated gastritis was present in 48 (70.58% patients, out of which 39 (81.25% patients responded to eradication therapy. Ten (50.00% patients without HP associated gastritis showed response to symptomatic therapy. Overall 49 (72.05% patients responded and 19 (27.94% showed no response. The value of χ2 was 28.571 (P = 0.003, which showed significant association between presence of HP and response to eradication regimen. Conclusion: The response of HP eradication therapy in infected patients of CIU is significant. HP should be included in diagnostic

  7. Perspectives on "chronic Lyme disease".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Phillip J

    2008-07-01

    There is much controversy about the treatment of Lyme disease with respect to 2 poorly defined entities: "chronic Lyme disease" and "posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome." In the absence of direct evidence that these conditions are the result of a persistent infection, some mistakenly advocate extended antibiotic therapy (>/=6 months), which can do great harm and has resulted in at least 1 death. The purpose of this brief report is to review what is known from clinical research about these conditions to assist both practicing physicians and lawmakers in making sound and safe decisions with respect to treatment.

  8. Treatment of refractory chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aayushi Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic spontaneous urticaria is a distressing disease encountered frequently in clinical practice. The current mainstay of therapy is the use of second-generation, non-sedating antihistamines. However, in patients who do not respond satisfactorily to these agents, a variety of other drugs are used. This article examines the available literature for frequently used agents including systemic corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, dapsone, sulfasalazine, hydroxychloroquine, H2 antagonists, methotrexate, cyclosporine A, omalizumab, autologous serum therapy, and mycophenolate mofetil, with an additional focus on publications in Indian literature.

  9. Treatment of Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Allen P

    2012-01-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria is defined as persistent symptoms of urticaria for 6 weeks or more. It is associated with autoimmunity in approximately 45 percent of patients. Therapy is often difficult however the initial approach should employ high-dose non-sedating antihistamines; 4-6 tablets/day may be necessary. It has been shown that the response to 4 tablets/day exceeds 3, and exceeds 2, which exceeds 1. However the dose that corresponds to the maximal dose of first generation antihistam...

  10. Lung cysts in chronic paracoccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Nathan Costa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available On HRCT scans, lung cysts are characterized by rounded areas of low attenuation in the lung parenchyma and a well-defined interface with the normal adjacent lung. The most common cystic lung diseases are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. In a retrospective analysis of the HRCT findings in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic paracoccidioidomycosis, we found lung cysts in 5 cases (10%, indicating that patients with paracoccidioidomycosis can present with lung cysts on HRCT scans. Therefore, paracoccidioidomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic lung diseases.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  12. The burden of chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Sjøgren, Per; Juel, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    in the adult Danish population and to analyze associated factors such as diseases, immigration, and opioid use. This cross-sectional survey combines individual-based information from the Danish Health Survey (2010) and official Danish health and socioeconomic, individual-based registers. The simple random...... sample consisted of 25,000 individuals (≥16 years old) living in Denmark. In all, 60.7% completed a mailed or online questionnaire. Associations were examined with multiple logistic regression analysis. The study population consisted of 14,925 individuals in whom a high prevalence of chronic pain (26...

  13. Neuropsychological functioning in chronic Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westervelt, Holly James; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    Lyme disease is currently the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. The disease is multisystemic, and chronic disease, in particular, may be associated with neuropsychological deficits. However, to date, only a few empirical studies exist, which examine the neuropsychological sequelae associated with chronic Lyme disease. A review of the literature shows that the deficits observed in adults with chronic Lyme disease are generally consistent with the deficits that can be seen in processes with primarily frontal systems involvement. These observations are generally consistent with neuroradiologic findings. The clinical presentation in chronic Lyme disease and the nature of the neuropsychological deficits are discussed, as are several central issues in understanding neuropsychological functioning in chronic Lyme disease, such as the impact of chronic illness, response to treatment, and the relationship between neuropsychological performance and depression, fatigue, and neurological indicators of disease.

  14. Multiple chronic conditions and life expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DuGoff, Eva H; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Buttorff, Christine;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of people living with multiple chronic conditions is increasing, but we know little about the impact of multimorbidity on life expectancy. OBJECTIVE: We analyze life expectancy in Medicare beneficiaries by number of chronic conditions. RESEARCH DESIGN: A retrospective cohort...... study using single-decrement period life tables. SUBJECTS: Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries (N=1,372,272) aged 67 and older as of January 1, 2008. MEASURES: Our primary outcome measure is life expectancy. We categorize study subjects by sex, race, selected chronic conditions (heart disease, cancer......, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, and Alzheimer disease), and number of comorbid conditions. Comorbidity was measured as a count of conditions collected by Chronic Conditions Warehouse and the Charlson Comorbidity Index. RESULTS: Life expectancy decreases with each additional chronic...

  15. T-cell production of matrix metalloproteinases and inhibition of parasite clearance by TIMP-1 during chronic Toxoplasma infection in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma H Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii leads to tissue remodelling in the brain and a continuous requirement for peripheral leucocyte migration within the CNS (central nervous system. In the present study, we investigate the role of MMPs (matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in T-cell migration into the infected brain. Increased expression of two key molecules, MMP-8 and MMP-10, along with their inhibitor, TIMP-1 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, was observed in the CNS following infection. Analysis of infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated MMP-8 and -10 production by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. In addition, infiltrating T-cells and CNS resident astrocytes increased their expression of TIMP-1 following infection. TIMP-1-deficient mice had a decrease in perivascular accumulation of lymphocyte populations, yet an increase in the proportion of CD4+ T-cells that had trafficked into the CNS. This was accompanied by a reduction in parasite burden in the brain. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for MMPs and TIMP-1 in the trafficking of lymphocytes into the CNS during chronic infection in the brain.

  16. Eccentric Strengthening for Chronic Lateral Epicondylosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Dennis Y.; Schultz, Brian J.; Schaal, Bob; Graham, Scott T.; Kim, Byung Sung

    2011-01-01

    Background: Effective treatments for chronic lateral epicondylosis have not been studied adequately. Eccentric overload exercises have been used with success for other chronic tendinopathy, mainly Achilles and patellar. Hypothesis/Purpose: To compare a wrist extensor eccentric strengthening exercise program with a wrist extensor stretching/modality program for the treatment of chronic lateral epicondylosis. The authors hypothesized that the eccentric strengthening program would produce more f...

  17. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, Alberto; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreatitis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis. There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation, hereditary a...

  18. Chronic Cough and OSA: A New Association?

    OpenAIRE

    Sundar, Krishna M.; Daly, Sarah E

    2011-01-01

    Chronic cough is defined as cough lasting more than 2 months. Common causes for chronic cough in nonsmokers with normal chest radiographs and pulmonary functions include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), cough-variant asthma (CVA), and upper airway cough syndrome (UACS). Current guidelines recommend diagnosing the etiology of chronic cough based upon the results of therapy for suspected GERD, CVA, and UACS. Despite following current recommendations for diagnosis and treatment, the cause...

  19. Cough . 2: Chronic cough in children

    OpenAIRE

    de Jongste, Johan; Shields, M D

    2003-01-01

    textabstractChronic cough is a common problem in childhood. Viral infections are the most prevalent cause, but other rarer disorders should be excluded whenever cough appears unusually severe and/or frequent, and when there is evidence of failure to thrive and growth retardation. The younger the child, the more the need to exclude underlying disease at an early stage. Passive smoking is an important contributor to chronic cough in children. Chronic productive cough with purulent sputum is alw...

  20. [Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases in cats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghermai, A K

    1989-01-01

    The aetiology of chronic idiopathic intestinal inflammation is unknown. It is characterized by a diffuse infiltration with inflammatory cells into the intestinal mucosa and sometimes submucosa. Cats with chronic intermittent vomiting and diarrhoea, later on accompanied by anorexia and weight loss, are presented. Definitive diagnosis can be obtained by intestinal biopsy only. An immune pathogenesis is suspected, which is supported by the fact, that chronic inflammatory bowel disease responds to steroid therapy.

  1. Imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile D. Balaban; Andrei M. Lungu; Dragoș Cuzino; Săndica Bucurică; Bogdan Macadon; Mihăiță Pătrășescu; Raluca S. Costache; Petruț Nuță; Constantin Ştefani; Florentina Ioniță-Radu; Mariana Jinga

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system, which leads to chronic pain, loss of endocrine and exocrine functions. Clinically, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency becomes apparent only after 90% of the parenchima has been lost. Despite the simple definition, diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains a challenge, especially for early stage disease. Because pancreatic function tests can be normal until l...

  2. Chronic migraine--classification, characteristics and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Dodick, David W; Goadsby, Peter J;

    2012-01-01

    According to the revised 2nd Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, primary headaches can be categorized as chronic or episodic; chronic migraine is defined as headaches in the absence of medication overuse, occurring on =15 days per month for =3 months, of which heada...... that conventional preventive therapy for episodic migraine may also be useful. This Review discusses the evolution of our understanding of chronic migraine, including its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and treatment options....

  3. New trends in healing chronic wounds

    OpenAIRE

    KREJSKOVÁ, Kamila

    2013-01-01

    Basic theoretical bases As a chronic wound is called a secondarily healing wound which despite adequate therapy does not tend to heal for a period of 6-9 weeks. The cause of the chronic wound occurrence and its transformation into an acute wound can be infection, influence of associated diseases, skin top layer microtraumatization or skin necrosis cavity. Among the most frequent types of chronic wounds there are aligned venous ulcerations, arterial rodent ulcers, decubitus ulcers and neuropat...

  4. Living with Chronic Pancreatitis: A qualitative study.

    OpenAIRE

    CRONIN, PATRICIA; Begley, Cecily

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED OBJECTIVE: Recent literature acknowledges the impact of this progressive and debilitating disease on psychological and social well-being, but the plight of those with chronic pancreatitis remains unknown and hidden. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of what it means to live with chronic pancreatitis. DESIGN: Qualitative study based on philosophical hermeneutics using multiple unstructured interviews. PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen people with chronic...

  5. Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kolb, Todd M.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular dysfunction arises in chronic lung disease when chronic hypoxemia and disruption of pulmonary vascular beds contribute to increase ventricular afterload, and is generally defined by hypertrophy with preserved myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Although the exact prevalence is unknown, right ventricular hypertrophy appears to be a common complication of chronic lung disease, and more frequently complicates advanced lung disease. Right ventricular failure is rare, ex...

  6. Chronic Pain Syndromes and Borderline Personality

    OpenAIRE

    Sansone, Randy A.; Sansone, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment and management of chronic pain is challenging and, according to the existing literature, oftentimes associated with various forms of psychopathology, including borderline personality disorder. Since 1994, eight studies have explored the relationship between chronic pain syndromes and borderline personality disorder. In averaging the prevalence rates in these studies, 30 percent of participants with chronic pain harbor this Axis II disorder. Related studies suggest that individu...

  7. Hypnotherapy for the Management of Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Elkins, Gary; Jensen, Mark P.; Patterson, David R.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews controlled prospective trials of hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain. Thirteen studies, excluding studies of headaches, were identified that compared outcomes from hypnosis for the treatment of chronic pain to either baseline data or a control condition. The findings indicate that hypnosis interventions consistently produce significant decreases in pain associated with a variety of chronic-pain problems. Also, hypnosis was generally found to be more effective than ...

  8. Radiolabelled cytokines for imaging chronic inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis and particularly follow-up of chronic inflammatory disorders could be often difficult in clinical practice. Indeed, traditional radiological techniques reveal only structural tissue alterations and are not able to monitor functional changes occurring in tissues affected by chronic inflammation. The continuous advances in the knowledge of the pathophysiology of chronic disorders, combine with the progress of radiochemistry, led to the development of new specific radiolabelled agents for the imaging of chronic diseases. In this scenario, cytokines, due to their pivotal role in such diseases, represent good candidate as radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  9. LABORATORY MODEL OF CHRONIC STAPHYLOCOCCAL TONSILLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkodovska NYu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigation and development of new preparations for chronic tonsillitis (CT treatment and prevention requires application of appropriate laboratory model. For the development of CT laboratory model chronic pyoinflammatory process was reproduced in chinchilla rabbits using Staphylococcus aureus 209 Р (АТСС 6538-Р reference-strain. Preliminary sensitizing of animals with inactivated causative agent and repeated infection with the reference-strain made it possible to work out reproducible model of chronic tonsillitis. Adequacy of chronic tonsillitis development was confirmed by the results of microbiological and pathomorphological researchers. The proposed laboratory model can be used for solving of theoretical and practical medicine and pharmacology topical problems.

  10. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Masoud; Tavakol, Marzieh; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Tavakol, Zahra; Momenzadeh, Kaveh; Nabavi, Mohammad; Dabbaghzade, Abbas; Mosallanejad, Asieh; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-04-01

    Chronic urticaria is the most common skin diseases, characterized by chronic cutaneous lesions which severely debilitates patients in several aspects of their everyday life. Vitamin D is known to exert several actions in the immune system and to influence function and differentiation of mast cells, central role players in the pathogenesis of chronic idiopathic urticaria. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D levels and susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria. One hundred and fourteen patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria were recruited in this study along with one hundred and eighty seven sex-matched and age-matched healthy volunteers as the control group. For each patient, urticaria activity score was calculated and autologous serum skin test was done. Vitamin D metabolic statue was measured in serum as 25 hydroxyvitamin D using enzyme immunoassay method. Patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria significantly showed lower levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria. There was a significant positive correlation between vitamin D levels and urticaria activity score. This study showed that patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria had reduced levels of vitamin D, while vitamin D deficiency could increase susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria.

  11. Oriental Medical Treatment of chronic Acalculous Cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic acalculous cholecystitis gets possession of about 12 to 13 percent of patients with chronic cholecystitis. Pathologically it is characterised by chronic inflammation and thickening of the gallbladder wall but doesn't come across stones. Clinical symptoms are vague and include abdominal discomfort and distension, nausea, flatulence and intolerance of fatty foods. A patient on chronic acalculous cholecystitis diagnosed from his clinical symtoms and abdominal ultrasonogram was treated by Geonbihwan, acupuncture and herbal acupuncture. Satisfactory symptomatic improvement was achieved and findings of abdominal ultrasonogram came also normal.

  12. Unpredictable chronic mild stress not chronic restraint stress induces depressive behaviours in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shenghua; Shi, Ruoyang; Wang, Junhui; Wang, Jun-Feng; Li, Xin-Min

    2014-10-01

    The chronic stress model was developed on the basis of the stress-diathesis hypothesis of depression. However, these behavioural responses associated with different stress paradigms are quite complex. This study examined the effects of two chronic stress regimens on anxiety-like and depressive behaviours. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress or to chronic restraint stress for 4 weeks. Subsequently, both anxiety-like behaviours (open field, elevated plus maze and novelty suppressed feeding) and depression-like behaviours (tail suspension, forced swim and sucrose preference) were evaluated. Both chronic stress models generated anxiety-like behaviours, whereas only unpredictable chronic mild stress could induce depressive behaviours such as increased immobility and decreased sucrose consumption. These results of the present study provide additional evidence on how chronic stress affects behavioural responses and point to the importance of the validity of animal models of chronic stress in studying depression. PMID:25089805

  13. [Dietotherapy of the chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhonina, Iu G; Gapparov, M M; Shakhovskaia, A K

    2006-01-01

    A modern pahtogenetic and etiological classification of pancreatic diseases is observed in the review and the questions of dietotherapy concerning the main forms of the disease are under consideration. There are numerous sources given from literature where the question is discussed on the fiber level, quantitative and qualitative structure of the fatty part of the ration in case of chronic pancreatitis. The majority of native and foreign authors consider it inexpedient to reduce fiber lover than 120 g per day, however there is a number of works where it is recommended to increase in the ration the quantity of carbohydrates up to 400 g, reducing some fiber at the same time. There has appeared a number of works for the recent years, where it is recommended to include mixes for enteral nutrition into the diets recommended both for acute and chronic course of the disease. Such diets are emphasized to be well bearable and high effective during the treatment of this disease. PMID:17313040

  14. Chronic Rhinosinusitis without Nasal Polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong Ho; Kim, Dae Woo; Gevaert, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps (CRSsNP) is more prevalent than chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Certain diseases predispose to whereas others are associated with CRSsNP. Predisposing diseases include allergic and nonallergic upper and lower airway diseases, epithelial cell disorders, immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and some infectious diseases. In addition, environmental and host factors, examples of which include smoking, a higher incidence of abnormal biofilms, and innate immune defects, play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. CRSsNP is characterized by histologic abnormalities, including basement membrane thickening (fibrosis) and goblet cell hyperplasia. Neutrophils and several chemokines, TGF-β and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL)-8, play a role in CRSsNP remodeling. However, there are conflicting data about CRSsNP endotypes, for example, whether it is characterized by neutrophilia or eosinophilia or both. In spite of advancements and the understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease, additional study is necessary to better comprehend its underlying mechanisms, endotypes, and evidence-based treatment strategies. PMID:27393771

  15. Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Whitney W; Schleimer, Robert P; Kern, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is an important clinical entity diagnosed by the presence of both subjective and objective evidence of chronic sinonasal inflammation. Symptoms include anterior or posterior rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, hyposmia, and/or facial pressure or pain that last for a duration of more than 12 weeks. Nasal polyps are inflammatory lesions that project into the nasal airway, are typically bilateral, and originate from the ethmoid sinus. Males are more likely to be affected than females, but no specific genetic or environmental factors have been strongly linked to the development of this disorder to date. CRSwNP is frequently associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the clinical symptoms are not fully understood. Defects in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, increased exposure to pathogenic and colonized bacteria, and dysregulation of the host immune system are all thought to play prominent roles in disease pathogenesis. Additional studies are needed to further explore the clinical and pathophysiological features of CRSwNP so that biomarkers can be identified and novel advances can be made to improve the treatment and management of this disease. PMID:27393770

  16. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-09-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T{sub 50} Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  17. Placental Origins of Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Graham J; Fowden, Abigail L; Thornburg, Kent L

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence links an individual's susceptibility to chronic disease in adult life to events during their intrauterine phase of development. Biologically this should not be unexpected, for organ systems are at their most plastic when progenitor cells are proliferating and differentiating. Influences operating at this time can permanently affect their structure and functional capacity, and the activity of enzyme systems and endocrine axes. It is now appreciated that such effects lay the foundations for a diverse array of diseases that become manifest many years later, often in response to secondary environmental stressors. Fetal development is underpinned by the placenta, the organ that forms the interface between the fetus and its mother. All nutrients and oxygen reaching the fetus must pass through this organ. The placenta also has major endocrine functions, orchestrating maternal adaptations to pregnancy and mobilizing resources for fetal use. In addition, it acts as a selective barrier, creating a protective milieu by minimizing exposure of the fetus to maternal hormones, such as glucocorticoids, xenobiotics, pathogens, and parasites. The placenta shows a remarkable capacity to adapt to adverse environmental cues and lessen their impact on the fetus. However, if placental function is impaired, or its capacity to adapt is exceeded, then fetal development may be compromised. Here, we explore the complex relationships between the placental phenotype and developmental programming of chronic disease in the offspring. Ensuring optimal placentation offers a new approach to the prevention of disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity, which are reaching epidemic proportions. PMID:27604528

  18. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnaike, R N

    2003-07-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption occurs from skin contact and inhalation. Arsenic exerts its toxicity by inactivating up to 200 enzymes, especially those involved in cellular energy pathways and DNA synthesis and repair. Acute arsenic poisoning is associated initially with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and severe diarrhoea. Encephalopathy and peripheral neuropathy are reported. Chronic arsenic toxicity results in multisystem disease. Arsenic is a well documented human carcinogen affecting numerous organs. There are no evidence based treatment regimens to treat chronic arsenic poisoning but antioxidants have been advocated, though benefit is not proven. The focus of management is to reduce arsenic ingestion from drinking water and there is increasing emphasis on using alternative supplies of water.

  19. Chronic Pain in the Classroom: Teachers' Attributions about the Causes of Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Deirdre E.; Catanese, Sarah P.; Coakley, Rachael M.; Scharff, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Background: School absenteeism and other impairments in school function are significant problems among children with chronic pain syndromes; yet, little is known about how chronic pain is perceived in the school setting. The purpose of this study was to examine teachers' attributions about the causes of chronic pain in adolescent students.…

  20. A plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 inhibitor reduces airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun H; Eren, Mesut; Vaughan, Douglas E; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2012-06-01

    We previously reported that plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 deficiency prevents collagen deposition in the airways of ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged mice. In this study, we explored the therapeutic utility of blocking PAI-1 in preventing airway remodeling, using a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, tiplaxtinin. C57BL/6J mice were immunized with intraperitoneal injections of OVA on Days 0, 3, and 6. Starting on Day 11, mice were challenged with phosphate-buffered saline or OVA by nebulization three times per week for 4 weeks. Tiplaxtinin was mixed with chow and administered orally from 1 day before the phosphate-buffered saline or OVA challenge. Lung tissues were harvested after challenge and characterized histologically for infiltrating inflammatory cells, mucus-secreting goblet cells, and collagen deposition. Airway hyperresponsiveness was measured using whole-body plethysmography. Tiplaxtinin treatment significantly decreased levels of PAI-1 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, which indicates successful blockage of PAI-1 activity in the airways. The number of infiltrated inflammatory cells was reduced by tiplaxtinin treatment in the lungs of the OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, oral administration of tiplaxtinin significantly attenuated the degree of goblet cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition in the airways of the OVA-challenged mice, and methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness was effectively reduced by tiplaxtinin in these animals. This study supports our previous findings that PAI-1 promotes airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma, and suggests that PAI-1 may be a novel target of treatment of airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22323366

  1. Chronic lead intoxication; Chronische Bleiintoxikation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieseler, B.; Leng, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hygiene; Lenz, S.; Schultz, C. [Klinikum Remscheid GmbH, Remscheid (Germany); Wilhelm, M. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hygiene, Sozial- und Umweltmedizin

    1999-02-01

    The case of a female 68 years old patient is described. Here, a chronic lead intoxication was diagnosed after a two year old medical history with increasing attacks of colic-like abdominal pain often described as life-threatening. After repeated hospitalizations and intensive search for the cause of the symptoms, porphyria and anemia was found to be a sign of a chronic lead poisoning. The blood lead concentrations were always about a level of 600 {mu}g/L. The source of exposure could not be found by now. Neither home inspection nor environmental investigations have shown a recent source of lead intake by the patient. However, a possible occupational source of lead exposure at a blast furnace was established by anamnesis for 1952 to 1962. Thus, osteoporosis induced lead mobilisation was suspected. Noticeable are the results of the six abdominal survey radiographies taken during hospitalization within one year; three radiographies were taken following clinical admission and three before discharge of the patient. In comparison, the course shows a chronic relapsing alimentary supply from metallic particles of unknown genesis. The patient was treated with the sodium salt of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propansulfonic acid (DMPS, Dimaval{sup TM}). She was free of complain afterwards. Following therapy, the blood lead concentrations fell under a level of 400 {mu}m/L, but after several weeks the lead level raised up to the original level of 600 {mu}g/L. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird eine 68jaehrige Patientin vorgestellt, bei der nach fast zweijaehriger Krankengeschichte, die gekennzeichnet war durch rezidivierende, teils als lebensbedrohlich geschilderte Bauchkoliken, eine chronische Bleiintoxikation diagnostiziert wurde. Erst nach wiederholten stationaeren Krankenhausaufenthalten mit intensiver Suche nach der Krankheitsursache wurden das Krankheitsbild und die Laborwerte durch Zusatzuntersuchungen ergaenzt, so dass sich in der festgestellten Porphyrie und Anaemie die Diagnose der

  2. Benzodiazepine pathways in the chronically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hulten, Rolf; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Bakker, Albert; Leufkens, Hubert G.

    1999-01-01

    The association between patterns of use of benzodiazepines and chronic somatic morbidity was examined by applying the Chronic Disease Score (CDS). In the only pharmacy in a Dutch community, 6921 patients with data available covering a 10-year period (1983-1992) were included. In 1992, two-thirds of

  3. Chronic diseases among older cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckx, L.D.; Akker, M.A. van der; Metsemakers, J.M.; Knottnerus, A.K.; Schellevis, F.G.; Buntinx, F.B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: With the growing number of older cancer patients, the burden of chronic diseases among older cancer patients will become increasingly important. Chronic diseases often interfere with treatment decisions and prognosis for cancer patients. However, little is known about the occurrence of

  4. Chronic bronchitis in an elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Parner, Jan; Prescott, Eva;

    2003-01-01

    in order to describe the prevalence and prognostic implications of chronic bronchitis in individuals 65 years or older we analysed data from The Copenhagen City Heart Study.......in order to describe the prevalence and prognostic implications of chronic bronchitis in individuals 65 years or older we analysed data from The Copenhagen City Heart Study....

  5. Future perspectives: pathogenesis of chronic muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland

    2007-06-01

    Chronic painful muscle conditions include non-inflammatory and inflammatory illnesses. This review is focused on chronic non-inflammatory pain conditions such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FM), and will not discuss metabolic, genetic or inflammatory muscle diseases such as McArdle's disease, muscular dystrophy, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, or inclusion body myositis.

  6. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength measurem

  7. Osteoporosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Schwarz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence.......The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence....

  8. Syndrome Analysis: Chronic Alcoholism in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendorf, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Provides outline narrative of most possible outcomes of regular heavy alcohol use, regular alcohol abuse, or chronic alcoholism. A systems analysis approach is used to expose conditions that may result when a human organism is subjected to excessive and chronic alcohol consumption. Such an approach illustrates the detrimental effects which alcohol…

  9. Counseling Adult Clients Experiencing Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Stephanie T.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pain affects 35% to 57% of the adult population in the United States and results in billions of dollars spent annually in direct health-care costs and lost productivity. Extensive research confirms the considerable role psychological factors play in the experience and expression of chronic pain. The author discusses implications for…

  10. Tailoring Self-Management in Chronic Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-Touwen, I.D.

    2016-01-01

    Self-management is nowadays seen as an important element in chronic care and therefore, self-management is increasingly embedded in chronic care guidelines; however, implementation in clinical practice is a slow and difficult process. Evidence, from research on self-management interventions, shows t

  11. Chronic Synovitis after Open Carpal Tunnel Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Justin; Chan, Patrick; Rahdon, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Open carpal tunnel decompression is a common procedure with potential long-term complications such as scar tenderness, pillar pain and neuroma. We present the case of a 65 year-old male with chronic lipomatous hypertrophy of the wrist and chronic flexor tenosynovitis after open carpal tunnel release for its rarity and severity of symptoms that required further surgery. PMID:27454645

  12. Ribavirin monotherapy for chronic hepatitis C infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Jesper; Gluud, Lise L; Gluud, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Adding ribavirin to interferon improves treatment response for patients with chronic hepatitis C, but the effects of ribavirin monotherapy are unclear. We conducted a systematic review to assess the benefits and harms of ribavirin monotherapy for patients with chronic hepatitis C....

  13. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  14. Interventions for treating chronic ankle instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.S. de Vries; R. Krips; I.N. Sierevelt; L. Blankevoort; C.N. van Dijk

    2011-01-01

    Chronic lateral ankle instability occurs in 10% to 20% of people after an acute ankle sprain. Initial treatment is conservative but if this fails and ligament laxity is present, surgical intervention is considered. To compare different treatments, conservative or surgical, for chronic lateral ankle

  15. Reported barriers to evaluation in chronic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knai, Cécile; Nolte, Ellen; Brunn, Matthias;

    2013-01-01

    The growing movement of innovative approaches to chronic disease management in Europe has not been matched by a corresponding effort to evaluate them. This paper discusses challenges to evaluation of chronic disease management as reported by experts in six European countries....

  16. Chronic Lyme disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Adriana

    2008-06-01

    Studies have shown that most patients diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease either have no objective evidence of previous or current infection with Borrelia burgdorferi or are patients who should be classified as having post-Lyme disease syndrome, which is defined as continuing or relapsing nonspecific symptoms (such as fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and cognitive complaints) in a patient previously treated for Lyme disease. Despite extensive study, there is currently no clear evidence that post-Lyme disease syndrome is caused by persistent infection with B burgdorferi. Four randomized placebo-controlled studies have shown that antibiotic therapy offers no sustained benefit to patients who have post-Lyme disease syndrome. These studies also showed a substantial placebo effect and a significant risk of treatment-related adverse events. Further research to elucidate the mechanisms underlying persistent symptoms after Lyme disease and controlled trials of new approaches to the treatment and management of these patients are needed.

  17. Looking after chronically ill dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stine B.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Sandøe, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    thus face similar challenges when caring for their animals. This qualitative study uncovers impacts on an owner's life, when attending to the care of an aged or chronically ill dog and reflects on the differing roles of caregivers with animal and human patients. Twelve dog owners were selected for in......-depth interviews based on the dogs' diagnoses, and the choice of treatments and care expected to affect the owner's life. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed qualitatively. The dog owners reported several changes in their lives due to their dog's condition: practicalities like extra care, changes...... in use of the home, and restrictions relating to work, social life, and finances. These were time-consuming, tough, and annoying, but could often be dealt with through planning and prioritizing. Changes in the human–dog relationship and activities caused sadness and frustration, which in turn led...

  18. Endoscopic treatment of chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of chronic pancreatitis has been exclusively surgical for a long time. Recently, endoscopic therapy has become widely used as a primary therapeutic option.Initially performed for drainage of pancreatic cysts and pseudocysts, endoscopic treatments were adapted to biliary and pancreatic ducts stenosis. Pancreatic sphincterotomy which allows access to pancreatic ducts was firstly reported. Secondly, endoscopic methods of stenting, dilatation, and stones extraction of the bile ducts were applied to pancreatic ducts. Nevertheless,new improvements were necessary: failures of pancreatic stone extraction justified the development of extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy; dilatation of pancreatic stenosis was improved by forage with a new device; moreover endosonography allowed guidance for celiac block, gastro-cystostomy, duodeno-cystostomy and pancreatico-gastrostomy. Although endoscopic treatments are more and more frequently accepted,indications are still debated.

  19. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an unusual clinical entity. More than 200 cases are described in the literature and it is presented here with special reference to its radiological aspects. It is an acquired disease of the skeleton which occurs predominantly during childhood and adolescence. About ten per cent of cases begin in early or, rarely, in later adult life. This variant is described here for the first time and is discussed as 'adult CRMO'. The underlying pathology is a bland, predominantly lympho-plasma cellular osteomyelitis which is self-limiting and leads to bone sclerosis (Garre). It probably involves an abnormal immune process which follows an infection but remains clinically latent and remains aseptic and sterile. In a quarter of cases there is an association with pustulosis palmo-plantaris and its relationship with psoriatic arthropathy is discussed. The clinical, histopathological and imaging features (radiological and particularly MRT) and the bone changes are described. (orig./AJ)

  20. Lenalidomide and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pilar González-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory drug used in multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndrome and most recently it has shown to be effective in the treatment of various lymphoproliferative disorders such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism of action of lenalidomide varies depending on the pathology, and in the case of CLL, it appears to primarily act by restoring the damaged mechanisms of tumour immunosurveillance. This review discusses the potential mechanism of action and efficacy of lenalidomide, alone or in combination, in treatment of CLL and its toxic effects such as tumor lysis syndrome (TLS and tumor flare reaction (TFR, that make its management different from other hematologic malignancies.

  1. Chronic pain and invasive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Rocco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The chronic pain “three-step” OMS ladder is likely to be revised, in order to introduce a “fourth step” including clinical indications for the invasive analgesic procedures. The number of patients who undergo such procedures is likely to increase, as well as modern oncology and palliative medicine development. Most of invasive approaches include central (spinal neuromodulation and peripheral (gangliar neurolysis, percutaneous vertebral reduction techniques, as well as pharmacological (opioids and adiuvants, chemical (alcohol and physical (electrical stimulation, thermic neurolysis means. Rarely effective as unique therapies, invasive procedures have to be accurately patient-selected and considered supplementary to conservative approaches, in order to minimize the adverse events deriving from a long term opioid therapy. In the near future, the development of both pain science and biomedical technology will probably be accompanied by the improvement of the knowledge regarding the recourse to invasive analgesic procedures.

  2. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsiana Beiko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant decreases in morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD and cancers, morbidity and cost associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD continue to be increasing. Failure to improve disease outcomes has been related to the paucity of interventions improving survival. Insidious onset and slow progression halter research successes in developing disease-modifying therapies. In part, the difficulty in finding new therapies is because of the extreme heterogeneity within recognized COPD phenotypes. Novel biomarkers are necessary to help understand the natural history and pathogenesis of the different COPD subtypes. A more accurate phenotyping and the ability to assess the therapeutic response to new interventions and pharmaceutical agents may improve the statistical power of longitudinal clinical studies. In this study, we will review known candidate biomarkers for COPD, proposed pathways of pathogenesis, and future directions in the field.

  3. Embryonic development during chronic acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. H.; Abbott, U. K.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments carried out on chicken eggs indicate that the embryo is affected during very early development, especially over the first four days, and during hatching. In the first four days, the brain develops as well as the anlage for all other organs. In addition, the heart commences to function and the extraembryonic membranes that compartmentalize the egg contents form. The latter require an appreciable extension and folding of tissue which may be disrupted by the mechanical load. Observations of embryonic abnormalities that occur during chronic acceleration suggest an inhibition of development of the axial skeleton, which is rarely seen otherwise, a general retardation of embryonic growth, and circulatory problems. The final stages of development (after 18 days) involve the uptake of fluids, the transition to aerial respiration, and the reorientation of the embryo into a normal hatching position. At 4 G mortality is very high during this period, with a majority of embryos failing to reorient into the normal hatching position.

  4. Chronic kidney disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  5. Pain management in chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cathia Gachago; Peter V Draganov

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a major clinical problem in patients with chronic pancreatitis.The cause of pain is usually multifactorial with a complex interplay of factors contributing to a varying degree to the pain in an individual patient and,therefore,a rigid standardized approach for pain control tends to lead to suboptimal results.Pain management usually proceeds in a stepwise approach beginning with general lifestyle recommendations,low fat diet,alcohol and smoking cessation are encouraged.Analgesics alone are needed in almost all patients.Maneuvers aimed at suppression of pancreatic secretion are routinely tried.Patients with ongoing symptoms may be candidates for more invasive options such as endoscopic therapy,and resective or drainage surgery.The role of pain modifying agents (antidepressants,gabapentin,peregabalin),celiac plexus block,antioxidants,octreotide and total pancreatectomy with islet cell auto transplantation remains to be determined.

  6. Etiological approach to chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Shankar D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 1769, William Cullen introduced the word "urticaria" (transient edematous papules, plaque with itching. Urticaria affects 15-25% of people at least once in their life time. It is a clinical reaction pattern triggered by many factors causing the liberation of vasoactive substances such as histamine, prostaglandins and kinins. Urticaria is classified according to its duration into acute (< 6 weeks duration and chronic (>6 weeks duration. Various clinical investigations may be initiated to diagnosis the cause. Aims: To evaluate the types of chronic urticaria with reference to etiology from history and investigations . Materials and Methods: A total of 150 patients with chronic urticaria of more than six weeks were studied. Autologous serum skin test (ASST was performed after physical urticarias were excluded. Standard batteries of tests were performed after ASST in all patients; and other specific investigations were done where necessary. Skin prick test was done in idiopathic urticaria. Results: The study sample consisted of 62 male and 88 female patients with a mean age of 21-40 years. About 50% of patients showed an ASST positive reaction, 3.9% were positive for antinuclear antibody (ANA, IgE titer was elevated in 37%, H. pylori antibodies was positive in 26.7%. Thyroid antibodies were positive in 6.2%. Giardia and entamoeba histolytica was reported in 3.3% on routine stool examination and on urinalysis 8% had elevated WBC counts; 12% showed para nasal sinusitis, with maxillary sinusitis of 7.3%. Random blood sugar was high in 5.3%. Four patients had ASOM, two had positive KOH mount for dermatophytes, abdominal USG showed cholecystitis in two patients. Recurrent tonsillitis was noted in two patients. Urticaria following intake of NSAIDs was observed in four patients and with oral contraceptive pills in one patient. Contact urticaria to condom (latex was seen in one patient. Cholinergic (4.7% and dermographic (4.7% urticaria were

  7. Endoscopic diagnostic of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubranić, Aleksandar; Dintinjana, Renata Dobrila; Vanis, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous inflammatory pancreatic disease, one characterized by irreversible morphological changes, often associates with pain and sometimes with the loss of endocrine and exocrine function. As a histological confirmation of chronic pancreatitis is often unavailable, the diagnosis is traditionally based on imaging methods such as computerized tomography (CT) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and recently magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) as a noninvasive alternative to ERCP. Developments in the classification system of CP include the Marseille classification of 1963 which offered histopathologic criteria for CP, the Cambridge classification of 1984 which introduced imaging features of computed tomography (CT), transabdominal ultrasound (TUS) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for classification of CP as well as Rosemont classification system of 2007 which presented the endoscopic ultrasonography diagnosis of CP. Endoscopic ultra-sonography (EUS) was first introduced as a diagnostic method for evaluation of pancreatic disease in 1986. It has experienced significant improvements since then and allowed for an alternative approach in diagnosing patients with pancreatic diseases. In patients with suspected pancreatic masses EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the best method for obtaining tissue diagnosis and differentiating CP from pancreatic carcinoma. The recent studies indicate that EUS is the method of choice when compared with other imaging methods such as ERCP because it frequently provides more accurate diagnostics. The aim of this review is to discuss the findings in endoscopic diagnostics up to the present moment and to indicate advantages, limitations and possible complications along with the current recommendations in CP diagnostics. PMID:25842773

  8. Chronic constipation in hemiplegic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of bowel dysfunction in hemiplegic patients, and its relationship with the site of neurological lesion, physical immobilization and pharmacotherapy.METHODS: Ninety consecutive hemiplegic patients and 81 consecutive orthopedic patients were investigated during physical motor rehabilitation in the same period, in the same center and on the same diet. All subjects were interviewed ≥ 3 mo after injury using a questionnaire inquiring about bowel habits before injury and at the time of the interview. Patients' mobility was evaluated by the Adapted Patient Evaluation Conference System. Drugs considered for the analysis were nitrates, angiogenic converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors,calcium antagonists, anticoagulants, antithrombotics,antidepressants, anti-epileptics.RESULTS: Mobility scores were similar in the two groups. De novo constipation (OR = 5.36) was a frequent outcome of the neurological accident.Hemiplegics showed an increased risk of straining at stool (OR: 4.33), reduced call to evacuate (OR: 4.13),sensation of incomplete evacuation (OR: 3.69), use of laxatives (OR: 3.75). Logistic regression model showed that constipation was significantly and independently associated with hemiplegia. A positive association was found between constipation and use of nitrates and antithrombotics in both groups. Constipation was not related to the site of brain injury.CONCLUSION: Chronic constipation is a possible outcome of cerebrovascular accidents occurring in 30% of neurologically stabilized hemiplegic patients.Its onset after a cerebrovascular accident appears to be independent from the injured brain hemisphere,and unrelated to physical inactivity. Pharmacological treatment with nitrates and antithrombotics may represent an independent risk factor for developing chronic constipation.

  9. Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panganamamula, Kashyap V; Parkman, Henry P

    2005-02-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) is a gastrointestinal motility disorder characterized by chronic symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction in the absence of a fixed, lumen-occluding lesion. Radiographic findings consist of dilated bowel with air-fluid levels. Pseudo-obstruction is an uncommon condition and can result from primary or secondary causes. The management is primarily focused on symptom control and nutritional support to prevent weight loss and malnutrition. The principles of management of patients with CIP involve 1) establishing a correct clinical diagnosis and excluding mechanical obstruction; 2) differentiating between idiopathic and secondary forms; 3) performing a symptomatic and physiologic assessment of the parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract involved by manometric and whole gut transit scintigraphic studies; 4) careful assessment of nutritional status of the patient; and 5) developing a therapeutic plan addressing the patient's symptoms and nutritional status. Treatment of CIP includes frequent small meals with a low-fat, low-fiber diet, liquid nutritional supplements may be needed; prokinetic agents such as metoclopramide may help to reduce upper GI symptoms. Trials of drugs such as erythromycin, domperidone, cisapride, and tegaserod may be considered if there is no response. Subcutaneous octreotide may be helpful to improve small bowel dysmotility especially in patients with scleroderma. In patients with symptoms suggestive of bacterial overgrowth, courses of antibiotics such as metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline may be needed. Nutritional assessment and support is an important aspect of management. Enteral nutrition is usually preferred. In carefully selected patients, feeding jejunostomy with or without decompression gastrostomy may be tried. Long term parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who can not tolerate enteral nutrition. Complications associated with total parenteral nutrition include

  10. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Hartleb; Krzysztof Gutkowski

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI),defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL,occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis.Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state,reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones.The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia,hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis.Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development,natriuresis,urine osmolality,response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion,and rarely on renal biopsy.Chronic glomeruIonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients.AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease,therefore,such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation.Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension,and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections,nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions,excessive diuresis,gastrointestinal hemorrhage,diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents.Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy.The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion,which is effective in about 50% of patients.The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt,renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support.

  11. [Association between chronic pain and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Fernández, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The comorbidity integrated by chronic pain and depression is very common. The somatoform depressive symptoms appear often as diferent types of pain. Amon them premenstrual pain and fibromialgia are some of the most important clinical pictures. Chronic pain leads to depression as a consequence of these three kinds of factors: biomedical, psychosocial (passive attitude, disability) and pharmacological agents. Copping and acceptance of chronic pain is associated with lower pain intensity, less depression and less psychosocial disability. The appropriate use of analgesics in the management of chronic pain demands individualization. Several antidepressants have possitive effects on pain syndrom. Depression is underrecognized ad undertreated above all in patients with chronic pain. In order screening the depression seven ways are described here: personal and family history, type of the personality, clinic and evolutive aspects of somatoform symptom, search of other depressive symptoms and positive therapeutic effect determinated by an antidepressant.

  12. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Mariani; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreaUtis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis.There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane con ductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation,hereditary and obstructive pancreatitis seem an acute disease that progress to chronic pancreatitis,likely as a consequence of the activation and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells that produce and activate collagen and therefore fibrosis.From the diagnostic point of view,in patients with acute recurrent pancreatitis Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) seems the more reliable technique for an accurate evaluation and follow-up of some ductal and parenchymal abnormalities suspected for early chronic pancreatitis.

  13. [Chronic diseases. Definition and basic concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspe, H

    2011-01-01

    The baroque deity Chronos symbolizes much of what we intuitively connect with "chronic", but it must not obscure our view of the diversity of chronic diseases. Common to all forms is a prognostic implication: a chronic disease and all associated burden will accompany the patient for the rest of his/her life. Chronic diseases are in general multifocal disorders simultaneously affecting biological, psychic, and social equilibria. This requires systematic problem-screening and -assessment, including possible comorbidities. Comorbidity in a strict sense should be distinguished from risk factors, implications, complications, and consequences of the index disorder of interest. The assessment is usually followed by the shared identification of therapeutic goals and indications. In chronic disorders, a wide spectrum of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, methods, and professions becomes relevant. PMID:21246322

  14. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-08-26

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity.

  15. Imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile D. Balaban

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system, which leads to chronic pain, loss of endocrine and exocrine functions. Clinically, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency becomes apparent only after 90% of the parenchima has been lost. Despite the simple definition, diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains a challenge, especially for early stage disease. Because pancreatic function tests can be normal until late stages and have significant limitations, there is an incresing interest in the role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. In this article we review the utility and accuracy of different imaging methods in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, focusing on the role of advanced imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound.

  16. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colvin Christopher J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART, it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity.

  17. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity. PMID:21871074

  18. Chronic pain after open inguinal hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkolo, Ceith; Lepner, Urmas

    2016-01-01

    Following the widespread use of mesh repairs, recurrence rates after inguinal hernia surgery have become acceptable and focus has shifted from recurrence to chronic pain. Although pain can be controlled with analgesics, chronic postsurgical pain is a major clinical problem, which can significantly influence the patient's quality of life. The rate of chronic pain after inguinal hernia mesh repair can reach 51.6%. The reasons for posthernioplasty chronic pain are often unclear. It has been linked to nerve injury and nerve entrapment, but there is also association between the rate of chronic pain and the type of mesh used for hernia repair. As there are >160 meshes available in the market, it is difficult to choose a mesh whose usage would result in the best outcome. Different mesh characteristics have been studied, among them weight of mesh has probably gained the most attention. The choice of adequate therapy for chronic groin pain after inguinal hernia repair is controversial. The European Hernia Society recommends that a multidisciplinary approach at a pain clinic should be considered for the treatment of chronic postoperative pain. Although surgical treatment of chronic posthernioplasty pain is limited because of the lack of relevant research data, resection of entrapped nerves, mesh removal in the case of mesh related pain or removal of fixation sutures can be beneficial for the patient with severe pain after inguinal hernia surgery. One drawback of published studies is the lack of consensus over definition of chronic pain, which makes it complicated to compare the results of different studies and to conduct meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Therefore, a uniform definition of chronic pain and its best assessment methods should be developed in order to conduct top quality multicenter randomized trials. Further research to develop meshes with optimal parameters is of vital importance and should be encouraged. PMID:26567717

  19. Review of occupational therapy for people with chronic pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, Katie

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pain is a significant health-care problem. This review aims to critically analyse occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain and identify significant factors influencing the future development of occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain.

  20. CHRONIC PAIN AFTER INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Chronic post herniorrhaphy groin pain is defined as pain lasting > 6 months after surgery, which is one of the most important complication occurring after inguinal hernia repair, occurs with greater frequency than previously thought. Chronic groin pain is one of the most significant complications following inguinal hernia repair, and majority of chronic pain has been attributed to ilioinguinal nerve entrapment. Various other factors are involved in development of chronic pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients undergoing elective inguinal hernioplasty in Victoria hospital from November2011 to May 2013 were included in the study. A total of 227 patients met the inclusion criteria and were available for follow up at end of six months. A detailed preoperative, intraoperative and post-operative details of cases were recorded according to proforma. The postoperative pain and pain at two, seven days and at end of six months were recorded on a VAS scale. RESULTS: Chronic pain at six month follow up was present in 89 patients constituting 39.4% of all patients undergoing hernia repair. It was seen that 26.9% without preoperative pain developed chronic pain whereas 76.7 % of patients with preoperative pain developed chronic pain. Patients with significant preoperative pain had higher chances of developing chronic pain (p<.0001. Preemptive analgesia failed to show statistical significance in development of chronic pain (p=0.079. Nerve injury were present in 22 of cases it was found that nerve injury significantly affected development of chronic pain (p=0.001.Post-operative infiltration of local anesthesia was practiced in 16.3 % of cases and it was found that local infiltration at incision site significantly reduced incidence of chronic pain (p=0.001.Postoperative complications in the form of hematoma, seroma or infection was present in 8.5 % of cases. It was found that post-operative complication not only increased early post-operative pain