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Sample records for chronic stroke patients

  1. Finger extensor variability in TMS parameters among chronic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn Shannon

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study determined the reliability of topographic motor cortical maps and MEP characteristics in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC evoked by single-pulse TMS among patients with chronic stroke. Methods Each of ten patients was studied on three occasions. Measures included location of the EDC hotspot and center of gravity (COG, threshold of activation and average amplitude of the hotspot, number of active sites, map volume, and recruitment curve (RC slope. Results Consistent intrahemispheric measurements were obtained for the three TMS mapping sessions for all measured variables. No statistically significant difference was observed between hemispheres for the number of active sites, COG distance or the RC slope. The magnitude and range of COG movement between sessions were similar to those reported previously with this muscle in able-bodied individuals. The average COG movement over three sessions in both hemispheres was 0.90 cm. The average COG movement in the affected hemisphere was 1.13 (± 0.08 cm, and 0.68 (± 0.04 cm for the less affected hemisphere. However, significant interhemispheric variability was seen for the average MEP amplitude, normalized map volume, and resting motor threshold. Conclusion The physiologic variability in some TMS measurements of EDC suggest that interpretation of TMS mapping data derived from hemiparetic patients in the chronic stage following stroke should be undertaken cautiously. Irrespective of the muscle, potential causes of variability should be resolved to accurately assess the impact of pharmacological or physical interventions on cortical organization as measured by TMS among patients with stroke.

  2. Effect of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease on Swallowing Function in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Gun Woong; Kim, Suk Kyoung; Lee, Chang Hwa; Kim, Chung Reen; Jeong, Ho Joong; Kim, Dong Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in stroke patients, and to assess the difference in swallowing function between stroke patients with COPD (COPD group) and stroke patients without COPD (control group). Methods The subjects included 103 stroke patients. They underwent the pulmonary function test and were assigned to either the COPD group or the control group. Their penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) scores and functional dysphagia scale sc...

  3. Neural interface of mirror therapy in chronic stroke patients: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Ashu Bhasin; M V Padma Srivastava; Kumaran, Senthil S; Rohit Bhatia; Sujata Mohanty

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recovery in stroke is mediated by neural plasticity. Neuro-restorative therapies improve recovery after stroke by promoting repair and function. Mirror neuron system (MNS) has been studied widely in humans in stroke and phantom sensations. Materials and Methods: Study subjects included 20 patients with chronic stroke and 10 healthy controls. Patients had clinical disease-severity scores, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffuse tensor imaging (DTI) at baseline, 8 a...

  4. The effect of chest expansion resistance exercise in chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chang-Beom; Shin, Jun-Ho; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the initial effects of chest expansion resistance exercise (CERE) applied to chronic stroke patients on their pulmonary functions, chest expansion, and functional gait ability. [Subjects] Forty chronic stroke patients without any respiration-related rehabilitation program experience (21 men and 19 women; times elapsed since occurrence of stroke: 21.8 ± 5.3 months) were randomly and equally allocated to a CERE group (experimental group) and a cont...

  5. Characterizing the Mechanisms of Central and Peripheral Forms of Neurostimulation in Chronic Dysphagic Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Michou, Emilia; Mistry, Satish; Jefferson, Samantha; Tyrrell, Pippa; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2014-01-01

    Background Swallowing problems following stroke may result in increased risk of aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and dehydration. Objective/hypothesis Our hypothesis was that three neurostimulation techniques would produce beneficial effects on chronic dysphagia following stroke through a common brain mechanism that would predict behavioral response. Methods In 18 dysphagic stroke patients (mean age: 66 ± 3 years, 3 female, time-post-stroke: 63 ± 15 weeks [±SD]), pharyngeal electromyograph...

  6. Influence of Kinesitherapy on Gait in Patients with Ischemic Stroke in the Chronic Period

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    Danche Vasileva

    2015-10-01

    CONCLUSION: The applied specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology continued later as exercise program at home, which significantly improved gait cadence and speed of movement in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period and is with a supportive prolonged exposure.

  7. Intensive Sensorimotor Arm Training Mediated by Therapist or Robot Improves Hemiparesis in Patients With Chronic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Bruce T.; Lynch, Daniel; Rykman-Berland, Avrielle; Ferraro, Mark; Galgano, Michael; Hogan, Neville; Krebs, Hermano I.

    2016-01-01

    Investigators have demonstrated that a variety of intensive movement training protocols for persistent upper limb paralysis in patients with chronic stroke (6 months or more after stroke) improve motor outcome. This randomized controlled study determined in patients with upper limb motor impairment after chronic stroke whether movement therapy delivered by a robot or by a therapist using an intensive training protocol was superior. Robotic training (n = 11) and an intensive movement protocol (n = 10) improved the impairment measures of motor outcome significantly and comparably; there were no significant changes in disability measures. Motor gains were maintained at the 3-month evaluation after training. These data contribute to the growing awareness that persistent impairments in those with chronic stroke may not reflect exhausted capacity for improvement. These new protocols, rendered by either therapist or robot, can be standardized, tested, and replicated, and potentially will contribute to rational activity-based programs. PMID:18184932

  8. The prevalence and risk factors of stroke in patients with chronic schizophrenia

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    Liang Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ying Liang,1 Jian Huang,1 Jingbin Tian,2 Yuanyuan Cao,2 Guoling Zhang,2 Chungang Wang,2 Ying Cao,2 Jianrong Li2 1National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Institute of Mental Health, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Peking University, 2Changping Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the stroke risk and risk factors in patients with chronic schizophrenia.Patients and methods: This study was a large-sample, cross-sectional survey. A total of 363 patients with chronic schizophrenia were selected from the Changping Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Beijing, in August 2014. The patients were divided into either stroke group or control group based on the presence of stroke. Clinical evaluation included positive and negative syndrome scale assessment and a detailed questionnaire to collect the general information and disease-related conditions.Results: The prevalence of stroke was 16.5% (60 cases. Stroke and control groups showed a significant difference in age, sex, smoking, combined medication, doses, negative factor score in positive and negative syndrome scale, body mass index, waist circumference, and systolic blood pressure. Multivariate analysis showed that a number of factors are significantly related to stroke, including age, sex, smoking, combined medication, doses, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure.Conclusion: The prevalence of stroke is relatively higher in Chinese patients with chronic schizophrenia. Chronic schizophrenia patients are more likely to suffer from stroke; meanwhile, a number of risk factors were identified, including old age, female sex, smoking history, combined medication with a variety of drugs, high doses, obesity, and high blood pressure. Keywords: schizophrenia, stroke, risk, risk factors

  9. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcript...

  10. Energy expenditure in chronic stroke patients playing Wii Sports: a pilot study

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    Stam Henk J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability in modern western countries. Stroke survivors often have functional limitations which might lead to a vicious circle of reduced physical activity, deconditioning and further physical deterioration. Current evidence suggests that routine moderate- or vigorous-intensity physical activity is essential for maintenance and improvement of health among stroke survivors. Nevertheless, long-term participation in physical activities is low among people with disabilities. Active video games, such as Nintendo Wii Sports, might maintain interest and improve long-term participation in physical activities; however, the intensity of physical activity among chronic stroke patients while playing Wii Sports is unknown. We investigated the energy expenditure of chronic stroke patients while playing Wii Sports tennis and boxing. Methods Ten chronic (≥ 6 months stroke patients comprising a convenience sample, who were able to walk independently on level ground, were recruited from a rehabilitation centre. They were instructed to play Wii Sports tennis and boxing in random order for 15 minutes each, with a 10-minute break between games. A portable gas analyzer was used to measure oxygen uptake (VO2 during sitting and during Wii Sports game play. Energy expenditure was expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs, calculated as VO2 during Wii Sports divided by VO2 during sitting. We classified physical activity as moderate (3-6 METs or vigorous (> 6 METs according to the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association Guidelines. Results Among the 10 chronic stroke patients, 3 were unable to play tennis because they had problems with timing of hitting the ball, and 2 were excluded from the boxing group because of a technical problem with the portable gas analyzer. The mean (± SD energy expenditure during Wii Sports game play was 3.7 (± 0.6 METs for tennis and 4.1 (

  11. The Effect of Repetitive Rhythmic Precision Grip Task-Oriented Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

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    Dispa, Delphine; Lejeune, Thierry; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic stroke patients present with difficulty in the manipulation of objects. The aim of this study was to test whether an intensive program of precision grip training could improve hand functioning of patients at more than 6 months after a stroke. This was a cross-over study; hence, at inclusion, the patients were randomly divided into two…

  12. An explorative, cross-sectional study into abnormal muscular coupling during reach in chronic stroke patients

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    Stienen Arno HA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many stroke patients arm function is limited, which can be related to an abnormal coupling between shoulder and elbow joints. The extent to which this can be translated to activities of daily life (ADL, in terms of muscle activation during ADL-like movements, is rather unknown. Therefore, the present study examined the occurrence of abnormal coupling on functional, ADL-like reaching movements of chronic stroke patients by comparison with healthy persons. Methods Upward multi-joint reaching movements (20 repetitions at a self-selected speed to resemble ADL were compared in two conditions: once facilitated by arm weight compensation and once resisted to provoke a potential abnormal coupling. Changes in movement performance (joint angles and muscle activation (amplitude of activity and co-activation between conditions were compared between healthy persons and stroke patients using a repeated measures ANOVA. Results The present study showed slight changes in joint excursion and muscle activation of stroke patients due to shoulder elevation resistance during functional reach. Remarkably, in healthy persons similar changes were observed. Even the results of a sub-group of the more impaired stroke patients did not point to an abnormal coupling between shoulder elevation and elbow flexion during functional reach. Conclusions The present findings suggest that in mildly and moderately affected chronic stroke patients ADL-like arm movements are not substantially affected by abnormal synergistic coupling. In this case, it is implied that other major contributors to limitations in functional use of the arm should be identified and targeted individually in rehabilitation, to improve use of the arm in activities of daily living.

  13. The prevalence and risk factors of stroke in patients with chronic schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Liang Y; Huang J; Tian J; Zhang G; Wang C; Cao Y; Li J

    2016-01-01

    Ying Liang,1 Jian Huang,1 Jingbin Tian,2 Yuanyuan Cao,2 Guoling Zhang,2 Chungang Wang,2 Ying Cao,2 Jianrong Li2 1National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Institute of Mental Health, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Peking University, 2Changping Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the stroke risk and risk factors in patients with chronic schizophrenia.Pa...

  14. Functional independence in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period

    OpenAIRE

    Vasileva, Dance; Lubenova, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of the specialized physical therapy on functional independence and to compare the impact of usual physical therapy in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period. Аn indisputable fact is that exercises have a positive contribution to the human body. It is well known that daily physical activities can improve the performance of many systems and organs by increasing its resistance and vital body tone, and also, can significantly improve the abi...

  15. Movement related slow cortical potentials in severely paralyzed chronic stroke patients

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    Ozge Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement-related slow cortical potentials (SCPs are proposed as reliable and immediate indicators of cortical reorganisation in motor learning. SCP amplitude and latency have been reported as markers for the brain’s computational effort, attention and movement planning. SCPs have been used as an EEG signature of motor control and as a main feature in Brain-Machine-Interfaces (BMIs. Some reports suggest SCPs are modified following stroke. In this study, we investigated movement-related SCPs in severe chronic stroke patients with no residual paretic hand movements preceding and during paretic (when they try to move and healthy hand movements. The aim was to identify SCP signatures related to cortex integrity and complete paralysis due to stroke in the chronic stage. 20 severely impaired (no residual finger extension chronic stoke patients, of whom 10 presented subcortical and 10 cortical and subcortical lesions, underwent EEG and EMG recordings during a cue triggered hand movement (open/close paradigm. SCP onset appeared and peaked significantly earlier during paretic hand movements than during healthy hand movements. Amplitudes were significantly larger over the midline (Cz, Fz for paretic hand movements while contralateral (C4, F4 and midline (Cz, Fz amplitudes were significantly larger than ipsilateral activity for healthy hand movements. Dividing the participants into subcortical only and mixed lesioned patient groups, no significant differences observed in SCP amplitude and latency between groups. This suggests lesions in the thalamocortical loop as the main factor in SCP changes after stroke. Furthermore, we demonstrated how, after long-term complete paralysis, post-stroke intention to move a paralyzed hand resulted in longer and larger SCPs originating in the frontal areas. These results suggest SCP are a valuable feature that should be incorporated in the design of new neurofeedback strategies for motor neurorehabilitation.

  16. Intra- and inter-rater reliability of the Sollerman hand function test in patients with chronic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogårdh, Christina; Persson, Ann L; Sjölund, Bengt H

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine whether the Sollerman hand function test is reliable in a test-retest situation in patients with chronic stroke. METHOD: Three independent examiners observed each patient at three experimental sessions; two days in week 1 (short-term test-retest) and one day in week 4 (long...... < 0.05) were, however, found between examiners A and B/C for all sessions. CONCLUSIONS: The Sollerman hand function test seems to be a reliable test in patients with chronic stroke, but we recommend that the same examiner evaluates a patient's hand function pre- and post-treatment.......-term test-retest). A total of 24 patients with chronic stroke (mean age; 59.7 years, mean time since stroke onset 29.6 months) participated. The examiners simultaneously assessed the patients' ability to perform 20 subtests. Both ordinal data (generalized kappa) and total sum scores (Spearman's rank...

  17. Neural interface of mirror therapy in chronic stroke patients: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

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    Ashu Bhasin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recovery in stroke is mediated by neural plasticity. Neuro-restorative therapies improve recovery after stroke by promoting repair and function. Mirror neuron system (MNS has been studied widely in humans in stroke and phantom sensations. Materials and Methods: Study subjects included 20 patients with chronic stroke and 10 healthy controls. Patients had clinical disease-severity scores, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffuse tensor imaging (DTI at baseline, 8 and at 24 weeks. Block design with alternate baseline and activation cycles was used with a total of 90 whole brain echo planar imaging (EPI measurements (timed repetition (TR = 4520 ms, timed echo (TE = 44 ms, slices = 31, slice thickness = 4 mm, EPI factor 127, matrix = 128 × 128, FOV = 230 mm. Whole brain T1-weighted images were acquired using 3D sequence (MPRage with 120 contiguous slices of 1.0 mm thickness. The mirror therapy was aimed via laptop system integrated with web camera, mirroring the movement of the unaffected hand. This therapy was administered for 5 days in a week for 60-90 min for 8 weeks. Results: All the patients showed statistical significant improvement in Fugl Meyer and modified Barthel Index (P < 0.05 whereas the change in Medical Research Council (MRC power grade was not significant post-therapy (8 weeks. There was an increase in the laterality index (LI of ipsilesional BA 4 and BA 6 at 8 weeks exhibiting recruitment and focusing principles of neural plasticity. Conclusions: Mirror therapy simulated the "action-observation" hypothesis exhibiting recovery in patients with chronic stroke. Therapy induced cortical reorganization was also observed from our study.

  18. The reliability of repeated TMS measures in older adults and in patients with subacute and chronic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Schambra, Heidi M.; R. Todd eOgden; Isis eMartínez-Hernández; Xuejing eLin; Y. Brenda eChang; Asif eRahman; Dylan eEdwards; Krakauer, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measures in healthy older adults and stroke patients has been insufficiently characterized. We determined whether common TMS measures could reliably evaluate change in individuals and in groups using the smallest detectable change (SDC), or could tell subjects apart using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We used a single-rater test-retest design in older healthy, subacute stroke, and chronic stroke subjects. At twice dail...

  19. Testing the effectiveness of group-based memory rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients.

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    Miller, Laurie A; Radford, Kylie

    2014-01-01

    Memory complaints are common after stroke, yet there have been very few studies of the outcome of memory rehabilitation in these patients. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a new manualised, group-based memory training programme. Forty outpatients with a single-stroke history and ongoing memory complaints were enrolled. The six-week course involved education and strategy training and was evaluated using a wait-list crossover design, with three assessments conducted 12 weeks apart. Outcome measures included: tests of anterograde memory (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test: RAVLT; Complex Figure Test) and prospective memory (Royal Prince Alfred Prospective Memory Test); the Comprehensive Assessment of Prospective Memory (CAPM) questionnaire and self-report of number of strategies used. Significant training-related gains were found on RAVLT learning and delayed recall and on CAPM informant report. Lower baseline scores predicted greater gains for several outcome measures. Patients with higher IQ or level of education showed more gains in number of strategies used. Shorter time since onset was related to gains in prospective memory, but no other stroke-related variables influenced outcome. Our study provides evidence that a relatively brief, group-based training intervention can improve memory functioning in chronic stroke patients and clarified some of the baseline factors that influence outcome. PMID:24624993

  20. Training-induced visual field recovery in chronic stroke patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergsma, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    The thesis describes the study of visual restorative function training (RFT) effects in patients with hemianopia. The training consists of repetitive stimulus detection threshold measurements in the border area of the visual field defect. The main result is ‘shrinkage’ of the defect-size. A computerized version of the training was made available in 1998. This met large scepticism, because it is yet unknown what the ‘shrinkage’ means for activities in daily life. Also, it is unknown how the me...

  1. Weight-shift training improves trunk control, proprioception, and balance in patients with chronic hemiparetic stroke.

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    Jung, Kyoungsim; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung; Hwang, Sujin

    2014-01-01

    Trunk instability is one of main problems in survivors following stroke. We investigated the effects of weight-shift training (WST) on an unstable surface in sitting position on trunk control, proprioception, and balance in individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke. Eighteen participants with chronic hemiparetic stroke were recruited and were allocated to either WST or control group. The WST group received a weight-shift training program for 30 min and then received a conventional exercise program for 30 min, while the control group received conventional exercise program for 60 min, five times a week for four weeks for both groups. In this randomized control study, we used three outcome measures: trunk reposition error (TRE), Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS), and Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. TRE was measured by each participant's reposition error to the target angle during his/her active trunk movement. TIS and TUG were examined for trunk control abilities and dynamic balance abilities, respectively. After training, TRE showed significantly greater improvement in the WST group (mean change, 1.67 ± 1.45˚) than the control group (mean change, 0.08 ± 1.05˚). The TIS score was significantly higher in the WST group (mean change, 2.33 ± 1.50) than the control group (mean change, 0.13 ± 0.83). The TUG test also showed a significant improvement in the WST group (mean change, 5.03 ± 1.88 sec) than the control group (mean change, 2.59 ± 1.86 sec). Our findings indicate that weight-shift training is beneficial for improving trunk control and proprioception in patients with chronic hemiparetic stroke. PMID:24646921

  2. Effects of task-oriented training on upper extremity function and performance of daily activities by chronic stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Juhyung; Yoo, Chanuk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effects that task-oriented training has on upper extremity function and performance of daily activities by chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Task-oriented training was applied to two chronic hemiplegic patients in this research. The training was provided to each patient for 30 minutes a day, five times a week for two weeks. The treatment program included six different types of training that could be performed by the patients t...

  3. Relationships of Balance, Gait Performance, and Functional Outcome in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Comparison of Left and Right Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Priscila Garcia Lopes; José Augusto Fernandes Lopes; Christina Moran Brito; Fábio Marcon Alfieri; Linamara Rizzo Battistella

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study compared the balance by center of pressure (COP) and its relationship with gait parameters and functional independence in left (LH) and right (RH) chronic stroke patients. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, twenty-one hemiparetic stroke patients were assessed for Functional Independence Measure (FIM), balance with a force platform, and gait in the Motion Analysis Laboratory. Results. The amplitudes of the COP in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions wer...

  4. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34⁺ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  5. Exploring Erythropoietin and G-CSF Combination Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) are known to have neuroprotective actions. Based on previous reports showing the synergistic effects of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in experimental models, we investigated the safety of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy in patients with chronic stroke. In a pilot study, 3 patients were treated with EPO and G-CSF for 5 consecutive days, with follow-up on day 30. In an exploratory double-blind study, 6 patients were allocated to treatment with either EPO+G-CSF or placebo. Treatment was applied once a day for 5 days per month over 3 months. Participants were followed up for 6 months. To substantiate safety, vital signs, adverse events, and hematological values were measured on days 0, 5, and 30 in each cycle and on day 180. Functional outcomes were determined on day 0 and 180. In the laboratory measurements, EPO+G-CSF combination therapy significantly elevated erythropoietin, CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells, white blood cells, and neutrophils on day 5 of each cycle. There were no observations of serious adverse events. In the functional outcomes, the grip power of the dominant hand was increased in the EPO+G-CSF treatment group. In conclusion, this exploratory study suggests a novel strategy of EPO+G-CSF combination therapy for stroke patients. PMID:27043535

  6. Effects of somatosensory stimulation on the excitability of the unaffected hemisphere in chronic stroke patients

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    Adriana B. Conforto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Somatosensory stimulation of the paretic upper limb enhances motor performance and excitability in the affected hemisphere, and increases activity in the unaffected hemisphere, in chronic stroke patients. We tested the hypothesis that somatosensory stimulation of the paretic hand would lead to changes in excitability of the unaffected hemisphere in these patients, and we investigated the relation between motor function of the paretic hand and excitability of the unaffected hemisphere. METHODS: Transcranial magnetic stimulation was administered to the unaffected hemisphere of nine chronic stroke patients. Patients were submitted to 2-h somatosensory stimulation in the form of median nerve stimulation and control stimulation using a cross-over design. Baseline Jebsen-Taylor test scores were evaluated. Resting motor threshold, intracortical facilitation, short-interval intracortical inhibition, and visual analog scores for attention, fatigue and drowsiness were measured across conditions. RESULTS: Better pre-stimulation baseline motor function was correlated with deeper SICI in the unaffected hemisphere. We found no overt changes in any physiological marker after somatosensory stimulation. There was increased drowsiness in the control session, which may have led to changes in intracortical facilitation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not support an overt effect of a single session of somatosensory stimulation of the paretic hand on motor cortical excitability of the unaffected hemisphere as measured by motor threshold, short-interval intracortical inhibition or intracortical facilitation. It remains to be determined if other markers of cortical excitability are modulated by somatosensory stimulation, and whether repeated sessions or lesion location may lead to different effects.

  7. The relationship between motor recovery and gait velocity during dual tasks in patients with chronic stroke.

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    Lee, Kyoung Bo; Kim, Jang Hwan; Lee, Kang Sung

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this study were to identify the relationship between motor recovery and gait velocity during dual tasks in patients with chronic stroke and determine automatic gait ability following stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-three outpatients and twelve healthy subjects participated in a cross-sectional assessment. Community ambulation was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Outcome measures included the Motricity index, Berg Balance Scale, and gait speed under three conditions (self-paced ambulation for 10 m, ambulation while performing dual cognitive tasks, and ambulation while performing dual manual tasks). Gait automaticity was calculated. [Results] No significant differences were observed for muscle strength or balance between the limited community ambulation and the community ambulation groups. However, a significant difference in gait velocity was observed between the groups under the three conditions. In particular, a significant difference was detected only in the limited community ambulation group depending on the level of motor function recovery during cognitive and manual dual task ambulation. Additionally, we revealed that the community ambulation group had a lower level of gait automaticity compared with that in the normal group. [Conclusion] Our results show the influence of motor recovery on the change in gait velocity depending on the task if a patient is limitedly ambulatory. We revealed that community ambulators did not have a sufficient level of gait automaticity. PMID:25995582

  8. The effect of step climbing exercise on balance and step length in chronic stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Ki-Hyeon; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kim, Tae-ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effect of step climbing exercise on the walking ability of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Among hospitalized stroke patients, 24 were selected based on the study criteria and randomly divided into two groups: an experimental group (12 patients) and a control group (12 patients). The patients in both groups participated in 15-minute exercise sessions three times a week for eight weeks. To analyze the effect of the exercise, musc...

  9. Selection of acupoints for managing upper-extremity spasticity in chronic stroke patients

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    Wang BH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bi-Huei Wang,1,* Chien-Lin Lin,1,2,* Te-Mao Li,2,3 Shih-Din Lin,3 Jaung-Geng Lin,2 Li-Wei Chou1,2,4 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital; 2School of Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine; 3Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, 4Acupuncture Research Center, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: This study investigated the clinical efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA in inhibiting upper-extremity spasticity in chronic stroke patients, and also in mapping a unique preliminary acupoint-selection protocol. Methods: Fifteen patients were divided into two groups: patients in the control group (n=6 received minimal acupuncture (MA, and those in the experimental group (n=9 received EA. Four acupoints, which include Neiguan (PC6, Shaohai (HT3, Zeqian (Ex-UE, A32, and Shounizhu (EX-UE, were treated near the motor points of the muscles for elbow flexion, forearm pronation, and finger flexion. Both groups were treated for twelve sessions, 20 minutes per session, for 6 weeks (two sessions per week. The outcome measures in this study included angle of muscle reaction (R1, passive range of motion (R2, and dynamic component (R2–R1. Results: In the experimental group, the R2–R1 of the elbow joint was significantly decreased at 1 (P=0.0079, 3 (P=0.0013, and 6 weeks (P=0.0149 after treatment compared with pretreatment levels (P<0.05. The between-group difference in the R2–R1 of the elbow joint after the 6-week treatment was statistically significant. Conclusion: Combining the 6-week EA and standard rehabilitation treatment reduced the spasticity of the elbow for chronic stroke survivors. However, no significant effect was observed in the spasticity of the wrist joints. The choice of acupoints and the frequency of EA have to be taken into account to achieve a positive treatment effect. The correlation between acupoints and motor points

  10. Effect of a rehabilitation program using virtual reality for balance and functionality of chronic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Henrique Souza Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis study aimed to investigate the effect of a rehabilitation program using virtual reality (VR in addition to conventional therapy for improvement of balance (BERG scale and functional independence (FIM scale in chronic stroke patients. Ten individuals, mean age of 51.4 (± 6.7 years, participated of eight 60-minute sessions comprising kinesiotherapy (15min, Nintendo Wii (30min and Learning transfer (15min exercises. After training, nonparametric statistical analysis showed significant improvement in total FIM (p= .01 and BERG scores (p= .00, and in some of their subitems: FIM - dressing lower body (p= .01, transfer to bathtub/shower (p= .02 and locomotion: stairs (p= .03; BERG - reaching forward with outstretched arm (p= .01, retrieving object from the floor (p= .04, turning 360º (p= .01, placing alternate foot on step (p≤ .01, standing with one foot in front (p= .01, and one leg stand (p= .03. These findings suggest a positive influence of virtual reality exercises adjunct to conventional therapy on rehabilitation of balance and functionality post stroke, and indicate the feasibility of the proposed VR-based rehabilitation program.

  11. The effects of Pilates exercise training on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hee Sung; Kim, You Lim; Lee, Suk Min

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of Pilates exercise on static and dynamic balance in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen individuals with unilateral chronic hemiparetic stroke (age, 64.7 ± 6.9 years; height, 161.7 ± 7.9 cm; weight, 67.0 ± 11.1 kg) were randomly allocated to either a Pilates exercise group (PG, n=10) or a control group (CG, n=9). The PG attended 24 exercise sessions conducted over an 8-week period (3 sessions/week). Center of pressure (COP) sway and COP velocity were measured one week before and after the exercise program and compared to assess training effects. [Results] Pilates exercise positively affected both static and dynamic balance in patients with chronic stroke. For static balance, COP sway and velocity in the medial-lateral (M-L) and anterior-posterior (A-P) directions were significantly decreased in the PG after training while no significant differences were found in the CG. For dynamic balance, measured during treadmill walking, the PG showed significantly reduced COP sway and velocity in the M-L and A-P directions for both the paretic and non-paretic leg. [Conclusions] The findings provide initial evidence that Pilates exercise can enhance static and dynamic balance in patients with chronic stroke. PMID:27390424

  12. Rhythmic auditory stimulation using a portable smart device: short-term effects on gait in chronic hemiplegic stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Byung-Woo; Lee, Hwi-Young; Song, Won-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effects of various rhythmic auditory stimulation tempos on stroke gait pattern changes when training patients with a smartphone-based rhythmic auditory stimulation application were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen patients with chronic stroke were included. Cadence during comfortable walking was measured (baseline). After the baseline findings were recorded, rhythmic auditory stimulation with five different tempos (i.e., −10%, −5%, 0%, +5%, and +10% change from baseline) was randomly applied. Finally, comfortable walking without rhythmic auditory stimulation was initiated to evaluate gait pattern changes. [Results] As the tempo increased, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of the stroke patients changed significantly. Gait speed, cadence, and gait cycle duration showed the greatest improvement in the +10% rhythmic auditory stimulation condition compared to baseline. After gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation, gait speed, cadence, stride length, gait cycle duration, and step length of the affected and unaffected sides improved significantly compared to baseline. [Conclusion] Significant changes in the gait pattern of stroke patients were noted for various tempos after training with rhythmic auditory stimulation. These findings could be used to customize rehabilitative gait training for patients who experience stroke with hemiplegia.

  13. Short-term effects and long-term use of a hybrid orthosis for neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the upper extremity in patients after chronic stroke.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.W.; Voerman, G.E.; Santegoets, K.M.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To associate the short-term effects of the Handmaster orthosis on disabling symptoms of the affected upper extremity with long-term Handmaster orthosis use after stroke. DESIGN: Historic cohort study. PATIENTS: Patients with chronic stroke. METHODS: The Modified Ashworth Scale (0-5) for w

  14. Effects of task-oriented training on upper extremity function and performance of daily activities in chronic stroke patients with impaired cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Juhyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of task-oriented training on upper extremity function and performance of daily activities in chronic stroke patients with impaired cognition. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 2 chronic hemiplegic stroke patients underwent task-oriented training. The training was conducted once a day for 30 minutes, 5 times/week, for 2 weeks. The patients were evaluated 3 times before and after the task-oriented training. Changes in upper extremity funct...

  15. Efficient neuroplasticity induction in chronic stroke patients by an associative brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Jiang, Ning; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Niazi, Imran Khan; Kostic, Vladimir; Pavlovic, Aleksandra; Radovanovic, Sasa; Djuric-Jovicic, Milica; Agosta, Federica; Dremstrup, Kim; Farina, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have the potential to improve functionality in chronic stoke patients when applied over a large number of sessions. Here we evaluated the effect and the underlying mechanisms of three BCI training sessions in a double-blind sham-controlled design. The applied BCI is based on Hebbian principles of associativity that hypothesize that neural assemblies activated in a correlated manner will strengthen synaptic connections. Twenty-two chronic stroke patients were divided into two training groups. Movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) were detected by electroencephalography during repetitions of foot dorsiflexion. Detection triggered a single electrical stimulation of the common peroneal nerve timed so that the resulting afferent volley arrived at the peak negative phase of the MRCP (BCIassociative group) or randomly (BCInonassociative group). Fugl-Meyer motor assessment (FM), 10-m walking speed, foot and hand tapping frequency, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data, and the excitability of the corticospinal tract to the target muscle [tibialis anterior (TA)] were quantified. The TA motor evoked potential (MEP) increased significantly after the BCIassociative intervention, but not for the BCInonassociative group. FM scores (0.8 ± 0.46 point difference, P = 0.01), foot (but not finger) tapping frequency, and 10-m walking speed improved significantly for the BCIassociative group, indicating clinically relevant improvements. Corticospinal tract integrity on DTI did not correlate with clinical or physiological changes. For the BCI as applied here, the precise coupling between the brain command and the afferent signal was imperative for the behavioral, clinical, and neurophysiological changes reported. This association may become the driving principle for the design of BCI rehabilitation in the future. Indeed, no available BCIs can match this degree of functional improvement with such a short intervention. PMID:26719088

  16. Determinants of left atrial appendage volume in stroke patients without chronic atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko Taina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Left atrial appendage (LAA volume has been shown to be increased in patients with acute cryptogenic stroke. Atrial fibrillation (AF is a well-recognized risk factor but it is not the only one associated with LAA enlargement. The aim of the study was to clarify the multifactorial etiology of LAA enlargement in cardiogenic stroke/TIA patients without AF. METHODS: Altogether 149 patients with suspected cardioembolic stroke/TIA (47 females; mean age 61 years underwent cardiac CT. Diagnosed AF on admittance was an exclusion criteria but 24-hour Holter ambulatory ECG revealed paroxysmal AF (PAF in 20 patients. Body surface area adjusted LAA volume was evaluated. Eighteen different variables were registered including general characteristics, definite and potential causal risk factors for ischemic stroke/TIA, clinical echoparameters and CT based cardiac volumetric and adipose tissue measurements. A stepwise linear regression analysis was performed to achieve a model adjusted for the number of predictors of LAA volume increase. RESULTS: In linear regression analysis, the best model accounted for 30% of the variability in LAA volume, including PAF (19% and enlarged left atrial volume (6%, enlarged left ventricle end-systolic diameter (3% and decreased pericardial adipose tissue (2%. No multi-colinearity between variables was observed. In addition to PAF, no other definitive or potential causal risk factors could account for the LAA volume in these patients. CONCLUSIONS: LAA volume increase seems to be poorly associated with currently known stroke/TIA risk factors, except for AF. Targeting more comprehensive ECG monitoring for stroke patients with increased LAA volume should be considered.

  17. Determinants of Left Atrial Appendage Volume in Stroke Patients without Chronic Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taina, Mikko; Sipola, Petri; Muuronen, Antti; Hedman, Marja; Mustonen, Pirjo; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Jäkälä, Pekka; Vanninen, Ritva

    2014-01-01

    Background Left atrial appendage (LAA) volume has been shown to be increased in patients with acute cryptogenic stroke. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a well-recognized risk factor but it is not the only one associated with LAA enlargement. The aim of the study was to clarify the multifactorial etiology of LAA enlargement in cardiogenic stroke/TIA patients without AF. Methods Altogether 149 patients with suspected cardioembolic stroke/TIA (47 females; mean age 61 years) underwent cardiac CT. Diagnosed AF on admittance was an exclusion criteria but 24-hour Holter ambulatory ECG revealed paroxysmal AF (PAF) in 20 patients. Body surface area adjusted LAA volume was evaluated. Eighteen different variables were registered including general characteristics, definite and potential causal risk factors for ischemic stroke/TIA, clinical echoparameters and CT based cardiac volumetric and adipose tissue measurements. A stepwise linear regression analysis was performed to achieve a model adjusted for the number of predictors of LAA volume increase. Results In linear regression analysis, the best model accounted for 30% of the variability in LAA volume, including PAF (19%) and enlarged left atrial volume (6%), enlarged left ventricle end-systolic diameter (3%) and decreased pericardial adipose tissue (2%). No multi-colinearity between variables was observed. In addition to PAF, no other definitive or potential causal risk factors could account for the LAA volume in these patients. Conclusions LAA volume increase seems to be poorly associated with currently known stroke/TIA risk factors, except for AF. Targeting more comprehensive ECG monitoring for stroke patients with increased LAA volume should be considered. PMID:24595515

  18. Determinants of depression in chronic stroke : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Port, Ingrid G. L.; Kwakkel, Gert; Bruin, Margje; Lindeman, Eline

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the study was to identify factors that are significantly related to depression in chronic stroke patients. Methods. Prospective cohort study of stroke patients admitted for rehabilitation. A total of 165 first ever stroke patients over 18 years of age were assessed at one and thr

  19. Comparison of Fine Motor Skills in Patients With Chronic Stroke in Final Stages of Bronestrum and Healthy Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirshoja

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the main problems of chronic stroke patients is the inability to move the fingers separately despite the passing of an extended period of time since the onset of the disease. Dexterity is a fine motor skill that allows one to manipulate objects through voluntary movement. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the fine motor skills of patients with chronic stroke to those of healthy controls. Patients and Methods This analytic and descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out randomly on 50 patients with chronic stroke with a mean age of 57.8 years suffering for 46 - 72 months and on 50 healthy people with a mean age of 51.16 years. Patients did not receive any intervention before or after one week of assessment. The function of both hands of each patient was measured with the nine-holepegtest (NHPT and the box and block test (BBT. Results The results showed that the mean variation of speed in the BBT test (standard deviation [SD] in the left hands of the patients (recessive limb was 57.8 (12.75, greater than in their right hand (dominant limb (54.76 [8.67]. The rate of speed in healthy people’s right hands was 68.58 (8.31, greater than in their left hands (63.5 [8.54]. In addition, the results of the NHPT showed that the stroke patients needed more time to manipulate the objects than the healthy ones. For the NHPT, the mean (SD of the right hand (dominant limb patients (4.89 and healthy controls 36.7 (14.5 21.98, mean (SD of the left hand (dominant limb patients (4.45 and 30.4 in healthy subjects (4.09 24.18 respectively. Independent T-test showed P < 0.05 in all the results obtained, respectively. Conclusions The results showed that the dexterity fingers of patients suffering from stroke at the final stages of Bronestrum is much closer to the dexterity of healthy controls.

  20. Primed Physical Therapy Enhances Recovery of Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerley, Suzanne J; Byblow, Winston D; Barber, P Alan; MacDonald, Hayley; McIntyre-Robinson, Andrew; Stinear, Cathy M

    2016-05-01

    Background Recovery of upper limb function is important for regaining independence after stroke.Objective To test the effects of priming upper limb physical therapy with intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS), a form of noninvasive brain stimulation.Methods Eighteen adults with first-ever chronic monohemispheric subcortical stroke participated in this randomized, controlled, triple-blinded trial. Intervention consisted of priming with real or sham iTBS to the ipsilesional primary motor cortex immediately before 45 minutes of upper limb physical therapy, daily for 10 days. Changes in upper limb function (Action Research Arm Test [ARAT]), upper limb impairment (Fugl-Meyer Scale), and corticomotor excitability, were assessed before, during, and immediately, 1 month and 3 months after the intervention. Functional magnetic resonance images were acquired before and at one month after the intervention.Results Improvements in ARAT were observed after the intervention period when therapy was primed with real iTBS, but not sham, and were maintained at 1 month. These improvements were not apparent halfway through the intervention, indicating a dose effect. Improvements in ARAT at 1 month were related to balancing of corticomotor excitability and an increase in ipsilesional premotor cortex activation during paretic hand grip.Conclusions Two weeks of iTBS-primed therapy improves upper limb function at the chronic stage of stroke, for at least 1 month postintervention, whereas therapy alone may not be sufficient to alter function. This indicates a potential role for iTBS as an adjuvant to therapy delivered at the chronic stage. PMID:26180053

  1. Influence of kinesitherapy on motor recovery and functional independence in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period

    OpenAIRE

    Vasileva, Dance; Lubenova, Daniela; Mihova, Marija; Grigorova-Petrova, Kristin; Dimitrova, Antoaneta

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to trace the influence of specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology (SKTM) on motor recovery and functional independence in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period (ISChP). Material and Methods The study was conducted with 56 patients with ISChP (32 men and 24 women, mean age 63.2 ± 8.8 years old, weight 77.9 ± 10.1 kg, height 169.2 ± 6.4 centimeters and duration of illness up to 1 year). Assessment of motor recovery and the level of functional independence...

  2. Fully Automated Detection of Corticospinal Tract Damage in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural integrity of the corticospinal tract (CST after stroke is closely linked to the degree of motor impairment. However, current methods for measurement of fractional atrophy (FA of CST based on region of interest (ROI are time-consuming and open to bias. Here, we used tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS together with a CST template with healthy volunteers to quantify structural integrity of CST automatically. Two groups of patients after ischemic stroke were enrolled, group 1 (10 patients, 7 men, and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA scores ⩽ 50 and group 2 (12 patients, 12 men, and FMA scores = 100. CST of FAipsi, FAcontra, and FAratio was compared between the two groups. Relative to group 2, FA was decreased in group 1 in the ipsilesional CST (P<0.01, as well as the FAratio (P<0.01. There was no significant difference between the two subgroups in the contralesional CST (P=0.23. Compared with contralesional CST, FA of ipsilesional CST decreased in group 1 (P<0.01. These results suggest that the automated method used in our study could detect a surrogate biomarker to quantify the CST after stroke, which would facilitate implementation of clinical practice.

  3. Effect of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability with chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Dae-Hyouk; Son, Young-Lan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of intensive aerobic exercise on respiratory capacity and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=6) or a control group (n=6). Patients in the experimental group received intensive aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy once a day, five days a week, for four weeks. The control group received aerobic exercise for 30 minutes and traditional physical therapy for 30 minutes a day, five days a week, for four weeks. [Results] After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, 10-meter walking test, and six-minute walking test over the baseline results. The comparison of the two groups after the intervention revealed that the experimental group showed more significant improvements in the forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and six-minute walking test. There was no significant difference in saturation pulse oximetry oxygen and 10-meter walking test between the groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that intensive aerobic exercise has a positive effect on respiratory capacity and walking endurance in patients with chronic stroke.

  4. Mobility training using a bionic knee orthosis in patients in a post-stroke chronic state: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byl Nancy N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction An emerging area of neurorehabilitation is the use of robotic devices to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of lower extremity physical therapy post-stroke. Many of the robotic devices currently available rely on computer-driven locomotive algorithms combined with partial bodyweight-supported treadmill training that drive reflex stepping with minimal patient intention during therapy. In this case series, we examined the effect of task-oriented mobility training in patients in a post-stroke chronic state using a novel, wearable, mobile, intention-based robotic leg orthosis. Case presentation Three individuals, all of whom had reached a plateau with conventional bodyweight-supported treadmill training, participated in task-oriented mobility therapy (1.5 hours, two to four times per week for four weeks with a robotic leg orthosis under supervision by a physical therapist. Participant 1 was a 59-year-old Caucasian man, who had an ischemic left stroke six years previously with resultant right hemiparesis. Participant 2 was a 42-year-old Caucasian woman with left hemiparesis after a right stroke 15 months previously. Participant 3 was a 62-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of a right middle cerebral artery aneurysm with third degree sub-arachnoid hemorrhage 10 years ago. Immediately after training, all participants demonstrated improved gait speed (10 meter walk, stride length and walking endurance (6 minute walk compared with baseline measurements. Improvements were maintained one month after training. Timed up and go and five times sit-to-stand were maintained for all three participants, with only one individual remaining outside the safety performance norm. Conclusions Lower extremity training integrating an intention-based robotic leg orthosis may improve gait speed, endurance and community levels of participation in select patients in a post-stroke chronic state after plateauing within a bodyweight

  5. The reliability of repeated TMS measures in older adults and in patients with subacute and chronic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schambra, Heidi M.; Ogden, R. Todd; Martínez-Hernández, Isis E.; Lin, Xuejing; Chang, Y. Brenda; Rahman, Asif; Edwards, Dylan J.; Krakauer, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measures in healthy older adults and stroke patients has been insufficiently characterized. We determined whether common TMS measures could reliably evaluate change in individuals and in groups using the smallest detectable change (SDC), or could tell subjects apart using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We used a single-rater test-retest design in older healthy, subacute stroke, and chronic stroke subjects. At twice daily sessions on two consecutive days, we recorded resting motor threshold, test stimulus intensity, recruitment curves, short-interval intracortical inhibition, and facilitation, and long-interval intracortical inhibition. Using variances estimated from a random effects model, we calculated the SDC and ICC for each TMS measure. For all TMS measures in all groups, SDCs for single subjects were large; only with modest group sizes did the SDCs become low. Thus, while these TMS measures cannot be reliably used as a biomarker to detect individual change, they can reliably detect change exceeding measurement noise in moderate-sized groups. For several of the TMS measures, ICCs were universally high, suggesting that they can reliably discriminate between subjects. TMS measures should be used based on their reliability in particular contexts. More work establishing their validity, responsiveness, and clinical relevance is still needed. PMID:26388729

  6. The reliability of repeated TMS measures in older adults and in patients with subacute and chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi M. Schambra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS measures in healthy older adults and stroke patients has been insufficiently characterized. We determined whether common TMS measures could reliably evaluate change in individuals and in groups using the smallest detectable change (SDC, or could tell subjects apart using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. We used a single-rater test-retest design in older healthy, subacute stroke, and chronic stroke subjects. At twice daily sessions on two consecutive days, we recorded resting motor threshold, test stimulus intensity, recruitment curves, short-interval intracortical inhibition and facilitation, and long-interval intracortical inhibition. Using variances estimated from a random effects model, we calculated the SDC and ICC for each TMS measure. For all TMS measures in all groups, SDCs for single subjects were large; only with modest group sizes did the SDCs become low. Thus, while these TMS measures cannot be reliably used as a biomarker to detect individual change, they can reliably detect change exceeding measurement noise in moderate-sized groups. For several of the TMS measures, ICCs were universally high, suggesting that they can reliably discriminate between subjects. Though most TMS measures have sufficient reliability in particular contexts, work establishing their validity, responsiveness, and clinical relevance is still needed.

  7. Energy expenditure in chronic stroke patients playing Wii Sports: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Stam Henk J; Streur-Kranenburg Marjolein F; Ribbers Gerard M; Hurkmans Henri L; van den Berg-Emons Rita J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability in modern western countries. Stroke survivors often have functional limitations which might lead to a vicious circle of reduced physical activity, deconditioning and further physical deterioration. Current evidence suggests that routine moderate- or vigorous-intensity physical activity is essential for maintenance and improvement of health among stroke survivors. Nevertheless, long-term participation in physical a...

  8. Enhancing activities of daily living of chronic stroke patients in primary health care by modified constraint-induced movement therapy (HOMECIMT): study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Barzel, Anne; Ketels, Gesche; Tetzlaff, Britta; Krüger, Heike; Haevernick, Kerstin; Daubmann, Anne; Wegscheider, Karl; Scherer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke leads to constant rehabilitation needs even at the chronic stage. However, although many stroke patients receive physical or occupational therapy in primary health care, treatment prescriptions do not generally specify therapeutic goals; in particular, participation is not established as an explicit therapeutic goal in the ambulatory setting. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a therapy regimen for chronic stroke patients (modified ‘constraint-induc...

  9. Energy expenditure in chronic stroke patients playing Wii Sports: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.P. Hurkmans (Henri); G.M. Ribbers (Gerard); M.F. Streur-Kranenburg (Marjolein); H.J. Stam (Henk); R.J.G. van den Berg-Emons (Rita)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Stroke is one of the leading causes of long-term disability in modern western countries. Stroke survivors often have functional limitations which might lead to a vicious circle of reduced physical activity, deconditioning and further physical deterioration. Current evidence s

  10. Efficient neuroplasticity induction in chronic stroke patients by an associative brain-computer interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Jiang, Ning; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have the potential to improve functionality in chronic stoke patients when applied over a large number of sessions. Here, we evaluate the effect and the underlying mechanisms of three BCI training sessions in a double-blind-sham-controlled design. The applied BCI is......-associative group. Fugl-Meyer motor scores (0.8±0.46 point difference p=0.01), foot (but not finger) tapping frequency, and 10-m walking speed improved significantly for the BCIassociative group, indicating clinically relevant improvements. For the BCI as applied here, the precise coupling between the brain command...

  11. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise;

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions.......Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  12. Dysphagia in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S; Hamdy, S.

    2006-01-01

    Swallowing musculature is asymmetrically represented in both motor cortices. Stroke affecting the hemisphere with the dominant swallowing projection results in dysphagia and clinical recovery has been correlated with compensatory changes in the previously non‐dominant, unaffected hemisphere. This asymmetric bilaterality may explain why up to half of stroke patients are dysphagic and why many will regain a safe swallow over a comparatively short period. Despite this propensity for recovery, dy...

  13. Stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia treated with Darbepoetin Alfa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skali, Hicham; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Parfrey, Patrick S;

    2011-01-01

    More strokes were observed in the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT) among patients assigned to darbepoetin alfa. We sought to identify baseline characteristics and postrandomization factors that might explain this association....

  14. Post-stroke seizures in consecutive elderly stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Chen; Lufang Chen; Yiqing Tao; Maomao Han; Chunlan Cui; Shichao Liu

    2011-01-01

    This prospective study sought to investigate the clinical, radiological and electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics of seizures in elderly stroke patients, and their outcomes. Over a 2-year study period, 158 consecutive eldedy patients with stroke were examined and followed up. Of these patients, 32 (20%) developed seizures, primarily related to stroke, within a follow up period between 5 months and 2 years. Of these 32 cases, 20 experienced infarctions, and 12 experienced hemorrhages. Involvement of cortical regions was detected in most of the patients exhibiting seizures. In these patients, 44% of the lesions involved cortical areas exclusively or in addition to subcortical areas observed on computed tomography (CT) images. Twenty-five patients (78%)developed early seizures (within 2 weeks after stroke), and half exhibited immediate post-stroke seizures. None of the patients exhibiting early onset seizures developed recurrent seizures or epilepsy, while 57% of late onset seizures (four cases) developed epilepsy. No specific EEG patterns were apparent in those who later developed epilepsy. Overall, early onset seizures after stroke were found to be relatively common, and did not affect outcome. Late onset seizures were less common, but were associated with chronic epilepsy.

  15. Effect of Radial Shock Wave Therapy on Spasticity of the Upper Limb in Patients With Chronic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tsung-Ying; Chang, Chih-Ya; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Chu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Chang, Shin-Tsu; Wu, Yung-Tsan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recently, studies have reported that extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a safe, noninvasive, alternative treatment for spasticity. However, the effect of ESWT on spasticity cannot be determined, because most studies to date have enrolled small patient numbers and have lacked placebo-controlled groups and/or long-term follow-up. In addition, whether varying the number of ESWT sessions would affect the duration of the therapeutic effect has not been investigated in a single study. Hence, we performed a prospective, randomized, single blind, placebo-controlled study to investigate the long-term effect of radial ESWT (rESWT) in patients with poststroke spasticity and surveyed the outcome of functional activity. Sixty patients were randomized into 3 groups. Group A patients received 1 session of rESWT per week for 3 consecutive weeks; group B patients received a single session of rESWT; group C patients received one session of sham rESWT per week for 3 consecutive weeks. The primary outcome was Modified Ashworth Scale of hand and wrist, whereas the secondary outcomes were Fugl-Meyer Assessment of hand function and wrist control. Evaluations were performed before the first rESWT treatment and immediately 1, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after the last session of rESWT. Compared to the control group, the significant reduction in spasticity of hand and wrist lasted at least 16 and 8 weeks in group A and B, respectively. Three sessions of rESWT had a longer-lasting effect than one session. Furthermore, the reduction in spasticity after 3 sessions of rESWT may be beneficial for hand function and wrist control and the effect was maintained for 16 and 12 weeks, respectively. rESWT may be valuable in decreasing spasticity of the hand and wrist with accompanying enhancement of wrist control and hand function in chronic stroke patients. PMID:27149465

  16. Movement related slow cortical potentials in severely paralyzed chronic stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ozge Yilmaz; Niels Birbaumer; Ander Ramos Murguialday

    2015-01-01

    Movement-related slow cortical potentials (SCPs) are proposed as reliable and immediate indicators of cortical reorganization in motor learning. SCP amplitude and latency have been reported as markers for the brain's computational effort, attention and movement planning. SCPs have been used as an EEG signature of motor control and as a main feature in Brain-Machine-Interfaces (BMIs). Some reports suggest SCPs are modified following stroke. In this study, we investigated movement-related SCPs ...

  17. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Intrathecal Transplantation in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy is being widely explored in the management of stroke and has demonstrated great potential. It has been shown to assist in the remodeling of the central nervous system by inducing neurorestorative effect through the process of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and reduction of glial scar formation. In this study, the effect of intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs is analyzed on the recovery process of patients with chronic stroke. 24 patients diagnosed with chronic stroke were administered cell therapy, followed by multidisciplinary neurorehabilitation. They were assessed on functional independence measure (FIM objectively, along with assessment of standing and walking balance, ambulation, and hand functions. Out of 24 patients, 12 improved in ambulation, 10 in hand functions, 6 in standing balance, and 9 in walking balance. Further factor analysis was done. Patients of the younger groups showed higher percentage of improvement in all the areas. Patients who underwent cell therapy within 2 years after the stroke showed better changes. Ischemic type of stroke had better recovery than the hemorrhagic stroke. This study demonstrates the potential of autologous BMMNCs intrathecal transplantation in improving the prognosis of functional recovery in chronic stage of stroke. Further clinical trials are recommended. This trial is registered with NCT02065778.

  18. The Effect of Somatosensory and Cognitive-motor Tasks on the Paretic Leg of Chronic Stroke Patients in the Standing Posture

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Sung-kwang; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate how different standing surfaces alter somatosensory input and how postural control is affected by these changes during the performance of a dual task with a cognitive-motor aspect. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 chronic stroke patients: 18 males, 2 females. [Methods] COP total distance, sway velocity, and the weight load on the paretic leg were measured while subjects performed the following three tasks (somatosensory task, cognitive-mot...

  19. Taping of the elbow extensor muscle in chronic stroke patients: comparison between before and after three-dimensional motion analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Won-Jin; Oh, Jae-Seop; Chang, Moonyoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to observe the effect of kinesio taping on the quality of movement of each arm during a reaching task in patients with right-sided hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen right-handed participants who had had a right-sided hemiparetic stroke were requested to perform a reaching task with each arm, with and without kinesio taping. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to measure peak angular velocity, time to reach peak angular velocity, and ...

  20. Patient's Guide to Antithrombotic Therapy in Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bleeding into the brain. This is called a“hemorrhagic” stroke (see section C). ! Patients who have had strokes ... intermittent compression devices. C. Bleeding in the Brain (Hemorrhagic Stroke) 1. What is a hemorrhagic stroke? ! A hemorrhagic ...

  1. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30 min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ≤45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ≤21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training. PMID:26644642

  2. A biofeedback cycling training to improve locomotion: a case series study based on gait pattern classification of 153 chronic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molteni Franco

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The restoration of walking ability is the main goal of post-stroke lower limb rehabilitation and different studies suggest that pedaling may have a positive effect on locomotion. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of a biofeedback pedaling treatment and its effects on cycling and walking ability in chronic stroke patients. A case series study was designed and participants were recruited based on a gait pattern classification of a population of 153 chronic stroke patients. Methods In order to optimize participants selection, a k-means cluster analysis was performed to subgroup homogenous gait patterns in terms of gait speed and symmetry. The training consisted of a 2-week treatment of 6 sessions. A visual biofeedback helped the subjects in maintaining a symmetrical contribution of the two legs during pedaling. Participants were assessed before, after training and at follow-up visits (one week after treatment. Outcome measures were the unbalance during a pedaling test, and the temporal, spatial, and symmetry parameters during gait analysis. Results and discussion Three clusters, mainly differing in terms of gait speed, were identified and participants, representative of each cluster, were selected. An intra-subject statistical analysis (ANOVA showed that all patients significantly decreased the pedaling unbalance after treatment and maintained significant improvements with respect to baseline at follow-up. The 2-week treatment induced some modifications in the gait pattern of two patients: one, the most impaired, significantly improved mean velocity and increased gait symmetry; the other one reduced significantly the over-compensation of the healthy limb. No benefits were produced in the gait of the last subject who maintained her slow but almost symmetrical pattern. Thus, this study might suggest that the treatment can be beneficial for patients having a very asymmetrical and inefficient gait and for those

  3. Navigation strategy training using virtual reality in six chronic stroke patients: A novel and explorative approach to the rehabilitation of navigation impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessen, Michiel H G; van der Ham, Ineke J M; Jagersma, Elbrich; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that navigation impairment is a common complaint after brain injury. Effective training programmes aiming to improve navigation ability in neurological patients are, however, scarce. The few reported programmes are merely focused on recalling specific routes rather than encouraging brain-damaged patients to use an alternative navigation strategy, applicable to any route. Our aim was therefore to investigate the feasibility of a (virtual reality) navigation training as a tool to instruct chronic stroke patients to adopt an alternative navigation strategy. Navigation ability was systematically assessed before the training. The training approach was then determined based on the individual pattern of navigation deficits of each patient. The use of virtual reality in the navigation strategy training in six middle-aged stroke patients was found to be highly feasible. Furthermore, five patients learned to (partially) apply an alternative navigation strategy in the virtual environment, suggesting that navigation strategies are mouldable rather than static. In the evaluation of their training experiences, the patients judged the training as valuable and proposed some suggestions for further improvement. The notion that the navigation strategy people use can be influenced after a short training procedure is a novel finding and initiates a direction for future studies. PMID:26040931

  4. Taping of the elbow extensor muscle in chronic stroke patients: comparison between before and after three-dimensional motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Won-Jin; Oh, Jae-Seop; Chang, Moonyoung

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to observe the effect of kinesio taping on the quality of movement of each arm during a reaching task in patients with right-sided hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen right-handed participants who had had a right-sided hemiparetic stroke were requested to perform a reaching task with each arm, with and without kinesio taping. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to measure peak angular velocity, time to reach peak angular velocity, and movement units during elbow motion. [Results] In the right arm, movements during the reaching task with kinesio taping were faster, smoother, and more efficient than those without kinesio taping. The peak angular velocity increased, and the time to reach peak angular velocity decreased. Movement units decreased significantly. However, in the untaped arm, the movement was slower, rougher, and less efficient. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping provided a positive effect on the reaching movement of the taped arm of right-handed persons who had had a right-sided hemiparetic stroke. PMID:26310566

  5. Post-stroke depression: Prevalence and relationship with disability in chronic stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate (1 the prevalence of operationally defined depressive disorder (ICD-10 in chronic stroke subjects and (2 the relationship of post-stroke depression (PSD with disability. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Setting: Neurological rehabilitation unit of a tertiary care university research center. Materials and Methods: Participants were those with first episode of supratentorial stroke of more than 3 months′ duration with impaired balance and gait who had been referred for rehabilitation. Data were collected on demographic data, stroke data (side and type of lesion and post-stroke duration, cognition (mini mental state examination, depressive ideation (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale - HRDS, impairment (Scandinavian Stroke Scale, balance (Berg Balance Scale, ambulatory status (Functional Ambulation Category, walking ability (speed, and independence in activities of daily living (Barthel Index. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 13.0. We carried out the chi-square test for ordinal variables and the independent t test for continuous variables. Results: Fifty-one patients (M:F: 41:10 of mean age 46.06 ± 11.19 years and mean post-stroke duration of 467.33 ± 436.39 days were included in the study. Eighteen of the 51 participants (35.29% met the criteria for depression. Demographic variables like male gender, being married, living in a nuclear family, urban background, and higher HRDS score were significantly correlated with PSD (P < 0.05. Depression was related to functional disability after stroke but to a statistically insignificant level (P > 0.05 and was unrelated to lesion-related parameters. Conclusion: Depression occurs in one-third of chronic stroke survivors and is prevalent in subjects referred for rehabilitation. PSD is related primarily to demographic variables and only to a lesser extent to functional disability following stroke.

  6. Rehabilitative Games for Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pyae

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the major problems in medical and healthcare that can cause severe disability and death of patients especially for older population. Rehabilitation plays an important role in stroke therapy. However, most of the rehabilitative exercises are monotonous and tiring for the patients. For a particular time, they can easily get bored in doing these exercises. The role of patient’s motivation in rehabilitation is vital. Motivation and rehabilitative outcomes are strongly related. Digital games promise to help stroke patients to feel motivated and more engaged in rehabilitative training through motivational gameplay. Most of the commercial games available in the market are not well-designed for stroke patients and their motivational needs in rehabilitation. This study aims at understanding the motivational requirements of stroke patients in doing rehabilitative exercises and living in a post-stroke life. Based on the findings from the literature review, we report factors that can influence the stroke patients’ level of motivation such as social functioning, patient-therapist relationship, goal-setting, and music. These findings are insightful and useful for ideating and designing interactive motivation-driven games for stroke patients. The motivational factors of stroke patients in rehabilitation may help the game designers to design motivation-driven game contexts, contents, and gameplay. Moreover, these findings may also help healthcare professionals who concern stroke patient’s motivation in rehabilitative context. In this paper, we reported our Virtual Nursing Home (VNH concept and the games that we are currently developing and re-designing. Based on this literature review, we will present and test out the ideas how we can integrate these motivational factors in our future game design, development, and enhancement.

  7. Patient Education Among Stroke Survivor Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most serious health problems in the world, cited as being the second leading cause of death. After stroke, there is a greater risk of suffering second and further subsequent stroke-events. Given the heavy burden of disease present by stroke, there is a great need to improve patient education for stroke survivors, who are at an increased risk of another cerebrovascular accident. The purpose of this thesis is to develop the quality of patient education in nursing care o...

  8. The effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hyuck; Park, Ji-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Subjects] The subjects were chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to either the control group or experimental group. All subjects received 20 sessions (5 days in a week) of virtual reality movement therapy using the Nintendo Wii. In addition to Wii-based virtual reality movement therapy, experimental group subjects performed mental practice consisting of 5 minutes of relaxation, Wii games imagination, and normalization phases before the beginning of Wii games. To compare the two groups, the upper extremity subtest of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log were performed. [Results] Both groups showed statistically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of the movement subscale of Motor Activity Log after the interventions. Also, there were significant differences in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log between the two groups. [Conclusion] Game-based virtual reality movement therapy alone may be helpful to improve functional recovery of the upper extremity, but the addition of MP produces a lager improvement. PMID:27134363

  9. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Fernanda Spitoni

    Full Text Available Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient's left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20, in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions.

  10. Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant drugs for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Jokic, Vera; Dagres, Nikolaos;

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are disorders with increasing prevalence. The presence of CKD increases the risk of incident AF and vice versa, and the presence of AF may accelerate CKD progression. Nearly a third of patients with established CKD also have AF, whilst half...

  11. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation Reduces Pain and Somatoparaphrenia in a Severe Chronic Central Post-Stroke Pain Patient: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Central post-stroke pain is a neuropathic syndrome characterized by intolerable contralesional pain and, in rare cases, somatic delusions. To date, there is limited evidence for the effective treatments of this disease. Here we used caloric vestibular stimulation to reduce pain and somatoparaphrenia in a 57-year-old woman suffering from central post-stroke pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the neurological effects of this treatment. Following vestibular stimulation we observed impressive improvements in motor skills, pain, and somatic delusions. In the functional connectivity study before the vestibular stimulation, we observed differences in the patient’s left thalamus functional connectivity, with respect to the thalamus connectivity of a control group (N = 20), in the bilateral cingulate cortex and left insula. After the caloric stimulation, the left thalamus functional connectivity with these regions, which are known to be involved in the cortical response to pain, disappeared as in the control group. The beneficial use of vestibular stimulation in the reduction of pain and somatic delusion in a CPSP patient is now documented by behavioral and imaging data. This evidence can be applied to theoretical models of pain and body delusions. PMID:27028404

  12. Protein consumptions in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Maghsoudi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Stroke is one of the most common causes of disabilities and death all over the world. The mortality rate of stroke is predicted to be doubled by 2030 in the Middle East countries. Nutrition is an effective strategy in prevention and management of stroke. This study assessed the relationship between various protein types and stroke risk. Materials and Methods: This hospital-based case-control study was performed in a University hospital. The data regarding consumption of usual food intake of 69 cases (46 men and 23 women and 60 controls (30 men and 30 women was collected with a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. The mean consumption of red and white meat and vegetable and processed proteins consumption were compared between two groups. Results: The percent of total of daily protein intake were lower in patients with stroke in both sexes (25.92% vs 30.55% in men and 30.7% vs 31.14% in women. Conclusion: Lower protein consumption may be observed in patients with stroke patients in both sex.

  13. Vein thromboembolism prevention in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Dejan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Having in mind the rate of occurrence and clinical importance, venous thromboembolism implies venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism as a result of embolisation of the thrombotic particles from deep veins or pelvic veins. Venous thrombosis of the deep veins may result in chronic vein insufficiency, but the primary medical problem is the possibility of development of pulmonary embolism which may cause permanent respiratory function damage or even fatal outcome. Venous thromboembolism prevention in stroke The high incidence of deep vein thrombosis (30% clinically and up to 50% subclinically in acute stroke hemiparetic and bed ridden patients within two weeks from the onset and 1-2% pulmonary embolism with the fatal outcome in the first month clinically and 17% of all fatal outcomes in postmortem investigations present a necessity for the early venous thromboembolism prevention. On the other hand, the most powerful prevention strategy - anticoagulation has important limitations in acute stroke patients: almost impossible to be used in cerebral haemorrhage and a great risk for the development of hemorrhagic transformation in cerebral infarction. The fact that other prevention strategies have limited value requires an estimation of efectivity-risk ratio in venous thromboembolism prevention in stroke. Conclusion Venous thromboembolism prevention in stroke patients is necessary because of a greater risk for venous thromboembolism in these patients according to the nature of illness and functional disability, but also a problem because of limited possibility to recommend the proper medicament according to the risk of serious complications. The necessity of preventing venous thromboembolism and estimation of efficiency-risk ratio in stroke patients, beside plenty of studies and consensus conferences, remain individual and often very difficult.

  14. Resting State Interhemispheric Motor Connectivity and White Matter Integrity Correlate with Motor Impairment in Chronic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Joyce L.; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    Functional and structural reorganization in the brain occurs after stroke. The ability to predict motor outcomes may depend on patterns of brain functional and structural connectivity. We tested the hypothesis that alterations in motor transcallosal and corticospinal connections correlate with motor impairment in patients with chronic stroke. Eleven ischemic stroke patients underwent the Upper Extremity Fugl-Meyer (UE-FM) assessment, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging, and di...

  15. Similar effects of two modified constraint-induced therapy protocols on motor impairment, motor function and quality of life in patients with chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma Costa Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Modified constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT protocols show motor function and real-world arm use improvement. Meanwhile it usually requires constant supervision by physiotherapists and is therefore more expensive than customary care. This study compared the preliminary efficacy of two modified CIMT protocols. A two-group randomized controlled trial with pre and post treatment measures and six months follow-up was conducted. Nineteen patients with chronic stroke received 10 treatment sessions distributed three to four times a week over 22 days. CIMT3h_direct group received 3 hours of CIMT supervised by a therapist (n=10 while CIMT1.5h_direct group had 1.5 hours of supervised CIMT+1.5 hours home exercises supervised by a caregiver (n=9. Outcome measures were the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the Motor Activity Log, and the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale. The modified CIMT protocols were feasible and well tolerated. Improvements in motor function, real-world arm use and quality of life did not differ significantly between treated groups receiving either 3 or 1.5 hours mCIMT supervised by a therapist.

  16. High-quality Health Information Provision for Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hong-Sheng; Ma, Jing-Jian; Li, Mu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: High-quality information provision can allow stroke patients to effectively participate in healthcare decision-making, better manage the stroke, and make a good recovery. In this study, we reviewed information needs of stroke patients, methods for providing information to patients, and considerations needed by the information providers. Data Sources: The literature concerning or including information provision for patients with stroke in English was collected from PubMed published from 1990 to 2015. Study Selection: We included all the relevant articles on information provision for stroke patients in English, with no limitation of study design. Results: Stroke is a major public health concern worldwide. High-quality and effective health information provision plays an essential role in helping patients to actively take part in decision-making and healthcare, and empowering them to effectively self-manage their long-standing chronic conditions. Different methods for providing information to patients have their relative merits and suitability, and as a result, the effective strategies taken by health professionals may include providing high-quality information, meeting patients’ individual needs, using suitable methods in providing information, and maintaining active involvement of patients. Conclusions: It is suggested that to enable stroke patients to access high-quality health information, greater efforts need to be made to ensure patients to receive accurate and current evidence-based information which meets their individual needs. Health professionals should use suitable information delivery methods, and actively involve stroke patients in information provision. PMID:27569241

  17. Fatigue after Stroke: The Patient's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Louise Barbour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fatigue after stroke is common and distressing to patients. Aims. Our aims were to explore patients' perceptions of post-stroke fatigue, including the causes of fatigue and the factors that alleviate fatigue, in a mixed methods study. Results. We interviewed 15 patients who had had a stroke and were inpatients on stroke rehabilitation wards. A substantial proportion of patients reported that their fatigue started at the time of their stroke. Various different factors were reported to improve fatigue, including exercise, good sleep, rehabilitation and rest. Fatigue influences patients' sense of “control” after their stroke. Conclusion. Our results are consistent with the possibility that poststroke fatigue might be triggered by factors that occur at the time of the stroke (e.g., the stroke lesion itself, or admission to hospital and then exacerbated by poor sleep and boredom. These factors should be considered when developing complex interventions to improve post-stroke fatigue.

  18. Effects of Training Using Video Games on the Muscle Strength, Muscle Tone, and Activities of Daily Living of Chronic Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, GyuChang

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect on the muscle strength, muscle tone, and activities of daily living of post-stroke patients. [Subjects] Fourteen stroke patients were recruited. They were randomly allocated into two groups; the experimental group (n=7) and the control group (n=7). [Methods] The experimental group performed training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect together with conventional oc...

  19. Effects of fast and slow squat exercises on the muscle activity of the paretic lower extremity in patients with chronic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Young-Ah; Kim, Jin-Seop; Lee, Dong-Yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the speed of squat exercises on paretic lower extremity muscle activity in patients with hemiplegia following a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Ten stroke patients performed fast and slow squat exercises for 2 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. The muscle activities of the paretic and non-paretic sides of the rectus femoris muscle, the biceps femoris muscle, and the tibialis anterior muscle were assessed and compared using...

  20. White matter integrity of premotor–motor connections is associated with motor output in chronic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Schulz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticocortical functional interactions between the primary motor cortex (M1 and secondary motor areas, such as the dorsal (PMd and ventral (PMv premotor cortices and the supplementary motor area (SMA are relevant for residual motor output after subcortical stroke. We hypothesized that the microstructural integrity of the underlying white matter tracts also plays a role in preserved motor output. Using diffusion-tensor imaging we aimed at (i reconstructing individual probable intrahemispheric connections between M1 and the three secondary areas (PMd, PMv, SMA and (ii examining the extent to which the tract-related microstructural integrity correlates with residual motor output. The microstructural integrity of the tract connecting ipsilesional M1 and PMd was significantly associated with motor output (R = 0.78, P = 0.02. The present results support the view that ipsilesional secondary motor areas such as the PMd might support M1 via corticocortical connections to generate motor output after stroke.

  1. Prehospital care of the acute stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Saver, Jeffrey

    2005-06-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) is the first medical contact for most acute stroke patients, thereby playing a pivotal role in the identification and treatment of acute cerebrovascular brain injury. The benefit of thrombolysis and interventional therapies for acute ischemic stroke is highly time dependent, making rapid and effective EMS response of critical importance. In addition, the general public has suboptimal knowledge about stroke warning signs and the importance of activating the EMS system. In the past, the ability of EMS dispatchers to recognize stroke calls has been documented to be poor. Reliable stroke identification in the field enables appropriate treatment to be initiated in the field and potentially inappropriate treatment avoided; the receiving hospital to be prenotified of a stroke patient's imminent arrival, rapid transport to be initiated; and stroke patients to be diverted to stroke-capable receiving hospitals. In this article we discuss research studies and educational programs aimed at improving stroke recognition by EMS dispatchers, prehospital personnel, and emergency department (ED) physicians and how this has impacted stroke treatment. In addition public educational programs and importance of community awareness of stroke symptoms will be discussed. For example, general public's utilization of 911 system for stroke victims has been limited in the past. However, it has been repeatedly shown that utilization of the 911 system is associated with accelerated arrival times to the ED, crucial to timely treatment of stroke patients. Finally, improved stroke recognition in the field has led investigators to study in the field treatment of stroke patients with neuroprotective agents. The potential impact of this on future of stroke treatment will be discussed. PMID:16194754

  2. Feasibility and efficacy of high-speed gait training with a voluntary driven exoskeleton robot for gait and balance dysfunction in patients with chronic stroke: nonrandomized pilot study with concurrent control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Takahiko; Shimizu, Issei; Hiroi, Yasuhiro; Kawaki, Masahiro; Sato, Daichi; Nagasawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of high-speed gait training with an exoskeleton robot hybrid assistive limb (HAL) in patients with chronic stroke, and to examine the efficacy of eight sessions (8 weeks) of gait training with a HAL compared with conventional physical therapy. Eighteen patients with chronic stroke were included in this study (nine each in the HAL and control groups). The HAL group underwent high-speed gait training with the HAL once a week for 8 weeks (20 min/session). The control group underwent conventional physical therapy for gait disturbance. Outcome measures were walking speed, number of steps, and cadence during a 10 m walking test, a timed up and go test, a functional reach test, and the Berg Balance Scale. Assessments were performed in the absence of the HAL before training and after the fourth and eighth training sessions. All patients in the HAL group completed the high-speed gait training without adverse events. The HAL group improved significantly in walking speed (55.9% increase, P<0.001), number of steps (17.6% decrease, P<0.01), and cadence (32.8% increase, P<0.001) during the 10 m walking test. The patients also exhibited significant improvements in the timed up and go test, the functional reach test, and the Berg Balance Scale after HAL training (P<0.01 in all). No statistical time-dependent changes were observed in any parameter in the control group. For chronic stroke patients, high-speed gait training with a HAL appears to be feasible and effective in improving gait and balance dysfunction despite the limitations of this nonrandomized pilot study. PMID:26288120

  3. Resting-state interhemispheric motor connectivity and white matter integrity correlate with motor impairment in chronic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    GottfriedSchlaug; JoyceLChen

    2013-01-01

    Functional and structural reorganization in the brain occurs after stroke. The ability to predict motor outcomes may depend on patterns of brain functional and structural connectivity. We tested the hypothesis that alterations in motor transcallosal and corticospinal connections correlate with motor impairment in patients with chronic stroke. Eleven ischemic stroke patients underwent the Upper Extremity Fugl Meyer assessment, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging, and diffusion ...

  4. Role of echocardiography in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Koki; Homma, Shunichi

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of potential embolic source is an important diagnostic step in treating patients with ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Cardiogenic embolism has been estimated to be the causative factor in 15-30% of all cases of ischemic stroke. Cardioembolic strokes are generally severe and recurrence and mortality rate high. Various cardiac disorders including atrial fibrillation, ventricular thrombus, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and structural heart defects can cause cardioembolic stroke. Although the aortic arch is not a cardiac structure, it is usually considered under source of cardiac embolism (cardioaortic source) and is reviewed in this article. Echocardiography (both transthoracic and transesophageal) is a widely used and versatile technique that can provide comprehensive information of thromboembolic risk in patients with stroke. This article reviews potential cardiac sources of stroke and discusses the role of echocardiography in clinical practice. PMID:27256218

  5. Effects of training using video games on the muscle strength, muscle tone, and activities of daily living of chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyuchang

    2013-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect on the muscle strength, muscle tone, and activities of daily living of post-stroke patients. [Subjects] Fourteen stroke patients were recruited. They were randomly allocated into two groups; the experimental group (n=7) and the control group (n=7). [Methods] The experimental group performed training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect together with conventional occupational therapy for 6 weeks (1 hour/day, 3 days/week), and the control group received conventional occupational therapy only for 6 weeks (30 min/day, 3 days/week). Before and after the intervention, the participants were measured for muscle strength, muscle tone, and performance of activities of daily living. [Results] There were significant differences pre- and post-test in muscle strength of the upper extremities, except the wrist, and performance of activities of daily living in the experimental group. There were no significant differences between the two groups at post-test. [Conclusion] The training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect had a positive effect on the motor function and performance of activities of daily living. This study showed that training using video games played on the Xbox Kinect may be an effective intervention for the rehabilitation of stroke patients. PMID:24259810

  6. Impaired cerebral autoregulation is associated with brain atrophy and worse functional status in chronic ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikio C Aoi

    Full Text Available Dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA is impaired following stroke. However, the relationship between dCA, brain atrophy, and functional outcomes following stroke remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine whether impairment of dCA is associated with atrophy in specific regions or globally, thereby affecting daily functions in stroke patients.We performed a retrospective analysis of 33 subjects with chronic infarctions in the middle cerebral artery territory, and 109 age-matched non-stroke subjects. dCA was assessed via the phase relationship between arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity. Brain tissue volumes were quantified from MRI. Functional status was assessed by gait speed, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL, modified Rankin Scale, and NIH Stroke Score.Compared to the non-stroke group, stroke subjects showed degraded dCA bilaterally, and showed gray matter atrophy in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes ipsilateral to infarct. In stroke subjects, better dCA was associated with less temporal lobe gray matter atrophy on the infracted side ([Formula: see text] = 0.029, faster gait speed ([Formula: see text] = 0.018 and lower IADL score ([Formula: see text]0.002. Our results indicate that better dynamic cerebral perfusion regulation is associated with less atrophy and better long-term functional status in older adults with chronic ischemic infarctions.

  7. Effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT 808 nm) on lower limb spastic muscle activity in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves, Marcele Florêncio; Dos Reis, Mariana César Ribeiro; de Andrade, Eliana Aparecida Fonseca; Lima, Fernanda Pupio Silva; Nicolau, Renata Amadei; Arisawa, Emília Ângela Loschiavo; Andrade, Adriano Oliveira; Lima, Mário Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    A cerebrovascular accident (CVA) may affect basic motor functions, including spasticity that may be present in the upper extremity and/or the lower extremity, post-stroke. Spasticity causes pain, muscle force reduction, and decreases the time to onset of muscle fatigue. Several therapeutic resources have been employed to treat CVA to promote functional recovery. The clinical use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for rehabilitation of muscular disorders has provided better muscle responses. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the application of LLLT in spastic muscles in patients with spasticity post-CVA. A double-blind clinical trial was conducted with 15 volunteer stroke patients who presented with post-stroke spasticity. Both males and females were treated; the average age was 51.5 ± 11.8 years old; the participants entered the study ranging from 11 to 48 months post-stroke onset. The patients participated in three consecutive phases (control, placebo, and real LLLT), in which all tests of isometric endurance of their hemiparetic lower limb were performed. LLLT (diode laser, 100 mW 808 nm, beam spot area 0.0314 cm(2), 127.39 J/cm(2)/point, 40 s) was applied before isometric endurance. After the real LLLT intervention, we observed significant reduction in the visual analogue scale for pain intensity (p = 0.0038), increased time to onset of muscle fatigue (p = 0.0063), and increased torque peak (p = 0.0076), but no significant change in the root mean square (RMS) value (electric signal in the motor unit during contraction, as obtained with surface electromyography). Our results suggest that the application of LLLT may contribute to increased recruitment of muscle fibers and, hence, to increase the onset time of the spastic muscle fatigue, reducing pain intensity in stroke patients with spasticity, as has been observed in healthy subjects and athletes. PMID:27299571

  8. Muscle, functional and cognitive adaptations after flywheel resistance training in stroke patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Sol; Turon, Marc; Prieto, Cristina; Tesch, Per A; García-Carreira, Maria del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance exercise (RE) improves neuromuscular function and physical performance after stroke. Yet, the effects of RE emphasizing eccentric (ECC; lengthening) actions on muscle hypertrophy and cognitive function in stroke patients are currently unknown. Thus, this study explored the effects of ECC-overload RE training on skeletal muscle size and function, and cognitive performance in individuals with stroke. Methods Thirty-two individuals with chronic stroke (≥6 months post-stroke...

  9. Bimanual Force Variability and Chronic Stroke: Asymmetrical Hand Control

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate force variability generated by both the paretic and non-paretic hands during bimanual force control. Nine chronic stroke individuals and nine age-matched individuals with no stroke history performed a force control task with both hands simultaneously. The task involved extending the wrist and fingers at 5%, 25%, and 50% of maximum voluntary contraction. Bimanual and unimanual force variability during bimanual force control was determined by calcula...

  10. Rehabilitation of a patient with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurba Barman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a significant cause of long-term disability world-wide. The post-stroke disabilities are due to loss of locomotion, activity of daily living, cognition and communication skills. Rehabilitation is an integral part of medical management and continues longitudinally through acute care, post-acute care and community reintegration. The objectives of stroke rehabilitation are to maximize the functional independence, minimize the disabilities, reintegrate back into the home and community and improve the self-esteem of patient. A comprehensive stroke rehabilitation service should provide early assessment of impairments and disabilities, management and prevention of complications and well-organized rehabilitation program in both in-patient and out-patient settings. A multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary team approach is necessary to reduce the post-stroke disabilities. It has many members, including physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, orthotist, psychotherapists, social workers, vocational rehabilitation therapists, rehabilitation nurse, patients, families and other caregivers. Physicians caring for patients with stroke during rehabilitation must be aware of potential medical complications, as well as a number of special problems that may complicate recovery, including cognitive deficits, aphasia, dysphagia, urinary incontinence, shoulder pain, spasticity, falls and depression. Involvement of patient and caregivers in the rehabilitation process is essential. This article outlines the salient features of the early comprehensive rehabilitation after stroke.

  11. Hypercholesterolemia in patients of ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Stroke is a common neurological disease that results in significant mortality and morbidity globally. Several risk factors have been identified for stroke among which hyperlipidaemia is one of the modifiable risk factors. Recent clinical trials have shown a reduction in ischemic stroke for patients taking lipid lowering medications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the frequency of hypercholesterolemia in patients of ischemic stroke in Hazara region. Method: This cross sectional study was carried out in the Medical Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad. Ninety patients of stroke confirmed as ischemic by CT scan brain were enrolled in the study after informed consent. The frequency of hypercholesterolemia in patients was recorded. Results: There were 55 (61.1 percentage) males. The mean age of patients was 64.4±11.5 years. The mean serum cholesterol in all patients was 4.16±1.1 mmol/l. The mean serum cholesterol of male patients was 4.3±1.2 mmol/l and 4.0±10.9 mmol/l in the case of females. Conclusions: Hypercholesterolemia could not be established as a major risk factor for stroke in our setup through this study that allude to the fact that other risk factors might be contributing more to the incidence of cerebrovascular accident in our population. (author)

  12. Prevalence of chronic conditions – Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ireland and Northern Ireland's Population Health Observatory (INIsPHO)

    2012-01-01

    IPH has estimated and forecast clinical diagnosis rates of stroke among adults for the years 2010, 2015 and 2020. In the Republic of Ireland, the data are based on the Survey of Lifestyle, Attitudes and Nutrition (SLÁN) 2007. The data describe the number of adults who report that they have experienced doctor-diagnosed stroke in the previous 12 months. Data are available by age and sex for each Local Health Office of the Health Service Executive (HSE) in the Republic of Ireland. In Northern Ir...

  13. Practical Assessment of Dysphagia in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyoung Moo; Kim, Hyo Jong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a quantitative and organ-specific practical test for the diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia based on assessment of stroke patients. Methods An initial test composed of 24 items was designed to evaluate the function of the organs involved in swallowing. The grading system of the initial test was based on the analysis of 50 normal adults. The initial test was performed in 52 stroke patients with clinical symptoms of dysphagia. Aspiration was measured via a videofluoroscop...

  14. Hemodynamic findings in patients with brain stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Siebert, Janusz; Gutknecht, Piotr; Molisz, Andrzej; Trzeciak, Bartosz; Nyka, Walenty

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Standard procedures carried out at a stroke department in patients after a cerebral event may prove insufficient for monitoring hemodynamic indices. Impedance cardiography enables hemodynamic changes to be monitored non-invasively. The aim of the work was to describe hemodynamic parameters in patients with acute phase of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and to analyse the correlation between the type of hemodynamic response and long-term prognosis. Material and methods The 45 cons...

  15. Relationship between plasma glutamate levels and post-stroke depression in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱方媛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the association between the plasma glutamate levels during acute ischemic stroke andpost-stroke depression(PSD)initially.Methods Seventy-four ischemic stroke patients admitted to the hospital within the first day of stroke onset were evaluated at a follow-up of 2 weeks.The Beck Depression Inventory(BDI,21-item)and DSM-Ⅳcriteria was used to diagnose post-stroke depression(PSD)at 2 weeks after stroke.

  16. Skipping Meds Greatly Ups Heart Patients' Risk of Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skipping Meds Greatly Ups Heart Patients' Risk of Stroke: Study Fatal strokes seven times more likely if drugs to control ... are much more likely to die from a stroke if they don't take cholesterol-lowering statin ...

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea in ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Tosun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ischemic stroke and to evaluate the effectiveness of nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment. METHODS: Overnight polysomnography was performed by a computerized system in 19 subjects with ischemic stroke. Patients with an apnea-hypopnea index > 5 were considered to have obstructive sleep apnea. The appropriate level of continuous positive airway pressure for each patient was determined during an all-night continuous positive airway pressure determination study. Attended continuous positive airway pressure titration was performed with a continuous positive airway pressure auto-titrating device. RESULTS: Obstructive sleep apnea prevalence among patients with ischemic stroke was 73.7%. The minimum SaO2 was significantly lower, and the percent of total sleep time in the wake stage and stage 1 sleep was significantly longer in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. In two patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea, we observed a decrease in the apnea-hypopnea index, an increase in mean wake time, mean SaO2, and minimum SaO2, and alterations in sleep structures with continuous positive airway pressure treatment. CONCLUSION: As the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea is of particular importance in secondary stroke prevention, we suggest that the clinical assessment of obstructive sleep apnea be part of the evaluation of stroke patients in rehabilitation units, and early treatment should be started.

  18. Stroke and the "stroke belt" in dialysis: contribution of patient characteristics to ischemic stroke rate and its geographic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, James B; Ellerbeck, Edward F; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Phadnis, Milind A; Rigler, Sally K; Spertus, John A; Zhou, Xinhua; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Shireman, Theresa I

    2013-12-01

    Geographic variation in stroke rates is well established in the general population, with higher rates in the South than in other areas of the United States. ESRD is a potent risk factor for stroke, but whether regional variations in stroke risk exist among dialysis patients is unknown. Medicare claims from 2000 to 2005 were used to ascertain ischemic stroke events in a large cohort of 265,685 incident dialysis patients. A Poisson generalized linear mixed model was generated to determine factors associated with stroke and to ascertain state-by-state geographic variability in stroke rates by generating observed-to-expected (O/E) adjusted rate ratios for stroke. Older age, female sex, African American race and Hispanic ethnicity, unemployed status, diabetes, hypertension, history of stroke, and permanent atrial fibrillation were positively associated with ischemic stroke, whereas body mass index >30 kg/m(2) was inversely associated with stroke (P1.0 were all in the South: North Carolina, Mississippi, and Oklahoma. Regional efforts to increase primary prevention in the "stroke belt" or to better educate dialysis patients on the signs of stroke so that they may promptly seek care may improve stroke care and outcomes in dialysis patients. PMID:23990675

  19. Functional status of patients after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašević-Todorović Snežana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients who have suffered from stroke become disabled and have specific problems due to the physical and mental disability that requires the implementation of rehabilitation and the creation of conditions for independent living, economic and social reintegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional recovery of patients after ischemic stroke, during the subacute phase of medical rehabilitation. Material and Methods. The study was organized as a prospective study, which included 74 patients (44 men, 30 women treated after stroke at the Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Clinical Center of Vojvodina during 2013. Motor recovery was assessed by Signe-Brunnstrom scale, and Barthel Index, Rivermead Mobility Index, and modified Rankin scale were applied to assess the function. Results. The average age of patients after stroke was 66.59 ± 9.607 years. The mean hospital stay was 34.35 days. The majority of patients in this study had righthand hemiparesis 47 (63.5%, and 27 (36.5% had left-hand hemiparesis. By analyzing the average value of motor recovery of the affected limb by S. Brunnstrom′s scale during rehabilitation at the Department of Medical Rehabilitation, it was found that the value at the end of subacute rehabilitation phase was significantly increased (p<0.01. The results of this testing showed a statistically significant improvement (p<0.01 in the average values of Barthel Index, Rivermead Mobility Index and modified Rankin scale during the rehabilitation treatment of stroke patients. Conclusion. The obtained results showed that the rehabilitation treatment resulted in better functional and motor recovery in the patients who had had ischemic stroke.

  20. Bowel Function in Acute Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Jin Hwa; Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Bo Ryun; Han, Eun Young; Park, Ji Young

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate factors related to bowel function and colon motility in acute stroke patients. Method Fifty-one stroke patients (29 males, mean age 63.4±13.6 years, onset 13.4±4.8 days) were recruited and divided into two groups: constipation (n=25) and non-constipation (n=26) groups. We evaluated the amount of intake, voiding function, concomitant swallowing problem and colon transit time (CTT) using radio-opaque markers for ascending, descending and rectosigmoid colons. The Adapted...

  1. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  2. Brain-computer interfaces in the completely locked-in state and chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, U; Birbaumer, N; Ramos-Murguialday, A

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) use brain activity to control external devices, facilitating paralyzed patients to interact with the environment. In this chapter, we discuss the historical perspective of development of BCIs and the current advances of noninvasive BCIs for communication in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and for restoration of motor impairment after severe stroke. Distinct techniques have been explored to control a BCI in patient population especially electroencephalography (EEG) and more recently near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) because of their noninvasive nature and low cost. Previous studies demonstrated successful communication of patients with locked-in state (LIS) using EEG- and invasive electrocorticography-BCI and intracortical recordings when patients still showed residual eye control, but not with patients with complete LIS (ie, complete paralysis). Recently, a NIRS-BCI and classical conditioning procedure was introduced, allowing communication in patients in the complete locked-in state (CLIS). In severe chronic stroke without residual hand function first results indicate a possible superior motor rehabilitation to available treatment using BCI training. Here we present an overview of the available studies and recent results, which open new doors for communication, in the completely paralyzed and rehabilitation in severely affected stroke patients. We also reflect on and describe possible neuronal and learning mechanisms responsible for BCI control and perspective for future BMI research for communication in CLIS and stroke motor recovery. PMID:27590968

  3. Clues to occult cancer in patients with ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Jae Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that hidden malignancy could be detected in patients with cryptogenic stroke without active cancer when they showed the distinctive characteristics of cancer-related stroke. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Among 2,562 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, patients with cryptogenic stroke were analyzed and categorized into two groups according to the presence of active cancer: cryptogenic stroke with active cancer (cancer-related stroke, CA-stroke group and without active cancer (CR-stroke group. Patients with active lung cancer without stroke were also recruited for comparison purposes (CA-control. Clinical factors, lesion patterns on diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI, and laboratory findings were analyzed among groups. A total of 348 patients with cryptogenic stroke were enrolled in this study. Among them, 71 (20.4% patients had active cancer at the time of stroke. The D-dimer levels were significantly higher in patients with CA-stroke than those with CR-stroke or CA-control (both p<0.001. Regarding lesion patterns, patients with CA-stroke mostly had multiple lesions in multiple vascular territories, while more than 80% of patients with CR-stroke had single/multiple lesions in a single vascular territory (P<0.001. D-dimer levels (OR 1.11 per 1 µg/mL increase; 95% CI 1.06-1.15; P<0.001 and DWI lesion patterns (OR 7.13; 95% CI 3.42-14.87; P<0.001 were independently associated with CA-stroke. Workup for hidden malignancy was performed during hospitalization in 10 patients who showed elevated D-dimer levels and multiple infarcts involving multiple vascular territories but had no known cancer, and it revealed hidden malignancies in all the patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with CA-stroke have distinctive D-dimer levels and lesion patterns. These characteristics can serve as clues to occult cancer in patients with cryptogenic stroke.

  4. Risk factors and prognosis of ischemic stroke in young patients in Uzbekistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurshidakhon Rasulova

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Between 2004 and 2008, we studied reasons and risk factors of ischemic stroke in 150 young patients (aged between 17-44 years, compared with those in elderly patients (n=70. According to our data, heredity, arterial hypertension, cerebral vasculitis, thyroid diseases, chronic alcoholism, smoking and long-term use of oral contraceptives are main risk factors of ischemic stroke in the young in Uzbekistan. However, relative risk of stroke in this group of patients is less than in elder patients. In 16% cases, usage of standard diagnostic measures does not lead to identification of the disease cause.

  5. Hurdles in stroke thrombolysis: Experience from 100 consecutive ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Badachi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute management of ischemic stroke involves thrombolysis within 4.5 h. For a successful outcome, early recognition of stroke, transportation to the hospital emergency department immediately after stroke, timely imaging, proper diagnosis, and thrombolysis within 4.5 h is of paramount importance. Aim: To analyze the obstacles for thrombolysis in acute stroke patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care center in South India. A total of hundred consecutive patients of acute ischemic stroke who were not thrombolysed, but otherwise fulfilled the criteria for thrombolysis were evaluated prospectively for various factors that prevented thrombolysis. The constraints to thrombolysis were categorized into: i Failure of patient to recognize stroke symptoms, ii patient′s awareness of thrombolysis as a treatment modality for stroke, iii failure of patient′s relative to recognize stroke, iv failure of primary care physician to recognize stroke, v transport delays, vi lack of neuroimaging and thrombolysis facility, and vii nonaffordability. Results: The biggest hurdle for early hospital presentation is failure of patients to recognize stroke (73%, followed by lack of neuroimaging facility (58%, nonaffordability (56%, failure of patient′s relative to recognize stroke (38%, failure of the primary care physician to recognize stroke (21%, and transport problems (13%. Awareness of thrombolysis as a treatment modality for stroke was seen only in 2%. Conclusion: Considering the urgency of therapeutic measures in acute stroke, there is necessity and room for improvement to overcome various hurdles that prevent thrombolysis.

  6. Effects of the bilateral isokinetic strengthening training on functional parameters, gait, and the quality of life in patients with stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Büyükvural Şen, Sıdıka; Özbudak Demir, Sibel; Ekiz, Timur; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of the bilateral isokinetic strengthening training applied to knee and ankle muscles on balance, functional parameters, gait, and the quality of in stroke patients. Methods: Fifty patients (33 M, 17 F) with subacute-chronic stroke and 30 healthy subjects were included. Stroke patients were allocated into isokinetic and control groups. Conventional rehabilitation program was applied to all cases; additionally maximal concentric isokinetic strengthening traini...

  7. Abnormal organization of white matter network in patients with no dementia after ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shi

    Full Text Available Structural changes after ischemic stroke could affect information communication extensively in the brain network. It is likely that the defects in the white matter (WM network play a key role in information interchange. In this study, we used graph theoretical analysis to examine potential organization alteration in the WM network architecture derived from diffusion tensor images from subjects with no dementia and experienced stroke in the past 5.4-14.8 months (N = 47, Mini-Mental Screening Examination, MMSE range 18-30, compared with a normal control group with 44 age and gender-matched healthy volunteers (MMSE range 26-30. Region-wise connectivity was derived from fiber connection density of 90 different cortical and subcortical parcellations across the whole brain. Both normal controls and patients with chronic stroke exhibited efficient small-world properties in their WM structural networks. Compared with normal controls, topological efficiency was basically unaltered in the patients with chronic stroke, as reflected by unchanged local and global clustering coefficient, characteristic path length, and regional efficiency. No significant difference in hub distribution was found between normal control and patient groups. Patients with chronic stroke, however, were found to have reduced betweenness centrality and predominantly located in the orbitofrontal cortex, whereas increased betweenness centrality and vulnerability were observed in parietal-occipital cortex. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score of patient is correlated with the betweenness centrality of right pallidum and local clustering coefficient of left superior occipital gyrus. Our findings suggest that patients with chronic stroke still exhibit efficient small-world organization and unaltered topological efficiency, with altered topology at orbitofrontal cortex and parietal-occipital cortex in the overall structural network. Findings from this study could

  8. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Ischemic Stroke in Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Lee, Ji-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Stroke is common among cancer patients. However, risk factors and biomarkers of stroke in cancer patients are not well established. This study aimed to investigate risk factors and biomarkers as well as etiology of ischemic stroke in cancer patients. Methods A retrospective review was conducted in cancer patients with ischemic stroke who were admitted to a general hospital in Busan, Korea, between January 2003 and December 2012. The risk factors and biomarkers for strok...

  9. Stroke mortality: predictive value of simple laboratory tests and acute physiology, age, chronic health evaluation III scoring system: a hospital based study

    OpenAIRE

    Ajeet K. Chaurasia; Manoj K. Mathur; N C Dwivedi; Manjul Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute stroke is a heterogeneous condition with respect to prognosis. This study was undertaken with the aim to evaluate the significance of routine simple blood parameters and APACHE (acute physiology, age, chronic health evaluation) III scoring system as methods of prediction of 1-month mortality in stroke patients and to assess the sensitivity and specificity of APACHE III scoring system in predicting short term outcome in critically ill patients having stroke. Methods: Patie...

  10. Thrombolysis outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients with prior stroke and diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, N K; Ahmed, N; Davalos, A; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Melo, T; Soinne, L; Wahlgren, N; Lees, K R

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM) and prior stroke (PS) were excluded from European approval of alteplase in stroke. We examined the influence of DM and PS on the outcomes of patients who received thrombolytic therapy (T; data from Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in...... Stroke-International Stroke Thrombolysis Register) compared to nonthrombolyzed controls (C; data from Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive). METHODS: We selected ischemic stroke patients on whom we held data on age, baseline NIH Stroke Scale score (NIHSS), and 90-day modified Rankin Scale score (m...... treatment (tissue plasminogen activator × DM × PS, p = 0.5). Age ≤80 years or >80 years did not influence our findings. CONCLUSIONS: Outcomes from thrombolysis are better than the controls among patients with DM, PS, or both. We find no statistical justification for the exclusion of these patients from...

  11. 5-year survival and rehospitalization due to stroke recurrence among patients with hemorrhagic or ischemic strokes in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Lee, Sze Haur; Heng, Bee Hoon; Chin, Vivien S

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke is the 4th leading cause of death and 1st leading cause of disability in Singapore. However the information on long-term post stroke outcomes for Singaporean patients was limited. This study aimed to investigate the post stroke outcomes of 5-year survival and rehospitalization due to stroke recurrence for hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke patients in Singapore. The outcomes were stratified by age, ethnic group, gender and stroke types. The causes of death and stroke recurrence...

  12. Art Therapy Outcomes in the Rehabilitation Treatment of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Chun, Sae-il

    2008-01-01

    This case report discusses the potential for art therapy to aid in the recovery of early-chronic stroke patients. The patient was diagnosed with having a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a cerebral aneurysm rupture 1 year prior to hospitalization. Therapies used as part of the patient's treatment included 10 weeks of art therapy conducted twice a…

  13. Hurdles in stroke thrombolysis: Experience from 100 consecutive ischemic stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sagar Badachi; Thomas Mathew; Arvind Prabhu; Raghunandan Nadig; Gosala R. K Sarma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute management of ischemic stroke involves thrombolysis within 4.5 h. For a successful outcome, early recognition of stroke, transportation to the hospital emergency department immediately after stroke, timely imaging, proper diagnosis, and thrombolysis within 4.5 h is of paramount importance. Aim: To analyze the obstacles for thrombolysis in acute stroke patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care center in South India. A total of hundred consecu...

  14. Improving stroke care for patients at Cavan hospital [poster

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murugasu, G Dr.

    2013-07-01

    Under the Quality and Continuing Care Directorate (QCCD) in stroke care Cavan General Hospital was identified as a hospital that received a large number of stroke and TIA patients. A programme was established to improve services to this population.

  15. Short- and long-term prognosis for very old stroke patients. The Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Jørgensen, H S; Reith, J; Nakayama, H; Pedersen, P M; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; NN, NN

    2004-01-01

    prognosis after stroke. CONCLUSIONS: In this study very old age per se was a strong predictor of outcome and mortality after stroke. Apart from very old age, factors such as prestroke medical and functional status, and onset stroke severity should be taken into consideration when planning treatment and......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The very old are expected to become a growing part of the stroke population in the industrialised part of the world. The aims of this study were to evaluate clinical characteristics of patients aged 85 years or more at stroke onset and to investigate very old age as an...... independent predictor of short- and long-term outcome. METHODS: In the community-based Copenhagen Stroke Study we recorded admission clinical characteristics in 1197 consecutive stroke patients. Patients were stratified according to age groups on admission. Follow-up was performed at a mean of 7 years after...

  16. A STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF TREADMILL EXERCISE TRAINING IN GAIT PARAMETERS OF CHRONIC STROKE CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Divan Mohaideen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is the leading cause of death and the most common cause of disability. This study determined the effects of Treadmill Aerobic Exercise on spatial and temporal gait parameters among stroke patients. Materials & Methods: In this study, Thirty -nine subjects with hemiparetic stroke underwent Treadmill Aerobic Exercise four times weekly for six months from December 2006 to June 2007. This study has taken place in Department of Physical therapy and Rehabilitation, GSN multi Specialty hospital and research Centre, Hyderabad, India. We measured the spatial and temporal gait parameters of the subjects before and after Treadmill Aerobic Exercise training by the means of 30-foot timed walks, 6 minute distance walks with usual assistive devices and 8metre instrumented walkway without assistive devices. Pre and post training results were compared and contrast. Results: This study results that the Treadmill Aerobic Exercise improved 30-foot walks by 17% and 6 minute walk by 23%. Unassisted walking velocity increased 22%, stride length increased 13% and cadence increased 7%. Paretic and non-paretic step lengths increased significantly, and respective step times increased significantly. Discussion: Large study should be done with treadmill exercise training along with other skills for the better results to improve the gait parameters in chronic stroke cases. Conclusion: This study shows the evidence for positive changes in spatial and temporal gait parameters of subjects with stroke after Treadmill Aerobic Exercise.

  17. Effects of melatonin in experimental stroke models in acute, sub-acute, and chronic stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Wen Lin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hsiao-Wen Lin, E-Jian LeeNeurophysiology Laboratory, Neurosurgical Service, Department of Surgery, National Cheng Kung University Medical Center and Medical School, Tainan, TaiwanAbstract: Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxy-tryptamine, a naturally occurring indole produced mainly by the pineal gland, is a well known antioxidant. Stroke (cerebral ischemia is the second leading cause of death worldwide. To date, however, effective and safe treatment for stroke remains unavailable. Melatonin is both lipid- and water-soluble and readily crosses the blood–brain barrier (BBB. Increasing evidence has shown that, in animal stroke models, administering melatonin significantly reduces infarct volume, edema, and oxidative damage and improves electrophysiological and behavioral performance. Here, we reviewed studies that assess effects of melatonin on cerebral ischemia in acute, sub-acute, and chronic stages. In addition to its potent antioxidant properties, melatonin exerts antiapoptotic, antiexcitotoxic, anti-inflammatory effects and promotes mitochondrial functions in animals with cerebral ischemia. Given that melatonin shows almost no toxicity to humans and possesses multifaceted protective capacity against cerebral ischemia, it is valuable to consider using melatonin in clinical trials on patients suffering from stroke.Keywords: cerebral ischemia, melatonin, stroke, neuroprotection

  18. Increased Force Variability in Chronic Stroke: Contributions of Force Modulation below 1 Hz

    OpenAIRE

    Lodha, Neha; Misra, Gaurav; Coombes, Stephen A.; Evangelos A Christou; James H Cauraugh

    2013-01-01

    Increased force variability constitutes a hallmark of arm disabilities following stroke. Force variability is related to the modulation of force below 1 Hz in healthy young and older adults. However, whether the increased force variability observed post stroke is related to the modulation of force below 1 Hz remains unknown. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare force modulation below 1 Hz in chronic stroke and age-matched healthy individuals. Both stroke and control individuals (N =...

  19. Improved nutritional status in elderly patients 6 months after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynningsen, P K; Damsgaard, Else Marie; Husted, Steen

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nutritional status among stroke patients has received limited attention despite the fact, that it may have an influence on clinical outcome. Previous studies have estimated that 15-20 % of patients suffer from malnutrition in the acute phase of stroke, but so far no studies have...... focused on the late rehabilitation phase after stroke in the patients own home, where the attention on nutrition may be reduced. AIMS: To determine the prevalence of malnutrition during 6 months of stroke rehabilitation, and to investigate the association between nutritional status, functional recovery......, length of stay in hospital and infectious complications. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 89 patients with ischemic stroke consecutively admitted to a geriatric stroke rehabilitation unit had their nutritional status evaluated in the hospital at 1 week and 5 weeks after stroke, and in their own home at 3 months and...

  20. Organization of prehospital medical care for patients with cerebral stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Anatolyevich Shamalov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main tasks of prehospital medical care are to make a correct diagnosis of stroke and to minimize patient transportation delays. Stroke is a medical emergency so all patients with suspected stroke must be admitted by a first arrived ambulance team to a specialized neurology unit for stroke patients. Most rapidly transporting the patient to hospital, as well as reducing the time of examination to verify the pattern of stroke are a guarantee of successful thrombolytic therapy that is the most effective treatment for ischemic stroke. Substantially reducing the time of in-hospital transfers (the so-called door-to-needle time allows stroke patients to be directly admitted to the around the clock computed tomography room, without being sent to the admission unit. Prehospital stroke treatment policy (basic therapy is to correct the body’s vital functions and to maintain respiration, hemodynamics, and water-electrolyte balance and it can be performed without neuroimaging verification of the pattern of stroke. The application of current organizational, methodical, and educational approaches is useful in improving the quality of medical care for stroke patients, in enhancing the continuity between prehospital and hospital cares, and in promoting new effective technologies in stroke therapy.

  1. Stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advent of computed tomography (CT) in the early 1970s greatly facilitated the diagnosis and management of stroke and added significantly to our understanding of the pathophysiologic brain alterations it causes in humans. With CT it is now possible for the first time to noninvasively and reliably diagnose and distinguish between stroke resulting from cerebral infraction and that resulting from cerebral hemorrhage. In addition, other brain lesions that at times may clinically present as stroke-like syndromes, such as primary or metastatic brain tumor, brain abscess, or subdural hematoma, can usually be clearly differentiated by the CT examination. In most instances it is no longer necessary to perform cerebral angiography to exclude a possible surgical lesion in patients in whom the clinical diagnosis of stroke may have been in doubt

  2. White matter changes in stroke patients. Relationship with stroke subtype and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leys, D; Englund, E; Del Ser, T;

    1999-01-01

    vascular dementia. WMC are more frequent in patients with lacunar infarcts, deep intracerebral hemorrhages, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. After an acute ischemic stroke, WMC are associated with a higher risk of...... death or dependency, recurrent stroke of any type, cerebral bleeding under anticoagulation, myocardial infarction, and poststroke dementia. WMC in stroke patients are often associated with small-vessel disease and lead to a higher risk of death, and poor cardiac and neurological outcome. However......White matter changes (WMC), detected by imaging techniques, are frequent in stroke patients. The aim of the study was to determine how WMC relate to stroke subtypes and to stroke outcome. We made a systematic Medline search for articles appearing with two of the following key words: either 'WMC or...

  3. Delayed gait recovery in a stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong Pyo; Lee, Mi Young; Kwon, Yong Hyun; Jang, Sung Ho

    2013-06-01

    We report on a stroke patient who showed delayed gait recovery between 8 and 11 months after the onset of intracerebral hemorrhage. This 32-year-old female patient underwent craniotomy and drainage for right intracerebral hemorrhage due to rupture of an arteriovenous malformation. Brain MR images revealed a large leukomalactic lesion in the right fronto-parietal cortex. Diffusion tensor tractography at 8 months after onset revealed that the right corticospinal tract was severely injured. At this time, the patient could not stand or walk despite undergoing rehabilitation from 2 months after onset. It was believed that severe spasticity of the left leg and right ankle was largely responsible, and thus, antispastic drugs, antispastic procedures (alcohol neurolysis of the motor branch of the tibial nerve and an intramuscular alcohol wash of both tibialis posterior muscles) and physical therapy were tried to control the spasticity. These measures relieved the severe spasticity, with the result that the patient was able to stand at 3 months. In addition, the improvements in sensorimotor function, visuospatial function, and cognition also seemed to contribute to gait recovery. As a result, she gained the ability to walk independently on even floor with a left ankle foot orthosis at 11 months after onset. This case illustrates that clinicians should attempt to find the cause of gait inability and to initiate intensive rehabilitation in stroke patients who cannot walk at 3-6 months after onset. PMID:25206447

  4. Dual isotope scintigraphy in stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelet scintigraphy is a useful technique to detect atherosclerotic lesions of the neck vessels in stroke patients. The habitual one isotope technique causes false positive and false negative results due to circulating platelet-bound activity. To eliminate these confusing results we performed a dual isotope technique on 20 stroke patients. The new method consists of simultaneous injections of 111-Indium labelled blood platelets and 99mTc labelled red cells, and achieves a calculation of the ratio 111-In/99mTc. Thus the subtraction of the red cell blood flow image can render a pure thrombus formation visible. The habitual visually evaluated one isotope scintigraphy showed positive scans in 11 out of 20 patients, whereas under dual isotope scintigraphy 3 patients showed no 111-Indium excess after subtraction of the red cell image; they can thus be qualified as false positive. In the case of another patient with a visually negative image a thrombus formation could be observed after the subtraction procedure. It seems, that the dual isotope technique in platelet scintigraphy is a valuable refinement on the way to verifiable results. (orig.)

  5. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... communicate with your child’s doctor. Symptoms of a Stroke Stroke is an injury to part of the ...

  6. Salivary neuron specific enolase: an indicator for neuronal damage in patients with ischemic stroke and stroke-prone patients

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rawi, Natheer H.; Atiyah, Karim M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The blood-brain barrier is compromised in patients with stroke. The release of neuro-biochemical protein markers, such as neuron specific enolase (NSE) into the circulation may allow the pathophysiology and prognosis of patients with cerebrovascular diseases to be evaluated further. The present study was designed to measure the marker of neuronal damage, NSE, in saliva and serum of patients with acute ischemic stroke and patients with stroke related diseases as a diagnostic and/or...

  7. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses in humans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: implications for cryptogenic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, H Cameron; Mangum, Tyler S; Kern, Julia P; Elliott, Jonathan E; Beasley, Kara M; Goodman, Randy D; Mladinov, Suzana; Barak, Otto F; Bakovic, Darija; Dujic, Zeljko; Lovering, Andrew T

    2016-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? Do individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses at rest or during exercise? What is the main finding and its importance? Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have a greater prevalence of blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses at rest than age-matched control subjects. Given that the intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses are large enough to permit venous emboli to pass into the arterial circulation, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and an elevated risk of thrombus formation may be at risk of intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomosis-facilitated embolic injury (e.g. stroke or transient ischaemic attack). The pulmonary capillaries prevent stroke by filtering venous emboli from the circulation. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses are large-diameter (≥50 μm) vascular connections in the lung that may compromise the integrity of the pulmonary capillary filter and have recently been linked to cryptogenic stroke and transient ischaemic attack. Prothrombotic populations, such as individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), may be at increased risk of stroke and transient ischaemic attack facilitated by intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses, but the prevalence and degree of blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses in this population has not been fully examined and compared with age-matched healthy control subjects. We used saline contrast echocardiography to assess blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses at rest (n = 29 COPD and 19 control subjects) and during exercise (n = 10 COPD and 10 control subjects) in subjects with COPD and age-matched healthy control subjects. Blood flow through intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses was detected in 23% of subjects with COPD at rest and was significantly higher compared with age

  8. Effects of temporary functional deafferentation on the brain, sensation, and behavior of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sens, Elisabeth; Teschner, Ulrike; Meissner, Winfried; Preul, Christoph; Huonker, Ralph; Witte, Otto W; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2012-08-22

    Following stroke, many patients suffer from chronic motor impairment and reduced somatosensation in the stroke-affected body parts. Recent experimental studies suggest that temporary functional deafferentation (TFD) of parts of the stroke-affected upper limb or of the less-affected contralateral limb might improve the sensorimotor capacity of the stroke-affected hand. The present study sought evidence of cortical reorganization and related sensory and motor improvements following pharmacologically induced TFD of the stroke-affected forearm. Examination was performed during 2 d of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy. Thirty-six human patients were deafferented on the stroke-affected forearm by an anesthetic cream (containing lidocaine and prilocaine) on one of the 2 d, and a placebo cream was applied on the other. The order of TFD and placebo treatment was counterbalanced across patients. Somatosensory and motor performance were assessed using a Grating orienting task and a Shape-sorter-drum task, and with somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields. Evoked magnetic fields showed significant pre- to postevaluation magnitude increases in response to tactile stimulation of the thumb of the stroke-affected hand during TFD but not following placebo treatment. We also observed a rapid extension of the distance between cortical representations of the stroke-affected thumb and little finger following TFD but not following placebo treatment. Moreover, somatosensory and motor performance of the stroke-affected hand was significantly enhanced during TFD but not during placebo treatment. Thus, pharmacologically induced TFD of a stroke-affected forearm might improve the somatosensory and motor functions of the stroke-affected upper limb, accompanied by cortical plasticity. PMID:22915119

  9. Kinesthetic taping improves walking function in patients with stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeskov, Birgitte; Carver, Line Tornehøj; von Essen-Leise, Anders; Henriksen, Marius

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is an important cause of severe disability and impaired motor function. Treatment modalities that improve motor function in patients with stroke are needed. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of kinesthetic taping of the anterior thigh and knee on maximal...... walking speed and clinical indices of spasticity in patients with stroke. METHODS: Thirty-two patients (9 women) receiving rehabilitation after stroke (average, 50 days since stroke) who had impaired walking ability were recruited. Primary outcome was maximal walking speed measured by the 10-meter walk......, although a trend was observed indicating a lesser degree of spasticity. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that kinesthetic taping of the anterior thigh and knee provides an immediate improvement in walking function in patients with stroke. Such a positive effect on motor function could be a...

  10. Monitoring of Functioning Status in Subjects With Chronic Stroke in South Korea Using WHODAS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Su-Yeon; Hong, Sang-Eun; Kim, Ee-Jin; Kim, Chang-Hwan; Joa, Kyung-Lim

    2016-01-01

    Objective To follow up the long-term functioning in a community through assessing personal background and status based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) after a stroke, by using a Korean version of World Health Organization Disability Assessment Scale II (K-WHODAS II). Methods We surveyed 146 patients diagnosed at the first-onset of acute stroke and discharged after Inha University Hospital, and 101 patients answered the K-WHODAS II survey. We analyzed the relationship of six functioning domains of K-WHODAS II with K-MMSE (Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination) and K-MBI (Korean version of Modified Barthel Index) at admission and discharge, and personal background. All subjects were divided into five groups, according to the disease durations, to assess the functional changes and the differences of K-MMSE and K-MBI at the admission and discharge. Results K-MBI and K-MMSE at admission and discharge showed no significant differences in all five groups, respectively (p>0.05), reflecting no baseline disparity for long-term follow-up. All subjects showed positive gains of K-MBI and K-MMSE at discharge (p<0.05). The six functioning domains and total scores of K-WHODAS II had decreasing trends until 3 years after the stroke onset, but rose thereafter. Higher scores of K-MBI and K-MMSE, younger age, women, working status, higher educational level, and living with a partner were correlated with lower scores of K-WHODAS II (p<0.05). Conclusion The long-term functioning after stroke was affected not only by cognitive and motor status in hospital, but also by certain kinds of personal background. K-WHODAS II may be used to monitor functioning status in a community and to assess personal backgrounds in subjects with chronic stroke. PMID:26949677

  11. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulati...

  12. Stroke in Patients With Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders Møller; Dalsgaard, Morten; Bang, Casper N;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There are limited data on risk stratification of stroke in aortic stenosis. This study examined predictors of stroke in aortic stenosis, the prognostic implications of stroke, and how aortic valve replacement (AVR) with or without concomitant coronary artery bypass graftin...... associated with mortality. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00092677....

  13. Dyslipidemia and Outcome in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tian; ZHANG Jin Tao; YANG Mei; ZHANG Huan; LIU Wen Qing; KONG Yan; XU Tan; ZHANG Yong Hong

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo study the relationship between dyslipidemia and outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MethodsData about 1 568 patients with acute ischemic stroke werecollected from 4 hospitals in Shandong Province from January 2006 to December 2008. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) >10 at discharge or death was defined as the outcome. Effect of dyslipidemia on outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score-adjusted analysis, respectively. ResultsThe serum levels of TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C were significantly associated with the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score-adjusted analysis showed that the ORs and 95% CIs were 3.013 (1.259, 7.214)/2.655 (1.298, 5.43), 3.157(1.306, 7.631)/3.405(1.621, 7.154), and 0.482 (0.245, 0.946)/0.51 (0.282, 0.921), respectively, for patients with acute ischemic stroke. Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test showed no significant difference in observed and predicted risk in patients with acute ischemic stroke (chi-square=8.235, P=0.411). ConclusionSerum levels of TC, LDL-C, and HDL-C are positively related with the outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  14. Predictors of ischemic versus hemorrhagic strokes in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To identify the factors that predispose to ischemic versus hemorrhagic stroke in hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: All the hypertensive patients, who were registered in AKUH acute stroke outcome data base, over a period of 22 months, were identified and from this cohort the patients with first ever stroke were selected. The data regarding demographics, stroke type (ischemic vs. hemorrhagic), pre-existing medical problems, laboratory and radiological investigations was recorded and analyzed. Results: Five hundred and nineteen patients with either ischemic stroke or parenchymal hemorrhage were registered over a period of 22 months. Three hundred and forty-eight patients (67%) had hypertension and of these, 250 had first ever stroke at the time of admission. Presence of diabetes mellitus (OR: 3.76; Cl:1.67-8.46) and ischemic heart disease (OR: 6.97; Cl:1.57-30.98) were found to be independent predictors of ischemic strokes. Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus and ischemic heart disease predict ischemic stroke in a patient with hypertension. (author)

  15. Risk factors for swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Flávia Ferraz Barros Baroni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Stroke is a frequent cause of dysphagia. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in a tertiary care hospital the prevalence of swallowing dysfunction in stroke patients, to analyze factors associated with the dysfunction and to relate swallowing dysfunction to mortality 3 months after the stroke. METHODS: Clinical evaluation of deglutition was performed in 212 consecutive patients with a medical and radiologic diagnosis of stroke. The occurrence of death was determined 3 months after the stroke. RESULTS: It was observed that 63% of the patients had swallowing dysfunction. The variables gender and specific location of the lesion were not associated with the presence or absence of swallowing dysfunction. The patients with swallowing dysfunction had more frequently a previous stroke, had a stroke in the left hemisphere, motor and/or sensitivity alterations, difficulty in oral comprehension, alteration of oral expression, alteration of the level of consciousness, complications such as fever and pneumonia, high indexes on the Rankin scale, and low indexes on the Barthel scale. These patients had a higher mortality rate. CONCLUSIONS: Swallowing evaluation should be done in all patients with stroke, since swallowing dysfunction is associated with complications and an increased risk of death.

  16. Improved nutritional status in elderly patients 6 months after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynningsen, Peter Krogh; Husted, Steen; Damsgaard, Else Marie Skjøde

    2007-01-01

    , length of stay in hospital and infectious complications. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 89 patients with ischemic stroke consecutively admitted to a geriatric stroke rehabilitation unit had their nutritional status evaluated in the hospital at 1 week and 5 weeks after stroke, and in their own home at 3 months and...... 6 months. Nutritional status was evaluated by body weight, body mass index (BMI), mid upper arm circumference (MAC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF) and serum concentrations of albumin and transferrin. Malnutrition was defined if the patients had 2 or more abnormal nutritional variables. RESULTS......INTRODUCTION: Nutritional status among stroke patients has received limited attention despite the fact, that it may have an influence on clinical outcome. Previous studies have estimated that 15-20 % of patients suffer from malnutrition in the acute phase of stroke, but so far no studies have...

  17. Evaluation of Factors Influencing Sensory Disability in Cerebral Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ghandehari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical findings affecting disability in stroke patients are important as presence of these factors determines the prognosis and future course of these patients. Methods: Consecutive stroke patients admitted at Ghaem hospital, Mashhad were enrolled in this prospective study in 2008. Hemihyposthesia, hemianesthesia, hemineglect and homonymous hemianopsia was evaluated in these patients. Disability score was based on the Modified Ranking Disability Score (MRDS, 72 hours post stroke. Mean of MRDS was analyzed by T test and Fisher tests and p<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: A total of 329 stroke patients were investigated. Hemihyposthesia, hemianesthesia, hemineglect and homonymous hemianopsia was found in 37.4%, 13.8%, 7.9% and 7.3% of the patients, respectively. MRDS was significantly higher in patients with hemianesthesia as compared to other stroke patients, (p<0.001. MRDS of patients with hemihypoestheisa, hemineglect and homonyous hemianopsia was not significantly different than patients without these abnormalities (p=0.44, p=023 and p=0.83. Patients with triad of hemianesthesia, hemineglect and homonymous hemianopsia had significantly higher MRDS than others (p<0.001. Conclusion: Hemianesthesia is a clinical factor affecting sensory disability in cerebral stroke patients. Presence of the above triad could increase MRDS in these patients.

  18. Delayed gait recovery in a stroke patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong Pyo Seo; Mi Young Lee; Yong Hyun Kwon; Sung Ho Jang

    2013-01-01

    We report on a stroke patient who showed delayed gait recovery between 8 and 11 months after the onset of intracerebral hemorrhage. This 32-year-old female patient underwent craniotomy and drainage for right intracerebral hemorrhage due to rupture of an arteriovenous malformation. Brain MR images revealed a large leukomalactic lesion in the right fronto-parietal cortex. Diffusion tensor tractography at 8 months after onset revealed that the right corticospinal tract was severely injured. At this time, the patient could not stand or walk despite undergoing rehabilitation from 2 months after onset. It was believed that severe spasticity of the left leg and right ankle was largely responsible, and thus, antispastic drugs, antispastic procedures (alcohol neurolysis of the motor branch of the tibial nerve and an intramuscular alcohol wash of both tibialis posterior muscles) and physical therapy were tried to control the spasticity. These measures relieved the severe spasticity, with the result that the patient was able to stand at 3 months. In addition, the improvements in sensorimotor function, visuospatial function, and cognition also seemed to contribute to gait recovery. As a result, she gained the ability to walk independently on even floor with a left ankle foot orthosis at 11 months after onset. This case illustrates that clinicians should attempt to find the months after onset.

  19. Selection of acute stroke patients for treatment of visual neglect.

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, S P; Patel, P.; Greenwood, R J

    1993-01-01

    Although visual neglect is a predictor of poor outcome after stroke, some patients regain independence, whilst others take up considerable rehabilitation resources. Intensive treatment of visual neglect is available and a knowledge of the predictive features in the recovery of these patients would be helpful in the early selection of patients for treatment. A study was therefore carried out to determine the prognosis of patients presenting with visual neglect at two to three days after stroke...

  20. Extracranial cerebral arterial atherosclerosis in Iranian patients suffering ischemic strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Ali Mousavi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine the distribution and severity of extracranial carotid arterial atherosclerosis in Iranian patients with ischemic stroke. METHODS: 328 patients with ischemic stroke were included in this study. Doppler ultrasound was used for evaluation of atherosclerosis in extracranial carotid arteries. The NASCET criteria were used to measure carotid stenosis. RESULTS: Ninety of 328 patients (27.4% were found to have atherosclerotic plaques; 40 of these patients were women and 50 were men. Sixty-eight patients (20.7% had artery stenosis <50%, 13 patients (3.95% had 50-70 % artery stenosis and 6 (1.8% had >70% artery stenosis. CONCLUSIONS: Extracranial atherosclerosis is not rare in Iranian patients with ischemic stroke, but most carotid artery lesions were plaques with <50% stenosis. KEY WORDS: Atherosclerosis, ischemic stroke, carotid stenosis.

  1. Rehabilitation of a patient with stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Apurba Barman; Ashok K Mahapatra

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a significant cause of long-term disability world-wide. The post-stroke disabilities are due to loss of locomotion, activity of daily living, cognition and communication skills. Rehabilitation is an integral part of medical management and continues longitudinally through acute care, post-acute care and community reintegration. The objectives of stroke rehabilitation are to maximize the functional independence, minimize the disabilities, reintegrate back into the home and community a...

  2. The predictive value of the Boston Acute Stroke Imaging Scale (BASIS in acute ischemic stroke patients among Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqi Zhao

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the predictive value of Boston Acute Stroke Imaging Scale (BASIS in acute ischemic stroke in Chinese population. METHODS: This was a retrospective study. 566 patients of acute ischemic stroke were classified as having a major stroke or minor stroke based on BASIS. We compared short-term outcome (death, occurrence of complications, admission to intensive care unit [ICU] or neurological intensive care unit [NICU], long-term outcome (death, recurrence of stroke, myocardial infarction, modified Rankin scale and economic index including in-hospital cost and length of hospitalization. Continuous variables were compared by using the Student t test or Kruskal-Wallis test. Categorical variables were tested with the Chi square test. Cox regression analysis was applied to identify whether BASIS was the independent predictive variable of death. RESULTS: During hospitalization, 9 patients (4.6% died in major stroke group while no patients died in minor stroke group (p < 0.001, 12 patients in the major stroke group and 5 patients in minor stroke group were admitted to ICU/NICU (p = 0.001. There were more complications (cerebral hernia, pneumonia, urinary tract infection in major stroke group than minor stroke group (p<0.05. Meanwhile, the average cost of hospitalization in major stroke group was 3,100 US$ and 1,740 US$ in minor stroke group (p<0.001; the average length of stay in major and minor stroke group was 21.3 days and 17.3 days respectively (p<0.001. Results of the follow-up showed that 52 patients (26.7% died in major stroke group while 56 patients (15.1% died in minor stroke group (P<0.001. 62.2% of the patients in major stroke group and 80.4% of the patients in minor stroke group were able to live independently (P = 0.002. The survival analysis showed that patients with major stroke had 80% higher of risk of death than patients with minor stroke even after adjusting traditional atherosclerotic factors and NIHSS at baseline (HR

  3. Medical complications experienced by first-time ischemic stroke patients during inpatient, tertiary level stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the medical complications in first-time ischemic stroke patients, to identify the factors related to occurrence of complications. [Subjects and Methods] First-time ischemic stroke patients (n=81) admitted to a tertiary level inpatient rehabilitation center during a 5 year period were included in the study. The attending physiatrist noted the presence of specific medical complications and complications that required transfer to the acute care facility from patient records. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification was used to define the clinical subtypes of the ischemic stroke patients. The Charlson comorbidity index was used to evaluate co-morbid conditions. Functional disability was assessed using the Functional Independence Measure at admission and discharge. [Results] We found that 88.9% of the patients had at least one complication. The five most common complications were urinary tract infection (48.1%), shoulder pain (37.0%), insomnia (37.0%), depression (32.1%), and musculoskeletal pain other than shoulder pain (32.1%) and 11.1% of patients were transferred to acute care facility during rehabilitation period. Functional Independence Measure scores both at admission and discharge were significantly lower in patients with at least one complication than in patients with no complications. [Conclusion] Medical complications are common among patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between physiatrists and other medical specialities is necessary for optimal management. PMID:27065523

  4. Factors Associated with Strain in Informal Caregivers of Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Wen Hung

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is one of the most prevalent causes of adult disability and handicap. Informal caregivers play an important role in poststroke care. However, informal caregivers may experience strain, which threatens the recovery of stroke subjects. This study aimed to describe changes in strain experienced by informal caregivers from 3 to 6 months after the stroke, and identify the predicting factors.Methods: We recruited pairs of inpatients with ischemic stroke and informal caregivers from a tertiary referral hospital and interviewed them at 3 and 6 months after the stroke. Caregiver strain was evaluated using the Caregiver Strain Index (CSI, with a CSI Ÿ 7 indicating considerable caregiver strain. Various factors associated with caregiver strain were analyzed using generalized estimating equations.Results: Eighty-nine stroke patients and caregivers completed the study. Considerable strain was reported in 46% and 43% of the caregivers at the 3rd and 6th month, respectively. Patient factors such as severe disabilities (Barthel Index ŷ 60, poor cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination ŷ 23, depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] Ÿ 10, and recurrent stroke were predictors for caregiver strain. Caregiver factors, such as changed employment status, help from formal caregivers, and depression (BDI Ÿ 10 were also associated with considerable caregiver strain.Conclusions: Nearly 50% of caregivers experienced considerable strain. Interventions aimed at reducing the caregivers’ strain should focus on enhancing the functional and emotional status of stroke subjects, prevention of recurrent stroke, and efficient management of depression symptoms in caregivers.

  5. Perception of stroke and knowledge of potential risk factors among Omani patients at increased risk for stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Asmi Abdullah R

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated poor knowledge of stroke among patients with established risk factors. This study aims to assess the baseline knowledge, among patients with increased risk for stroke in Oman, of warning symptoms of stroke, impending risk factors, treatment, and sources of information. Methods In April 2005, trained family practice residents at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital Clinics (cardiology, neurology, diabetic, and lipid clinics, using a standardised, structured, pre-tested questionnaire, conducted a survey of 400 Omani patients. These patients all demonstrated potential risk factors for stroke. Results Only 35% of the subjects stated that the brain is the organ affected by a stroke, 68% correctly identified at least one symptom/sign of a stroke, and 43% correctly identified at least one stroke risk factor. The majority (62% did not believe they were at increased risk for stroke, and 98% had not been advised by their attending physician that their clinical conditions were risk factors for stroke. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, lower age and higher levels of education were associated with better knowledge regarding the organ involved in stroke, stroke symptoms, and risk factors. Conclusion Because their knowledge about stroke risk factors was poor, the subjects in this study were largely unaware of their increased risk for stroke. Intensive health education is needed to improve awareness of stroke, especially among the most vulnerable groups.

  6. Determinants of Length of Stay in Stroke Patients: A Geriatric Rehabilitation Unit Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to identify the predictors of length of stay--the impact of age, comorbidity, and stroke subtype--on the outcome of geriatric stroke patients. One hundred and seventy stroke patients (129 first-ever ischemic, 25 hemorrhagic, and 16 ischemic second strokes) were included in the study. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project…

  7. Music as an Auditory Stimulus in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Antić, Sonja; Galinović, Ivana; Lovrenčić-Huzjan, Arijana; Vuković, Vlasta; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Demarin, Vida

    2008-01-01

    Auditory stimulation increases mean blood flow velocity (MBFV) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in healthy individuals. Our aim was to monitor such changes in the affected MCA of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The study included 66 non-thrombolysed patients with AIS who were divided into groups according to National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Group I consisted of patients with NIHSS score £ 10 and group II with NIHSS score ³11. Affected MCA was...

  8. Comparison of Swallowing Functions Between Brain Tumor and Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Dae Hwan; Chun, Min Ho; Lee, Sook Joung; Song, Yoon Bum

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the swallowing functions according to the lesion locations between brain tumor and stroke patients. Methods Forty brain tumor patients and the same number of age-, lesion-, and functional status-matching stroke patients were enrolled in this study. Before beginning the swallowing therapy, swallowing function was evaluated in all subjects by videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Brain lesions were classified as either supratentorial or in-fratentorial. We evaluated the follo...

  9. Effects of Balance Training on Hemiplegic Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    I-Chun Chen; Pao-Tsai Cheng; Chia-Ling Chen; Shih-Ching Chen; Chia-Ying Chung; Tu-Hsueh Yeh

    2002-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the delayed effects of balancetraining program on hemiplegic stroke patients.Methods: A total of 41 ambulatory hemiplegic stroke patients were recruited into thisstudy and randomly assigned into two groups, the control group and trainedgroup. Visual feedback balance training with the SMART Balance Masterwas used in the trained group. Bruunstrom staging of affected limb scoresand Functional Independent Measure (FIM) scores of each patient w...

  10. Influence of visual feedback on dynamic balance control in chronic stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Eric R; Hyngstrom, Allison S; Schmit, Brian D

    2016-03-21

    Chronic stroke survivors have an increased incidence of falls during walking, suggesting changes in dynamic balance control post-stroke. Despite this increased incidence of falls during walking, balance control is often studied only in standing. The purpose of this study was to quantify deficits in dynamic balance control during walking, and to evaluate the influence of visual feedback on this control in stroke survivors. Ten individuals with chronic stroke, and ten neurologically intact individuals participated in this study. Walking performance was assessed while participants walked on an instrumented split-belt treadmill with different types of visual feedback. Dynamic balance control was quantified using both the extent of center of mass (COM) movement in the frontal plane over a gait cycle (COM sway), and base of support (step width). Stroke survivors walked with larger COM sway and wider step widths compared to controls. Despite these baseline differences, both groups walked with a similar ratio of step width to COM sway (SW/COM). Providing a stationary target with a laser reference of body movement reduced COM sway only in the stroke group, indicating that visual feedback of sway alters dynamic balance control post-stroke. These results demonstrate that stroke survivors attempt to maintain a similar ratio of step width to COM movement, and visual cues can be used to help control COM movement during walking post-stroke. PMID:26916509

  11. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism in Indian stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalita J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: In view of the prevailing controversy about the role of Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutation in stroke and paucity of studies from India, this study has been undertaken to evaluate MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism in consecutive ischemic stroke patients and correlate these with folic acid, homocysteine (Hcy and conventional risk factors. Settings and Design: Ischemic stroke patients prospectively evaluated in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Computerized tomography proven ischemic stroke patients were prospectively evaluated including clinical, family history of stroke, dietary habits and addictions. Their fasting and postprandial blood sugar, lipid profile, vitamin B12, folic acid and MTHFR gene analysis were done. Statistical Analysis: MTHFR gene polymorphism was correlated with serum folic acid, Vitamin B12 and Hcy levels; family history of stroke in first-degree relatives; and dietary habits; employing Chi-square test. Results: There were 58 patients with ischemic stroke, whose mean age was 50 (4-79 years; among them, 10 were females. MTHFR gene polymorphism was present in 19 (32.8% patients, 3 were homozygous and 16 were heterozygous. Both serum folate and B12 levels were low in 29 (50% patients and Hcy in 48 (83%. Hypertension was present in 28 (48% patients, diabetes in 12 (21%, hyperlipidemia in 52 (90%, smoking in 17 (29%, obesity in 1 (1.7% and family history of stroke in first-degree relatives in 13 (22.4%. There was no significant relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphism with folic acid, B12, Hcy levels, dietary habits and number of risk factors. Vitamin B12 level was low in vegetarians ( P Conclusion: MTHFR gene polymorphism was found in one-third of patients with ischemic stroke and was insignificantly associated with higher frequency of elevated Hcy.

  12. Risk of Ischemic Stroke and Stroke Prevention in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Renal Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze-Fan Chao; Shih-Ann Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and its prevalence is projected to continuously increase over the next few decades.1 AF patients usually have several important comorbidities, such as hypertension, diabetes and heart failure, and “lone AF” is becoming uncommon.2 The incidence of AF significantly increased when patients have more systemic diseases. In the previous study from Taiwan, the risk of new-onset AF increased from 0.77 per 1000 person-years for patients with a CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75, diabetes mellitus, and prior stroke or transient ischemic attack score of 0 to 34.6 per 1000 person-years for those with a score of 6.3 AF is an important risk factor of ischemic stroke with a worse prognosis and higher recurrence rate compared to that of non-AF related stroke.4 The risk of AF-related stroke is not homogenous and mainly depends on the presence or absence of clinical risk factors. Several scoring systems, including CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack, vascular disease, age 65–74, female schemes,5-6 which incorporated clinical important factors have been developed to estimate the risk of stroke and guide anti-thrombotic therapies for AF patients.

  13. Stroke and the “Stroke Belt” in Dialysis: Contribution of Patient Characteristics to Ischemic Stroke Rate and Its Geographic Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Wetmore, James B.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Phadnis, Milind A; Rigler, Sally K.; Spertus, John A.; Zhou, Xinhua; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2013-01-01

    Geographic variation in stroke rates is well established in the general population, with higher rates in the South than in other areas of the United States. ESRD is a potent risk factor for stroke, but whether regional variations in stroke risk exist among dialysis patients is unknown. Medicare claims from 2000 to 2005 were used to ascertain ischemic stroke events in a large cohort of 265,685 incident dialysis patients. A Poisson generalized linear mixed model was generated to determine facto...

  14. Outcome of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in patients with prior ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Song-nan; KANG Jun-ping; DU Xin; HE Xiao-nan; LONG De-yong; YU Rong-hui; FANG Ri-bo

    2013-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) has been demonstrated to be effective in a subsets of patients with AF.However,very few data are available in regard to patients with prior history of stroke undergoing catheter ablation.This study aimed to investigate the outcome of catheter ablation in AF patients with prior ischemic stroke.Methods Between January 2008 and December 2011,of 1897 consecutive patients who presented at Beijing An Zhen Hospital for treatment of drug-refractory AF,172 (9.1%) patients in the study population had a history of ischemic stroke.All patients underwent catheter ablation and were followed up to assess maintenance of sinus rhythm and recurrence of symptomatic stroke.Results Among these 1897 patients,1768 (93.2%) who had complete follow-up information for a minimum of six months were included in the final analysis.Patients in the stroke group (group Ⅰ) and the no-stroke group (group Ⅱ) were similar in regards to gender,body mass index (BMI),history of diabetes,type of AF,and left atrial size.The patients in group Ⅰ were older than those in group Ⅱ,and had a higher incidence of hypertension,chronic heart failure,lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF),and higher CHADS2 scores.Six months after ablation,107 (68.6%) patients in group Ⅰ and 1403 (87.1%) in group Ⅱ had discontinued warfarin treatment (P <0.001).During a median follow-up of (633±415)days,65 patients in the group Ⅰ and 638 in group Ⅱ experienced AF recurrence,and five patients in group Ⅰ and 28 in group Ⅱ developed symptomatic stroke.The rates of AF recurrence and recurrent stroke were similar between group Ⅰ and group Ⅱ (41.7% vs.39.6%,P=-0.611; 3.2% vs.1.7%,P=0.219; respectively).Conclusion Catheter ablation of AF in patients with prior stroke is feasible and efficient.

  15. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a hospital quickly to begin treatment. Acute stroke therapies try to stop a stroke while it is ... rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment ...

  16. Stroke and the “Stroke Belt” in Dialysis: Contribution of Patient Characteristics to Ischemic Stroke Rate and Its Geographic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Phadnis, Milind A.; Rigler, Sally K.; Spertus, John A.; Zhou, Xinhua; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Shireman, Theresa I.

    2013-01-01

    Geographic variation in stroke rates is well established in the general population, with higher rates in the South than in other areas of the United States. ESRD is a potent risk factor for stroke, but whether regional variations in stroke risk exist among dialysis patients is unknown. Medicare claims from 2000 to 2005 were used to ascertain ischemic stroke events in a large cohort of 265,685 incident dialysis patients. A Poisson generalized linear mixed model was generated to determine factors associated with stroke and to ascertain state-by-state geographic variability in stroke rates by generating observed-to-expected (O/E) adjusted rate ratios for stroke. Older age, female sex, African American race and Hispanic ethnicity, unemployed status, diabetes, hypertension, history of stroke, and permanent atrial fibrillation were positively associated with ischemic stroke, whereas body mass index >30 kg/m2 was inversely associated with stroke (P1.0 were all in the South: North Carolina, Mississippi, and Oklahoma. Regional efforts to increase primary prevention in the “stroke belt” or to better educate dialysis patients on the signs of stroke so that they may promptly seek care may improve stroke care and outcomes in dialysis patients. PMID:23990675

  17. User perceptions of gaming interventions for improving upper extremity motor function in persons with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Margaret; Combs, Stephanie

    2013-04-01

    Finding ways to engage patients with stroke in repetitive intervention protocols long-term is poorly understood, particularly from the patients' perspective. Limited information exists that combines clinical expertise as well as user feedback on improving gaming interaction. The purpose of this study was to utilize input from focus groups of gaming intervention users with chronic stroke to identify characteristics of gaming that influence user/patient engagement in the activity. Two focus groups (n = 10) were conducted with each group participant playing two different gaming systems. Following exposure to the two systems, guided group interview sessions occurred that consisted of open-ended questions encompassing areas of overall gaming system preference, aspects that were liked or disliked, background appearance, music options, feedback provided, as well as recommendations for change. Findings revealed that participants enjoyed playing the gaming systems. Three primary themes emerged differentiating the systems: (1) musical encouragement; (2) focus and attention; and (3) motivation provided by performance feedback. It was concluded that when selecting a gaming system for upper extremity rehabilitation, a clinician should select a system that provides user-relevant music options with a modifiable background appearance for progression from basic to more challenging, providing appropriate feedback in an effort to encompass to a variety of user performance levels. PMID:22924427

  18. Stroke prevention awareness and treatment knowledge among patients' relatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Li; Dongcai Yuan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent research indicates that if a stroke can be effectively treated within three hours, prognosis is improved. Therefore, it is necessary to properly educate stroke patients' relatives about prevention and treatment. OBJECTIVE: To survey and analyze the present awareness of stroke prevention and treatment knowledge among patients' relatives. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Beijing Hospital and Medical College of Shandong University and Harrison International Peace Hospital, the Affiliated Hospital of Hebei Medical University.PARTICIPANTS: From May 2005 to November 2006, a "stroke awareness" questionnaire survey was performed in four hospitals, including Harrison International Peace Hospital in Hengshui City (third class, first grade), Fucheng County People's Hospital (second class, first grade), Zaoqiang County Jiahui Countryside Hospital (first class, first grade) and Hengshui City Electricity Industry Bureau Infirmary. The participants provided confirmed consent.METHODS: The "stroke awareness" questionnaire included 10 questions: 1–8 were related to the understanding of stroke, 9 and 10 were related to behavior and attitude towards medical treatment. Demographic information was also collected on each participant, including age, education level, and occupation. Each positive answer accounted for one point. A score of 8 or higher was categorized as "good stroke awareness".MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Scores of stroke awareness. RESULTS: A total of 4 000 "stroke awareness" questionnaires were printed and distributed. 3 597 copies were completed and 3 468 were included in the study. ① Relative factors of stroke awareness: The survey demonstrated that the participant's age, educational level, occupation, grade of hospital, and the relationship with the patient had a significant effect on their stroke awareness (P < 0.05–0.01). ② Stroke knowledge: With regard to stroke awareness, 72% subjects did not know the signs indicating the onset of

  19. Stroke rehabilitation and patients with multimorbidity: a scoping review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L.A. Nelson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke care presents unique challenges for clinicians, as most strokes occur in the context of other medical diagnoses. An assessment of capacity for implementing “best practice” stroke care found clinicians reporting a strong need for training specific to patient/system complexity and multimorbidity. With mounting patient complexity, there is pressure to implement new models of healthcare delivery for both quality and financial sustainability. Policy makers and administrators are turning to clinical practice guidelines to support decision-making and resource allocation. Stroke rehabilitation programs across Canada are being transformed to better align with the Canadian Stroke Strategy’s Stroke Best Practice Recommendations. The recommendations provide a framework to facilitate the adoption of evidence-based best practices in stroke across the continuum of care. However, given the increasing and emerging complexity of patients with stroke in terms of multimorbidity, the evidence supporting clinical practice guidelines may not align with the current patient population. To evaluate this, electronic databases and gray literature will be searched, including published or unpublished studies of quantitative, qualitative or mixed-methods research designs. Team members will screen the literature and abstract the data. Results will present a numerical account of the amount, type, and distribution of the studies included and a thematic analysis and concept map of the results. This review represents the first attempt to map the available literature on stroke rehabilitation and multimorbidity, and identify gaps in the existing research. The results will be relevant for knowledge users concerned with stroke rehabilitation by expanding the understanding of the current evidence.

  20. Patent Foramen Ovale in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease and Stroke: Case Presentations and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Razdan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD are at increased risk for stroke, the underlying pathophysiology is incompletely understood. Intracardiac shunting via a patent foramen ovale (PFO is associated with cryptogenic stroke in individuals without SCD. Recent evidence suggests that PFOs are associated with stroke in children with SCD, although the role of PFOs in adults with stroke and SCD is unknown. Here, we report 2 young adults with SCD, stroke, and PFOs. The first patient had hemoglobin SC and presented with a transient ischemic attack and a subsequent ischemic stroke. There was no evidence of cerebral vascular disease on imaging studies and the PFO was closed. The second patient had hemoglobin SS and two acute ischemic strokes. She had cerebral vascular disease with moyamoya in addition to a peripheral deep venous thrombosis (DVT. Chronic transfusion therapy was recommended, and the DVT was managed with warfarin. The PFO was not closed, and the patients' neurologic symptoms were stabilized. We review the literature on PFOs and stroke in SCD. Our cases and the literature review illustrate the dire need for further research to evaluate PFO as a potential risk factor for stroke in adults with SCD.

  1. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-08-16

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into "a training package", based on the patient's functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  2. VERBAL CHOICE IN ISCHEMIC STROKE PATIENTS WITH ANOMIC APHASIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мaya P. Danovska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposes: Anomic aphasia is common in patients with left hemispheric strokes. The purpose of this study was to explore the verbal production of ischemic stroke patients with anomic aphasia. Contingent and methods: Fifty ischemic stroke patients admitted to the Neurology Clinic of University Hospital Pleven were studied by neuropsychological battery and CT scan of the brain. Verbal productivity changes found were analyzed in relation to the speech recovery education. Results: All the patients showed lower scores at all nominative and reproductive speech subtests. Discussion: Among the ischemic stroke patients with mild anomic aphasia comparatively great was the percentage of low frequency word actualization and verbal fluency impairment. The usage of nominatives in speech expression of ischemic stroke patients is less as compared with that one of predicatives. Actualization of particles, unions, prepositions and interjections was comparatively high thus compensating the difficulty in choice of a definite lexical number. Conclusion: Future studies on testing of verbal choice in ischemic stroke patients should confirm its practical significance for the assessment of speech disorders concerning a special speech- recovery education.

  3. Cardiovascular Response During Submaximal Underwater Treadmill Exercise in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, JeeHyun; Lim, Kil-Byung; Lee, Hong-Jae; Kwon, Yong-Geol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cardiovascular response during head-out water immersion, underwater treadmill gait, and land treadmill gait in stroke patients. Methods Ten stroke patients were recruited for underwater and land treadmill gait sessions. Each session was 40 minutes long; 5 minutes for standing rest on land, 5 minutes for standing rest in water or on treadmill, 20 minutes for treadmill walking in water or on land, 5 minutes for standing rest in water or on treadmill, and 5 minutes for ...

  4. Factors delaying hospital arrival of patients with acute stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf, V. V.; Maneesh, M; Praveenkumar, R.; Saifudheen, K; Girija, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low rates of thrombolysis for ischemic stroke in India and other developing countries have been attributed to delays in presentation to the hospital. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out during a 12-month period ending December 2012 in the department of Neurology, Malabar Institute of Medical Sciences, Kerala, India, to look for the factors contributing to delay in hospital arrival of patients with acute stroke. Patients and or their relatives were interviewe...

  5. Factors delaying hospital arrival of patients with acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V V Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low rates of thrombolysis for ischemic stroke in India and other developing countries have been attributed to delays in presentation to the hospital. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out during a 12-month period ending December 2012 in the department of Neurology, Malabar Institute of Medical Sciences, Kerala, India, to look for the factors contributing to delay in hospital arrival of patients with acute stroke. Patients and or their relatives were interviewed within 48 hours of admission using a structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 264 patients attending the emergency department were included. There were 170 men and 94 women. The mean age was 61.5 ± 12.4 years. A total of 67 (25% patients presented within 4 hours of stroke onset. Factors associated with early arrival (multivariate logistic regression analysis were distance 15 km or less from hospital (P 0.03, odds ratio (OR 2.7, directly reaching the stroke department (P < 0.001, OR 9.7, history of coronary artery disease (P 0.001, OR 3.84, higher educational status (P 0.001, OR 3.7, and presence of hemiplegia (P 0.001, OR 5.5. Conclusions: We found a considerable delay in the early arrival of patients to our stroke department. Health promotion strategies to improve community awareness of early symptoms of stroke, education of local physicians about the importance of early referrals to the stroke centers, and wider availability and use of ambulance services are promising methods to help expedite presentation to hospital post stroke and thereby improve the management of stroke in India.

  6. Knowledge of stroke risk factors amongst black diabetic, hypertensive and stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bogoshi

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess and compare theknowledge of black patients diagnosed with hypertension, diabetes and stroke about the risk factors for stroke.  Four groups made up of 33 subjects (hypertensive, diabetic, stroke and control group were interviewed using open-ended questions and a structured questionnaire. Qualitative coding, frequencies and proportions were used to determine their knowledge.  Groups were compared with respect to percentage knowledge using the chi-square statistic at a 0.05 level of significance.  Stress was mentioned as the most important risk factor in all groups.  Although identification of stroke risk factors was  inadequate, the diabetic group was found to be significantly better in  identifying some of the risk factors (salt - p =0,05; sugar - p = 0,001; fat - p = 0,004; moderate smoking - p = 0,05; weight - p = 0,002

  7. Stroke prevention in the elderly atrial fibrillation patient with comorbid conditions: focus on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Turagam MK; Velagapudi P; Flaker GC

    2015-01-01

    Mohit K Turagam, Poonam Velagapudi, Greg C FlakerDivision of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, USAAbstract: Stroke prevention in elderly atrial fibrillation patients remains a challenge. There is a high risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism but also a high risk of bleeding if anticoagulants are prescribed. The elderly have increased chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, polypharmacy, and overall frailty. For all these reasons, a...

  8. Functional versus Nonfunctional Rehabilitation in Chronic Ischemic Stroke: Evidences from a Randomized Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela C. X. Pelicioni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors may include functional and/or nonfunctional strategy. The present study aimed to compare the effect of these two rehabilitation strategies by means of clinical scales and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Twelve hemiparetic chronic stroke patients were selected. Patients were randomly assigned a nonfunctional (NFS or functional (FS rehabilitation scheme. Clinical scales (Fugl-Meyer, ARA test, and modified Barthel and fMRI were applied at four moments: before rehabilitation (P1 and immediately after (P2, 1 month after (P3, and three months after (P4 the end of rehabilitation. The NFS group improved significantly and exclusively their Fugl-Meyer scores at P2, P3, and P4, when compared to P1. On the other hand, the FS group increased significantly in Fugl-Meyer at P2, when compared to P1, and also in their ARA and Barthel scores. fMRI inspection at the individual level revealed that both rehabilitation schemes most often led to decreased activation sparseness, decreased activity of contralesional M1, increased asymmetry of M1 activity to the ipsilesional side, decreased perilesional activity, and decreased SMA activity. Increased M1 asymmetry with rehabilitation was also confirmed by Lateralization Indexes. Our clinical analysis revealed subtle differences between FS and NFS.

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease accompanying stroke:A multicenter investigation of 4 960 patients in Beijing%北京地区4960例慢性阻塞性肺疾病住院患者合并卒中情况的多中心临床调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the correlation of prevalence and distribution in patients with stroke due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) over the past 10 years with their age and gender. Methods Patients with stroke due to COPD admitted to Chinese PLA General Hospital, PUMC Hospital and Beijing Hospital from January 2000 to March 2010 were investigated according to the medical records databases. Results Of the 46 701 patients included in this study, 4 960 (10.62%) suffered from COPD. Of these 4 960 COPD patients (592 males and 216 females with an average age of 70.2±11.1 years, 808 (16.29%) were complicated with stroke. The prevalence of COPD was higher in male patients than in female patients and increased with their age. The prevalence of COPD was 1.81%, 4.25%, 7.97%, 22.49%and 41%respectively in the patients with their age<50, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79 and ≥ 80 years. The risk of stroke was significantly higher in COPD patients than in non-COPD patients (HR=2.97, 95%CI:2.59%-3.40%). No significant difference was observed in the prevalence of stroke among male and female COPD patients (P=0.372). However, a significant difference was found in the prevalence of stroke among COPD and non-COPD patients at different ages (P<0.01). Conclusion COPD is one of the important risk factor for the occurrence and development of stroke.%  目的研究10年间住院慢性阻塞性肺疾病(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,COPD)患者脑卒中患病比例、人群分布、年龄和性别的相关性。方法对2000年1月-2010年3月间解放军总医院、北京协和医院及北京医院的住院病案数据库进行现况调查分析。结果入选住院患者共46701例,其中COPD 4960例,占10.62%;COPD合并脑卒中808例,占16.29%,男性592例,女性216例,平均年龄(70.2±11.1)岁。各年龄段COPD男性患者患病比例均高于女性,并随年龄增长而升高;不同年龄(<50岁、50~59岁、60~69岁、70~79岁及≥80

  10. Subclinical Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Patients with Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroosh Dabiri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is the first cause of morbidity all around the world. Entrapment neuropathies are a known complication of stroke. The objective of this study is to assess the frequency of subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in the healthy and paretic hands of stroke patients.Methods: The authors performed nerve conduction study in the first three days after admission in 39 stroke patients without subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome and 30 days after admission. Electrophysiological studies were done in both paretic and non-paretic hands. Both ulnar and median nerves were studied.Results: After one month we found subclinical carpal tunnel syndrome in 16 paretic hands and 13 healthy hands. We did not find any difference in the frequency of carpal tunnel syndrome in two sides.Conclusion: The authors suggest that simultaneous different mechanisms may act in inducing carpal tunnel syndrome in both hands of hemiparetic patients.

  11. The Importance of Patient Involvement in Stroke Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the perceived needs for health services by persons with stroke within the first year after rehabilitation, and associations between perceived impact of stroke, involvement in decisions regarding care/treatment, and having health services needs met. Method Data was collected, through a mail survey, from patients with stroke who were admitted to a university hospital in 2012 and had received rehabilitation after discharge from the stroke unit. The rehabilitation lasted an average of 2 to 4.6 months. The Stroke Survivor Needs Survey Questionnaire was used to assess the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) 3.0. Eleven logistic regression models were created to explore associations between having health services needs met in each problem area respectively (dependent variable) and the independent variables. In all models the independent variables were: age, sex, SIS domain corresponding to the dependent variable, or stroke severity in cases when no corresponding SIS domain was identified, and involvement in decisions on care and treatment. Results The 63 participants who returned the questionnaires had a mean age of 72 years, 33 were male and 30 were female. Eighty percent had suffered a mild stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading. Conclusions The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health

  12. Pattern and risk factors of stroke in the young among stroke patients admitted in medical college hospital, Thiruvananthapuram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Prasannakumar Subha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke in the young is particularly tragic because of its potential to create a long-term burden on the victims, their families, and the community. There had been relatively few studies on young stroke in Kerala′s socio-economic setup, that too encapsulating the mentioned apparently relevant dimensions of stroke in the young . Objective: To study the prevalence, patterns and risk factors of young stroke. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study with case control comparison at Government Medical College Hospital, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. Materials and and Methods: Total 100 stroke patients were identified over a period of 2 months, and data were collected on the basis of questionnaire developed for the purpose. Results: Of 100 stroke patients, 15 had stroke in the young, among which 9 (60% had ishaemic stroke. Hypertension was the most common risk factor. Smoking, alcohol, atrial fibrillation, and hyperlipidemia were found to be more common in cases (young stroke when compared with controls. Alcohol use and atrial fibrillation were significantly higher among young stroke patients. Physical inactivity was significantly lesser in those with stroke in the young than elderly. Atrial fibrillation emerged as an independent risk factor of stroke in the young with adjusted odds ratio of 6.18 (1.31-29.21. Conclusion: In all, 15% of total stroke occurred in young adults <50 years. The proportion of hemorrhagic stroke in young adults is higher than in elderly. Atrial fibrillation is identified as an independent risk factor of stroke in the young. Compared with stroke in elderly alcohol use, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and cardiac diseases, which are known risk factors, are higher in young stroke.

  13. Effects of a Web-Based Stroke Education Program on Recurrence Prevention Behaviors among Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Il; Lee, Sook; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of methods to prevent stroke recurrence and of education focusing on learners' needs has not been fully explored. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of such interventions among stroke patients and their primary caregivers and to evaluate the feasibility of a web-based stroke education program. The participants were…

  14. A COMPAR A TIVE STUDY OF SELECTIVE INDICATOR PROFILES IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE AND HEMORRHAGIC STROKE

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanaswamy; Ravi; Nagarjun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Urban India, stroke accounts for 1% mortality in all hospital admissions. The pathogenic role of increased plasma fibrinogen level in causing stroke has been recently reinforced. It was therefore of interest to measure plasma fibrinogen level in patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and to compare it with lipid profile....

  15. Prevalence of risk factors for ischaemic stroke and their treatment among a cohort of stroke patients in Dublin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R

    2000-10-01

    The majority of strokes are due to ischaemia. Risk factors include atrial fibrillation, hypertension and smoking. The incidence can be reduced by addressing these risk factors. This study examines the prevalence of risk factors and their treatment in a cohort of patients with ischaemic stroke registered on a Dublin stroke database.

  16. Post-stroke bacteriuria among stroke patients attending a physiotherapy clinic in Ghana: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkor, Eric S; Akumwena, Amos; Amoo, Philip K; Owolabi, Mayowa O; Aspelund, Thor; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections are known to be a major complication of stroke patients. In this study, we evaluated the risk of community-acquired bacteriuria among stroke patients, the associated factors, and the causative organisms. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 70 stroke patients and 83 age- and sex-matched, apparently healthy controls. Urine specimens were collected from all the study subjects and were analyzed by standard microbiological methods. Demographic and clinical information was also collected from the study subjects. For stroke patients, the information collected also included stroke parameters, such as stroke duration, frequency, and subtype. Results Bacteriuria was significantly higher among stroke patients (24.3%, n=17) than among the control group (7.2%, n=6), with a relative risk of 3.36 (confidence interval [CI], 1.40–8.01, P=0.006). Among the control group, all six bacteriuria cases were asymptomatic, whereas the 17 stroke bacteriuria cases comprised 15 cases of asymptomatic bacteriuria and two cases of symptomatic bacteriuria. Female sex (OR, 3.40; CI, 1.12–10.30; P=0.03) and presence of stroke (OR, 0.24; CI, 0.08–0.70; P=0.009) were significantly associated with bacteriuria. The etiology of bacteriuria was similar in both study groups, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were the most predominant organisms isolated from both stroke patients (12.9%) and the control group (2.4%). Conclusion Stroke patients in the study region have a significantly higher risk of community-acquired bacteriuria, which in most cases is asymptomatic. Community-acquired bacteriuria in stroke patients appears to have little or no relationship with clinical parameters of stroke such as stroke subtype, duration and frequency. PMID:27051289

  17. Dabigatran in Secondary Stroke Prevention: Clinical Experience with 106 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia DeFelipe-Mimbrera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Our aim was to analyze our clinical experience with dabigatran etexilate in secondary stroke prevention. Methods. We retrospectively included patients starting dabigatran etexilate for secondary stroke prevention from March 2010 to December 2012. Efficacy and safety variables were registered. Results. 106 patients were included, median follow-up of 12 months (range 1–31. Fifty-six females (52.8%, mean age 76.4 (range 50–95, SD 9.8, median CHADS2 4 (range 2–6, CHA2DS2-VASc 5 (range 2–9, and HAS-BLED 2 (range 1–5. Indication for dabigatran etexilate was ischemic stroke in 101 patients and acute cerebral hemorrhage (CH due to warfarin in 5 (4.7%. Dabigatran etexilate 110 mg bid was prescribed in 71 cases (67% and 150 mg bid was prescribed in the remaining. Seventeen patients (16% suffered 20 complications during follow-up. Ischemic complications (10 were 6 transient ischemic attacks (TIA, 3 ischemic strokes, and 1 acute coronary syndrome. Hemorrhagic complications (10 were CH (1, gastrointestinal bleeding (6, mild hematuria (2, and mild metrorrhagia (1, leading to dabigatran etexilate discontinuation in 3 patients. Patients with previous CH remained uneventful. Three patients died (pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and acute cholecystitis and 9 were lost during follow-up. Conclusions. Dabigatran etexilate was safe and effective in secondary stroke prevention in clinical practice, including a small number of patients with previous history of CH.

  18. Satisfaction with activity and participation in patients with stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Bouffioulx, Edouard

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the most common cause of severe adult disability in the western world (Greenwood et al. 2009) and a major health problem all over the world (Kendall et al. 2007; Proot et al. 2002; Wade et al. 1987; Yu-Ying et al. 2002). In Belgium, the incidence of stroke is estimated at 2.62 per 1000 persons (Buntinx et al. 2002). Stroke may affect the social roles of the patient and it is therefore important to take into account the concept of social participation and the environmental and person...

  19. Parkinsonian patients reduce their stroke size with increased processing demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gemmert, A W; Teulings, H L; Stelmach, G E

    2001-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often show reductions in writing size (micrographia) as the length of the text they produce increases. The cause for these reductions in stroke size are not well understood. Reductions in stroke size could be associated with either concurrent processing demands that result from the coordination and control of fingers, wrist, and arm during writing and the processing of future words or increased extension of the wrist joint as the execution of the writing progresses to the right across the page, resulting in increased stiffness in the pen-limb system. Parkinson's patients and elderly controls wrote phrases of different lengths with target patterns in various serial positions. When the number of words to be written increased, PD patients reduced their stroke size of the initial target pattern, while the elderly controls did not reduce their stroke size. There was no systematic change in stroke size of the second pattern as function of serial position. This result suggests that PD patients reduce the size of their handwriting strokes when concurrent processing load increases. PMID:11748904

  20. Is air transport of stroke patients faster than ground transport?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselfeldt, Rasmus; Gyllenborg, Jesper; Steinmetz, Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    observational study, we included patients referred to a stroke centre if their ground transport time exceeded 30 min, or they were transported by a secondarily dispatched, physician-staffed helicopter. The primary endpoint was time from telephone contact to triaging neurologist to arrival in the stroke centre....... Secondary endpoints included modified Rankin Scale at 3 months, 30-day and 1-year mortality. RESULTS: A total of 330 patients were included; 265 with ground transport and 65 with helicopter, of which 87 (33%) and 22 (34%), received thrombolysis, respectively (p=0.88). Time from contact to triaging...... neurologist to arrival in the regional stroke centre was significantly shorter in the ground group (55 (34-85) vs 68 (40-85) min, p<0.01). The distance from scene to stroke centre was shorter in the ground group (67 (42-136) km) than in the helicopter group (83 (46-143) km) (p<0.01). We did not detect...

  1. Long-term use of antiplatelet drugs by stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Kamilla; Hallas, Jesper; Bak, Søren; Christensen, René Depont; Gaist, David

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Treatment with antiplatelet drugs is a key element of secondary stroke prevention. We investigated long-term antiplatelet drug use in stroke patients with a focus on non-persistence. METHODS: Population-based prescription register data were used to determine antiplatelet drug use in a......-persistent. Stroke severity was inversely associated with the risk of non-persistence [NIHSS score on admission 0-3 (reference); 4-6: hazard risk (HR) 0.87, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.61-1.25; 7+: HR 0.47, 95 % CI 0.29-0.74]. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term non-persistence with antiplatelet treatment was high and more...... cohort of stroke patients discharged from a Danish neurology department. The antiplatelet drugs comprised acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), clopidogrel and dipyridamole (if combined with ASA use). Non-persistence was defined as failure to present a prescription for antiplatelet drugs within 180 days after the...

  2. Women Sex Importance in Stroke Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemile Handan Mısırlı

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It was shown the differences in age, risk factors and treatment between women and men in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation METHODS: The stroke patients with atrial fibrillation who were hospitalized in our department at the last 2 years were seperated into 2 groups of aged above 75 and below 75, investigated with CHADS2 and CHA2DS2VASc scores and looked at the sex differences of women and men. RESULTS: Stroke ratio according to sex was statistically meaningful especially in women above the age of 75. Risc factors also were founded in elderly women and CHA2DS2VASc scores were higher in women than men so more anticoagulan treatment were begun. No differences were shown between sexes at lone atrial fibrillation and no treatment were begun. CONCLUSION: Women with atrial fibrillation had more risk factors, higher stroke rate and higher anticoagulation treatment.

  3. Highly sensitive troponin T in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J K; Ueland, T; Aukrust, P; Antonsen, Lisbeth; Kristensen, Søren Risom; Januzzi, J L; Ravkilde, J

    2012-01-01

    sensitive troponin T (hsTnT) was measured daily during the first 4 days in 193 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke without overt ACS or atrial fibrillation. The patients were previously tested normal with a fourth-generation TnT assay. The patients were followed for 47 months, with all-cause and...... in patients with acute ischemic stroke previously tested normal with a fourth-generation TnT assay. hsTnT did not provide additional prognostic information in these subjects....

  4. The impact of patient's weight on post-stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Leonid; Alperovitch-Najenson, Deborah; Treger, Iuly

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of patient's weight on rehabilitation outcomes in first-event stroke patients. Design Retrospective, observational comparative study. 102 first-time stroke male and female patients admitted to the 52-bed neurology rehabilitation department in a rehabilitation hospital were included in the study. Body mass index (BMI), Functional Independence Measure (FIM) on admission and at discharge, as well as the delta-FIM (FIM on admission - FIM at discharge) were evaluated. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the FIM and the NIHSS scores between BMI groups (normal, overweight, moderate and severe obesity). Results A statistically significant negative correlation (rho = -0.20, p = 0.049) was found between FIM change and BMI, that remained significant after adjustments for age, sex and hospitalisation days. No difference was found between groups in FIM or NIHSS change between BMI groups. Conclusions In sub-acute post-stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in rehabilitation hospital, BMI was negatively associated with the improvement of functional parameters. Patients' BMI should be taken into consideration when predicting rehabilitation outcome for stroke patients. Further investigations are needed to identify the functional parameters affected by the patients' BMI. Implications for Rehabilitation In sub-acute post-stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation in rehabilitation hospital, BMI was negatively associated with the improvement of functional parameters. Patients' BMI should be taken into consideration when predicting rehabilitation outcome for stroke patients. New rehabilitation strategies should be designed to improve the functional outcomes of rehabilitation of obese patients. PMID:27248186

  5. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35–54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16–2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55–64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56–1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  6. Late Thrombolytic Treatment In A Patient With Ischemic Stroke Caused By Biatrial Thrombus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit CINARKA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism is a preventable disease when necessary precautions are taken and it occurs along with deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Mortality related to venous thromboembolism may be high in the acute phase of the disease and it may become chronic. Intracardiac thrombus may be detected in some venous thromboemboli cases. Cardiac embolism is responsible for most of the ischemic strokes which can be very mortal or may cause serious morbidity when they are not treated in time. In this report, we aimed to present the results of late antithrombolytic treatment in a 77-year old patient who developed deep vein thrombosis, biatrial thrombosis and ischemic stroke following hydrocephalus shunt operation. Key words: Venous thromboembolism; ischemic stroke; thrombolytic therapy

  7. REHABILITATION BALANCE ASSESSMENT IN STROKE PATIENTS USING BAROPODOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danelciuc Francisc Tadeus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Coordinative capabilities develops under different formes, one of them being the capability of self balance, which have an important role în stance, gait and in performing the activities of daily living of the persons with stroke. This study aims to emphasize the advantages offered by an appropriate equipment properly used in stroke patients rehabilitation, both for balance assessment by electronic baropodometry and for its rehabilitation by using MBT devices.

  8. Review of nutrition support and evaluation in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuo-li WU; Shao-shi WANG

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is common after stroke, usually caused by cognitive disorder, dysphagia, paralysis, sensorimotor disability and visual field defect. Many researches indicate that the initiation of early enteral nutrition in stroke patients would own enormous clinical benefits, including a decrease in the risk of death and infectious diseases, shorter hospital stay and lower health expenditure. However, irregular nutrition management could increase the incidence of hypostatic pneumonia and ...

  9. The cardiovascular status of the black stroke patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cardiac status of 102 consecutive black stroke patients entered to the Medunsa Stroke Databank was determined. Cardiological examination, echocardiography and a gated blood pool scan revealed structural and/or functional cardiac abnormalities in 73,6% of patients. Rheumatic heart disease was diagnosed in 15,6%, mitral valve prolapse in 5,8% and mitral annulus calcification in 4,9% of cases. 'Possible' cardiac sources of cerebral embolism were detected in 22,5% and 'definite' sources in 23,5% of patients. Hypertensive heart disease was diagnosed in 35,2% and cardiomyopathy in 13,7% of the study population. Ischaemic heart disease was present in 6,86%. Ultrasonography revealed ventricular bands in 29,4% of patients. The high incidence of structural cardiac abnormalities detected by non-invasive means is in keeping with recent studies in white stroke patients. 32 refs., 11 tabs., 2 figs

  10. Gender differences in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Corea, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Alberti, Andrea; Lanari, Alessia; Micheli, Sara; Bertolani, Luca; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Billeci, Antonia M R; Comi, Giancarlo; Previdi, Paolo; Silvestrelli, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    Stroke has a greater effect on women than men owing to the fact that women have more stroke events and are less likely to recover. Age-specific stroke rates are higher in men; however, because of women's longer life expectancy and the much higher incidence of stroke at older ages, women have more stroke events than men overall. The aims of this prospective study in consecutive patients were to assess whether there are gender differences in stroke risk factors, treatment or outcome. Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were included in this prospective study at four study centers. Disability was assessed using a modified Rankin Scale score (>or=3 indicating disabling stroke) in both genders at 90 days. Outcomes and risk factors in both genders were compared using the chi(2) test. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify any independent predictors of outcome. A total of 1136 patients were included in this study; of these, 494 (46%) were female. Women were statistically older compared with men: 76.02 (+/- 12.93) and 72.68 (+/- 13.27) median years of age, respectively. At admission, females had higher NIH Stroke Scale scores compared with males (9.4 [+/- 6.94] vs 7.6 [+/- 6.28] for men; p = 0.0018). Furthermore, females tended to have more cardioembolic strokes (153 [30%] vs 147 [23%] for men; p = 0.004). Males had lacunar and atherosclerotic strokes more often (146 [29%] vs 249 [39%] for men; p = 0.002, and 68 [13%] vs 123 [19%] for men; p = 0.01, respectively). The mean modified Rankin Scale score at 3 months was also significantly different between genders, at 2.5 (+/- 2.05) for women and 2.1 (+/- 2.02) for men (p = 0.003). However, at multivariate analysis, female gender was not an indicator for negative outcome. It was concluded that female gender was not an independent factor for negative outcome. In addition, both genders demonstrated different stroke pathophysiologies. These findings should be taken into account when diagnostic workup and

  11. Effect of mirror therapy with tDCS on functional recovery of the upper extremity of stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hyuk-Shin; Cha, Hyun-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of mirror therapy (MT) with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on the recovery of the upper extremity function of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-seven patients at least 6 months after stroke onset were divided randomly into an experimental group (14 patients) and a control group (13 patients). [Methods] All subjects received tDCS for 20 min followed by a 5 min rest. Then the experimental group received MT while the con...

  12. Recovery of slow-5 oscillations in a longitudinal study of ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. La

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional networks in resting-state fMRI are identified by characteristics of their intrinsic low-frequency oscillations, more specifically in terms of their synchronicity. With advanced aging and in clinical populations, this synchronicity among functionally linked regions is known to decrease and become disrupted, which may be associated with observed cognitive and behavioral changes. Previous work from our group has revealed that oscillations within the slow-5 frequency range (0.01–0.027 Hz are particularly susceptible to disruptions in aging and following a stroke. In this study, we characterized longitudinally the changes in the slow-5 oscillations in stroke patients across two different time-points. We followed a group of ischemic stroke patients (n = 20 and another group of healthy older adults (n = 14 over two visits separated by a minimum of three months (average of 9 months. For the stroke patients, one visit occurred in their subacute window (10 days to 6 months after stroke onset, the other took place in their chronic window (>6 months after stroke. Using a mid-order group ICA method on 10-minutes eyes-closed resting-state fMRI data, we assessed the frequency distributions of a component's representative time-courses for differences in regards to slow-5 spectral power. First, our stroke patients, in their subacute stage, exhibited lower amplitude slow-5 oscillations in comparison to their healthy counterparts. Second, over time in their chronic stage, those same patients showed a recovery of those oscillations, reaching near equivalence to the healthy older adult group. Our results indicate the possibility of an eventual recovery of those initially disrupted network oscillations to a near-normal level, providing potentially a biomarker for stroke recovery of the cortical system. This finding opens new avenues in infra-slow oscillation research and could serve as a useful biomarker in future treatments aimed at recovery.

  13. The evaluation of cerebral oxygenation by oximetry in patients with ischaemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet G

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To evaluate the clinical significance of estimation of the regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2 in the patients with ischaemic stroke by the cerebral oximetry during acute, sub-acute and chronic phases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In this prospective study, 24 patients with ischaemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory were included. A detailed clinical examination and appropriate laboratory investigations were carried out. The rSO2 was determined by oximetery (INVOS 3100-SD bilaterally on the first, third, seventh, and fifteenth days. The blood pressure, the peripheral capillary oxygen saturation and the arterial blood gas values were noted too. the changes were evaluated along with Glasgow coma scale (GCS using unpaired student t-test and one way ANOVA test. RESULTS: There were significant differences between the rSO2 values in acute, subacute and chronic phases on the side of the lesion (p value < 0.05. The values of oxygen saturation gradually increased throughout the chronic phase. These values showed a positive correlation with GCS, but the results were not significant statistically. The rSO2 values were also significantly higher on the non-lesional side than those on the lesion side in the acute phase (p= 0.0034, the discrepancy disappeared during the sub-acute and chronic phases. CONCLUSION: Cerebral oximetry can be used as a measure to evaluate the cerebral oxygenation during the various phases of ischaemic stroke. It has a potential to serve as a useful marker for detection of cerebral oxygenation imbalances, to judge the effectiveness of the management and for the follow-up of patients with ischaemic stroke.

  14. Neurological PRESentations in Sickle Cell Patients Are Not Always Stroke: A Review of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solh, Ziad; Taccone, Michael S; Marin, Samantha; Athale, Uma; Breakey, Vicky R

    2016-06-01

    Acute neurological changes in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients often raise the suspicion for stroke. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) can mimic stroke in its clinical presentation. We aimed to (i) review the PRES literature in SCD patients including clinical presentation, risk factors, pathophysiology, and management and (ii) elucidate the distinction between PRES and stroke in SCD. The exact pathophysiology of PRES in SCD remains elusive but is likely multifactorial and related to sickling, ischemia, and chronic anemia predisposing to vasogenic edema. PRES and stroke in SCD are distinguishable conditions. Our review may help elucidate a clinical approach to this distinction. PMID:26871763

  15. Community stroke rehabilitation helps patients return to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, John; O'Connor, Rory J

    2013-09-01

    Around 150,000 people experience a stroke every year in the UK. Nearly one million people in England are living with the effects of a stroke; one third of whom are moderately to severely disabled. A quarter of stroke survivors are under the age of 65 meaning that many are in work and/or have responsibility for caring for children or elderly parents. With a comprehensive rehabilitation team, patients with more complex or severe disability can be rehabilitated in the community providing that the home environment can be suitably adapted. All patients will require regular review by their own doctor and some of these reviews will focus on standardised assessments of risk factors for stroke and implementation of appropriate secondary prevention. The GP has a role in identifying the emotional impact of stroke on the patient and the impact that the stroke has on relatives and carers. The core components of the community-based programme can be broadly defined as improving emotional wellbeing, communication, cognitive function and physical independence and supporting return to work. Antidepressants are effective in reducing emotional lability. Cognitive functions such as memory, attention, perception and planning are often affected by stroke. Assessment and treatment by the occupational therapy team and clinical psychologist can reduce the impact of these impairments. Speech and language therapy is instrumental in facilitating recovery as is training carers in supportive communication and providing aphasia-friendly information. NICE recommends that patients receive 45 minutes of each relevant therapy five times a week. Each therapy needs to be provided at an intensity that will produce a functional change. Most patients will be able to drive again if there is no significant visual field loss or uncontrolled epilepsy. Graded return to work programmes are more successful as people are gradually accustomed to the workplace. PMID:24383153

  16. The Importance Of Patient Involvement In Stroke Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Tistad, Malin; Von Koch, Lena;

    2016-01-01

    the participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke...... stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and reading....... Conclusions: The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health services needs....

  17. The importance of patient involvement in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Tistad, Malin; Von Koch, Lena;

    2016-01-01

    participants' perceptions of involvement in decisions on care or treatment and needs for health services in 11 problem areas: mobility, falls, incontinence, pain, fatigue, emotion, concentration, memory, speaking, reading, and sight. The perceived impact of stroke in eight areas was assessed using the Stroke...... a mild stroke. The number of participants who reported problems varied between 51 (80%, mobility) and 24 (38%, sight). Involvement in decisions on care and treatment was found to be associated with having health services needs met in six problem areas: falls, fatigue, emotion, memory, speaking, and...... reading. Conclusions: The results highlight the importance of involving patients in making decisions on stroke rehabilitation, as it appears to be associated with meeting their health services needs....

  18. Fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin Gözübüyükoğulları; Duru Tabanlıoğlu Onan; Nuran Allı

    2014-01-01

    Background and Design: The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out with the participation of 100 chronic urticaria patients and 61 control group patients. Chronic urticaria patients were investigated for the etiology of urticaria and the autologous serum skin test was performed in those patients. Both the chronic urticaria patients and the controls were evaluated for fibromyalgi...

  19. Automated segmentation of chronic stroke lesions using LINDA: Lesion identification with neighborhood data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustina, Dorian; Coslett, H Branch; Turkeltaub, Peter E; Tustison, Nicholas; Schwartz, Myrna F; Avants, Brian

    2016-04-01

    The gold standard for identifying stroke lesions is manual tracing, a method that is known to be observer dependent and time consuming, thus impractical for big data studies. We propose LINDA (Lesion Identification with Neighborhood Data Analysis), an automated segmentation algorithm capable of learning the relationship between existing manual segmentations and a single T1-weighted MRI. A dataset of 60 left hemispheric chronic stroke patients is used to build the method and test it with k-fold and leave-one-out procedures. With respect to manual tracings, predicted lesion maps showed a mean dice overlap of 0.696 ± 0.16, Hausdorff distance of 17.9 ± 9.8 mm, and average displacement of 2.54 ± 1.38 mm. The manual and predicted lesion volumes correlated at r = 0.961. An additional dataset of 45 patients was utilized to test LINDA with independent data, achieving high accuracy rates and confirming its cross-institutional applicability. To investigate the cost of moving from manual tracings to automated segmentation, we performed comparative lesion-to-symptom mapping (LSM) on five behavioral scores. Predicted and manual lesions produced similar neuro-cognitive maps, albeit with some discussed discrepancies. Of note, region-wise LSM was more robust to the prediction error than voxel-wise LSM. Our results show that, while several limitations exist, our current results compete with or exceed the state-of-the-art, producing consistent predictions, very low failure rates, and transferable knowledge between labs. This work also establishes a new viewpoint on evaluating automated methods not only with segmentation accuracy but also with brain-behavior relationships. LINDA is made available online with trained models from over 100 patients. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1405-1421, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26756101

  20. Perception of stroke and knowledge of potential risk factors among Omani patients at increased risk for stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Al Asmi Abdullah R; Ganguly Shyam S; Al Shafaee Mohammed A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated poor knowledge of stroke among patients with established risk factors. This study aims to assess the baseline knowledge, among patients with increased risk for stroke in Oman, of warning symptoms of stroke, impending risk factors, treatment, and sources of information. Methods In April 2005, trained family practice residents at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital Clinics (cardiology, neurology, diabetic, and lipid clinics), using a standard...

  1. ANALYSIS OF RISK FACTORS IN 3901 PATIENTS WITH STROKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Feng Liu; Guy van Melle; Julien Bogousslavsky

    2005-01-01

    Objective To estimate the frequency of various risk factors for overall stroke and to identify risk factors for cerebral infarction (CI) versus intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a large hospital-based stroke registry.Methods Data from a total of 3901 patients, consisting of 3525 patients with CI and 376 patients with ICH were prospectively coded and entered into a computerized data bank.Results Hypertension and smoking were the most prominent factors affecting overall stroke followed by mild internal carotid artery stenosis (< 50%), hypercholesterolemia, transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), diabetes mellitus, and cardiac ischemia. Univariate analysis showed that factors in male significantly associated with CI versus ICH were old age, a family history of stroke, and intermittent claudication; whereas in female the factors were oral contraception and migraine. By multivariate analysis, in all patients, the factors significantly associated with CI as opposed to ICH were smoking, hypercholesterolemia, migraine, TIAs, atrial fibrillation, structural heart disease, and arterial disease. Hypertension was the only significant factor related with ICH versus CI.Conclusions The factors for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are not exactly the same. Cardiac and arterial disease are the most powerful factors associated with CI rather than ICH.

  2. Patient management in the recovery period of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kosivtsova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stroke heads the list of all causes of disability in middle-aged and elderly people. In recent years, there have been about 30% of morbid events among able-bodied persons (less than 65 years of age. The major post-stroke incapacitating disorders are motor and speech defects, cognitive and psychoemotional disorders, and pelvic organ dysfunctions. The patients’ quality of life largely depends on the degree of recovery of lost functions. In turn, the degree of their recovery depends on the start, proportioning, and continuity of initiated rehabilitation measures and on whether the patient has cognitive, speech, and psychoemotional problems and pelvic organ dysfunctions. Unfortunately, after discharge from a specialized unit, only a small number of post-stroke patients are admitted to specialized rehabilitation centers. The responsibility of caring forthese patients rests with their relatives and outpatient physicians.The main tasks in the early and late recovery periods following stroke are, in addition to the prevention of recurrent stroke, the implementation of rehabilitation programs to correct motor and speech disorders and cognitive impairments, the stabilization of emotions, and the provision of proper and qualitative general care for patients with severe motor defects and pelvic organ dysfunctions. The paper considers the main principles of patient management in the early and late post-stroke recovery periods. The authors give rehabilitation recommendations and main errors in routine practice (their relatives and junior medical staff have no speech contact with patients having speech disorders; psychoemotional disorders are underestimated and uncorrected; proper general care for patients with pelvic organ dysfunctions is absent.

  3. Biventricular function at high altitude: implications for regulation of stroke volume in chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, J Simon R

    2007-01-01

    The myocardium is well protected against chronic hypoxia. In chronic hypoxia stroke volume falls both at rest and on exercise. The fall in stroke volume is associated with reduction in left ventricular dimensions and filling pressure. An obvious explanation for this is the reduction in plasma volume observed at high altitude, but this does not appear to be the whole story. Neither is left ventricular systolic function abnormal even at the summit of Mount Everest. Hypoxia itself may have a direct effect on impairing myocardial relaxation. Increased pulmonary vascular resistance leads to right ventricular pressure overload. This may impair right ventricular function, and reduce stroke volume and venous return to the left atrium. Interaction between the right and left ventricles, which share a common septum and are potentially constrained in volume by the pericardium, may impair diastolic left ventricular filling as a consequence of right ventricular pressure overload, and hence reduce stroke volume. It is questionable how clinically significant is this left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The relative importance of different mechanisms which reduce stroke volume probably depends whether hemodynamics are measured at rest or on exercise. Intervention with sildenafil to ameliorate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is associated with both an increase in exercise capacity and stroke volume in hypoxia. Whether these have a causal association remains to be demonstrated. PMID:18269185

  4. Reducing chronic visuo-spatial neglect following right hemisphere stroke through instrument playing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeka eBodak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral visuo-spatial neglect is a neuropsychological syndrome commonly resulting from right hemisphere strokes at the temporo-parietal junction of the infero-posterior parietal cortex. Neglect is characterised by reduced awareness of stimuli presented on patients’ contralesional side of space and has previously been shown to be improved by a number of motivational influences, including listening to preferred music and numerical sequence completion. Here we examined whether playing musical sequences on chime bars – an instrument with a horizontal alignment – would bring about clinically significant improvement in chronic neglect.Two left neglect patients completed an intervention comprising four weekly 30-minute music sessions involving playing scales and familiar melodies on chime bars from right to left. Two cancellation tests (Mesulam shape, BIT star, the line bisection test, and the neglect subtest from the computerised TAP (Test for Attentional Performance battery were administered three times during a preliminary baseline phase, before and after each music session during the rehabilitation phase to investigate short-term effects, as well as one week after the last intervention session to investigate whether any effects would persist.Both patients demonstrated significant short-term and longer-lasting improvements on the Mesulam shape cancellation test. One patient also showed longer-lasting effects on the BIT star cancellation test and scored in the normal range one week after the intervention. These findings provide preliminary evidence that active music-making may help neglect patients attend more to their affected side.

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) Gene Polymorphism in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraczynska, Kinga; Kurzepa, Jacek; Ksiazek, Andrzej; Buraczynska, Monika; Rejdak, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), endopeptidases degrading extracellular matrix, play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and vascular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the C(-1562)T functional polymorphism in the MMP-9 gene and risk of stroke. We examined 322 patients with stroke and 410 controls. In the patient group, 52 % had type 2 diabetes. All subjects were genotyped for the C(-1562)T polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction and restriction analysis. A significant increase in T allele and CT + TT genotype frequencies was observed in patients compared with controls (OR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.34-2.23 and 1.89, 95 % CI 1.39-2.56, respectively). The T allele carriers were younger at the onset of stroke (63.5 ± 11.7 years) than patients with CC genotype (71 ± 14.1 years) (p = 0.0002). The comparison between patients with T2DM and without it showed that the T allele and CT + TT genotype were more frequent in T2DM patients (OR 1.48, 95 % CI 1.03-2.12 for T allele and 1.44, 95 % CI 1.93-2.24 for CT + TT genotype). In conclusion, our findings suggest that MMP-9 C(-1562)T polymorphism is significantly associated with risk of stroke in patients with and without T2DM. PMID:26330106

  6. Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Combined with Intensive Swallowing Rehabilitation for Chronic Stroke Dysphagia: A Case Series Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Momosaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to clarify the safety and feasibility of a 6-day protocol of bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS combined with intensive swallowing rehabilitation for chronic poststroke dysphagia. In-hospital treatment was provided to 4 poststroke patients (age at treatment: 56-80 years; interval between onset of stroke and treatment: 24-37 months with dysphagia. Over 6 consecutive days, each patient received 10 sessions of rTMS at 3 Hz applied to the pharyngeal motor cortex bilaterally, followed by 20 min of intensive swallowing rehabilitation exercise. The swallowing function was evaluated by the Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS, Modified Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MMASA, Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS, laryngeal elevation delay time (LEDT and Repetitive Saliva-Swallowing Test (RSST on admission and at discharge. All patients completed the 6-day treatment protocol and none showed any adverse reactions throughout the treatment. The combination treatment improved laryngeal elevation delay time in all patients. Our proposed protocol of rTMS plus swallowing rehabilitation exercise seems to be safe and feasible for chronic stroke dysphagia, although its efficacy needs to be confirmed in a large number of patients.

  7. Ischemic Stroke Due to Cardiac Involvement: Emery Dreifuss Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kasım Ulusoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is a hereditary disease. It is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, fatigue related to skapulo-humero-peroneal muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy which develops in adulthood and cardiac conduction system block. Cardiac involvement has a prognostic significance in patients with EDMD and even sudden cardiac death may be the first clinical presentation. In this article, an EDMD patient with ischemic stroke clinic who didn’t have regular cardiac follow-up was reported and the importance of the treatment of cardiac diseases which could play a role in ischemic stroke etiology and the implantation of pace-maker was mentioned.

  8. Family History and Functional Outcome in Korean Stroke Patients: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hee Jung; Kim, Tae Uk; Hyun, Jung Keun; Kim, Jung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of family history of stroke with functional outcomes in stroke patients in Korea. Methods A case-control study was conducted. A total of 170 patients who were admitted to a rehabilitation unit were included. Risk factors for stroke such as age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, smoking, high blood cholesterol and homocysteine level, obesity, and family history of stroke were taken into account. Stroke subtypes were the followin...

  9. The PhysioFlow Thoracic Impedancemeter Is Not Valid for the Measurements of Cardiac Hemodynamic Parameters in Chronic Anemic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bogui, Pascal; Balayssac-Siransy, Edwige; Connes, Philippe; Tuo, Nalourgo; Ouattara, Soualiho; Pichon, Aurélien; Dah, Cyrille Serges

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the validity of the transthoracic electrical bioimpedance method PhysioFlow® to measure stroke volume in patients with chronic anemia. Stroke volume index (SVI), as well as cardiac index (CI) obtained by transthoracic electrical bioimpedance method and doppler echocardiography were compared in healthy subjects (n = 25) and patients with chronic anemia (i.e. mainly with sickle cell anemia; n = 32), at rest. While doppler echocardiography was able to det...

  10. MEG-based detection and localization of perilesional dysfunction in chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron K.O. Chu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke impairment is associated not only with structural lesions, but also with dysfunction in surviving perilesional tissue. Previous studies using equivalent current dipole source localization of MEG/EEG signals have demonstrated a preponderance of slow-wave activity localized to perilesional areas. Recent studies have also demonstrated the utility of nonlinear analyses such as multiscale entropy (MSE for quantifying neuronal dysfunction in a wide range of pathologies. The current study utilized beamformer-based reconstruction of signals in source space to compare spectral and nonlinear measures of electrical activity in perilesional and healthy cortices. Data were collected from chronic stroke patients and healthy controls, both young and elderly. We assessed relative power in the delta (1–4 Hz, theta (4–7 Hz, alpha (8–12 Hz and beta (15–30 Hz frequency bands, and also measured the nonlinear complexity of electrical activity using MSE. Perilesional tissue exhibited a general slowing of the power spectrum (increased delta/theta, decreased beta as well as a reduction in MSE. All measures tested were similarly sensitive to changes in the posterior perilesional regions, but anterior perilesional dysfunction was detected better by MSE and beta power. The findings also suggest that MSE is specifically sensitive to electrophysiological dysfunction in perilesional tissue, while spectral measures were additionally affected by an increase in rolandic beta power with advanced age. Furthermore, perilesional electrophysiological abnormalities in the left hemisphere were correlated with the degree of language task-induced activation in the right hemisphere. Finally, we demonstrate that single subject spectral and nonlinear analyses can identify dysfunctional perilesional regions within individual patients that may be ideal targets for interventions with noninvasive brain stimulation.

  11. Cognitive Profile of Elderly Patients with Mild Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Gramstad

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: A pattern characterizing cognitive deficits in mild stroke could help in differential diagnosis and rehabilitation planning. Methods: Fifty patients with mild stroke (modified Rankin scale ≤2 at discharge aged >60 years were given the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R and the Stroop test. Results: On HVLT-R, significant impairments were found in learning and recall, but not in delayed recall. The Stroop test revealed significant impairments in reading speed, but not in color-word interference. Using the MMSE, significant deficits were only found in the youngest age group. Conclusion: Elderly patients with mild stroke show deficits in verbal learning/recall and in reading speed, but not in the MMSE, delayed recall or color-word interference. The deficits are consistent with a mild-to-moderate brain dysfunction, with relative sparing of medial brain structures.

  12. Strategies of Daily Living Rehabilitative Activities for Post Stroke Patients at Minia University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaky, Hend Elham Mohamed; EL-Lateef Mohammad, Zienab Abd; EL-Labban, Abdou Saad Taha; Ahmed, Gahen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a leading cause of disability. Rehabilitation aims to hasten and maximize recovery from stroke by treating the disabilities caused by the stroke. Therefore, the aim of this study determine the post stroke patients' knowledge and practices in relation to disease and activities of daily living before the implementation of…

  13. Stroke Patients Often Can't Name Doctor, Grasp Treatment Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 157348.html Stroke Patients Often Can't Name Doctor, Grasp Treatment Plan: Study Research exposes communication gap ... News) -- Many stroke patients can't identify their doctor, which may increase the likelihood that they won' ...

  14. Brain perfusion-CT in acute stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1979 when Grodfrey Hounsfield and Allan Corman introduced the computed tomography new generations of CT were developed that improved the special resolution and time of acquisition. The role of neuro-imaging in the evaluation of acute stroke has changed dramatically in the past decade. Previously, neuro-imaging was used in this set-ting to provide anatomic imaging that indicated the presence or absence of acute cerebral ischemia and excluded lesions that produce symptoms or signs mimicking those of stroke, such as hemorrhage and neoplasms. More recently, the introduction of thrombolysis has changed the goals of neuro-imaging from providing solely anatomic information to providing physiologic information that could help to determine which patients might benefit from therapy. In particular, significant emphasis has been placed on the delineation of the ischemic penumbra, also called tissue at risk. Modem CT survey, consisting of three indissociable elements; noncontrast CT (NCT) of course, perfusion-CT (PCT) and CT-angiography (CTA), fulfill all the requirements for hyperacute stroke imaging. CTA can define the occlusion site, depict arterial dissection, grade collateral blood flow, and characterize atherosclerotic disease, whereas PCT accurately defines the infarct core and the ischemic penumbra. CT offers a number of practical advantages over other cerebral perfusion imaging methods, including its wide availability. Using PCT and CTA to define new individualized strategies for acute reperfusion will allow more acute stroke patients to benefit from thrombolytic therapy. Key words: Stroke. Penumbra. Computed Tomography. Perfusion-CT. CT Angiography. Outcome

  15. High Incidence of Atrial Fibrillation or Flutter in Stroke Patients Who Have the Clinical Risk Factors for Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob I. Haft; Louis E. Teichholz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation or flutter (AF is well known and depends on the presence of risk factors. The incidence of AF in patients who have a stroke and its relationship to risk factors is not clear, however, because many stroke patients may have occult intermittent AF that is not present at the time of stroke and is not diagnosed. To better assess the incidence of AF, we studied the clinical records and all the 12 lead ECGs in a 14 year medical center data base of 985 patients admitted with ischemic stroke over a 3 year period and correlated the incidence of AF with the presence of the stroke risk factors. Of the stroke patients with congestive heart failure 61.9% had AF (95%CL 54.4, 68.9, with age >/= 75 years 45.2% had AF (CL 41.0,49.4, with coronary artery disease 42.9 had AF (CL 36.8, 49.2, with diabetes 39.2% had AF (CL 32.8,46.1 and with hypertension 33.7% had AF (CL 30.5, 37.1, all significantly higher than without these risk factors. Patients with more than one risk factor or with echo abnormalities, especially left atrial enlargement, had an even higher incidence of AF. These findings suggest that AF may be a very common mechanism whereby the stroke risk factors cause stroke. Stroke patients in normal sinus rhythm with these risk factors should be monitored for AF so they can receive anticoagulation to prevent a subsequent stroke if AF is diagnosed.

  16. Effect of visual training on cognitive function in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-Xiang Chen; Rong-Hua Mao; Shu-Xing Li; Ya-Ning Zhao; Min Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of visual training on cognitive function in stoke patients. Methods: Eighty stroke patients with cognitive dysfunction were divided into two groups (n = 40 in each group). The control group received conventional rehabilitation therapies. The experimental group received visual training in addition to the conventional therapies. This training was administered for 30 min once a day, five times a week, for four weeks. All patients were screened with the Montrea...

  17. Botulinum toxin injection improved voluntary motor control in selected patients with post-stroke spasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo-Hsiu Chang; Gerald E Francisco; Sheng Li

    2012-01-01

    The effect of botulinum toxin type A injection on voluntary grip control was examined in a 53-year-old female, who sustained a hemorrhagic right middle cerebral artery stroke 3 years previously, which resulted in finger flexor spasticity and residual weak finger/wrist extension. The patient received 50 units of botulinum toxin type A injection each to the motor points (2 sites/muscle) of the left flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor digitorum profundus, respectively. Botulinum toxin injection led to weakness and tone reduction in the spastic finger flexors, but improved grip release time in grip initiation/release reaction time tasks. Improved release time was accompanied by shortened extensor electromyography activity, and improved release time likely correlated with blocked co-contraction of finger flexors during voluntary finger extension. This case report demonstrated that botulinum toxin injection improved voluntary motor control of the hand in a chronic stroke patient with residual finger extension.

  18. A piano training program to improve manual dexterity and upper extremity function in chronic stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam eVilleneuve

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Music-supported therapy was shown to induce improvements in motor skills in stroke survivors. Whether all stroke individuals respond similarly to the intervention and whether gains can be maintained over time remain unknown. We estimated the immediate and retention effects of a piano training program on upper extremity function in persons with chronic stroke. Methods: Thirteen stroke participants engaged in a 3-week piano training comprising of supervised sessions (9 x 60min and home practice. Fine and gross manual dexterity, movement coordination and functional use of the upper extremity were assessed at baseline, pre-intervention, post-intervention and at a 3-week follow-up. Results: Significant improvements were observed for all outcomes at post-intervention and follow-up, compared to pre-intervention scores. Larger magnitudes of change in manual dexterity and functional use of the upper extremity were associated with higher initial levels of motor recovery. Conclusions: Piano training can result in sustainable improvements in upper extremity function in chronic stroke survivors. Individuals with a higher initial level of motor recovery at baseline appear to benefit the most from this intervention.

  19. Review of nutrition support and evaluation in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo-li WU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is common after stroke, usually caused by cognitive disorder, dysphagia, paralysis, sensorimotor disability and visual field defect. Many researches indicate that the initiation of early enteral nutrition in stroke patients would own enormous clinical benefits, including a decrease in the risk of death and infectious diseases, shorter hospital stay and lower health expenditure. However, irregular nutrition management could increase the incidence of hypostatic pneumonia and urinary tract infection. Therefore, both European Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ESPEN and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN recommended that nutrition screening and assessment and nutrition support be initiated as soon as possible, preferably within 24 h of hospital admission, to improve clinical outcomes. Chinese neurologists and patients have accepted this concept and have done many worthful studies in the past few years. This paper summarized the common methods of nutrition assessment and measurement of interstinal barrier function, in order to monitor the nutritional status of stroke patients, and push the establishment and improvement of nutrition support system for stroke patients in China. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.004

  20. Anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner-Frandsen, Nicole; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Ashournia, Hamoun;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, with a lifetime risk of 25%, and it is a well-known independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Over the last 15 years, efforts have been made to initiate relevant treatment in patients with AF. A retrospective study was...

  1. Endovascular middle cerebral arterial occlusion in a nonhuman primate model of chronic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Wang; Tong Zhang; Chunyu Zhao; Bin Du; Feng Gao; Mei Wen; Weijian Jiang

    2011-01-01

    No study has reported the safety, effectiveness, and consistency of endovascular middle cerebral artery occlusion in a chronic cerebral ischemia model. Nor have studies verified the safest and most effective segment, or branch, in the embolic middle cerebral artery. In this experiment, cerebral infarction models were established at M1, and on the upper and lower trunks on the contralateral side of the handedness of rhesus monkeys by using endovascular intervention. The results confirmed a high animal survival rate in stroke models of middle cerebral artery upper trunk occlusion. There was pronounced paralysis at the acute phase, long-term upper extremity dysfunction at the chronic phase, and the models showed good repeatability and consistency. Thus, this study describes a safe and effective model of chronic stroke.

  2. Efficacy and safety of Cerebrolysin in patients with hemorrhagic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Bajenaru, O; Tiu, C; Moessler, H; Antochi, F; Muresanu, D.; Popescu, BO; Novak, P.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of Cerebrolysin in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. The primary objective of this trial was to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of a 10–days course of therapy with a daily administration of Cerebrolysin (50 mL Ⅳ per day). The trial had to demonstrate that Cerebrolysin treatment is safe in hemorrhagic stroke. Methods: The study was performed as a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo–controlled, parallel group...

  3. Carotid interventions (CEA and CAS) in acute stroke patients: which procedure on which patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Ralph C; Warner, Courtney; Yeh, Chin C; Shah, Melissa D; Hnath, Jeffrey C; Shah, Dhiraj M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of carotid bifurcation disease in patients presenting with acute stroke has been a controversial issue over the past four decades. Classically, patients were asked to wait four to six weeks before intervention was entertained in order for the brain to stabilize and the risks of intervention to be minimized. Unfortunately, up to 20% of patients will have a secondary event after their index event and the window of opportunity to save potentially salvageable ischemic tissue will be missed. Early reports had demonstrated poor results with intervention. However, more recently, institutions such as ours have demonstrated excellent results with early intervention in patients who present with stable mild to moderate stroke with an NIH stroke scale less than 15 and preferably less than 10, present with stroke and ipsilateral carotid artery lesion of 50% or greater. Also more recently, we have been aggressively treating patients with larger ulcerative plaques even if the stenosis approaches 50%. In our and others experiences, patients who are treated at institutions that have comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs) where they have a multidisciplinary system that consists of vascular surgeons, neuro interventionalists, stroke neurologists, specifically trained stroke nursing staff and a neuro intensive ICU have had optimal results. Early assessment, diagnosis of stroke with recognition of cause of embolization is mandatory but patient selection is extremely important; finding those patients who will benefit the most from urgent intervention. Most studies have demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy in these patients. More recent studies have demonstrated acceptable results with carotid stenting, especially in smaller lesions, those less than 1.2 centimeters. Early intervention should be avoided in most patients who are obtunded or with an NIH stroke scale greater than 15 or who do not have any "brain at risk" to salvage. These patients may be better served by

  4. Evaluating interhemispheric cortical responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in chronic stroke: A TMS-EEG investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borich, Michael R; Wheaton, Lewis A; Brodie, Sonia M; Lakhani, Bimal; Boyd, Lara A

    2016-04-01

    TMS-evoked cortical responses can be measured using simultaneous electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) to directly quantify cortical connectivity in the human brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interhemispheric cortical connectivity between the primary motor cortices (M1s) in participants with chronic stroke and controls using TMS-EEG. Ten participants with chronic stroke and four controls were tested. TMS-evoked responses were recorded at rest and during a typical TMS assessment of transcallosal inhibition (TCI). EEG recordings from peri-central gyral electrodes (C3 and C4) were evaluated using imaginary phase coherence (IPC) analyses to quantify levels of effective interhemispheric connectivity. Significantly increased TMS-evoked beta (15-30Hz frequency range) IPC was observed in the stroke group during ipsilesional M1 stimulation compared to controls during TCI assessment but not at rest. TMS-evoked beta IPC values were associated with TMS measures of transcallosal inhibition across groups. These results suggest TMS-evoked EEG responses can index abnormal effective interhemispheric connectivity in chronic stroke. PMID:26940237

  5. Evaluation of patients with stroke monitored by home care programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patient with a stroke in home treatment, investigating physical capacity, mental status and anthropometric analysis. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Fortaleza/CE, from January to April of 2010. Sixty-one individuals monitored by a home care program of three tertiary hospitals were investigated, through interviews and the application of scales. The majority of individuals encountered were female (59%, elderly, bedridden, with a low educational level, a history of other stroke, a high degree of dependence for basic (73.8% and instrumental (80.3 % activities of daily living, and a low cognitive level (95.1%. Individuals also presented with tracheostomy, gastric feeding and urinary catheter, difficulty hearing, speaking, chewing, swallowing, and those making daily use of various medications. It was concluded that home care by nurses is an alternative for care of those individuals with a stroke.

  6. Vrednotenje Intervjuja kontinuitete življenja pri osebah po možganski kapi: Evaluation of Continuity of Life Interview in stroke patients:

    OpenAIRE

    Grad, Anton; Janca, Aleksandar; Janša, Jelka; Vidmar, Gaj

    2008-01-01

    Background: Continuity of life is a novel concept in rehabilitation. Therefore, we performed psychometric evaluation of the Continuity of Life Interview in chronic stroke patients. Methods: Thirty randomly chosen stroke patients participated, 11 females and 19 males. In addition to COLI, Barthel Index and WHO DAS-S were applied at first assessment. During the first interview, another assessor was present independently doing the scoring. Three days later, a third assessor performed the intervi...

  7. Stroke in a patient with tuberculous meningitis and HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bruna Pasticci

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is a devastating disease. TBM occurs more commonly in HIV infected patients. The influence of HIV co-infection on clinical manifestations and outcome of TBM is not well defined. Yet, some differences have been observed and stroke has been recorded to occur more frequently. This study reports on an HIV infected Caucasian female with lung, meningeal tuberculosis and stroke due to a cortical sub-cortical ischemic lesion.TBM was documented in the absence of neurologic symptoms. At the same time, miliary lung TB caused by multi-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed. Anti-TB therapy consisting of a combination of four drugs was administered. The patient improved and was discharged five weeks later. In conclusion, TBM and multiple underling pathologies including HIV infection, as well as other risk factors can lead to a greater risk of stroke. Moreover, drug interactions and their side effects add levels of complexity. TBM must be included in the differential diagnosis of HIV infected patients with stroke and TBM treatment needs be started as soon as possible before the onset of vasculopathy.

  8. Oral anticoagulation and the risk of stroke or death in patients with atrial fibrillation and one additional stroke risk factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauchier, Laurent; Lecoq, Coralie; Clementy, Nicolas; Bernard, Anne; Angoulvant, Denis; Ivanes, Fabrice; Babuty, Dominique; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    Background: It remains uncertain whether patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and a single additional stroke risk factor (CHA2DS2-VASc score = 1 in males, 2 in females) should be treated with oral anticoagulation (OAC). We investigated the risk of ischemic stroke, systemic embolism and death in...

  9. GERSTMANN’S SYNDROME IN ACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Zukic, Sanela; Mrkonjic, Zamir; Sinanovic, Osman; Vidovic, Mirjana; Kojic, Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Gerstmann in 1924. observed in a few patients a concomitant impairment in discriminating their own fingers, writing by hand, distinguishing left from right and performing calculations. He claimed that this tetrad of symptoms constituted a syndromal entity, assigned it to a lesion of the dominant parietal lobe. Since than, Gerstmann`s syndrome (GS) was enigma for neuropsychologists. The aim of this study was to analyze frequency and clinical features of GS among acute stroke patient...

  10. Ischemic Stroke Due to Cardiac Involvement: Emery Dreifuss Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Ersin Kasım Ulusoy; Tolga Kunak; Şule Bilen; Fikri Ak

    2015-01-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is a hereditary disease. It is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, fatigue related to skapulo-humero-peroneal muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy which develops in adulthood and cardiac conduction system block. Cardiac involvement has a prognostic significance in patients with EDMD and even sudden cardiac death may be the first clinical presentation. In this article, an EDMD patient with ischemic stroke clinic who didn’t...

  11. Stroke in a Patient with Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Caridade, S; Machado, A.; Ferreira, C.

    2007-01-01

    Stroke in patients with sickle cell anemia is multifactorial but occurs mainly by 2 mechanisms: occlusive arteriopathy and obliteration of small vessels with plugs of sickle cells. The high individual risk can be assessed by simple and well-defined strategies such as ultrasounds with transcranial and cervical Doppler Ultrasonography. The authors report the clinical case of a 25 year-old black female patient with sickle cell anemia, who was admitted with right hemiparesis. Cerebral MRI sho...

  12. Impaired Hyperemic Response to Exercise Post Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Durand, Matthew J.; Murphy, Spencer A.; Schaefer, Kathleen K.; HUNTER, SANDRA K.; Schmit, Brian D.; Gutterman, David D.; Hyngstrom, Allison S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with chronic stroke have reduced perfusion of the paretic lower limb at rest; however, the hyperemic response to graded muscle contractions in this patient population has not been examined. This study quantified blood flow to the paretic and non-paretic lower limbs of subjects with chronic stroke after submaximal contractions of the knee extensor muscles and correlated those measures with limb function and activity. Ten subjects with chronic stroke and ten controls had blood flow ...

  13. How a Stroke Is Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... Diagnosis » How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed Lab ...

  14. Vein thromboembolism prevention in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Savić Dejan; Savić Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Having in mind the rate of occurrence and clinical importance, venous thromboembolism implies venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism as a result of embolisation of the thrombotic particles from deep veins or pelvic veins. Venous thrombosis of the deep veins may result in chronic vein insufficiency, but the primary medical problem is the possibility of development of pulmonary embolism which may cause permanent respiratory function damage or even fatal outcome. Venous thromboemb...

  15. fMRI as a molecular imaging procedure for the functional reorganization of motor systems in chronic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    LAZARIDOU, ASIMINA; Astrakas, Loukas; MINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOS; KHANCHICEH, AZADEH; SINGHAL, ANEESH; Moskowitz, Michael; Rosen, Bruce; Tzika, Aria

    2013-01-01

    Previous brain imaging studies suggest that stroke alters functional connectivity in motor execution networks. Moreover, current understanding of brain plasticity has led to new approaches in stroke rehabilitation. Recent studies showed a significant role of effective coupling of neuronal activity in the SMA (supplementary motor area) and M1 (primary motor cortex) network for motor outcome in patients after stroke. After a subcortical stroke, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) durin...

  16. Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Change in alertness (including sleepiness, unconsciousness, and coma) Changes in hearing or taste Changes that affect ... or prevent more strokes Nutrients and fluids Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and swallowing therapy will ...

  17. Neck Proprioceptive Training for Balance Function in Patients with Chronic Poststroke Hemiparesis: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Oh, Duck-Won

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of neck proprioceptive training on the balance of patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis. [Subjects] Three patients with chronic stroke were recruited for this study. [Methods] The subjects underwent neck proprioceptive training using the red light of a laser pointer (30 min daily, five times per week for 4 weeks). Outcome measures included the stability and weight distribution indices measured with a Tetrax system and Timed Up and Go (TUG) ...

  18. In-hospital medical complications associated with patient dependency after acute ischemic stroke: data from the China National Stroke Registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng-lian; ZHAO Xing-quan; DU Wan-liang; WANG An-xin; JI Rui-jun; YANG Zhong-hua; WANG Chun-xue

    2013-01-01

    Background The mortality of stroke patients is strongly affected by medical complications.However,there are limited data investigating the effect of in-hospital medical complications on the dependency of stroke patients worldwide.We prospectively and systematically investigated the effect of medical complications on dependency of patients at 3,6 and 12 months after stroke using the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR).Methods This prospective cohort study collected data of patients age >18 years with acute ischemic stroke in 132 clinical centers distributed across 32 provinces and four municipalities (including Hong Kong region) of China,from September 2007 to August 2008.Data on medical complications,dependency and other information were obtained from paper-based registry forms.Medical complications associated with stroke outcomes were assessed using multivariable Logistic regression.Results Of 11 560 patients with acute ischemic stroke,1826 (15.80%) presented with in-hospital medical complications.In-hospital medical complications were independent risk factors for dependency of patients at 3 months (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.367,95% confidence interval (CI) 2.021-2.771),6 months (adjusted OR 2.257,95% CI 1.922-2.650),and 12 months (adjusted OR 1.820,95% CI 1.538-2.154) after acute ischemic stroke.Conclusion The results demonstrated that the short-term and long-term dependency of acute ischemic stroke patients is significantly associated with in-hospital medical complications in China.

  19. Psychological problems affecting the prognosis of stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It is believed that mental disorder influences the morbility and prognosis of cardio-cerebrovascular disease by biological factors.OBJECTIVE:To observe the characteristics of stroke patients complicated by psychological problems and the prognosis of such patients.DESIGN:Observational study.SETTING:Department of Neurology,Beijing Longfu Hospital.PARTICIPANTS:Totally 160 inpatients (46 males and 114 females) with stroke admitted to Department of Neurology,Beijing Longfu Hospital between June 2005 and June 2006 were recruited in this study.The involved patients all corresponded to the diagnosis criteria of cerebrovascular disease formulated in the 1995 National Conference of Cerebrovascular Disease and confirmed by skull CT or MRI examination.The age range was between 43 and 74 years.They all signed the informed consent for the detection and therapeutic regimen,and the application of this technique also gave the approval of the Ethics Committee of the hospital.METHODS:On admission,the patients were investigated on psychological problems using Hopkin symptom checklist.After admission,all the patients received oral administration of aspirin anti-platelet drugs and intravenous infusion of Fufang Danshen.Motor relearning program was used in the rehabilitation treatment for disability rehabilitation.Mental intervention was carried out in the end of observation period.On day 30 after admission,the recovery of two groups of patients was compared using activities of daily living scale,Scandinanvian Stroke Scale (SSS) and disability level.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The activities of daily living were assessed with Barthel index.Higher scores of patients suggested better activities of daily living.For SSS,the higher points,the severer defect degree.The reduction of scores of neurologic impairment suggested that neurological function improved.Disability level was graded according to the method formulated in the Second National Cerebrovascular Conference.RESULTS:All the 160

  20. Chronic constipation in hemiplegic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of bowel dysfunction in hemiplegic patients, and its relationship with the site of neurological lesion, physical immobilization and pharmacotherapy.METHODS: Ninety consecutive hemiplegic patients and 81 consecutive orthopedic patients were investigated during physical motor rehabilitation in the same period, in the same center and on the same diet. All subjects were interviewed ≥ 3 mo after injury using a questionnaire inquiring about bowel habits before injury and at the time of the interview. Patients' mobility was evaluated by the Adapted Patient Evaluation Conference System. Drugs considered for the analysis were nitrates, angiogenic converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors,calcium antagonists, anticoagulants, antithrombotics,antidepressants, anti-epileptics.RESULTS: Mobility scores were similar in the two groups. De novo constipation (OR = 5.36) was a frequent outcome of the neurological accident.Hemiplegics showed an increased risk of straining at stool (OR: 4.33), reduced call to evacuate (OR: 4.13),sensation of incomplete evacuation (OR: 3.69), use of laxatives (OR: 3.75). Logistic regression model showed that constipation was significantly and independently associated with hemiplegia. A positive association was found between constipation and use of nitrates and antithrombotics in both groups. Constipation was not related to the site of brain injury.CONCLUSION: Chronic constipation is a possible outcome of cerebrovascular accidents occurring in 30% of neurologically stabilized hemiplegic patients.Its onset after a cerebrovascular accident appears to be independent from the injured brain hemisphere,and unrelated to physical inactivity. Pharmacological treatment with nitrates and antithrombotics may represent an independent risk factor for developing chronic constipation.

  1. Cerebral blood flow in acute and chronic ischemic stroke using xenon-133 inhalation tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Paulson, O B; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    Serial measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were performed in 12 patients with acute symptoms of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. CBF was measured by xenon-133 inhalation and single photon emission computer tomography. Six patients had severe strokes and large infarcts on the CT scan. They...

  2. What happens to stroke patients after hospital discharge?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Noone, I

    2001-05-01

    Of 231 stroke patients discharged from hospital, 34 patients (14.7%) had died when reviewed 6 months later. Of 195 survivors, 115 (58%) were independent and living in the community. The remaining 80 (42%) patients were dependent. The majority of dependent patients were in institutional care but 29 (36%) were residing in the community of whom a substantial number were not receiving physiotherapy, occupational therapy or day care. Patients who were dependent in nursing homes were less likely to have received physiotherapy (48% versus 70%) or occupational therapy (28% versus 60%) compared to disabled patients in hospital based extended nursing care. 45 patients (24%) had been re-admitted to hospital although only 48% of patients had been reviewed in hospital outpatients since discharge. 64% of patients were on anti-thrombotic treatment. This survey suggests that 6 months after hospital discharge, most stroke patients are still alive and living in the community. Many of the dependent survivors have ongoing unmet medical and rehabilitation needs.

  3. A multi-channel biomimetic neuroprosthesis to support treadmill gait training in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Noelia; Ambrosini, Emilia; Baccinelli, Walter; Nardone, Antonio; Monticone, Marco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ferrante, Simona

    2015-08-01

    This study presents an innovative multi-channel neuroprosthesis that induces a biomimetic activation of the main lower-limb muscles during treadmill gait training to be used in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The electrostimulation strategy replicates the physiological muscle synergies used by healthy subjects to walk on a treadmill at their self-selected speed. This strategy is mapped to the current gait sub-phases, which are identified in real time by a custom algorithm. This algorithm divides the gait cycle into six sub-phases, based on two inertial sensors placed laterally on the shanks. Therefore, the pre-defined stimulation profiles are expanded or stretched based on the actual gait pattern of each single subject. A preliminary experimental protocol, involving 10 healthy volunteers, was carried out to extract the muscle synergies and validate the gait-detection algorithm, which were afterwards used in the development of the neuroprosthesis. The feasibility of the neuroprosthesis was tested on one healthy subject who simulated different gait patterns, and a chronic stroke patient. The results showed the correct functioning of the system. A pilot study of the neurorehabilitation treatment for stroke patients is currently being carried out. PMID:26737943

  4. Improvement in balance using a virtual reality-based stepping exercise: a randomized controlled trial involving individuals with chronic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Llorens Rodríguez, Roberto; Gil Gómez, Jose Antonio; Alcañiz Raya, Mariano Luis; COLOMER FONT, CAROLINA; Noe, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Objective: To study the clinical effectiveness and the usability of a virtual reality-based intervention compared with conventional physical therapy in the balance recovery of individuals with chronic stroke. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Outpatient neurorehabilitation unit. Participants: A total of 20 individuals with chronic stroke. Interventions: The intervention consisted of 20 one-hour sessions, five sessions per week. The experimental group combined 30 m...

  5. Foot Placement and Arm Position Affect the Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test Time of Individuals with Chronic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of two foot placements (normal or posterior placement) and three arm positions (hands on the thighs, arms crossed over chest, and augmented arm position with elbow extended) on the five times sit-to-stand (FTSTS) test times of individuals with chronic stroke. Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. University-based rehabilitation clinic. Participants. A convenience sample of community-dwelling individuals with chronic stroke (N = 45). Methods. The times i...

  6. Early seizures in patients with acute stroke: Frequency, predictive factors, and effect on clinical outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Alberti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Alberti, Maurizio Paciaroni, Valeria Caso, Michele Venti, Francesco Palmerini, Giancarlo AgnelliStroke Unit and Division of Internal and Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, ItalyBackground: Early seizure (ES may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of and the predictive factors for ES as well the effects of ES on the clinical outcome at hospital discharge in patients with first-ever stroke.Patients and methods: A total of 638 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke (543 ischemic, 95 hemorrhagic, admitted to our Stroke Unit, were included in this prospective study. ES were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded.Results: Thirty-one patients (4.8% had ES. Seizures were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke. ES was not associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability. After multivariate analysis, hemorrhagic transformation resulted as an independent predictive factor for ES (OR = 6.5; 95% CI: 1.95–22.61; p = 0.003.Conclusion: ES occur in about 5% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES does not seem to be associated with an adverse outcome at hospital discharge after acute stroke.Keywords: seizures, stroke, cortical involvement, hemorrhagic transformation

  7. Effect of mirror therapy on walking ability in patients with stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Reza Mazlom; Mahnaz Bahrami; Farzaaneh Hasanzadeh; Kavian Ghandehari

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Stroke is one of major causes of disability. Therefore, it is important to introduce and develop new treatment approaches in order to improve and enhance post-stroke recovery process for medical, social, and economical purposes. The present study aimed at determining the effect of mirror therapy on walking ability of patients with stroke regarding the muscular power of the affected leg. Materials and Methods: This semi-experimental study was done on 50 stroke patients...

  8. Prediction of mortality in stroke patients using multilayer perceptron neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Süt, Necdet; ÇELİK, Yahya

    2012-01-01

    We aim ed to predict mortality in stroke patients by using multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural networks. Materials and methods: A data set consisting of 584 stroke patients was analyzed using MLP neural networks. The effect of prognostic factors (age, hospitalization time, sex, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, embolism, stroke type, infection, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease) on mortality in stroke were trained with 6 different MLP algorithms [quick propagation (QP), Levenberg...

  9. UPPER LIMB PROSTHETIC FOR STROKE AFFECTED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEBIKA KHANRA,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Paralysis causes loss of muscle function and loss of feeling in the affected area. The main problem faced by the patients after paralysis is muscle atrophy caused due to non-functionality of the stump. Orthotics is an orthopedic device which supports the function of the arm, leg or torso. This paper deals with the design of an upper limb orthotic device which has a hollow shell/ braces structure and can be used by paralyzed patients to bring about simple hand movements independently by the patient.

  10. Stroke warning campaigns: delivering better patient outcomes? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellon L

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lisa Mellon,1 Frank Doyle,1 Daniela Rohde,1 David Williams,2 Anne Hickey1 1Department of Psychology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland; 2Department of Geriatric and Stroke Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland Background: Patient delay in presenting to hospital with stroke symptoms remains one of the major barriers to thrombolysis treatment, leading to its suboptimal use internationally. Educational interventions such as mass media campaigns and community initiatives aim to reduce patient delays by promoting the signs and symptoms of a stroke, but no consistent evidence exists to show that such interventions result in appropriate behavioral responses to stroke symptoms. Methods: A systematic literature search and narrative synthesis were conducted to examine whether public educational interventions were successful in the reduction of patient delay to hospital presentation with stroke symptoms. Three databases, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, were searched to identify quantitative studies with measurable behavioral end points, including time to hospital presentation, thrombolysis rates, ambulance use, and emergency department (ED presentations with stroke. Results: Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria: one randomized controlled trial, two time series analyses, three controlled before and after studies, five uncontrolled before and after studies, two retrospective observational studies, and two prospective observational studies. Studies were heterogeneous in quality; thus, meta-analysis was not feasible. Thirteen studies examined prehospital delay, with ten studies reporting a significant reduction in delay times, with a varied magnitude of effect. Eight studies examined thrombolysis rates, with only three studies reporting a statistically significant increase in thrombolysis administration. Five studies examined ambulance usage, and four reported a statistically significant increase in ambulance

  11. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in stroke patients with concomitant vascular disease--a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Floel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: G-CSF has been shown in animal models of stroke to promote functional and structural regeneration of the central nervous system. It thus might present a therapy to promote recovery in the chronic stage after stroke. METHODS: Here, we assessed the safety and tolerability of G-CSF in chronic stroke patients with concomitant vascular disease, and explored efficacy data. 41 patients were studied in a double-blind, randomized approach to either receive 10 days of G-CSF (10 µg/kg body weight/day, or placebo. Main inclusion criteria were an ischemic infarct >4 months prior to inclusion, and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Primary endpoint was number of adverse events. We also explored changes in hand motor function for activities of daily living, motor and verbal learning, and finger tapping speed, over the course of the study. RESULTS: Adverse events (AEs were more frequent in the G-CSF group, but were generally graded mild or moderate and from the known side-effect spectrum of G-CSF. Leukocyte count rose after day 2 of G-CSF dosing, reached a maximum on day 8 (mean 42/nl, and returned to baseline 1 week after treatment cessation. No significant effect of treatment was detected for the primary efficacy endpoint, the test of hand motor function. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate the feasibility, safety and reasonable tolerability of subcutaneous G-CSF in chronic stroke patients. This study thus provides the basis to explore the efficacy of G-CSF in improving chronic stroke-related deficits. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00298597.

  12. Family History and Functional Outcome in Korean Stroke Patients: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Jung; Kim, Tae Uk; Hyun, Jung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of family history of stroke with functional outcomes in stroke patients in Korea. Methods A case-control study was conducted. A total of 170 patients who were admitted to a rehabilitation unit were included. Risk factors for stroke such as age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, smoking, high blood cholesterol and homocysteine level, obesity, and family history of stroke were taken into account. Stroke subtypes were the following: large vessel infarct, small vessel infarct, embolic infarct, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracranial hemorrhage. Stroke severity as assessed with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), functional outcomes using the Korean version of the Modified Barthel index (K-MBI), Functional Independence Measurement (FIM), and cognitive function using the Korean version of Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) were assessed at admission and discharge. Results Subjects with a family history of stroke were more likely to have an ischemic stroke (90.7%) than were those without a family history (70.9%). The K-MBI, FIM, NIHSS, and K-MMSE scores did not show significant differences between patients with or without family history. Conclusion Family history of stroke was significantly associated with ischemic stroke, but not with functional outcomes. Other prognostic factors of stroke were not distributed differently between patients included in this study with or without a family history of stroke. PMID:26798613

  13. Emotional reactions in patients after frontal lobe stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zlatan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Emotional reactions have been documented after tumor lesions and the other damages of the brain. The aim of this paper was to examine the correlation between frontal lobe lesions and emotional reactions in patients with stroke. Methods. The research included 118 patients after stroke. Lesion localization was defined on computed axial tomography records, whereas the area and perimeter of lesion were measured by AutoCAD 2004 software. Examinations by means of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety and Depression (HRSA and HRSD were carried out 11-40 days after stroke. Statistic data were processed by simple linear/nonlinear regression, Cox's and the generalized linear model. Results. A higher frequency of emotional reactions, i.e. anxiety, was determined in women after stroke (p = 0.024. A negative correlation between the lesion size and the intensity of anxiety manifestations was determined (Spearman’s r = -0.297; p = 0.001. Anxiety was more frequent in patients with frontal lobe lesions in the dominant hemisphere (interaction: frontal lesion * hand dominant hemisphere, p = 0.017. Also, HRSD score values showed the tendency for lesser decline in case of greater frontal lobe lesions in relation to lesions of other regions of prosencephalon (interaction: frontal lesion * lesion area, p = 0.001. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate the correlation between evolutionary younger structures of the central nervous system and emotional reactions of man. Therefore, it is necessary to undertake proper early psychopharmacotherapy in the vulnerable group of patients.

  14. Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Patients With Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, San-Chi; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Hung, Man-Hsin; Hung, Yi-Ping; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Improvements in therapeutic modalities have prolonged the survival of gastric cancer patients. Comorbidities such as thromboembolic events that emerge as a result of disease complexities and/or treatments received have not been considered. The objectives of this study are to examine the relationship between gastric cancer and ischemic stroke, and to determine predictive risk factors. A nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted using data from the Taiwan National Health I...

  15. Intravenous thrombolysis, mechanical embolectomy, and intracranial stenting for hyperacute ischemic stroke in a patient with moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argetsinger, Debora S; Miller, Jeffrey W; Fletcher, Jeffrey J

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese translation of moyamoya means "puff of smoke" and refers to the angiographic appearance of dilated collateral vessels seen during chronic progressive narrowing of the intracranial supraclinoid portions of the internal carotid arteries. Despite cerebral ischemia being the most common presenting symptom, 20% to 40% of adults suffer a hemorrhagic stroke. Due to the lack of evidence and histopathologic findings, intravenous and endovascular reperfusion therapy is typically avoided. This case study presents a patient with moyamoya disease in the hyperacute phase of ischemic stroke. The patient received full dose (0.9mg/kg) tissue plasminogen activator and subsequently underwent a mechanical clot extraction and Wingspan stent (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI, USA) placement. The use of these options in the setting of moyamoya disease is novel. This demonstrates that moyamoya disease may not be an absolute contraindication to revascularization in hyperacute ischemic stroke and underscores that many perceived contraindications to thrombolytic and mechanical revascularization therapies are relative. PMID:26896911

  16. Reproducibility of corticospinal diffusion tensor tractography in normal subjects and hemiparetic stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The reproducibility of corticospinal diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) for a guideline is important before longitudinal monitoring of the therapy effects in stroke patients. This study aimed to establish the reproducibility of corticospinal DTT indices in healthy subjects and chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. Materials and methods: Written informed consents were obtained from 10 healthy subjects (mean age 25.8 ± 6.8 years), who underwent two scans in one session plus the third scan one week later, and from 15 patients (mean age 47.5 ± 9.1 years, 6–60 months after the onset of stroke, NIHSS scores between 9 and 20) who were scanned thrice on separate days within one month. Diffusion-tensor imaging was performed at 3 T with 25 diffusion directions. Corticospinal tracts were reconstructed using fiber assignment by continuous tracking without and with motion/eddy-current corrections. Intra- and inter-rater as well as intra- and inter-session variations of the DTT derived indices (fiber number, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA)) were assessed. Results: Intra-session and inter-session coefficients of variations (CVs) are small for FA (1.13–2.09%) and ADC (0.45–1.64%), but much larger for fiber number (8.05–22.4%). Inter-session CVs in the stroke side of patients (22.4%) are higher than those in the normal sides (18.0%) and in the normal subjects (14.7%). Motion/eddy-current correction improved inter-session reproducibility only for the fiber number of the infarcted corticospinal tract (CV reduced from 22.4% to 14.1%). Conclusion: The fiber number derived from corticospinal DTT shows substantially lower precision than ADC and FA, with infarcted tracts showing lower reproducibility than the healthy tissues

  17. Reproducibility of corticospinal diffusion tensor tractography in normal subjects and hemiparetic stroke patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chao-Chun, E-mail: cclin39@gmail.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Miao-Yu, E-mail: mytsai@cc.ncue.edu.tw [Institute of Statistics and Information Science, National Changhua University of Education, Chang-Hua, Taiwan (China); Lo, Yu-Chien, E-mail: D6105@mail.cmuh.org.tw [Department of Radiology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yi-Jui, E-mail: ericliu6@ms35.hinet.net [Department of Automatic Control Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Master' s Program in Biomedical Informatics and Biomedical Engineering, Feng-Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Po-Pang, E-mail: D6004@mail.cmuh.org.tw [Department of Radiology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chiao-Ying, E-mail: chiaoying42@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chia-Wei, E-mail: movingbed@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shen, Wu-Chung, E-mail: d16021@mail.cmuh.org.tw [Department of Radiology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); College of Health Care, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chung, Hsiao-Wen, E-mail: chung@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: The reproducibility of corticospinal diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) for a guideline is important before longitudinal monitoring of the therapy effects in stroke patients. This study aimed to establish the reproducibility of corticospinal DTT indices in healthy subjects and chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. Materials and methods: Written informed consents were obtained from 10 healthy subjects (mean age 25.8 ± 6.8 years), who underwent two scans in one session plus the third scan one week later, and from 15 patients (mean age 47.5 ± 9.1 years, 6–60 months after the onset of stroke, NIHSS scores between 9 and 20) who were scanned thrice on separate days within one month. Diffusion-tensor imaging was performed at 3 T with 25 diffusion directions. Corticospinal tracts were reconstructed using fiber assignment by continuous tracking without and with motion/eddy-current corrections. Intra- and inter-rater as well as intra- and inter-session variations of the DTT derived indices (fiber number, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA)) were assessed. Results: Intra-session and inter-session coefficients of variations (CVs) are small for FA (1.13–2.09%) and ADC (0.45–1.64%), but much larger for fiber number (8.05–22.4%). Inter-session CVs in the stroke side of patients (22.4%) are higher than those in the normal sides (18.0%) and in the normal subjects (14.7%). Motion/eddy-current correction improved inter-session reproducibility only for the fiber number of the infarcted corticospinal tract (CV reduced from 22.4% to 14.1%). Conclusion: The fiber number derived from corticospinal DTT shows substantially lower precision than ADC and FA, with infarcted tracts showing lower reproducibility than the healthy tissues.

  18. Prognostic value of copeptin in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hui

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality in the Chinaand one of the leading causes of severe morbidity. An earlyrisk assessment with estimate of the severity of disease andprognosis is pivotal for optimized care and allocation ofhealthcare resources. Reliable prognostic markers availableduring the initial phase after acute stroke may aid clinicaldecision-making.Vasopressin (AVP is a potent synergistic factor ofcorticotropin-releasing hormone as hypothalamic stimulator ofthe hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.1 Some studies foundincreased AVP levels in patients with ischemic stroke werecorrelated with stroke severity2 and outcome.3 Copeptin isreleased in an equimolar ratio to AVP, and is more stable inthe circulation and easy to measure.4We designed a preliminary prospective cohort study toevaluate the prognostic value of copeptin in acute strokepatients. Adult patients with a persistent neurological deficitdue to ischemic stroke were eligible. Sixty-ninenonconsecutive patients admitted at 3 hospitals with adiagnosis of acute ischemic stroke confirmed by CT scanningwere evaluated. All patients provided informed consent. Inpatients who died within 24 hours after admission or inpatients who were discharged, data from admission or untildischarge were collected. The National Institute of HealthStroke Scale (NIHSS score was assessed on admission.Functional outcome was obtained on days 90 according to themodified Rankin Scale (mRS blinded to copeptin levels. Poorfunctional outcome at 3 months was considered as a mRSscore > 2. Blood samples were collected on admission andimmediately centrifuged and sera stored at –70°C. Copeptinwas measured with a sandwich immunoluminometricassay.1 Discrete variables are summarized as counts(percentage, and continuous variables as medians andinterquartile ranges (IQRs. Two-group comparison of notnormally distributed data was performed using Mann–Whitney U test, and a Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis

  19. Declining Patient Functioning and Caregiver Burden/Health: The Minnesota Stroke Survey-Quality of Life after Stroke Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Melissa M.; Smith, Maureen A.; Martinson, Brian C.; Kind, Amy; Luepker, Russell V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Caregivers of stroke patients may adapt to changes in patient functioning over time. If adaptation occurs, then caregiver burden and health may be influenced more by worsening in patient functioning than by static levels of functioning. This study examines the relationship between patients' baseline and changes in functioning and…

  20. [Chronic cough: common problem, discontended patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Heikki; Purokivi, Minna

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic cough is 10 to 15%. It has a strong negative impact on the patients' quality of life and it often causes depression. Many patients find medications unhelpful. Successful management of chronic cough requires the identification of the underlying condition like chronic rhinosinusitis, asthma, and asthma-like syndrome, and esophageal reflux disease. If the underlying condition cannot be identified or if the drug trials fail to help, the patient probably suffers from idiopathic chronic cough. A new paradigm has been introduced in which chronic cough is regarded as a primary condition. PMID:25558624

  1. Clinical application of computerized evaluation and re-education biofeedback prototype for sensorimotor control of the hand in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Hsiu-Yun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemianaesthesia patients usually exhibit awkward and inefficient finger movements of the affected hands. Conventionally, most interventions emphasize the improvement of motor deficits, but rarely address sensory capability and sensorimotor control following stroke. Thus it is critical for stroke patients with sensory problems to incorporate appropriate strategies for dealing with sensory impairment, into traditional hand function rehabilitation programs. In this study, we used a custom-designed computerized evaluation and re-education biofeedback (CERB prototype to analyze hand grasp performances, and monitor the training effects on hand coordination for stroke patients with sensory disturbance and without motor deficiency. Methods The CERB prototype was constructed to detect momentary pinch force modulation for 14 sub-acute and chronic stroke patients with sensory deficiency and 14 healthy controls. The other ten chronic stroke patients (ranges of stroke period: 6–60 months were recruited to investigate the effects of 4-weeks computerized biofeedback treatments on the hand control ability. The biofeedback procedures provide visual and auditory cues to the participants when the interactive force of hand-to-object exceeded the target latitude in a pinch-up-holding task to trigger optimal motor strategy. Follow-up measurements were conducted one month after training. The hand sensibility, grip forces and results of hand functional tests were recorded and analyzed. Results The affected hands of the 14 predominant sensory stroke patients exhibited statistically significant elevation in the magnitude of peak pinch force (p = 0.033 in pinching and lifting-up tasks, and poor results for hand function tests (p = 0.005 than sound hands did. In addition, the sound hands of patients were less efficient in force modulation (p = 0.009 than the hands of healthy subjects were. Training with the biofeedback system produced

  2. DTI-MR tractography of white matter damage in stroke patients with neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, M; Thiebaut de Schotten, M; Rodrigo, S; Oppenheim, C; Touzé, E; Méder, J-F; Moreau, K; Loeper-Jeny, C; Dubois, B; Bartolomeo, P

    2011-02-01

    Left visual neglect is a dramatic neurological condition that impairs awareness of left-sided events. Neglect has been classically reported after strokes in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery. However, the precise lesional correlates of neglect within this territory remain discussed. Recent evidence strongly suggests an implication of dysfunction of large-scale perisylvian networks in chronic neglect, but the quantitative relationships between neglect signs and damage to white matter (WM) tracts have never been explored. In this prospective study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography in twelve patients with a vascular stroke in the right hemisphere. Six of these patients showed signs of neglect. Nonparametric voxel-based comparisons between neglect and controls on fractional anisotropy maps revealed clusters in the perisylvian WM and in the external capsule. Individual DTI tractography identified specific disconnections of the fronto-parietal and fronto-occipital pathways in the neglect group. Voxel-based correlation statistics highlighted correlations between patients' performance on two visual search tasks and damage to WM clusters. These clusters were located in the anterior limb of the internal capsule and in the WM underlying the inferior frontal gyrus, along the trajectory of the anterior segment of the arcuate fasciculus (asAF). These results indicate that chronic visual neglect can result from, and correlate with, damage to fronto-parietal connections in the right hemisphere, within large-scale cortical networks important for orienting of spatial attention, arousal and spatial working memory. PMID:21113581

  3. Knowledge of stroke risk factors among primary care patients with previous stroke or TIA: a questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strender Lars-Erik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivers of stroke or transient ischaemic attacks (TIA are at risk of new vascular events. Our objective was to study primary health care patients with stroke/TIA regarding their knowledge about risk factors for having a new event of stroke/TIA, possible associations between patient characteristics and patients' knowledge about risk factors, and patients' knowledge about their preventive treatment for stroke/TIA. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to 240 patients with stroke/TIA diagnoses, and 182 patients (76% responded. We asked 13 questions about diseases/conditions and lifestyle factors known to be risk factors and four questions regarding other diseases/conditions ("distractors". The patients were also asked whether they considered each disease/condition to be one of their own. Additional questions concerned the patients' social and functional status and their drug use. The t-test was used for continuous variables, chi-square test for categorical variables, and a regression model with variables influencing patient knowledge was created. Results Hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking were identified as risk factors by nearly 90% of patients, and atrial fibrillation and diabetes by less than 50%. Few patients considered the distractors as stroke/TIA risk factors (3-6%. Patients with a family history of cardiovascular disease, and patients diagnosed with carotid stenosis, atrial fibrillation or diabetes, knew these were stroke/TIA risk factors to a greater extent than patients without these conditions. Atrial fibrillation or a family history of cardiovascular disease was associated with better knowledge about risk factors, and higher age, cerebral haemorrhage and living alone with poorer knowledge. Only 56% of those taking anticoagulant drugs considered this as intended for prevention, while 48% of those taking platelet aggregation inhibitors thought this was for prevention. Conclusions Knowledge about hypertension

  4. The leukoaraiosis is more prevalent in the large artery atherosclerosis stroke subtype among Korean patients with ischemic stroke

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    Kim Yeong-In

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have suggested that the specific stroke subtype may influence the presence of leukoaraiosis in patients with ischemic stroke. We investigated the association between stroke subtype and leukoaraiosis in Korean patients with ischemic stroke by MRI. Methods There were 594 patients included in this study that were classified as large artery disease, lacune and cardioembolic stroke. For large-artery disease, the analysis focused on the intracranial or extracranial location of the stenosis, and the multiplicity of the stenotic lesions. Leukoaraiosis grading was performed according to the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Results There was a significant association between leukoaraiosis and the stroke subtypes; the large-artery-disease group had a higher prevalence of leukoaraiosis than did the other groups (55.4% in the large-artery-disease group, 30.3% in the lacunar group and 14.3% in the cardioembolic group, P = 0.016 by chi-square test. On the multivariate linear regression analysis, age, the presence of hypertension, previous stroke and stroke subtype were independently associated with the presence of leukoaraiosis. In the sub analysis of the large-artery-disease group, the leukoaraiosis had a tendency to be more prevalent in the mixed and intracranial stenosis group than did the extracranial stenosis group (45.5% in the mixed group, 40.3% in the intracranial group and 26.9% in the extracranial group, P = 0.08 by chi-square test. Conclusion The association of leukoaraiosis with large-artery disease in this study might be due to the relatively high prevalence of intracranial occlusive lesions in Korean stroke patients compared to other ethnic groups.

  5. Association of the APOE, MTHFR and ACE genes polymorphisms and stroke in Zambian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masharip Atadzhanov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of APOE, MTHFR and ACE polymorphisms with stroke in the Zambian population. We analyzed 41 stroke patients and 116 control subjects all of Zambian origin for associations between the genotype of the APOE, MTHFR and ACE polymorphisms and stroke. The APOE ε2ε4 genotype showed increased risk for hemorrhagic stroke (P<0.05 and also a high risk for ischemic stroke (P=0.05. There was complete absence of the APOE ε2ε2 and the MTHFR TT genotypes in the Zambian population. The difference between cases and controls was not significant for the other genetic variants when analyzed for relationship between stroke, stroke subtype and genotype. We show that genetic variation at the APOE locus affects susceptibility to stroke. No detectable association were observed for the MTHFR and ACE genotypes and stroke in the Zambian population.

  6. Sleep parameters, functional status and time post-stroke are associated with off-line motor skill learning in people with chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eSiengsukon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mounting evidence demonstrates that individuals with stroke benefit from sleep to enhance learning of a motor task. While stage NREM2 sleep and REM sleep have been associated with off-line motor skill learning in neurologically-intact individuals, it remains unknown which sleep parameters or specific sleep stages are associated with off-line motor skill learning in individuals with stroke. Methods: Twenty individuals with chronic stroke (> 6 months following stroke and 10 neurologically slept for three consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory with polysomnography. Participants practiced a tracking task the morning before the third night and underwent a retention test the morning following the third night. Off-line learning on the tracking task was assessed. Pearson’s correlations assessed for associations between the magnitude of off-line learning and sleep variables, age, upper extremity motor function, stroke severity, depression and time since stroke occurrence.Results: Individuals with stroke performed with significantly less error on the tracking task following a night of sleep (p=.006 while the control participants did not (p=.816. Increased sleep efficiency (r= -.285, less time spent in stage NREM3 sleep (r=.260, and more time spent in stage REM sleep (r= -.266 was weakly-to-moderately associated with increased magnitude of off-line motor learning. Furthermore, higher upper-extremity motor function (r = -.400, lower stroke severity (r = .360, and less time since stroke occurrence (r=.311 were moderately associated with increased magnitude of off-line motor learning. Conclusion: This study is the first study to provide insight into which sleep stages and individual characteristics may be associated with off-line learning in people with stroke. Future work should continue to understand which factors or combination of factors promote off-line motor learning in people with neurologic injury to best promote motor recovery in

  7. HBV Vaccination in Chronic Renal Failure Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mir-davood Omrani; Mohammad Hassan Khadem Ansari

    2006-01-01

    HBV infection in chronic renal failure (CRF) becomes chronic in 30 to 60% compared with less than 10% in nonuremic patients. Immunological dysfunction in patients on hemodialysis may be related to imbalanced cytokine systems, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-|α|) and interleukin (IL) 6,1 by retention of renal metabolite in uremia and chronic inflammation and have a poor immunological reaction to T-cell-dependent antigens, like hepatitis B vaccination. Immunocompromised patients who are unre...

  8. Short-term ankle motor performance with ankle robotics training in chronic hemiparetic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindo Roy, PhD

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular accident (stroke often results in impaired motor control and persistent weakness that may lead to chronic disability, including deficits in gait and balance function. Finding ways to restore motor control may help reduce these deficits; however, little is known regarding the capacity or temporal profile of short-term motor adaptations and learning at the hemiparetic ankle. Our objective was to determine the short-term effects of a single session of impedance-controlled ankle robot (“anklebot” training on paretic ankle motor control in chronic stroke. This was a double-arm pilot study on a convenience sample of participants with chronic stroke (n = 7 who had residual hemiparetic deficits and an equal number of age- and sex-matched nondisabled control subjects. Training consisted of participants in each group playing a target-based video game with the anklebot for an hour, for a total of 560 movement repetitions in dorsiflexion/plantar flexion ranges followed by retest 48 hours later. Task difficulty was adjusted to ankle range of motion, with robotic assistance decreased incrementally across training. Assessments included robotic measures of ankle motor control on unassisted trials before and after training and at 48 hours after training. Following exposure to the task, subjects with stroke improved paretic ankle motor control across a single training session as indexed by increased targeting accuracy (21.6 +/– 8.0 to 31.4 +/– 4.8, p = 0.05, higher angular speeds (mean: 4.7 +/– 1.5 degrees/s to 6.5 +/– 2.6 degrees/s, p 0.05 at 48 hours in both groups. Robust maintenance of motor adaptation in the robot-trained paretic ankle over 48 hours may be indicative of short-term motor learning. Our initial results suggest that the anklebot may be a flexible motor learning platform with the potential to detect rapid changes in ankle motor performance poststroke.

  9. Nurses 'must' control of the nutritional needs of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Jacqui

    The aim of this observational study was to review nutritional practice within an acute stroke unit (ASU) and compare practice against National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance, National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) guidelines, and the National Stroke Agenda. 'Observations of Care', a well recognized approach and part of the Royal College of Nursing clinical leadership programme, was undertaken along with a traditional audit to review nutritional care in the ASU. Usually undertaken by persons outside of the team to prevent bias, in this situation the bias was minimized as the auditor was new to the team. Current practice was evaluated and it was important for the team to have ownership of the assessment process. This article also reviews the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitals and the importance of nutritional assessment, the use of screening tools and types of diet that best maintain optimum outcomes. Patients who have experienced a stroke can face a range of problems that influence dietary intake. On admission, 16-31% are already malnourished. PMID:20081700

  10. Stroke patients and their attitudes toward mHealth monitoring to support blood pressure control and medication adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Carolyn; Burkett, Nina-Sarena; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Mueller, Martina; Patel, Sachin; Brunner-Jackson, Brenda; Saulson, Raelle; Treiber, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile health, or mHealth, has increasingly been signaled as an effective means to expedite communication and improve medical regimen adherence, especially for patients with chronic health conditions such as stroke. However, there is a lack of data on attitudes of stroke patients toward mHealth. Such information will aid in identifying key indicators for feasibility and optimal implementation of mHealth to prevent and/or decrease rates of secondary stroke. Our objective was to ascertain stroke patients’ attitudes toward using mobile phone enabled blood pressure (BP) monitoring and medication adherence and identify factors that modulate these attitudes. Methods Sixty stroke patients received a brief demonstration of mHealth devices to assist with BP control and medication adherence and a survey to evaluate willingness to use this technology. Results The 60 participants had a mean age of 57 years, were 43.3% male, and 53.3% were White. With respect to telecommunication prevalence, 93.3% owned a cellular device and 25% owned a smartphone. About 70% owned a working computer. Regarding attitudes, 85% felt comfortable with a doctor or nurse using mHealth technologies to monitor personal health information, 78.3% believed mHealth would help remind them to follow doctor’s directions, and 83.3% were confident that technology could effectively be used to communicate with health care providers for medical needs. Conclusions Mobile device use is high in stroke patients and they are amenable to mHealth for communication and assistance in adhering to their medical regimens. More research is needed to explore usefulness of this technology in larger stroke populations.

  11. Cardiorespiratory fitness and cognitive functioning following short-term interventions in chronic stroke survivors with cognitive impairment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Sophie; Richards, Carol L; Leblond, Jean; Olivier, Charles; Maltais, Désirée B

    2016-06-01

    This study, a quasi-experimental, one-group pretest-post-test design, evaluated the effects on cognitive functioning and cardiorespiratory fitness of 8-week interventions (aerobic exercise alone and aerobic exercise and cognitive training combined) in patients with chronic stroke and cognitive impairment living in the community (participants: n=14, 61.93±9.90 years old, 51.50±38.22 months after stroke, n=7 per intervention group). Cognitive functions and cardiorespiratory fitness were evaluated before and after intervention, and at a 3-month follow-up visit (episodic memory: revised-Hopkins Verbal Learning Test; working memory: Brown-Peterson paradigm; attention omission and commission errors: Continuous Performance Test; cardiorespiratory fitness: peak oxygen uptake during a symptom-limited, graded exercise test performed on a semirecumbent ergometer). Friedman's two-way analysis of variance by ranks evaluated differences in score distributions related to time (for the two groups combined). Post-hoc testing was adjusted for multiple comparisons. Compared with before the intervention, there was a significant reduction in attention errors immediately following the intervention (omission errors: 14.6±21.5 vs. 8±13.9, P=0.01; commission errors: 16.4±6.3 vs. 10.9±7.2, P=0.04), and in part at follow-up (omission errors on follow-up: 3.4±4.3, P=0.03; commission errors on follow-up: 13.2±7.6, P=0.42). These results suggest that attention may improve in chronic stroke survivors with cognitive impairment following short-term training that includes an aerobic component, without a change in cardiorespiratory fitness. Randomized-controlled studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:26954991

  12. Impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes of carotid artery stenting in acute ischemic stroke patients

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    Yu CS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheng-Sheng Yu,1,* Chih-Ming Lin,2,3,* Chi-Kuang Liu,4 Henry Horng-Shing Lu1 1Institute of Statistics and Big Data Research Center, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 2Stroke Centre and Department of Neurology, Chunghua Christian Hospital, Chunghua, 3Graduate Institute of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 4Department of Medical Imaging, Chunghua Christian Hospital, Chunghua, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Carotid artery stenting is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke patients with moderate-to-severe carotid artery stenosis. However, the midterm outcome for patients undergoing this procedure varies considerably with baseline characteristics. To determine the impact of baseline characteristics on outcomes following carotid artery stenting, data from 107 eligible patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke were collected by retrospective chart review. A modified Rankin Scale (mRS was used to divide patients into two baseline groups, mRS ≤2 and mRS >2. A three-step decision-tree statistical analysis was conducted. After weighting the decision-tree parameters, the following impact hierarchy was obtained: admission low-density lipoprotein, gouty arthritis, chronic kidney disease, ipsilateral common carotid artery resistance index, contralateral ophthalmic artery resistance index, sex, and dyslipidemia. The finite-state machine model demonstrated that, in patients with baseline mRS ≤2, 46% had an improved mRS score at follow-up, whereas 54% had a stable mRS score. In patients with baseline mRS >2, a stable mRS score was observed in 75%, improved score in 23%, and a poorer score in 2%. Admission low-density lipoprotein was the strongest predictive factor influencing poststenting outcome. In addition, our study provides further evidence that carotid artery stenting can be of benefit in first-time ischemic stroke patients with baseline m

  13. Geriatric rehabilitation of stroke patients in nursing homes: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Geurts Alexander CH; Voncken Frans LM; Zuidema Sytse U; Buijck Bianca I; Spruit-van Eijk Monica; Koopmans Raymond TCM

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Geriatric patients are typically underrepresented in studies on the functional outcome of rehabilitation after stroke. Moreover, most geriatric stroke patients do probably not participate in intensive rehabilitation programs as offered by rehabilitation centers. As a result, very few studies have described the successfulness of geriatric stroke rehabilitation in nursing home patients, although it appears that the majority of these patients are being discharged back to the ...

  14. Clinical Approach to the Standardization of Oriental Medical Diagnostic Pattern Identification in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Woo Sang Jung; Jung Mi Park; Sang Kwan Moon; Seong Uk Park; Hyung Sup Bae; Han Jung Kim

    2011-01-01

    In Korea, many stroke patients receive oriental medical care, in which pattern-identification plays a major role. Pattern-identification is Oriental Medicine's unique diagnostic system. This study attempted to standardize oriental medical pattern-identification for stroke patients. This was a community-based multicenter study that enrolled stroke patients within 30 days after their ictus. We assessed the patients' general characteristics and symptoms related to pattern-identification. Each pa...

  15. SECONDARY PREVENTION OF STROKE IN PATIENTS WITH NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: THE CLINICIANS’ VIEWPOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Drozdova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is one of the main risk factor of ischemic stroke. Current problems of the management of patients with stroke due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation and secondary stroke prevention in these patients are considered. Data of own author’s observation for patients of this type during 6 months after discharge from the hospital are presented. The problems which patients faced with are analyzed. Comparative assessment of warfarin and dabigatran therapies is given.

  16. An intelligent rollator for mobility impaired persons, especially stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Thomas; Lindahl, Olof; Bäcklund, Tomas; Karlsson, Marcus; Hohnloser, Peter; Bråndal, Anna; Hu, Xiaolei; Wester, Per

    2016-07-01

    An intelligent rollator (IRO) was developed that aims at obstacle detection and guidance to avoid collisions and accidental falls. The IRO is a retrofit four-wheeled rollator with an embedded computer, two solenoid brakes, rotation sensors on the wheels and IR-distance sensors. The value reported by each distance sensor was compared in the computer to a nominal distance. Deviations indicated a present obstacle and caused activation of one of the brakes in order to influence the direction of motion to avoid the obstacle. The IRO was tested by seven healthy subjects with simulated restricted and blurred sight and five stroke subjects on a standardised indoor track with obstacles. All tested subjects walked faster with intelligence deactivated. Three out of five stroke patients experienced more detected obstacles with intelligence activated. This suggests enhanced safety during walking with IRO. Further studies are required to explore the full value of the IRO. PMID:27078084

  17. Effects of Balance Training on Hemiplegic Stroke Patients

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    I-Chun Chen

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the delayed effects of balancetraining program on hemiplegic stroke patients.Methods: A total of 41 ambulatory hemiplegic stroke patients were recruited into thisstudy and randomly assigned into two groups, the control group and trainedgroup. Visual feedback balance training with the SMART Balance Masterwas used in the trained group. Bruunstrom staging of affected limb scoresand Functional Independent Measure (FIM scores of each patient wererecorded. Quantitative balance function was evaluated using the SMARTBalance Master. Data were collected before training and 6 months aftercompleting the training program.Results: Significant improvements in dynamic balance function measurements werefound for patients in the trained group at 6 months after completing the trainingprogram. The ability of self-care and sphincter control also improved forpatients in the trained group. On the other hand, no significant differenceswere found in static balance functions between the trained group and controlgroup at 6 months of follow up. The locomotion and mobility scoring ofFIM also revealed no differences between the groups.Conclusion: Dynamic balance function of patients in the visual feedback training grouphad significant improvements when compared with the control group.Activities of daily living (ADL function in self-care also had significantimprovements at 6 months of follow up in the trained group. The resultsshowed that balance training was beneficial for patients after hemiplegicstroke.

  18. Subtotal Gastrectomy With Billroth II Anastomosis Is Associated With a Low Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Peptic Ulcer Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Duodenal diversion can ameliorate lipid and glucose metabolism. We assessed the risk of stroke after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth II anastomosis (SGBIIA) in peptic ulcer disease (PUD). We identified 6425 patients who received SGBIIA for PUD between 1998 and 2010 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database as the study cohort; we frequency-matched them with 25,602 randomly selected controls from the PUD population who did not receive SGBIIA according to age, sex, index year, and comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and obesity. All patients were followed until the end of 2011 to determine the incidence of stroke. The incidence of stroke was lower in patients in the SGBIIA cohort than in those in the non-SGBIIA cohort (18.9 vs 22.9 per 1000 person-years, adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72–0.89, P < 0.001). The risk of ischemic stroke (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69–0.86, P < 0.001), rather than hemorrhagic stroke (aHR 1.00, 95% CI 0.78–1.28), was lower for the SGBIIA cohort than for the non-SGBIIA cohort according to the multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was lower in men (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69–0.86) than in women (aHR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65–0.99) and in patients aged ≥65 years (aHR 0.72, 95% CI 0.63–0.81) than in those of other age groups (≤49 years, aHR 0.82, 95% CI 0.48–1.39; 50–64 years, aHR 1.01, 95% CI 0.79–1.28). The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was also reduced in patients with comorbidities (aHR 0.84, 5% CI 0.75–0.95) rather than in those without comorbidities (aHR 0.81, 95% CI 0.59–1.12). SGBIIA is associated with a low risk of ischemic stroke for PUD patients, and its protective effect is prominent in men, patients aged ≥65

  19. Left atrial size and risk of stroke in patients in sinus rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Thure Filskov; Brønnum Nielsen, Peter; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Søgaard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the risk of stroke associated with left atrial enlargement in patients in sinus rhythm, and whether such patients may have an unmet need for thromboprophylaxis. In this systematic review we summarise the existing evidence concerning left atrial size and risk of stroke in...... patients in sinus rhythm. Nine cohort studies were identified, analysing a total of 67,875 participants and 3,093 stroke outcomes. Rates of stroke per 100 person-years in patients with left atrial enlargement and in sinus rhythm ranged from 0.59 in a population-based cohort to 2.07 in patients with...... stroke across a variety of patient populations in sinus rhythm. The underlying aetiology explaining this observed higher risk is likely to be multifactorial and not confined to a potential direct effect of left atrial enlargement on thromboembolic risk. Formal stroke risk stratification among patients...

  20. CT differential diagnosis of stroke in subacute and chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is a very useful method for the diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases, especially in the acute stage. In the subacute stage, however, it is difficult to determine whether a lesion is a hematoma or an ischemia. It is necessary to use contrast agents to differentiate these two types of lesions. Therefore, it is very important to study the plain and the enhanced CT findings of these lesions in the acute and subacute stages. The author analysed the sequential CT findings of cerebral hemorrhage (60 cases), ischemic infarction (22 cases), and hemorrhagic infarction (22 cases) and reaches the following conclusions: 1) In cerebral hemorrhage, the high-density area disappears within weeks at a rate related with the length (cm) of the maximum diameter of the high-density area in the first week, contrast enhancement also disappears within months in parallel with the length of the maximum diameter of the high-density area in the first week. 2) In contrast-enhanced CT, cerebral hemorrhage showed a ring enhancement in all stages and sometimes showed a slit enhancement in the chronic stage. In general however, ischemic infarction did not show ring enhancement. 3) Mass effect and contrast enhancement disappear within the first month in ischemic infarction, but continue for two months in hemorrhagic infarction. (author)

  1. CT differential diagnosis of stroke in subacute and chronic stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, T.; Mizukami, M.; Kawase, T.; Tazawa, T.; Araki, G. (Mihara Memorial Hospital, Isesaki, Gunma (Japan). Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels)

    1981-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a very useful method for the diagnosis of cerebrovascular diseases, especially in the acute stage. In the subacute stage, however, it is difficult to determine whether a lesion is a hematoma or an ischemia. It is necessary to use contrast agents to differentiate these two types of lesions. Therefore, it is very important to study the plain and the enhanced CT findings of these lesions in the acute and subacute stages. The author analysed the sequential CT findings of cerebral hemorrhage (60 cases), ischemic infarction (22 cases), and hemorrhagic infarction (22 cases) and reaches the following conclusions: 1) In cerebral hemorrhage, the high-density area disappears within weeks at a rate related with the length (cm) of the maximum diameter of the high-density area in the first week, contrast enhancement also disappears within months in parallel with the length of the maximum diameter of the high-density area in the first week. 2) In contrast-enhanced CT, cerebral hemorrhage showed a ring enhancement in all stages and sometimes showed a slit enhancement in the chronic stage. In general however, ischemic infarction did not show ring enhancement. 3) Mass effect and contrast enhancement disappear within the first month in ischemic infarction, but continue for two months in hemorrhagic infarction.

  2. Motor function improvement with mirror therapy in stroke patients: a CAT

    OpenAIRE

    Raúl Aguilera Eguía; Edson Zafra Santos; Alejandro Ibacache Palma

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Stroke comprises several conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function. A large percentage of individuals who survive stroke will have limb motor sequelae. Aim To assess the validity and applicability of the results regarding the effectiveness of mirror therapy in patients with stroke and answer the following question: In stroke subjects, can mirror therapy improve motor function? Method We analyzed the article "Mirror therapy f...

  3. Clinical profile of acute hemorrhagic stroke patients: a study in tertiary care hospital in Northern India

    OpenAIRE

    Omkar P. Baidya; Sunita Tiwari; Kauser Usman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute hemorrhagic stroke, a subtype of acute stroke is one of the leading cause of death and major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The incidence of acute hemorrhagic stroke is increasing with gradual increase in obesity, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and various cardiac problems. This study had been conducted with an objective to study the risk factors and clinical presentation of acute hemorrhagic stroke patients in north-Indian population...

  4. A study of factors delaying hospital arrival of patients with acute stroke.

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava A; Prasad K

    2001-01-01

    Thrombolytic therapy for acute ischaemic stroke has recently become available in India but its success depends on initiating the treatment in the narrow therapeutic time window. There is commonly a delay of several hours before patients with acute stroke seek medical attention. A prospective study was conducted to assess the factors influencing this delay in admission of acute stroke cases. 110 cases (71 males, 39 females) of acute stroke that arrived within 72 hours at our hospital casualty ...

  5. A Research on Factors Influencing the Clinical Prognosis of Acute Stroke Patie.patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zuming; Li Manli

    2000-01-01

    Object: To search for the factors significantly influencing the clinical prognosis of acute stroke patients. Background: There are lack of prospective multivariate analysis research m acute stroke in the world. Method: We chose 17 factors possibly influencing the prognosis of acute patients, took Barthel′s Index at the end of 2 months after stroke onset and decreased percentage of neurological deficit scores (MESSS) between 72h after hospitalization and 2 months after onset as gold standard, to have a prospective, multivariate analysis research combined with univariate analysis. Results: Multivariate analysis of 106 acute stroke patients combined with univariate analysis showed the factors significantly influencing the clinical prognosis of acute stroke patients were: initial MESSS score、 age、 complication、 mass effect、 stroke location、 time of delay before emergency arrival (BDT). Time of delay after emergency arrival was not found to be a significant prognostic factor. Discussion: Barthel Index at the end of 1 month after stroke onset was strongly related to that at the end of 2 month after onset, as was the same with MESSS score. It showed there was no significant difference between 1 month and 2 months after stroke onset when we choose time interval in evaluating prognosis of acute stroke patients.Conclusion: BDT、 initial MESSS score、 age、 stroke location、 mass effect、 complication were important factors of acute stroke patients. Avoid the delay before emergency arrival after onset, prevent and treat complications after stroke, more carefully treat acute stroke patients with advanced age, advanced age, high initial MESSS scores and those with mass effect reported by CT, we can improve the outcome of stroke patients.

  6. The effect of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jin-Young; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Hee-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects were each assigned to a mirror therapy group and a sham therapy group. The Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment and the Box and Block Test were performed to compare paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities. The functional independence measurement was conducted to compare abi...

  7. Improving stroke patients' care: a patient held record is not enough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampe Fiona

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke patients' care in hospital tends to be poorly organised, with poor communication and a lack of information being frequent sources of complaint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a patient-held record (PHR would result in greater patient satisfaction and better care planning for stroke patients. Methods A time series control (6 months - intervention (8 months - control (6 months was used among London teaching hospital general medical and geriatric medicine inpatient wards. All stroke patients admitted to the wards during the intervention phase received a PHR and were instructed in its use. Demographic, stroke severity, social factors and outcomes were collected from all stroke patients during all phases of the study. Results Of 252 stroke patients aged 46 to 98 years entered into the study, by six months after admission 118 (46.8% had died. PHR and control group patients were well matched in terms of socio-demographic characteristics and pre-stroke ability. At six months after admission, 119 (97% patients responded to the questionnaire. Just over half (56%, 13 of intervention group patients recalled receiving a PHR. Of those patients, 59% reported reading the PHR, 27% had lost their PHR, and two-thirds said they had difficulties encouraging staff to write in the PHR. Half felt that possession of the PHR was more trouble than it was worth. PHR group patients were more satisfied with the recovery they had made (79% vs. 59%, p=0.04, but felt less able to talk to staff about their problems (61% vs. 82%, p=0.02. PHR group patients reported receiving fewer explanations about their condition (18% vs. 33%, p=0.12 and treatment (26% vs. 45%, p=0.07, and were more afraid of asking doctors questions (21% vs. 4%, p=0.01 than controls. PHR group patients were no better prepared for hospital discharge than control group patients, and both groups were ill-informed about services and benefits that might have helped

  8. Stroke service in the Netherlands: an exploratory study on effectiveness, patient satisfaction and utilisation of healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rosendal

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess whether shared care for stroke patients results in better patient outcome, higher patient satisfaction and different use of healthcare services. Design: Prospective, comparative cohort study. Setting: Two regions in the Netherlands with different healthcare models for stroke patients: a shared care model (stroke service and a usual care setting. Patients: Stroke patients with a survival rate of more than six months, who initially were admitted to the Stroke Service of the University Hospital Maastricht (experimental group in the second half of 1997 and to a middle sized hospital in the western part of the Netherlands between March 1997 and March 1999 (control group. Main outcome measures: Functional health status according to the SIP-68, EuroQol, Barthel Index and Rankin Scale, patient satisfaction and use of healthcare services. Results: In total 103 patients were included in this study: 58 in the experimental group and 45 in the control group. Six months after stroke, 64% of the surviving patients in the experimental group had returned home, compared to 42% in the control group (p Conclusions: The Stroke Service Maastricht resulted in a higher number of patients who returned home after stroke, but not in a better health status. Since patients in the usual care group received a higher volume of healthcare in the period of rehabilitation, the Stroke Service Maastricht might be more efficient.

  9. Test-Retest Reproducibility of Two Short-Form Balance Measures Used in Individuals with Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Lih-Jiun; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Chen, Hui-Mei; Lin, Jau-Hong; Lo, Sing-Kai

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the test-retest reproducibility of the seven-item Short-Form Berg Balance Scale (SFBBS) and the five-item Short-Form Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (SFPASS) in individuals with chronic stroke. Fifty-two chronic stroke patients from two rehabilitation departments were included in the study. Both…

  10. Prognostic Value of Cortically Induced Motor Evoked Activity by TMS in Chronic Stroke: Caveats from a Revealing Single Clinical Case

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amengual, Julià L

    2012-06-08

    AbstractBackgroundWe report the case of a chronic stroke patient (62 months after injury) showing total absence of motor activity evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of spared regions of the left motor cortex, but near-to-complete recovery of motor abilities in the affected hand.Case presentationMultimodal investigations included detailed TMS based motor mapping, motor evoked potentials (MEP), and Cortical Silent period (CSP) as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of motor activity, MRI based lesion analysis and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Tractography of corticospinal tract (CST). Anatomical analysis revealed a left hemisphere subinsular lesion interrupting the descending left CST at the level of the internal capsule. The absence of MEPs after intense TMS pulses to the ipsilesional M1, and the reversible suppression of ongoing electromyographic (EMG) activity (indexed by CSP) demonstrate a weak modulation of subcortical systems by the ipsilesional left frontal cortex, but an inability to induce efficient descending volleys from those cortical locations to right hand and forearm muscles. Functional MRI recordings under grasping and finger tapping patterns involving the affected hand showed slight signs of subcortical recruitment, as compared to the unaffected hand and hemisphere, as well as the expected cortical activations.ConclusionsThe potential sources of motor voluntary activity for the affected hand in absence of MEPs are discussed. We conclude that multimodal analysis may contribute to a more accurate prognosis of stroke patients.

  11. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in cryptogenic stroke patients under 60 years with patent foramen ovale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain feature in cryptogenic stroke patients with patent foramen ovale (PFO), cryptogenic stroke patients without PFO and patients with cardioembolic stroke. Materials and methods: The ethics committee required neither institutional review board approval nor informed patient consent for retrospective analyses of the patients’ medical records and imaging data. The patients’ medical files were retrospectively reviewed in accordance with human subject research protocols. Ninety-two patients under 60 years of age were included: 15 with cardioembolic stroke, 32 with cryptogenic stroke with PFO and 45 with cryptogenic stroke without PFO. Diffusion-weighted imaging of brain MRI was performed by a radiologist blinded to clinical data. Univariate, Fischer's exact test for qualitative data and non-parametric Wilcoxon test for quantitative data were used. Results: There was no statistically significant difference found between MRI features of patients with PFO and those with cardioembolic stroke (p < .05). Patients without PFO present more corticosubcortical single lesions (p < .05) than patients with PFO. Patients with PFO have more often subcortical single lesions larger than 15 mm, involvement of posterior cerebral arterial territory and intracranial occlusion (p < .05) than patients with cryptogenic stroke without PFO. Conclusion: Our study suggests a cardioembolic mechanism in ischemic stroke with PFO

  12. Early seizures in patients with acute stroke: Frequency, predictive factors, and effect on clinical outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Andrea; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Caso, Valeria; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2008-01-01

    Background Early seizure (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of and the predictive factors for ES as well the effects of ES on the clinical outcome at hospital discharge in patients with first-ever stroke. Patients and methods A total of 638 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke (543 ischemic, 95 hemorrhagic), admitted to our Stroke Unit, were included in this prospective study. ES were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. Results Thirty-one patients (4.8%) had ES. Seizures were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke. ES was not associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). After multivariate analysis, hemorrhagic transformation resulted as an independent predictive factor for ES (OR = 6.5; 95% CI: 1.95–22.61; p = 0.003). Conclusion ES occur in about 5% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES does not seem to be associated with an adverse outcome at hospital discharge after acute stroke. PMID:18827922

  13. Mechanical thrombectomy with snare in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of thrombus extraction using a microsnare in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). This was a prospective, observational, cohort study in which consecutive patients with AIS (<6 hours of ischemia for anterior circulation and <24 hours for posterior circulation) who had been previously excluded from intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) thrombolysis were included and followed-up for 3 months. Mechanical embolectomy with a microsnare of 2-4 mm was undertaken as the first treatment. Low-dose intraarterial thrombolysis or angioplasty was used if needed. TIMI grade and modified Rankin stroke scale (mRSS) score were used to evaluate vessel recanalization and clinical efficacy, respectively. Nine patients (mean age 55 years, range 17-69 years) were included. Their basal mean NIHSS score was 16 (range 12-24). In seven out of the nine patients (77.8%) the clot was removed, giving a TIMI grade of 3 in four patients and TIMI grade 2 in three patients. Occlusion sites were: middle cerebral artery (four), basilar artery (two) and anterior cerebral artery plus middle cerebral artery (one). The mean time for recanalization from the start of the procedure was 50 min (range 50-75 min). At 3 months, the mRSS score was 0 in two patients and 3-4 in three patients (two patients died). According to our results, the microsnare is a safe procedure for mechanical thrombectomy with a good recanalization rate. Further studies are required to determine the role of the microsnare in the treatment of AIS. (orig.)

  14. Determinants of outcome in patients eligible for thrombolysis for ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Milia, Paolo; Biagini, Sergio; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Eligibility criteria for thrombolysis in ischemic stroke have been clearly defined. However, not all eligible patients benefit from this treatment. This study aimed to assess the determinants for clinical outcome in consecutive, eligible patients with ischemic stroke treated with thrombolysis in a single-center study. Methods Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were treated with tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) following the established eligibility National Institute of Ne...

  15. Effect of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation According to the Stimulation Site in Stroke Patients With Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Lee, Sook Joung; Lee, Jae Uk

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) according to the stimulation site in subacute stroke patients with dysphagia. Methods This study was designed as a matched comparative study. Twenty-four patients who had dysphagia after ischemic stroke were recruited, and they were divided into two groups after matching for age and stroke lesion. The patients in group A received rTMS over the brain cortex where motor evoked potential (MEP) was obtained...

  16. Correlative study between neuron-specific enolase and blood sugar level in ischemic stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aparna Pandey; Kiran Saxena; Meena Verma; Anuradha Bharosay

    2011-01-01

    Background: A study to investigate the level of the neurobiochemical marker, Neuron-Specific Enolase (NSE), at the time of admission and its correlation with the blood sugar level in ischemic stroke patients. Patients and Methods: We investigated 90 patients with complete stroke who were admitted to the Stroke Unit of the Department of Neurology at Sri Aurobindo Institute of Medical Sciences. NSE was measured with commercially available quantitative ‘sandwich’ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assa...

  17. Utilization of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Services in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fridriksson, Julius; Frank, Elaine; Vesselinov, Roumen

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate biographical and medical factors associated with utilization of speech-language pathology and audiology services provided to stroke patients in the hospital setting. Moreover, the study sought to identify possible sub-groups of stroke patients that might be under served by speech-language pathologists and audiologists. Discharge data for over 91,000 stroke patients from the years 1996 to 2000 were examined. Using a relatively new statistical approa...

  18. Homocysteine and carotid intima-media thickness in ischemic stroke patients are not correlated

    OpenAIRE

    Ntaios, George; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos; Ekonomou, Ippoliti; Destanis, Evangelos; Chryssogonidis, Ioannis; Chatzinikolaou, Anastasia; Pidonia, Ifigenia; Karamitsos, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Hyperhomocysteinemia has been linked to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality by numerous authors. Whether this association is causal or not remains uncertain. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of hyperhomocysteinemia with the degree of carotid atherosclerosis in stroke patients. Methods We studied 97 Greek patients in our stroke unit who were hospitalized as a result of ischemic stroke between March 2006 and May 2007. The patients were divided into two gro...

  19. Characterization of motor and somatosensory function for stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a pilot study, stroke patients with a lesion related to the motor system were studied using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electromyography (EMG). The patients performed sustained finger movements for 30 s followed by 30 s of rest and 20 repetitions of this sequence in total. Task-related cortical signals derived from MEG were observed here at very different frequency scales. Slow signals below 0.1 Hz were extracted by independent component analysis and are associated with the sustained activation of the motor cortex, the dcMEG motor activation. MEG–EMG coupling phenomena in the 10–30 Hz range were analyzed using the imaginary part of coherency and are attributed to cortico-muscular coupling driving the muscles. Additionally a signal from the somatosensory cortex due to an electrical stimulation at the wrist, the N20m, was recorded as a physiological marker. Field maps and time series associated with the three types of signals are presented for one patient and one control subject as the signal quality of the patient data was not sufficient to achieve a group result. The feasibility of a comprehensive electrophysiological measuring and analysis procedure of the motor function for stroke research is demonstrated by the results

  20. Ancrod causes rapid thrombolysis in patients with acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, V E; Glas-Greenwalt, P; Olinger, C P; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A

    1990-05-01

    Clot lysis is desirable in patients with thrombi in arteries and arterioles by a safe rapidly-acting thrombolytic agent. Ancrod cleaves fibrinogen; the resulting circulating ancrod-fibrin stimulates fibrinolysis. Ancrod action and effect were studied in 20 patients with acute developing stroke in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, and received either normal saline or ancrod 0.5 mu/kg in normal saline administered as a constant-rate intravenous infusion over 6 hours. Subsequent doses of ancrod (or saline placebo) were determined daily thereafter for a total treatment period of 7 days. Neither bleeding nor re-thrombosis occurred within the 90 day follow-up period. That ancrod acted rapidly was shown by a significant decrease in functional plasminogen activator inhibitor (PA-I) within 60 minutes, and by significant elevations of fibrin(ogen) degradation products (FDP) and D-dimer within 3 and 4 hours. The biological effect of fibrinolysis in ancrod infused patients was demonstrated by a greater improvement in stroke score when compared to those infused with saline. PMID:2186630

  1. Cognitive and Neurophysiological Effects of Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Stroke Patients after Motor Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, Federico; Peila, Elena; Cicerale, Alessandro; Caglio, Marcella M; Caroppo, Paola; Vighetti, Sergio; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Minuto, Alice; Campagnoli, Marcello; Salatino, Adriana; Molo, Maria T; Mortara, Paolo; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Massazza, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two specific Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) paradigms, the repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), in the upper limb rehabilitation of patients with stroke. Short and long term outcomes (after 3 and 6 months, respectively) were evaluated. We measured, at multiple time points, the manual dexterity using a validated clinical scale (ARAT), electroencephalography auditory event related potentials, and neuropsychological performances in patients with chronic stroke of middle severity. Thirty four patients were enrolled and randomized. The intervention group was treated with a NIBS protocol longer than usual, applying a second cycle of stimulation, after a washout period, using different techniques in the two cycles (rTMS/tDCS). We compared the results with a control group treated with sham stimulation. We split the data analysis into three studies. In this first study we examined if a cumulative effect was clinically visible. In the second study we compared the effects of the two techniques. In the third study we explored if patients with minor cognitive impairment have most benefit from the treatment and if cognitive and motor outcomes were correlated. We found that the impairment in some cognitive domains cannot be considered an exclusion criterion for rehabilitation with NIBS. ERP improved, related to cognitive and attentional processes after stimulation on the motor cortex, but transitorily. This effect could be linked to the restoration of hemispheric balance or by the effects of distant connections. In our study the effects of the two NIBS were comparable, with some advantages using tDCS vs. rTMS in stroke rehabilitation. Finally we found that more than one cycle (2-4 weeks), spaced out by washout periods, should be used, only in responder patients, to obtain clinical relevant results. PMID:27445730

  2. Is perception of vertical impaired in individuals with chronic stroke with a history of 'pushing'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Avril; Fraser, Lindsey; Rajachandrakumar, Roshanth; Danells, Cynthia J; Knorr, Svetlana; Campos, Jennifer

    2015-03-17

    Post-stroke 'pushing' behaviour appears to be caused by impaired perception of vertical in the roll plane. While pushing behaviour typically resolves with stroke recovery, it is not known if misperception of vertical persists. The purpose of this study was to determine if perception of vertical is impaired amongst stroke survivors with a history of pushing behaviour. Fourteen individuals with chronic stroke (7 with history of pushing) and 10 age-matched healthy controls participated. Participants sat upright on a chair surrounded by a curved projection screen in a laboratory mounted on a motion base. Subjective visual vertical (SVV) was assessed using a 30 trial, forced-choice protocol. For each trial participants viewed a line projected on the screen and indicated if the line was tilted to the right or the left. For the subjective postural vertical (SPV), participants wore a blindfold and the motion base was tilted to the left or right by 10-20°. Participants were asked to adjust the angular movements of the motion base until they felt upright. SPV was not different between groups. SVV was significantly more biased towards the contralesional side for participants with history of pushing (-3.6 ± 4.1°) than those without (-0.1 ± 1.4°). Two individuals with history of pushing had SVV or SPV outside the maximum for healthy controls. Impaired vertical perception may persist in some individuals with prior post-stroke pushing, despite resolution of pushing behaviours, which could have consequences for functional mobility and falls. PMID:25666890

  3. Accuracy of Patient Self-Report of Stroke: A Systematic Review from the UK Biobank Stroke Outcomes Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Woodfield

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic review of the accuracy of patient self-report of stroke to inform approaches to ascertaining and confirming stroke cases in large prospective studies.We sought studies comparing patient self-report against a reference standard for stroke. We extracted data on survey method(s, response rates, participant characteristics, the reference standard used, and the positive predictive value (PPV of self-report. Where possible we also calculated sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV, and stroke prevalence. Study-level risk of bias was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies tool (QUADAS-2.From >1500 identified articles, we included 17 studies. Most asked patients to report a lifetime history of stroke but a few limited recall time to ≤5 years. Some included questions for transient ischaemic attack (TIA or stroke synonyms. No study was free of risk of bias in the QUADAS-2 assessment, the most frequent causes of bias being incomplete reference standard data, absence of blinding of adjudicators to self-report status, and participant response rates (75% in all but one study. It was not possible to assess the influence of recall time or of the question(s asked on PPV or sensitivity.Characteristics of the study population strongly influence self-report accuracy. In population-based studies with low stroke prevalence, a large proportion of self-reported strokes may be false positives. Self-report is therefore unlikely to be helpful for identifying cases without subsequent confirmation, but may be useful for case ascertainment in combination with other data sources.

  4. Urinary incontinence nursing diagnoses in patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Alteniza Leandro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Identifying the prevalence of Stress urinary incontinence (SUI, Urge urinary incontinence (UUI, Functional urinary incontinence (FUI, Overflow urinary incontinence (OUI and Reflex urinary incontinence (RUI nursing diagnoses and their defining characteristics in stroke patients. METHOD A cross-sectional study with 156 patients treated in a neurological clinic. Data were collected through interviews and forwarded to nurses for diagnostic inference. RESULTS 92.3% of the patients had at least one of the studied diagnoses; OUI showed the highest prevalence (72.4%, followed by FUI (53.2%, RUI (50.0%, UUI (41.0% and SUI (37.8%. Overdistended bladder and reports of inability to reach the toilet in time to avoid urine loss were the most prevalent defining characteristics. A statistically significant association of the defining characteristics with the studied diagnosis was verified. CONCLUSION The five incontinence diagnoses were identified in the evaluated patients, with different prevalence.

  5. Short- and long-term prognosis for very old stroke patients. The Copenhagen Stroke Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Jørgensen, H S; Reith, J;

    2004-01-01

    prognosis after stroke. CONCLUSIONS: In this study very old age per se was a strong predictor of outcome and mortality after stroke. Apart from very old age, factors such as prestroke medical and functional status, and onset stroke severity should be taken into consideration when planning treatment and...... after stroke very old age predicted mortality or nursing home placement (OR 3.9; 95% CI 2.1-7.3), and long-term mortality (HR 2.0; 95% CI 1.6-2.5). However, other factors such as onset stroke severity, pre-existing disability and atrial fibrillation were also significant independent predictors of...

  6. Red cell distribution width and neurological scoring systems in acute stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Murat Akinci,1 Ali Dogru,1 Fikret Akyurek,2 Seyit Ali Kayis3 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey; 2Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey; 3Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Karabuk University, Karabuk, Turkey Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the association between the red blood cell distribution width (RDW and the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Canadian Neurological Scale (CNS, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores in patients who had acute ischemic stroke. Methods: This prospective observational cohort study included 88 patients who have had acute ischemic stroke and a control group of 40 patients who were evaluated in the Emergency Department for disorders other than acute ischemic stroke. All subjects had RDW determined, and stroke patients had scoring with the GCS, CNS, and NIHSS scores. The GCS, CNS, and NIHSS scores of the patients were rated as mild, moderate, or severe and compared with RDW. Results: Stroke patients had significantly higher median RDW than control subjects. The median RDW values were significantly elevated in patients who had more severe rather than milder strokes rated with all three scoring systems (GCS, CNS, and NIHSS. The median RDW values were significantly elevated for patients who had moderate rather than mild strokes rated by GCS and CNS and for patients who had severe rather than mild strokes rated by NIHSS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.760 (95% confidence interval, 0.676–0.844. Separation of stroke patients and control groups was optimal with RDW 14% (sensitivity, 71.6%; specificity, 67.5%; accuracy, 70.3%. Conclusion: In stroke patients who have symptoms <24 hours, the RDW may be useful in predicting the severity and functional outcomes of the stroke

  7. Preadmission oral anticoagulant therapy and clinical outcome in patients hospitalised with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Tobias Pilgaard; Svendsen, Marie Louise; Hansen, Morten Lock; Brandes, Axel; Andersen, Grethe; Husted, Steen Elkjær; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Information about the effect of preadmission oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) on stroke outcome in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is scarce. A systematic review was done of the existing data on the association between preadmission OAT and stroke outcome in patients with AF...... haemorrhagic stroke. The proportion of patients in preadmission OAT varied from 5 to 37%, and the proportion who did not receive any antithrombotic therapy (AT) varied from 22 to 75%. The risk of having a severe stroke for patients with an international normalised ratio (INR) < 2 ranged from 26 to 43% compared...

  8. Changes in motor function in the unaffected hand of stroke patients should not be ignored

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingli Zhang; Peihong Li; Zhibang Mao; Xiang Qi; Jun Zou; Zhusheng Yu

    2014-01-01

    Motor function changes in the unaffected hand of stroke patients with hemiplegia. These chang-es are often ignored by clinicians owing to the extent of motor disability of the affected hand. Finger tapping frequency and Lind-mark hand function score showed that the motor function of unaffected hands in stroke patients was poorer than that of a healthy control hand. After 2 weeks of rehabilitation treatment, motor function of the unaffected hand of stroke patients was obviously improved. Therefore, attention should also be paid to motor function in the unaffect-ed hand of stroke patients with hemiplegia during rehabilitation.

  9. Effect of action observation therapy on daily activities and motor recovery in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hong Zhu

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Action observation therapy significantly improves upper extremity motor function and performance of activities of daily living, and alleviates upper limb spasticity in patients with stroke.

  10. Increased perfusion in motor areas after constraint-induced movement therapy in chronic stroke: a single-photon emission computerized tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könönen, Mervi; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Husso-Saastamoinen, Minna; Vanninen, Esko; Vanninen, Ritva; Soimakallio, Seppo; Mervaala, Esa; Sivenius, Juhani; Pitkänen, Kauko; Tarkka, Ina M

    2005-12-01

    Hemiparesis is the most common deficit after cerebral stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is a new neurorehabilitation method that emphasizes task-relevant repetitive training for the stroke hand. Twelve chronic stroke patients were studied with single-photon emission computerized tomography at rest before and after the two-week CIMT period. Increased perfusion was found in motor control related areas. The specific areas with an increase in perfusion in the affected hemisphere were in the precentral gyrus, premotor cortex (Brodmann's area 6 (BA6)), frontal cortex, and superior frontal gyrus (BA10). In the nonaffected hemisphere, perfusion was increased in the superior frontal gyrus (BA6) and cingulate gyrus (BA31). In the cerebellum increased perfusion was seen bilaterally. The brain areas with increased perfusion receive and integrate the information from different sensory systems and plan the movement execution. Regional cerebral perfusion decreased in the lingual gyrus (BA18) in the affected hemisphere. In the nonaffected frontal cortex, two areas with decreased perfusion were found in the middle frontal gyrus (BA8/10). Also, the fusiform gyrus (BA20) and inferior temporal gyrus (BA37) in the nonaffected hemisphere showed decreased perfusion. Intensive movement therapy appears to change local cerebral perfusion in areas known to participate in movement planning and execution. These changes might be a sign of active reorganization processes after CIMT in the chronic state of stroke. PMID:15931162

  11. Prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Gard, Gunvor; Klarskov, Peter; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Dehlendorff, Christian; Jensen, Rigmor

    2008-01-01

    their daily life (bother score) over the previous fortnight. Of 519 stroke patients invited, 482 subjects were eligible. RESULTS: The response rate was 84%. The period prevalence of at least one symptom was 94%; the most frequent symptom was nocturia (76%) followed by urgency (70%) and daytime frequency...... (59%). The most severe symptom was urgency followed by nocturia and daytime frequency. Among respondents who had at least one symptom, the prevalence of bother was 78%. Likewise the most frequent bothersome symptom was nocturia (53%), followed by urgency (48%) and daytime frequency (40%). Paresis in...

  12. An analysis of risk factors for stroke in atrial fibrillation and hypertension patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the independent risk factors for the 1 year stroke event in Chinese patients with atrial fibrillation(AF)and hypertension(HT).Methods Data of AF and HT patients in the Chinese Emergency Atrial Fibrillation Registry Study were retrospectively analyzed.The eligible patients were divided into the stroke group

  13. CHARACTERISTICS OF PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL STROKE OR TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK, INCLUDED INTO THE LIS-2 REGISTER (LYUBERTSY STUDY OF MORTALITY IN PATIENTS AFTER STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Martsevich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To provide final data on the three-year period of the inclusion of patients; to give most accurate "portrait" of patients hospitalized with a brain stroke within the framework of the LIS-2 register (Lyubertsy study of mortality in patients after stroke.Material and methods. All patients (n=960 admitted to the Lyubertsy district hospital №2 with stroke for the period from 01.2009 to 12.2011 were included into the study.Results. Men accounted for 37.5%, women - 62.5%, mean age was 71.1±9.8 years. The history of hypertension was present in 833 patients (86.8%, atrial fibrillation in 252 (26.8% patients, 199 (20.7% patients had previously undergone stroke. In-hospital mortality was 21.6% (207 patients had died; mean age 72.9±9.8 years. Low frequency of the antihypertensive therapy (34.5%, lipid-lowering therapy (0.7%, antiplatelet agents (5.7%, anticoagulation therapy prescription in patients with atrial fibrillation was detected.Conclusion. Insufficient assignment of drugs with a proven effect on the prognosis in patients with risk factors prior to the development of the reference stroke draws attention. High incidence of recurrent strokes indicates an underactive secondary prevention.

  14. Mirror therapy enhances upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirela Cristina, Luca; Matei, Daniela; Ignat, Bogdan; Popescu, Cristian Dinu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy program in addition with physical therapy methods on upper limb recovery in patients with subacute ischemic stroke. 15 subjects followed a comprehensive rehabilitative treatment, 8 subjects received only control therapy (CT) and 7 subjects received mirror therapy (MT) for 30 min every day, five times a week, for 6 weeks in addition to the conventional therapy. Brunnstrom stages, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (upper extremity), the Ashworth Scale, and Bhakta Test (finger flexion scale) were used to assess changes in upper limb motor recovery and motor function after intervention. After 6 weeks of treatment, patients in both groups showed significant improvements in the variables measured. Patients who received MT showed greater improvements compared to the CT group. The MT treatment results included: improvement of motor functions, manual skills and activities of daily living. The best results were obtained when the treatment was started soon after the stroke. MT is an easy and low-cost method to improve motor recovery of the upper limb. PMID:25850528

  15. A clinical study on cognitive impairment in post-ischemic stroke patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Chen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the relation between metabolic syndrome (MetS and cognitive impairment after ischemic stroke. Methods Ninety-four cases of first ischemic stroke patients were divided into stroke without MetS group (n = 54 and stroke with MetS group (n = 40 according to the diagnostic criteria for MetS defined by Metabolic Syndrome Researching Group of Chinese Diabetes Society. All patients underwent Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Clock Drawing Test (CDT, animal Verbal Fluency Test (aVFT, Trial Making Test-A (TMT-A at 2 weeks and 3 months after stroke to evaluate mental state such as verbal learning memory, and executive, attentional and visuospatial abilities. The incidence and development of cognitive impairment were also assessed. Results At 2 weeks and 3 months after stroke, the incidence of cognitive impairment were 24.47% (23/94 and 22.34% (21/94, respectively, and in the cognitive impairment patients the incidence of non-dementia were 21.28% (20/94 and 19.15% (18/94, while the incidence of dementia were 3.19% (3/94 and 3.19% (3/94, respectively. The incidence of cognitive impairment was higher in the stroke patients with MetS than the stroke patients without MetS, 37.50% (15/40 vs 14.81% (8/54 (Z = 2.500, P = 0.012 at 2 weeks after stroke and 35.00% (14/40 vs 12.96% (7/54 (Z = 2.513, P = 0.012 at 3 months after stroke. In the scores of MMSE, delay recall and CDT of the stroke patients with MetS were all lower than those without MetS at 2 weeks after stroke and at 3 months after stroke (P < 0.05, for all. The stroke patients with MetS had more cognition deterioration than the stroke patients without MetS at 3 months after stroke, the difference was significant (Z = 2.134, P = 0.033. Conclusion MetS can increase the incidence of cognitive impairment, especially non-dementia cognitive impairment in post ischemic stroke. Executive dysfunction and hypomnesis are often seen. The development of cognitive impairment in stroke patients

  16. Net Clinical Benefit of Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Anders Nissen; Lip, Gregory Y H; Kamper, Anne-Lise;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The balance between stroke reduction and increased bleeding associated with antithrombotic therapy among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) is controversial. OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the risk associated with CKD in individual CHA₂DS₂-VASc...... (Congestive heart failure; Hypertension; Age ≥75 years; Diabetes mellitus; previous Stroke, transient ischemic attack, or thromboembolism; Vascular disease; Age 65 to 74 years; Sex category) strata and the net clinical benefit of warfarin in patients with AF and CKD in a nationwide cohort. METHODS: By...

  17. Plasma D-dimer levels are associated with stroke subtypes and infarction volume in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jie Zi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that modestly elevated circulating D-dimer values may be associated with acute ischemic stroke (AIS. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between plasma D-dimer level at admission and AIS in Chinese population. METHODS: In a prospective observational study, plasma D-dimer levels were measured using a particle-enhanced, immunoturbidimetric assay on admission in 240 Chinese patients with AIS. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score was assessed on admission blinded to D-dimer levels. RESULTS: Plasma median D-dimer levels were significantly (P = 0.000 higher in AIS patients as compared to healthy controls (0.88; interquartiler range [IQR], 0.28-2.11 mg/L and 0.31; IQR, 0.17-0.74 mg/L. D-dimer levels increased with increasing severity of stroke as defined by the NIHSS score(r = 0.179, p = 0.005 and infarct volume(r = 0.425, p = 0.000. Those positive trends still existed even after correcting for possible confounding factors (P = 0.012, 0.000; respectively. Based on the Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, the optimal cut-off value of plasma D-dimer levels as an indicator for diagnosis of cardioembolic strokes was projected to be 0.91 mg/L, which yielded a sensitivity of 83.7% and a specificity of 81.5%, the area under the curve was 0.862(95% confidence interval [CI], 0.811-0.912. CONCLUSION: We had shown that plasma D-dimer levels increased with increasing severity of stroke as defined by the NIHSS score and infarct volume. These associations were independent other possible variables. In addition, cardioembolic strokes can be distinguished from other stroke etiologies by measuring plasma D-dimer levels very early (0-48 hours from stroke symptom onset.

  18. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION IN CHRONIC POST-STROKE APHASIA: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilla Vestito

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been suggested to improve language function in patients with post-stroke aphasia. Most studies on aphasic patients, however, were conducted with a very limited follow-up period, if any. In this pilot, single-blind study on chronic post-stroke aphasic patients, we aimed to verify whether or not tDCS is able to extend its beneficial effects for a longer period of time (21 weeks after the end of stimulation. Three aphasic patients underwent anodal tDCS (A-tDCS, 20 min, 1.5 mA and sham stimulation (S-tDCS over the left frontal (perilesional region, coupled with a simultaneous naming training (on-line tDCS. Ten consecutive sessions (five days per week for two weeks were implemented. In the first five sessions we used a list of 40 figures, while in the subsequent five sessions we utilized a second set of 40 figures differing in word difficulty. At the end of the stimulation period we found a significant beneficial effect of A-tDCS (as compared to baseline and S-tDCS in all our subjects, regardless of word difficulty, although with some inter-individual differences. In the follow-up period, the percentage of correct responses persisted significantly better until the 16th week, when an initial decline in naming performance was observed. Up to the 21st week, the number of correct responses, though no longer significant, was still above the baseline level. These results in a small group of aphasic patients suggest a long-term beneficial effect of on-line A-tDCS.

  19. Correlative study between neuron-specific enolase and blood sugar level in ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Pandey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A study to investigate the level of the neurobiochemical marker, Neuron-Specific Enolase (NSE, at the time of admission and its correlation with the blood sugar level in ischemic stroke patients. Patients and Methods: We investigated 90 patients with complete stroke who were admitted to the Stroke Unit of the Department of Neurology at Sri Aurobindo Institute of Medical Sciences. NSE was measured with commercially available quantitative ′sandwich′ enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits obtained from R and D Systems. Hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose concentration ≥ 7 mmol / L, and measured using the glucose oxidase method immediately. Results: Significantly increased NSE and lipid profile levels were found in ischemic stroke patients as compared to the control. Hyperglycemic ischemic stroke patients had increased levels of NSE, lipid profile, and National Institute of Health stroke scale scores (NIHSS score compared to normoglycemic ischemic stroke patients. In addition the serum NSE level of hyperglycemic stroke patients was also positively correlated with the blood sugar level (r = 0.734 P < 0.001. Conclusions: Hyperglycemia predicts an increased risk of poor outcome after ischemic stroke and it is reflected by a significantly increased level of Neuron-Specific Enolase.

  20. Medical complications in patients with stroke: data validity in a stroke registry and a hospital discharge registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Ingeman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Annette Ingeman1, Grethe Andersen2, Heidi H Hundborg1, Søren P Johnsen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, DenmarkBackground: Stroke patients frequently experience medical complications; yet, data on incidence, causes, and consequences are sparse.Objective: To examine the data validity of medical complications among patients with stroke in a population-based clinical registry and a hospital discharge registry.Methods: We examined the predictive values, sensitivity and specificity of medical complications among patients admitted to specialized stroke units and registered in the Danish National Indicator Project (DNIP and the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP between January 2003 and December 2006 (n = 8,024. We retrieved and reviewed medical records from a random sample of patients (n = 589, 7.3%.Results: We found substantial variation in the data quality of stroke-related medical complication diagnoses both within the specific complications and between the registries. The positive predictive values ranged from 39.0%–87.1% in the DNIP, and from 0.0%–92.9% in the NRP. The negative predictive values ranged from 71.6%–98.9% in the DNIP and from 63.3% to 97.4% in the NRP. In both registries the specificity of the diagnoses was high. The sensitivity ranged from 23.5% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 14.9–35.4 for falls to 62.9% (95% CI: 54.9–70.4 for urinary infection in the DNIP, and from 0.0 (95% CI: 0.0–4.99 for falls to 18.1% (95% CI: 2.3–51.8 for pressure ulcer in the NRP.Conclusion: The DNIP may be useful for studying medical complications among patients with stroke.Keywords: stroke, medical complications, data validity, clinical database

  1. Early seizures in patients with acute stroke: Frequency, predictive factors, and effect on clinical outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Alberti; Maurizio Paciaroni; Valeria Caso; Michele Venti; Francesco Palmerini; Giancarlo Agnelli

    2008-01-01

    Andrea Alberti, Maurizio Paciaroni, Valeria Caso, Michele Venti, Francesco Palmerini, Giancarlo AgnelliStroke Unit and Division of Internal and Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, ItalyBackground: Early seizure (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the rate of and the predictive factors for ES as well the effects of ES on the clinical outcome at hospital discharge in patients with first-ever stroke.Patie...

  2. The Relationship Between Sleep Disturbance and Functional Status in Mild Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jinil; Kim, Yuntae; Yang, Kwang Ik; Kim, Doh-eui; Kim, Soo A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the sleep state of mild stroke patients and relationship between sleep disturbance and functional status. Methods A total of 80 acute stroke patients were enrolled in this study. The criteria for inclusion in the study was as following: 1) first stroke, 2) cognitive function preserved enough to perform the test (Mini Mental State Examination ≥24), 3) good functional levels (Modified Rankin Scale ≤3), 4) upper extremity motor function preserved enough to perform occupa...

  3. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA:detection of mutations in patients with occipital stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Finnilä, S. (Saara)

    2000-01-01

    Abstract A mitochondrial disorder may be one of the rare aetiologies of occipital stroke. Clinical and molecular analysis has suggested that 10% of young patients with occipital stroke have a mitochondrial disorder and 6% harbour the mutation 3243A>G in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), causing the MELAS syndrome. To identify other possible mtDNA mutations involved, we studied mtDNA genotypes in patients who had suffered an occipital stroke and in whom the common pathogenic m...

  5. Comparison of the Topography of Carotid Territory Stenosis in North American and Iranian Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    A Shoayb; K Ghandehari

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Atherosclerotic stenosis of carotid territory is the most common cause of ischemic stroke. A higher frequency of intracranial arterial stenosis has been reported in Africa and the Far East. Methods: 304 geriatric ischemic stroke patients admitted in Mackenzie hospital, Canada and the same number of geriatric ischemic stroke patients with similar sex ratio admitted in Valie-Asr hospital, Iran during 2003-2005 were enrolled in a double center and prospective study. Diagnosis of br...

  6. Clinicoradiological features of recurrent ischemic stroke: healthcare for poststroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehisa Hirayama

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Takehisa Hirayama, Yoshikazu Nakamura, Yasuhiro Yoshii, Ken IkedaDepartment of Neurology, Toho University Omori Medical Center, Tokyo, JapanObjective: Little is known about recurrent risk profile of brain infarct (BI in Japan. The study aimed to clarify clinicoradiological features of recurrent BI patients.Methods: 374 consecutive BI patients (231 men and 143 women were admitted to our ­department between 2007 and 2008. Recurrent BI was defined as a prior history of BI. ­Cardiovascular disease (CVD risk profile, stroke mechanism subtypes and Bamford subtypes were compared between the first BI and the recurrent BI group. CVD risk factors, stroke subtypes of the first BI and preventative medication were analyzed in recurrent BI patients.Results: Recurrent BI existed in 72 patients (40 men and 32 women. Age of the recurrent BI group was significantly older than the first BI group (P < 0.01. In comparison to the first BI group, the recurrent BI group had a high frequency of hypertension (P < 0.01 and CVD comorbidity (P < 0.05. Recurrent rates were increased significantly in cardioembolic patients as compared to the first BI patients (P < 0.05. Bamford BI subtypes did not differ between both groups. Mean recurrent interval (SD was 3.1 (2.3 years. Approximately half the patients experienced recurrent BI less than 2 years after the first BI. Antiplatelet agents were used in 33 patients and warfarin was used in 12 patients as preventative medication. The remaining 27 patients had no prevention therapy by self-cessation. Nine warfarin users were controlled poorly. There were no significant correlations between the first and recurrent Bamford subtypes in recurrent BI patients.Conclusions: The present study indicated that the recurrent frequency of BI was 19.3%. Causative profile of recurrent BI suggested elderly age (≥65 years, hypertension, prior history of CVD, cardioembolism, 2 years poststroke, insufficient treatment of warfarin and self

  7. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets’ tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight

  8. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Ozge; Baykal, Ahmet Tarik; Sener, Azize

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters) was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org) and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics). These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides an insight into

  9. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Cevik

    Full Text Available Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics. These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides

  10. Does short-term whole-body vibration training affect arterial stiffness in chronic stroke? A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Christie E.; Stoner, Lee; Hodges, Lynette D.; Cochrane, Darryl J.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Previous studies have shown that stroke is associated with increased arterial stiffness that can be diminished by a program of physical activity. A novel exercise intervention, whole-body vibration (WBV), is reported to significantly improve arterial stiffness in healthy men and older sedentary adults. However, little is known about its efficacy in reducing arterial stiffness in chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Six participants with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of WBV training or control followed by cross-over after a 2-week washout period. WBV intervention consisted of 3 sessions of 5 min intermittent WBV per week for 4 weeks. Arterial stiffness (carotid arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity [PWV], pulse and wave analysis [PWA]) were measured before/after each intervention. [Results] No significant improvements were reported with respect to carotid arterial stiffness, PWV, and PWA between WBV and control. However, carotid arterial stiffness showed a decrease over time following WBV compared to control, but this was not significant. [Conclusion] Three days/week for 4 weeks of WBV seems too short to elicit appropriate changes in arterial stiffness in chronic stroke. However, no adverse effects were reported, indicating that WBV is a safe and acceptable exercise modality for people with chronic stroke.

  11. Adapting the Home After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... after a Stroke Adapting the Home after a Stroke Caregiver Introduction What is Aphasia? Stroke Recovery Guides ...

  12. Intracranial carotid calcification on cranial computed tomography: visual scoring methods, semiautomated scores, and volume measurements in patients with stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, U.M.; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, M.L.; Sudlow, Catherine; Sellar, Robin; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose—Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods—We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cr...

  13. Is Barthel index a relevant measure for measuring prevalence of urinary incontinence in stroke patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) measured by Barthel Index and the Danish Prostate Symptom Score (DAN‐PSS‐1) questionnaire in stroke patients. A cross‐sectional, hospital based survey was initiated whereby 407 stroke patients, average age 67 (SD 12) years with a mean interval...

  14. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  15. Optimal Scoring Methods of Hand-Strength Tests in Patients with Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheau-Ling; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Lin, Jau-Hong; Chen, Hui-Mei

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal scoring methods for measuring strength of the more-affected hand in patients with stroke by examining the effect of reducing measurement errors. Three hand-strength tests of grip, palmar pinch, and lateral pinch were administered at two sessions in 56 patients with stroke. Five scoring methods…

  16. Risk factors for burn-out in caregivers of stroke patients, and possibilities for intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, ETP; de Witte, LP; Schure, LM; Sanderman, R; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To identify which caregivers of stroke patients living at home experience the highest levels of strain and are at risk of burn-out, and to investigate how support for caregivers of stroke patients could best be organized, and when this support should be offered. Design and setting: Caregi

  17. Feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia in awake patients with acute stroke through surface cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Rasmussen, B H; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig;

    2000-01-01

    Hypothermia reduces neuronal damage in animal stroke models. Whether hypothermia is neuroprotective in patients with acute stroke remains to be clarified. In this case-control study, we evaluated the feasibility and safety of inducing modest hypothermia by a surface cooling method in awake patients...

  18. Neurological rehabilitation of stroke patients via motor imaginary-based brain-computer interface technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyu Sun; Yang Xiang; Mingdao Yang

    2011-01-01

    The present study utilized motor imaginary-based brain-computer interface technology combined with rehabilitation training in 20 stroke patients. Results from the Berg Balance Scale and the Holden Walking Classification were significantly greater at 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.01), which suggested that motor imaginary-based brain-computer interface technology improved balance and walking in stroke patients.

  19. Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the…

  20. Impact of sensory integration training on balance among stroke patients: sensory integration training on balance among stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Sang Hun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to investigate the impact that the sensory integration training has on the recovery of balance among patients with stroke by examining the muscle activity and limit of stability (LOS. A total of 28 subjects participated. The subjects were randomly allocated by the computer program to one of two groups: control (CON group (n=15, sensory integration training (SIT group (n=13. The research subjects received intervention five days a week for a total of four weeks. The CON group additionally received 30-minute general balance training, while the SIT group additionally received 30-minute sensory integration training. In the muscle activity, the improvement of Erector spinae (ES and Gluteus medius (GM was more significant in the SIT group than in the CON group. In the LOS, the improvement of affected side and forward side was significantly higher in the SIT group compared to the CON group. Sensory integration training can improve balance ability of patients with stroke by increasing muscle activity of stance limb muscles such as GM and trunk extensor such as ES along with enhancement of the limit of stability.

  1. Anosognosia in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke

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    V. N. Grigoryeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the frequency of anosognosia (a deficit of self-awareness, its anatomic correlates associated with other neuropsychological and neurological disorders in acute hemispheric ischemic stroke (IS.Patients and methods 150 patients (83 men and 67 women; mean age, 63.0±9.3 years with acute hemispheric IS were examined. All the patients underwent neurological, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological (by the procedure described by A.R. Luria examinations. neuropsychological investigations. Anosognosia was diagnosed using the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX and the authors' procedure involving a scale to measure impaired self-rating of motor abilities and a scale to measure impaired self-rating of cognitive abilities in everyday life.Results and discussion. In the acute period of hemispheric IS, reduced self-awareness of motor and cognitive abilities was noted in 14% of the patients and unawareness of only cognitive abilities was recorded in 15%. Patients with anosognosia and cognitive dysfunction (ACD and those with anosognosia and motor dysfunction (AMD had right-sided hemispheric IS more frequently (76% while this was not found in patients with isolated ACD. The development of anosognosia for paralysis and paresis was favored by the large sizes of an ischemic focus that involved a few lobes in the posterior regions of the brain although no lesions were found in the anosognosia-specific anatomical regions. ACD and AMD proved to be associated with unilateral spatial and tactile neglect and obvious regulatory dysfunction. 

  2. Impact of stroke unit in a public hospital on length of hospitalization and rate of early mortality of ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sheila G. Rocha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We ascertained whether a public health stroke unit reduces the length of hospitalization, the rate of inpatient fatality, and the mortality rate 30 days after the stroke. Methods We compared a cohort of stroke patients managed on a general neurology/medical ward with a similar cohort of stroke patients managed in a str oke unit. The in-patient fatality rates and 30-day mortality rates were analyzed. Results 729 patients were managed in the general ward and 344 were treated at a comprehensive stroke unit. The in-patient fatality rates were 14.7% for the general ward group and 6.9% for the stroke unit group (p<0.001. The overall mortality rate 30 days after stroke was 20.9% for general ward patients and 14.2% for stroke unit patients (p=0.005. Conclusions We observed reduced in-patient fatalities and 30-day mortality rates in patients managed in the stroke unit. There was no impact on the length of hospitalization.

  3. The Synergic Effects of Mirror Therapy and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Hand Function in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Gi Jeong; Chun, Min Ho; Park, Ji Young; Kim, Bo Ryun

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the synergic effects of mirror therapy and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) for hand function in stroke patients. Method Sixty patients with hemiparesis after stroke were included (41 males and 19 females, average age 63.3 years). Twenty patients had NMES applied and simultaneously underwent mirror therapy. Twenty patients had NMES applied only, and twenty patients underwent mirror therapy only. Each treatment was done five days per week, 30 minutes per day...

  4. Evaluation of pre-hospital transport time of stroke patients to thrombolytic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sofie; Andresen, Morten; Michelsen, Lene;

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundEffective treatment of stroke is time dependent. Pre-hospital management is an important link in reducing the time from occurrence of stroke symptoms to effective treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate time used by emergency medical services (EMS) for stroke patients during a...... five-year period in order to identify potential delays and evaluate the reorganization of EMS in Copenhagen in 2009.MethodsWe performed a retrospective analysis of ambulance records from stroke patients suitable for thrombolysis from 1 January 2006 to 7 July 2011. We noted response time from dispatch...

  5. Acupuncture Modulates the Functional Connectivity of the Default Mode Network in Stroke Patients

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    Yong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abundant evidence from previous fMRI studies on acupuncture has revealed significant modulatory effects at widespread brain regions. However, few reports on the modulation to the default mode network (DMN of stroke patients have been investigated in the field of acupuncture. To study the modulatory effects of acupuncture on the DMN of stroke patients, eight right hemispheric infarction and stable ischemic stroke patients and ten healthy subjects were recruited to undergo resting state fMRI scanning before and after acupuncture stimulation. Functional connectivity analysis was applied with the bilateral posterior cingulate cortices chosen as the seed regions. The main finding demonstrated that the interregional interactions between the ACC and PCC especially enhanced after acupuncture at GB34 in stroke patients, compared with healthy controls. The results indicated that the possible mechanisms of the modulatory effects of acupuncture on the DMN of stroke patients could be interpreted in terms of cognitive ability and motor function recovery.

  6. Urea synthesis in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamberg, Ole; Sonne, J; Larsen, S;

    2001-01-01

    Up-regulation of urea synthesis by amino acids and dietary protein intake may be impaired in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) due to the reduced glucagon secretion. Conversely, urea synthesis may be increased as a result of the chronic inflammation. The aims of the study were to determine...... urea synthesis kinetics in CP patients in relation to glucagon secretion (study I) and during an increase in protein intake (study II)....

  7. Depression in Patients with Stroke%脑卒中患者抑郁情绪的初步调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵俊宏

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate depression status in patients with stroke. Methods: Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) was used to assess 63 hospitalized patients with stroke and 30 healthy persons. The total and factor scores of the HAMD were compared between groups, as well as between first occurrence and reoccurrence of stoke. Results: HAMD total score and factor scores were significantly higher in stroke patients than in healthy controls (P<0.01), as well as higher in the reoccurrence than in the first occurrence of stroke (P<0.05). Conclusion: Most stroke patients experience significant depression, which might play an important role in reoccurrence of stroke .

  8. An exploratory intervention study suggests clinical benefits of training in chronic stroke to be paralleled by changes in brain activity using repeated fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landsmann B

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Landsmann,1,2 Daniela Pinter,2 Eva Pirker,1,2 Gerald Pichler,3 Walter Schippinger,3 Elisabeth M Weiss,1 Gabriel Mathie,2 Thomas Gattringer,2 Franz Fazekas,2 Christian Enzinger2,4 1Institute of Psychology, University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 2Department of Neurology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 3Albert Schweitzer Clinic Graz, Graz, Austria; 4Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria Purpose: Previous studies demonstrated changes in sensorimotor network activation over time after stroke that have been interpreted as partly compensatory. Locomotor and balance trainings may improve both mobility and cognition even in chronic stroke and thereby impact on cerebral activation patterns. We here aimed at testing these assumptions in an exploratory study to inform subsequent larger intervention studies. Patients and methods: Eight patients (73.3±4.4 years with a chronic lacunar stroke (mean interval 3.7 years after the acute event with a range from 2 to 4 years and residual leg paresis leading to gait disturbance received a guided 5-week training focusing on mobility, endurance, and coordination. Before and afterward, they underwent clinical, neuropsychological, and gait assessments and brain MRI at 3 T including a functional ankle movement paradigm. Sixteen healthy controls (HCs; 68.8±5.4 years followed the same protocol without intervention. Results: After training, patients had improved in mobility, memory, and delayed recall of memory. While cerebral activations in HC remained completely unaltered, patients showed increased activations in the right precentral gyrus, the right and left superior frontal gyri, and the right frontal lobe, with bipedal ankle movements after training. Conclusion: In this exploratory study of chronic stroke, we found not only significant effects of physical training on mobility but also distinct aspects of cognition already with a small number of

  9. Robotic unilateral and bilateral upper-limb movement training for stroke survivors afflicted by chronic hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Matt; Kim, Hyuchul; Abrams, Gary; Byl, Nancy; Rosen, Jacob

    2013-06-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of long-term neurological disability and the principle reason for seeking rehabilitative services in the US. Learning based rehabilitation training enables independent mobility in the majority of patients post stroke, however, restoration of fine manipulation, motor function and task specific functions of the hemiplegic arm and hand is noted in fewer than 15% of the stroke patients. Brain plasticity is the innate mechanism enabling the recovery of motor skills through neurological reorganization of the brain as a response to limbs' manipulation. The objective of this research was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy for the upper limbs with a dual arm exoskeleton system (EXO-UL7) using three different modalities: bilateral mirror image with symmetric movements of both arms, unilateral movement of the affected arm and standard care. Five hemiparetic subjects were randomly assigned to each therapy modality. An upper limb exoskeleton was used to provide bilateral and unilateral treatments. Standard care was provided by a licensed physical therapist. Subjects were evaluated before and after the interventions using 13 different clinical measures. Following these treatments all of the subjects demonstrated significant improved of their fine motor control and gross control across all the treatment modalities. Subjects exhibited significant improvements in range of motion of the shoulder, and improved muscle strength for bilateral training and standard care, but not for unilateral training. In conclusion, a synergetic approach in which robotic treatments (unilateral and bilateral depending on the level of the motor control) are supplemented by the standard of care may maximize the outcome of the motor control recover following stroke. PMID:24187321

  10. The individualized rehabilitation interventions for dysphagia: a multidisciplinary case control study of acute stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Lixue; Li, Yi; Liu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of the individualized rehabilitation programs on the recovery of swallowing during acute stroke. Methods: A total of 88 stroke patients with dysphagia (within 2 weeks of acute stroke) were enrolled and classified into the experimental and control groups (n=44). The control group was treated with conventional rehabilitation program, while a multidisciplinary rehabilitation team was established to offer physical, social and psychological support to dysphagic pa...

  11. Preadmission oral anticoagulant treatment and clinical outcome among patients hospitalized with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Svendsen, Marie Louise; Hansen, Morten Lock;

    2014-01-01

    Preadmission oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) has been linked with less severe stroke and a better outcome in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, the existing studies have methodological limitations and have, with one exception, not included hemorrhagic strokes. We performed a nationwid...... historic follow-up study using data from population-based healthcare registries to assess the effect of preadmission OAT on stroke outcomes further....

  12. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Over the Primary and Secondary Somatosensory Cortices Transiently Improves Tactile Spatial Discrimination in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Shuhei; Kon, Noriko; Otaka, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Nakayama, Takeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Ragert, Patrick; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    In healthy subjects, dual hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the primary (S1) and secondary somatosensory cortices (S2) has been found to transiently enhance tactile performance. However, the effect of dual hemisphere tDCS on tactile performance in stroke patients with sensory deficits remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether dual hemisphere tDCS over S1 and S2 could enhance tactile discrimination in stroke patients. We employed a double-blind, crossover, sham-controlled experimental design. Eight chronic stroke patients with sensory deficits participated in this study. We used a grating orientation task (GOT) to measure the tactile discriminative threshold of the affected and non-affected index fingers before, during, and 10 min after four tDCS conditions. For both the S1 and S2 conditions, we placed an anodal electrode over the lesioned hemisphere and a cathodal electrode over the opposite hemisphere. We applied tDCS at an intensity of 2 mA for 15 min in both S1 and S2 conditions. We included two sham conditions in which the positions of the electrodes and the current intensity were identical to that in the S1 and S2 conditions except that current was delivered for the initial 15 s only. We found that GOT thresholds for the affected index finger during and 10 min after the S1 and S2 conditions were significantly lower compared with each sham condition. GOT thresholds were not significantly different between the S1 and S2 conditions at any time point. We concluded that dual-hemisphere tDCS over S1 and S2 can transiently enhance tactile discriminative task performance in chronic stroke patients with sensory dysfunction. PMID:27064531

  13. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy on muscle tone and upper extremity function in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Boo, Jung-A; Moon, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sun-Min; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen chronic stroke patients were included in this study. Prior to occupational therapy, whole-body exercise was performed for 10 minutes, 5 times per week, for a total of 8 weeks. Muscle tone and upper extremity function were measured. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure muscle tone, and the Ma...

  14. Quality of care and mortality among patients with stroke - A nationwide follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeman, A.; Pedersen, Lars; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager;

    2008-01-01

    Background: The relationship between process and outcome measures among patients with stroke is unclear. Objectives: To examine the association between quality of care and mortality among patients with stroke in a nationwide population-based follow-up study. Methods: Using data from The Danish...... National Indicator Project, a quality improvement initiative with participation of all Danish hospital departments caring for patients with stroke, we identified 29,573 patients hospitalized with stroke between January 13, 2003 and October 31, 2005. Quality of care was measured in terms of 7 specific...... criteria: early admission to a stroke unit, early initiation of antiplatelet or oral anticoagulant therapy, early examination with computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging scan, and early assessment by a physiotherapist, an occupational therapist, and of nutritional risk. Data on 30- and 90-day...

  15. Relationship Between Grip and Pinch Strength and Activities of Daily Living in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jung Hyun; Kang, Si Hyun; Seo, Kyung Mook; Kim, Don-Kyu; Shin, Hyun Iee; Shin, Hye Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between grip and pinch strength and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) in stroke patients. Methods Medical records of 577 stroke patients from January 2010 to February 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' grip and pinch strength of both hemiplegic and non-hemiplegic hands and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) score were collected. These patients were divided into three groups: group A (onset duration: ≤3 month...

  16. Frequency and characteristics of emotional disorders in patients after ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    D. Kadojic´; M. Vladetic´; M. Candrlic´; M. Kadojic´; M. Dikanovic´; Z. Trkanjec

    2005-01-01

    Emotional disturbances in stroke patients may unfavorably affect the process of rehabilitation and longterm outcome of the disease. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of emotional disturbances and their characteristics in our stroke patients, according to hemispheric lateralization of cerebral lesion (as recorded by CT), patient sex and grade of neurological handicap (as assessed by Rankin scale). The study included 50 patients (29 men and 21 women, mean age 65.52 ± 7.07 and 64...

  17. Stroke Risk among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Zhejiang: A Population-Based Prospective Study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to explore the incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM based on the long-term surveillance data in Zhejiang, China, during 2007 to 2013. Materials and Methods. During January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2013, a total of 327,268 T2DM and 307,984 stroke patients were registered on Diabetes and Stroke Surveillance System, respectively. Stroke subtypes were classified according to standard definitions of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes was calculated by standardized incidence ratio (SIRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs compared with general population. Results. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with T2DM was significantly higher than in general population. Stroke risk was found significantly increased with an SIR of 3.87 (95% CI 3.76–3.99 and 3.38 (95% CI 3.27–3.48 in females and males, respectively. The excess risk of stroke was mainly attributable to the significantly higher risk of cerebral infarctions with the risk for T2DM being four times that for general population. Conclusions. The relationship between stroke and T2DM was strong, especially in female. The incidence of stroke and stroke subtypes among patients with T2DM was up to 3-fold higher than in general population in Zhejiang province, especially the subtype of cerebral infarctions.

  18. Protocol and methodology of the Stroke in Young Fabry Patients (sifap1) study: a prospective multicenter European study of 5,024 young stroke patients aged 18-55 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rolfs, Arndt

    2011-01-01

    Stroke in the young has not been thoroughly investigated with most previous studies based on a small number of patients from single centers. Furthermore, recent reports indicate that Fabry disease may be a significant cause for young stroke. The primary aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of Fabry disease in young stroke patients, while the secondary aim was to describe patterns of stroke in young patients.

  19. Walking training associated with virtual reality-based training increases walking speed of individuals with chronic stroke: systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M. Rodrigues-Baroni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the available evidence on the efficacy of walking training associated with virtual reality-based training in patients with stroke. The specific questions were: Is walking training associated with virtual reality-based training effective in increasing walking speed after stroke? Is this type of intervention more effective in increasing walking speed, than non-virtual reality-based walking interventions? METHOD: A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials was conducted. Participants were adults with chronic stroke and the experimental intervention was walking training associated with virtual reality-based training to increase walking speed. The outcome data regarding walking speed were extracted from the eligible trials and were combined using a meta-analysis approach. RESULTS: Seven trials representing eight comparisons were included in this systematic review. Overall, the virtual reality-based training increased walking speed by 0.17 m/s (IC 95% 0.08 to 0.26, compared with placebo/nothing or non-walking interventions. In addition, the virtual reality-based training increased walking speed by 0.15 m/s (IC 95% 0.05 to 0.24, compared with non-virtual reality walking interventions. CONCLUSIONS: This review provided evidence that walking training associated with virtual reality-based training was effective in increasing walking speed after stroke, and resulted in better results than non-virtual reality interventions.

  20. Mean platelet volume is related with ischemic stroke in patients with sinus rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Buğra; Arik, Osman Z; Gözükara, Mehmet Y; Şahin, Durmuş Y; Topal, Salih; Uysal, Onur K; Elbasan, Zafer; Epçeliden, Tuncay; Çayli, Murat; Gür, Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability worldwide. It is known that atrial fibrillation and left atrial enlargement contribute ischemic stroke, and mean platelet volume (MPV) increases in patients with ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation. We aimed to determine whether higher MPV is associated with ischemic stroke in patients with sinus rhythm. We evaluated 74 patients in sinus rhythm and with ischemic stroke (Group 1) and 90 age-matched and sex-matched healthy individuals as control group (Group 2). After physical and echocardiographic examination, 24-48 h Holter monitoring and complete blood counts were studied. There were no statistically significant differences in age, sex rates, and comorbidities between groups. Left atrial diameter was higher in Group 1 than Group 2 (P = 0.001), but both were in normal range. MPV was significantly higher in Group 1 (P < 0.001) and was an independent determinant [odds ratio (OR): 1.840; P < 0.001; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.330-2.545] of ischemic stroke with left atrial (OR: 1.138; P = 0.006; 95% CI 1.037-1.248). In conclusion, higher MPV is associated with acute ischemic stroke in patients with sinus rhythm and without heart failure or left atrial enlargement. MPV and left atrial diameter are independent predictors of ischemic stroke in this patient population. PMID:24686100

  1. Frequency of cerebral infarction and haemorrhage in the patients of stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroke is rapidly developing phenomena of symptoms and signs of focal, and at times global, loss of cerebral function with no apparent cause other than that of vascular origin. The Objective was to know the frequency of cerebral infarction and haemorrhage in one hundred patients of stroke in a period of one year. Data was collected by consecutive sampling technique. Total one hundred patients of stroke were collected for the study. They were assessed through a detailed history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, previous stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), previous myocardial infarction, angina, atrial fibrillation, alcohol intake, drugs used for hypertension/diabetes mellitus. Blood pressure was recorded at arrival and 24 hours after admission. There were 70% males and 30% females. Twenty percent of the patients were in the age range of 51-60 years, 26% of the patients were in the age range of 61-70 years and 18% were in the age range of 71-80 years. Cerebral infarction was present in 72% patients while cerebral haemorrhage was present in 28% patients. Hypertension was the most common risk factor among these stroke patients. Average blood pressure was 180/100 mmHg. Cerebral infarction is the commonest form of stroke. Hypertension is the leading risk factor in stroke patients. (author)

  2. Increased risk of ischemic stroke in cervical cancer patients: a nationwide population-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased risk of ischemic stroke has been validated for several cancers, but limited study evaluated this risk in cervical cancer patients. Our study aimed to evaluate the risk of ischemic stroke in cervical cancer patients. The study analyzed data from the 2003 to 2008 National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) provided by the National Health Research Institutes in Taiwan. Totally, 893 cervical cancer patients after radiotherapy and 1786 appendectomy patients were eligible. The Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model were used to assess the risk of ischemic stroke. The 5-year cumulative risk of ischemic stroke was significantly higher for the cervical cancer group than for the control group (7.8% vs 5.1%; p <0.005). The risk of stroke was higher in younger (age <51 years) than in older (age ≥51 years) cervical cancer patients (HR = 2.73, p = 0.04; HR = 1.37, p = 0.07) and in patients with more than two comorbid risk factors (5 years cumulative stroke rate of two comorbidities: 15% compared to no comorbidities: 4%). These study demonstrated cervical cancer patients had a higher risk of ischemic stroke than the general population, especially in younger patients. Strategies to reduce this risk should be assessed

  3. Elevated factor VIII level and stroke in patients without traditional risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasek-Bal A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anetta Lasek-Bal, Przemyslaw Puz, Zofia KazibutowskaStroke Unit, Department of Neurology, Medical University of Silesia, Professor Leszek Giec Upper Silesian Medical Centre, Katowice, PolandIntroduction: Hemostasis is affected by interactions between physiological processes, including those connected with the coagulation system, whose essence is converting fibrinogen into fibrin. The role of factor VIII (FVIII consists in activating factor X, which directly participates in the generation of thrombin, which is able to produce stable fibrin, which in turn forms blood clots. There are divergent opinions regarding the significance of high levels of FVIII in stroke pathogenesis.Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate FVIII activity in individuals with cryptogenic stroke in order to determine a potential relationship between it and cerebral ischemia.Material and methods: Nine patients suffering with stroke were used in this study: six women and three men aged 49–63 years. In all of the patients, the presence of known and potential risk factors for stroke had been excluded during previous diagnostic procedures. These patients accounted for 1.2% of the 719 people who suffered a stroke and were hospitalized in 2011 at the Stroke Unit. FVIII activity was examined in each of the nine qualified subjects within 1–2 months of the occurrence of stroke (the first test and repeated (the second test in five patients with abnormal results obtained from the first examination.Results: Increased activity of FVIII was found in 5 out of 9 patients. In patients with abnormal results, elevated FVIII was found in follow-up examinations in the 8th–10th month following stroke. Hemodynamic abnormalities in carotid or cerebral artery (presence of thrombus were found in 3 of the 5 patients with increased FVIII levels. In the first 24 hours following stroke the neurological state of patients with abnormal FVIII was worse than individuals with normal FVIII activity. The

  4. [Verbal patient information through nurses--a case of stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, Elli; Holle, Regina; Schüssler, Dörte; Beier, Jutta; Dassen, Theo

    2004-06-01

    The article represents results of a theoretical work in the field of nursing education, with the topic: Verbal Patient Information through Nurses--A Case of Stroke Patients. The literature review and analysis show that there is a shortage in (stroke) patient information generally and a lack of successful concepts and strategies for the verbal (stroke) patient information through nurses in hospitals. The authors have developed a theoretical basis for health information as a nursing intervention and this represents a model of health information as a "communicational teach-and-learn process", which is of general application to all patients. The health information takes place as a separate nursing intervention within a non-public, face-to-face communication situation and in the steps-model of the nursing process. Health information is seen as a learning process for patients and nurses too. We consider learning as information production (constructivism) and information processing (cognitivism). Both processes are influenced by different factors and the illness-situation of patients, personality information content and the environment. For a successful health information output, it is necessary to take care of these aspects and this can be realized through a constructivational understanding of didactics. There is a need for an evaluation study to prove our concept of health information. PMID:15281356

  5. Microstructural properties of premotor pathways predict visuomotor performance in chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Derek B; Misra, Gaurav; Patten, Carolynn; Coombes, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    Microstructural properties of the corticospinal tract (CST) descending from the motor cortex predict strength and motor skill in the chronic phase after stroke. Much less is known about the relation between brain microstructure and visuomotor processing after stroke. In this study, individual's poststroke and age-matched controls performed a unimanual force task separately with each hand at three levels of visual gain. We collected diffusion MRI data and used probabilistic tractography algorithms to identify the primary and premotor CSTs. Fractional anisotropy (FA) within each tract was used to predict changes in force variability across different levels of visual gain. Our observations revealed that individuals poststroke reduced force variability with an increase in visual gain, performed the force task with greater variability as compared with controls across all gain levels, and had lower FA in the primary motor and premotor CSTs. Our results also demonstrated that the CST descending from the premotor cortex, rather than the primary motor cortex, best predicted force variability. Together, these findings demonstrate that the microstructural properties of the premotor CST predict visual gain-related changes in force variability in individuals poststroke. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2039-2054, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26920656

  6. Increasing rate of atrial fibrillation from 2003 to 2011 in patients with ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, S F; Christensen, Thomas; Christensen, A;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The general awareness of atrial fibrillation is increasing. The key to prevent atrial fibrillation related stroke is oral anticoagulation therapy; however, it has often been proposed that oral anticoagulation therapy is under-utilized despite indication. The aim of the study...... was to examine the trends in atrial fibrillation rate in patients after acute ischaemic stroke and to determine whether the use of oral anticoagulation therapy increased from 2003 to 2011. METHODS: In the nationwide Danish Stroke Registry 55 551 patients (≥18 years) admitted with acute ischaemic...... stroke were identified. Frequency analysis and linear regression were used to assess trends in atrial fibrillation diagnosis and oral anticoagulation therapy prescription. RESULTS: A total of 17.1% (n = 9482) of ischaemic stroke patients had atrial fibrillation. The relative frequency of atrial...

  7. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN LEVEL OF SERUM FERRITIN AND OUTCOME OF PATIENTS OF STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Despite lot of researches in the field of stroke, accurate prognostication of an acute attack is difficult. Several prognostic factors like site of infarction, size of infarct, size of the vessel involved, Glasgow coma scale, level of cerebral edema, intr acranial tension have been found significant in cerebral infarction. Similarly in cases of cerebral hemorrhage, CT calculated volume of hematoma, GCS, site of hemorrhage etc. are important. One of the prognostic indicators which has gained great clinical i nterest in recent times is the level of serum ferritin. Initially considered only as a stress response to stroke, serum ferritin now is under research as a prognostic indicator. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To correlate the levels of serum ferritin with early neur ological deterioration and prognosis in patients of acute stroke. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 50 patients of cerebrovascular accident presenting within 48hrs of symptom onset were included in the study and diagnosis of stroke was confirmed by CT scan. In vitro quantitative determination of ferritin in human serum was done within 48 hours of presentation by electro chemiluminescence immunoassay “ECLIA” in Elecsys and cobas e immunoassay analyser. Neurological assessment was done by Canadian stroke scale . INCLUSION CRITERIA: patients above 18 yrs. of age of both sexes with CT scan confirmed diagnosis of stroke presenting within 48 hrs of symptom onset EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Patient not fulfilling inclusion criteria and with history of recent infection or inf lammation in the previous month, with history of malignancy and with anemia. RESULTS: level of serum ferritin has direct correlation with worse prognosis in patients of stroke. The mean level of serum ferritin in the group of clinically improved (87.01 wa s much lesser compared to the group clinically deteriorated or died (458.7 among patients of ischemic stroke. Similarly in hemorrhagic stroke it was 96.4 in improved

  8. The importance of dynamometry during medical rehabilitation of stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašević Snežana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Rehabilitation centers pay great attention to recovery of motor functions. Dynamometry is used for monitoring and objective overall assessment of damage and recovery of motor functions. Material and methods The aim of this investigation was estimation of upper limb muscle strength, with stroke patients during medical rehabilitation. It included 80 right-handed examinees of certain age and sex distribution. The clinical part of examination estimated motor recovery, applying Signe-Brunnström staging, as well as estimation of upper limb muscle strength, using dynamometry during inpatient rehabilitation. Results Average values of muscle strength of the affected hand with patients who had right-sided hemiparesis increased by 22.01%, whereas with patients who had left-sided hemiparesis by 36.38%, compared with values from the beginning of treatment. Examination results showed that muscle strength values in both hands after rehabilitation were statistically, considerably improved (p<0.05, compared with the results from the beginning of treatment. However, they did not reach values of the control group. Discussion and Conclusion Muscle strength improvement at the end of treatment is affected by complex changes of the neural system, leading to lesion regression, as well as by positive effects of rehabilitation treatment. Result of examination help decision making regarding treatment duration and speak in favor of early rehabilitation applying facilitation techniques for fast and significant recovery.

  9. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  10. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattler, Margriet G.A., E-mail: g.a.sattler@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Vroomen, Patrick C. [Department of Neurology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Sluiter, Wim J. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schers, Henk J. [Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (Netherlands); Berg, Gerrit van den [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Beek, André P. van [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  11. Postacute Stroke Rehabilitation Utilization: Are There Differences between Rural-Urban Patients and Taxonomies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huanguang; Cowper, Diane C.; Tang, Yuhong; Litt, Eric; Wilson, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between Veterans Affairs (VA) stroke patients' poststroke rehabilitation utilization and their residential settings by using 2 common rural-urban taxonomies. Methods: This retrospective study included all VA stroke inpatients in 2001 and 2002. Rehabilitation utilization referred to rehabilitation therapy received…

  12. Abnormal EEG Complexity and Functional Connectivity of Brain in Patients with Acute Thalamic Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Guo, Jie; Meng, Jiayuan; Wang, Zhijun; Yao, Yang; Yang, Jiajia; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic thalamus stroke has become a serious cardiovascular and cerebral disease in recent years. To date the existing researches mostly concentrated on the power spectral density (PSD) in several frequency bands. In this paper, we investigated the nonlinear features of EEG and brain functional connectivity in patients with acute thalamic ischemic stroke and healthy subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) in resting condition with eyes closed was recorded for 12 stroke patients and 11 healthy subjects as control group. Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC), Sample Entropy (SampEn), and brain network using partial directed coherence (PDC) were calculated for feature extraction. Results showed that patients had increased mean LZC and SampEn than the controls, which implied the stroke group has higher EEG complexity. For the brain network, the stroke group displayed a trend of weaker cortical connectivity, which suggests a functional impairment of information transmission in cortical connections in stroke patients. These findings suggest that nonlinear analysis and brain network could provide essential information for better understanding the brain dysfunction in the stroke and assisting monitoring or prognostication of stroke evolution.

  13. Efficiency of drug therapy in complex rehabilitation of patients in late recovery period of stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Dilshod Sagatov

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and neurological studies in 73 patients (44 men and 29 women) with the consequences of ischemic stroke in late recovery period were performed. Dopplerographic and electroencephalographic parameters before and after the rehabilitation measures were examined. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic effect of nootropics in drug rehabilitation with the inclusion of Nootropil and Cavinton Forte in late stroke recovery period.

  14. Effects of a robot-assisted training of grasp and pronation/supination in chronic stroke: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambercy Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rehabilitation of hand function is challenging, and only few studies have investigated robot-assisted rehabilitation focusing on distal joints of the upper limb. This paper investigates the feasibility of using the HapticKnob, a table-top end-effector device, for robot-assisted rehabilitation of grasping and forearm pronation/supination, two important functions for activities of daily living involving the hand, and which are often impaired in chronic stroke patients. It evaluates the effectiveness of this device for improving hand function and the transfer of improvement to arm function. Methods A single group of fifteen chronic stroke patients with impaired arm and hand functions (Fugl-Meyer motor assessment scale (FM 10-45/66 participated in a 6-week 3-hours/week rehabilitation program with the HapticKnob. Outcome measures consisted primarily of the FM and Motricity Index (MI and their respective subsections related to distal and proximal arm function, and were assessed at the beginning, end of treatment and in a 6-weeks follow-up. Results Thirteen subjects successfully completed robot-assisted therapy, with significantly improved hand and arm motor functions, demonstrated by an average 3.00 points increase on the FM and 4.55 on the MI at the completion of the therapy (4.85 FM and 6.84 MI six weeks post-therapy. Improvements were observed both in distal and proximal components of the clinical scales at the completion of the study (2.00 FM wrist/hand, 2.55 FM shoulder/elbow, 2.23 MI hand and 4.23 MI shoulder/elbow. In addition, improvements in hand function were observed, as measured by the Motor Assessment Scale, grip force, and a decrease in arm muscle spasticity. These results were confirmed by motion data collected by the robot. Conclusions The results of this study show the feasibility of this robot-assisted therapy with patients presenting a large range of impairment levels. A significant homogeneous improvement in

  15. Left atrial appendage morphology in patients with suspected cardiogenic stroke without known atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Miika; Muuronen, Antti; Arponen, Otso; Mustonen, Pirjo; Hedman, Marja; Jäkälä, Pekka; Vanninen, Ritva; Taina, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the typical origin for intracardiac thrombus formation. Whether LAA morphology is associated with increased stroke/TIA risk is controversial and, if it does, which morphological type most predisposes to thrombus formation. We assessed LAA morphology in stroke patients with cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology and in age- and gender-matched healthy controls. LAA morphology and volume were analyzed by cardiac computed tomography in 111 patients (74 males; mean age 60 ± 11 years) with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology other than known atrial fibrillation (AF). A subgroup of 40 patients was compared to an age- and gender-matched control group of 40 healthy individuals (21 males in each; mean age 54 ± 9 years). LAA was classified into four morphology types (Cactus, ChickenWing, WindSock, CauliFlower) modified with a quantitative qualifier. The proportions of LAA morphology types in the main stroke group, matched stroke subgroup, and control group were as follows: Cactus (9.0%, 5.0%, 20.0%), ChickenWing (23.4%, 37.5%, 10.0%), WindSock (47.7%, 35.0%, 67.5%), and CauliFlower (19.8%, 22.5%, 2.5%). The distribution of morphology types differed significantly (P<0.001) between the matched stroke subgroup and control group. The proportion of single-lobed LAA was significantly higher (P<0.001) in the matched stroke subgroup (55%) than the control group (6%). LAA volumes were significantly larger (P<0.001) in both stroke study groups compared to controls patients. To conclude, LAA morphology differed significantly between stroke patients and controls, and single-lobed LAAs were overrepresented and LAA volume was larger in patients with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology. PMID:25751618

  16. Left atrial appendage morphology in patients with suspected cardiogenic stroke without known atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miika Korhonen

    Full Text Available The left atrial appendage (LAA is the typical origin for intracardiac thrombus formation. Whether LAA morphology is associated with increased stroke/TIA risk is controversial and, if it does, which morphological type most predisposes to thrombus formation. We assessed LAA morphology in stroke patients with cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology and in age- and gender-matched healthy controls. LAA morphology and volume were analyzed by cardiac computed tomography in 111 patients (74 males; mean age 60 ± 11 years with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology other than known atrial fibrillation (AF. A subgroup of 40 patients was compared to an age- and gender-matched control group of 40 healthy individuals (21 males in each; mean age 54 ± 9 years. LAA was classified into four morphology types (Cactus, ChickenWing, WindSock, CauliFlower modified with a quantitative qualifier. The proportions of LAA morphology types in the main stroke group, matched stroke subgroup, and control group were as follows: Cactus (9.0%, 5.0%, 20.0%, ChickenWing (23.4%, 37.5%, 10.0%, WindSock (47.7%, 35.0%, 67.5%, and CauliFlower (19.8%, 22.5%, 2.5%. The distribution of morphology types differed significantly (P<0.001 between the matched stroke subgroup and control group. The proportion of single-lobed LAA was significantly higher (P<0.001 in the matched stroke subgroup (55% than the control group (6%. LAA volumes were significantly larger (P<0.001 in both stroke study groups compared to controls patients. To conclude, LAA morphology differed significantly between stroke patients and controls, and single-lobed LAAs were overrepresented and LAA volume was larger in patients with acute ischemic stroke of cryptogenic or suspected cardiogenic etiology.

  17. Intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for ischemic stroke patients over 80 years old: the Fukuoka Stroke Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Matsuo

    Full Text Available The benefit of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA therapy for very old patients with acute ischemic stroke remains unclear. The aim of this study was to elucidate the efficacy and safety of intravenous rt-PA therapy for patients over 80 years old.Of 13,521 stroke patients registered in the Fukuoka Stroke Registry in Japan from June 1999 to February 2013, 953 ischemic stroke patients who were over 80 years old, hospitalized within 3 h of onset, and not treated with endovascular therapy were included in this study. Among them, 153 patients were treated with intravenous rt-PA (0.6 mg/kg. For propensity score (PS-matched case-control analysis, 148 patients treated with rt-PA and 148 PS-matched patients without rt-PA therapy were selected by 1:1 matching with propensity for using rt-PA. Clinical outcomes were neurological improvement, good functional outcome at discharge, in-hospital mortality, and hemorrhagic complications (any intracranial hemorrhage [ICH], symptomatic ICH, and gastrointestinal bleeding.In the full cohort of 953 patients, rt-PA use was associated positively with neurological improvement and good functional outcome, and negatively with in-hospital mortality after adjustment for multiple confounding factors. In PS-matched case-control analysis, patients treated with rt-PA were still at lower risk for unfavorable clinical outcomes than non-treated patients (neurological improvement, odds ratio 2.67, 95% confidence interval 1.61-4.40; good functional outcome, odds ratio 2.23, 95% confidence interval 1.16-4.29; in-hospital mortality, odds ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.65. There was no significant association between rt-PA use and risk of hemorrhagic complications in the full and PS-matched cohorts.Intravenous rt-PA therapy was associated with improved clinical outcomes without significant increase in risk of hemorrhagic complications in very old patients (aged>80 years with acute ischemic stroke.

  18. Reasons for diagnostic delay in patient with out-of-hospital acute ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tongge Wang; Qi Ma

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Time window is a common problem in various therapies of acute ischemic stroke,and diagnostic duration plays an important role in prognosis.OBJECTIVE:To analyze the main reasons for out-of-hospital diagnostic delay of patients with acute ischemic stroke.DESIGN:Survey and analysis.SETTING:Department of Neurology,the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 116 patients with acute ischemic stroke were selected from the Department of Neurology,the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University from December 2002 to December 2005,including 79 males and 37 females aged fnom 35 to 90 years with the mean age of(65+10)years.All patients met the diagnostic criteda of "mainly diagnostic points of various cerebrovascular diseases"established by the 4th National Cerebrovascular Diseases Meeting in 1995.Patients having acute ischemic stroke in hospital were excluded.Moreover,32 nurses received questionnaires of partial items.All patients and nurses provided informed consent.METHODS:①Information,such as social Position,educational level and incomes,was added up based on questionnaires.②Out-of-hospital diagnostic delay was surveyed based on the recorded time of patients treated in emergency department and out-patient clinic or during hospitalization. ③Ability of patients and nurses to identify symptoms of stroke dudng an early period was evaluated:meanwhile,understanding concept of stroke and using emergent system of social medicine by patients were surveyed,Especially.whether Patients understood the emergent number"120" or not and how they used it practically were investigated further.④Attitude and behavior of patients to stroke were surveyed.⑤Whether patients were able to identify the symptoms of stroke or not was investigated;furthermore,identification of stroke by patients and nurses was dealt with semi-quantitative analysis.The scores ranged from-10 to 10.The higher the scores were,the better the identification was

  19. Quality of life of elderly ischaemic stroke patients one year after thrombolytic therapy. A comparison between patients with and without thrombolytic therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weerd, Leonie; Luijckx, Gert-Jan R.; Groenier, Klaas H.; van der Meer, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Background: An observational study to examine whether thrombolytic therapy in stroke patients realizes better quality of life outcomes compared to patients without thrombolytic therapy one year after stroke. We also examined whether daily functioning, mental functioning and activities improved after

  20. Dabigatran experience in primary and secondary prevention of cardioembolic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Alekseyevich Domashenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The review of novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban in stroke prevention and also own data of administration of dabigatran in primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke in 45 patients with cerebrovascular diseases are presented. Most patients received dabigatran 14 days after the first stroke associated with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. In other cases dabigatran was used for primary prevention of stroke in patients with chronic forms of cerebrovascular diseases and nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Dabigatran shows good tolerability and efficacy. Recurrent strokes were diagnosed in 2 patients. The reasons for these events were arterial hypertension in one case and symptomatic atherosclerotic plaque in the other case.

  1. The effects of fatigue, pain, and depression on quality of life in ischemic stroke patients: The Bergen Stroke Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naess H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Halvor Naess,1 Lene Lunde,2 Jan Brogger11Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, 2Department of Economics, University of Bergen, Bergen, NorwayBackground: Many patients with cerebral infarction suffer from symptoms such as pain, fatigue, and depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate these symptoms in relation to health-related quality of life (HRQoL on long-term follow-up.Materials and methods: All surviving stroke patients admitted to the Stroke Unit, Haukeland University Hospital, Norway between February 2006 and November 2008 were sent a questionnaire, including a visual analog pain scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Barthel Index, and three measures of HRQoL – 15D, EuroQol, and EuroQol Visual Analogue Scale – at least 6 months after stroke onset. Cox regression survival analysis, including EQ-5D, was performed by November 2009.Results: The questionnaire was returned by 328 patients. All three symptoms were reported by 10.1% of the patients, and 26% reported two symptoms. There was a significant association between worse HRQoL scores and an increasing number of cooccurring symptoms for all three HRQoL scores. Fatigue, depression, pain, functional state, and sleeping disorder on follow-up accounted for 58%–83% of the variability in HRQoL, depending on which HRQoL scale was used. Cox regression analysis showed that mortality was associated with a low EuroQol score (P = 0.016.Conclusion: Pain, fatigue, and depression were common symptoms among these stroke patients and, to a large extent, they determined the patients' HRQoL. Low HRQoL was associated with increased mortality.Keywords: cerebral infarction, symptoms, mortality

  2. Fear of Falling in Subacute Hemiplegic Stroke Patients: Associating Factors and Correlations with Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun Joo; Kim, Doo Young; Kim, Wan Ho; Lee, Kwang Lae; Yoon, Yong Hoon; Park, Jeong Mi; Shin, Jung In; Kim, Seong Kyu; Kim, Dong Goo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the associating factors of fear of falling (FOF) and the correlations between FOF and quality of life (QOL) on subacute stroke patients in Korea. Method Fifty hemiplegic subacute stroke patients in our clinic were recruited. We directly asked patients with their fear of falling and interviewed them with the Korean version of falls efficacy scale-international (KFES-I). We divided the participants into two groups; with FOF and without FOF. We compared these groups with t...

  3. Effect of action observation therapy on daily activities and motor recovery in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mei-Hong Zhu; Jing Wang; Xu-Dong Gu; Mei-Fang Shi; Ming Zeng; Chun-Yuan Wang; Qiao-Ying Chen; Jian-Ming Fu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of action observation therapy, which is based on mirror neuron theory, on upper limb function and activities of daily living in patients with stroke. Methods: Sixty-one patients with stroke were randomly divided into two groups; those in the control group received routine rehabilitation treatment and nursing, whereas those in the experimental group additionally received eight weeks of action observation therapy for 30 min, six times per week. Patients rec...

  4. Plantar Pressure Distribution During Robotic-Assisted Gait in Post-stroke Hemiplegic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jin Kyu; Ahn, Na El; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Deog Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the plantar pressure distribution during the robotic-assisted walking, guided through normal symmetrical hip and knee physiological kinematic trajectories, with unassisted walking in post-stroke hemiplegic patients. Methods Fifteen hemiplegic stroke patients, who were able to walk a minimum of ten meters independently but with asymmetric gait patterns, were enrolled in this study. All the patients performed both the robotic-assisted walking (Lokomat) and the unassisted wal...

  5. Preliminary investigation of economics issues in hospitalized patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Tolou-Ghamari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The cost disparity within this study after stroke could be mainly connected to variations in duration of hospital stay. Inspecting agenda towards this direction could reduce the economic cost of stroke significantly. Therefore, further assessment correlated to attain strategies in order to reduce costs associated to patients′ paid and home insurance contribution could be much more advantageous.

  6. Patients' Experiences of Disruptions Associated with Post-Stroke Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Sylvia; Barbour, Rosaline S.; Brady, Marian; Clark, Alexander M.; Paton, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysarthria rehabilitation should consider social participation for people with dysarthria, but before this approach can be adopted, an understanding of the psychosocial impact of dysarthria is required. Despite the prevalence of dysarthria as a result of stroke, there is a paucity of research into this communication…

  7. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-11-15

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  8. Concurrence of Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis and Parakinesia Brachialis Oscitans in a Patient with Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tsan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD is defined as a reduction in blood flow in the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the supratentorial focal lesion. The phenomenon termed parakinesia brachialis oscitans (PBO in which stroke patients experience involuntary stretching of the hemiplegic arm during yawning is rarely reported. The concurrence of CCD and PBO has never been described. A 52-year-old man had putaminal hemorrhage and demonstrated no significant recovery in his left hemiplegia after intensive rehabilitation, but his gait improved gradually. Two months after the stroke, the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed CCD. Four months after the stroke, the patient noticed PBO. The follow-up SPECT showed persistent CCD and the patient’s arm was still plegic. The frequency and intensity of PBO have increased with time since the stroke. We speculate that the two phenomena CCD and PBO might share similar neuroanatomical pathways and be valuable for predicting clinical recovery after stroke.

  9. Risk of Stroke in Patients With Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yuan; Yeh, Diana Yu-Wung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-04-01

    The association between spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) and stroke has not been reported, and this study aimed to explore this association. We used the National Health Insurance Research Database for conducting a nationwide, population-based, retrospective cohort study of patients newly hospitalized for SP from 2000 to 2010. A total of 2541 patients with newly diagnosed SP were included and compared with patients without SP. We observed that patients with SP were at higher risk for developing stroke, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.56. In addition, these patients had a significantly higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke (adjusted HR = 2.22) than of ischemic stroke (adjusted HR = 1.48). The risk of stroke was the highest in the initial 4 months after hospitalization for SP (adjusted HR = 3.41, 95% confidence interval = 1.98-5.87). In conclusion, our study revealed a correlation between stroke and a history of SP, and the risk of stroke after SP was time sensitive. PMID:27100423

  10. Comparing a diffusion tensor and non-tensor approach to white matter fiber tractography in chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Auriat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI-based tractography has been used to demonstrate functionally relevant differences in white matter pathway status after stroke. However, it is now known that the tensor model is insensitive to the complex fiber architectures found in the vast majority of voxels in the human brain. The inability to resolve intra-voxel fiber orientations may have important implications for the utility of standard DTI-based tract reconstruction methods. Intra-voxel fiber orientations can now be identified using novel, tensor-free approaches. Constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD is one approach to characterize intra-voxel diffusion behavior. In the current study, we performed DTI- and CSD-based tract reconstruction of the corticospinal tract (CST and corpus callosum (CC to test the hypothesis that characterization of complex fiber orientations may improve the robustness of fiber tract reconstruction and increase the sensitivity to identify functionally relevant white matter abnormalities in individuals with chronic stroke. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 27 chronic post-stroke participants and 12 healthy controls. Transcallosal pathways and the CST bilaterally were reconstructed using DTI- and CSD-based tractography. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, axial diffusivity (AD, and radial diffusivity (RD were calculated across the tracts of interest. The total number and volume of reconstructed tracts was also determined. Diffusion measures were compared between groups (Stroke, Control and methods (CSD, DTI. The relationship between post-stroke motor behavior and diffusion measures was evaluated. Overall, CSD methods identified more tracts than the DTI-based approach for both CC and CST pathways. Mean FA, ADC, and RD differed between DTI and CSD for CC-mediated tracts. In these tracts, we discovered a difference in FA for the CC between stroke and healthy control groups

  11. The exact science of stroke thrombolysis and the quiet art of patient selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balami, Joyce S; Hadley, Gina; Sutherland, Brad A; Karbalai, Hasneen; Buchan, Alastair M

    2013-12-01

    The science of metric-based patient stratification for intravenous thrombolysis, revolutionized by the landmark National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke trial, has transformed acute ischaemic stroke therapy. Recanalization of an occluded artery produces tissue reperfusion that unequivocally improves outcome and function in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. Recanalization can be achieved mainly through intravenous thrombolysis, but other methods such as intra-arterial thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy can also be employed. Strict guidelines preclude many patients from being treated by intravenous thrombolysis due to the associated risks. The quiet art of informed patient selection by careful assessment of patient baseline factors and brain imaging could increase the number of eligible patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis. Outside of the existing eligibility criteria, patients may fall into therapeutic 'grey areas' and should be evaluated on a case by case basis. Important factors to consider include time of onset, age, and baseline blood glucose, blood pressure, stroke severity (as measured by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) and computer tomography changes (as measured by Alberta Stroke Programme Early Computed Tomography Score). Patients with traditional contraindications such as wake-up stroke, malignancy or dementia may have the potential to receive benefit from intravenous thrombolysis if they have favourable predictors of outcome from both clinical and imaging criteria. A proportion of patients experience complications or do not respond to intravenous thrombolysis. In these patients, other endovascular therapies or a combination of both may be used to provide benefit. Although an evidence-based approach to intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke is pivotal, it is imperative to examine those who might benefit outside of protocol-driven practice. PMID:24038074

  12. Prevalence of microalbuminuria in patients with non-diabetic acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhara N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microalbuminuria has been associated with clinical risk factors for stroke like diabetes, hypertension, aging, history of myocardial infarction, obesity, smoking and left ventricular hypertrophy. The present study is aimed to determine the potential use of microalbuminurea, as a marker of stroke risk and its outcome in non-diabetic population. Methods: The present study was conducted in the department of internal medicine and department of neurology after the institutional ethical clearance and the informed consent from all the subjects. A total of 116 patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke presenting within 24 hours of stroke onset were recruited for the study. The microalbuminurea was assayed by immunoprecipitation. The stroke severity was assessed by NIH Stroke Severity Statistical Software Package. P value less than 0.05 was considered the level of significance. Results: There was graded co-relation between NIHSSS score and urine albumin creatinine ratio with significant P value of <0.001 in group A, but no such co-relation was seen in group B (P value 0.2. This suggests more the elevated urine ACR more the neurodefecit implying its utility as prognostic marker in acute ischemic stroke. Conclusion: Urine albumin excretion had the strongest correlation with the NIHSSS Score of the patient in acute ischemic stroke. Therefore, measurement of microalbuminurea may help to assess those who are at increased risk and to triage those who may need a more aggressive management protocol. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 954-957

  13. Stroke patient's experiences with Wii Sport® during inpatient rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celinder, Dora; Peoples, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Commercial virtual reality games have been used as adjunct therapy for stroke rehabilitation, mainly after patients have been discharged. The aim of this study was to explore stroke patients' experiences with Wii Sports® as a supplement to conventional occupational therapy in a...... controlled hospital setting. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study had a qualitative triangulation design that included semi-structured interviews and field notes. Nine Danish stroke patients participated, receiving between one and nine interventions with Wii Sports® during a three-week period. Responses were...... were confirmed by field notes that included observations of engagement and challenges. DISCUSSION: Stroke patients in hospital settings may experience Wii Sports® as a beneficial and challenging occupation for both rehabilitation and leisure. Incorporation of Wii Sports® into conventional occupational...

  14. Thrombolytics in acute ischaemic stroke: a guide to patient selection and optimum use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, H P

    2000-02-01

    Intravenously administered alteplase (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator; rtPA) is the only medical treatment that has been approved for the management of acute ischaemic stroke. Although rtPA has demonstrated efficacy in improving outcomes of patients with a wide range of neurological impairments, it cannot be given with impunity. Thrombolytic therapy is associated with a considerable risk of intracranial bleeding that is likely to be catastrophic. Careful selection of patients to treat and intensive ancillary care are the keys for successful administration of rtPA. An algorithm for selection is based on the interval from the onset of stroke, history of recent medical illnesses or use of medications, findings of the medical and neurological examinations and the results of laboratory and brain imaging studies. Because rtPA must be given within 3 hours of onset of stroke, most patients cannot be treated. Thus, additional therapies are needed for treatment of patients with acute ischaemic stroke. PMID:18034518

  15. Intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with left atrial myxoma with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Baburao Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT is an accepted therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting within 3-4.5 hours of symptom onset. Selection of the patient for thrombolysis depends on the careful assessment for the risk of post thrombolysis symptomatic haemorrhage (6.2-8.9% which may be fatal. Atrial myxomas which are the commonest tumors of the heart are associated with stroke due to tumor/clot embolism. There are very few case reports of IVT and its outcome in patients with atrial myxoma with stroke. Some have reported successful thrombolysis, while others have reported intracerebral bleeding. In this report we describe our experience of IVT in atrial myxoma patient with ischemic stroke and review the relevant literature.

  16. The value of serum mean platelet volume in ischaemic stroke patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of serum Mean Platelet Volume in acute ischaemic stroke patients. Method: The retrospective case-control study was conducted at Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital in Turkey and comprised record of patients of acute ischaemic stroke admitted to the Emergency Department between June 2010 and January 2012. The two groups were statistically compared using SPSS 18.0. Result: Overall, there were 482 stroke patients (Group 1) and 315 subjects as controls (Group 2). The median value in Group 1 was 9.0 (2.1) (fL), while in Group 2 it was 8.80 (2.4) (fL). The difference was statistically significant (Z=-2.80; p<0.05). Conclusion: Mean Platelet Volume increased in the stroke patients. (author)

  17. Effect of age on stroke prevention therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation: the atrial fibrillation investigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Walraven, Carl; Hart, Robert G; Connolly, Stuart;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke risk increases with age in patients who have nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. It is uncertain whether the efficacy of stroke prevention therapies in atrial fibrillation changes as patients age. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of age on the...... relative efficacy of oral anticoagulants (OAC) and antiplatelet (AP) therapy (including acetylsalicylic acid and triflusal) on ischemic stroke, serious bleeding, and vascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation. METHODS: This is an analysis of the Atrial Fibrillation Investigators database, which...... contains patient level-data from randomized trials of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. We used Cox regression models with age as a continuous variable that controlled for sex, year of randomization, and history of cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and congestive heart failure...

  18. Therapeutic implications of transesophageal echocardiography after transthoracic echocardiography on acute stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Tribolet de Abreu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Tiago Tribolet de Abreu, Sonia Mateus, Cecilia Carreteiro, Jose CorreiaLaboratorio de Ultrasonografia Cardiaca e Neurovascular, Hospital do Espirito Santo-Evora, E. P. E., PortugalBackground: The role of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE in the evaluation of acute stroke patients is still ill-defined. We conducted a prospective observational study to find the prevalence of TEE findings that indicate anticoagulation as beneficial, in acute ischemic stroke patients without indication for anticoagulation based on clinical, electrocardiographic and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE findings.Methods: We prospectively studied all patients referred to our laboratory for TTE and TEE. Patients were excluded if the diagnosis was not acute ischemic stroke or if they had an indication for anticoagulation based on clinical, electrocardiographic, or TTE data. Patients with TEE findings that might indicate anticoagulation as beneficial were identified.Results: A total of 84 patients with acute ischemic stroke and without indication for anticoagulation based on clinical and electrocardiographic or TTE data were included in the study. Findings indicating anticoagulation as beneficial were found in 32.1%: spontaneous echo contrast (1.2%, complex aortic atheroma (27.4%, thrombus (8.3%, and simultaneous patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm (2.4%.Conclusions: The results of our study show that TEE can have therapy implications in 32.1% of ischemic stroke patients in sinus rhythm and with TTE with no indication for anticoagulation.Keywords: acute ischemic stroke, transesophageal echocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, therapy

  19. [NDT-Bobath method used in the rehabilitation of patients with a history of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Kubsik, Anna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and disability in human. The vitally important problem after ischemic stroke is hemiparesis of the body. The most common methods used in improving the mobility of patients after ischemic stroke is a Bobath-NDT (Neuro-Developmental Treatment - Bobath), which initiated the Berta and Karel Bobath for children with cerebral palsy. It is a method designed to neurophysiological recovery of these vital functions that the patient was lost due to illness, and wants it back. PMID:23289255

  20. How is nursing care for stroke patients organised? Nurses' views on best praactices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Jette; Struwe, Jytte Holm; Baernholdt, Marianne;

    2013-01-01

    In the developed world, stroke is the third leading cause of death (DSFA 2009) In Denmark there are 12400 new patients every year and 30000 - 40000 people living with long-term after stroke. This group consists mainly of people aged 80 years and older. When these patients have a stroke their biol...... biological age and co-morbidities complicate their in-hospital stay and rehabilitation. Nevertheless with the right treatment and quality care these strok victims can experience good outcomes and regain their quality of life (Gosselin et al. 2008, Saposnik et al. 2009)...

  1. Baclofen for stroke patients with persistent hiccups: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Cuie; Zhang, Ruifen; Zhang, Shuangyan; Xu, Meiling; Zhang, Shuyan

    2014-01-01

    Background The results of preclinical studies suggest that baclofen may be useful in the treatment of stroke patients with persistent hiccups. This study was aimed to assess the possible efficacy of baclofen for the treatment of persistent hiccups after stroke. Methods In total, 30 stroke patients with persistent hiccups were randomly assigned to receive baclofen (n = 15) or a placebo (n = 15) in a double-blind, parallel-group trial. Participants in the baclofen group received 10 mg baclofen ...

  2. DEFINITION AND ANALYSIS OF MOTION ACTIVITY AFTER-STROKE PATIENT FROM THE VIDEO STREAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Katayev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an approach to the assessment of motion activity of man in after-stroke period, allowing the doctor to get new information to give a more informed recommendations on rehabilitation treatment than in traditional approaches. Consider description of the hardware-software complex for determination and analysis of motion activity after-stroke patient for the video stream. The article provides a description of the complex, its algorithmic filling and the results of the work on the example of processing of the actual data. The algorithms and technology to significantly accelerate the gait analysis and improve the quality of diagnostics post-stroke patients.

  3. Cardiovascular MRI in Detection and Measurement of Aortic Atheroma in Stroke/TIA patients

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, Theodore; Rippy, Ashley; Hyslop, W Brian; Hinderliter, Alan; Sen, Souvik

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic Atheroma (AoA) is an independent risk factor for new and recurrent stroke. AoA ulceration and mobility are associated with an increased risk for brain embolism. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for detection and measurement of AoA in stroke/TIA patients. Cardiovascular MRI (cMRI) could be an alternative, non-invasive imaging modality for stroke/TIA patients. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and correlation of AoA detected and ...

  4. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Pilot Study of D-Cycloserine in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Butler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the USA. Up to 60% of patients do not fully recover despite intensive physical therapy treatment. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA-R have been shown to play a role in synaptic plasticity when activated. D-Cycloserine promotes NMDA receptor function by binding to receptors with unoccupied glycine sites. These receptors are involved in learning and memory. We hypothesized that D-cycloserine, when combined with robotic-assisted physiotherapy (RAP, would result in greater gains compared with placebo + RAP in stroke survivors. Participants (n=14 were randomized to D-cycloserine plus RAP or placebo plus RAP. Functional, cognitive, and quality-of-life measures were used to assess recovery. There was significant improvement in grip strength of the affected hand within both groups from baseline to 3 weeks (95% confidence interval for mean change, 3.95 ± 2.96 to 4.90 ± 3.56 N for D-cycloserine and 5.72 ± 3.98 to 8.44 ± 4.90 N for control. SIS mood domain showed improvement for both groups (95% confidence interval for mean change, 72.6 ± 16.3 to 82.9 ± 10.9 for D-cycloserine and 82.9 ± 13.5 to 90.3 ± 9.9 for control. This preliminary study does not provide evidence that D-cycloserine can provide greater gains in learning compared with placebo for stroke survivors.

  5. Charlson comorbidity index as a predictor of in-hospital death in acute ischemic stroke among very old patients: a single-cohort perspective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsetti, Lorenzo; Viticchi, Giovanna; Tarquinio, Nicola; Silvestrini, Mauro; Capeci, William; Catozzo, Vania; Fioranelli, Agnese; Buratti, Laura; Pellegrini, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    Chronic diseases are increasing worldwide. Association of two or more chronic conditions is related with poor health status and reduced life expectancy, particularly among elderly patients. Comorbidities represent a risk factor for adverse events in several critical illnesses. We aimed to evaluate if elderly patients are affected by multiple chronic pathologies, assessed by Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), showed a reduced in-hospital survival after ischemic stroke. In a 3-year period, we evaluated all the subjects admitted to our internal medicine department for ischemic stroke. Age, sex, NIHSS score and all the comorbidities were recorded. Days of hospitalization, hospital-related infections and in-hospital mortality were also assessed. For each patient, we evaluated CCI, obtaining four classes: group 1 (CCI: 2-3), group 2 (CCI: 4-5), group 3 (CCI: 6-7) and group 4 (CCI: ≥8). Survival was evaluated with Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. The complete model considered in-hospital death as the main outcome, days of hospitalization as the time variable and CCI as the main predictor, adjusting for NIHSS, sex and nosocomial infections. Patients in CCI group 3 and 4 had an increased risk of in-hospital mortality, independently of NIHSS, sex and nosocomial infections. Elderly patients with multiple comorbidities have higher risk of in-hospital death when affected by ischemic stroke. PMID:27166707

  6. Usefulness of mean platelet volume for predicting stroke risk in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayar, Nermin; Arslan, Sakir; Cagirci, Goksel; Ureyen, Cagin Mustafa; Cay, Serkan; Yuksel, Isa Oner; Koklu, Erkan; Erkal, Zehra; Kucukseymen, Selcuk

    2015-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia in clinical practice. It is important to specify patients with a high risk of thromboembolus due to elevated procoagulant and prothrombotic state. The aim of this study is to assess the relation of stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA) with mean platelet volume (MPV), which is an indicator of platelet activation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Patients with PAF were enrolled in this study during years of 2012-2014. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of stroke/TIA. Demographic data were registered and CHA2DS2VASc scores of patients were calculated. It was investigated whether there was a difference among groups regarding MPV levels. Ninety patients, 31 of whom had history of stroke/TIA (symptomatic group), were enrolled to study. CHA2DS2VASc score of symptomatic group was 4.77 ± 1.26, while CHA2DS2VASc score of asymptomatic group was 2.63 ± 1.41. Nevertheless, there was not any difference regarding CHA2DS2VASc score among two groups when 2 points due to stroke/TIA were subtracted in symptomatic patients. MPV was detected higher in symptomatic patients than asymptomatic patients (11.1 ± 1.3 vs. 9.1 ± 1.0 fL, P operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to predict stroke/TIA was found to have a sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 78%. Elevated MPV levels were ascertained to be related with stroke/TIA in patients with PAF. Assessment of MPV apart from CHA2DS2VASc score in patients with PAF might be subsidiary to specify patients with an enhanced risk of stroke/TIA. PMID:26214705

  7. Effect of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy and Mirror Therapy for Patients With Subacute Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Jin A; Koo, Bon Il; Shin, Myung Jun; Shin, Yong Beom; Ko, Hyun-Yoon; Shin, Yong-Il

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and combined mirror therapy for inpatient rehabilitation of the patients with subacute stroke. Methods Twenty-six patients with subacute stroke were enrolled and randomly divided into three groups: CIMT combined with mirror therapy group, CIMT only group, and control group. Two weeks of CIMT for 6 hours a day with or without mirror therapy for 30 minutes a day were performed under supervision. All groups rec...

  8. Effects of visual feedback with a mirror on balance ability in patients with stroke

    OpenAIRE

    In, Tae-Sung; Cha, Yu-Ri; Jung, Jin-Hwa; Jung, Kyoung-Sim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of a visual feedback obtained from a mirror on balance ability during quiet standing in patients with stroke. [Subjects] Fifteen patients with stroke (9 males, 6 females) enrolled in the study. [Methods] Experimental trials (duration, 20s) included three visual conditions (eyes closed, eyes open, and mirror feedback) and two support surface conditions (stable, and unstable). Center of pressure (COP) displacements in the mediolateral and antero...

  9. The Influence of Laterality of Pharyngeal Bolus Passage on Dysphagia in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min Seok; Lee, Seong Jae; Kim, Tae Uk; Seo, Dong Hyuk; Hyun, Jung Keun; Kim, Jae Il

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate swallowing laterality in hemiplegic patients with stroke and recovery of dysphagia according to the laterality. Method The sample was comprised of 46 dysphagic patients with hemiplegia after their first stroke. The sample's videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) was reviewed. Swallowing laterality was determined by the anterior-posterior view of VFSS. We measured width difference of barium sulfate liquid flow in the pharyngoesophageal segment. If there was double o...

  10. Associating Factors Regarding Nasogastric Tube Removal in Patients With Dysphagia After Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Kyeong Woo; Lee, Sook Joung; Park, Jin Gee; Ri, Jae Won

    2014-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate associating factors regarding nasogastric tube (NGT) removal in patients with dysphagia after stroke. Methods This study is a retrospective medical chart review. Patients were divided into non-brain stem (NBS) and brain stem (BS) groups. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study was conducted until swallowing functions were recovered. Initial disease status was measured using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Risk f...

  11. Prediction of the prognosis of ischemic stroke patients after intravenous thrombolysis using artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun-An; Lin, Yi-Ching; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2014-01-01

    In general, around 80% of all strokes are ischemic. Take caring of the patients who have suffered an ischemic stroke is both expensive and time consuming. It is known that thrombolysis in patients with ischemic stroke can reduce the disability and increase the survival rate, however some patients still have poor outcomes. Therefore, to be able to predict the outcome of ischemic stroke patients after intravenous thrombolysis would be useful while making clinical decisions. In this study, we collected retrospective data of 82 ischemic stroke patients who received intravenous thrombolysis from July 2005 to June 2012 in Tri-service General Hospital. Of these patients, 10 died within 3 months, and only 36 patients made a good recovery. We used STATISTICA 10 software to select the best artificial neural network. The parameters of model 1 were age, blood sugar, onset to treatment time, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, dense cerebral artery sign, and old stroke to predict 3-month outcomes. The parameters of model 2 were age, onset to treatment time, NIHSS score, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes and old stroke to predict the 3-month prognosis. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for model 1 were 77.78%, 80.43% and 79.27%, respectively, and 94.44%, 95.65% and 95.12%, respectively, for model 2. Artificial neural networks are used to establish prediction models with good performance to predict thrombolysis outcomes. These models may be able to help physicians to discuss and explain the likely outcomes to patients and their families before thrombolysis treatment. PMID:25000029

  12. An International Standard Set of Patient-Centered Outcome Measures After Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Joel; Sprinkhuizen, Sara M.; Ackerson, Teri; Bernhardt, Julie; Davie, Charlie; George, Mary G.; Gething, Stephanie; Kelly, Adam G.; Lindsay, Patrice; Liu, Liping; Martins, Sheila C.O.; Morgan, Louise; Norrving, Bo; Ribbers, Gerard M.; Silver, Frank L.; Smith, Eric E.; Williams, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Value-based health care aims to bring together patients and health systems to maximize the ratio of quality over cost. To enable assessment of healthcare value in stroke management, an international standard set of patient-centered stroke outcome measures was defined for use in a variety of healthcare settings. Methods— A modified Delphi process was implemented with an international expert panel representing patients, advocates, and clinical specialists in stroke outcomes, stroke registers, global health, epidemiology, and rehabilitation to reach consensus on the preferred outcome measures, included populations, and baseline risk adjustment variables. Results— Patients presenting to a hospital with ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage were selected as the target population for these recommendations, with the inclusion of transient ischemic attacks optional. Outcome categories recommended for assessment were survival and disease control, acute complications, and patient-reported outcomes. Patient-reported outcomes proposed for assessment at 90 days were pain, mood, feeding, selfcare, mobility, communication, cognitive functioning, social participation, ability to return to usual activities, and health-related quality of life, with mobility, feeding, selfcare, and communication also collected at discharge. One instrument was able to collect most patient-reported subdomains (9/16, 56%). Minimum data collection for risk adjustment included patient demographics, premorbid functioning, stroke type and severity, vascular and systemic risk factors, and specific treatment/care-related factors. Conclusions— A consensus stroke measure Standard Set was developed as a simple, pragmatic method to increase the value of stroke care. The set should be validated in practice when used for monitoring and comparisons across different care settings. PMID:26604251

  13. Effects of Hippotherapy on Recovery of Gait and Balance Ability in Patients with Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chae-Woo; Kim, Seong Gil; Yong, Min Sik

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the the effects of hippotherapy on gait and balance ability in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were randomly divided into a hippotherapy group and a treadmill group and they conducted exercise for eight weeks. [Results] Berg Balance Scale score, gait velocity, and step length asymmetry ratio were significantly improved in the group receiving hippotherapy training. However, in the group receiving treadmill train...

  14. Verticality Perceptions Associate with Postural Control and Functionality in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Baggio, Jussara A. O.; Mazin, Suleimy S. C.; Alessio-Alves, Frederico F.; Barros, Camila G. C.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Leite, João P.; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M.; Santos-Pontelli, Taiza E. G.

    2016-01-01

    Deficits of postural control and perceptions of verticality are disabling problems observed in stroke patients that have been recently correlated to each other. However, there is no evidence in the literature confirming this relationship with quantitative posturography analysis. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were to analyze the relationship between Subjective Postural Vertical (SPV) and Haptic Vertical (HV) with posturography and functionality in stroke patients. We included ...

  15. Effect of computerized cognitive rehabilitation program on cognitive function and activities of living in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Chanuk; Yong, Mi-hyun; Chung, Jaeyeop; Yang, YeongAe

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effect of cognitive rehabilitation using a computer on cognitive function and activities of daily living in stroke patients presenting impairment of cognitive function. [Subjects] Forty-six stroke patients were divided into two groups (a training group and control group) through random assignment. [Methods] The training group received rehabilitation therapy and an additional computerized cognitive rehabilitation program using The RehaCo...

  16. Correlation of knee proprioception with muscle strength and spasticity in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jin-Mo; Kim, Suhn-yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of knee proprioception with muscle strength and spasticity in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 31 stroke patients. The subjects received an explanation of the procedures and methods and provided informed consent before the experiment. A measurement board was used to determine the the proprioception deficit of the knee as a proprioception test. The proprioception test consisted of a passive and act...

  17. The role of clinical pathway on the outcomes of ischemic stroke patients at Bethesda Hospital Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Diana Alexandra, Iwan Dwiprahasto, Rizaldy Pinzon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Stroke becomes world health problem all over the world because it is the causal factor of high mortality and disability. Good and well-organized process of healthcare service will improve the outcome of the patients with stroke. Clinical pathway may be used as clear standard to help reduce unnecessary variations of medical treatment and measure. The study aimed at finding out the correlation between the use of clinical pathway and the outcome of the patients with ischemic stroke in Bethesda Hospital Yogyakarta. It was an observational and analytic study with cohort restorative study design. The author compared the outcomes of acute ischemic stroke between the group with clinical pathway and the group without the clinical pathway. Data was collected using consecutive sampling from the electronic registry and medical record data of the patients from January 1st, 2011 to December 31st, 2011. It was conducted to 124 patients with ischemic stroke assigned to two groups (the first groups of 62 patients with clinical pathway and the second groups of 62 patients without clinical pathway. The basic characteristics of the two groups were the same. The results of the analysis showed that there was a significant decrease in the incidence of complication and a significant increase in the use of antiplatelete drugs, antidiabetic drugs and statin as secondary preventive measure of the recurrent stroke. There was not any significant difference in the duration of the hospitalized healthcare, the financing and the mortality between the two observation groups. The study indicated that the use of the clinical pathway in the stroke treatment improved the outcome of the patients with stroke. It was necessary to conduct further study to evaluate the effectiveness of the clinical pathway in improving the outcome of the patients with bigger number of the subjects and the longer period of time.

  18. Comparison of quality of life according to community walking in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Eunkyoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the quality of life of stroke patients according to their degree of community walking. [Subjects] This study utilized raw data from the sixth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted in 2013 by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The subjects were noninstitutionalized stroke patients (n = 71) diagnosed by a doctor. [Methods] Trained surveyors visited households selected for the sample and conducted face-t...

  19. Correlation between vitamin D and lipid profile in patients with ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Richa Giri; Rohit Rai; Rajendra Kumar Verma; Shivendra Verma

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum vitamin D level and lipid profile in ischemic stroke patients. Methods: 217 patients with ischemic stroke were selected for analysis between ages 45 and 80 years admitted at our hospital from January 2014 to December 2015. Measurement of serum vitamin-D concentration was made by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Confounding variables like diabetes, hypertension, smoking, alcohol, tobacco, BMI, CRP, S. uric acid...

  20. Quality of life of elderly ischaemic stroke patients one year after thrombolytic therapy. A comparison between patients with and without thrombolytic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    de Weerd Leonie; Luijckx Gert-Jan R; Groenier Klaas H; Van der Meer Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background An observational study to examine whether thrombolytic therapy in stroke patients realizes better quality of life outcomes compared to patients without thrombolytic therapy one year after stroke. We also examined whether daily functioning, mental functioning and activities improved after thrombolytic treatment. Methods A total of 88 stroke patients were interviewed at home one year post-stroke. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was assessed using the RAND-36, disabili...

  1. Reduction in Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) Results in an Increased Risk of Spontaneous Hemorrhagic Transformation in Patients with Large-artery Atherosclerosis Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bian; Wang, Deren; Hao, Zilong; Li, Dan; Zhang, Junhuai; Liu, Junfeng; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The association between chronic kidney disease and spontaneous hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke is seldom reported. We performed this study to identify whether reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is associated with spontaneous HT in acute ischemic stroke patients, and examine whether the association depends on stroke etiology. Patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke whose serum creatinine levels at admission were available were consecutively and prospectively enrolled in the Chengdu Stroke Registry Database. All were analyzed on admission by cranial computed tomography (CT) scanning, followed by regular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 2-3 days later and afterwards CT scan if neurological symptoms deteriorated. HT was defined based on the MRI or later CT, and eGFR was calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were performed to determine whether reduced eGFR, defined as < 60 ml/min/1.73m2, was associated with spontaneous HT. The association was also assessed in subgroups of patients classified according to the criteria of the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST). Of the 1,645 patients enrolled, 123 (7.5%) developed spontaneous HT and 215 (13.1%) had reduced eGFR. Reduced eGFR was significantly associated with increased risk of spontaneous HT in all ischemic stroke patients (OR 1.821, 95% CI 1.081 to 3.06, P=0.024), and in the subgroup of large artery atherosclerosis, not in the cardio-embolism stroke group (OR 1.588, 95% CI 0.642 to 3.782, P=0.327). Reduced eGFR did not increase the risk of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation (OR 0.937, 95%CI 0.247 to 3.577, P=0.924). In conclusion, reduced eGFR was significantly associated with increased risk of spontaneous HT in all ischemic stroke patients, and in large artery atherosclerosis, not in cardio-embolism stroke. Reduced eGFR did not increase the risk of

  2. Patient concerns regarding chronic hepatitis C infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuk, G Y; Gutkin, A; Wong, S G; Kaita, K D E

    2005-01-01

    Counselling of patients with chronic hepatitis C infections is often limited to discussions regarding how the virus is transmitted and what can be done to decrease the risk of transmission to others. The purpose of the present study was to document the principal concerns of newly diagnosed and follow-up patients with chronic hepatitis C, and thereby enhance counselling strategies and content. Seventy newly diagnosed and 115 follow-up patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were initially asked in an open-ended manner (volunteered concerns) and then to prioritize from a prepared list of seven potential concerns (prioritized concerns), to identify those concerns that were of utmost importance to them. The most common volunteered concerns of newly diagnosed patients in decreasing order were: disease progression (27%), premature death (19%), infecting family members (13%), side-effects of treatment (11%) and miscellaneous others. In decreasing order, prioritized concerns included: infecting family members, development of liver cancer, infecting others, development of cirrhosis, social stigma of having liver disease, need for liver transplant and loss of employment. The principal volunteered and prioritized concerns of follow-up patients were similar to those of newly diagnosed patients. Volunteered and prioritized concerns were relatively consistent across the different genders, age groups, ethnic backgrounds, education level, marital status, employment, modes of viral acquisition and in the case of follow-up patients, duration of follow-up. These results indicate that health care providers who focus counselling efforts exclusively on viral transmission are unlikely to address other important concerns of newly diagnosed and follow-up patients with chronic HCV infection. PMID:15655048

  3. Malnutrition in patients with chronic renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Abdul Rashid Tony

    2000-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is common in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) and may contribute to a poor clinical outcome. However, the role of nutrition in this regard has not been clearly defined. Malnutrition in patients with CRF may have many causes, including disturbances in protein and energy metabolism, hormonal derangements, as well as low food intake because of anorexia, caused by uremic toxicity, various superimposed illnesses and psychosocial problems. Alth...

  4. The unexpected force of acute stroke leading to patients' sudden death as described by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejnö, Åsa; Danielson, Ella; von Post, Iréne

    2013-03-01

    Stroke occurs suddenly and unexpectedly and its consequences can mean the difference between life and death. Research into stroke is extensive but largely focused on patients who survive. The aim of the study was to describe how nurses experience the patient's death and dying, when patients are afflicted by acute stroke and whose lives cannot be saved. The study had a descriptive design with a hermeneutical approach. Interviews were carried out with ten nurses in stroke units at three hospitals. Data were interpreted using hermeneutic textual interpretation based on Gadamer's philosophy. The study shows that sudden death, when unexpected forces intervene in the lives of patients afflicted by acute stroke, was described by the main theme sudden death - the unexpected force and the following three sub-themes: death comes unexpectedly and without warning to the patient; the relatives are at the mercy of the unexpected and the nurses find themselves in demanding situations. The new understanding emphasizes that the unexpected and demanding situations the nurses are put in can be understood as ethical dilemmas and value conflicts because they are not free to give their time to preserving the dying patient's dignity and are not able to give the good care they wish to. A more flexible organization could support the nurses in making use of the creative forces in the unexpected event which an acute stroke that leads to death constitutes. PMID:22612457

  5. Acupuncture Enhances Effective Connectivity between Cerebellum and Primary Sensorimotor Cortex in Patients with Stable Recovery Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijing Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that stimulation of acupuncture at motor-implicated acupoints modulates activities of brain areas relevant to the processing of motor functions. This study aims to investigate acupuncture-induced changes in effective connectivity among motor areas in hemiparetic stroke patients by using the multivariate Granger causal analysis. A total of 9 stable recovery stroke patients and 8 healthy controls were recruited and underwent three runs of fMRI scan: passive finger movements and resting state before and after manual acupuncture stimuli. Stroke patients showed significantly attenuated effective connectivity between cortical and subcortical areas during passive motor task, which indicates inefficient information transmissions between cortical and subcortical motor-related regions. Acupuncture at motor-implicated acupoints showed specific modulations of motor-related network in stroke patients relative to healthy control subjects. This specific modulation enhanced bidirectionally effective connectivity between the cerebellum and primary sensorimotor cortex in stroke patients, which may compensate for the attenuated effective connectivity between cortical and subcortical areas during passive motor task and, consequently, contribute to improvement of movement coordination and motor learning in subacute stroke patients. Our results suggested that further efficacy studies of acupuncture in motor recovery can focus on the improvement of movement coordination and motor learning during motor rehabilitation.

  6. Dietary habits in patients with ischemic stroke: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rodríguez-Campello

    Full Text Available Diet appears to have some role in stroke development. The objective of our study was to describe the dietary habits in patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke and compare selected dietary components with healthy controls. Adherence to healthy diet behaviors was also assessed.A case-control study of consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the Neurology Department of Hospital del Mar from 2007 to 2010. Patients were matched by age and sex with control subjects. A previously validated nutritional survey was administered to patients and controls. Demographic data, vascular risk factors, caloric intake and dietary nutrients were evaluated. Intention to follow a healthy diet was also assessed in both groups.A total of 300 acute ischemic stroke patients and 300 controls with evaluation of dietary habits. No differences were observed in vascular risk factors, except smoking habit, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. Stroke patients reported a higher caloric intake: 2444.8(1736.8-3244.5 vs 2208.7(1753.1-2860.7 Kcal, p = 0.001. After adjusting for energy intake, patients had higher intake of proteins (p<0.001; OR 1.02, total cholesterol (p = 0.001; OR 1.04, and breaded foods (p = 0.001; OR 1.94 and lower consumption of probiotic yogurt (p = 0.002; OR 0.88. Compared to patients, control participants indicated greater intention to eat vegetables (p = 0.002; OR 1.5 and whole foods (p = 0.000; OR 2.4 and reduce their intake of salt (p = 0.002; OR 1.7, fat (p = 0.000; OR 3.7 and sweets (p = 0.004; OR 1.7 than patients.We observed different dietary patterns between stroke patients and controls. Stroke patients have a higher caloric intake and are less concerned about maintaining healthy nutritional habits.

  7. Motor function improvement with mirror therapy in stroke patients: a CAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Aguilera Eguía

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Stroke comprises several conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function. A large percentage of individuals who survive stroke will have limb motor sequelae. Aim To assess the validity and applicability of the results regarding the effectiveness of mirror therapy in patients with stroke and answer the following question: In stroke subjects, can mirror therapy improve motor function? Method We analyzed the article "Mirror therapy for improving motor function after stroke," Cochrane Systematic Review [Thieme 20121]. Results Mirror therapy may increase motor function between the second and sixth week of intervention, with a standardized mean difference (SMD of 0.61 (95% CI 0.22-1.00. Conclusion Despite methodological limitations of the primary studies included in the systematic review, we found that mirror therapy is a reasonable adjunct to standard therapy by physiotherapists.

  8. Robot-assisted reaching exercise promotes arm movement recovery in chronic hemiparetic stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymer W Zev

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Providing active assistance to complete desired arm movements is a common technique in upper extremity rehabilitation after stroke. Such active assistance may improve recovery by affecting somatosensory input, motor planning, spasticity or soft tissue properties, but it is labor intensive and has not been validated in controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of robotically administered active-assistive exercise and compare those with free reaching voluntary exercise in improving arm movement ability after chronic stroke. Methods Nineteen individuals at least one year post-stroke were randomized into one of two groups. One group performed 24 sessions of active-assistive reaching exercise with a simple robotic device, while a second group performed a task-matched amount of unassisted reaching. The main outcome measures were range and speed of supported arm movement, range, straightness and smoothness of unsupported reaching, and the Rancho Los Amigos Functional Test of Upper Extremity Function. Results and discussion There were significant improvements with training for range of motion and velocity of supported reaching, straightness of unsupported reaching, and functional movement ability. These improvements were not significantly different between the two training groups. The group that performed unassisted reaching exercise improved the smoothness of their reaching movements more than the robot-assisted group. Conclusion Improvements with both forms of exercise confirmed that repeated, task-related voluntary activation of the damaged motor system is a key stimulus to motor recovery following chronic stroke. Robotically assisting in reaching successfully improved arm movement ability, although it did not provide any detectable, additional value beyond the movement practice that occurred concurrently with it. The inability to detect any additional value of robot-assisted reaching

  9. Diagnosis of hemodynamic compromise in patients with chronic cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests using 133Xe inhalation method and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with acetazolamide (Diamox) were performed in 23 patients with chronic cerebral ischemia, before and after extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery or carotid-endarterectomy. All patients complained of TIA, RIND, or minor completed stroke. Cerebral angiography demonstrated severe stenosis or occlusion in the ipsilateral internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with 133Xe SPECT, and was measured 15 minutes after intravenous administration of 10-12 mg/kg Diamox, which is known as a cerebral vasodilatory agent (Diamox test). Our results revealed that all patients could be divided into four types according to their resting rCBF and Diamox reactivity. The patients who had normal resting rCBF and normal Diamox reactivity (type 1) were considered to have well-developed collateral circulation and normal cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in spite of severe occlusive lesions in the carotid system. Moderate vasodilation due to reduced CPP was considered to occur in patients who had normal resting rCBF and decreased Diamox reactivity (type 2). The resting rCBF remained unchanged, but Diamox reactivity improved to normal after surgery in the patients of type 2, which indicated the improvement of CPP and the resolution of the autoregulatory vasodilation. Maximum vasodilation or dysautoregulation was considered to occur due to the inadequate collateral flow and the severely reduced CPP in patients whose findings revealed decrease in the resting rCBF and impaired Diamox reactivity (type 3). Remarkable improvement was seen in both resting rCBF and Diamox reactivity after surgery in the patients of type 3. In the patients who had decreased resting rCBF and normal Diamox reactivity (type 4), the decreased resting rCBF was considered to result from the reduction in metabolic demand because of irreversible ischemic neuronal damage. (J.P.N.)

  10. Neck proprioceptive training for balance function in patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Oh, Duck-Won

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of neck proprioceptive training on the balance of patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis. [Subjects] Three patients with chronic stroke were recruited for this study. [Methods] The subjects underwent neck proprioceptive training using the red light of a laser pointer (30 min daily, five times per week for 4 weeks). Outcome measures included the stability and weight distribution indices measured with a Tetrax system and Timed Up and Go (TUG) and proprioception tests. [Results] For all subjects, the stability and weight distribution indices increased by 1.87-9.66% in the eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions, and the TUG and proprioception test scores improved by 2.49-15.27%. [Conclusion] Neck proprioceptive training may be a good option for improving the balance function of patients with chronic poststroke hemiparesis. PMID:25364136

  11. Novel Diagnostic and Monitoring Tools in Stroke: an Individualized Patient-Centered Precision Medicine Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, Sulette; Swanepoel, Albe; Bester, Janette; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2016-05-01

    Central to the pathogenesis of ischaemic stroke are the normally protective processes of platelet adhesion and activation. Experimental evidence has shown that the ligand-receptor interactions in ischaemic stroke represent a thrombo-inflammatory cascade, which presents research opportunities into new treatment. However, as anti-platelet drugs have the potential to cause severe side effects in ischaemic stroke patients (as well as other vascular disease patients), it is important to carefully monitor the risk of bleeding and risk of thrombus in patients receiving treatment. Because thrombo-embolic ischaemic stroke is a major health issue, we suggest that the answer to adequate treatment is based on an individualized patient-centered approach, inline with the latest NIH precision medicine approach. A combination of viscoelastic methodologies may be used in a personalized patient-centered regime, including thromboelastography (TEG®) and the lesser used scanning electron microscopy approach (SEM). Thromboelastography provides a dynamic measure of clot formation, strength, and lysis, whereas SEM is a visual structural tool to study patient fibrin structure in great detail. Therefore, we consider the evidence for TEG® and SEM as unique means to confirm stroke diagnosis, screen at-risk patients, and monitor treatment efficacy. Here we argue that the current approach to stroke treatment needs to be restructured and new innovative thought patterns need to be applied, as even approved therapies require close patient monitoring to determine efficacy, match treatment regimens to each patient's individual needs, and assess the risk of dangerous adverse effects. TEG® and SEM have the potential to be a useful tool and could potentially alter the clinical approach to managing ischaemic stroke. As envisaged in the NIH precision medicine approach, this will involve a number of role players and innovative new research ideas, with benefits that will ultimately only be realized in a

  12. [Efficacy and safety of selective estrogen receptor modulators in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators(SERMs)have beneficial effects on the improvement of bone mineral density of the spine and hip, and decrease the vertebral fracture in postmenopausal women. Similar to patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, including dialysis patients, however, SERMs cannot decrease the risk of hip fracture, which is extremely high in Japanese dialysis patients. One of the most important disadvantages of SERMs is an increase in the risk of venous thromboembolic events and fatal stroke in high-risk groups of the Framingham Stroke Risk Score. On the other hand, SERMs may be used in unique osteoporosis drugs for reducing the incidence and progression of breast cancer. Moreover, SERMs attenuate oxidative stress and may lessen the deterioration of kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease. The evidences for the efficacy and safety of SERMs in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease are insufficient, and knowledge concerning the selection and indication of osteoporosis drugs for those patients need to be developed. PMID:27561348

  13. Resistive Index Analysis Using Doppler Ultrasonography in Patients with Acute Stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Hui Joong; Jeong, Han Young; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Yong Sun [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of resistive index using carotid Doppler sonography for understanding hemodynamics in acute stroke patients. We retrospectively reviewed Doppler sonography in 97 acute stroke patients and 235 asymptomatic patients. We compared the resistive index between the ipsilateral and contralateral internal carotid arteries, and analyzed the relationship between the degree of stenosis and the resistive index of the internal carotid artery using linear regression analysis. We divided our patients into two groups according to the ASPECT score (7 and more and less than 7) determined from diffusion and T2 weighted images. Then we analyzed the difference of Doppler sonographic parameters between these two groups (independent t test). The resistive indices of both the ipsilateral internal carotid arteries of the acute stroke patients and the arteries of the asymptomatic patients showed a positive correlation with their respective degrees of stenosis (R2 = 0.127, p < 0.001: R2 = 0.046, p < 0.001, respectively). However, the resistive index of the contralateral internal carotid arteries was not correlated with their degree of stenosis (R2 = 0.016, p = 0.215). The resistive index of the ipsilateral internal carotid arteries in the acute stroke patients was significantly higher in the patients with ASPECT more than 7 than those with ASPECT score less than 7 (p = 0.002). Evaluation of the resistive index of the internal carotid arteries in acute stroke patients may be useful for understanding the cerebral hemodynamics

  14. Activation timing patterns of the abdominal and leg muscles during the sit-to-stand movement in individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Tae-Heon; Choi, Jong-Duk; Lee, Nam-Gi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the activation timing patterns of abdominal and leg muscles during the sit-to-stand movement in individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects] Twenty adults with chronic hemiparetic stroke participated in this study. [Methods] Subjects performed five sit-to-stand movements at a self-selected velocity without using their hands. Surface electromyography was used to measure the reaction time of the bilateral transverse abdominis/inter...

  15. Quantitative videofluoroscopic analysis of penetration-aspiration in post-stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingjie Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Dysphagia is a common complication of stroke and is a potential cause for aspiration and malnutrition and is also associated with poor outcome. Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study (VFSS is the most objective method for evaluation of swallowing disorders. Aim : To investigate the incidence and characteristics of penetration-aspiration in post-stroke patients, and to study the relationship between penetration-aspiration and kinematic parameters of swallow. Materials and Methods : We prospectively studied swallowing function in 105 consecutive post-stroke patients and 100 normal adults by videofluoroscopic swallowing studies. The severity of airway invasion, penetration-aspiration, was studied quantitatively and kinematic parameters of swallow i.e. oral transit time, pharyngeal transit time (PTT, pharyngeal delay timem (PDT, maximal extent of vertical and anterior movement of larynx and hyoid bone for four kinds of boluses were also studied. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association between aspiration and kinematic parameters of swallow. Results : Stroke patients scored significantly higher scores on penetration-aspiration scale than the normal subjects (P < 0.001 during four bolus swallows. Logistic regression analysis showed that PTT, PDT, maximal extent of vertical laryngeal and hyoid movement were statistically associated with the prevalence of aspiration (P < 0.05. Conclusion : Penetration-aspiration is common in stroke patients. Several kinematic parameters of swallow are associated with the presence of aspiration on fluoroscopy. These data demonstrate that VFSS may be helpful for objective identification of dysphagia in stroke patients.

  16. Predictors of pneumonia in acute stroke in patients in an emergency unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara R. M. Almeida

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the risk factors and comorbid conditions associated with the development of pneumonia in patients with acute stroke. To determine the independent predictors of pneumonia. Method Retrospective study from July to December 2011. We reviewed all medical charts with diagnosis of stroke. Results 159 patients (18-90 years were admitted. Prevalence of pneumonia was 32%. Pneumonia was more frequent in patients with hemorrhagic stroke (OR: 4.36; 95%CI: 1.9-10.01, p < 0.001, higher National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS (p = 0.047 and, lower Glasgow Coma Score (GCS (p < 0.0001. Patients with pneumonia had longer hospitalization (p < 0.0001. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified NIHSS as an independent predictor of pneumonia (95%CI: 1.049-1.246, p = 0.002. Conclusion Pneumonia was associated with severity and type of stroke and length of hospital stay. The severity of the deficit as evaluated by the NIHSS was shown to be the only independent risk factor for pneumonia in acute stroke patients.

  17. Oxidative stress in post-acute ischemic stroke patients after intensive neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancarelli, Irene; De Amicis, Daniela; Di Massimo, Caterina; Carolei, Antonio; Ciancarelli, Maria Giuliana Tozzi

    2012-11-01

    We investigated in post-acute ischemic stroke patients the influence of intensive neurorehabilitation on oxidative stress balance during recovery of neurological deficits. For this purpose, fourteen patients were included in the study within 30 days of stroke onset. Outcome measures were the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), the Barthel Index, and the Katz Index. Redox balance was assessed by measuring plasma peroxidative by-products, nitrite/nitrate metabolites (NOx), as an index of nitric oxide (NO), Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (Cu/Zn SOD) activity, serum urate concentration, autoantibodies against ox-LDL (OLAB) serum level and plasma antioxidant capacity. Assessments were made before and after neurorehabilitation. Fifteen apparently healthy controls were investigated to compare redox markers. Intensive neurorehabilitation was associated with an improvement of all the outcome measures (P Changes observed before and after neurorehabilitation in NIHSS scores (Δ NIHSS scores) and in plasma NOx amount (Δ NOx) correlated positively (r=0.79; P concentrations were found between stroke patients and controls, before and after neurorehabilitation. Total plasma antioxidant capacity, lower in stroke patients than in controls before neurorehabilitation, was unchanged thereafter. Our data provide evidence of the effectiveness of neurorehabilitation on reducing redox unbalance in stroke patients and hints the role of NO as a messenger involved in post-ischemic neuronal plasticity influencing recovery of neurological deficits. PMID:22873723

  18. Impact of a Pilot Intervention to Increase Physician-Patient Communication About Stroke Risk in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Pamela A; Prabandari, Yayi S; Burfeind, Chelsea; Lefebvre, R Craig; LaBresh, Kenneth A

    2016-12-01

    In Indonesia, where stroke is the leading cause of death, we designed and tested a brief intervention to increase physician-patient conversations about stroke prevention in community health centers. The pilot study used a quasi-experimental design involving repeated cross-sectional data collection over 15 weeks to compare pre- and during-intervention differences within four centers. We conducted exit interviews with 675 patients immediately following their medical appointments to assess whether physicians discussed stroke risks and provided recommendations to modify their risk behaviors. From pre-intervention to during intervention, patients reported more frequent physician recommendations to modify their stroke risk behaviors. We also conducted interviews with eight providers (physicians and nurses) after the intervention to get their feedback on its implementation. This study demonstrated that a brief intervention to motivate physician-patient conversations about stroke prevention may improve these conversations in community health centers. While interventions to reduce risk hold considerable promise for reducing stroke burden, barriers to physician-patient conversations identified through this study need to be addressed. PMID:27055106

  19. Psychosocial interventions for patients with chronic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deter Hans-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treatment of patients with chronic diseases will be one of the main challenges of medicine in the future. This paper presents an overview of different origins, mechanism, and symptoms necessary for understanding new and different interventions that include a psychosomatic view. In a psychosomatic therapeutic intervention there are very different targets, such as psychological symptoms, personality traits, attitudes toward disease and life, risk behaviour, and social isolation and as biological targets the change of autonomic imbalance and of the effects of the psycho-endocrinological or psycho-immunological stress responses. And there are also different psychosomatic measures that influence the individual biological, psychological and sociological targets. There is a need to give different answer to different questions in the field of psychosomatic and behavioral medicine. Comparative effectiveness research is an important strategy for solving some methodological issues. What is the target of treatment for different diseases: Symptom reduction, healing, or limiting progression to the worst case - the death of patients. We know that, the patient-physician relationship is important for every medical/therapeutic action for patients with chronic diseases. This volume of BioPsychoSocial Medicine will present four different psychosomatic treatment studies from the clinical field in the sense of phase 2 studies: Reports of patients with obesity, anorexia nervosa, chronic somatoform pain and coronary artery disease were presented

  20. Determinants of outcome in patients eligible for thrombolysis for ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Valeria; Paciaroni, Maurizio; Venti, Michele; Palmerini, Francesco; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Milia, Paolo; Biagini, Sergio; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Eligibility criteria for thrombolysis in ischemic stroke have been clearly defined. However, not all eligible patients benefit from this treatment. This study aimed to assess the determinants for clinical outcome in consecutive, eligible patients with ischemic stroke treated with thrombolysis in a single-center study. Methods Consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were treated with tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) following the established eligibility National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and European Stroke Initiative (EUSI) criteria. Risk factors including blood pressure and pre-treatment glycemia were properly managed. Death and disability at 3 months were the study outcomes. Disability was evaluated by the Rankin-scale. Favorable outcome was defined as 0–2 and adverse outcome as 3–6 including death. Results Seventy-eight patients were included in the study in a single stroke unit. The mean age was 70.9 ± 13.2 years (range 36–94). Follow-up at 3 months was completed in 73 patients. A favorable outcome was observed in 37 patients (50%) and adverse outcome in 36 (36%). Nine patients (12.3%) died within 3 months. The presence of an occluded carotid artery was a strong predictor for adverse outcome (p < 0.0001). A low NIH Stroke Scale-Score (NIHSS) at admission was a associated with a favorable outcome, while history of diabetes mellitus led to an unfavorable outcome. Conclusion Among patients eligible for thrombolysis, many do not benefit from this treatment. These include patients with carotid occlusion and diabetes. PMID:18078026

  1. Subtotal Gastrectomy With Billroth II Anastomosis Is Associated With a Low Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Peptic Ulcer Disease Patients: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Duodenal diversion can ameliorate lipid and glucose metabolism. We assessed the risk of stroke after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth II anastomosis (SGBIIA) in peptic ulcer disease (PUD).We identified 6425 patients who received SGBIIA for PUD between 1998 and 2010 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database as the study cohort; we frequency-matched them with 25,602 randomly selected controls from the PUD population who did not receive SGBIIA according to age, sex, index year, and comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and obesity. All patients were followed until the end of 2011 to determine the incidence of stroke.The incidence of stroke was lower in patients in the SGBIIA cohort than in those in the non-SGBIIA cohort (18.9 vs 22.9 per 1000 person-years, adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72-0.89, P < 0.001). The risk of ischemic stroke (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69-0.86, P < 0.001), rather than hemorrhagic stroke (aHR 1.00, 95% CI 0.78-1.28), was lower for the SGBIIA cohort than for the non-SGBIIA cohort according to the multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was lower in men (aHR 0.77, 95% CI 0.69-0.86) than in women (aHR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65-0.99) and in patients aged ≥65 years (aHR 0.72, 95% CI 0.63-0.81) than in those of other age groups (≤49 years, aHR 0.82, 95% CI 0.48-1.39; 50-64 years, aHR 1.01, 95% CI 0.79-1.28). The relative risk of ischemic stroke after SGBIIA was also reduced in patients with comorbidities (aHR 0.84, 5% CI 0.75-0.95) rather than in those without comorbidities (aHR 0.81, 95% CI 0.59-1.12).SGBIIA is associated with a low risk of ischemic stroke for PUD patients, and its protective effect is prominent in men, patients aged ≥65 years, and those with comorbidities

  2. Effects of DRG-based hospital payment in Poland on treatment of patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrov, Victor; Staszewska-Bystrova, Anna; Rutkowski, Daniel; Hermanowski, Tomasz

    2015-08-01

    A prospective payment system based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) presents strong financial incentives to healthcare providers. These incentives may have intended as well as unintended consequences for the healthcare system. In this paper we use administrative data on stroke admissions to Polish hospitals in order to demonstrate the response of hospitals to the incentives embedded in the design of stroke-related groups in Poland. The design was intended to motivate hospitals for the development of specialized stroke units by paying significantly higher tariffs for treatment of patients in these units. As a result, an extensive network of stroke units has emerged. However, as it is shown in the paper, there is no evidence that outcomes in hospitals with stroke units are significantly different from outcomes in hospitals without stroke units. It is also demonstrated that the reliance on the length of stay as a major grouping variable provides incentives for regrouping patients into more expensive groups by extending their length of stay in stroke units. The results of the study are limited by the incompleteness of the casemix data. There is a need to develop information and audit systems which would further inform a revision of the DRG system aimed to reduce the risk of regrouping and up-coding. PMID:26008985

  3. Method of motor function recovery in patients with muscle spasticity after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potokii V.S.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to prove the effectiveness of an innovative method of recovery of motor function of persons with spasticity after stroke. Material: in the experiment involved 26 patients aged 45-68 years who have had an ischemic stroke, a period of illness from 6 months to 5 years. Results: the analysis of specialized literature on the problem of reduced mobility due to spasticity confirms that spastic muscle condition after stroke significantly reduces the possibility of movement after stroke. The results of applying the method of recovery of motor function of persons with post-stroke spasticity of the muscles, which is based on the use of the second phase of post isometric relaxation - passive stretching muscles after heat-treatment procedures. This study confirms the high efficiency of this method for reducing pain in the shoulder and restore motor function of persons with spasticity after stroke. Conclusions: the implementation of the proposed method of recovery of motor function of persons with spasticity of muscles can increase the amplitude of the active movements of the shoulder and elbow joints, and, consequently, improve motor function in patients after stroke.

  4. Acinarcellcarcinomaofthepancreasina young patient with chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fatima-Zahra Kebir; Ahlem Lahmar; Nafaa Arfa; Saber Manai; Mohamed Ali El Ouaer; Saadia Bouraoui; Carole Gouttalier; Sabah Mezabi-Regaya

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy of the pancreas arising from acinar cells. Unlike ductal adenocarcinoma, this tumor rarely presents with pancreatitis. METHODS: We present a case of ACC associated with chronic calcifying pancreatitis, and a review of the literature focusing on diagnosis and management. RESULTS: A 43-year-old man was proposed for Wirsungo-jejunal derivation for chronic pancreatitis. Histopathological examination of the tissue extracted revealed an ACC. Duodenopancreatectomy was performed. Six months post-operatively, the patient developed hepatic metastasis and was treated with gemcitabine as palliative chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical presentation of ACC of the pancreas is not speciifc and the tumor can be under-diagnosed when associated with chronic pancreatitis. Data regarding course, treatment, and prognosis of this tumor are generally lacking.

  5. Baseline characteristics of the 4011 patients recruited into the 'Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke' (ENOS) trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bath, Philip M. W.; Adami, Alessandro; Bereczki, Daniel; Berge, Eivind; Beridze, Maia; Cala, Lesley; Casado, Ana; Caso, Valeria; Chang, Hui Meng; Christensen, Hanne; Collins, Ronan; Czlonkowska, Anna; Dineen, Robert A; El Etribi, Anwar; Ghani, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Background High blood pressure is common in acute stroke and associated with a worse functional outcome. Many patients who present with acute stroke are taking prescribed antihypertensive therapy before their stroke.Aims ENOS tested whether lowering blood pressure and continuing pre-stroke antihypertensive therapy are each safe and effective.Methods This study is an international multi-centre prospective randomized single-blind blinded-endpoint parallel-group partial-factorial controlled tria...

  6. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process.Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients' places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential.For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey - interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey - a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan.Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing, appropriately selected

  7. Enhanced spinal excitation from ankle flexors to knee extensors during walking in stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achache, V.; Mazevet, D.; Iglesias, C.;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It is still unclear to what an extent altered reflex activity contributes to gait deficit following stroke. Spinal group I and group II excitations from ankle dorsiflexors to knee extensors were investigated during post-stroke walking. METHODS: Electrical stimulation was applied to the...... common peroneal nerve (CPN) in the early stance, and the short-latency biphasic excitation in Quadriceps motoneurones was evaluated from the Vastus Lateralis (VL) rectified and averaged (N=50) EMG activity in 14 stroke patients walking at 0.6-1.6 km/h, and 14 control subjects walking at 3.2-4.8 and at 1...

  8. Visual contrast sensitivity in patients with impairment of functional independence after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    dos Santos Natanael; Andrade Suellen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Stroke has been considered a serious public health problem in many countries, accounting for complex disorders involving perception, such as visual, cognitive and functional deficits. The impact of stroke on the visual perception of individuals with impairments in functional independence was investigated. Methods We measured changes in functional independence and visual function in 40 patients with stroke (M = 52.3, SD = 0.65) and 10 controls (M = 52.5, SD = 0.66). The pat...

  9. Imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke patients: Current neuroradiological perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Dong Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Neuroradiology, Head and Neck Radiology, Thyroid Radiology Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Chul Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung Yeop [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Advances in imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke now provide crucial information such as infarct core, ischemic penumbra/degree of collaterals, vessel occlusion, and thrombus that helps in the selection of the best candidates for reperfusion therapy. It also predicts thrombolytic efficacy and benefit or potential hazards from therapy. Thus, radiologists should be familiar with various imaging studies for patients with acute ischemic stroke and the applicability to clinical trials. This helps radiologists to obtain optimal rapid imaging as well as its accurate interpretation. This review is focused on imaging studies for acute ischemic stroke, including their roles in recent clinical trials and some guidelines to optimal interpretation.

  10. Imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke patients: Current neuroradiological perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke now provide crucial information such as infarct core, ischemic penumbra/degree of collaterals, vessel occlusion, and thrombus that helps in the selection of the best candidates for reperfusion therapy. It also predicts thrombolytic efficacy and benefit or potential hazards from therapy. Thus, radiologists should be familiar with various imaging studies for patients with acute ischemic stroke and the applicability to clinical trials. This helps radiologists to obtain optimal rapid imaging as well as its accurate interpretation. This review is focused on imaging studies for acute ischemic stroke, including their roles in recent clinical trials and some guidelines to optimal interpretation.

  11. Direct interaction with an assistive robot for individuals with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmetz, Brandon; Markham, Heather; Brewer, Bambi R

    2011-01-01

    Many robotic systems have been developed to provide assistance to individuals with disabilities. Most of these systems require the individual to interact with the robot via a joystick or keypad, though some utilize techniques such as speech recognition or selection of objects with a laser pointer. In this paper, we describe a prototype system using a novel method of interaction with an assistive robot. A touch-sensitive skin enables the user to directly guide a robotic arm to a desired position. When the skin is released, the robot remains fixed in position. The target population for this system is individuals with hemiparesis due to chronic stroke. The system can be used as a substitute for the paretic arm and hand in bimanual tasks such as holding a jar while removing the lid. This paper describes the hardware and software of the prototype system, which includes a robotic arm, the touch-sensitive skin, a hook-style prehensor, and weight compensation and speech recognition software. PMID:22254546

  12. EEG patterns from acute to chronic stroke phases in focal cerebral ischemic rats: correlations with functional recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring the neural activities from the ischemic penumbra provides critical information on neurological recovery after stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the temporal alterations of neural activities using electroencephalography (EEG) from the acute phase to the chronic phase, and to compare EEG with the degree of post-stroke motor function recovery in a rat model of focal ischemic stroke. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to 90 min transient middle cerebral artery occlusion surgery followed by reperfusion for seven days (n = 58). The EEG signals were recorded at the pre-stroke phase (0 h), acute phase (3, 6 h), subacute phase (12, 24, 48, 72 h) and chronic phase (96, 120, 144, 168 h) (n = 8). This study analyzed post-stroke seizures and polymorphic delta activities (PDAs) and calculated quantitative EEG parameters such as the alpha-to-delta ratio (ADR). The ADR represented the ratio between alpha power and delta power, which indicated how fast the EEG activities were. Forelimb and hindlimb motor functions were measured by De Ryck's test and the beam walking test, respectively. In the acute phase, delta power increased fourfold with the occurrence of PDAs, and the histological staining showed that the infarct was limited to the striatum and secondary sensory cortex. In the subacute phase, the alpha power reduced to 50% of the baseline, and the infarct progressed to the forelimb cortical region. ADRs reduced from 0.23 ± 0.09 to 0.04 ± 0.01 at 3 h in the acute phase and gradually recovered to 0.22 ± 0.08 at 168 h in the chronic phase. In the comparison of correlations between the EEG parameters and the limb motor function from the acute phase to the chronic phase, ADRs were found to have the highest correlation coefficients with the beam walking test (r = 0.9524, p < 0.05) and De Ryck's test (r = 0.8077, p < 0.05). This study measured EEG activities after focal cerebral ischemia and showed that functional recovery was closely

  13. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkmaz S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sevda Korkmaz,1 Sevler Yildiz,1 Tuba Korucu,1 Burcu Gundogan,1 Zehra Emine Sunbul,1 Hasan Korkmaz,2 Murad Atmaca1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey Purpose: Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency.Methods: All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic.Findings: Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%, followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%, and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%. Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients.Results: The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population

  14. First-ever Ischemic Stroke after a Flight in a Patient with Prior Poliomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chiang Chang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of poliomyelitis sometimes travel by air with mobility assistance. However, prolonged seating during long-haul flights may also possibly produce stroke events on polio-inflicted patients. A 48-year-old polio-inflicted male suffered a stroke after an extended flight. A two-dimensional echocardiography was normal without detected patent foramen ovale or dyskinetic segment. The venodynamic variables were all within normal limits. MR Imaging studies revealed acute cerebral infarction in the distribution of the right middle cerebral artery and posterior watershed area. Hematological examination revealed positive anti-cardiolipin IgG antibody which might contribute to the risk of thrombosis as an underlying condition in addition to immobilization. This is the fi rst presentation of ischemic stroke after a flight in a patient with prior poliomyelitis. In addition to decompression sickness, economy class stroke syndrome and postpoliomyelitis syndrome, the physician should also take other coagulation disorders into consideration during the investigation.

  15. Misperceptions of comprehension difficulties of stroke patients by doctors, nurses and relatives.

    OpenAIRE

    McClenahan, R; Johnston, M.; Densham, Y

    1990-01-01

    Doctors, nurses and relatives involved with 30 recently aphasic stroke patients were asked to predict how the patient would perform on a comprehension test. Results show that not only do doctors, nurses and relatives underestimate the receptive disability of these patients, but they also illustrate a lack of agreement between health professionals. Implications for management are considered.

  16. A study of predictors of anxiety and depression among stroke patient-caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatan Pal Singh Balhara

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Caring for the patients with stroke presents increased burden to the care givers which manifests as increased rate of anxiety and depression among them. It is important to assess the care givers along with the patients for emergence of these negative affective states. One needs to be extra cautious if the patient happens to be the primary earning member of the family.

  17. Inter-rater reliability of the Sødring Motor Evaluation of Stroke patients (SMES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsaa, K E; Sødring, K M; Bjelland, E; Finsrud, K; Bautz-Holter, E

    1999-12-01

    The Sødring Motor Evaluation of Stroke patients is an instrument for physiotherapists to evaluate motor function and activities in stroke patients. The rating reflects quality as well as quantity of the patient's unassisted performance within three domains: leg, arm and gross function. The inter-rater reliability of the method was studied in a sample of 30 patients admitted to a stroke rehabilitation unit. Three therapists were involved in the study; two therapists assessed the same patient on two consecutive days in a balanced design. Cohen's weighted kappa and McNemar's test of symmetry were used as measures of item reliability, and the intraclass correlation coefficient was used to express the reliability of the sumscores. For 24 out of 32 items the weighted kappa statistic was excellent (0.75-0.98), while 7 items had a kappa statistic within the range 0.53-0.74 (fair to good). The reliability of one item was poor (0.13). The intraclass correlation coefficient for the three sumscores was 0.97, 0.91 and 0.97. We conclude that the Sødring Motor Evaluation of Stroke patients is a reliable measure of motor function in stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation. PMID:10599901

  18. The taxonomy statistic uncovers novel clinical patterns in a population of ischemic stroke patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Tukiendorf

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe a simple taxonomic approach for clinical data mining elaborated by Marczewski and Steinhaus (M-S, whose performance equals the advanced statistical methodology known as the expectation-maximization (E-M algorithm. We tested these two methods on a cohort of ischemic stroke patients. The comparison of both methods revealed strong agreement. Direct agreement between M-S and E-M classifications reached 83%, while Cohen's coefficient of agreement was κ = 0.766(P < 0.0001. The statistical analysis conducted and the outcomes obtained in this paper revealed novel clinical patterns in ischemic stroke patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of Marczewski-Steinhaus' taxonomic approach as a tool for the detection of novel patterns of data in ischemic stroke patients and the prediction of disease outcome. In terms of the identification of fairly frequent types of stroke patients using their age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, and diabetes mellitus (DM status, when dealing with rough characteristics of patients, four particular types of patients are recognized, which cannot be identified by means of routine clinical methods. Following the obtained taxonomical outcomes, the strong correlation between the health status at moment of admission to emergency department (ED and the subsequent recovery of patients is established. Moreover, popularization and simplification of the ideas of advanced mathematicians may provide an unconventional explorative platform for clinical problems.

  19. Music as Medicine: The Therapeutic Potential of Music for Acute Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supnet, Charlene; Crow, April; Stutzman, Sonja; Olson, DaiWai

    2016-04-01

    Nurses caring for patients with acute stroke are likely to administer both music and medication with therapeutic intent. The administration of medication is based on accumulated scientific evidence and tailored to the needs of each patient. However, the therapeutic use of music is generally based on good intentions and anecdotal evidence. This review summarizes and examines the current literature regarding the effectiveness of music in the treatment of critically ill patients and the use of music in neurologically injured patients. The rationale for hypothesis-driven research to explore therapeutic music intervention in acute stroke is compelling. PMID:27037347

  20. Choosing a particular oral anticoagulant and dose for stroke prevention in individual patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Aisenberg, James; Ansell, Jack;

    2016-01-01

    The choice of oral anticoagulant (OAC) for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) may be influenced by individual clinical features or by patterns of risk factors and comorbidities. We reviewed analyses of subgroups of patients from trials of vitamin K antagonists vs. non-vitamin K oral...... anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention in AF with the aim to identify patient groups who might benefit from a particular OAC more than from another. In addition, we discuss the timing of initiation of anticoagulation. In the second of a two-part review, we discuss the use of NOAC for stroke prevention in...... the following subgroups of patients with AF: (vii) secondary stroke prevention in patients after stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA), (viii) patients with acute stroke requiring thrombolysis or thrombectomy, (ix) those initiating or restarting OAC treatment after stroke or TIA, (x) those with...

  1. Cerebrolysin combined with rehabilitation promotes motor recovery in patients with severe motor impairment after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Chang-hyun; Kim, Deog Young; Shin, Yong-Il; Ko, Myoung-Hwan; Lee, Ahee; Jang, Shin Yi; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstracts Background Cerebrolysin is a neuropeptide preparation with neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects. Combining Cerebrolysin treatment with a standardized rehabilitation program may have a potential synergistic effect in the subacute stage of stroke. This study aims to evaluate whether Cerebrolysin provides additional motor recovery on top of rehabilitation therapy in the subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe motor impairment. Methods This phase IV trial was designed a...

  2. The Effect of Mirror Therapy Integrating Functional Electrical Stimulation on the Gait of Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Sang-Goo; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Lee, Chang-Ryeol

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to examine whether mirror therapy in conjunction with FES in stroke patients can improve gait ability. [Subjects] This study was conducted with 30 subjects who were diagnosed with hemiparesis due to stroke. [Methods] Experimental group I contained 10 subjects who received mirror therapy in conjunction with functional electrical stimulation, experimental group II contained 10 subjects who received mirror therapy, and the control group contained 10 sub...

  3. Stroke and Death Prediction with the Impact of Vascular Disease in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Maan, MD; Amir Y. Shaikh, MD; Moussa Mansour, MD; Jeremy N. Ruskin, MD; E. Kevin Heist, MD, PhD

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia encountered in the U.S. and the growing burden of AF has profound health implications due to the association of AF with an increased risk of stroke, heart failure, and mortality. AF is a significant risk factor for thromboembolic stroke; and also independently increases total mortality in patients with and without cardiovascular disease. Various risk stratification schemes such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc have been implemented in clinical ...

  4. Hierarchy of Dysfunction Related to Dressing Performance in Stroke Patients: A Path Analysis Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Takaaki; Nagayama, Hirofumi; Sato, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Yamane, Kazuhiro; Otsuki, Koji; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Tozato, Fusae

    2016-01-01

    Previous reports indicated that various dysfunctions caused by stroke affect the level of independence in dressing. These dysfunctions can be hierarchical, and these effects on dressing performance can be complicated in stroke patients. However, there are no published reports focusing on the hierarchical structure of the relationships between the activities of daily living and balance function, motor and sensory functions of the affected lower limb, strength of the abdominal muscles and knee ...

  5. Stroke Social Network Scale: development and psychometric evaluation of a new patient-reported measure

    OpenAIRE

    Northcott, S.; Hilari, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the development and psychometric evaluation of a new patient-reported measure which assesses a person’s social network in the first six months post stroke. Although it is known that the social networks of those with stroke and aphasia are vulnerable to change, there is currently no social network scale that has been validated for this population. Design and Setting: Repeated measures psychometric study, evaluating internal consistency, construct validity, and respon...

  6. Age as Risk Factor for Stroke in Atrial Fibrillation Patients:Implications for Thromboprophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantina Mitrousi; Gregory Y H Lip; Stavros Apostolakis

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. There is a strong relationship between atrial fibrillation and aging, thromboembolism, stroke, congestive heart failure and hypertension. On the other hand, advanced age confers a powerful risk factor for stroke and thromboembolism in patients with atrial fibrillation. For many years, vitamin K antagonists were the only approved anticoagulants for the management of atrial fibrillation. Lately new anticoagulants ma...

  7. Immediate effects of kinesio taping on fixed postural alignment and foot balance in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Sung Rae; Heo, Seo Yoon; Lee, Hee Jae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The main aim of this study was to identify the short-term effects of Kinesio taping (KT) on the static body alignment and overall balance function presented by the coordinate and foot balance in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-eight stroke subjects were randomly allocated into the study groups. The kinematic analysis measured deviation or changes from standard body alignment and foot pressure by the human anatomy-based coordinates were examined using the Shisei Innova...

  8. Efficiency of drug therapy in complex rehabilitation of patients in late recovery period of stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilshod Sagatov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and neurological studies in 73 patients (44 men and 29 women with the consequences of ischemic stroke in late recovery period were performed. Dopplerographic and electroencephalographic parameters before and after the rehabilitation measures were examined. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic effect of nootropics in drug rehabilitation with the inclusion of Nootropil and Cavinton Forte in late stroke recovery period.

  9. Left Atrial Appendage Dysfunction in a Patient with Premature Ventricular Contractions - A Risk Factor for Stroke?

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Sandeep M; Ackerman, Michael J.; Asirvatham, Samuel J.

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old female with ventricular dysfunction and frequent ventricular arrhythmia presented with a cardioembolic stroke. Prior electrophysiology study and ablation was performed for ventricular tachycardia (VT). For remaining ventricular ectopy, the patient was maintained on carvedilol and mexiletine. After one year on this regimen, she presented with an acute stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed no evidence of an intracardiac or ventricular thrombus but demonstrated markedly...

  10. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help you. Learn more What Is Stroke? Hemorrhagic Stroke Ischemic Stroke What is TIA? Stroke Facts Recognizing ... Stroke Survey Faces of Stroke What is stroke? Hemorrhagic stroke Ischemic stroke What is TIA? Stroke facts I ...

  11. Early rehabilitation and neuroprotective drug therapy outcomes in elderly patients with acute stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Chen; Lufang Chen; Yiqing Tao; Feixue Zhou; Chunlan Cui; Shichao Liu

    2011-01-01

    Sixty elderly patients, who suffered from acute stroke and were admitted within a 1-year period to the Department of Geriatrics in the First Affiliated Hospital of School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, China, underwent early rehabilitation in combination with neuroprotective drug therapy. Limb movement, cognitive functions and daily life self-care ability in elderly patients upon admission and discharge were assessed using the Hunt-Hess scale, functional independence measures and mini-mental state examination. The mean duration of hospital stay among the 60 patients was 35 days. Upon discharge, 42 (75%) of the patients exhibited cognitive impairment to varying degrees, and 25 (45%) of the 56 stroke patients who underwent rehabilitation evaluation attained independence in daily living activities, 11 (20%) required intermittent supervision, and 20 (36%) required 24-hour constant supervision during performance of these activities. Results demonstrated that early rehabilitation treatment in combination with neuroprotective therapy for acute stroke was effective.

  12. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78+9-12.23 years compared to 61.01+-15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p<0.01). Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity. (author)

  13. The role of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in patients with ischaemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the impact of atrial fibrillation on mortality and morbidity in ischaemic stroke patients. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Neurology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey, and comprised records of ischaemic stroke patients hospitalised between January 2006 and September 2009. SPSS 13 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 404 patients in the study, 69 (17.1%) had atrial fibrilation. The mean age of such patients was 66.78+-12.23 years compared to 61.01+-15.11 years for the rest. Besides 47 (68.1%) of these patients were females. According to the modified Rankin Scale scores, the degree of disability was significantly higher at the time of arrival and discharge, and mortality rates were significantly higher also (p<0.01). Conclusion: Atrial fibrillation affected the prognosis of ischaemic stroke adversely in terms of mortality and morbidity. (author)

  14. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of stroke prevention treatments in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Amy Tawfik,1,2 Joanna M Bielecki,2 Murray Krahn,1,2 Paul Dorian,3,4 Jeffrey S Hoch,1,3,5 Heather Boon,1 Don Husereau,6 Petros Pechlivanoglou2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, 2Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA Collaborative, University of Toronto, 3Centre for Excellence in Economic Analysis Research (CLEAR, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael’s Hospital, 4Department of Medicine and Cardiology, University of Toronto, 5Pharmacoeconomics Research Unit, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, 6Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background: In the last 4 years, four novel oral anticoagulants have been developed as alternatives to warfarin and antiplatelet agents for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF patients. The objective of this review was to estimate the comparative effectiveness of all antithrombotic treatments for AF patients.Materials and methods: Data sources were Medline Ovid (1946 to October 2015, Embase Ovid (1980 to October 2015, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (­CENTRAL, Issue 9, 2015. Randomized controlled trials of AF patients were selected if they compared at least two of the following: placebo, aspirin, aspirin and clopidogrel combination therapy, adjusted-dose warfarin (target international normalized ratio 2.0–3.0, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Bayesian network meta-analyses were conducted for outcomes of interest (all stroke, ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, overall mortality, major bleeding, and intracranial hemorrhage.Results: Based on 16 randomized controlled trials of 96,826 patients, all oral anticoagulants were more effective than antiplatelet agents at reducing the risk of ischemic stroke and all strokes. Compared to warfarin, dabigatran 150 mg (rate ratio 0.65, 95% credible interval 0.52–0.82 and apixaban (rate ratio 0.82, 95% credible interval 0.69–0.97 reduced the risk of

  15. Monitoring mobility assistive device use in post-stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boissy, Patrice; Hester, Todd; Sherrill, Delsey; Corriveau, Hélène; Bonato, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Mobility assistive devices (MAD) such as canes can improve mobility and allow independence in the performance of mobility-related tasks. The use of MAD is often prescribed for stroke survivors. Despite their acknowledged qualities, MAD in real life conditions are typically underutilized, misused...... and abandoned. Ecologically sound, evidence based outcome measures need to be developed so as to capture the inherent complexities behind real life use of MAD and identify markers and mitigators of a successful integration of MAD into the daily activities of stroke survivors. In this study, we used...

  16. EMG and kinematic analysis of sensorimotor control for patients after stroke using cyclic voluntary movement with visual feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Rong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical scales are often used to evaluate upper-limb deficits. The objective of this study is to investigate the parameters during voluntary arm tracking at different velocities for evaluating motor control performance after stroke. Methods Eight hemiplegic chronic stroke subjects were recruited to perform voluntary movements of elbow flexion and extension by following sinusoidal trajectories from 30 deg to 90 deg at six velocities in the horizontal plane by completing 3, 6, 8, 12, 15, 18 flexion and extension cycles in 36 seconds in a single trial, and the peak velocities ranged from 15.7 to 94.2 deg/s. The actual elbow angle and the target position were displayed as real-time visual feedback. The angular displacement of the arm and electromyographic (EMG signals of biceps and triceps were captured to evaluate the sensorimotor control of the affected and unaffected side. Results The results showed significant differences in the root mean square error (RMSE, response delay (RD and cocontraction index (CI when the affected and unaffected sides were compared during the arm tracking experiment (P Conclusions The method and parameters have potential for clinical use in quantitatively evaluating the sensorimotor deficiencies for patients after stroke about the accuracy of motion, response delay and cocontraction between muscle pairs.

  17. Psychological status of patients with chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasaoglu, Gülden; Bavbek, Sevim; Tugcu, Handan; Abadoglu, Oznur; Misirligil, Zeynep

    2006-11-01

    Although chronic urticaria is the most common cutaneous disorder seen in our outpatient allergy clinics, to our knowledge, no study of psychiatric morbidity in allergy departments has been carried out in our country. For the present study, we used the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) to evaluate the personality traits and psychological status of patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). Fifty-nine outpatients with CIU and 59 healthy control subjects were enrolled in the study. Patients were included if no specific cause for their urticaria could be identified by detailed history and appropriate investigations. Psychiatric evaluation for all patients and controls was conducted at the Department of Psychiatry by using MMPI. Analysis of the MMPI profile showed that the scores for hypochondriasis, depression, hysteria, psychopathic deviance, paranoia, psychasthenia, schizophrenia, and social introversion were higher in patients with CIU compared to the control group (P CIU seem to have more depressive, hysteric, touchy and suspicious personality traits with hypochondriac tendencies and in more conflict with their social environment. Attitudes such as perfectionism, need for approval, external control and need to be loved were also characteristics of the patient group. We believe that psychological status should be considered for effective management of patients with CIU. PMID:17073991

  18. The effectiveness of problem solving therapy for stroke patients: study protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background Coping style is one of the determinants of health-related quality of life after stroke. Stroke patients make less use of active problem-oriented coping styles than other brain damaged patients. Coping styles can be influenced by means of intervention. The primary aim of this study is to investigate if Problem Solving Therapy is an effective group intervention for improving coping style and health-related quality of life in stroke patients. The secondary aim is to determine the effe...

  19. The Effect of Early Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Therapy in Acute/Subacute Ischemic Stroke Patients With Dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Jong Hwa; Lee, Sook Joung; Ri, Jae Won; Park, Jin Gee

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the outcome of an early application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) combined with traditional dysphagia therapy (TDT) versus traditional dysphagia therapy only in acute/subacute ischemic stroke patients with moderate to severe dysphagia by videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS). Methods Fifty-seven dysphagic stroke patients were enrolled in a VFSS within 10 days after stroke onset. Patients were randomly assigned into two treatment groups. Thirty-one pat...

  20. Weekend Admission in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke Is Not Associated with Poor Functional Outcome than Weekday Admission

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang-Chul; Hong, Keun-Sik; Hwang, Seon-Il; KIM, Ji-Eun; Kim, Ah-Ro; Cho, Joong-Yang; Park, Hee Kyung; Park, Ji-Hyun; Koo, Ja-Seong; Park, Jong-Moo; Bae, Hee-Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Kang, Dong-Wha; Oh, Mi-Sun; Yu, Kyung-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Stroke requires consistent care, but there is concern over the "weekend effect", whereby a weekend admission results in a poor outcome. Our aim was to determine the impact of weekend admission on clinical outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke in Korea. Methods The outcomes of patients admitted on weekdays and weekends were compared by analyzing data from a prospective outcome registry enrolling 1247 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to f...

  1. Efficacy and safety of thrombolysis in patients aged 80 years or above with major acute ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Chul Kim; Keun-Sik Hong; Yong-Jin Cho; Joong-Yang Cho; Hee-Kyung Park; Pamela Song

    2012-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients with major ischemic strokes may remain severely disabled or dead. However, efficacy and safety of thrombolysis in this have not been fully explored. Materials and Methods: Data from the case records of patients aged >80 years with acute ischemic stroke with admission National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score ≥10 admitted between April 2009 and May 2011 were retrieved. Outcomes in patients treated with thrombolysis and control subjects were compared. ...

  2. Reinforcement learning of self-regulated β-oscillations for motor restoration in chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naros, Georgios; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    the participant. Here, we propose a comprehensive neurofeedback strategy for motor restoration after stroke that addresses these aspects, and provide evidence for the feasibility of the suggested approach by demonstrating that dynamic threshold adaptation based on reinforcement learning may lead to frequency-specific operant conditioning of β-band oscillations paralleled by task-specific motor improvement; a proposal that requires investigation in a larger cohort of stroke patients. PMID:26190995

  3. Doppler sonography of extracranial and intracranial vessels in patients with thrombotic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Iranmanesh

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The results of intracranial and extracranial vessel color Doppler sonography, which is now an inseparable part of patient evaluation, vary in different studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pattern of vascular involvement in thrombotic stroke and its relationship with risk factors of stroke. METHODS: One-hundred patients (45 males and 55 females with thrombotic stroke underwent transcranial sonography and color Doppler sonography of extracranial vessels. The pattern of vascular involvement was analyzed. The risk factors of stroke were also evaluated. RESULTS: Forty-seven percent of the studied individuals had some variations in their color Doppler sonography of extracranial vessels, 27% had changes in the intracranial vessels and 26% showed changes in both. The most frequently involved vessels among the intracranial and extracranial vessels were the middle cerebral artery and the internal carotid artery, respectively. The pattern of vascular involvement was unrelated to hypertension, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia or history of ischemic heart disease. Extracranial involvement in patients with positive history of MI was more prevalent than in those without such history. CONCLUSIONS: Extracranial vessel involvement in thrombotic stroke was found to be more prevalent than intracranial vessel involvement in the city of Rafsanjan; however, intracranial vessel involvement was more prevalent than in western countries. KEY WORDS: Thrombotic stroke, color Doppler sonography, intracranial vessels, extracranial, cerebrovascular risk factors

  4. CONTRAST ADVERSE EFFECT STUDY OF ASPIRIN AND CLOPIDOGREL IN STROKE PATIENTS USING COMBINATION AND INDIVIDUAL MEDICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Giri Prasad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia and hemorrhage are the conditions which may lead to stroke. As stroke is a medical emergency, treated with medications such as aspirin, clopidogrel and dipyridamole. In the present study the combination and individual adverse effects of aspirin and clopidogrel medication were studied. The study during was around nine months in one of the private hospital at Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India. Adverse effects evaluation was based on WHO guide lines and Naranjo’s Algorithm. Total 69 stroke patients were taken in to studies. 46 (66.66% were males and 23 (33.33% were females. The number of ischemic stroke patients was 39(56.5% and hemorrhage stroke was 30(43.4%. Among 41 patients, 19 patients was on Aspirin (46.34%, 10 patients was on clopidogral (24.34% and 12 patients was on combinations medication (29.26%. Adverse effects reported among the antiplatelate users were 6 patients. Among these 6 patients 4 patients were observed with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGI the overall percentage was 66.66% and 2 patients were observed with Vomiting, the overall percentage was 33.33%. In this study, the relative risk reduction for secondary stroke prevention was 37% with use of a combination of extended- release dipyridamole and aspirin. Importantly, the risk of major bleeding attributable to the combination therapy was no greater than that seen with aspirin alone. The benefit of clopidogrel over aspirin for the prevention of vascular events was a relative risk reduction of 8.7%.In addition, there was less major bleeding in the clopidogrel group, yielding a relative net benefit of about 10%. This study revels clopidogrel is the safe drug when compared with Aspirin and as well as combination therapy.

  5. Clinical impact of MRI perfusion disturbances and normal diffusion in acute stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In acute ischemic stroke MR-imaging typically shows diffusion abnormalities surrounded by reduced perfusion signifying the so-called ischemic penumbra. Mismatch between diffusion and perfusion abnormalities gives indication for thrombolysis. But is there an indication for thrombolytic treatment, if there is no diffusion abnormality but pathologic perfusion combined with acute stroke symptoms?. Material and methods: MR-imaging of 1465 patients treated on our Stroke Unit between June 2004 and May 2007 retrospectively are analyzed. 6 patients met the inclusion criteria of severe neurological symptoms, large territorial perfusion disturbances, lack of diffusion abnormalities and complete neurological recovery after treatment. Results: In all six patients MTT measurements showed a significantly depressed perfusion in the symptomatic hemisphere (p < 0.02). Time-to-peak delay correlated with the mean transit time delay (0.949, p < 0.01). Indication for thrombolysis was based on perfusion abnormalities and clinical symptoms. Stroke symptoms could be reversed in all patients without any complication. Conclusion: Whereas diffusion imaging could not reveal any abnormality, perfusion analysis legitimated therapy with systemic thrombolysis in heavily affected patients. This work underlines the importance of multimodal MR imaging for guiding treatment decisions in acute stroke patients.

  6. Atherothrombotic stroke: clinical data and parameters of platelet haemostasis in patients in acute stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laskovets A.B.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available

     

    The aim of the study was the investigation of clinical data and platelet haemostasis parameters in patients with atherothrombotic stroke for secondary prophylaxis improvement. Materials and Methods. 41 patient: 26 (63,4% males, 15 (36,6% females, mean age 66,0±9,4 years and 18 healthy person were examined. Neurological examination was performed, patient condition was estimated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and Rankin scale. The set of investigation included clinical blood analysis, adenosinediphosphate-induced agregometry, flow-cytometry, molecular genetic analysis of gene Iba. Results. There was platelet activation in patients with atherothrombotic stroke according to flow-cytometry data. The conventional optic agregometry was not helpful for revealing of platelet activation. The expression of 1ba receptors correlated with the point of National Institute of Health Stroke Scale at discharge. The incidence of Iba gene mutation was higher in patients with atherothrombotic stroke comparing with control group. Conclusions. The revealed data predispose to the possibility of individual administration of antiagregant therapy in such patients.

  7. Clinical impact of MRI perfusion disturbances and normal diffusion in acute stroke patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondin, D. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: blondin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Seitz, R.J. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany); Biomedical Research Centre, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf (Germany); Brain Imaging Centre, Research Centre Julich (Germany); Rusch, O.; Janssen, H.; Andersen, K.; Wittsack, H.-J.; Turowski, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: In acute ischemic stroke MR-imaging typically shows diffusion abnormalities surrounded by reduced perfusion signifying the so-called ischemic penumbra. Mismatch between diffusion and perfusion abnormalities gives indication for thrombolysis. But is there an indication for thrombolytic treatment, if there is no diffusion abnormality but pathologic perfusion combined with acute stroke symptoms?. Material and methods: MR-imaging of 1465 patients treated on our Stroke Unit between June 2004 and May 2007 retrospectively are analyzed. 6 patients met the inclusion criteria of severe neurological symptoms, large territorial perfusion disturbances, lack of diffusion abnormalities and complete neurological recovery after treatment. Results: In all six patients MTT measurements showed a significantly depressed perfusion in the symptomatic hemisphere (p < 0.02). Time-to-peak delay correlated with the mean transit time delay (0.949, p < 0.01). Indication for thrombolysis was based on perfusion abnormalities and clinical symptoms. Stroke symptoms could be reversed in all patients without any complication. Conclusion: Whereas diffusion imaging could not reveal any abnormality, perfusion analysis legitimated therapy with systemic thrombolysis in heavily affected patients. This work underlines the importance of multimodal MR imaging for guiding treatment decisions in acute stroke patients.

  8. Effects of epilepsy and selected antiepileptic drugs on risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death in patients with or without previous stroke: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell; Erdal, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy have increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death associated with epilepsy and examined if this risk was modified by treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).......Patients with epilepsy have increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death associated with epilepsy and examined if this risk was modified by treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)....

  9. A Community-based Fitness and Mobility Exercise (FAME) Program for Older Adults with Chronic Stroke: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Marco Y.C.; Eng, Janice J.; Dawson, Andrew S.; McKay, Heather A.; Harris, Jocelyn E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine the effects of a community-based group exercise program for older individuals with chronic stroke. DESIGN Prospective, single-blind, randomized controlled intervention trial. SETTING Intervention was community-based. Data collection was performed in a research laboratory located in a rehabilitation hospital. PARTICIPANTS Sixty-three older individuals (≥50 years) with a chronic stroke (post-stroke duration ≥ 1 year) who were living in the community. INTERVENTION Participants were randomized into intervention group (n=32) or control group (n=31). The intervention group underwent a Fitness and Mobility Exercise (FAME) program designed to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, mobility, leg muscle strength, balance and hip bone mineral density (BMD) (1-hour sessions, 3 sessions/week, for 19 weeks). The control group underwent a seated upper extremity program. MEASUREMENTS (1) cardiorespiratory fitness (maximal oxygen consumption), (2) mobility (Six Minute Walk Test), (3) leg muscle strength (isometric knee extension), (4) balance (Berg Balance Scale), (5) activity and participation (Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities) and (6) femoral neck BMD (Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). RESULTS The intervention group had significantly more gains in cardiorespiratory fitness, mobility, and paretic leg muscle strength than controls. Femoral neck BMD of the paretic leg was maintained in the intervention group whereas a significant decline of the same occurred in controls. There was no significant time × group interaction for balance, activity and participation, non-paretic leg muscle strength and non-paretic femoral neck BMD. CONCLUSION The FAME program is feasible and beneficial for improving some of the secondary complications resulting from physical inactivity in older adults living with stroke. It may serve as a good model of community-based fitness program for preventing secondary diseases in older adults living with

  10. Impaired motor preparation and execution during standing reach in people with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombe Waller, Sandy; Yang, Chieh-Ling; Magder, Laurence; Yungher, Don; Gray, Vicki; Rogers, Mark W

    2016-09-01

    Movement preparation of both anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) and goal directed movement during a standing reaching task in adults with chronic hemiparesis and healthy controls was investigated. Using a simple reaction time paradigm, while standing on two separate force platforms, subjects received a warning light cue to "get ready to reach" followed 2.5s later by an imperative light cue to "reach as quickly as possible" with the paretic arm (matched arm for controls) to touch a target in front of them for a total of 90 trials. In 30 of the reaching trials a loud acoustic stimulus (LAS) of 123 dB was randomly - -200, or 0ms relative to the "go" cue. APA (postural) responses were characterized by the onset and maximal posterior displacement of center of pressure (CoP) and onset/offset of electromyography (EMG) from tibialis anterior (TA), soleus (SOL), while reach was characterized by onset and maximal forward displacement of the reach hand and onset of the anterior (AD), biceps brachii (BB) and middle deltoid (MD). Subjects with stroke, demonstrated a marked reduction in the occurrence of the StartReact responses for both APA and forward reach at all LAS time points indicating movement preparation dysfunction. Movement execution during a cued reach showed significant delays in APA and reach onsets, significant reduction in the magnitude of APA (posterior CoP displacement) and reach excursion, and an increased latency between the APA and reach compared to controls. EMG activation patterns for the TA and SOL demonstrated co contraction compared to the temporally sequenced pattern of control subjects. When LAS was provided at the "go" there were earlier but not significant differences in APA onset latency compared to reaching without LAS and significant delays in reach onset latency when compared to control subjects with or without LAS. An early burst of EMG in biceps brachii muscles with a further delay of the reach onset compared to reaching without LAS may

  11. Challenges and Treatment for Stroke Prophylaxis in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation in Mexico: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of stroke. AF-related strokes cause greater disability and mortality than those in patients without AF, and are associated with a significant clinical and economic burden in Mexico. Antithrombotic therapy reduces stroke risk in patients with AF and is recommended for all patients except those classified as having a low stroke risk. However, its use is suboptimal all around the world; one study showed that only 4 % of Mexican patients with AF who presented with ischemic stroke were in the therapeutic range for anticoagulation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin or acenocoumarin have long been the only oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in AF. Although effective, VKAs have disadvantages, including the need for regular coagulation monitoring and dose adjustment. Interactions with numerous common medications and foods contribute to the risk of serious bleeding and thrombotic events in VKA-treated patients. Thus novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), more properly called direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), such as dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban (not available in Mexico), have been developed. These offer the convenience of fixed-dose treatment without the need for monitoring, and have few drug or food interactions. Pivotal phase III trials have demonstrated that these agents are at least as effective as warfarin in preventing stroke and are associated with a reduced risk of intracranial hemorrhage. With apixaban approved in Mexico in April 2013, clinicians now have the choice of three novel DOACs as alternatives to warfarin. However, it is yet to be established which of these agents should be the first choice, and treatment decisions are likely to depend on the individual patient's characteristics. PMID:26923792

  12. HBV Vaccination in Chronic Renal Failure Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-davood Omrani

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available HBV infection in chronic renal failure (CRF becomes chronic in 30 to 60% compared with less than 10% in nonuremic patients. Immunological dysfunction in patients on hemodialysis may be related to imbalanced cytokine systems, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-|α| and interleukin (IL 6,1 by retention of renal metabolite in uremia and chronic inflammation and have a poor immunological reaction to T-cell-dependent antigens, like hepatitis B vaccination. Immunocompromised patients who are unresponsive to hepatitis B vaccination seem to be unable to enhance IL-10 synthesis for control of monokine overproduction. Moreover, human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes, which play a major role in the antigen presentation to immunocompetent cells, have also been shown to modulate this immune response. Unfortunately, seroconversion to anti-HBS has been reported to occur in only 40 to 50% of the vaccine, a significantly lower rate than that observed in healthy adults. Various methods including adjutants such as zinc, gamma interferon, thymopentine, GM-CSF and Levamisol for improving immune responses have been advised. Experience with Pres1/s2, third-generation vaccines is limited and they have not been proven more effective than intradermally (ID administered second-generation S antigen vaccines. Both intramuscular (IM and intradermal (ID vaccinations against hepatitis B have variable efficiency in hemodialysis and non-responders should be retreated by ID route.

  13. Reinforcement learning of self-regulated β-oscillations for motor restoration in chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios eNaros

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurofeedback training of motor imagery-related brain-states with brain-machine interfaces (BMI is currently being explored prior to standard physiotherapy to improve the motor outcome of stroke rehabilitation. Pilot studies suggest that such a priming intervention before physiotherapy might increase the responsiveness of the brain to the subsequent physiotherapy, thereby improving the clinical outcome. However, there is little evidence up to now that these BMI-based interventions have achieved operate conditioning of specific brain states that facilitate task-specific functional gains beyond the practice of primed physiotherapy. In this context, we argue that BMI technology needs to aim at physiological features relevant for the targeted behavioral gain. Moreover, this therapeutic intervention has to be informed by concepts of reinforcement learning to develop its full potential. Such a refined neurofeedback approach would need to address the following issues (1 Defining a physiological feedback target specific to the intended behavioral gain, e.g. β-band oscillations for cortico-muscular communication. This targeted brain state could well be different from the brain state optimal for the neurofeedback task (2 Selecting a BMI classification and thresholding approach on the basis of learning principles, i.e. balancing challenge and reward of the neurofeedback task instead of maximizing the classification accuracy of the feedback device (3 Adjusting the feedback in the course of the training period to account for the cognitive load and the learning experience of the participant. The proposed neurofeedback strategy provides evidence for the feasibility of the suggested approach by demonstrating that dynamic threshold adaptation based on reinforcement learning may lead to frequency-specific operant conditioning of β-band oscillations paralleled by task-specific motor improvement; a proposal that requires investigation in a larger cohort of stroke

  14. Outcome and periprocedural time management in referred versus directly admitted stroke patients treated with thrombectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Ralph; Reimann, Gernot; Weimar, Christian; Winkler, Angela; Berger, Klaus; Nordmeyer, Hannes; Hadisurya, Jeffrie; Brassel, Friedhelm; Kitzrow, Martin; Krogias, Christos; Weber, Werner; Busch, Elmar W.; Eyding, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background: After thrombectomy has shown to be effective in acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusion, the potential benefit of secondary referral for such an intervention needs to be validated. Aims: We aimed to compare consecutive stoke patients directly admitted and treated with thrombectomy at a neurointerventional centre with patients secondarily referred for such a procedure from hospitals with a stroke unit. Methods: Periprocedure times and mortality in 300 patients primarily treated in eight neurointerventional centres were compared with 343 patients referred from nine other hospitals in a prospective multicentre study of a German neurovascular network. Data on functional outcome at 3 months was available in 430 (76.4%) patients. Results: In-hospital mortality (14.8% versus 11.7%, p = 0.26) and 3 months mortality (21.9% versus 24.1%, p = 0.53) were not statistically different in both patient groups despite a significant shorter symptom to groin puncture time in directly admitted patients, which was mainly caused by a longer interfacility transfer time. We found a nonsignificant trend for better functional outcome at 3 months in directly admitted patients (modified Rankin Scale 0–2, 44.0% versus 35.7%, p = 0.08). Conclusions: Our results show that a drip-and-ship thrombectomy concept can be effectively organized in a metropolitan stroke network. Every effort should be made to speed up the emergency interfacility transfer to a neurointerventional centre in stroke patients eligible for thrombectomy after initial brain imaging. PMID:27006695

  15. A PRELIMINARY STUDY ON EFFECTIVENESS OF CONVENTIONAL AND SYMMETRICAL WEIGHT TRAINING IN STROKE PATIENTS TO PREVENT FALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Divan Mohaideen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the elderly and significant source of disability. In the stroke patients the occurrence of fall is one of the essential factors hindering the rehabilitation process. Asymmetrical weight bearing is the major cause for frequent falls in stroke patients. Materials & Methods: In this study 15 patients subjected to Symmetrical weight bearing along with conventional stroke training in Experimental group. Other 15 patients subjected to conventional stroke training alone in control group. After 3 months of training period the pre and post test values of frequency of falls were compared. Results: As per the study results the mean difference of reduced number of falls in experimental group was 5.8 and the mean difference of reduced number of falls in control group was 2.86. The calculated value of experimental group was 31.8 whereas in control group 14.3. Discussion: Stroke patients can be trained easily with conventional weight training exercise which is highly beneficial. Further study can be done with huge number of stroke patients. Conclusion: The study concluded that the number of falls in stroke cases were reduced significantly by using symmetrical weight training exercise and conventional stroke training compared to conventional stroke training alone

  16. Radioisotope hepatography in patients with chronic bronchitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examination carried out by means of radioisotope hepatography with bengal-rose-iodine 131 in 69 patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis associated with respiratory insufficiency of grades 1, 2, 3 at the phase of remission revealed disturbances of the absorptive-excretory function of the liver. A direct dependence was found between the intensity of disorder of the functionsl state of parenchymatous cells and degree of resperatory insufficiency in this category of patients. The disorders of the absorptive-excretory function of the liver were most pronounced in respiratory insufficiency of grade 3

  17. Telerehabilitation for stroke patients: an overview of reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turolla, Andrea; Larsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of survivors following stroke events are enlightening new needs to guarantee appropriate care and quality of life support at home. A potential application of telemedicine is to exploit home care and rehabilitation. Within the framework of an EU FP7 project called Integrated...... in the clinical, financial and social perspectives....

  18. Altered Functional Connectivity of Cognitive-Related Cerebellar Subregions in Well-Recovered Stroke Patients

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    Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum contains several cognitive-related subregions that are involved in different functional networks. The cerebellar crus II is correlated with the frontoparietal network (FPN, whereas the cerebellar IX is associated with the default-mode network (DMN. These two networks are anticorrelated and cooperatively implicated in cognitive control, which may facilitate the motor recovery in stroke patients. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC changes in 25 subcortical ischemic stroke patients with well-recovered global motor function. Consistent with previous studies, the crus II was correlated with the FPN, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and posterior parietal cortex, and the cerebellar IX was correlated with the DMN, including the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/Pcu, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC, DLPFC, lateral parietal cortices, and anterior temporal cortices. No significantly increased rsFCs of these cerebellar subregions were found in stroke patients, suggesting that the rsFCs of the cognitive-related cerebellar subregions are not the critical factors contributing to the recovery of motor function in stroke patients. The finding of the disconnection in the cerebellar-related cognitive control networks may possibly explain the deficits in cognitive control function even in stroke patients with well-recovered global motor function.

  19. Cardioembolism and Involvement of the Insular Cortex in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihoon Kang

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether topographical characteristics of insular involvement in ischemic stroke are associated with cardioembolism.A consecutive series of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke within 7 days of symptom onset were identified. Based on diffusion-weighted imaging, we included those who had ischemic lesions in the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory. Each patient was assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of insular involvement. The primary outcome was the frequency of cardioembolism, which was compared based on insular involvement. Of 1,311 patients with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory, 112 had insular involvement (8.5%. The frequency of cardioembolism in patients with insular involvement (52.7% was significantly higher than that in patients without insular involvement (30.4%, P < 0.001. Although insular involvement was associated with a severe baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (13 vs. 4, it did not independently affect the 3-month functional outcome.In cases of stroke in the MCA territory, involvement of the insular cortex may be associated with a risk of cardioembolism.

  20. Axillary Nerve Conduction Study in Paretic Limbs of Patients with Cerebrovascular Stroke

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    Fahmy Emam Fahmy Emam*, Ahmed Fathy Mohammed Genedy**, Sobhia Ali Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the axillary nerve injury after shoulder sublaxtion in patients of stroke. Methods: All eligible and consenting patients of stroke (underwent electrophysiology studies of both axillary nerve. The parameters include measurement of neuropathy motor latancy, CMAP (compound muscle action potential &SNAP (sensory nerve action potential and the conduction velocity. This study included 33 patients with cerebrovascular stroke who were refered to the Physical medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation department at Al-Zahraa University hospital between 1st April and 31st December 2012. They were 23 males and 10 females, their ages ranged from 27 to 72 years. The paretic limbs of the patients included were classified as case limbs, while the non-paretic limbs were classified as controls. Results: Axillary nerve latency and amplitude were high significant in shoulder subluxation in the hemiparaetic side in comparison with control significant. Conclusion: There is lower motor neuron axillary nerve in stroke patients, mixed type (demylinated and axonal, the incidence of axillary nerve lesion is mostly with stroke shoulder subluxation