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Sample records for chronic respiratory encephalopathy

  1. Event-related evoked potentials in chronic respiratory encephalopathy

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    A R Al Tahan

    2010-02-01

    limited by the small number of tested patients. P300 latency changes correlated significantly with age as well as severity of respiratory failure. P300 was also significantly delayed whether hypoxia occurred with or without hypercapnia.Conclusion: Results show a significant delay of P300 latency in patients with severe and mild respiratory failure. This was associated with subclinical encephalopathy in most patients, evidenced by a near-normal MMSE score. Apart from confirming the importance of P300 latency measurement as a marker of respiratory encephalopathy, this study asserts the causal relationship between hypoxemia and cognitive derangement. Furthermore, it promotes the early use of oxygen therapy in a selected group of patients with mild or moderate respiratory failure, who have responsibilities which involve taking rapid critical decisions.Keywords: event-related evoked potentials, hypoxic–hypercapnic encephalopathy, respiratory failure, chronic respiratory encephalopathy

  2. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Saulle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  3. Early use of noninvasive techniques for clearing respiratory secretions during noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy

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    Wang, Jinrong; Cui, Zhaobo; Liu, Shuhong; Gao, Xiuling; Gao, Pan; Shi, Yi; Guo, Shufen; Li, Peipei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) might be superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPDs). Inefficient clearance of respiratory secretions provokes NPPV failure in patients with hypercapnic encephalopathy (HE). This study compared CMV and NPPV combined with a noninvasive strategy for clearing secretions in HE and AECOPD patients. The present study is a prospective cohort study of AECOPD and HE patients enrolled between October 2013 and August 2015 in a critical care unit of a major university teaching hospital in China. A total of 74 patients received NPPV and 90 patients received CMV. Inclusion criteria included the following: physician-diagnosed AECOPD, spontaneous airway clearance of excessive secretions, arterial blood gas analysis requiring intensive care, moderate-to-severe dyspnea, and a Kelly–Matthay scale score of 3 to 5. Exclusion criteria included the following: preexisting psychiatric/neurological disorders unrelated to HE, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, upper airway obstruction, acute coronary syndromes, preadmission tracheostomy or endotracheal intubation, and urgent endotracheal intubation for cardiovascular, psychomotor agitation, or severe hemodynamic conditions. Intensive care unit participants were managed by NPPV. Participants received standard treatment consisting of controlled oxygen therapy during NPPV-free periods; antibiotics, intravenous doxofylline, corticosteroids (e.g., salbutamol and ambroxol), and subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin; and therapy for comorbidities if necessary. Nasogastric tubes were inserted only in participants who developed gastric distension. No pharmacological sedation was administered. The primary and secondary outcome measures included comparative complication rates, durations of ventilation and hospitalization, number of invasive devices/patient, and in-hospital and 1-year mortality

  4. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

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    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  5. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes.

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    Galgano, Michael A; Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-03-14

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE.

  6. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmela Tartaglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is described as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to result from multiple concussions. Traditionally, concussions were considered benign events and although most people recover fully, about 10% develop a post-concussive syndrome with persisting neurological, cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. CTE was once thought to be unique to boxers, but it has now been observed in many different athletes having suffered multiple concussions as well as in military personal after repeated blast injuries. Much remains unknown about the development of CTE but its pathological substrate is usually tau, similar to that seen in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The aim of this perspective is to compare and contrast clinical and pathological CTE with the other neurodegenerative proteinopathies and highlight that there is an urgent need for understanding the relationship between concussion and the development of CTE as it may provide a window into the development of a proteinopathy and thus new avenues for treatment.

  7. A critical review of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

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    Iverson, Grant L; Gardner, Andrew J; McCrory, Paul; Zafonte, Ross; Castellani, Rudy J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been described in the literature as a neurodegenerative disease with: (i) localized neuronal and glial accumulations of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) involving perivascular areas of the cerebral cortex, sulcal depths, and with a preference for neurons within superficial cortical laminae; (ii) multifocal axonal varicosities and axonal loss involving deep cortex and subcortical white matter; (iii) relative absence of beta-amyloid deposits; (iv) TDP-43 immunoreactive inclusions and neurites; and (v) broad and diverse clinical features. Some of the pathological findings reported in the literature may be encountered with age and other neurodegenerative diseases. However, the focality of the p-tau cortical findings in particular, and the regional distribution, are believed to be unique to CTE. The described clinical features in recent cases are very similar to how depression manifests in middle-aged men and with frontotemporal dementia as the disease progresses. It has not been established that the described tau pathology, especially in small amounts, can cause complex changes in behavior such as depression, substance abuse, suicidality, personality changes, or cognitive impairment. Future studies will help determine the extent to which the neuropathology is causally related to the diverse clinical features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

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    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  9. A novel type of encephalopathy associated with mushroom Sugihiratake ingestion in patients with chronic kidney diseases.

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    Gejyo, Fumitake; Homma, Noriyuki; Higuchi, Noboru; Ataka, Ken; Teramura, Tomoko; Alchi, Bassam; Suzuki, Yukio; Nishi, Schinichi; Narita, Ichiei

    2005-07-01

    The etiology of encephalopathy in uremic patients is multiple. We recently encountered a novel type of encephalopathy which occurred exclusively in patients with chronic kidney diseases after ingestion of a mushroom called Sugihiratake. While the exact etiology of this encephalopathy remained mysterious, we aimed to describe its clinical features. A total of 32 patients with chronic kidney diseases who had presented with encephalopathy following ingestion of Sugihiratake were enrolled from seven prefectures in Japan., with 24 of the 32 patients undergoing regular hemodialysis. The patient's clinical data were from surveillance by The Japanese Society of Nephrology. There was a significant association between Sugihiratake ingestion and the occurrence of encephalopathy in 524 hemodialysis patients questioned for a recent ingestion of this mushroom (P= 0.0006). The latent asymptomatic period before the onset of symptoms varied from 1 to 31 days (mean 9.1 +/- 7.3) days. The patient's symptoms consisted of disturbed consciousness in 30 patients (93.8%), convulsions in 25 (78.1%), myoclonus in 15 (46.9%), dysarthria in ten (31.3%), ataxia in eight (25.0%), paresis or paralysis in seven (21.9%), and skin parasthesia in two patients (6.3%). Nine (27.2%) patients died, mostly due to respiratory failure. The other patients were either discharged or still in hospitals with various degrees of clinical improvement. Patients with chronic kidney diseases are at risk of having serious encephalopathy following Sugihiratake ingestion and must refrain from eating it. Physicians, in those parts of the world, where this mushroom harvesting is common, should be aware of this complication.

  10. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

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    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other

  11. [Chronic respiratory insufficiency in France].

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    Chailleux, E; Boffa, C

    2001-05-31

    The data concerning the prevalence of chronic respiratory insufficiency (CRI) in France are scarce: in 1994 official numbers were 14,000 deaths due to chronic bronchitis, 2,000 due to asthma for a total number of 40,000 deaths with respiratory cause; the same year 27,000 new patients were compensated for chronic respiratory insufficiency by social security services. On January 1st 2000 the non-profit organizations was in charge of 21,500 patients with long term oxygen therapy and 10,500 with home ventilation, and the commercial companies respectively 30,000 and 6,000. Accordingly the total of patients treated at home for CRI is about 68,000. The repartition by cause of CRI, the characteristics of patients and the prognosis can be evaluated thanks to the ANTADIR observatory which collects medical data since 1981. Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, bronchiectasis) count for more than half of the total of cases. Other causes comprise pleuro-parietal diseases (tuberculosis sequelae, kyphoscoliosis), neuro-muscular diseases and interstitial lung diseases. CRI is a severe disease with a survival median of three years for chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and a prognosis slightly better for kyphoscoliosis and neuro-muscular diseases, and worse for pulmonary fibrosis.

  12. Encephalopathy

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    ... the brain that alters brain function or structure. Encephalopathy may be caused by infectious agent (bacteria, virus, or prion), metabolic or mitochondrial dysfunction, brain tumor or increased pressure in the ...

  13. A fatal encephalopathy in chronic haemodialysis patients.

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    Burks, J S; Alfrey, A C; Huddlestone, J; Norenberg, M D; Lewin, E

    1976-04-10

    A distinct neurological syndrome in twelve chronic haemodialysis patients is described. This syndrome is currently the leading cause of death in one Denver dialysis unit. The hallmarks of this syndrome are progressive speech difficulties, mental changes, and a markedly abnormal electroencephalogram which may be present months before the clinical signs appear. Additional clinical features including seizures, myoclonus, asterixis, apraxia, focal neurological signs, and psychiatric symptoms may also be observed. Neuropathological changes are slight and non-specific. The aetiology of this syndrome is unknown but the clinical and pathological features suggest a toxic/metabolic disorder. To date, this disorder has been refractory to several therapeutic measures.

  14. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

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    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2016-05-23

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article.

  15. [Chronic respiratory insufficiency and the elderly patient].

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    Cobarzan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Chronic respiratory failure is a complex entity of varied etiology and physio-pathological mechanisms. It is mainly characterised by the respiratory system's difficulty in ensuring correct aeration at rest, resulting initially in insufficient oxygenation of arterial blood. Treatment is adapted to each etiology and aims to compensate for respiratory failure and to ensure the oxygenation of the organism.

  16. The course of chronic solvent induced encephalopathy: a systematic review.

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    van Valen, Evelien; Wekking, Ellie; van der Laan, Gert; Sprangers, Mirjam; van Dijk, Frank

    2009-11-01

    Worldwide millions of workers are exposed to organic solvents. Long term exposure leads in some workers to the development of Chronic Solvent induced Encephalopathy (CSE). The first reports about CSE came from the European Nordic countries in the 1970s. In spite of decades of experience with this disease, little is known about the course and prognostic factors of CSE. To provide an overview of the evidence about the course and prognostic factors of CSE. A systematic review was conducted. Databases PubMed, PsycINFO (1970-2008) and EMBASE (1980-2008) were searched with the search strategy: solvent AND follow up AND (encephalopathy OR chronic intoxication). Inclusion criteria were: written in English, study population of CSE patients, follow-up time of at least 1 year. Included articles were assessed on methodological quality. Sixty unique articles were retrieved of which sixteen met the inclusion criteria. Data extraction provided information about domains of neurology, neuropsychology, physical and mental health perceptions, and social consequences. In a number of studies no significant changes, and in other studies improvement of functioning could be measured. Prognostic factors resulting from included studies were summarized for each domain indicating a potential positive influence of younger age and lower exposure variables. Due to the large heterogeneity of methodology no levels of evidence could be obtained. This review shows that there is a need for future research that addresses a variety of domains of functioning, hopefully resulting in an overall prognostic model for CSE. Studies in this review are in agreement about CSE being a non-progressive disease in which no severe deterioration of functioning occurs after diagnosis. In a number of studies no significant changes, and in other studies improvement of functioning could be measured. Presumably cessation of exposure might be one of the causal factors for the non-progressive character of the disease as has

  17. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MSE; Schmand, B; Wekking, EM; Hageman, G; Deelman, BG

    2003-01-01

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  18. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Suicide: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hal S. Wortzel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a global health concern, and the recent literature reports that a single mild TBI can result in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. It has been suggested that CTE may lead to death by suicide, raising important prevention, treatment, and policy implications. Thus, we conducted a systematic review of the medical literature to answer the key question: What is the existing evidence in support of a relationship between CTE and suicide? Systematic searches of CTE and suicide yielded 85 unique abstracts. Seven articles were identified for full text review. Only two case series met inclusion criteria and included autopsies from 17 unique cases, 5 of whom died by suicide. Neither studies used blinding, control cases, or systematic data collection regarding TBI exposure and/or medical/neuropsychiatric history. The identified CTE literature revealed divergent opinions regarding neuropathological elements of CTE and heterogeneity regarding clinical manifestations. Overall quality of evidence regarding a relationship between CTE and suicide was rated as very low using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group (GRADE criteria. Further studies of higher quality and methodological rigor are needed to determine the existence and nature of any relationship between CTE and suicide.

  19. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: A paradigm in search of evidence?

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    Castellani, Rudy J

    2015-06-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been in the medical literature since the 1920s. It is characterized clinically by diverse neuropsychiatric symptoms, and pathologically by variable degrees of phosphorylated tau accumulation in the brain. The evolving paradigm for the pathogenesis of CTE suggests that concussion or subconcussion from athletic participation initiates a cascade of pathologic events, encompassing neuroinflammation and protein templating with trans-synaptic neurotoxicity. The end result is neurologic and neurobehavioral deterioration, often with self-harm. Although these concepts warrant further investigation, the available evidence permits no conclusions as regards the pathogenesis of the reported findings. Investigations into the role of premorbid or co-morbid neurodegenerative diseases has been limited to date, and in-depth genetic analyses have not been performed. The role of concussion or subconcussion if any, whether and how the condition progresses over time, the extent of phosphorylated tau in clinically normal athletes, the role of phosphorylated tau as a toxic species versus an inert disease response, and whether protein templating has any in vivo relevance remain to be elucidated.

  20. The evidence for chronic traumatic encephalopathy in boxing.

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    McCrory, Paul; Zazryn, Tsharni; Cameron, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The sport of boxing has been the source of much debate, with concerns about the neurological risks of participating having led to many calls to ban the sport. This review seeks to establish an evidence base for the development of boxing-related chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and to determine the relevance of this information to the modern day sport.The clinical features of CTE include various symptoms affecting the pyramidal and extrapyramidal systems, which manifest most often as disturbed gait and coordination, slurred speech and tremors, as well as cerebral dysfunction causing cognitive impairments and neurobehavioural disturbances. Both amateur and professional boxers are potentially at risk of developing CTE. No current epidemiological evidence exists to determine the prevalence of this condition in modern day boxing, despite 17% of professional boxers in Britain with careers in the 1930-50s having clinical evidence of CTE. As medical presence within the sport increases and with modern boxers likely to have shorter careers, a reduced exposure to repetitive head trauma, and improved treatment and understanding of the development of CTE will occur. This should lead to the incidence of CTE diminishing in boxing populations.

  1. Respiratory Viral Infections in Chronic Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Clemente J; Brady, Virginia; Lee, Seiwon; Dela Cruz, Charles S

    2017-03-01

    Chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, cystic fibrosis (CF) and interstitial lung diseases (ILD), affect many individuals worldwide. Patients with these chronic lung diseases are susceptible to respiratory lung infections and some of these viral infections can contribute to disease pathogenesis. This review highlights the associations of lung infections and the respective chronic lung diseases and how infection in the different lung diseases affects disease exacerbation and progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Is phosphorylated tau unique to chronic traumatic encephalopathy? Phosphorylated tau in epileptic brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvenna, Vikram; Engeler, Madeline; Banjara, Manoj; Brennan, Chanda; Schreiber, Peter; Dadas, Aaron; Bahrami, Ashkon; Solanki, Jesal; Bandyopadhyay, Anasua; Morris, Jacqueline K; Bernick, Charles; Ghosh, Chaitali; Rapp, Edward; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Janigro, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI) is one of the major risk factors for the abnormal deposition of phosphorylated tau (PT) in the brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affect the limbic system, but no comparative studies on PT distribution in TLE and CTE are available. It is also unclear whether PT pathology results from repeated head hits (rTBI). These gaps prevent a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical significance of PT, limiting our ability to develop preventative and therapeutic interventions. We quantified PT in TLE and CTE to unveil whether a history of rTBI is a prerequisite for PT accumulation in the brain. Six postmortem CTE (mean 73.3 years) and age matched control samples were compared to 19 surgically resected TLE brain specimens (4 months-58 years; mean 27.6 years). No history of TBI was present in TLE or control; all CTE patients had a history of rTBI. TLE and CTE brain displayed increased levels of PT as revealed by immunohistochemistry. No age-dependent changes were noted, as PT was present as early as 4 months after birth. In TLE and CTE, cortical neurons, perivascular regions around penetrating pial vessels and meninges were immunopositive for PT; white matter tracts also displayed robust expression of extracellular PT organized in bundles parallel to venules. Microscopically, there were extensive tau-immunoreactive neuronal, astrocytic and degenerating neurites throughout the brain. In CTE perivascular tangles were most prominent. Overall, significant differences in staining intensities were found between CTE and control (Pbrain contained low molecular weight tau. Tau deposition may not be specific to rTBI since TLE recapitulated most of the pathological features of CTE.

  3. A case of chronic Wernicke's encephalopathy: A neuropsychological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W.; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE). She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After 5 days without treatment, she was diagno

  4. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...

  5. Expression of glutamine transporter isoforms in cerebral cortex of rats with chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Escobar, Thayssa D.C.; Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that occurs due to acute and chronic liver diseases, the hallmark of which is the increased levels of ammonia and subsequent alterations in glutamine synthesis, i.e. conditions associated with the pathophysiology of HE. Under physiological...

  6. Effects of Body-Mind Training and Relaxation Stretching on Persons with Chronic Toxic Encephalopathy.

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    Engel, Lis; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the psychological and physical effects of training of body awareness and slow stretching on persons (N=8) with chronic toxic encephalopathy. Results show that electromyography on the frontalis muscle and state anxiety decreased, but no changes were observed in trait anxiety and in the creativity score. (Author/MKA)

  7. Genetic polymorphism of metabolic enzymes modifies the risk of chronic solvent-induced encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kezic; F. Calkoen; M.A.M. Wenker; J.J.L. Jacobs; M.M. Verberk

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate whether genetic polymorphism in enzymes involved in the metabolism of organic solvents influences susceptibility to chronic solvent encephalopathy (CSE), which is one of the major effects of long-term exposure to organic solvents. Polymorphisms in the genes encod

  8. Effect of NIPPV combined with respiratory stimulant therapy on serum markers in COPD patients with mild pulmonary encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Chen; Ying-Jia Lu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of NIPPV combined with respiratory stimulant therapy on serum markers in COPD patients with mild pulmonary encephalopathy.Methods: A total of 102 cases of COPD patients with mild pulmonary encephalopathy who were hospitalized in our hospital from November 2012 to February 2015 were selected as research subjects and divided into observation group 51 cases and control group 51 cases according to the different clinical treatment they received. Control group received respiratory stimulant therapy alone, observation group received NIPPV combined with respiratory stimulant therapy, and then differences in arterial blood gas, serum AngⅡ, CPK, LDH, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 levels, S-100β, NSE, MBP, T-SOD and MDA levels as well as T3, T4 and TSH levels were compared between two groups.Results:PH value and PaO2 value of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group, and PaCO2 level was lower than that of control group; serum AngⅡ, CPK, LDH, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 levels of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group; serum S-100β, NSE, MBP and MDA levels of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group, and T-SOD level was higher than that of control group; serum T3, T4 and TSH levels of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group.Conclusion:NIPPV combined with respiratory stimulant therapy for COPD patients with mild pulmonary encephalopathy can effectively optimize respiratory function and equilibrate body fluid environment, and it has active clinical significance.

  9. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of common chronic medical conditions on psychometric tests used to diagnose minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M M; Poulsen, L; Rasmussen, C K

    2016-01-01

    Many chronic medical conditions are accompanied by cognitive disturbances but these have only to a very limited extent been psychometrically quantified. An exception is liver cirrhosis where hepatic encephalopathy is an inherent risk and mild forms are diagnosed by psychometric tests. The preferred....../15, p psychometrically measurable cognitive deficits, whereas those with ESRF or DMII had not. This adds to the understanding of the clinical consequences of chronic heart- and lung disease, and implies...... that the psychometric tests should be interpreted with great caution in cirrhosis patients with heart- or lung comorbidity....

  11. Cerebral blood flow and liver function in patients with encephalopathy due to acute and chronic liver diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, T; Schroeder, T; Ranek, L

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in hepatic encephalopathy, to ascertain whether this was related to the changes in liver function and whether these changes gave any prognostic information. CBF, determined by the intravenous xenon-133 method......, and liver functions, assessed by the prothrombin index, bilirubin concentration, and the galactose elimination capacity, were studied in patients with acute fulminant liver failure and in patients with encephalopathy due to chronic liver diseases--that is, cirrhosis of various etiologies. The CBF range...... any differences between patients with acute or chronic liver diseases or the different degrees of hepatic encephalopathy. In conclusion, a marked reduction of the CBF was seen in hepatic encephalopathy, irrespective of the etiology of the disease....

  12. Chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Ellen Fischer; Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995-2009.......To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995-2009....

  13. [EFFICIENT TREATMENT OF CHRONIC RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY IN PATIENTS WITH KYPHOSCOLIOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkova, O A; Pal'man, A D; Abdulaeva, G B

    2015-01-01

    We report efficient treatment of chronic respiratory insufficiency in patients with congenital kyphoscoliosis by non-invasive auxiliary ventilation and low-flow oxygen therapy. It proved possible to effectively control severe chronic respiratory insufficiency under conditions of a pulmonological ward without application of means and measures of intensive therapy.

  14. A case of chronic Wernicke’s Encephalopathy: a neuropsychological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eOudman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE. She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After five days without treatment she was diagnosed with WE in a general hospital. During the course of the disease minimal change to the acute situation occurred, with chronic confusion, attention deficits and incoherent behavior symptoms most notable unlike classical Korsakoff's Syndrome (KS. Neuropsychological assessment after four and sixteen months after admission to the hospital revealed global cognitive decline, with striking impairments in attentional, executive and memory functions. The present case study suggests that the state of confusion and the neuropsychological symptoms in WE can become chronic in case of very late treatment. We therefore recommend that confused alcoholics should receive appropriate parenteral thiamine according to the current clinical standards.

  15. Effectiveness and safety of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation for severe hypercapnic encephalopathy due to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease:a prospective case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guang-fa; ZHANG Wei; ZONG Hua; XU Qiu-fen; LIANG Ying

    2007-01-01

    Background Although severe encephalopathy has been proposed as a possible contraindication to the use of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation(NPPV),increasing clinical reports showed it was effective in patients with impaired consciousness and even coma secondary to acute respiratory failure,especially hypercapnic acute respiratory failure(HARF).To further evaluate the effectiveness and safety of NPPV for severe hypercapnic encephalopathy,a prospective case-control study was conducted at a university respiratory intensive care unit(RICU)in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(AECOPD)during the past 3 years.Methods Forty-three of 68 consecutive AECOPD patients requiring ventilatory support for HARF were divided into 2 groups,which were carefully matched for age,sex,COPD course,tobacco use and previous hospitalization history,according to the severity of encephalopathy,22 patients with Glasgow coma scale(GCS)0.05),but group A needed an average of 7 cmH2O higher of maximal pressure support during NPPV,and 4,4 and 7 days longer of NPPV time,RICU stay and hospital stay respectively than group B(P<0.05 or P<0.01).NPPV therapy failed in 12 patients(6 in each group)because of excessive airway secretions(7 patients),hemodynamic instability(2),worsening of dyspnea and deterioration of gas exchange(2),and gastric content aspiration(1).Conclusions Selected patients with severe hypercapnic encephalopathy secondary to HARF can be treated as effectively and safely with NPPV as awake patients with HARF due to AECOPD;a trial of NPPV should be instituted to reduce the need of endotracheal intubation in patients with severe hypercapnic encephalopathy who are otherwise good candidates for NPPV due to AECOPD.

  16. Chronic Respiratory Diseases of School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, John P.

    1976-01-01

    The author examines the problems of chronic respiratory disease in school-age children from a medical viewpoint, including recognition and diagnosis, commonly encountered diseases, their effect on participation in physical exercise, emotional factors, medication, and emergency care. (MB)

  17. Respiratory weakness in patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Kapreli, Eleni; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory muscle strength is one parameter that is currently proposed to be affected in patients with chronic neck pain. This study was aimed at examining whether patients with chronic neck pain have reduced respiratory strength and with which neck pain problems their respiratory strength is associated. In this controlled cross-sectional study, 45 patients with chronic neck pain and 45 healthy well-matched controls were recruited. Respiratory muscle strength was assessed through maximal mouth pressures. The subjects were additionally assessed for their pain intensity and disability, neck muscle strength, endurance of deep neck flexors, neck range of movement, forward head posture and psychological states. Paired t-tests showed that patients with chronic neck pain have reduced Maximal Inspiratory (MIP) (r = 0.35) and Maximal Expiratory Pressures (MEP) (r = 0.39) (P Neck muscle strength (r > 0.5), kinesiophobia (r neck pain and disability (r Neck muscle strength was the only predictor that remained as significant into the prediction models of MIP and MEP. It can be concluded that patients with chronic neck pain present weakness of their respiratory muscles. This weakness seems to be a result of the impaired global and local muscle system of neck pain patients, and psychological states also appear to have an additional contribution. Clinicians are advised to consider the respiratory system of patients with chronic neck pain during their usual assessment and appropriately address their treatment.

  18. Talking with parents of high school football players about chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a concise summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Shawn; Solomon, Gary S

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decade, athletic-related chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has garnered a great deal of attention in the popular press and, more recently, in the scientific press. With increasing frequency, sports medicine practitioners and providers are faced with questions from the parents of high school football players about CTE and the risk posed to children who participate in this or other contact or collision sports. The purpose of this review was to summarize the research on CTE in an attempt to provide some evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions in clinics from parents. Addressed are (1) the definitions of CTE and its symptoms, (2) the evidence for CTE in football, (3) abnormal tau protein, (4) the use of neuroimaging in CTE diagnosis, (5) risk for CTE, (6) CTE diagnosis in youth, (7) CTE and its relationship to suicide, and (8) contact and collision sports as a risk factor for permanent brain injury or death.

  19. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF THE CHRONIC RESPIRATORY QUESTIONNAIRE (CRQ)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJKSTRA, PJ; TENVERGERT, EM; VANALTENA, R; OTTEN, [No Value; POSTMA, DS; KRAAN, J; KOETER, GH

    1994-01-01

    Background - The Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ) is frequently applied to assess quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the reliability and validity of this questionnaire have not yet been determined. This study investigates the reliability an

  20. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  1. [Gastro-esophageal reflux and chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirou, S; Germaud, P; Bruley des Varannes, S; Magnan, A; Blanc, F-X

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) frequently occurs in association with chronic respiratory diseases although the casual link is not always clear. Several pathophysiological and experimental factors are considered to support a role for GERD in respiratory disease. Conversely, respiratory diseases and bronchodilator treatment can themselves exacerbate GERD. When cough or severe asthma is being investigated, GERD does not need to be systematically looked for and a therapeutic test with proton pump inhibitors is not always recommended. pH impedance monitoring is now the reference diagnostic tool to detect non acid reflux, a form of reflux for which proton pump inhibitor treatment is ineffective. Recent data have shown a potential role of GERD in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and bronchiolitis obliterans following lung transplantation, leading to discussions about the place of surgery in this context. However, studies using pH impedance monitoring are still needed to better understand and manage the association between GERD and chronic respiratory diseases.

  2. Importance of Social Relationships in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    The literature lacks reports on the role of the social relationships domain (SRD) of quality of life (QoL) in shaping care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases in primary care. In this study we examined a group of 582 patients with chronic respiratory diseases and chronic non-respiratory diseases recruited from 199 primary care centers. In the patients with chronic respiratory diseases, higher SRD correlated with more frequent patient visits due to medical issue, fewer district nurse interventions over the past 12 months, less frequent hospitalizations over the past 3 years, and fewer chronic diseases. In these patients, a high SRD was most effectively created by high QoL in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, and the satisfaction with QoL. Programs for preventing a decline in SRD should include patients with low scores in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, those who show no improvement in mental or somatic well-being in the past 12 months, those with a low level of positive mental attitudes, unhealthy eating habits, and with low levels of met needs. Such programs should include older widows and widowers without permanent relationships, with only primary education, living far from a primary care center, and those whose visits were not due to a medical issue.

  3. Sex-dependent mitochondrial respiratory impairment and oxidative stress in a rat model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarest, Tyler G; Schuh, Rosemary A; Waddell, Jaylyn; McKenna, Mary C; Fiskum, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Increased male susceptibility to long-term cognitive deficits is well described in clinical and experimental studies of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. While cell death signaling pathways are known to be sexually dimorphic, a sex-dependent pathophysiological mechanism preceding the majority of secondary cell death has yet to be described. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell death following cerebral hypoxic-ischemia (HI). Several lines of evidence suggest that there are sex differences in the mitochondrial metabolism of adult mammals. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that brain mitochondrial respiratory impairment and associated oxidative stress is more severe in males than females following HI. Maximal brain mitochondrial respiration during oxidative phosphorylation was two-fold more impaired in males following HI. The endogenous antioxidant glutathione was 30% higher in the brain of sham females compared to males. Females also exhibited increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity following HI injury. Conversely, males displayed a reduction in mitochondrial GPx4 protein levels and mitochondrial GPx activity. Moreover, a 3-4-fold increase in oxidative protein carbonylation was observed in the cortex, perirhinal cortex, and hippocampus of injured males, but not females. These data provide the first evidence for sex-dependent mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and oxidative damage, which may contribute to the relative male susceptibility to adverse long-term outcomes following HI. Lower basal GSH levels, lower post-hypoxic mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase (mtGPx) activity, and mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase 4 (mtGPx4) protein levels may contribute to the susceptibility of the male brain to oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction following neonatal hypoxic-ischemia (HI). Treatment of male pups with acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) protects against the loss of mtGPx activity, mtGPx4 protein, and increases in protein

  4. Update on the "Dutch hypothesis" for chronic respiratory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J; Prescott, E

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients with chronic obstructive lung disease show increased airways responsiveness to histamine. We investigated the hypothesis that increased airways responsiveness predicts the development and remission of chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: We used data from 24-year follow......-up (1965-90) of 2684 participants in a cohort study in Vlagtwedde and Vlaardingen, Netherlands. Increased airways responsiveness was defined as a PC10 value (concentration of histamine for which challenge led to a 10% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s) of less than 8 mg/ml. Information on respiratory...... of the odds ratio for the development of any of the six symptoms was 1.7 (1.2-2.3). Participants with increased airways responsiveness were less likely than those without this characteristic to show remission of these respiratory symptoms. The estimate of the odds ratio for the remission of any of the six...

  5. Our great forgotten, chronic respiratory sufferers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordejé Laguna, María Luisa

    2017-05-08

    Lung’s own properties make that nutritional support, besides covering the requirements can modulate its infl ammatory response. Lung tissue has a low glucose stock. Fatty acids are the main energy producer of type II pneumocytes, which use them in order to form phospholipids, essential for surfactant whose creation and release decrease in acute lung injury (ALI). Glutamine is a good substratum for endocrine cells and type II pneumocytes. Due to high nutritional risk, it is important its assessments in disorders as COPD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ADRS). Indirect calorimetry values the effect of ventilation and nutritional support, avoiding overfeeding. Hypophosphatemia and refeeding syndrome are frequent and need to be avoided because of their morbidity. In critically ill patients, malnutrition can lead to respiratory failure and increasing mechanical ventilation time. To avoid hypercapnia in weaning, glucose levels should be controlled. High lipids/carbohydrates ratio do not show usefulness in COPD neither mechanical ventilation removal. ALI patients beneficiate from an early start and the volume administered. Enteral nutrition with high fatty acids ratio (EPA, DHA and γ-linolenic acid) and antioxidants do not show any superiority. Omega-3 fatty acid in parenteral nutrition could modulate infl ammation and immunosuppression in a positive manner. The use of glutamine, vitamins or antioxidants in these patients could be justified.

  6. Metabolic profiling indicates impaired pyruvate dehydrogenase function in myalgic encephalopathy/chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluge, Øystein; Mella, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Risa, Kristin; Dyrstad, Sissel E; Alme, Kine; Rekeland, Ingrid G; Sapkota, Dipak; Røsland, Gro V; Fosså, Alexander; Ktoridou-Valen, Irini; Lunde, Sigrid; Sørland, Kari; Lien, Katarina; Herder, Ingrid; Thürmer, Hanne; Gotaas, Merete E; Baranowska, Katarzyna A; Bohnen, Louis M L J; Schäfer, Christoph; McCann, Adrian; Sommerfelt, Kristian; Helgeland, Lars; Ueland, Per M; Dahl, Olav; Tronstad, Karl J

    2016-12-22

    Myalgic encephalopathy/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a debilitating disease of unknown etiology, with hallmark symptoms including postexertional malaise and poor recovery. Metabolic dysfunction is a plausible contributing factor. We hypothesized that changes in serum amino acids may disclose specific defects in energy metabolism in ME/CFS. Analysis in 200 ME/CFS patients and 102 healthy individuals showed a specific reduction of amino acids that fuel oxidative metabolism via the TCA cycle, mainly in female ME/CFS patients. Serum 3-methylhistidine, a marker of endogenous protein catabolism, was significantly increased in male patients. The amino acid pattern suggested functional impairment of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), supported by increased mRNA expression of the inhibitory PDH kinases 1, 2, and 4; sirtuin 4; and PPARδ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from both sexes. Myoblasts grown in presence of serum from patients with severe ME/CFS showed metabolic adaptations, including increased mitochondrial respiration and excessive lactate secretion. The amino acid changes could not be explained by symptom severity, disease duration, age, BMI, or physical activity level among patients. These findings are in agreement with the clinical disease presentation of ME/CFS, with inadequate ATP generation by oxidative phosphorylation and excessive lactate generation upon exertion.

  7. In vivo characterization of chronic traumatic encephalopathy using [F-18]FDDNP PET brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Jorge R; Small, Gary W; Wong, Koon-Pong; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Merrill, David A; Giza, Christopher C; Fitzsimmons, Robert P; Omalu, Bennet; Bailes, Julian; Kepe, Vladimir

    2015-04-21

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is an acquired primary tauopathy with a variety of cognitive, behavioral, and motor symptoms linked to cumulative brain damage sustained from single, episodic, or repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). No definitive clinical diagnosis for this condition exists. In this work, we used [F-18]FDDNP PET to detect brain patterns of neuropathology distribution in retired professional American football players with suspected CTE (n = 14) and compared results with those of cognitively intact controls (n = 28) and patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD) (n = 24), a disease that has been cognitively associated with CTE. [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging results in the retired players suggested the presence of neuropathological patterns consistent with models of concussion wherein brainstem white matter tracts undergo early axonal damage and cumulative axonal injuries along subcortical, limbic, and cortical brain circuitries supporting mood, emotions, and behavior. This deposition pattern is distinctively different from the progressive pattern of neuropathology [paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and amyloid-β] in AD, which typically begins in the medial temporal lobe progressing along the cortical default mode network, with no or minimal involvement of subcortical structures. This particular [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging pattern in cases of suspected CTE also is primarily consistent with PHF-tau distribution observed at autopsy in subjects with a history of mild TBI and autopsy-confirmed diagnosis of CTE.

  8. Comparison of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalopathy with other disorders: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Ak; Lervik, Lv; Harvey, Sb; Løvvik, Cms; Omenås, An; Mykletun, A

    2012-05-01

    To examine the level of activity in online discussion forums for chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalopathy (CFS/ME) compared to other disorders. We hypothesized the level of activity to be higher in CFS/ME online discussion forums. Observational study Norway, which has more than 80% household coverage in internet access, September 2009 Twelve Norwegian disorder-related online discussion forums Number of registered users and number of posted messages on each discussion forum Two forums were targeted towards individuals with CFS/ME. These forums had the highest number of registered users per estimated 1,000 cases in the population (50.5 per 1,000 and 29.7 per 1,000), followed by a site for drug dependency (5.4 per 1,000). Counting the number of posted messages per 1,000 cases gave similar indications of high online activity in the CFS/ME discussion forums. CFS/ME online forums had more than ten times the relative activity of any other disorder or condition related forum. This high level of activity may have multiple explanations. Individuals suffering from a stigmatized condition of unknown aetiology may use the internet to look for explanations of symptoms or to seek out alternative treatments. Internet forum activity may also be reinforced by the creation of in-group identity and pre-morbid personality traits. More knowledge on the type and quality of information provided in online forums is urgently needed.

  9. Hepatic encephalopathy in patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis and acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Montagnese, Sara; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy in a hospitalized cirrhotic patient is associated with a high mortality rate and its presence adds further to the mortality of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The exact pathophysiological mechanisms of HE in this group of patients are unclear but hyperammonemia, systemic inflammation (including sepsis, bacterial translocation, and insulin resistance) and oxidative stress, modulated by glutaminase gene alteration, remain as key factors. Moreover, alcohol misuse, hyponatremia, renal insufficiency, and microbiota are actively explored. HE diagnosis requires exclusion of other causes of neurological, metabolic and psychiatric dysfunction. Hospitalization in the ICU should be considered in every patient with overt HE, but particularly if this is associated with ACLF. Precipitating factors should be identified and treated as required. Evidence-based specific management options are limited to bowel cleansing and non-absorbable antibiotics. Ammonia lowering drugs, such as glycerol phenylbutyrate and ornithine phenylacetate show promise but are still in clinical trials. Albumin dialysis may be useful in refractory cases. Antibiotics, prebiotics, and treatment of diabetes reduce systemic inflammation. Where possible and not contraindicated, large portal-systemic shunts may be embolized but liver transplantation is the most definitive step in the management of HE in this setting. HE in patients with ACLF appears to be clinically and pathophysiologically distinct from that of acute decompensation and requires further studies and characterization.

  10. Tau prions from Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy patients propagate in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerman, Amanda L; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Patel, Smita; Kazmi, Sabeen A; Lobach, Iryna; Grinberg, Lea T; McKee, Ann C; Seeley, William W; Olson, Steven H; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2016-12-13

    Tau prions are thought to aggregate in the central nervous system, resulting in neurodegeneration. Among the tauopathies, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common, whereas argyrophilic grain disease (AGD), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Pick's disease (PiD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) are less prevalent. Brain extracts from deceased individuals with PiD, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by three-repeat (3R) tau prions, were used to infect HEK293T cells expressing 3R tau fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Extracts from AGD, CBD, and PSP patient samples, which contain four-repeat (4R) tau prions, were transmitted to HEK293 cells expressing 4R tau fused to YFP. These studies demonstrated that prion propagation in HEK cells requires isoform pairing between the infecting prion and the recipient substrate. Interestingly, tau aggregates in AD and CTE, containing both 3R and 4R isoforms, were unable to robustly infect either 3R- or 4R-expressing cells. However, AD and CTE prions were able to replicate in HEK293T cells expressing both 3R and 4R tau. Unexpectedly, increasing the level of 4R isoform expression alone supported the propagation of both AD and CTE prions. These results allowed us to determine the levels of tau prions in AD and CTE brain extracts.

  11. Effects of pneumococcal vaccine in patients with chronic respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Watanuki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, it is very difficult to demonstrate the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccines because the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia is very low. Vaccination against pneumococci infection was advised for 1378 outpatients, over 60 years of age, with chronic respiratory disease for more than one year. Of these patients, those who responded affirmatively to the advice were vaccinated against pneumococci between August and November 2002. The effectiveness of vaccination was evaluated by means of a 2-year cohort-study, comparing the vaccinated group (647 with the non-vaccinated group (731. The variables analyzed were the frequency of onset of bacterial respiratory infection, hospitalization due to bacterial respiratory infection and onset of pneumococcal respiratory infection. The incidence of bacterial respiratory infection and the incidence of pneumococcal respiratory infection to have decreased in the following 2 years (17.4%, 0.9%, as compared to the previous year (25.9%, 3.1%, in the vaccinated group. Conversely, the frequency was higher in the following 2 years (14.4%, 0.9% as compared to the previous year (14.2%, 0.4% in the non-vaccinated group. This inter-group difference was statistically significant. Simultaneous vaccination against pneumococci and influenza virus also resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of bacterial respiratory infection. No decrease was observed in the frequency of hospitalization. These results indicate that pneumococcal vaccine is useful for elderly patients with chronic respiratory disease and that its efficacy may be enhanced by simultaneous vaccination against influenza.

  12. Respiratory Conditions Update: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, Daphne J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as persistent airflow limitation due to irritant-induced chronic inflammation. A postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio of 0.7 or less is diagnostic in a patient with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of irritant exposure. Tobacco smoking is the most significant etiology, and smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. Long-acting beta2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists are first-line treatments for patients with persistently symptomatic COPD with an FEV1 of 80% or less of predicted. When COPD is uncontrolled with a long-acting bronchodilator, combination therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist-long-acting beta2-agonist or long-acting beta2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid should be prescribed. Patients with COPD and reduced exercise tolerance should undergo pulmonary rehabilitation and be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy. Other treatment options for persistently symptomatic COPD include inhaler triple therapy (ie, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, long-acting beta2-agonist, inhaled corticosteroid), phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, oxygen, and surgical interventions.

  13. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in an Iraqi war veteran with posttraumatic stress disorder who committed suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omalu, Bennet; Hammers, Jennifer L; Bailes, Julian; Hamilton, Ronald L; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Webster, Garrett; Fitzsimmons, Robert P

    2011-11-01

    Following his discovery of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in football players in 2002, Dr. Bennet Omalu hypothesized that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in military veterans may belong to the CTE spectrum of diseases. The CTE surveillance at the Brain Injury Research Institute was therefore expanded to include deceased military veterans diagnosed with PTSD. The authors report the case of a 27-year-old United States Marine Corps (USMC) Iraqi war veteran, an amphibious assault vehicle crewman, who committed suicide by hanging after two deployments to Fallujah and Ramadi. He experienced combat and was exposed to mortar blasts and improvised explosive device blasts less than 50 m away. Following his second deployment he developed a progressive history of cognitive impairment, impaired memory, behavioral and mood disorders, and alcohol abuse. Neuropsychiatric assessment revealed a diagnosis of PTSD with hyperarousal (irritability and insomnia) and numbing. He committed suicide approximately 8 months after his honorable discharge from the USMC. His brain at autopsy appeared grossly unremarkable except for congestive brain swelling. There was no atrophy or remote focal traumatic brain injury such as contusional necrosis or hemorrhage. Histochemical and immunohistochemical brain tissue analysis revealed CTE changes comprising multifocal, neocortical, and subcortical neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic threads (ranging from none, to sparse, to frequent) with the skip phenomenon, accentuated in the depths of sulci and in the frontal cortex. The subcortical white matter showed mild rarefaction, sparse perivascular and neuropil infiltration by histiocytes, and mild fibrillary astrogliosis. Apolipoprotein E genotype was 3/4. The authors report this case as a sentinel case of CTE in an Iraqi war veteran diagnosed with PTSD to possibly stimulate new lines of thought and research in the possible pathoetiology and pathogenesis of PTSD in military veterans as part of

  14. The seasonality of respiratory viruses in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Jesse T; Paula, Flavia E; Proença-Modena, José L; Demarco, Ricardo C; Buzatto, Guilherme P; Saturno, Tamara H; Delcaro, Luana S; Tamashiro, Edwin; Valera, Fabiana C P; Arruda, Eurico; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma T

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common illness, yet little is known about its pathogenesis, including the role played by respiratory viruses. A transversal prospective study was conducted to analyze the seasonality of CRS using real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect respiratory virus genomes in secretions and tissue samples from patients with CRS with and without nasal polyps. The frequency of viral detection was 41% (31/75). The respiratory virus most frequently detected was human rhinovirus, found in 18 patients (24%), followed by human metapneumovirus, human enterovirus, human respiratory sincicial virus, human adenovirus, human bocavirus, human coronavirus, and human influenza virus, detected in 12 (16%), five (6.6%), four (5.3%), four (5.3%), two (2.6%), two (2.6%), and one (1.3%) patient(s), respectively. Although none of the patients presented symptoms when the samples were collected, there was a peak in detection of the most prevalent virus in the autumn and winter seasons of both years, similar to the pattern that occurs in acute conditions. The pattern of respiratory virus seasonality found in nasal mucosa, polyps, and paranasal sinus samples in patients with CRS reinforces the possibility of asymptomatic respiratory viral infections.

  15. Acute effects of urban air pollution on respiratory health of children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, S; Hoek, G; Boezen, H M; Schouten, J P; van Wijnen, J H; Brunekreef, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate to what extent different components of air pollution are associated with acute respiratory health effects in children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: During three consecutive winters starting in 1992-3, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and respiratory sym

  16. Absence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in retired football players with multiple concussions and neurological symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili-Naz eHazrati

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is the term coined for the neurodegenerative disease often suspected in athletes with histories of repeated concussion and progressive dementia. Histologically, CTE is defined as a tauopathy with a distribution of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles that is distinct from other tauopathies, and usually shows an absence of beta-amyloid deposits, in contrast to Alzheimer’s disease. Although the connection between repeated concussions and CTE-type neurodegeneration has been recently proposed, this causal relationship has not yet been firmly established. Also, the prevalence of CTE among athletes with multiple concussions is unknown. Methods: We performed a consecutive case series brain autopsy study on six retired professional football players from the Canadian Football League with histories of multiple concussions and significant neurological decline. Results: All participants had progressive neurocognitive decline prior to death; however, only 3 cases had post-mortem neuropathological findings consistent with CTE. The other 3 participants had pathological diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease. Moreover, the CTE cases showed co-morbid pathology of cancer, vascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Discussion: Our case studies highlight that not all athletes with history of repeated concussions and neurological symptomalogy present neuropathological changes of CTE. These preliminary findings support the need for further research into the link between concussion and CTE as well as the need to expand the research to other possible causes of taupathy in athletes. They point to a critical need for prospective studies with good sampling methods to allow us to understand the relationship between multiple concussions and the development of CTE.

  17. Absence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in retired football players with multiple concussions and neurological symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Tartaglia, Maria C; Diamandis, Phedias; Davis, Karen D; Green, Robin E; Wennberg, Richard; Wong, Janice C; Ezerins, Leo; Tator, Charles H

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the term coined for the neurodegenerative disease often suspected in athletes with histories of repeated concussion and progressive dementia. Histologically, CTE is defined as a tauopathy with a distribution of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) that is distinct from other tauopathies, and usually shows an absence of beta-amyloid deposits, in contrast to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the connection between repeated concussions and CTE-type neurodegeneration has been recently proposed, this causal relationship has not yet been firmly established. Also, the prevalence of CTE among athletes with multiple concussions is unknown. We performed a consecutive case series brain autopsy study on six retired professional football players from the Canadian Football League (CFL) with histories of multiple concussions and significant neurological decline. All participants had progressive neurocognitive decline prior to death; however, only 3 cases had post-mortem neuropathological findings consistent with CTE. The other 3 participants had pathological diagnoses of AD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Moreover, the CTE cases showed co-morbid pathology of cancer, vascular disease, and AD. Our case studies highlight that not all athletes with history of repeated concussions and neurological symptomology present neuropathological changes of CTE. These preliminary findings support the need for further research into the link between concussion and CTE as well as the need to expand the research to other possible causes of taupathy in athletes. They point to a critical need for prospective studies with good sampling methods to allow us to understand the relationship between multiple concussions and the development of CTE.

  18. Active music therapy improves cognition and behaviour in chronic vascular encephalopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnoli, Anna Rita; Oliveri, Serena; Schifano, Letizia; Raglio, Alfredo

    2014-02-01

    This study describes the effects of active music therapy (AMT) on cognition and behaviour in chronic vascular encephalopathy. A single case study investigated different cognitive and psycho-behavioural changes after AMT. An adult patient with memory, attention, and verbal fluency deficits associated with Vascular Cognitive Impairment-No Dementia (VCI-ND) was treated. A four-months AMT course was based on creative and interactive music playing. Sixteen sessions were conducted simultaneously to the pharmacological therapy. Cognitive performances, mood, interpersonal interactions, and perceived abilities were assessed using standardized neuropsychological and psycho-behavioural measurements. At baseline, the patient reported a tendency to feel tense, nervous, and angry and difficulties in memory and visuospatial performances, frequently accompanied by attention drops. The social network was a habitual component of the patient's life, but not a source of sharing of personal experiences, safety or comfort. Neuropsychological tests showed deficits in object and figure naming, verbal fluency, short and long-term verbal memory, short-term spatial memory, selective attention, and visuomotor coordination. After AMT, the cognitive profile significantly improved in attention, visuomotor coordination, and verbal and spatial memory. Such positive changes were confirmed at the three-months follow-up. An increase of the interpersonal interactions and consistent reduction of anxiety were also observed. In selected patients with VCI-ND, a well-structured AMT intervention added to standard therapy may contribute in determining a stable improvement of cognitive and psycho-behavioural aspects. Controlled studies are needed to confirm these promising results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Understanding of pneumococcal vaccination in patients with chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Yuji; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yoshiike, Yasuhiro; Ogura, Takashi; Sato, Masamiti; Miyazawa, Naoki; Kakemizu, Nobumasa

    2005-04-01

    Pneumococcal vaccination is still rare in Japan. To evaluate understanding concerning the vaccination, we employed a questionnaire answered by patients aged over 60 with chronic respiratory diseases from August to October 2002. Only 286 (18%) of the 1595 patients already knew of the existence of the vaccine, and 999 (64%) patients wanted to be vaccinated. That season, 717 (43%) patients were actually vaccinated. Patients with chronic respiratory failure, those who had contracted pulmonary infections in the previous year, those over 70 year-old, and male patients tended to be vaccinated. Although elderly and high-risk patients are recommended to be vaccinated, the pneumococcal vaccination rates in those patients was low. Campaigns for vaccination are needed.

  20. [Anthropometric evaluation of pediatric patients with non-progressive chronic encephalopathy according to different methods of classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Jéssica Socas; Gomes, Mirian Martins

    2014-09-01

    To perform anthropometric assessment of patients with quadriplegic, chronic non-progressive encephalopathy, comparing two distinct references of nutritional classification, and to compare the estimated height to the length measured by stadiometer. Cross-sectional study including 0-3-year children with quadriplegic, chronic non-progressive encephalopathy in secondary public hospital. Length, weight, arm circumference, triceps skinfold and knee height were measured. The arm muscle circumference and estimated height were calculated. The following relations were evaluated: weight-for-age, length-for-age and weight-for-length, using as reference the charts of the the World Health Organization (WHO) and those proposed by Krick et al. Fourteen children with a mean age of 21 months were evaluated. Assessment of anthropometric indicators showed significant difference between the two classification methods to assess nutritional indicators length/age (p=0.014), weight/age (p=0.014) and weight/length (p=0.001). There was significant correlation between measured length and estimated height (r=0.796, p=0.001). Evaluation of arm circumference and triceps skinfold showed that most patients presented some degree of malnutrition. According to arm muscle circumference, most were eutrophic. Specific curves for children with chronic non-progressive encephalopathy appear to underestimate malnutrition when one takes into account indicators involving weight. Curves developed for healthy children can be a good option for clinical practice and weight-for-length indicator and body composition measurements should be considered as complementary tools. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Mixed pathologies including chronic traumatic encephalopathy account for dementia in retired association football (soccer) players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Helen; Morris, Huw R; Neal, James W; Lees, Andrew J; Hardy, John; Holton, Janice L; Revesz, Tamas; Williams, David D R

    2017-03-01

    In retired professional association football (soccer) players with a past history of repetitive head impacts, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a potential neurodegenerative cause of dementia and motor impairments. From 1980 to 2010, 14 retired footballers with dementia were followed up regularly until death. Their clinical data, playing career, and concussion history were prospectively collected. Next-of-kin provided consent for six to have post-mortem brain examination. Of the 14 male participants, 13 were professional and 1 was a committed amateur. All were skilled headers of the ball and had played football for an average of 26 years. Concussion rate was limited in six cases to one episode each during their careers. All cases developed progressive cognitive impairment with an average age at onset of 63.6 years and disease duration of 10 years. Neuropathological examination revealed septal abnormalities in all six post-mortem cases, supportive of a history of chronic repetitive head impacts. Four cases had pathologically confirmed CTE; concomitant pathologies included Alzheimer's disease (N = 6), TDP-43 (N = 6), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (N = 5), hippocampal sclerosis (N = 2), corticobasal degeneration (N = 1), dementia with Lewy bodies (N = 1), and vascular pathology (N = 1); and all would have contributed synergistically to the clinical manifestations. The pathological diagnosis of CTE was established in four individuals according to the latest consensus diagnostic criteria. This finding is probably related to their past prolonged exposure to repetitive head impacts from head-to-player collisions and heading the ball thousands of time throughout their careers. Alzheimer's disease and TDP-43 pathologies are common concomitant findings in CTE, both of which are increasingly considered as part of the CTE pathological entity in older individuals. Association football is the most popular sport in the world and the potential link between

  2. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of terms Donate Today Enroll in 123 What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain ...

  3. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-07

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause neurological death with brain edema and intracranial hypertension. It is assumed that approximately 60%-80% of patients with liver cirrhosis develop hepatic encephalopathy. This review explores the complex mechanisms that lead to hepatic encephalopathy. However, noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is not associated with hepatic diseases and has a completely different etiology. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a severe occurrence that is connected with multiple pathogeneses.

  4. Steroid myopathy in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Oleg S; Polunina, Anna G; Demyanova, Marina A; Isaev, Fedor V

    2014-03-15

    Corticosteroid-induced myopathy is a well known clinical entity, and experimental studies showed decreased rate of protein synthesis and increased rate of protein breakdown in muscles of chronically treated animals. The present observational study was aimed to evaluate skeletal muscle functions in asthmatics and patients with other chronic respiratory diseases treated by inhaled or oral corticosteroids. Thirty six patients with respiratory diseases were included into the study. The physician-rated peripheral motor deficits scale, stepper test and ankle/wrist index were used for assessment of muscle functions. The effects of length of glucocorticoids intake on muscle functions were evaluated. Sixty five per cent of patients using corticosteroids daily during 1 year and longer reported weakness in legs, and 20% of these patients demonstrated objective signs of the muscle weakness. The performance on the stepper test was significantly worse in patients chronically using corticosteroids in comparison with the control group (10.9 ± 3.4 steps vs 16.1 ± 2.4 steps per 10s, respectively; F=21.6, pmuscle hypotrophy at a dominant leg. Chronic intake of inhaled corticosteroids induces clinically significant decrease of muscle functions at least after 1-year of daily treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Health-related quality of life in COPD patients with chronic respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, M. L.; Wempe, J. B.; Bladder, G.; Kerstjens, H. A. M.; Wijkstra, P. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Maugeri Respiratory Failure (MRF-28) and Severe Respiratory Insufficiency (SRI) questionnaires were recently developed to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with chronic respiratory failure, although not exclusively in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients.

  6. Clinicopathological Evaluation of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Players of American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mez, Jesse; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Kiernan, Patrick T; Abdolmohammadi, Bobak; Alvarez, Victor E; Huber, Bertrand R; Alosco, Michael L; Solomon, Todd M; Nowinski, Christopher J; McHale, Lisa; Cormier, Kerry A; Kubilus, Caroline A; Martin, Brett M; Murphy, Lauren; Baugh, Christine M; Montenigro, Phillip H; Chaisson, Christine E; Tripodis, Yorghos; Kowall, Neil W; Weuve, Jennifer; McClean, Michael D; Cantu, Robert C; Goldstein, Lee E; Katz, Douglas I; Stern, Robert A; Stein, Thor D; McKee, Ann C

    2017-07-25

    Players of American football may be at increased risk of long-term neurological conditions, particularly chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). To determine the neuropathological and clinical features of deceased football players with CTE. Case series of 202 football players whose brains were donated for research. Neuropathological evaluations and retrospective telephone clinical assessments (including head trauma history) with informants were performed blinded. Online questionnaires ascertained athletic and military history. Participation in American football at any level of play. Neuropathological diagnoses of neurodegenerative diseases, including CTE, based on defined diagnostic criteria; CTE neuropathological severity (stages I to IV or dichotomized into mild [stages I and II] and severe [stages III and IV]); informant-reported athletic history and, for players who died in 2014 or later, clinical presentation, including behavior, mood, and cognitive symptoms and dementia. Among 202 deceased former football players (median age at death, 66 years [interquartile range, 47-76 years]), CTE was neuropathologically diagnosed in 177 players (87%; median age at death, 67 years [interquartile range, 52-77 years]; mean years of football participation, 15.1 [SD, 5.2]), including 0 of 2 pre-high school, 3 of 14 high school (21%), 48 of 53 college (91%), 9 of 14 semiprofessional (64%), 7 of 8 Canadian Football League (88%), and 110 of 111 National Football League (99%) players. Neuropathological severity of CTE was distributed across the highest level of play, with all 3 former high school players having mild pathology and the majority of former college (27 [56%]), semiprofessional (5 [56%]), and professional (101 [86%]) players having severe pathology. Among 27 participants with mild CTE pathology, 26 (96%) had behavioral or mood symptoms or both, 23 (85%) had cognitive symptoms, and 9 (33%) had signs of dementia. Among 84 participants with severe CTE pathology, 75 (89

  7. Axonal disruption in white matter underlying cortical sulcus tau pathology in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleran, Laurena; Kim, Joong Hee; Gangolli, Mihika; Stein, Thor; Alvarez, Victor; McKee, Ann; Brody, David L

    2017-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disorder associated with repetitive traumatic brain injury. One of the primary defining neuropathological lesions in CTE, based on the first consensus conference, is the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in gray matter sulcal depths. Post-mortem CTE studies have also reported myelin loss, axonal injury and white matter degeneration. Currently, the diagnosis of CTE is restricted to post-mortem neuropathological analysis. We hypothesized that high spatial resolution advanced diffusion MRI might be useful for detecting white matter microstructural changes directly adjacent to gray matter tau pathology. To test this hypothesis, formalin-fixed post-mortem tissue blocks from the superior frontal cortex of ten individuals with an established diagnosis of CTE were obtained from the Veterans Affairs-Boston University-Concussion Legacy Foundation brain bank. Advanced diffusion MRI data was acquired using an 11.74 T MRI scanner at Washington University with 250 × 250 × 500 µm(3) spatial resolution. Diffusion tensor imaging, diffusion kurtosis imaging and generalized q-sampling imaging analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Following MRI acquisition, tissue sections were tested for phosphorylated tau immunoreactivity in gray matter sulcal depths. Axonal disruption in underlying white matter was assessed using two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis of myelin black gold staining. A robust image co-registration method was applied to accurately quantify the relationship between diffusion MRI parameters and histopathology. We found that white matter underlying sulci with high levels of tau pathology had substantially impaired myelin black gold Fourier transform power coherence, indicating axonal microstructural disruption (r = -0.55, p = 0.0015). Using diffusion tensor MRI, we found that fractional anisotropy (FA) was modestly (r = 0.53) but significantly (p = 0.0012) correlated

  8. Nature and frequency of respiratory involvement in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.W.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Cuppen, F.; Engelen, B.G. van

    2011-01-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a relatively common mitochondrial disorder. Weakness of the extra-ocular, limb girdle and laryngeal muscles are established clinical features. Respiratory muscle involvement however has never been studied systematically, even though respiratory

  9. MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Han, Chun Hwan; Rho, Eun Jin [Kangnam General Hospital Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a rare syndrom characterized by developmental delay, acrocyanosis, petechiae, chronic diarrhea, and ethylmalonic, lactic, and methylsuccinic aciduria. We report the MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy including previously unreported intracranial hematoma.

  10. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, tr...

  11. Nitric oxide mediates effects of acute, not chronic, naltrexone on LPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiassy, Bentolhoda; Rahimi, Nastaran; Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest endogenous opioids and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, the interaction between the opioid receptor antagonist and NO was investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced HE in cirrhotic rats. Male rats were divided in the sham- and bile duct ligation (BDL)-operated groups. Animals were treated with saline; naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.p.); or L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination with naltrexone. To induce HE, LPS (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected 1 h after the final drug treatment. HE scoring, hepatic histology, and plasma NO metabolites levels and mortality rate were recorded. Deteriorated level of consciousness and mortality after LPS administration significantly ameliorated following both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone in cirrhotic rats. However, acute and chronic administration of L-NAME did not change HE scores in cirrhotic rats. The effects of acute but not chronic treatment of naltrexone on HE parameters were reversed by L-NAME. Plasma NOx concentrations elevated in BDL rats, which were decreased after acute and chronic treatment by naltrexone or L-NAME, significantly. We suggest both acute and chronic treatment with naltrexone improved LPS-induced HE. But, only acute treatment with naltrexone may affect through NO pathway.

  12. Successful Reversal of Chronic Incapacitating Post-TIPS Encephalopathy by Balloon Occlusion of the Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphna Fenyves

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS placement is a new technique allowing decompression of the portal system without the need for abdominal surgery or general anesthetic. This promising procedure appears safe, and is being evaluated in the context of life threatening uncontrollable variceal hemorrhage as well as ascites refractory to medical treatment. Following TIPS, portal flow diversion is associated with hepatic encephalopathy in up to 25% of patients. This is most often mild and treatable but may become uncontrollable, incapacitating and even life threatening in up to 3 to 5% of cases. The authors present two patients in whom such life threatening encephalopathy and stupor was reversed by transjugular balloon occlusion of the TIPS.

  13. Dialysis disequilibrium leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Pratim; Biswas, Sumanta

    2016-11-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome is a neurological adverse effect of acute hemodialysis in advanced uremic patients. Dialysis disequilibrium has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations starting from subtle uneasiness, confusion, to florid and complex life threatening neurological deficit. In this case study, we present a patient who developed sudden cortical blindness following hemodialysis due to posterior reversible encephalopathy, which is a rare presentation of dialysis disequilibrium syndrome.

  14. RESPIRATORY STUDIES IN CHRONIC MOUNTAIN SICKNESS:THE PERUVIAN EXPERIENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabiola León-Velarde

    2005-01-01

    @@ Chronic Mountain Sickness (CMS) is a multifactorial disease caused by a limited capacity to achieve complete adaptation to life under chronic hypoxic conditions. It is accompanied by excessive erythrocitosis (levels of erythrocytes above the normal value set for each altitude), and in advances cases also by pulmonary hypertension. The hypoxemia, caused by central or peripheral respiratory disorders and/or associated to diverse risk factors, produces the excessive erythrocytosis. The most common symptoms are headaches, dizziness, breathlessness, sleep disturbances, tinnitus, physical and mental fatigue, anorexia, and bone and muscle pain. The most common signs are an intermittent or permanent cyanosis, hyperemia and venous dilatation in hands or feet (Monge-M et al., 1928; Winslow and Monge-C, 1987). Aging, respiratory diseases, sleep, menopause, and overweight has proved to be additional risk factors in the development of CMS (Kryger et al., 1978; León-Velarde et al., 1993; Sime et al., 1975; León-Velarde et al., 1997; León-Velarde et al., 2001; Monge-C et al., 1992; Normand et al., 1992)

  15. Effect of metabolic alkalosis on respiratory function in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, R.; Goldstein, M.; Phillipson, E.; Ho, M.; Hammeke, M.; Feldman, R.; Handelsman, S.; Halperin, M.

    1977-01-01

    Eleven instances of a mixed acid-base disorder consisting of chronic respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis were recognized in eight patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and carbon dioxide retention. Correction of the metabolic alkalosis led to substantial improvement in blood gas values and clinical symptoms. Patients with mixed chronic respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis constitute a common subgroup of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and carbon dioxide retention; these patients benefit from correction of the metabolic alkalosis. PMID:21028

  16. Respiratory viruses in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Mir, Hyder; Akram, Shabir; Potdar, Varsha; Chadha, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) cause significant morbidity, mortality, and an inexorable decline of lung function. Data from developed countries have shown viruses to be important causes of AECOPD, but data from developing countries like India are scant. We set out to determine the contribution of viruses in the causation of hospitalized patients with AECOPD. Methods: Twin nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs collected from 233 patients admitted with an acute AECOPD and tested for respiratory viruses including respiratory syncytial virus A and B, parainfluenza were (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) A and B, influenza A and B, enterovirus, corona NL65, OC43, and 229E viruses, adenovirus 2 and 4, rhinovirus, and bocavirus, by duplex real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using CDC approved primers and probes. Samples positive for influenza A were subtyped for A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 whereas influenza B samples were subtyped into B/Yamagata and B/Victoria subtypes, using primers and probes recommended by CDC, USA. Results: Respiratory viruses were detected in 46 (19.7%) cases, influenza A/H3N2 and rhinoviruses being the most common viruses detected. More than one virus was isolated in four cases consisting of hMPV-B + adeno-2 + Inf-B; rhino + H3N2, PIV-1 + rhino; and PIV-1+ hMPV-B in one case each. Ancillary supportive therapeutic measures included bronchodilators, antibiotics, steroids, and ventilation (noninvasive in 42 and invasive in 4). Antiviral therapy was instituted in influenza-positive patients. Three patients with A/H3N2 infection died during hospitalization. Conclusions: We conclude that respiratory viruses are important contributors to AECOPD in India. Our data calls for prompt investigation during an exacerbation for viruses to obviate inappropriate antibiotic use and institute antiviral therapy in viral disease amenable to antiviral therapy. Appropriate

  17. Ultrastructure of synaptic junctions in the cerebellar cortex in experimental valproate encephalopathy and after terminating chronic application of the antiepileptic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse in TEM the evolution of changes in structural elements of synaptic junctions of the cerebellar cortex in rats in valproate encephalopathy induced by chronic 12-month administration of sodium valproate - VPA (once daily intragastrically, in a dose of 200 mg/kg b.w.) and after withdrawal of this antiepileptic for 1 and 3 months. After 9 and 12 months of the experiment, synaptic endings of both the symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses in the neuropil of the cerebellar cortex, especially in the molecular layer, showed signs of severe damage (mainly swelling) and even disintegration. They were mostly observed in axodendritic endings and axospinal endings on the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells, being manifested in the presence of large vacuolar structures, electron lucent areas and swollen mitochondria within the cytoplasm. A reduced number of axonal synaptic vesicles (with more type F vesicles preserved) could be seen. One and 3 months after the end of chronic application of VPA, the synaptic junctions did not show morphological exponents of the repair processes. The alterations observed in the synapticjunctions of the cerebellar cortex may suggest disorders in neurotransmission processes, such as exhaustion and damage caused by ischaemia due to damage to the blood-brain barrier induced by VPA and/or its toxic metabolites.

  18. Carnitine deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in a patient receiving chronic enteral tube feeding: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Carnitine is an essential cofactor in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Carnitine deficiency results in accumulation of non-oxidized fatty acyl-coenzyme A molecules, and this inhibits intra-mitochondrial degradation of ammonia. Hyperammonemia may lead to encephalopathy. This scenario has been previously reported. Case presentation We report the case of a 47-year-old Caucasian man who had sustained a remote motor vehicle accident injury and relied on long-term tube feeding with a commercial product that wascarnitine-free. He was also on phenytoin therapy for control of his chronic seizures. He developed significant acute psychological and behavioral changes superimposed on his chronic neurological impairment. His ammonia level was found to be elevated at 75 to 100μmol/L (normal Conclusion This case illustrates the importance of avoiding carnitine deficiency and anti-convulsant toxicity in tube-fed patients encountered in hospital wards and nursing homes. These patients should have their carnitine levels assessed regularly, and supplementation should be provided as necessary. Manufacturers of enteral feeds and formulas should consider adding carnitine to their product lines.

  19. Infantile mitochondrial encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziel, Graziella; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2011-08-01

    Individually rare, when taken as a whole, genetic inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) account for a significant proportion of early onset encephalopathy. Prompt diagnosis is crucial to assess appropriate investigation and can sometimes warrant successful therapy. Recent improvements in technology and expansion of knowledge on the biochemical and molecular basis of these disorders allow astute child neurologists and paediatricians to improve the early diagnosis of these genetically determined defects. However, because of rarity and heterogeneity of these disorders, IEM encephalopathies are still a formidable challenge for most physicians. The most frequent cause of childhood IEM encephalopathy is mitochondrial disease, whose biochemical 'signature' is faulty energy supply due to defects of the last component of the oxidative pathways residing within mitochondria, i.e. the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Chronic Respiratory Disease: Considerations within the Public Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Durán Palomino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Respiratory Disease (CRD is a publichealth problem in Colombia. Its severity increasesby the presence of risk factors like firesmoke, which tend to prevail in young populationand that leads consequences at physical,social and mental level in the long run. The CRDincludes a series of clinical entities with theirown characteristics, caused by the suffering, socialisolation, physiological deterioration andthe associated morbidity. All these contributeto the functional limitation, the lost quality oflife and, ultimately, can turn the individual thatsuffers it in a dependent being without future.All this takes to a greater consumption of healthresources without this means one better attention,since in many opportunities the isolated efforts, the lack of clear rules, sustained proposalsand the non use of clinical guidelines amongother causes, allow that the intervention wouldbe destined to only palliate the present symptoms,but is far from including an integral, effectivehandling and that responds to individualnecessities. This article analyze the public norms and policies that cover patients with CRD, theaspects related to the rights to an integral, safeand real treatment in the affected individualalong with the obstacles for its accomplishment.

  1. Depression in chronic respiratory disorders in a tertiary rural hospital of Central India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sameer singhal; Pankaj Banode; Nitish Baisakhiya

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine prevalence of depression in chronic respiratory disorders in a tertiary rural hospital of Central India. Various studies done in past have shown that prevalence of depression in diabetes and hypertension is around 40%-57%. Few studies have been done to screen depression in chronic respiratory disorders. This study was conducted in a tertiary rural hospital of Central India to find out prevalence of depression in indoor patients suffering from chronic respiratory disorders. Methods: Total 68 patients were evaluated for depression. Patients suffering from chronic respiratory disorders (total duration of illness >3 months) were evaluated using Prime MD Questionnaire. Patients suffering from diabetes, heart diseases, stroke, having past history of psychiatric illness, drug abusers, having lack of social support and suffering from chronic upper respiratory tract infections were excluded from this study. Questionnaire was asked when treatment for acute phase of illness is over. Results: Out of 68 patients evaluated, 36 (53%) were found out to be suffering from depression. Female gender (80%) was more prone to depression, inspite of the fact that all alcoholics were male. 39% of all chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were suffering from depression in comparison to 65% for pulmonary tuberculosis and 44% for other chronic respiratory illness. 54% of patients suffering from depression are 60 yrs of age, suggesting that age has no relation with depression. No association was seen between alcoholism and depression. Conclusion: Prevalence of depression in patients of chronic respiratory illness is very high, like in cases of diabetes and hypertension. Further community and hospital based studies are needed to find out exact prevalence of depression in chronic respiratory illnesses.

  2. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review of Clinical Diagnosis, Animal Models, Sex Differences, and A Revised Return-to-Play Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie D. Fitzgerald

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease marked by debilitating cognitive and behavioral symptoms. CTE is thought to be caused by traumatic brain injuries (TBIs, though it remains unclear how the frequency, duration and intensity of TBIs contribute to CTE vulnerability. It is estimated that as many as 4M sports-related TBIs may occur annually in the US, though mild TBIs are often underreported and/or undiagnosed. As participation in athletics is arguably a voluntary and controllable risk factor for TBI, it is important to identify and understand factors that might affect an athlete’s’ likelihood of developing CTE. This review summarizes CTE symptomology and pathology, reviews relevant findings from animal models of TBI/CTE, discusses clinical criteria and emerging technologies used for diagnosis, reviews the extent to which sex differences may contribute to TBI severity and/or recovery and, finally, presents a data-driven protocol for return-to-play procedures for student athletes in contact sports.

  3. Chronic exposure to sulfide causes accelerated degradation of cytochrome c oxidase in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meo, Ivano; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Prelle, Alessandro; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2011-07-15

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is an autosomal recessive, invariably fatal disorder associated with mutations in ETHE1, a gene encoding a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase (SDO). The main consequence of the absence of Ethe1-SDO is the accumulation of sulfide (H(2)S) in critical tissues, including colonic mucosa, liver, muscle, and brain. To make progress in the elucidation of the biochemical mechanisms leading to cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency, we (i) generated tissue-specific conditional Ethe1 knockout mice to clarify the different contributions of endogenous and exogenous H(2)S production, and (ii) studied the development of H(2)S-driven COX deficiency in Ethe1(-/-) mouse tissues and human cells. Ethe1(-/-) conditional animals displayed COX deficiency limited to the specific targeted tissue. The accumulation of H(2)S over time causes progressive COX deficiency in animal tissues and human cells, which is associated with reduced amount of COX holoenzyme, and of several COX subunits, including mitochondrially encoded cytochrome c oxidase 1 (MTCO1), MTCO2, COX4, and COX5A. This reduction is not paralleled by consistent downregulation in expression of the corresponding mRNAs. Tissue-specific ablation of Ethe1 causes COX deficiency in targeted organs, suggesting that failure in neutralizing endogenous, tissue-specific production of H(2)S is sufficient to cause the biochemical defect but neither to determine a clinical impact nor to induce the biomarker profile typical of EE. The mechanism by which H(2)S causes COX deficiency consists of rapid heme a inhibition and accelerated long-term degradation of COX subunits. However, the pleiotropic devastating effects of H(2)S accumulation in EE cannot be fully explained by the sole defect of COX in critical tissues, but are likely consequent to several toxic actions on a number of enzymatic activities in different tissues, including endothelial lining of the small vessels, leading to multiorgan failure.

  4. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE, the neuropsychiatric presentation of liver disease, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Reduction of plasma ammonia remains the central therapeutic strategy, but there is a need for newer novel therapies. We discuss current evidence supporting the use of interventions for both the general management of chronic HE and that necessary for more acute and advanced disease.

  5. Long-term survival in a child with severe encephalopathy, multiple respiratory chain deficiency and GFM1 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Sara; Thompson, Kyle; Campistol, Jaume; Colomer, Jaime; Hardy, Steven A.; He, Langping; Fernández-Marmiesse, Ana; Palacios, Lourdes; Jou, Cristina; Jiménez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Armstrong, Judith; Montero, Raquel; Artuch, Rafael; Tischner, Christin; Wenz, Tina; McFarland, Robert; Taylor, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial diseases due to deficiencies in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS) can be associated with nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial translation, causing heterogeneous early onset and often fatal phenotypes. Case report: The authors describe the clinical features and diagnostic workup of an infant who presented with an early onset severe encephalopathy, spastic-dystonic tetraparesis, failure to thrive, seizures and persistent lactic acidemia. Brain imaging revealed thinning of the corpus callosum and diffuse alteration of white matter signal. Genetic investigation confirmed two novel mutations in the GFM1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial translation elongation factor G1 (mtEFG1), resulting in combined deficiencies of OXPHOS. Discussion: The patient shares multiple clinical, laboratory and radiological similarities with the 11 reported patients with mutations involving this gene, but presents with a stable clinical course without metabolic decompensations, rather than a rapidly progressive fatal course. Defects in GFM1 gene confer high susceptibility to neurologic or hepatic dysfunction and this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first described patient who has survived beyond early childhood. Reporting of such cases is essential so as to delineate the key clinical and neuroradiological features of this disease and provide a more comprehensive view of its prognosis. PMID:25852744

  6. Long-term survival in a child with severe encephalopathy, multiple respiratory chain deficiency and GFM1 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eBrito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mitochondrial diseases due to deficiencies in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS can be associated with nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial translation, causing heterogeneous early onset and often fatal phenotypes. Case report: The authors describe the clinical features and diagnostic workup of an infant who presented with an early onset severe encephalopathy, spastic-dystonic tetraparesis, failure to thrive, seizures and persistent lactic acidemia. Brain imaging revealed thinning of the corpus callosum and diffuse alteration of white matter signal. Genetic investigation confirmed two novel mutations in the GFM1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial translation elongation factor G1 (mtEFG1, resulting in combined deficiencies of OXPHOS. Discussion: The patient shares multiple clinical, laboratory and radiological similarities with the eleven reported patients with mutations involving this gene, but presents with a stable clinical course without metabolic decompensations, rather than a rapidly progressive fatal course. Defects in GFM1 gene confer high susceptibility to neurologic or hepatic dysfunction and this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first described patient who has survived beyond early childhood. Reporting of such cases is essential so as to delineate the key clinical and neuroradiological features of this disease and provide a more comprehensive view of its prognosis.

  7. Within-breath respiratory impedance and airway obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Kristine Dames da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent work has suggested that within-breath respiratory impedance measurements performed using the forced oscillation technique may help to noninvasively evaluate respiratory mechanics. We investigated the influence of airway obstruction on the within-breath forced oscillation technique in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the contribution of this analysis to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: Twenty healthy individuals and 20 smokers were assessed. The study also included 74 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We evaluated the mean respiratory impedance (Zm as well as values for the inspiration (Zi and expiration cycles (Ze at the beginning of inspiration (Zbi and expiration (Zbe, respectively. The peak-to-peak impedance (Zpp=Zbe-Zbi and the respiratory cycle dependence (ΔZrs=Ze-Zi were also analyzed. The diagnostic utility was evaluated by investigating the sensitivity, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01888705. RESULTS: Airway obstruction increased the within-breath respiratory impedance parameters that were significantly correlated with the spirometric indices of airway obstruction (R=−0.65, p90%. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude the following: (1 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease introduces higher respiratory cycle dependence, (2 this increase is proportional to airway obstruction, and (3 the within-breath forced oscillation technique may provide novel parameters that facilitate the diagnosis of respiratory abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  8. A new disease-related mutation for mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome affects the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lertrit, P.; Noer, A.S.; Kapsa, R.; Marzuki, S. (Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia)); Jean-Francois, M.J.B.; Thyagarajan, D.; Byrne, E. (St. Vincent' s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia)); Dennett, X. (Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)); Lethlean, K. (Prince Henry Hospital, Sydney (Australia))

    1992-09-01

    The molecular lesions in two patients exhibiting classical clinical manifestations of MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes) syndrome have been investigated. A recently reported disease-related A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243 of the mtDNA, in the DHU loop of tRNA[sup Leu], was detected by restriction-enzyme analysis of the relevant PCR-amplified segment of the mtDNA of one patient but was not observed, by either restriction-enzyme analysis or nucleotide sequencing, in the other. To define the molecular lesion in the patient who does not have the A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243, the total mitochondrial genome of the patient has been sequenced. An A[yields]G base substitution at nt 11084, leading to a Thr-to-Ala amino acid replacement in the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I, is suggested to be a disease-related mutation. 49 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A CLINICAL STUDY OF HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY IN CHRONIC LIVER DISEASE WITH REFERENCE TO SERUM AMMONIA IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL OF NORTH EAST INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tribeni Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Hepatic encephalopathy is the term used to describe the complex, sometimes irreversible, and variable changes in neuropsychiatric status that can complicate both acute and chronic liver disease. A spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities exists ranging from clinically indiscernible changes in cognition to clinically obvious changes in intellect behaviour, motor function, and consciousness. METHODS We conducted a hospital-based observational descriptive study comprising of 80 patients of chronic liver disease from June 2014-May 2015 who had been diagnosed on the basis of a thorough history, physical examination, including mini-mental status examination, Glasgow Coma Score, biochemical tests including arterial ammonia, radiological findings, EEG and CFF (critical flicker frequency Tests after excluding other causes of neurological impairment. The patients were admitted in Gauhati Medical College and Hospital, Guwahati, Assam (India and fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the study. Statistical analysis was performed using one way ANOVA method of analysis. RESULTS In our study, 61 patients were male and 19 patients were female. 30% patients were in the third decade of life followed by 26.25% in the fourth decade and 18.75% in the fifth decade. Most of the patients were in Child-Pugh Class C (72.5% followed by Class A (16.25% and Class B (11.25%. The patients were assigned grades of hepatic encephalopathy according to the West-Haven classification. Majority of patients were in grade I hepatic encephalopathy (30% followed by grade III (28.75% and grade IV (21.25%. The lowest mean arterial ammonia level was found in grade 0 and grade I hepatic encephalopathy - 39.2±7.4 mg/dL and 58.7±9.8 mg/dL (mean±standard deviation respectively and the highest values were found in the highest grades of hepatic encephalopathy - grade III and IV (98.4±10.7 mg/dL and 145.0±17.0 mg/dL respectively. CONCLUSION The arterial ammonia

  10. Chronic wasting disease and atypical forms of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are not transmissible to mice expressing wild-type levels of human prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rona; Plinston, Chris; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Suardi, Silvia; Ruggerone, Margherita; Moda, Fabio; Graziano, Silvia; Sbriccoli, Marco; Cardone, Franco; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Ingrosso, Loredana; Baron, Thierry; Richt, Juergen; Andreoletti, Olivier; Simmons, Marion; Lockey, Richard; Manson, Jean C; Barron, Rona M

    2012-07-01

    The association between bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health and raises the possibility that other ruminant TSEs may be transmissible to humans. In recent years, several novel TSEs in sheep, cattle and deer have been described and the risk posed to humans by these agents is currently unknown. In this study, we inoculated two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and H-type BSE), a chronic wasting disease (CWD) isolate and seven isolates of atypical scrapie into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP). Upon challenge with these ruminant TSEs, gene-targeted Tg mice expressing human PrP did not show any signs of disease pathology. These data strongly suggest the presence of a substantial transmission barrier between these recently identified ruminant TSEs and humans.

  11. Clinical-instrumental evaluation of the effects of mesoglycan sulphate in chronic vascular encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, G; Viapiano, F; Massetani, R; Ferrari, M; Murri, L

    1991-06-01

    15 patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease were studied using carotid Doppler and B-mode echography, transcranial Doppler, EEG and clinical evaluation before and 3 and 6 months after treatment with mesoglycan sulphate at doses of 96 mg/day per os. A subjective improvement was reported by 7 out of 15 patients while no significant variations in Doppler, TCD, echographic and EEG data were observed. During treatment no side effects or laboratory abnormalities were found.

  12. Integrative Medicine for Respiratory Conditions: Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Gloria Y; Horwitz, Randy

    2017-09-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are 2 common chronic respiratory disorders in primary care that cause considerable morbidity and mortality. This article reviews disease pathophysiology and outlines an integrative, multidimensional approach to the evaluation and management of these conditions, including pharmacotreatment, nutrition, supplements, self-care strategies, mind-body therapies, and other integrative modalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Airways responsiveness and development and remission of chronic respiratory symptoms in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, XP; Rijcken, B; Schouten, JP; Weiss, ST

    1997-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic obstructive lung disease show increased airways responsiveness to histamine. We investigated the hypothesis that increased airways responsiveness predicts the development and remission of chronic respiratory symptoms. Methods We used data from 24-year follow-up

  14. Chronic diseases, chromosomal abnormalities, and congenital malformations as risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Hjuler, Thomas; Ravn, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how chronic conditions other than prematurity, heart disease, and Down syndrome affect the risk and severity of hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We assess the risk and severity of RSV hospitalization in children with chronic conditions in this register...

  15. Re-Evaluation of Acid-Base Prediction Rules in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Martinu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: The prediction rules for the evaluation of the acid-base status in patients with chronic respiratory acidosis, derived primarily from an experimental canine model, suggest that complete compensation should not occur. This appears to contradict frequent observations of normal or near-normal pH levels in patients with chronic hypercapnia.

  16. Acute encephalopathy with concurrent respiratory and metabolic disturbances in first known parenteral human administration of flunixin meglumine and acepromazine maleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Michael F; Wilson, Anwar C; Acquisto, Nicole M; Spillane, Linda; Schneider, Sandra M

    2013-08-01

    Flunexin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug approved for veterinary use in horses and cattle. Acepromazine is a phenothiazine derivative used in horses, dogs, and cats. Human exposure to these substances is rare. We report a case of a human injection of two equine medications, flunixin and acepromazine, which resulted in altered mental status, respiratory alkalosis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and elevation of liver transaminases in a 43-year-old woman who worked as a horse trainer. The patient intentionally self-injected these medications and subsequently presented to the Emergency Department with altered mental status and lethargy. The patient required hospitalization for metabolic abnormalities, including respiratory alkalosis, and suffered a gastrointestinal bleed requiring blood transfusion. The patient ultimately recovered with supportive measures. We believe this to be the first case of concomitant injection of flunixin and acepromazine in a human. This report explains a case of parenteral administration of two equine medications and the subsequent complications in a patient that presented to the Emergency Department. Human exposure to veterinary medications cannot be predicted by their effect in animals due to variations in absorption, distribution, and metabolism. Physicians should be aware that individuals who work with animals may have access to large quantities of veterinary medicine. This case also exemplifies the challenges that Emergency Physicians face on a daily basis, and generates additional consideration for overdoses and intoxications from medications that are not considered commonplace in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G;

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS ...

  18. Metabolic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Michael J; Young, G Bryan

    2011-11-01

    Kinnier Wilson coined the term metabolic encephalopathy to describe a clinical state of global cerebral dysfunction induced by systemic stress that can vary in clinical presentation from mild executive dysfunction to deep coma with decerebrate posturing; the causes are numerous. Some mechanisms by which cerebral dysfunction occurs in metabolic encephalopathies include focal or global cerebral edema, alterations in transmitter function, the accumulation of uncleared toxic metabolites, postcapillary venule vasogenic edema, and energy failure. This article focuses on common causes of metabolic encephalopathy, and reviews common causes, clinical presentations and, where relevant, management.

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to Give Contact Us Privacy ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  2. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE ... liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. ...

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2017 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  5. Quality of Care for Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases: Data for Accreditation Plan in Primary Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    There are scarce reports in the literature on factors affecting the assessment of the quality of care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Such information is relevant in the accreditation process on implementing the healthcare. The study group consisted of 133 adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases and 125 adult patients with chronic non-respiratory diseases. In the present study, the level of satisfaction from healthcare provided by the primary healthcare unit, disease acceptance, quality of life, health behaviors, and met needs were examined, as well as associations between variables with the use of correspondence analysis. The results are that in patients with chronic respiratory diseases an increase in satisfaction depends on the improvement of well-being in the mental sphere. The lack of problems with obtaining a referral to a specialist and a higher level of fulfilled needs also have a positive effect. Additionally, low levels of satisfaction should be expected in those patients with chronic respiratory diseases who wait for an appointment in front of the office for a long time, report problems with obtaining a referral to additional tests, present a low level of health behaviors, and have a low index of benefits.

  6. Community-based exercise training for people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease: a mixed-methods evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Renae J; McKeough, Zoe J; Mo, Laura R; Dallimore, Jamie T; Dennis, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor uptake and adherence are problematic for hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation programs, often because of access difficulties. The aims of this mixed-methods study were to determine the feasibility of a supervised exercise training program in a community gymnasium in people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease, to explore the experiences of participants and physiotherapists and to determine if a community venue improved access and adherence to rehabilitation. Methods Adults with chronic respiratory and/or chronic cardiac disease referred to a hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation program were screened to determine their suitability to exercise in a community venue. Eligible patients were offered the opportunity to attend supervised exercise training for 8 weeks in a community gymnasium. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and physiotherapists at the completion of the program. Results Thirty-one people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease (34% males, mean [standard deviation] age 72 [10] years) commenced the community-based exercise training program. Twenty-two (71%) completed the program. All participants who completed the program, and the physiotherapists delivering the program, were highly satisfied, with reports of the community venue being well-equipped, convenient, and easily accessible. Using a community gymnasium promoted a sense of normality and instilled confidence in some to continue exercising at a similar venue post rehabilitation. However, factors such as cost and lack of motivation continue to be barriers. Conclusion The convenience and accessibility of a community venue for rehabilitation contributed to high levels of satisfaction and a positive experience for people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease and physiotherapists. PMID:27895476

  7. Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy in an STXBP1 Patient with Lactic Acidemia and Normal Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of clinical findings have been associated with mutations in Syntaxin Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1, including multiple forms of epilepsy, nonsyndromic intellectual disability, and movement disorders. STXBP1 mutations have recently been associated with mitochondrial pathology, although it remains unclear if this phenotype is a part of the core feature for this gene disorder. We report a 7-year-old boy who presented for diagnostic evaluation of intractable epilepsy, episodic ataxia, resting tremor, and speech regression following a period of apparently normal early development. Mild lactic acidemia was detected on one occasion at the time of an intercurrent illness. Due to the concern for mitochondrial disease, ophthalmologic evaluation was performed that revealed bilateral midperiphery pigmentary mottling. Optical coherence tomography (OCT testing demonstrated a bilaterally thickened ganglion cell layer in the perifovea. Skeletal muscle biopsy analysis showed no mitochondrial abnormalities or respiratory chain dysfunction. Exome sequencing identified a de novo c.1651C>T (p.R551C mutation in STXBP1. Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported in some individuals, our proband had only mild lactic acidemia and no skeletal muscle tissue evidence of mitochondrial disease pathology. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction is not an obligate feature of STXBP1 disease.

  8. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  9. Major affective disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with other chronic respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pothirat C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chaicharn Pothirat, Warawut Chaiwong, Nittaya Phetsuk, Sangnual Pisalthanapuna, Nonglak Chetsadaphan, Juthamas InchaiDivision of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Allergy, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, ThailanBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and other chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs have significant impacts on quality of life including psychomotor domain.Purpose: To evaluate three major affective disorders in subjects with COPD compared with other CRDs and nonill population.Materials and methods: The Thai version of Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI was used as a diagnostic instrument for three major affective disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, and panic disorder by face-to-face interview in assessing patients with CRDs [COPD, asthma, rhinasthma, all asthma (asthma and rhinasthma, and chronic rhinitis], and nonill subjects. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the relation between major affective disorders and CRDs adjusting for age, sex, and disease severity.Results: Major affective disorders were more prevalent in CRDs than nonill groups (adjusted OR =2.6 [95% CI, 1.8-3.9], P<0.001. COPD patients had significantly more generalized anxiety and panic disorder (adjusted OR =4.0 [95% CI, 1.4-11.9], P=0.011, and 4.4 [95% CI, 1.1-18.1], P=0.038, respectively but not major depressive disorder (adjusted OR =2.7 [95% CI, 0.8-9.0, P=0.105] than nonill group. Comparing with all asthma, COPD patients had lower occurrence of major depressive and panic disorders (adjusted OR =0.1 [95% CI, 0.0-0.4], P=0.002, and 0.1 [95% CI, 0.0-0.9], P=0.043, respectively. There was no difference in major mood disorders in COPD, rhinasthma, and chronic rhinitis patients. Major affective disorders were not increased by disease severity in COPD.Conclusion: Major affective disorders were significantly higher in CRDs than nonill

  10. High rates of detection of respiratory viruses in tonsillar tissues from children with chronic adenotonsillar disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proenca-Modena, Jose Luiz; Pereira Valera, Fabiana Cardoso; Jacob, Marcos Gerhardinger; Buzatto, Guilherme Pietrucci; Saturno, Tamara Honorato; Lopes, Lucia; Souza, Jamila Mendonça; Escremim Paula, Flavia; Silva, Maria Lucia; Carenzi, Lucas Rodrigues; Tamashiro, Edwin; Arruda, Eurico; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha

    2012-01-01

    Chronic tonsillar diseases are an important health problem, leading to large numbers of surgical procedures worldwide. Little is known about pathogenesis of these diseases. In order to investigate the role of respiratory viruses in chronic adenotonsillar diseases, we developed a cross-sectional study to determine the rates of viral detections of common respiratory viruses detected by TaqMan real time PCR (qPCR) in nasopharyngeal secretions, tonsillar tissues and peripheral blood from 121 children with chronic tonsillar diseases, without symptoms of acute respiratory infections. At least one respiratory virus was detected in 97.5% of patients. The viral co-infection rate was 69.5%. The most frequently detected viruses were human adenovirus in 47.1%, human enterovirus in 40.5%, human rhinovirus in 38%, human bocavirus in 29.8%, human metapneumovirus in 17.4% and human respiratory syncytial virus in 15.7%. Results of qPCR varied widely between sample sites: human adenovirus, human bocavirus and human enterovirus were predominantly detected in tissues, while human rhinovirus was more frequently detected in secretions. Rates of virus detection were remarkably high in tonsil tissues: over 85% in adenoids and close to 70% in palatine tonsils. In addition, overall virus detection rates were higher in more hypertrophic than in smaller adenoids (p = 0.05), and in the particular case of human enteroviruses, they were detected more frequently (p = 0.05) in larger palatine tonsils than in smaller ones. While persistence/latency of DNA viruses in tonsillar tissues has been documented, such is not the case of RNA viruses. Respiratory viruses are highly prevalent in adenoids and palatine tonsils of patients with chronic tonsillar diseases, and persistence of these viruses in tonsils may stimulate chronic inflammation and play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  11. High rates of detection of respiratory viruses in tonsillar tissues from children with chronic adenotonsillar disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luiz Proenca-Modena

    Full Text Available Chronic tonsillar diseases are an important health problem, leading to large numbers of surgical procedures worldwide. Little is known about pathogenesis of these diseases. In order to investigate the role of respiratory viruses in chronic adenotonsillar diseases, we developed a cross-sectional study to determine the rates of viral detections of common respiratory viruses detected by TaqMan real time PCR (qPCR in nasopharyngeal secretions, tonsillar tissues and peripheral blood from 121 children with chronic tonsillar diseases, without symptoms of acute respiratory infections. At least one respiratory virus was detected in 97.5% of patients. The viral co-infection rate was 69.5%. The most frequently detected viruses were human adenovirus in 47.1%, human enterovirus in 40.5%, human rhinovirus in 38%, human bocavirus in 29.8%, human metapneumovirus in 17.4% and human respiratory syncytial virus in 15.7%. Results of qPCR varied widely between sample sites: human adenovirus, human bocavirus and human enterovirus were predominantly detected in tissues, while human rhinovirus was more frequently detected in secretions. Rates of virus detection were remarkably high in tonsil tissues: over 85% in adenoids and close to 70% in palatine tonsils. In addition, overall virus detection rates were higher in more hypertrophic than in smaller adenoids (p = 0.05, and in the particular case of human enteroviruses, they were detected more frequently (p = 0.05 in larger palatine tonsils than in smaller ones. While persistence/latency of DNA viruses in tonsillar tissues has been documented, such is not the case of RNA viruses. Respiratory viruses are highly prevalent in adenoids and palatine tonsils of patients with chronic tonsillar diseases, and persistence of these viruses in tonsils may stimulate chronic inflammation and play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  12. Burden of Chronic Respiratory Diseases (CRD) in Middle East and North Africa (MENA)

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Abdallah, F Chermiti; Taktak, S; Chtourou, A; Mahouachi, R; Ben Kheder, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases involve a heterogenous group of diseases, including, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, sleep apnea syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, and many occupational diseases. They affect more than one billion people worldwide. Their medical, social, and economic impacts are heavy, especially in developing countries such as Middle East and North Africa countries, where they represent a public health problem. They are essentially represented by COPD, asthm...

  13. Chronic respiratory symptoms associated with airway wall thickening measured by thin-slice low-dose CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Xueqian; Dijkstra, Akkelies E.; Vonk, Judith M.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In lung cancer screening, the prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms is high among heavy smokers. The purpose of this study was to compare CT-derived airway wall measurements between male smokers with and those without chronic respiratory symptoms. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty male

  14. Impaired cortical processing of inspiratory loads in children with chronic respiratory defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Annick

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inspiratory occlusion evoked cortical potentials (the respiratory related-evoked potentials, RREPs bear witness of the processing of changes in respiratory mechanics by the brain. Their impairment in children having suffered near-fatal asthma supports the hypothesis that relates asthma severity with the ability of the patients to perceive respiratory changes. It is not known whether or not chronic respiratory defects are associated with an alteration in brain processing of inspiratory loads. The aim of the present study was to compare the presence, the latencies and the amplitudes of the P1, N1, P2, and N2 components of the RREPs in children with chronic lung or neuromuscular disease. Methods RREPs were recorded in patients with stable asthma (n = 21, cystic fibrosis (n = 32, and neuromuscular disease (n = 16 and in healthy controls (n = 11. Results The 4 RREP components were significantly less frequently observed in the 3 groups of patients than in the controls. Within the patient groups, the N1 and the P2 components were significantly less frequently observed in the patients with asthma (16/21 for both components and cystic fibrosis (20/32 and 14/32 than in the patients with neuromuscular disease (15/16 and 16/16. When present, the latencies and amplitudes of the 4 components were similar in the patients and controls. Conclusion Chronic ventilatory defects in children are associated with an impaired cortical processing of afferent respiratory signals.

  15. Community-based exercise training for people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease: a mixed-methods evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNamara RJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Renae J McNamara,1,2 Zoe J McKeough,3 Laura R Mo,3 Jamie T Dallimore,4 Sarah M Dennis3 1Physiotherapy Department, 2Respiratory and Sleep Medicine Department, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, 3Discipline of Physiotherapy, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, 4Eastern Sydney Medicare Local, Rosebery, NSW, Australia Background: Poor uptake and adherence are problematic for hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation programs, often because of access difficulties. The aims of this mixed-methods study were to determine the feasibility of a supervised exercise training program in a community gymnasium in people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease, to explore the experiences of participants and physiotherapists and to determine if a community venue improved access and adherence to rehabilitation. Methods: Adults with chronic respiratory and/or chronic cardiac disease referred to a hospital-based pulmonary and heart failure rehabilitation program were screened to determine their suitability to exercise in a community venue. Eligible patients were offered the opportunity to attend supervised exercise training for 8 weeks in a community gymnasium. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and physiotherapists at the completion of the program. Results: Thirty-one people with chronic respiratory and chronic cardiac disease (34% males, mean [standard deviation] age 72 [10] years commenced the community-based exercise training program. Twenty-two (71% completed the program. All participants who completed the program, and the physiotherapists delivering the program, were highly satisfied, with reports of the community venue being well-equipped, convenient, and easily accessible. Using a community gymnasium promoted a sense of normality and instilled confidence in some to continue exercising at a similar venue post rehabilitation. However, factors such as cost and lack of motivation continue to be barriers

  16. Vascular changes in the retina in patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić-Zečević Antoaneta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chronic respiratory insufficiency is a pathological state which occurs as a result of respiratory system inability to maintain normal gas exchange between the outside air and circulating blood. For the purposes of human organism’s proper functioning, it is necessary that a certain amount of air in the lungs comes into contact with a certain amount of blood within a unit of time, so that an adequate hemoglobin oxygenation could be achieved. Then, hemoglobin from erythrocytes in the blood supply delivers oxygen to all the tissues and cells of the body including the eye. Direct impact of hypoxemia and hypercapnia on the wall of arterioles, venules and capillaries results in a severe vasodilatation along with the increased permeability of the walls causing clinically evident changes in the retina. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of ocular changes in retina with patients suffering from chronic respiratory insufficiency. Methods. A prospective study was conducted on 80 patients, 40 patients with respiratory failure and 40 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease an and bronchial asthma (the control group. In all the patients direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and fluoresceine angiography was performed. Clinically visible fundus and retina changes in patients suffering from chronic respiratory failure were categorized as mild (dilatation and retinal veins and arteries tortosion up to the mid-periphery, moderate (retinal hemorrhage and severe (optic nerve edema, macular edema, superficial and deep retinal hemorrhages and venous occlusion. Results. In the patients suffering from respiratory insufficiency the changes in retinal blood vessels were found [in 18 (45% mild, in 13 (32.5% moderate, and in 9 (22% severe], while in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchial asthma (without respiratory insufficiency no changes were recognized. Conclusion. The results of this study indicate

  17. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not available for clinical testing. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and quantitative EEG. These noninvasive tests use electroencephalography ( ... has symptoms of CTE, he or she may benefit from supportive care similar to that of people ...

  18. Canadian Practice Assessment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Respiratory Specialist Physician Perception Versus Patient Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Hernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a common respiratory condition and the fourth leading cause of death in Canada. Optimal COPD management requires patients to participate in their care and physician knowledge of patients’ perceptions of their disease.

  19. Population-wide preventive interventions for reducing the burden of chronic respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, M J; Koplin, J; Hoy, R; Dharmage, S C

    2015-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma impose a substantial burden of disease. This narrative review focuses on potential population-wide interventions that are likely to have an impact on these diseases. The developmental origins of adult disease commence in utero, with maternal nutrition being of particular interest. However, to date, trials of maternal allergen avoidance, dietary supplementation or probiotics have not shown consistent protective effects against asthma. Poor indoor air quality, especially from biomass fuels as well as second-hand tobacco smoke, is a well-recognised risk factor for chronic respiratory diseases. This can be modified by cleaner fuels, cooking stoves or heaters, and improved ventilation. Although allergens are a risk factor for childhood asthma, the results of interventions to reduce exposures have been disappointing. Traffic-related air pollution is associated with an increased incidence of asthma in children. Primary prevention of the adverse effects of air pollution has focused on the development of ambient air quality guidelines, but enforcement remains a challenge in many countries. Occupational asthma may be induced by sensitisers or irritants in the workplace. Prevention involves eliminating the agent or reducing exposure as far as possible, which is more effective than respiratory protective equipment. Smoking cessation remains a key proven preventive strategy for chronic respiratory diseases. There is now an international framework for tobacco control, and recent innovations include plain packaging of tobacco. Chronic respiratory diseases can be substantially prevented by the above population-wide interventions.

  20. The Environmental Domain of Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The literature lacks reports on the role played by the Environmental domain of quality of life (QoL) in care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Such information has a high potential for implementation in modern medicine based on a 'tailor-made' holistic healthcare model. The purpose of this study was to determine the components that shape the Environmental domain of QoL in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. The study group consisted of 305 adult patients (median age 65 years) with at least one chronic respiratory disease. The greatest contribution to a high value of QoL in the Environmental domain among patients with chronic respiratory diseases was made by the coexistence of high QoL levels in other domains and in satisfaction with QoL. Programs for preventing a decline in QoL in the Environmental domain should include patients with low scores for the above variables as well as those with a low level of education, those who have not shown an improvement in their psychological well-being in the past 12 months, those with a low level of positive mental attitudes or healthy eating habits, a low Camberwell index, and low levels of overall pro-health behavior.

  1. Vocal Cord Paralysis and Respiratory Muscle Weakness: An Unusual Presentation of Chronic Polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LKL Chau

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of chronic polyneuropathy that manifested with an unusual combination of vocal cord paralysis and respiratory muscle weakness is reported. In addition, results of an exercise test carried out to assess the severity and mechanisms of exertional breathlessness in this unique condition with combined obstructive and restrictive disorders are described.

  2. Association Between Chronic Respiratory Diseases and Helicobacter pylori: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijie; Guan, Yan; Li, Yan; Liu, Xiuju; Zhang, Yakun; Wang, Fuxia; Kong, Lingling; Guo, Qisen

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs), including chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), has increased significantly over the past decades. Several studies suggest that Helicobacter pylori infection may be related to the development of CRDs, but the results were not consistent. We carried out a meta-analysis to evaluate the potential association of H.pylori infection with CRDs. We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed, Embase, Ovid, Google Scholar and CNKI from inception to October 31, 2013. The following search terms were used: "chronic respiratory disease," "chronic bronchitis," "chronic obstructive pulmonary disease" or "COPD" in combination with "Helicobacter pylori" or "Campylobacter pylori." According to established inclusion criteria, we selected all eligible published papers and then extracted essential data. To evaluate the association of H.pylori with chronic bronchitis and COPD, an overall analysis and subgroup analyses were conducted. A total of 9 case-control studies comprising 782 cases and 815 controls were included in the study. Pooled ORs were 2.30 (95%CI: 1.85-2.85) in the overall analysis, 2.90 (95%CI: 2.04-4.13) in the chronic bronchitis subgroup, and 2.11 (95%CI: 1.35-3.29) in the COPD subgroup. The results of the overall analysis and subgroup analyzed suggest a significant association between H.pylori and CRDs. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathogenetic mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Persistent activation of an innate immune response translates respiratory viral infection into chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edy Y; Battaile, John T; Patel, Anand C; You, Yingjian; Agapov, Eugene; Grayson, Mitchell H; Benoit, Loralyn A; Byers, Derek E; Alevy, Yael; Tucker, Jennifer; Swanson, Suzanne; Tidwell, Rose; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Morton, Jeffrey D; Castro, Mario; Polineni, Deepika; Patterson, G Alexander; Schwendener, Reto A; Allard, John D; Peltz, Gary; Holtzman, Michael J

    2008-06-01

    To understand the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disease, we analyzed an experimental mouse model of chronic lung disease with pathology that resembles asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in humans. In this model, chronic lung disease develops after an infection with a common type of respiratory virus is cleared to only trace levels of noninfectious virus. Chronic inflammatory disease is generally thought to depend on an altered adaptive immune response. However, here we find that this type of disease arises independently of an adaptive immune response and is driven instead by interleukin-13 produced by macrophages that have been stimulated by CD1d-dependent T cell receptor-invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells. This innate immune axis is also activated in the lungs of humans with chronic airway disease due to asthma or COPD. These findings provide new insight into the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disease with the discovery that the transition from respiratory viral infection into chronic lung disease requires persistent activation of a previously undescribed NKT cell-macrophage innate immune axis.

  4. Respiratory viruses are continuously detected in children with chronic tonsillitis throughout the year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença-Módena, José Luiz; Buzatto, Guilherme P; Paula, Flávia E; Saturno, Tamara H; Delcaro, Luana S; Prates, Mirela C; Tamashiro, Edwin; Valera, Fabiana C P; Arruda, Eurico; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma T

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the oscillations on the viral detection in adenotonsillar tissues from patients with chronic adenotonsillar diseases as an indicia of the presence of persistent viral infections or acute subclinical infections. Cross-sectional prospective study. Tertiary hospital. The fluctuations of respiratory virus detection were compared to the major climatic variables during a two-year period using adenoids and palatine tonsils from 172 children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy and clinical evidence of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome or recurrent adenotonsillitis, without symptoms of acute respiratory infection (ARI), by TaqMan real-time PCR. The rate of detection of at least one respiratory virus in adenotonsillar tissue was 87%. The most frequently detected viruses were human adenovirus in 52.8%, human enterovirus in 47.2%, human rhinovirus in 33.8%, human bocavirus in 31.1%, human metapneumovirus in 18.3% and human respiratory syncytial virus in 17.2%. Although increased detection of human enterovirus occurred in summer/autumn months, and there were summer nadirs of human respiratory syncytial virus in both years of the study, there was no obvious viral seasonality in contrast to reports with ARI patients in many regions of the world. Respiratory viruses are continuously highly detected during whole year, and without any clinical symptomatology, indicating that viral genome of some virus can persist in lymphoepithelial tissues of the upper respiratory tract. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An official European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society technical standard: field walking tests in chronic respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Anne E; Spruit, Martijn A; Troosters, Thierry; Puhan, Milo A; Pepin, Véronique; Saey, Didier; McCormack, Meredith C; Carlin, Brian W; Sciurba, Frank C; Pitta, Fabio; Wanger, Jack; MacIntyre, Neil; Kaminsky, David A; Culver, Bruce H; Revill, Susan M; Hernandes, Nidia A; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Mitchell, Katy E; Lee, Annemarie L; Hill, Catherine J; Singh, Sally J

    2014-12-01

    Field walking tests are commonly employed to evaluate exercise capacity, assess prognosis and evaluate treatment response in chronic respiratory diseases. In recent years, there has been a wealth of new literature pertinent to the conduct of the 6-min walk test (6MWT), and a growing evidence base describing the incremental and endurance shuttle walk tests (ISWT and ESWT, respectively). The aim of this document is to describe the standard operating procedures for the 6MWT, ISWT and ESWT, which can be consistently employed by clinicians and researchers. The Technical Standard was developed by a multidisciplinary and international group of clinicians and researchers with expertise in the application of field walking tests. The procedures are underpinned by a concurrent systematic review of literature relevant to measurement properties and test conduct in adults with chronic respiratory disease. Current data confirm that the 6MWT, ISWT and ESWT are valid, reliable and responsive to change with some interventions. However, results are sensitive to small changes in methodology. It is important that two tests are conducted for the 6MWT and ISWT. This Technical Standard for field walking tests reflects current evidence regarding procedures that should be used to achieve robust results. ©ERS 2014.

  6. Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Joana; Castillo, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of Hashimoto's encephalopathy with atypical and partially reversible MRI findings. T2-weighted MRI images revealed bilaterally symmetric areas of increased signal in the mesial temporal lobes and basal ganglia. Despite clinical and imaging improvement after steroid therapy, some memory deficits and MRI abnormalities persisted.

  7. Burden of Chronic Respiratory Diseases (CRD) in Middle East and North Africa (MENA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abdallah, F Chermiti; Taktak, S; Chtourou, A; Mahouachi, R; Kheder, Ali Ben

    2011-01-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases involve a heterogenous group of diseases, including, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, sleep apnea syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, and many occupational diseases. They affect more than one billion people worldwide. Their medical, social, and economic impacts are heavy, especially in developing countries such as Middle East and North Africa countries, where they represent a public health problem. They are essentially represented by COPD, asthma, and allergic diseases. Chronic respiratory diseases are increasing in frequency, morbidity, and mortality. In addition, their economic and social impact is increasing rapidly in this region. Main risk factors are represented by tobacco smoking and exposure to biomass fuel. Smoking prevention and standardized management programs for asthma and COPD are now available but prompt actions are needed to make them more effective in this region and thus avoid an adverse impact on national economic development.

  8. Nutritional status in patients with chronic respiratory failure receiving home mechanical ventilation: impact on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzl, Andre P; Jörres, Rudolf A; Heinemann, Frank; Pfeifer, Michael; Budweiser, Stephan

    2010-02-01

    In patients with chronic respiratory diseases body mass index (BMI) is a predictor of long-term survival, whereas the prognostic value of body composition, especially fat-free mass index (FFMI), is unknown. In a prospectively collected cohort of 131 patients (50 females, 81 males; 71% chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 29% severe restrictive disorders) undergoing home mechanical ventilation (HMV) due to chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (CHRF), the prognostic value of nutritional composition assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis was evaluated during a 4-year follow-up and compared to that of BMI, anthropometrics, and functional parameters. After follow-up, 53 patients (40.5%) had died. Regarding all-cause mortality cumulative survival percentages after 1, 2 and 3 years were 89.3, 76.3 and 67.9%, respectively. In univariate analyses, FFMI, BMI, sex, age, leukocyte number, FEV1 and 6-min walking distance were associated with survival (pNutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic respiratory diseases and risk factors in 12 regions of the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuchalin AG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander G Chuchalin,1 Nikolai Khaltaev,2 Nikolay S Antonov,1 Dmitry V Galkin,3 Leonid G Manakov,4 Paola Antonini,5 Michael Murphy,5 Alexander G Solodovnikov,6 Jean Bousquet,7 Marcelo HS Pereira,8 Irina V Demko9 1Institute of Pulmonology, Federal Medical and Biological Agency, Moscow, Russia; 2Global Alliance Against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD, Genève, Switzerland; 3GlaxoSmithKline, Moscow, Russia; 4Far Eastern Scientific Center of Physiology and Pathology of Respiration RAS (Russian Academy of Sciences, Blagoveshchensk, Russia; 5Worldwide Clinical Trials, King of Prussia, PA, USA; 6Worldwide Clinical Trials, Ekaterinburg, Russia; 7Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Montpellier, France; 8Research and Development Chief Medical Office, International Medical, GlaxoSmithKline, London, United Kingdom; 9Krasnoyarsk State Medical University, Krasnoyarsk, Russia Background: Estimation suggests that at least 4 million people die, annually, as a result of chronic respiratory disease (CRD. The Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD was formed following a mandate from the World Health Assembly to address this serious and growing health problem. Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of CRD in Russian symptomatic patients and to evaluate the frequency of major risk factors for CRD in Russia. Methods: A cross-sectional, population-based epidemiological study using the GARD questionnaire on adults from 12 regions of the Russian Federation. Common respiratory symptoms and risk factors were recorded. Spirometry was performed in respondents with suspected CRD. Allergic rhinitis (AR and chronic bronchitis (CB were defined by the presence of related symptoms according to the Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma and the Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines; asthma was defined based on disease symptoms; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD was defined as a post

  10. Cat scratch encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, B E; Bean, C S

    1991-06-01

    Cat scratch disease is usually benign, self-limited and without sequelae. Margileth has established four clinical criteria, three of which must be satisfied to make the diagnosis: 1) a history of animal exposure, usually kitten, with primary skin or ocular lesions; 2) regional chronic adenopathy without other apparent cause; 3) a positive cat scratch disease antigen skin test; and 4) lymph node biopsy demonstrating noncaseating granulomas and germinal center hyperplasia. Central nervous system involvement in cat scratch disease has been previously reported, although it is extremely uncommon. In a several-month period, we encountered two cases of cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy. The intents of this paper are twofold: 1) to briefly review the current literature on cat scratch disease, 2) to demonstrate that cat scratch disease complicated by encephalopathy presents acutely with seizures, posturing and coma and resolves rapidly with supportive care.

  11. Microbial communities in the upper respiratory tract of patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HeeKuk Park

    Full Text Available Respiratory infections are well-known triggers of chronic respiratory diseases. Recently, culture-independent tools have indicated that lower airway microbiota may contribute to pathophysiologic processes associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, the relationship between upper airway microbiota and chronic respiratory diseases remains unclear. This study was undertaken to define differences of microbiota in the oropharynx of asthma and COPD patients relative to those in healthy individuals. To account for the qualitative and quantitative diversity of the 16S rRNA gene in the oropharynx, the microbiomes of 18 asthma patients, 17 COPD patients, and 12 normal individuals were assessed using a high-throughput next-generation sequencing analysis. In the 259,572 total sequence reads, α and β diversity measurements and a generalized linear model revealed that the oropharynx microbiota are diverse, but no significant differences were observed between asthma and COPD patients. Pseudomonas spp. of Proteobacteria and Lactobacillus spp. of Firmicutes were highly abundant in asthma and COPD. By contrast, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Prevotella, and Neisseria of Bacteroidetes dominated in the healthy oropharynx. These findings are consistent with previous studies conducted in the lower airways and suggest that oropharyngeal airway microbiota are important for understanding the relationships between the various parts of the respiratory tract with regard to bacterial colonization and comprehensive assessment of asthma and COPD.

  12. Early-life origins of chronic respiratory diseases: understanding and promoting healthy ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Silvia; Scheltema, Nienke; Bont, Louis; Baraldi, Eugenio

    2014-12-01

    Chronic obstructive respiratory disorders such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often originate early in life. In addition to a genetic predisposition, prenatal and early-life environmental exposures have a persistent impact on respiratory health. Acting during a critical phase of lung development, these factors may change lung structure and metabolism, and may induce maladaptive responses to harmful agents, which will affect the whole lifespan. Some environmental factors, such as exposure to cigarette smoke, type of childbirth and diet, may be modifiable, but it is more difficult to influence other factors, such as preterm birth and early exposure to viruses or allergens. Here, we bring together recent literature to analyse the critical aspects involved in the early stages of lung development, going back to prenatal and perinatal events, and we discuss the mechanisms by which noxious factors encountered early on may have a lifelong impact on respiratory health. We briefly comment on the need for early disease biomarkers and on the possible role of "-omic" technologies in identifying risk profiles predictive of chronic respiratory conditions. Such profiles could guide the ideation of effective preventive strategies and/or targeted early lifestyle or therapeutic interventions.

  13. Severe encephalopathy after ingestion of star fruit juice in a patient with chronic renal failure admitted to the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Alkmin Teixeira, Gil Cezar; da Silva, Graciana Soares; Viana, Jaciara Machado; Nicolini, Edson Antônio; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Basile-Filho, Anibal

    2010-01-01

    Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) is a popular tropical fruit that is usually consumed as fresh fruit or fruit juice. Consumption of star fruit by patients with chronic renal failure can lead to neurologic symptoms. The present report describes the clinical course, management, and outcome of a patient with chronic renal failure admitted to an intensive care unit after ingestion of star fruit juice 2 days before hospital admission. A case of nausea, vomiting, intractable hiccups, and severe encephalopathy along with mental confusion, disorientation, agitation, and seizures in a 53-year-old woman is presented. The patient's ventilatory pattern worsened, with development of dyspnea and tachypnea, which resulted in her transfer to an intensive care unit. Although hemodialysis was performed and the septic shock was adequately treated, the patient died on the fifth day after hospital admission. The susceptibility of patients with chronic renal failure to star fruit and the severity of intoxication are poorly known by intensivists. This case demonstrates that star fruit consumption should be considered as a cause of rapid deterioration in the renal function of patients with underlying chronic renal failure, potentially resulting in a fatal outcome.

  14. Morphometric analysis of the cerebellar cortex capillaries in the course of experimental valproate encephalopathy and after chronic exposure to sodium valproate using transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Sobaniec, W; Augustynowicz, A

    2001-01-01

    Morphometric analysis of the cerebellar cortex capillary cross-section area performed in experimental valproate encephalopathy using transmission electron microscopy showed that prolongation of VPA application resulted in more enhanced lumen narrowing manifested in gradual reduction in the mean value of the coefficient examined. After 6, 9 and 12 months of experiment this value was statistically different from that obtained in control subgroups, being respectively lower by approximately 22%, 48% and 65%. One month after terminating of chronic administration this value was close to the one found after 12 months of the study. Three months after the drug withdrawal the coefficient was higher by approximately 44% compared to the one after 12 months, which seemed to indicate an increase in capillary lumen patency. The morphometric analysis of the cerebellar cortex capillary cross-section area performed in the present study objectifies the results of qualitative ultrastructural investigations concerning the microcirculation of this CNS structure.

  15. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Atypical Pros and Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that affect several mammalian species including human beings. Four animal TSE agents have been reported: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink encephalopath...

  16. Advances in the Evaluation of Respiratory Pathophysiology during Exercise in Chronic Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Denis E.; Elbehairy, Amany F.; Berton, Danilo C.; Domnik, Nicolle J.; Neder, J. Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Dyspnea and exercise limitation are among the most common symptoms experienced by patients with various chronic lung diseases and are linked to poor quality of life. Our understanding of the source and nature of perceived respiratory discomfort and exercise intolerance in chronic lung diseases has increased substantially in recent years. These new mechanistic insights are the primary focus of the current review. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) provides a unique opportunity to objectively evaluate the ability of the respiratory system to respond to imposed incremental physiological stress. In addition to measuring aerobic capacity and quantifying an individual's cardiac and ventilatory reserves, we have expanded the role of CPET to include evaluation of symptom intensity, together with a simple “non-invasive” assessment of relevant ventilatory control parameters and dynamic respiratory mechanics during standardized incremental tests to tolerance. This review explores the application of the new advances in the clinical evaluation of the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic asthma, interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hope to demonstrate how this novel approach to CPET interpretation, which includes a quantification of activity-related dyspnea and evaluation of its underlying mechanisms, enhances our ability to meaningfully intervene to improve quality of life in these pathologically-distinct conditions. PMID:28275353

  17. How to adapt the pulmonary rehabilitation programme to patients with chronic respiratory disease other than COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne E. Holland

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dyspnoea, fatigue, reduced exercise tolerance, peripheral muscle dysfunction and mood disorders are common features of many chronic respiratory disorders. Pulmonary rehabilitation successfully treats these manifestations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and emerging evidence suggests that these benefits could be extended to other chronic respiratory conditions, although adaptations to the standard programme format may be required. Whilst the benefits of exercise training are well established in asthma, pulmonary rehabilitation can also provide evidence-based interventions including breathing techniques and self-management training. In interstitial lung disease, a small number of trials show improved exercise capacity, symptoms and quality of life following pulmonary rehabilitation, which is a positive development for patients who may have few treatment options. In pulmonary arterial hypertension, exercise training is safe and effective if patients are stable on medical therapy and close supervision is provided. Pulmonary rehabilitation for bronchiectasis, including exercise training and airway clearance techniques, improves exercise capacity and quality of life. In nonsmall cell lung cancer, a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach is required to ensure the success of pulmonary rehabilitation following surgery. Pulmonary rehabilitation programmes provide important and underutilised opportunities to improve the integrated care of people with chronic respiratory disorders other than COPD.

  18. Hashimoto's encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid...... diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb...

  19. Reduction of cervical and respiratory muscle strength in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and having moderate to severe disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Sollano-Vallez, Ernesto; Del Corral, Tamara

    2017-06-11

    To investigate whether patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and having moderate to severe disability have a greater cervical motor function impairment and respiratory disturbances compared with patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain having mild disability and asymptomatic subjects; and the association between these outcomes in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and healthy controls. Cross-sectional study, 44 patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and 31 healthy subjects participated. The neck disability index was used to divide the patients into 2 groups: 1) mild disability group (scores between 5 and 14 points); and 2) moderate to severe disability group (scores >14 points). Cervical motor function was measured by cervical range of motion, forward head posture, neck flexor, and extensor muscle strength. Respiratory function and maximum respiratory pressures were also measured. Statistically differences were found between the patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain having a moderate to severe disability and the asymptomatic subjects for cervical and respiratory muscle strength. Comparisons between chronic nonspecific neck pain and the asymptomatic groups showed differences for all the variables, except for forward head posture. The regression model determined that strength of cervical flexion explained 36.4 and 45.6% of the variance of maximum inspiratory pressures and maximum expiratory pressures, respectively. Only the chronic nonspecific neck pain group with moderate to severe disability showed differences compared with the healthy subjects. Neck muscle strength could be a good predictor of respiratory muscle function. Implications for rehabilitation Neck pain severity could be closely associated with decreased respiratory pressure in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. These findings suggest a new therapeutic approach for patients with moderate to severe disability, such as respiratory muscle training. The regression

  20. [A case of cryptococcal meningitis mimicking hepatic encephalopathy in a patient with liver cirrhosis caused by chronic hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Mi; Jung, Gum Mo; Lee, Woong Ki; Lee, Hyeuk Soo; Kim, Byung Sun; Seong, Choong Sil; Yoon, So Hee; Cho, Yong Keun

    2014-11-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, an encapsulated fungus, is an important opportunistic pathogen that can cause meningitis in im-munocompromised patients. Since patients with cryptococcemia have high mortality, it is essential to make an early diagnosis and promptly initiate antifungal therapy. However, it is often very difficult to differentiate between cryptococcal meningitis and hepatic encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis, and there is delay in making the diagnosis. Therefore, these patients have a particularly grave prognosis and consequently many patients die before culture results become available. In one study, starting antifungal therapy within 48 hours of the blood culture was associated with improved survival, but patients with liver cirrhosis were significantly less likely to receive antifungal therapy within 48 hours compared to those without liver cirrhosis. Recently, the authors experience a case of a 68-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis who presented with fever and a drowsy mental status. She had a previous history of having been admitted for infection-associated hepatic encephlopathy. Cryptococcal meningitis and cryptococcemia were diagnosed by spinal puncture and culture of cerebrospinal fluid. In spite of adequate treatment, the patient developed multi-system organ failure and eventually expired. Herein, we report a case of cryptococcal meningitis mimicking hepatic encephalopathy in a patient with liver cirrhosis.

  1. The emerging relationship between the airway microbiota and chronic respiratory disease: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yvonne J; Lynch, Susan V

    2011-12-01

    Until recently, relationships between evidence of colonization or infection by specific microbial species and the development, persistence or exacerbation of pulmonary disease have informed our opinions of airway microbiology. However, recent applications of culture-independent tools for microbiome profiling have revealed a more diverse microbiota than previously recognized in the airways of patients with chronic pulmonary disease. New evidence indicates that the composition of airway microbiota differs in states of health and disease and with severity of symptoms and that the microbiota, as a collective entity, may contribute to pathophysiologic processes associated with chronic airway disease. Here, we review the evolution of airway microbiology studies of chronic pulmonary disease, focusing on asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Building on evidence derived from traditional microbiological approaches and more recent culture-independent microbiome studies, we discuss the implications of recent findings on potential microbial determinants of respiratory health or disease.

  2. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic respiratory diseases: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yonghua; Liu, Chunli; Lu, Wenju; Li, Mengxi; Hadadi, Cyrus; Wang, Elizabeth Wenqian; Yang, Kai; Lai, Ning; Huang, Junyi; Li, Shiyue; Zhong, Nanshan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic respiratory disease-associated pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an important subtype of PH, which lacks clinical epidemiological data in China. Methods Six hundred and ninety three patients hospitalized from 2010 to 2013 were classified by echocardiography according to pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP): mild (36≤ PASP 20 mm) were associated with moderate-to-severe PH, while RV [odds ratio (OR) =3.53, 95% CI, 2.17–5.74], NT-proBNP (OR=2.44, 95% CI, 1.51–3.95), HCT (OR=1.03, 95% CI, 1.00–1.07) and PaCO2 (OR=1.01, 95% CI, 1.00–1.03) were independent risk factors. Conclusions PH related to respiratory diseases is mostly mild to moderate, and the severity is associated with the category of respiratory disease. Increased HCT can be an independent risk factor for PH related to chronic respiratory diseases. PMID:27076929

  3. Effects of chronic exposure to crack cocaine on the respiratory tract of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculiani, Percyleine P; Pires-Neto, Ruy C; Bueno, Heloisa M S; Zorzetto, Júlio C; Silva, Luiz C; Santos, Angela B G; Garcia, Raphael C T; Yonamine, Mauricio; Detregiachi, Cláudia R P; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Mauad, Thais

    2009-04-01

    Smoked cocaine (crack cocaine) causes several forms of injury to the respiratory tract, including asthma exacerbations, lung edema and hemorrhage, and nasal mucosal alterations. Few studies, however, have assessed respiratory tract pathology in habitual users of crack cocaine. Here, we describe the histological alterations in the respiratory tract of mice caused by chronic inhalation of crack cocaine. Twenty 2-month-old BALB/c mice were exposed to the smoke of 5 g crack cocaine in an inhalation chamber once a day for two months and compared to controls (n = 10). We then morphometrically analyzed nose and bronchiolar epithelial alterations, bronchiolar and alveolar macrophage cell density, alveolar hemosiderin content, and in addition determined the vasoconstriction index and the wall thickness of pulmonary arteries. The serum cocaine level was 212.5 ng/mL after a single inhalation. The mucus content of the nasal epithelium increased in crack-exposed animals, and the nasal and bronchial epithelium thickness decreased significantly. The alveolar hemosiderin content and the alveolar and bronchiolar macrophage cell density increased in animals exposed to crack. The vasoconstriction index increased in the pulmonary arteries of the exposed group. Chronic crack cocaine inhalation causes extensive histological changes along the entire respiratory tract.

  4. [Effectiveness of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in older patients with chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Yuji; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ogura, Takashi; Miyazawa, Naoki; Nakamura, Mari; Hashizume, Toshihiko; Kozawa, Satoko; Tagawa, Akihiro

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate effectiveness of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, we recommended 1378 outpatients aged over 60 with chronic respiratory diseases to be vaccinated from August to October 2002, and 647 patients were vaccinated from August to November 2002. In the 1229 patients without respiratory failure, the incidence of antimicrobial treatment for bacterial respiratory infections in 547 vaccinated patients significantly decreased from 7.9% in the 2001/02 winter season to 5.7% in the 2002/03 winter season, although that in the 682 unvaccinated patients increased from 3.8% to 5.7%. The incidence of antimicrobial treatment for bacterial respiratory infections in 229 vaccinated patients with pneumococcal and influenza vaccines together significantly decreased from 10.5% in the 2001/02 winter season to 5.2% in 2002/03 winter season although that in 110 subjects vaccinated with influenza vaccine only increased from 2.7% to 7.2%. These findings suggest the effectiveness of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine for the prevention of bacterial respiratory infections and the additive effectiveness of pneumococcal and influenza vaccines together.

  5. Modification in CSF specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure independent of encephalopathy, evidences for an early blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Nicolas; Rosselli, Matteo; Mouri, Sarah; Galanaud, Damien; Puybasset, Louis; Agarwal, Banwari; Thabut, Dominique; Jalan, Rajiv

    2017-04-01

    Although hepatic encephalopathy (HE) on the background of acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is associated with high mortality rates, it is unknown whether this is due to increased blood-brain barrier permeability. Specific gravity of cerebrospinal fluid measured by CT is able to estimate blood-cerebrospinal fluid-barrier permeability. This study aimed to assess cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and to compare it in patients with or without ACLF and with or without hepatic encephalopathy. We identified all the patients admitted for acute decompensation of cirrhosis who underwent a brain CT-scan. Those patients could present acute decompensation with or without ACLF. The presence of hepatic encephalopathy was noted. They were compared to a group of stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. Quantitative brain CT analysis used the Brainview software that gives the weight, the volume and the specific gravity of each determined brain regions. Results are given as median and interquartile ranges and as relative variation compared to the control/baseline group. 36 patients presented an acute decompensation of cirrhosis. Among them, 25 presented with ACLF and 11 without ACLF; 20 presented with hepatic encephalopathy grade ≥ 2. They were compared to 31 stable cirrhosis patients and 61 healthy controls. Cirrhotic patients had increased cerebrospinal fluid specific gravity (CSF-SG) compared to healthy controls (+0.4 %, p gravity did not differ between different brain regions according to the presence or absence of either ACLF or HE. In patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis, and those with ACLF, CSF specific gravity is modified compared to both stable cirrhotic patients and healthy controls. This pattern is observed even in the absence of hepatic encephalopathy suggesting that blood-CSF barrier impairment is manifest even in absence of overt hepatic encephalopathy.

  6. Time trend in hospitalised chronic lower respiratory diseases among Danish building and construction workers, 1981-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tüchsen, Finn; Hannerz, Harald; Mølgaard, Ellen Fisher;

    2012-01-01

    To show trends in age-standardised hospital admission ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases, estimated for Danish construction workers over three time periods (1981-1990, 1991-2000, 2001-2009).......To show trends in age-standardised hospital admission ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases, estimated for Danish construction workers over three time periods (1981-1990, 1991-2000, 2001-2009)....

  7. Study on the effect of nursing intervention on chronic severe hepatitis and hepatic encephalopathy patient%护理干预对慢性重型肝炎肝性脑病影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨运娟; 冯碧英; 彭碧文

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨护理干预对慢性重型肝炎肝性脑病的影响.方法:对90例慢性重型肝炎患者在常规治疗护理的基础上实施全面评估发生肝性脑病存在及潜在的诱因,进行预见性的护理干预(观察组),并随机抽取常规治疗护理的同病种病例90例(对照组).结果:观察组肝性脑病的发生率及治疗效果与对照组比较有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:护理干预可消除和减少肝性脑病的诱发因素,减少肝性脑病的发生率,提高治疗效果.提示慢性重型肝炎患者要重视对肝性脑病诱发因素的评估及进行预见性护理干预,去除肝性脑病的诱因,对防治慢性重型肝炎肝性脑病、改善治疗效果、提高患者的生存率有重要作用.%Objective: To explore the influence of nursing intervention on chronic severe hepatitis and hepatic encephalopathy.Methods: Selected 90 chronic severe hepatitis patients on the basis of conventional care, then implemented comprehensive evaluation on existing and potential triggers lead to hepatic encephalopathy for participative nursing intervention, and randomly extracted 90 patients with the same disease cases based on conventional care as control group.Results: Comparison of therapeutic effect and incidence of hepatic encephalopathy between observation group and contrast group was statistically significant( P <0.05 ).Conclusions: Nursing intervention can eliminate and reduce liver cerebral causative factor,reduce the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy and increase the therapeutic effect.It' s prompted that nursing chronic severe hepatitis patients should pay attention on assessing the induce factor of hepatic encephalopathy and carrying out the predictive nursing intervention.Removed hepatic encephalopathy triggers, is very important to the prevention and control of hepatic encephalopathy , the improve of therapeutic effect and the increase of patient surial rates.

  8. Rhinovirus genome variation during chronic upper and lower respiratory tract infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Tapparel

    Full Text Available Routine screening of lung transplant recipients and hospital patients for respiratory virus infections allowed to identify human rhinovirus (HRV in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, including immunocompromised hosts chronically infected with the same strain over weeks or months. Phylogenetic analysis of 144 HRV-positive samples showed no apparent correlation between a given viral genotype or species and their ability to invade the lower respiratory tract or lead to protracted infection. By contrast, protracted infections were found almost exclusively in immunocompromised patients, thus suggesting that host factors rather than the virus genotype modulate disease outcome, in particular the immune response. Complete genome sequencing of five chronic cases to study rhinovirus genome adaptation showed that the calculated mutation frequency was in the range observed during acute human infections. Analysis of mutation hot spot regions between specimens collected at different times or in different body sites revealed that non-synonymous changes were mostly concentrated in the viral capsid genes VP1, VP2 and VP3, independent of the HRV type. In an immunosuppressed lung transplant recipient infected with the same HRV strain for more than two years, both classical and ultra-deep sequencing of samples collected at different time points in the upper and lower respiratory tracts showed that these virus populations were phylogenetically indistinguishable over the course of infection, except for the last month. Specific signatures were found in the last two lower respiratory tract populations, including changes in the 5'UTR polypyrimidine tract and the VP2 immunogenic site 2. These results highlight for the first time the ability of a given rhinovirus to evolve in the course of a natural infection in immunocompromised patients and complement data obtained from previous experimental inoculation studies in immunocompetent volunteers.

  9. August 2014 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: the use of macrolide antibiotics in chronic respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. This month's journal club reviewed the role of macrolide antibiotics in chronic respiratory disease. Macrolide usage was suggested from observational studies in Japan in diffuse panbroncholitis, a disorder associated with chronic respiratory infection, usually Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1. Clinical improvement was noted despite doses of antibiotics well below the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the antibiotic. This suggested the antibiotic was likely working by an anti-inflammatory effect. These observations were extended to cystic fibrosis (CF where prophylactic macrolide therapy in CF patients infected with Pseudomonas has become standard therapy (2. More recently, low dose macrolide therapy has been applied to non-CF lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, bronchiectasis and asthma. Time did not permit a review of all studies so a representative sample was discussed. In patients with COPD, the four randomized, placebo-controlled trials reviewed all suggested that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduced COPD exacerbations (3-5. This ...

  10. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among patients with systemic arterial hypertension without respiratory symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabahi MF

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Fouad Rabahi,1,2 Sheila Alves Pereira,1 José Laerte Rodrigues Silva Júnior,1,2 Aline Pacheco de Rezende,1 Adeliane Castro da Costa,2 Krislainy de Sousa Corrêa,2,3 Marcus Barreto Conde4,5 1School of Medicine, Federal University of Goiás, Goiania, Brazil; 2Clínica do Aparelho Respiratório (CLARE, Goiania, Brazil; 3Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás, Goiania, Brazil; 4Faculdade de Medicina de Petrópolis/FASE, Petrópolis, Brazil; 5Instituto de Doenças do Tórax da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Background: The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is often delayed until later stages of the disease. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of COPD among adults on treatment for systemic arterial hypertension independently of the presence of respiratory symptoms. Methods: This cross-sectional study included adults aged ≥40 years with tobacco/occupational exposure and systemic arterial hypertension diagnosed at three Primary Health Care facilities in Goiania, Brazil. Patients were evaluated using a standardized respiratory questionnaire and spirometry. COPD prevalence was measured considering the value of forced vital capacity and/or forced expiratory volume in 1 second <0.70. Results: Of a total of 570 subjects, 316 (55% met inclusion criteria and were invited to participate. Two hundred and thirty-three (73.7% patients with arterial hypertension reported at least one respiratory symptom, while 83 (26.3% reported no respiratory symptoms; 41 (17.6% patients with arterial hypertension and at least one respiratory symptom, and 10 (12% patients with arterial hypertension but no respiratory symptoms were diagnosed with COPD (P=0.24. The prevalence of COPD in people with no previous COPD diagnosis was greater among those with no respiratory symptoms (100% than among those with respiratory symptoms (56.1% (P=0.01. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that

  11. Functional connectivity and information flow of the respiratory neural network in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lianchun; De Mazancourt, Marine; Hess, Agathe; Ashadi, Fakhrul R; Klein, Isabelle; Mal, Hervé; Courbage, Maurice; Mangin, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    Breathing involves a complex interplay between the brainstem automatic network and cortical voluntary command. How these brain regions communicate at rest or during inspiratory loading is unknown. This issue is crucial for several reasons: (i) increased respiratory loading is a major feature of several respiratory diseases, (ii) failure of the voluntary motor and cortical sensory processing drives is among the mechanisms that precede acute respiratory failure, (iii) several cerebral structures involved in responding to inspiratory loading participate in the perception of dyspnea, a distressing symptom in many disease. We studied functional connectivity and Granger causality of the respiratory network in controls and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), at rest and during inspiratory loading. Compared with those of controls, the motor cortex area of patients exhibited decreased connectivity with their contralateral counterparts and no connectivity with the brainstem. In the patients, the information flow was reversed at rest with the source of the network shifted from the medulla towards the motor cortex. During inspiratory loading, the system was overwhelmed and the motor cortex became the sink of the network. This major finding may help to understand why some patients with COPD are prone to acute respiratory failure. Network connectivity and causality were related to lung function and illness severity. We validated our connectivity and causality results with a mathematical model of neural network. Our findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy involving the modulation of brain activity to increase motor cortex functional connectivity and improve respiratory muscles performance in patients. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2736-2754, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Temperature effects on outpatient visits of respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated the risk of outpatient visits for respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction not elsewhere classified (CAO) associated with ambient temperatures and extreme temperature events from 2000 to 2008 in Taiwan. Based on geographical and socioeconomics characteristics, this study divided the whole island into seven areas. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the area-disease-specific cumulative relative risk (RR), and random-effect meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled RR of outpatient visits, from lag 0 to lag 7 days, associated with daily temperature, and added effects of prolonged extreme heat and cold for population of all ages, the elderly and younger than 65 years. Pooled analyses showed that younger population had higher outpatient visits for exposing to low temperature of 18 °C, with cumulative 8-day RRs of 1.36 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.31-1.42) for respiratory diseases, 1.10 (95 % CI 1.03-1.18) for asthma, and 1.12 (95 % CI 1.02-1.22) for CAO. The elderly was more vulnerable to high temperature of 30 °C with the cumulative 8-day RR of 1.08 (95 % CI 1.03-1.13) for CAO. Elevated outpatient visits for all respiratory diseases and asthma were associated with extreme heat lasting for 6 to 8 days. On the contrary, the extreme cold lasting more than 8 days had significant negative association with outpatient visits of all respiratory diseases. In summary, elderly patients of respiratory diseases and CAO are vulnerable to high temperature. Cold temperature is associated with all types of respiratory diseases for younger patients.

  13. Persistent and Recurrent Bacterial Bronchitis—A Paradigm Shift in Our Understanding of Chronic Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Alya; Everard, Mark L.

    2017-01-01

    The recent recognition that the conducting airways are not “sterile” and that they have their own dynamic microbiome, together with the rapid advances in our understanding of microbial biofilms and their roles in the causation of respiratory diseases (such as chronic bronchitis, sinusitis, and chronic otitis media), permit us to update the “vicious circle” hypothesis of the causation of bronchiectasis. This proposes that chronic inflammation driven by persistent bacterial bronchitis (PBB) causes damage to both the epithelium, resulting in impaired mucociliary clearance, and to the airway wall, which eventually manifests as bronchiectasis. The link between a “chronic bronchitis” and a persistence of bacterial pathogens, such as non-typable Haemophilus influenzae, was first made more than 100 years ago, and its probable role in the causation of bronchiectasis was proposed soon afterward. The recognition that the “usual suspects” are adept at forming biofilms and hence are able to persist and dominate the normal dynamically changing “healthy microbiome” of the conducting airways provides an explanation for the chronic colonization of the bronchi and for the associated chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation characteristic of a PBB. Understanding the complex interaction between the host and the microbial communities of the conducting airways in health and disease will be a key component in optimizing pulmonary health in the future. PMID:28261574

  14. Randomised crossover trial of telemonitoring in chronic respiratory patients (TeleCRAFT trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatwin, M; Hawkins, G; Panicchia, L; Woods, A; Hanak, A; Lucas, R; Baker, E; Ramhamdany, E; Mann, B; Riley, J; Cowie, M R; Simonds, A K

    2016-04-01

    Randomised crossover trial with 6 months of standard best practice clinical care (control group) and 6 months with the addition of telemonitoring. 68 patients with chronic lung disease (38 with COPD; 30 with chronic respiratory failure due to other causes), who had a hospital admission for an exacerbation within 6 months of randomisation and either used long-term oxygen therapy or had an arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) of telemonitoring (second-generation system) via broadband link to a hospital-based care team. Primary outcome measure was time to first hospital admission for an acute exacerbation. Secondary outcome measures were hospital admissions, general practitioner (GP) consultations and home visits by nurses, quality of life measured by EuroQol-5D and hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) scale, and self-efficacy score (Stanford). Median (IQR) number of days to first admission showed no difference between the two groups—77 (114) telemonitoring, 77.5 (61) control ( p=0.189). Hospital admission rate at 6 months increased (0.63 telemonitoring vs 0.32 control p=0.026). Home visits increased during telemonitoring; GP consultations were unchanged. Self-efficacy fell, while HAD depression score improved marginally during telemonitoring. Telemonitoring added to standard care did not alter time to next acute hospital admission, increased hospital admissions and home visits overall, and did not improve quality of life in chronic respiratory patients. NCT02180919 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  15. Chronic respiratory diseases in developing countries: the burden and strategies for prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aït-Khaled, N; Enarson, D; Bousquet, J

    2001-01-01

    In developing countries, chronic respiratory diseases represent a challenge to public health because of their frequency, severity, projected trends, and economic impact. Health care planners, for example, are faced with a dramatic increase in tobacco use and must establish priorities for the allocation of limited resources. Nevertheless, smoking prevention and standardized management programmes for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease should be implemented in developing countries whenever possible. International measures will be required to reverse tobacco smoking trends, and international agencies could define essential drugs and equipment and encourage the use of generic drugs, particularly for corticosteroids inhaled at high dosages. For such programmes to be effective, producers of high-quality generics will need to be identified, and the medications added to national lists of essential drugs and included in procurement procedures. Other recommendations for alleviating the burden of chronic respiratory diseases in developing countries are: adapting guidelines to local contexts and ensuring their distribution; upgrading equipment at district level; purchasing high-quality drugs at low prices; routine training and supervision of health services personnel; and regular monitoring of performance. Social mobilization by professional societies, nongovernmental organizations, and the mass media will also increase government commitment to tobacco control and standardized case management.

  16. Renal (uremic) encephalopathy in a goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Z A; Thomsen, B V; Summers, B A

    2005-10-01

    Renal encephalopathy was diagnosed in a 2-year-old male boar goat with a history of chronic weight loss and ataxia. Histopathological examination of the brain revealed a striking myelin vacuolation distributed mainly in two patterns: (i) along the junction of the neocortex and corona radiata, and (ii) in the bundles of the internal capsule as it dissects through the basal nuclei. The kidneys had diffuse severe tubular and glomerular necrosis and degeneration. The neural lesions are consistent with renal (uremic) encephalopathy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of renal encephalopathy in a goat.

  17. Re-evaluation of acid-base prediction rules in patients with chronic respiratory acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinu, Tereza; Menzies, Dick; Dial, Sandra

    2003-09-01

    The prediction rules for the evaluation of the acid-base status in patients with chronic respiratory acidosis, derived primarily from an experimental canine model, suggest that complete compensation should not occur. This appears to contradict frequent observations of normal or near-normal pH levels in patients with chronic hypercapnia. Linear regression analysis was used to estimate the relationships between arterial pH, bicarbonate and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) from 18 separate arterial blood gas measurements in 18 clinically stable outpatients with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure from chronic obstructive lung disease, and without clinical conditions or medications likely to cause a primary metabolic alkalosis. The PCO2 ranged from 45 mmHg to 77 mmHg, and pH ranged from 7.37 to 7.44. In only three of the arterial blood gas measurements were the pH values lower than 7.38. From the regression equations derived from these measurements, the pH decreased by 0.014 for each 10 mmHg increase in the PCO2, and the bicarbonate level increased by 5.1 mmol/L. These values are quite different from a decrease in pH of 0.03 and an increase in bicarbonate of 3.5 mmol/L predicted using the rules derived from the canine model. In patients with chronic stable hypercapnia, acid-base compensatory mechanisms appear to be more effective than would be predicted using the classic rules.

  18. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  19. Sex-specific respiratory effects of acute and chronic caffeine administration in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchi, Hayet; Uppari, NagaPraveena; Joseph, Vincent; Bairam, Aida

    2017-06-01

    Caffeine is widely used for the treatment of apnea of prematurity (AoP) but whether this effect varies with sex is unknown. To shed some light on this question, we present a summary of data obtained on the effects of caffeine on the respiratory chemoreflexes and apnea frequency in 1- and 12-days old male and female rats. Caffeine was either administered as a single acute injection (10mg/kg, i.p.) or for 10 consecutive days (7.5mg/kg/day between 3 and 12days of life by gavage, simulating its clinical use). Acute caffeine had little effects on breathing in 1-day old male and female rats. In 12-days old female rats caffeine reduced the response to hypercapnia (not hypoxia) compared to males. During the steady state of hypoxia females had a lower frequency of apneas than males, and acute injection of caffeine decreased the frequency of apnea, suppressing the differences between males and females. In 12-days old rats chronic administration of caffeine stimulated basal breathing and decreased the frequency of apnea similarly in males and females. In response to hypoxia, chronic caffeine administration also masked the difference in respiratory frequency between males and females observed in control rats. Female rats had lower frequency of apnea than males with or without caffeine treatment. These observations indicate that sex influences the respiratory responses to caffeine and this effect seems to depend on the modality of administration (acute vs chronic) and environmental oxygen (normoxia vs hypoxia). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3 : Area 5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y. Z.; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J.; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J.; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H.; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman-Rodriguez, M.; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D.; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H. A.; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C.; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D. Y.; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS

  1. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G;

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS ...

  2. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3 : Area 5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y. Z.; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J.; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J.; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M.; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H.; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman-Rodriguez, M.; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D.; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H. A.; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C.; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D. Y.; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L.; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS int

  3. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3 Area 5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D.; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS int

  4. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  5. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis Causing Chronic Stridor and Delayed Speech in an 18-Month-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Alharbi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis is a relatively uncommon disease that presents clinically with symptoms ranging from hoarseness to severe dyspnea. Human papilloma virus types 6 and 11 are important in the etiology of papillomas and are most probably transmitted from mother to child during birth. Although spontaneous remission is frequent, pulmonary spread and/or malignant transformation resulting in death has been reported. CO2 laser evaporation of papillomas and adjuvant drug therapy using lymphoblastoid interferon-alpha are the most common treatments. However, several other treatments have been tried, with varying success. In the present report, a case of laryngeal papillomatosis presenting with chronic stridor and delayed speech is described.

  6. NEW POSSIBILITIES OF ANTIBACTERIAL TREATMENT IN ACUTE AND CHRONIC RESPIRATORY DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Simonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors show the data on current microbiological pattern in children with acute and chronic respiratory disorders and dynamics of microflora susceptibility to the most frequently used antibiotics over recent years. The principles of antibiotic choice and control for their efficiency, peculiarities of their usage in children and the most common side effects are given. New aspects of the usage of combined antibacterial agents - ecoantibiotics – are discussed. Including of the Lactulose Anhydro into their composition allows to achieve high microbiological efficacy and does not cause antibiotic-induced diarrhea, which has a great importance in pediatric practice.

  7. The role of invasive ventilation in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease causing respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosky, Christopher; Turton, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can usually be managed initially with medical treatment and non- invasive ventilation. In circumstances where non- invasive ventilation cannot be used or has failed, intubation and invasive ventilation may be lifesaving. The outcome of patients with an exacerbation of COPD requiring invasive ventilation is better than often thought, with a hospital survival of 70-89%. Decisions regarding invasive ventilation made by physicians and patients with COPD are unpredictable and vary with the individual. This article reviews the role of invasive ventilation in exacerbations of COPD to assist decision making.

  8. [18F]-T807 tauopathy PET imaging in chronic traumatic encephalopathy [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4fb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Gandy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new molecular ligand for positron emission tomography (PET of the human brain, [18F]-T807, is under investigation for the antemortem detection of pathological neurofibrillary aggregates, which are evidence of neurofibrillary tangle (NFT diseases, also known as tauopathies. Repetitive mild traumatic brain injuries in athletes and battlefield veterans are associated with one such tauopathy, known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. In a recent case report, a former NFL player with clinically probable CTE and a concurrent Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP –like syndrome was studied using [18F]-T807. The interpretation of this player’s [18F]-T807 PET imaging was complicated by the overlap of tracer uptake in brain regions involved in CTE and PSP with regions associated with either nonspecific [18F]-T807 ligand binding or “aging-associated” binding of [18F]-T807 to authentic tauopathy known to be associated with aging and disease severity (i.e., NFT in the mesial temporal lobe. The implications of these data for the utility of [18F]-T807 in the pre-mortem detection of CTE are summarized.

  9. Surveillance for transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in scavengers of white-tailed deer carcasses in the chronic wasting disease area of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennelle, Christopher S; Samuel, Michael D; Nolden, Cherrie A; Keane, Delwyn P; Barr, Daniel J; Johnson, Chad; Vanderloo, Joshua P; Aiken, Judd M; Hamir, Amir N; Hoover, Edward A

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a class of neurodegenerative transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) occurring in cervids, is found in a number of states and provinces across North America. Misfolded prions, the infectious agents of CWD, are deposited in the environment via carcass remains and excreta, and pose a threat of cross-species transmission. In this study tissues were tested from 812 representative mammalian scavengers, collected in the CWD-affected area of Wisconsin, for TSE infection using the IDEXX HerdChek enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only four of the collected mammals tested positive using the ELISA, but these were negative when tested by Western blot. While our sample sizes permitted high probabilities of detecting TSE assuming 1% population prevalence in several common scavengers (93%, 87%, and 87% for raccoons, opossums, and coyotes, respectively), insufficient sample sizes for other species precluded similar conclusions. One cannot rule out successful cross-species TSE transmission to scavengers, but the results suggest that such transmission is not frequent in the CWD-affected area of Wisconsin. The need for further surveillance of scavenger species, especially those known to be susceptible to TSE (e.g., cat, American mink, raccoon), is highlighted in both a field and laboratory setting.

  10. GR3027 antagonizes GABAA receptor-potentiating neurosteroids and restores spatial learning and motor coordination in rats with chronic hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Maja; Agusti, Ana; Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Strömberg, Jessica; Malinina, Evgenya; Ragagnin, Gianna; Doverskog, Magnus; Bäckström, Torbjörn; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-09-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is one of the primary complications of liver cirrhosis. Current treatments for HE, mainly directed to reduction of ammonia levels, are not effective enough because they cannot completely eliminate hyperammonemia and inflammation, which induce the neurological alterations. Studies in animal models show that overactivation of GABAA receptors is involved in cognitive and motor impairment in HE and that reducing this activation restores these functions. We have developed a new compound, GR3027, that selectively antagonizes the enhanced activation of GABAA receptors by neurosteroids such as allopregnanolone and 3α,21-dihydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one (THDOC). This work aimed to assess whether GR3027 improves motor incoordination, spatial learning, and circadian rhythms of activity in rats with HE. GR3027 was administered subcutaneously to two main models of HE: rats with chronic hyperammonemia due to ammonia feeding and rats with portacaval shunts (PCS). Motor coordination was assessed in beam walking and spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze and the radial maze. Circadian rhythms of ambulatory and vertical activity were also assessed. In both hyperammonemic and PCS rats, GR3027 restores motor coordination, spatial memory in the Morris water maze, and spatial learning in the radial maze. GR3027 also partially restores circadian rhythms of ambulatory and vertical activity in PCS rats. GR3027 is a novel approach to treatment of HE that would normalize neurological functions altered because of enhanced GABAergic tone, affording more complete normalization of cognitive and motor function than current treatments for HE.

  11. Neuroprotective effects of guanosine administration on behavioral, brain activity, neurochemical and redox parameters in a rat model of chronic hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniz, L G; Calcagnotto, M E; Pandolfo, P; Machado, D G; Santos, G F; Hansel, G; Almeida, R F; Bruch, R S; Brum, L M; Torres, F V; de Assis, A M; Rico, E P; Souza, D O

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that glutamatergic excitotoxicity and oxidative stress are implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The nucleoside guanosine exerts neuroprotective effects through the antagonism against glutamate neurotoxicity and antioxidant properties. In this study, we evaluated the neuroprotective effect of guanosine in an animal model of chronic HE. Rats underwent bile duct ligation (BDL) and 2 weeks later they were treated with i.p. injection of guanosine 7.5 mg/kg once a day for 1-week. We evaluated the effects of guanosine in HE studying several aspects: a) animal behavior using open field and Y-maze tasks; b) brain rhythm changes in electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings; c) purines and glutamate levels in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF); and d) oxidative stress parameters in the brain. BDL rats presented increased levels of glutamate, purines and metabolites in the CSF, as well as increased oxidative damage. Guanosine was able not only to prevent these effects but also to attenuate the behavioral and EEG impairment induced by BDL. Our study shows the neuroprotective effects of systemic administration of guanosine in a rat model of HE and highlights the involvement of purinergic system in the physiopathology of this disease.

  12. Surveillance for transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in scavengers of white-tailed deer carcasses in the chronic wasting disease area of wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennelle, C.S.; Samuel, M.D.; Nolden, C.A.; Keane, D.P.; Barr, D.J.; Johnson, Chad; Vanderloo, J.P.; Aiken, Judd M.; Hamir, A.N.; Hoover, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a class of neurodegenerative transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) occurring in cervids, is found in a number of states and provinces across North America. Misfolded prions, the infectious agents of CWD, are deposited in the environment via carcass remains and excreta, and pose a threat of cross-species transmission. In this study tissues were tested from 812 representative mammalian scavengers, collected in the CWD-affected area of Wisconsin, for TSE infection using the IDEXX HerdChek enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only four of the collected mammals tested positive using the ELISA, but these were negative when tested by Western blot. While our sample sizes permitted high probabilities of detecting TSE assuming 1% population prevalence in several common scavengers (93%, 87%, and 87% for raccoons, opossums, and coyotes, respectively), insufficient sample sizes for other species precluded similar conclusions. One cannot rule out successful cross-species TSE transmission to scavengers, but the results suggest that such transmission is not frequent in the CWD-affected area of Wisconsin. The need for further surveillance of scavenger species, especially those known to be susceptible to TSE (e.g., cat, American mink, raccoon), is highlighted in both a field and laboratory setting.

  13. [Atmospheric pollution and chronic respiratory diseases in the blast-furnace areas of iron-works].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannini, D; Valente, T; Rotunno, R; Giusto, R

    1977-01-01

    An epidemiologic research together with a study on the environmental pollution were carried out in order to evaluate the risk of chronic respiratory diseases of blast furnace workers. The environment study was performed mainly using personal samplers given to workers with different jobs. Observations on 222 work shifts have shown that the total dust concentration to which cast workmen, maintenance men and blast furnace service men were exposed, marginally exceed the TLV values. Furthermore the level of respirable dusts for blast furnace service men was found slightly excessive. The average SO2 concentration was largely below the TLV values. However this gas could be found in excess for very short periods during the work. The epidemiologic study, conducted on a cohort of blast furnace area workers against a control group cohort, indicated a moderate prevalence of pneumoconiosis and chronic bronchitis amongst blast furnaces workers. The clinic and radiological pictures do not seem to go beyond the initial stages.

  14. Chronic respiratory failure in patients with neuromuscular diseases: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, Ilma Aparecida; Villalba, Wander de Oliveira; Pereira, Mônica Corso

    2007-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases affect alveolar air exchange and therefore cause chronic respiratory failure. The onset of respiratory failure can be acute, as in traumas, or progressive (slow or rapid), as in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, muscular dystrophies, diseases of the myoneural junction, etc. Respiratory muscle impairment also affects cough efficiency and, according to the current knowledge regarding the type of treatment available in Brazil to these patients, it can be said that the high rates of morbidity and mortality in these individuals are more often related to the fact that they cough inefficiently rather than to the fact that they ventilate poorly. In this review, with the objective of presenting the options of devices available to support and substitute for natural ventilation in patients with neuromuscular diseases, we have compiled a brief history of the evolution of orthopedic braces and prostheses used to aid respiration since the end of the 19th century. In addition, we highlight the elements that are fundamental to the diagnosis of alveolar hypoventilation and of failure of the protective cough mechanism: taking of a clinical history; determination of peak cough flow; measurement of maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures; spirometry in two positions (sitting and supine); pulse oximetry; capnography; and polysomnography. Furthermore, the threshold values available in the literature for the use of nocturnal ventilatory support and for the extension of this support through the daytime period are presented. Moreover, the maneuvers used to increase cough efficiency, as well as the proper timing of their introduction, are discussed.

  15. Challenges in diagnosing hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenborn, K

    2015-02-01

    The term "hepatic encephalopathy" (HE) covers the neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with acute, chronic and acute-on-chronic liver disease (CLD). This paper deals with clinical features and diagnosis of HE in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension or porto-systemic shunts. The possible impact of concomitant disorders and the cirrhosis underlying liver disease upon brain function is described emphasizing the need of a detailed diagnostic work up of every individual case before diagnosing HE. Currently used methods for diagnosing minimal or covert hepatic encephalopathy are compared with regard to their sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing HE against the background of a multitude of concomitant disorders and diseases that could contribute to brain dysfunction.

  16. Base excess, a marker of chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure and predictor of survival in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Budweiser

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the role of base excess (BE as marker of chronic hypercapnia and survival in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (CHRF. Moreover, it was investigated whether the effects of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV on CHRF were reflected in BE and survival. In 240 (160 without exacerbation patients with COPD (mean±SD FEV1 30.7±9.7 %pred; PaCO2 56.9±9.9 mmHg body-mass index (BMI, lung function, respiratory muscle function, blood gases and 6-minute walking distance (6-MWD were assessed prior to initiation of NPPV. In addition, the changes of risk factors 6.3±2.9 months after initiation of NPPV were evaluated. Overall mortality during the follow-up time (26.0±24.5 months was 34.6%. Deaths resulted predominantly from respiratory causes (65.1%; among those, respiratory failure was most frequent (85.2%. Univariate analysis revealed BMI, FEV1, maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax, inspiratory load (P0.1, haemoglobin, 6-MWD, hyperinflation (IC/TLC, RV/TLC, blood gases and BE to be associated (p<0.05 each with prognosis. In multivariate analyses, however, only BMI, RV/TLC and BE turned out to be independent cross-sectional predictors (p<0.05. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that BE had predictive value particularly in patients with BMI25 kg·m–2, RV/TLC70 % and PaCO257 mmHg. Furthermore, changes of BMI, RV/TLC and BE (p<0.01 were associated with improved prognosis in severe hypercapnic COPD. In patients with COPD and CHRF, BE was a prognostic marker for mortality, that was independent from other factors, particularly PaCO2. In addition, reversal of CHRF was reflected in BE and appeared to have an impact on prognosis.

  17. Relationship of chronic pain and opioid use with respiratory disturbance during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungquist, Carla R; Flannery, Marie; Perlis, Michael L; Grace, Jeanne T

    2012-06-01

    This research assessed: 1) whether patients thought to have sleep disordered breathing would have more severe symptoms if they were taking opioids; 2) whether severity of sleep disordered breathing was associated with class or dose of opioid; and 3) whether pain intensity was associated with sleep disordered breathing. A descriptive cross-sectional study of patients referred for assessment of sleep disorders was conducted. Data were collected on a total of 419 subjects (no pain [n = 171], chronic pain without opioid treatment [n = 187], and chronic pain with opioid treatment [n = 61]). The findings suggest that regardless of opioid drug or dose, the management of chronic pain with opioids is not likely to exacerbate obstructive sleep apnea at stable doses. However, central sleep apnea was associated with opioid use. Patients with chronic pain taking opioids had a mean of 5 ± 13 central apneic events per hour compared with 1.6 ± 7 events per hour in patients without pain and not taking opioids. Oxygen saturation mean nadir 83.5% (opioid group) versus 82.9% (no pain, pain without opioid) was not significantly different. The clinical relevance of the effect is unknown, so the potential for marginal respiratory disturbance (an increase of 2.8 central events per hour for every 100 mg morphine-equivalent opioid dose) must be weighed against the therapeutic value of pain management with opioids.

  18. Effects of home-based respiratory muscle training in children and adolescents with chronic lung disease

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    Iván Rodríguez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Respiratory muscle weakness is a functional repercussion of chronic lung disease (CLD. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of home-based respiratory muscle training (RMT in children and adolescents with CLD or neuromuscular disease (NMD. METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study involving children and adolescents with CLD or NMD. Before and after 6 months of home-based RMT, we measured respiratory muscle strength (MIP and MEP, PEF, and peak cough flow (PCF. We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT. RESULTS: The study included 29 patients, with a mean age of 12 years (range, 5-17 years, of whom 18 (62.1% were male. The CLD group comprised 11 patients (37.9%, and the NMD group comprised 18 (62.1%. The mean duration of the RMT was 60 weeks (range, 46-90 weeks in the CLD group and 39 weeks (range, 24-89 weeks in the NMD group. In comparison with the pre-RMT values, the post-RMT values for MIP and MEP were significantly higher in both groups, whereas those for PEF and PCF were significantly higher only in the NMD group. We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT. CONCLUSIONS: Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD.

  19. Hypertensive Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa SHARIFIAN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to cite this article: Sharifian M. Hypertensive Encephalopathy. Iran J Child Neurol 2012; 6(3:1-7.Hypertension is called the silent killer and vital organs such as the brain, eyes,kidneys and the heart are the targets. Seizure, central nervous system (CNShemorrhage, and cerebrovascular accident (CVA, blindness and heart attacksare the end points.The prevalence of hypertension in children is much less than adults, but evidencereveals that the source of hypertension in adulthood goes back to childhood. In70-80% of cases hypertension is due to renal diseases. In children, hypertensiveencephalopathy (HE may be the first manifestation of renal diseases. Seizure isone of the most common manifestations of HE.In this article, definitions, etiology, pathophysiology and finally the acute andchronic managements of HE will be discussed.ReferencesSawicka K, Szczyrek M, Jastrzębska I, Prasal M, ZwolakA, Jadwiga D. Hypertension – The silent killer. J Pre-Clin Clin Res 2011;5(2:43-6.Croix B, Feig DI. Childhood hypertension is not a silent disease. Pediatr Nephrol 2006 Apr;21(4:527-32.Wong TY, Mitchell P. Hypertensive retinopathy. N Engl J Med 2004 Nov;351(22:2310-7.Krzesinski JM, Cohen EP.Hypertension and the kidney.Acta Clin Belg 2007 Jan-Feb;62(1:5-14.Report of the Second Task Force on Blood Pressure Control in Children – 1987. Task Force on Blood Pressure Control in Children. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. Pediatrics 1987Jan;79(1:1-25.Update on the 1987 Task Force Report on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents: a working group report from the National High Blood Pressure Education Program. National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on Hypertension Control in Children and Adolescents. Pediatrics 1996 Oct;98(4 Pt1:649-58.Ataei N, Aghamohammadi A, Yousefi E, Hosseini M, Nourijelyani K, Tayebi M, et al. Blood pressure nomograms for school children in Iran. Pediatr Nephrol 2004 Feb;19

  20. Recommendations for Patients with Chronic Respiratory Disease Considering Air Travel: A Statement from the Canadian Thoracic Society

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    Dale Lien

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with respiratory disease regularly seek the convenience of commercial airline travel. In addition to the stresses that all patients with chronic disease encounter, these patients are exposed to the affects of acute altitudinal hypoxemia. This in turn has the potential to produce significant symptoms and complications in-flight for patients with chronic respiratory disease. This article reviews the current literature, and seeks to help the practicing physician by providing recommendations on which patients should be assessed preflight, the type of assessment that should be carried out and recommendations for providing advice to these travelling patients.

  1. Deep breathing heart rate variability is associated with respiratory muscle weakness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Michel Silva Reis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A synchronism exists between the respiratory and cardiac cycles. However, the influence of the inspiratory muscle weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD on cardiac autonomic control is unknown. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the influence of respiratory muscle strength on autonomic control in these patients. METHODS: Ten chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (69±9 years; FEV1/FVC 59±12% and FEV1 41±11% predicted and nine age-matched healthy volunteers (64±5 years participated in this study. Heart-rate variability (HRV was obtained at rest and during respiratory sinusal arrhythmia maneuver (RSA-M by electrocardiograph. RESULTS: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients demonstrated impaired cardiac autonomic modulation at rest and during RSA-M when compared with healthy subjects (p<0.05. Moreover, significant and positive correlations between maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP and the inspiratory-expiratory difference (ΔIE (r = 0.60, p<0.01 were found. CONCLUSION: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented impaired sympathetic-vagal balance at rest. In addition, cardiac autonomic control of heart rate was associated with inspiratory muscle weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Based on this evidence, future research applications of respiratory muscle training may bring to light a potentially valuable target for rehabilitation.

  2. Chronic-Alcohol-Abuse-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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    Yan Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol ingestion increases the risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, a severe form of acute lung injury, characterized by alveolar epithelial and endothelial barrier disruption and intense inflammation. Alcohol abuse is also associated with a higher incidence of sepsis or pneumonia resulting in a higher rate of admittance to intensive care, longer inpatient stays, higher healthcare costs, and a 2–4 times greater mortality rate. Chronic alcohol ingestion induced severe oxidative stress associated with increased ROS generation, depletion of the critical antioxidant glutathione (GSH, and oxidation of the thiol/disulfide redox potential in the alveolar epithelial lining fluid and exhaled breath condensate. Across intracellular and extracellular GSH pools in alveolar type II cells and alveolar macrophages, chronic alcohol ingestion consistently induced a 40–60 mV oxidation of GSH/GSSG suggesting that the redox potentials of different alveolar GSH pools are in equilibrium. Alcohol-induced GSH depletion or oxidation was associated with impaired functions of alveolar type II cells and alveolar macrophages but could be reversed by restoring GSH pools in the alveolar lining fluid. The aims of this paper are to address the mechanisms for alcohol-induced GSH depletion and oxidation and the subsequent effects in alveolar barrier integrity, modulation of the immune response, and apoptosis.

  3. 慢加急性肝衰竭合并肝性脑病159例生存分析%Survival analysis of 159 patients with hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔燕平; 崔霞; 管珊; 李庆方; 王思奎

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the prognostic factors for patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in acute-on-chronic liver failure(ACLF).Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 159 ACLF patients with HE.The hepatic encephalopathy was determined to baseline,the patients were divided into survivors(n =13) and nonsurvivors(n =146),The 32 factors affecting the prognosis were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard model with SPSS.Results One-month,three-month,and six-month survival rates were 20.13%,10.06% and 8.18%,respectively.Cox regression analysis of prognostic factors showed that it could the stage of hepatic encephalopathy and HRS significantly improve the survival rate of the patients with HE in acute-on-chronic liver failure.The stage of hepatic encephalopathy and HRS could significantly decrease the survival rate of the patients(x2 =18.344,11.368,all P < 0.05),elevated the levels of hepatic encephalopathy (relative risk (RR) =1.591) and HRS (RR =1.809) indicate worse prognosis with hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic failure.Conclusion The stage of hepatic encephalopathy and HRS were independent risk factor sof prognosis in acute-on-chronic liver failure.%目的 对影响慢加急性肝衰竭(ACLF)伴肝性脑病(HE)患者预后的因素进行分析,探讨影响预后的危险因素.方法 回顾性分析159例ACLF伴HE患者的临床资料,以确定HE为起点,将患者分为生存组(13例)和死亡组(146例),选择32个相关临床指标,用SPSS软件对相关数据进行单因素和多因素非比例风险的Cox模型分析.结果 ACLF伴HE患者1、3、6个月的生存率分别为20.13%、10.06%、8.18%,经Cox回归分析,筛选出HE分期、肝肾综合征(HRS)为独立的预后因素(x2=18.344、11.368,均P<0.05),HE分期越高、出现HRS增加患者死亡风险,相对危险度(RR)分别为1.591、1.809.结论 HE分期、HRS是判断ACLF伴HE患者预后的重要指标.

  4. Ultrastructure of Purkinje cell perikarya and their dendritic processes in the rat cerebellar cortex in experimental encephalopathy induced by chronic application of valproate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, M E

    2001-12-01

    Long-term intragastric administration of the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (Vuprol Polfa) to rats for 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, once daily at the effective dose of 200 mg/kg body weight showed morphological evidence of encephalopathy, manifested by numerous nonspecific changes within Purkinje cell perikarya and their dendritic processes. The first ultrastructural abnormalities appeared after 3 months. They became more severe in animals with longer survival and were most pronounced after 12 months. The changes were maintained both 1 and 3 months after drug withdrawal. Mitochondria of Purkinje cell perikarya were most severely affected. Damage to mitochondria was accompanied by disintegration and fragmentation of granular endoplasmic reticulum, dilation of channels and cisterns of Golgi apparatus, enlargement of smooth endoplasmic reticulum elements including submembranous cisterns, and accumulation of profuse lipofuscin deposits. Frequently, Purkinje cells appeared as dark ischemic neurones, with focally damaged cellular membrane and features of disintegration. Swollen Bergmann's astrocytes were seen among damaged Purkinje cells or at the site of their loss. The general pattern of submicroscopic alterations of Purkinje cell perikarya suggested severe disorders in several intercellular biochemical extents, including inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and abnormal protein synthesis, both of which could lead to lethal damage. Ultrastructural abnormalities within dendrites were characterized by damage to elements of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, which was considerably enlarged, with formation of large vacuolar structures situated deep in the dendroplasm. Mitochondrial lesions and alterations in cytoskeletal elements--disintegration of microtubules or even their complete loss--were also observed. The general pattern of abnormalities within the organelles and cytoskeletal elements of dendritic processes in Purkinje cells in the VPA chronic experimental model

  5. [Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Hajime; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. CTE has gained large public interest owing to dramatic cases involving retired professional athletes wherein serious behavioral problems and tragic incidents were reported. Unlike mild repetitive TBI, a single episode of severe TBI can cause another type of late-onset neuropsychiatric disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several epidemiological studies have shown that a single episode of severe TBI is one of the major risk factors of AD. Pathologically, both AD and CTE are characterized by abnormal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. However, recent neuropathological studies revealed that CTE demonstrates a unique pattern of tau pathology in neurons and astrocytes, and accumulation of other misfolded proteins such as TDP-43. Currently, no reliable biomarkers of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI are available, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only via postmortem neuropathological examination. Development in neuroimaging techniques such as tau and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging might not only enable early diagnosis of CTE, but also contribute to the interventions for prevention of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the living brain of patients with TBI.

  6. Respiratory responses to progesterone and allopregnanolone following chronic caffeine treatment in newborn female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppari, Naga Praveena; Joseph, Vincent; Bairam, Aida

    2017-06-01

    We recently showed that in 12-day-old male rats exposed to caffeine for 10 consecutive days, progesterone inhibits the respiratory response to hypoxia and increases apnea frequency (Uppari et al., 2016). This was partly due to a higher inhibitory response of GABAa receptor to allopregnanolone, the neuroactive metabolite of progesterone. In the present study, we addressed whether similar effects occur in females. We used newborn female rats daily gavaged with water (control) or caffeine (15mg/kg) between the postnatal (P) days 3-12. At P12, we recorded ventilation, metabolic rate, and apnea frequency and duration in normoxia and in response to moderate hypoxia, following an intraperitonial injection of progesterone (4mg/kg) or allopregnanolone (10mg/kg). In control rats, progesterone had no effect on breathing in normoxia and in hypoxia, and in rats treated with caffeine it decreased the initial increase in respiratory frequency in hypoxia. In both groups, allopregnalone decreased breathing frequency in normoxia and in hypoxia and increased the frequency of apnea in normoxia in control rats and in rats treated with caffeine. Injection of bicuculline (a specific GABAa receptor antagonist) prevented the inhibitory effects of allopregnanolone on breathing in both groups. These data indicate that chronic caffeine treatment unmasked an inhibitory effect of progesterone on the hypoxic response but this was weaker than in males, and contrasting to what was observed in male rats (Uppari et al., 2016), GABAa receptors are not significantly affected by chronic caffeine treatment in newborn female rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Subclinical encephalopathy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Encefalopatia subclínica na doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica

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    Olga Maria Pinto de Lima

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is associated with a variety of mental symptoms that range from cognitive slowing to mental confusion and dementia. PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that COPD leads to cognitive impairment in the absence of acute confusion or dementia. METHOD: The global cognitive status of 30 patients with COPD without dementia or acute confusion and 34 controls was assessed with a Brazilian version of the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE. RESULTS: The MMSE scores were significantly lower in the patient group and inversely related to the severity of COPD. This finding could not be attributed to age, education, gender, daytime sleepiness, hypoxemia, chronic tobacco use, or associated diseases such as diabetes, depression, high blood pressure or alcoholism. CONCLUSION: These results suggest the existence of a subclinical encephalopathy of COPD characterized by a subtle impairment of global cognitive ability.CONTEXTO: Evidências clínicas e experimentais sugerem que a doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica (DPOC se associa a sintomas neurocomportamentais que variam da lentidão cognitiva à confusão mental e à demência. PROPÓSITO: Testar a hipótese de que a DPOC pode comprometer a cognição na ausência de estado confusional agudo ou de demência. MÉTODO: O estado cognitivo global de 30 pacientes com DPOC sem demência e sem confusão mental aguda e o de 34 controles foi examinado com a versão brasileira do Mini-Exame do Estado Mental (MEEM. RESULTADOS: As pontuações no meem mostraram-se significativamente mais baixas nos pacientes, e inversamente relacionadas à gravidade da DPOC. Este achado não pôde ser atribuído a diferenças de idade, escolaridade, sonolência diurna, hypoxemia, tabagismo crônico, ou a doenças associadas como diabetes, depressão, hipertensão arterial ou alcoolismo. CONCLUSÃO: Estes resultados sugerem a existência de uma

  8. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: update on limb muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maltais, F.; Decramer, M.; Casaburi, R.; Barreiro, E.; Burelle, Y.; Debigare, R.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Franssen, F.; Gayan-Ramirez, G.; Gea, J.; Gosker, H.R.; Gosselink, R.; Hayot, M.; Hussain, S.N.; Janssens, W.; Polkey, M.I.; Roca, J.; Saey, D.; Schols, A.M.W.J.; Spruit, M.A.; Steiner, M.; Taivassalo, T.; Troosters, T.; Vogiatzis, I.; Wagner, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS)

  9. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-05

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease.

  10. An official systematic review of the European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society: measurement properties of field walking tests in chronic respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sally J; Puhan, Milo A; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios; Hernandes, Nidia A; Mitchell, Katy E; Hill, Catherine J; Lee, Annemarie L; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Troosters, Thierry; Spruit, Martijn A; Carlin, Brian W; Wanger, Jack; Pepin, Véronique; Saey, Didier; Pitta, Fabio; Kaminsky, David A; McCormack, Meredith C; MacIntyre, Neil; Culver, Bruce H; Sciurba, Frank C; Revill, Susan M; Delafosse, Veronica; Holland, Anne E

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review examined the measurement properties of the 6-min walk test (6MWT), incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) and endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) in adults with chronic respiratory disease. Studies that report the evaluation or use of the 6MWT, ISWT or ESWT were included. We searched electronic databases for studies published between January 2000 and September 2013. The 6-min walking distance (6MWD) is a reliable measure (intra-class correlation coefficients ranged from 0.82 to 0.99 in seven studies). There is a learning effect, with greater distance walked on the second test (pooled mean improvement of 26 m in 13 studies). Reliability was similar for ISWT and ESWT, with a learning effect also evident for ISWT (pooled mean improvement of 20 m in six studies). The 6MWD correlates more strongly with peak work capacity (r=0.59-0.93) and physical activity (r=0.40-0.85) than with respiratory function (r=0.10-0.59). Methodological factors affecting 6MWD include track length, encouragement, supplemental oxygen and walking aids. Supplemental oxygen also affects ISWT and ESWT performance. Responsiveness was moderate to high for all tests, with greater responsiveness to interventions that included exercise training. The findings of this review demonstrate that the 6MWT, ISWT and ESWT are robust tests of functional exercise capacity in adults with chronic respiratory disease. ©ERS 2014.

  11. Effects of Abdominal Stimulation during Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory Function of Chronic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Shim, Je-Myung; Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Kim, Ha-Roo; Kim, Bo-In

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to verify a new method for improving respiratory functions by applying both abdominal stimulation and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) to train the inspiratory muscle and the expiratory muscle simultaneously, to improve the efficiency of IMT of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] Eighteen stroke patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 9) and a control group (n = 9). [Methods] The experimental group was administered IMT with abdominal stimulation, and the control group was administered only IMT. During the intervention period, the experimental group and control group received training 20 min/day, 3 times/wk, for 4 weeks. To examine the lung functions of the subjects, FVC, FEV1, PEF, and FEF25-75 were measured using an electronic spirometer. The diaphragm thickness ratio was calculated from measurements made with a 7.5-MHz linear probe ultrasonic imaging system. [Result] The experimental group and the control group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness ratio on the paretic side, but not on the non-paretic side. With regard to lung function, the experimental group showed significant increases in FEV1, PEF, and FEF25-75. The changes between before and after the intervention in the two groups were compared with each other, and the results showed significant differences in FEV1 and PEF. [Conclusion] The present study identified that IMT accompanied by abdominal stimulation improved the pulmonary function of chronic stroke patients.

  12. Chronic respiratory aeroallergen exposure in mice induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the large airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill R Johnson

    Full Text Available Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-polarized inflammation and leads to airway remodeling and fibrosis but the mechanisms involved are not clear. To determine whether epithelial-mesenchymal transition contributes to airway remodeling in asthma, we induced allergic airway inflammation in mice by intranasal administration of house dust mite (HDM extract for up to 15 consecutive weeks. We report that respiratory exposure to HDM led to significant airway inflammation and thickening of the smooth muscle layer in the wall of the large airways. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1 levels increased in mouse airways while epithelial cells lost expression of E-cadherin and occludin and gained expression of the mesenchymal proteins vimentin, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and pro-collagen I. We also observed increased expression and nuclear translocation of Snail1, a transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin and a potent inducer of EMT, in the airway epithelial cells of HDM-exposed mice. Furthermore, fate-mapping studies revealed migration of airway epithelial cells into the sub-epithelial regions of the airway wall. These results show the contribution of EMT to airway remodeling in chronic asthma-like inflammation and suggest that Th2-polarized airway inflammation can trigger invasion of epithelial cells into the subepithelial regions of the airway wall where they contribute to fibrosis, demonstrating a previously unknown plasticity of the airway epithelium in allergic airway disease.

  13. Ubiquitination and proteolysis in limb and respiratory muscles of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debigaré, Richard; Côté, Claude H; Maltais, François

    2010-02-01

    Peripheral muscle dysfunction associated with chronic diseases is undeniably a growing problem as one of its main causes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), progresses. Among others, muscle atrophy is one component building the concept of muscle dysfunction. Muscle atrophy has a significant impact on patient clinical status, independent of the impairment in lung function. A lot of effort has been devoted lately to increasing our understanding of the relationship between COPD and the initiation and the development of muscle atrophy. A growing body of evidence is showing that the ubiquitin-proteasome system, an ATP-dependent proteolytic pathway, is playing a crucial role in the cascade leading to degradation of contractile proteins, thus promoting the development of muscle atrophy. Interestingly, this system is also involved in essential cellular processes such as response to hypoxemia and muscle tissue regeneration. In this review, existing evidence linking the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the cellular events taking place in respiratory and peripheral muscles of patients with COPD are reported. Based on this information, the reader should be able to understand the essential role of this pathway in the context of muscle homeostasis and to picture the coming research in this area.

  14. Exertional dyspnoea in chronic heart failure: the role of the lung and respiratory mechanical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno-Pierre Dubé

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exertional dyspnoea is among the dominant symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure and progresses relentlessly as the disease advances, leading to reduced ability to function and engage in activities of daily living. Effective management of this disabling symptom awaits a better understanding of its underlying physiology. Cardiovascular factors are believed to play a major role in dyspnoea in heart failure patients. However, despite pharmacological interventions, such as vasodilators or inotropes that improve central haemodynamics, patients with heart failure still complain of exertional dyspnoea. Clearly, dyspnoea is not determined by cardiac factors alone, but likely depends on complex, integrated cardio-pulmonary interactions. A growing body of evidence suggests that excessively increased ventilatory demand and abnormal “restrictive” constraints on tidal volume expansion with development of critical mechanical limitation of ventilation, contribute to exertional dyspnoea in heart failure. This article will offer new insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of exertional dyspnoea in patients with chronic heart failure by exploring the potential role of the various constituents of the physiological response to exercise and particularly the role of abnormal ventilatory and respiratory mechanics responses to exercise in the perception of dyspnoea in patients with heart failure.

  15. Determinants of Noninvasive Ventilation Outcomes during an Episode of Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Effects of Comorbidities and Causes of Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Grazia Pacilli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the effect of the cause of acute respiratory failure and the role of comorbidities both acute and chronic on the outcome of COPD patients admitted to Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU with acute respiratory failure and treated with NIV. Design. Observational prospective study. Patients and Methods. 176 COPD patients consecutively admitted to our RICU over a period of 3 years and treated with NIV were evaluated. In all patients demographic, clinical, and functional parameters were recorded including the cause of acute respiratory failure, SAPS II score, Charlson comorbidity index, and further comorbidities not listed in the Charlson index. NIV success was defined as clinical improvement leading to discharge to regular ward, while exitus or need for endotracheal intubation was considered failure. Results. NIV outcome was successful in 134 patients while 42 underwent failure. Univariate analysis showed significantly higher SAP II score, Charlson index, prevalence of pneumonia, and lower serum albumin level in the failure group. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant predictive value for pneumonia and albumin. Conclusions. The most important determinants of NIV outcome in COPD patients are the presence of pneumonia and the level of serum albumin as an indicator of the patient nutritional status.

  16. Chronic respiratory disease in adults treated for tuberculosis in Khartoum, Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, K.; Bjune, G.; El Sony, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic respiratory disease (CRD) causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Although the global CRD epidemic collides with the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in many low- and middle-income country settings, the risk of TB-associated CRD is not well described in countries with a high burden of TB. Methods: We recruited 136 patients with a history of sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) from the TB clinic at Omdurman Teaching Hospital in Khartoum, Sudan, and 136 age- and sex-matched community controls, between 28 July 2013 and 30 December 2013. Data were collected using standardised questionnaires and spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator. Results: The mean age of the subjects with previous PTB and controls was respectively 44.0 years (SD 8.5) and 44.5 years (SD 8.6), with 27.2% females in both groups. Chronic respiratory symptoms such as chronic cough (OR 6.67, 95%CI 2.98–14.90, P grupo de los casos fue 44,0 (desviación estándar 8,5 años) y en el grupo de testigos fue 44,5 años (8,6 años); la proporción de mujeres en ambos grupos fue 27,2%. Se observó una fuerte asociación entre la presencia de síntomas respiratorios crónicos como la tos (OR 6,67; IC95% 2,98–14,90; P < 0,001) y la presencia de obstrucción crónica al flujo en las vías respiratorias (OR 12,39; IC95% 1,56–98,40; P = 0,02) en las personas con antecedente de TBP, una vez corregidos los posibles factores de confusión. Conclusión: La presencia de rasgos clínicos de EPC exhibe una fuerte correlación con el antecedente de TBP. Es preciso considerar la posibilidad de aplicar un enfoque integrado con el fin de mejorar la atención de ambas enfermedades tan frecuentes. PMID:27695684

  17. Hepatic encephalopathy as a complication of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephan vom Dahl; Gerald Kircheis; Dieter Haussinger

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Hepatic encephalopathy ( HE) is a frequent complication of chronic liver disease .It is defined as a characteristic functional and reversible alteration of the mental state ,due to impaired liver function and / or increased portosystemic shunting .

  18. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    OpenAIRE

    Bousquet, J.; Farrell, J.; Crooks, G.; Hellings, P; Bel, E. H.; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J. Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T.; Joos, G.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact ...

  19. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    10.1 Respiratory failure2003068 Evaluation of non-invasive ventilation in a-cute respiratory failure with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. GU Jianyong(顾俭勇), et al. Dept E-mergen, Zhongshan Hosp, Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Shanghai J Med 2002; 25 (12): 741 - 743.Objective:To observe the effect of non-invasive venti-lation(NIV) in acute respiratory failure with chronic

  20. BCAP31-associated encephalopathy and complex movement disorder mimicking mitochondrial encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanyan, Saleh; Al Teneiji, Amal; Monfared, Nasim; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2017-06-01

    BCAP31, encoded by BCAP31, is involved in the export of transmembrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum. Pathogenic variants in BCAP31 results in global developmental delay, dystonia, deafness and dysmorphic features in males, called deafness, dystonia, and cerebral hypomyelination (DDCH) syndrome. We report a new patient with BCAP3-associated encephalopathy, DDCH syndrome, sensorineural hearing loss, generalized dystonia, and choreoathetosis. This 3.5-year-old boy had microcephaly and failure to thrive within the first 3 months of life. His brain MRI showed bilateral increased signal intensity in globus pallidus at age 3 months raising the suspicion of mitochondrial encephalopathy. His muscle biopsy revealed pleomorphic subsarcolemmal mitochondria collection in electron microscopy. Respiratory chain enzyme activities were normal in muscle. He was enrolled to a whole exome sequencing research study, which identified a hemizygous likely pathogenic truncating variant (c.533_536dup; p.Ser180AlafsX6) in BCAP31, inherited from his mother, who had sensorineural hearing loss and normal cognitive functions. We report a new patient with BCAP31-associated encephalopathy, DDCH syndrome, mimicking mitochondrial encephalopathy. We also report a heterozygous mother who has bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. This patient's clinical features, muscle histopathology, brain MRI features, and family history were suggestive of mitochondrial encephalopathy. Whole exome sequencing research study confirmed the diagnosis of BCAP31-associated encephalopathy, DDCH syndrome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Singing teaching as a therapy for chronic respiratory disease - a randomised controlled trial and qualitative evaluation

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    Kelly Julia L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite optimal pharmacological therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation, patients with COPD continue to be breathless. There is a need to develop additional strategies to alleviate symptoms. Learning to sing requires control of breathing and posture and might have benefits that translate into daily life. Methods To test this hypothesis we performed a randomised controlled trial, comparing a six week course of twice weekly singing classes to usual care, in 28 COPD patients. The experience of singing was assessed in a qualitative fashion, through interviews with a psychologist. In addition, we surveyed patients with chronic respiratory conditions who participated in a series of open singing workshops. Results In the RCT, the physical component score of the SF36 improved in the singers (n = 15 compared to the controls (n = 13; +7.5(14.6 vs. -3.8(8.4 p = 0.02. Singers also had a significant fall in HAD anxiety score; -1.1(2.7 vs. +0.8(1.7 p = 0.03. Singing did not improve single breath counting, breath hold time or shuttle walk distance. In the qualitative element, 8 patients from the singing group were interviewed. Positive effects on physical sensation, general well-being, community/social support and achievement/efficacy emerged as common themes. 150 participants in open workshops completed a questionnaire. 96% rated the workshops as "very enjoyable" and 98% thought the workshop had taught them something about breathing in a different way. 81% of attendees felt a "marked physical difference" after the workshop. Conclusion Singing classes can improve quality of life measures and anxiety and are viewed as a very positive experience by patients with respiratory disease; no adverse consequences of participation were observed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials - ISRCTN17544114.

  2. Lung function reduction and chronic respiratory symptoms among workers in the cement industry: a follow up study

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    Zeleke Zeyede K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are only a few follow-up studies of respiratory function among cement workers. The main aims of this study were to measure total dust exposure, to examine chronic respiratory symptoms and changes in lung function among cement factory workers and controls that were followed for one year. Methods The study was conducted in two cement factories in Ethiopia. Totally, 262 personal measurements of total dust among 105 randomly selected workers were performed. Samples of total dust were collected on 37-mm cellulose acetate filters placed in closed faced Millipore-cassettes. Totally 127 workers; 56 cleaners, 44 cement production workers and 27 controls were randomly selected from two factories and examined for lung function and interviewed for chronic respiratory symptoms in 2009. Of these, 91 workers; 38 cement cleaners (mean age 32 years, 33 cement production workers (36 years and 20 controls (38 years were examined with the same measurements in 2010. Results Total geometric mean dust exposure among cleaners was 432 mg/m3. The fraction of samples exceeding the Threshold Limit Value (TLV of 10 mg/m3 for the cleaners varied from 84-97% in the four departments. The levels were considerably lower among the production workers (GM = 8.2 mg/m3, but still 48% exceeded 10 mg/m3. The prevalence of all the chronic respiratory symptoms among both cleaners and production workers was significantly higher than among the controls. Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1 and FEV1/Forced Vital Capacity (FEV1/FVC were significantly reduced from 2009 to 2010 among the cleaners (p Conclusions The high prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and reduction in lung function is probably associated with high cement dust exposure. Preventive measures are needed to reduce the dust exposure.

  3. The applicable value of respiratory impedance for the stage 0 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuan; XIE Wei; WEI Ping; YU Bao-ping; FANG Ping

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the applicable value of respiratory impedance for the stage 0 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods:Respiratory impedance was measured by impulse oscillometry (IOS) in 41 cases at stage 0 of COPD (NHLBI/WHO, 2001 Standard) and their conventional pulmonary function values were compared with 42 healthy subjects. Both groups had no significant deviation in age, stature and avoirdupois, etc. Master-Screen pulmonary function test system (Jaeger Co, Germany) were used to determine IOS parameters including viscous resistance of 5Hz, 20 Hz and 35Hz (R5, R20, R35), reactance of 5Hz, 35 Hz (X5, X35 ), resonant frequency (Fres) ,total respiratory impedance (Zrs) and routine pulmonary function values including forced expiratory volume in one second to predicted value (FEV1%), forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity ratio( FEV1/FVC%), maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF%),V25% and V50%. Results:Both groups had no significant deviation in FEV1%, FEV1/FVC% and X35 (P>0.05). It was increased significantly in viscous resistance of 5Hz, 20 Hz and 35Hz (R5, R20, R35) in COPD group than that in healthy group (P<0.01). So were Fres and Zrs (P<0.01). MMEF%,V25%,V50% and reactance of 5Hz (X5) in COPD group were marked lower than that in healthy group (P<0.01). The sensitivity of MMEF%, V25%,V50% was higher than others, but its specificity was lower. In parameters of IOS, Fres was the most sensitive index for diagnosis of the small airway function and its specificity was higher than that of MMEF%, V25%,V50%. Conclusion:In the risk case at the stage 0 of COPD, MMEF%, V25% and V50% could be decreased, but Fres, R5,R5-20 could be increased in spite of FEV1% and FEV1/FVC% in normal range.

  4. Assessment of Respiratory lmpedance During Deep-Slow Breathing with lmpulse Oscillometry in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁永杰; 蔡映云

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the relationship of deep-slow respiratory pattern and respiratory impedance(RI) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: RI under normal respiration and during deep-slow respiration was measured one after the other with impulse oscillometry for 8 patients with COPD and for 9 healthy volunteers as control. Results: When respiration was changed from normal pattern to the deep-slow pattern, the tidal volume increased and respiratory frequency significantly decreased in both groups (P<0.01), the total respiratory impedance (Z respir) showed a decreasing trend in COPD group, but with no obvious change in the control group. No change in the resonant frequency (fres) was found in both groups, and the respiratory viscous resistance obviously decreased in the COPD group(R5: P=0.0168; R20: P=0.0498; R5-R20: P=0.0388),though in the control group it was unchanged. Conclusion: IOS detection could reflect the response heterogeneity of different compartments of respiratory system during tidal breathing. During deep-slow respiration, the viscous resistance in both central airway and peripheral airway was decreased in patients with COPD. RI measurement by impulse oscillometry may be a convenient pathophysiological method for studying the application of breathing exercise in patients with COPD.

  5. High rates of detection of respiratory viruses in the nasal washes and mucosae of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gye Song; Moon, Byung-Jae; Lee, Bong-Jae; Gong, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Nam Hee; Kim, You-Sun; Kim, Hun Sik; Jang, Yong Ju

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viral infections are often implicated as triggers of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) flare-ups. However, there is a paucity of respiratory viral surveillance studies in CRS patients, and such studies could elucidate the potential role of viruses in promoting symptoms and aggravating mucosal inflammation. Therefore, a prospective case-control study was conducted to determine the prevalence of respiratory viruses in CRS patients and non-CRS controls. Nasal lavage fluids and turbinate epithelial cells were collected prospectively from 111 CRS patients and 50 controls. Multiplex PCR was used to identify common respiratory viruses in both sample types and the infection rate was compared between groups. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50.5% of lavage samples and in 64.0% of scraping samples from CRS patients. The overall infection rate was significantly different in CRS patients and controls (odds ratio, 2.9 in lavage and 4.1 in scraping samples). Multiple viral infections were detected more frequently in lavage samples from CRS patients than those from controls (P virus and the only virus with a significantly different infection rate in CRS patients and controls in both samples (odds ratio, 3.2 in lavage and 3.4 in scraping samples). This study detected a higher prevalence of respiratory viruses in CRS patients than controls, suggesting that there may be significant associations between inflammation of CRS and respiratory viruses, particularly rhinovirus. Further studies should investigate the exact role of highly prevalent respiratory viruses in CRS patients during symptomatic aggravation and ongoing mucosal inflammation.

  6. Systematic Analysis of Blood Cell Transcriptome in End-Stage Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botturi, Karine; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Mussot, Sacha; Stern, Marc; Danner-Boucher, Isabelle; Mornex, Jean-François; Pison, Christophe; Dromer, Claire; Kessler, Romain; Dahan, Marcel; Brugière, Olivier; Le Pavec, Jérôme; Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Gomez, Carine; Brouard, Sophie; Magnan, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Background End-stage chronic respiratory diseases (CRD) have systemic consequences, such as weight loss and susceptibility to infection. However the mechanisms of such dysfunctions are as yet poorly explained. We hypothesized that the genes putatively involved in these mechanisms would emerge from a systematic analysis of blood mRNA profiles from pre-transplant patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), pulmonary hypertension (PAH), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Whole blood was first collected from 13 patients with PAH, 23 patients with CF, and 28 Healthy Controls (HC). Microarray results were validated by quantitative PCR on a second and independent group (7PAH, 9CF, and 11HC). Twelve pre-transplant COPD patients were added to validate the common signature shared by patients with CRD for all causes. To further clarify a role for hypoxia in the candidate gene dysregulation, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HC were analysed for their mRNA profile under hypoxia. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering allowed the identification of 3 gene signatures related to CRD. One was common to CF and PAH, another specific to CF, and the final one was specific to PAH. With the common signature, we validated T-Cell Factor 7 (TCF-7) and Interleukin 7 Receptor (IL-7R), two genes related to T lymphocyte activation, as being under-expressed. We showed a strong impact of the hypoxia on modulation of TCF-7 and IL-7R expression in PBMCs from HC under hypoxia or PBMCs from CRD. In addition, we identified and validated genes upregulated in PAH or CF, including Lectin Galactoside-binding Soluble 3 and Toll Like Receptor 4, respectively. Conclusions Systematic analysis of blood cell transcriptome in CRD patients identified common and specific signatures relevant to the systemic pathologies. TCF-7 and IL-7R were downregulated whatever the cause of CRD and this could play a role in the higher susceptibility to infection of these patients. PMID:25329529

  7. End-of-life decision making in respiratory failure. The therapeutic choices in chronic respiratory failure in a 7-item questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Elfriede Rinnenburger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The transition from paternalistic medicine to a healthcare culture centred on the patient's decision making autonomy presents problems of communication and understanding. Chronic respiratory failure challenges patients, their families and caregivers with important choices, such as invasive and non-invasive mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy, which, especially in the case of neuromuscular diseases, can significantly postpone the end of life. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A 7-item questionnaire was administered to 100 patients with advanced COPD, neuromuscular diseases and pulmonary fibrosis, all of them on oxygen therapy and receiving day-hospital treatment for respiratory failure. The objective was to find out whether or not patients, if faced with a deterioration of their health condition, would want to take part in the decision making process and, if so, how and with whom. RESULTS. Results showed that: 90% of patients wanted to be interviewed, 10% preferred not to be interviewed, 82% wanted to be regularly updated on their clinical situation, 75% wanted to be intubated, if necessary, and 56% would also agree to have a tracheostomy. These choices have been confirmed one year later, with 93% of respondents accepting the questionnaire and considering it useful. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to conclude that a simple questionnaire can be a useful tool contributing to therapeutic decision making in respiratory failure.

  8. [Anesthetic management for a patient with chronic expanding hematoma of the thorax associated with respiratory failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotaki, Kenji; Yoshida, Akiko; Ito, Yosuke; Nagaya, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma (CEH) of the thorax is an intractable disease which induces long-standing growing hematoma after tuberculosis or thoracic surgery. It causes respiratory failure and heart failure by compressing the mediastinum. A 68-year-old man with a history of tuberculosis during childhood had suffered from progressive exertional dyspnea for 20 years. Because a huge hematoma occupying whole right thoracic cavity compressed the heart and the trachea to the left, he was scheduled for extrapleural pneumonectomy. Bronchial arterial embolization was performed preoperatively to prevent hemoptysis and reduce intraoperative blood loss. There was no problem in the airway management using a double lumen endotracheal tube. However, severe hypotension and a decrease in cardiac index were observed due to excessive bleeding, leading to total blood loss of 11,000 g. In addition, surgical manipulation caused abrupt severe hypotension. Monitoring of arterial pressure-based cardiac output and deep body temperature was useful for the hemodynamic management during the operation. The successful postoperative course resulted in remarkable improvement of Huge-Jones dyspnea criteria from IV to II. In the anesthetic management of CEH precautions should be taken against the excessive intraoperative bleeding and abrupt hemodynamic changes.

  9. [Cerebral hemodynamic disorders in patients with chronic decompensated respiratory insufficiency. Physiopathogenetic considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, M

    1978-01-01

    The present paper reports on 12 patients (8 males, 4 females) suffering from chronic decompensated respiratory failure, who presented concomitant transient haemodynamic disturbances in the carotid and vertebrobasilary systems, manifested by hemisphere or brain stem symptoms. Owing to the adaptive capacity of these patients there exists a certain tolerance threshold to hypercapnic hypoxemia, but following accentuated or rapid aggravation of acid-base hypercapnic hypoxemia, the biological balance is abruptly perturbed leading to cerebral haemodynamic disturbances. The pathophysiological mechanism of production appears to be the accumulation of acid ions caused by pH acidification of the cerebrospinal fluid. Increase in the cerebral arterial output with decrease in the rate of circulation and vascular resistance take place especially in the vessels with atheromatous or hyaline lesions. Under conditions of severe acidosic hypercapnic hypoxemia this, nevertheless, insures a minimum of 10--20% oxygen required by the metabolism of the nerve cell, sufficient for maintaining the structure of the cell (vita minima). These vasculometabolic mechanisms explain why with improvement of haematosis, following remission of the decompensated disease and fall in acidotic hypercapnic hypoxemia values, the cerebral haemodynamic disturbances also show a more or less evident remission because the nerve cells having maintained their structure are able to take up their function again.

  10. The Impact on Family of Pediatric Chronic Respiratory Failure in the Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Robert J; Rodday, Angie Mae; Weidner, Ruth Ann; Parsons, Susan K

    2016-08-01

    To assess the family impact of managing severe, chronic respiratory failure (CRF) at home. Better understanding will inform parental counseling and serve as a point of reference for interventions. Families of children with CRF completed the Impact on Family Scale (IFS) and Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems. Using multivariable linear regression, we assessed the relationship between IFS and family, clinical, and utilization characteristics. A total of 118 parents (60%) completed the IFS; 114 parents (58%) completed all measures. The 15-item IFS mean total score was 40 (SD = 10) with a possible range of 15-60 (greater scores indicate more impact). Modeling identified a negative association with parent emotional functioning, parent-rated child health, and private insurance only (compared with both private/public), and other family characteristics (eg, parental education, marital status, and income) were not associated with IFS scores. Families of children with CRF are greatly impacted by their child's health. In contrast to other children with special health care needs, family characteristics were not associated with IFS scores, excluding insurance type. These results may reflect more uniform demands and stressors related to CRF. Future research should identify interventions to attenuate the impact of CRF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential serologic response to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini in lambs affected with chronic respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, M; Rosenbusch, R F; Lopez-Virella, J; Kaeberle, M L

    1999-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) was used to evaluate the levels of antibodies to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and M. arginini in lambs with chronic respiratory disease. Sera were obtained from lambs in several flocks at various stages of the clinical disease and tested with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-treated M. ovipneumoniae and M. arginini whole cells and a crude capsular extract of M. ovipneumoniae as the antigens. There were low levels of antibody to M. ovipneumoniae in flocks sampled at the early stages of infection, whereas increased levels of antibody were present in lambs from flocks that had apparently recovered from the clinical disease. Slowly rising titers of circulating antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae were confirmed by sequential bleeding of lambs during the course of the clinical disease. However, antibody levels of M. arginini were more likely to increase earlier in the disease process. There was significant cross-reactivity between the 2 SDS-treated antigens in both the ELISA test and western immunoblotting. In contrast, the crude capsular extract was specific for detecting antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae.

  12. PLACEBO-DRIVEN CLINICAL TRIALS OF TRANSFER POINT GLUCAN #300 IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS: ANTIBODY PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetvicka Vaclav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of glucan in stimulation of immune reactions has been well-established. In this report, we focused on the antibody production in glucan-supplemented children with chronic respiratory problems. We measured the levels of salivary IgA, IgM and IgG in 40 children aged 8-12 years and evaluated the effects of 100 mg d-1 oral dose of glucan. We found a significant increase in production of all tested antibodies in the glucan-stimulated group, but a decrease of antibody production in the control group. A thirty-day oral application of yeast-based natural immunomodulator β-glucan strongly stimulated the mucosal immunity of children with chronic respiratory problems.

  13. The possibility of evaluation on inflammatory change at respiratory tract in chronic bronchial asthma using {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Mori, Yutaka; Kawakami, Kenji [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kikuchi, Ichiro; Shimada, Takao

    1997-05-01

    {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy was performed in 17 patients with chronic bronchial asthma to grasp the inflammatory change of respiratory tract. On {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy, abnormal accumulations were detected on lung fields in 6 cases (35.3%) of 17 cases. In 5 cases of these 6 cases, the defect areas which were pointed out on {sup 81m}Kr ventilation scintigraphy were matched to the abnormal accumulation areas which were pointed out on {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy. In dynamics, the abnormal accumulation areas which were pointed out on {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy were matched to the defect areas which had been at all times pointed out on {sup 81m}Kr ventilation scintigraphy. {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy was expected to be one of index to grasp the inflammatory change of respiratory tract in patients with chronic bronchial asthma. (author)

  14. Chronic and acute exposures to the world trade center disaster and lower respiratory symptoms: area residents and workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Carey B; Friedman, Stephen M; Pillai, Parul S; Reibman, Joan; Berger, Kenneth I; Goldring, Roberta; Stellman, Steven D; Farfel, Mark

    2012-06-01

    We assessed associations between new-onset (post-September 11, 2001 [9/11]) lower respiratory symptoms reported on 2 surveys, administered 3 years apart, and acute and chronic 9/11-related exposures among New York City World Trade Center-area residents and workers enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry. World Trade Center-area residents and workers were categorized as case participants or control participants on the basis of lower respiratory symptoms reported in surveys administered 2 to 3 and 5 to 6 years after 9/11. We created composite exposure scales after principal components analyses of detailed exposure histories obtained during face-to-face interviews. We used multivariate logistic regression models to determine associations between lower respiratory symptoms and composite exposure scales. Both acute and chronic exposures to the events of 9/11 were independently associated, often in a dose-dependent manner, with lower respiratory symptoms among individuals who lived and worked in the area of the World Trade Center. Study findings argue for detailed assessments of exposure during and after events in the future from which potentially toxic materials may be released and for rapid interventions to minimize exposures and screen for potential adverse health effects.

  15. Chronic respiratory disease in adults treated for tuberculosis in Khartoum, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, R K; Mortimer, K; Bjune, G; El Sony, A I

    2016-09-01

    Background: Chronic respiratory disease (CRD) causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Although the global CRD epidemic collides with the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic in many low- and middle-income country settings, the risk of TB-associated CRD is not well described in countries with a high burden of TB. Methods: We recruited 136 patients with a history of sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) from the TB clinic at Omdurman Teaching Hospital in Khartoum, Sudan, and 136 age- and sex-matched community controls, between 28 July 2013 and 30 December 2013. Data were collected using standardised questionnaires and spirometry was performed before and after bronchodilator. Results: The mean age of the subjects with previous PTB and controls was respectively 44.0 years (SD 8.5) and 44.5 years (SD 8.6), with 27.2% females in both groups. Chronic respiratory symptoms such as chronic cough (OR 6.67, 95%CI 2.98-14.90, P morbilidad y mortalidad. Aunque la epidemia mundial de EPC rivaliza con la epidemia de tuberculosis (TB) en muchos entornos de países con bajos y medianos recursos, el riesgo de aparición de EPC asociado con la TB se ha descrito cabalmente en los países con una alta carga de morbilidad por TB. Métodos: Entre el 28 de julio y el 30 de diciembre del 2013, participaron en el estudio 136 pacientes con antecedente de tuberculosis pulmonar (TBP) y baciloscopia positiva del esputo que habían recibido tratamiento en el consultorio de neumología del Hospital Universitario Omdurman de Jartún, en Sudán, y 136 testigos sanos de la comunidad, emparejados en función de la edad y el sexo. Se recogieron datos mediante cuestionarios normalizados y se practicó una espirometría antes y despuès una prueba de broncodilatación. Resultados: El promedio de la edad en el grupo de los casos fue 44,0 (desviación estándar 8,5 años) y en el grupo de testigos fue 44,5 años (8,6 años); la proporción de mujeres en ambos grupos fue 27,2%. Se observó una fuerte asociaci

  16. Reversible cortical blindness in a case of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kanti Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and often fatal manifestation of chronic liver disease. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is believed to be multifactorial including impaired blood-brain barrier function, imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in cortex, accumulation of various toxic and false neurotransmitters, and lack of nutrients like oxygen and glucose. Signs and symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy varies and commonly ranges from personality changes, disturbed consciousness, sleep pattern alternation, intellectual deterioration, speech disturbances, asterixis to frank coma and even death. Reversible or transient cortical blindness is rare manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy. It may even precede the phase of altered consciousness in such patients. Very few similar cases have been reported worldwide. Hence, we would like to report a case of transient cortical blindness in a patient of hepatic encephalopathy.

  17. ETIOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF VIRAL RESPIRATORY DISEASES IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH BRONCHIAL ASTHMA EXACERBATION AND CHRONICAL BRONCHIOLITIS OBLITERANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Z. Krivitskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exacerbation of bronchial asthma (BA and common deterioration of health during chronic bronchiolitis obliterans (ChBO are associated with viral infections in adults in 64 and 83% respectively. Mixed virus-viral associations were shown in 21–25% of cases. Respiratory syncytial infections were diagnosed with the highest frequency (50% in patients with BA. Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 and adenoviral infections dominated in persons with ChBO in 50 and 42% of cases, respectively. Response of virus-specific IgG in patients with BA and ChBO indicates the acute course of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 (63% of seroconversions. There were no reactions of IgG which is specific to respiratory syncytial virus in 75% of cases and to adenovirus in 83% of cases, that is the risk factor for occurrence of latent/persistent infection. Presence of structural components of respiratory syncytial virus in the upper respiratory tract had been revealed in three patients with asthma within at least 21–28 days. Respiratory syncytial viral infections and pandemic influenza A(H1N1 pdm09 in patients with BA and ChBO are characterized by the presence of an allergic component, which is indicated by the high levels of virus-specific IgE in blood. An adenoviral infection, in contrast, has no such peculiarity. 

  18. Pulmonary infection control window as a switching point for consequential ventilation: an encouraging finding in treatment of acute respiratory failure of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xi-long

    2005-01-01

    @@ I read with great interest the article by Collaborating Research Group for Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation of Chinese Respiratory Society.1 Based on the concept mentioned in this paper, I have found that it is really an encouraging new finding in the field of clinical application of mechanical ventilation and treatment of acute respiratory failure (ARF) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  19. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy with features on diffusion-weighted images: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare toxic encephalopathy caused by accumulated plasma ammonia. A few literatures are reported about MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. It is different from the well-known chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The clinical symptom and MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy can be reversible with proper treatment. Acute hepatic encephalopathy involves the cingulate cortex, diffuse cerebral cortices, insula, bilateral thalami on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery. Acute hepatic encephalopathy might mimic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy because of their similar predominant involving sites. We experienced 2 cases of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy consecutively. They showed restricted diffusion at the cingulate cortex, cerebral cortices, insula, and bilateral dorsomedial thalami on DWI. One patient underwent acute fulminant hepatitis A, the other patient with underlying chronic liver disease had acute liver failure due to hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis medication. In this report, we presented the characteristic features of DWI in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. In addition, we reviewed articles on MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  20. Risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus illness among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Jyotsna; Walsh, Edward E; Mahadevia, Parthiv J; Falsey, Ann R

    2013-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), although not typically considered an important pathogen in adults, may cause acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is unclear which COPD patients are at highest risk for developing serious RSV illness. Our objective was to identify risk factors for RSV illness among adult patients with COPD. We conducted a pooled analysis of data from COPD patients in 2 previously published longitudinal studies that examined RSV infection in high risk adults for ≤ 2 RSV seasons. Risk factors for RSV illness studied included age, sex, race, smoking status, exposure to children, home oxygen use, inhaled or oral steroid use, instrumental activities of daily living scores, and co-morbid conditions. Outcomes studied included symptomatic and medically attended RSV illness. Logistic regression was used to identify significant risk factors for RSV illness among older adults with COPD. Among 379 patients with COPD, the rate of symptomatic RSV illness was 11.1% (42/379); almost half (20/42) of whom required medical attention. In multivariable analyses, congestive heart failure (odds ratio [OR] = 4.18; 95% CI: 1.38, 12.69) and exposure to children (OR = 2.38; 95% CI: 1.03, 5.51) were risk factors for symptomatic RSV illness. Congestive heart failure (OR = 4.16; 95% CI: 1.02, 17.01) was the only significant risk factor for developing medically attended RSV illness. Exposure to children and congestive heart failure are risk factors for RSV illness among adult patients with COPD. Future prospective, well-designed studies are needed to corroborate these findings and examine other risk factors, including history of exacerbations.

  1. Mortality in Western Australian seniors with chronic respiratory diseases: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emery Jon D

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively few studies have examined survival by pharmacotherapy level and the effects of patient characteristics on mortality by pharmacotherapy level in older chronic respiratory disease (CRD patients. This study aimed to investigate these issues in older (≥ 65 CRD patients in Western Australia. Methods We identified 108,312 patients ≥ 65 years with CRD during 1992-2006 using linked medical, pharmaceutical, hospital and mortality databases held by the Commonwealth and State governments. Pharmacotherapy classification levels were designed by a clinical consensus panel. Cox regression was used to investigate the study aim. Results Patients using only short acting bronchodilators experienced similar, but slightly worse survival than patients in the highest pharmacotherapy level group using high dose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS ± long acting bronchodilators (LABs ± oral steroids. Patients using low to medium dose ICS ± LABs experienced relatively better survival. Also, male gender was associated with all-cause mortality in all patients (HR = 1.72, 95% CI 1.65-1.80 and especially in those in the highest pharmacotherapy level group (HR = 1.97, 95%CI = 1.84-2.10. The P-value of interaction between gender and pharmacotherapy level for the effect on all-cause death was significant (0.0003. Conclusions Older patients with CRD not using ICS experienced the worst survival in this study and may benefit from an escalation in therapeutic regime. Males had a higher risk of death than females, which was more pronounced in the highest pharmacotherapy level group. Hence, primary health care should more actively direct disease management to mild-to-moderate disease patients.

  2. Low-Power Wearable Systems for Continuous Monitoring of Environment and Health for Chronic Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieffenderfer, James; Goodell, Henry; Mills, Steven; McKnight, Michael; Yao, Shanshan; Lin, Feiyan; Beppler, Eric; Bent, Brinnae; Lee, Bongmook; Misra, Veena; Zhu, Yong; Oralkan, Omer; Strohmaier, Jason; Muth, John; Peden, David; Bozkurt, Alper

    2016-09-01

    We present our efforts toward enabling a wearable sensor system that allows for the correlation of individual environmental exposures with physiologic and subsequent adverse health responses. This system will permit a better understanding of the impact of increased ozone levels and other pollutants on chronic asthma conditions. We discuss the inefficiency of existing commercial off-the-shelf components to achieve continuous monitoring and our system-level and nano-enabled efforts toward improving the wearability and power consumption. Our system consists of a wristband, a chest patch, and a handheld spirometer. We describe our preliminary efforts to achieve a submilliwatt system ultimately powered by the energy harvested from thermal radiation and motion of the body with the primary contributions being an ultralow-power ozone sensor, an volatile organic compounds sensor, spirometer, and the integration of these and other sensors in a multimodal sensing platform. The measured environmental parameters include ambient ozone concentration, temperature, and relative humidity. Our array of sensors also assesses heart rate via photoplethysmography and electrocardiography, respiratory rate via photoplethysmography, skin impedance, three-axis acceleration, wheezing via a microphone, and expiratory airflow. The sensors on the wristband, chest patch, and spirometer consume 0.83, 0.96, and 0.01 mW, respectively. The data from each sensor are continually streamed to a peripheral data aggregation device and are subsequently transferred to a dedicated server for cloud storage. Future work includes reducing the power consumption of the system-on-chip including radio to reduce the entirety of each described system in the submilliwatt range.

  3. Renal responses of trout to chronic respiratory and metabolic acidoses and metabolic alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C M; Milligan, C L; Walsh, P J

    1999-08-01

    Exposure to hyperoxia (500-600 torr) or low pH (4.5) for 72 h or NaHCO(3) infusion for 48 h were used to create chronic respiratory (RA) or metabolic acidosis (MA) or metabolic alkalosis in freshwater rainbow trout. During alkalosis, urine pH increased, and [titratable acidity (TA) - HCO(-)(3)] and net H(+) excretion became negative (net base excretion) with unchanged NH(+)(4) efflux. During RA, urine pH did not change, but net H(+) excretion increased as a result of a modest rise in NH(+)(4) and substantial elevation in [TA - HCO(-)(3)] efflux accompanied by a large increase in inorganic phosphate excretion. However, during MA, urine pH fell, and net H(+) excretion was 3.3-fold greater than during RA, reflecting a similar increase in [TA - HCO(-)(3)] and a smaller elevation in phosphate but a sevenfold greater increase in NH(+)(4) efflux. In urine samples of the same pH, [TA - HCO(-)(3)] was greater during RA (reflecting phosphate secretion), and [NH(+)(4)] was greater during MA (reflecting renal ammoniagenesis). Renal activities of potential ammoniagenic enzymes (phosphate-dependent glutaminase, glutamate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) and plasma levels of cortisol, phosphate, ammonia, and most amino acids (including glutamine and alanine) increased during MA but not during RA, when only alanine aminotransferase increased. The differential responses to RA vs. MA parallel those in mammals; in fish they may be keyed to activation of phosphate secretion by RA and cortisol mobilization by MA.

  4. QIL1 mutation causes MICOS disassembly and early onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guarani, Virginia; Jardel, Claude; Chrétien, Dominique; Lombès, Anne; Bénit, Paule; Labasse, Clémence; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Bourillon, Agnès; Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Dorboz, Imen; Gilleron, Mylène; Goetzman, Eric S; Gaignard, Pauline; Slama, Abdelhamid; Elmaleh-Bergès, Monique; Romero, Norma B; Rustin, Pierre; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Paulo, Joao A; Harper, J Wade; Schiff, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    ... (Guarani et al., 2015). Here, we identify QIL1 null alleles in two siblings displaying multiple clinical symptoms of early-onset fatal mitochondrial encephalopathy with liver disease, including defects in respiratory chain...

  5. Current concepts in the assessment and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cash, W J

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined as a metabolically induced, potentially reversible, functional disturbance of the brain that may occur in acute or chronic liver disease. Standardized nomenclature has been proposed but a standardized approach to the treatment, particularly of persistent, episodic and recurrent encephalopathy associated with liver cirrhosis has not been proposed. This review focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of HE in patients with cirrhosis. The pathogenesis and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in fulminant hepatic failure is quite different and is reviewed elsewhere.

  6. Severe early onset ethylmalonic encephalopathy with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papetti, Laura; Garone, Giacomo; Schettini, Livia; Giordano, Carla; Nicita, Francesco; Papoff, Paola; Zeviani, Massimo; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Spalice, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset encephalopathy, chronic diarrhoea, petechiae, orthostatic acrocyanosis and defective cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in muscle and brain. High levels of lactic, ethylmalonic and methylsuccinic acids are detected in body fluids. EE is caused by mutations in ETHE1 gene, a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase. Neurologic signs and symptoms include progressively delayed development, hypotonia, seizures, and abnormal movements. We report on the clinical, electroencephalographic and MRI findings of a baby with a severe early onset encephalopathy associated with novel ETHE1 gene mutation. This is the first case described in literature with an early pure epileptic onset, presenting with West syndrome.

  7. Protein restriction in hepatic encephalopathy is appropriate for selected patients: a point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Morgan, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    Since the late nineteenth century, protein restriction has been shown to improve hepatic encephalopathy. However, malnutrition has been described in up to 60 % of cirrhotic patients and is associated with increased mortality. Furthermore, emerging clinical evidence has revealed that a large proportion of cirrhotic patients may tolerate normal protein intake. However, approximately one third of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy may need a short course of protein restriction, in addition to maximum medical therapy, to ameliorate the clinical course of their hepatic encephalopathy. For patients with chronic hepatic encephalopathy who are protein-sensitive, modifying their sources of nitrogen by using more vegetable protein, less animal protein, and branched-chain amino acids may improve their encephalopathy without further loss of lean body mass. In conclusion, among cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy, modulation of normal protein intake must take into account the patient's hepatic reserve, severity of hepatic encephalopathy, and current nutritional status.

  8. Respiratory motor training and neuromuscular plasticity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovechkin, Alexander V; Sayenko, Dimitry G; Ovechkina, Elena N; Aslan, Sevda C; Pitts, Teresa; Folz, Rodney J

    2016-07-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of a full-scale investigation of the neurophysiological mechanisms of COPD-induced respiratory neuromuscular control deficits. Characterization of respiratory single- and multi-muscle activation patterns using surface electromyography (sEMG) were assessed along with functional measures at baseline and following 21±2 (mean±SD) sessions of respiratory motor training (RMT) performed during a one-month period in four patients with GOLD stage II or III COPD. Pre-training, the individuals with COPD showed significantly increased (prespiratory muscle activity and disorganized multi-muscle activation patterns in association with lowered spirometrical measures and decreased fast- and slow-twitch fiber activity as compared to healthy controls (N=4). Following RMT, functional and respiratory sEMG activation outcomes during quite breathing and forced expiratory efforts were improved suggesting that functional improvements, induced by task-specific RMT, are evidence respiratory neuromuscular networks re-organization.

  9. Allergy to house dust mites in primary health care subjects with chronic or recurrent inflammatory states of respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszkowski, Jacek; Łopatyński, Jerzy

    2002-01-01

    Chronic and recurrent respiratory tract disorders are a frequent problem in general practice. The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of hypersensitivity to house dust mites in respiratory tract diseases in general practice patients. We tried to assess the influence of determined risk factors exposure on development of respiratory tract allergy. Patients from family practitioners surgeries with chronic or recurrent respiratory tract symptoms who had no diagnosis of allergy were recruited to the study (n = 89). All patients responded to a questionnaire focused on history of symptoms, atopic conditions in family and exposure to determined environmental factors like dwelling conditions, obstetrician history, diet in the first year of life. All patients underwent skin prick test with common inhalant allergens. Families of the patients were asked to participate in the study. Families who agreed to take part also responded to the questionnaire and underwent skin tests. In patients and their families blood samples were taken to determine total IgE and specific IgE antibodies to mites allergens. Dust samples were collected by vacuuming of patients' bedroom carpets and mattresses to determine house dust mites allergens concentration. Data on 30 complete patients family sets of their brotherhood, mother and father were collected. Total and specific serum IgE antibodies were determined by disc enzyme-immunoassay (Analco). Mites allergens concentration in dust was measured by simple Acarex strip test (Nexter). The results of the assays (positive skin tests and/or elevated levels of specific IgE) showed allergy to house dust mites in 24 of 89 study patients from general practitioners surgeries (27%). The prevalence of chronic rhinitis, recurrent bronchitis, chronic or recurrent cough, wheezing, dyspnoea was higher in allergic than in nonallergic subjects. Patients with the diagnosis of allergy to house dust mites had usually worse dwelling conditions. Especially

  10. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encephalopathy may be a presenting sign in a wide range of medical conditions. G F van der ... some mitochondrial disorders, a strictly maternally .... like lysine as a fuel source during times of catabolic .... are not uniformly distributed and that.

  11. The AIMAR recommendations for early diagnosis of chronic obstructive respiratory disease based on the WHO/GARD model*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Stefano; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Del Donno, Mario; Delucchi, Maurizio; Bettoncelli, Germano; Lamberti, Vincenzo; Patera, Carlo; Polverino, Mario; Russo, Antonio; Santoriello, Carlo; Soverina, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory diseases in Italy already now represent an emergency (they are the 3(rd) ranking cause of death in the world, and the 2(nd) if Lung cancer is included). In countries similar to our own, they result as the principal cause for a visit to the general practitioner (GP) and the second main cause after injury for recourse to Emergency Care. Their frequency is probably higher than estimated (given that respiratory diseases are currently underdiagnosed). The trend is towards a further increase due to epidemiologic and demographic factors (foremost amongst which are the widespread diffusion of cigarette smoking, the increasing mean age of the general population, immigration, and pollution). Within the more general problem of chronic disease care, chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) constitute one of the four national priorities in that they represent an important burden for society in terms of mortality, invalidity, and direct healthcare costs. The strategy suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO) is an integrated approach consisting of three goals: inform about health, reduce risk exposure, improve patient care. The three goals are translated into practice in the three areas of prevention (1-primary, 2-secondary, 3-tertiary) as: 1) actions of primary (universal) prevention targeted at the general population with the aim to control the causes of disease, and actions of Predictive Medicine - again addressing the general population but aimed at measuring the individual's risk for disease insurgence; 2) actions of early diagnosis targeted at groups or - more precisely - subgroups identified as at risk; 3) continuous improvement and integration of care and rehabilitation support - destined at the greatest possible number of patients, at all stages of disease severity. In Italy, COPD care is generally still inadequate. Existing guidelines, institutional and non-institutional, are inadequately implemented: the international guidelines are not always adaptable

  12. Interactive videogame as rehabilitation tool of patients with chronic respiratory diseases: preliminary results of a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Montagnani, Giulia; Vagheggini, Guido; Buono, Lorenzo; Moretti, Francesca; Dario, Paolo; Ambrosino, Nicolino

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive videogame (IV) system in addition to a supervised pulmonary rehabilitation programme (PRP) in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Randomised Controlled Trial comparing standard PRP (20 patients, control group: CG), and PRP + sessions of interactive videogame-aided exercises (20 patients, experimental group: EG). Lung and respiratory muscle function, arterial blood gases, exercise capacity, dyspnoea, health status and health-related quality of life (HRQL) and emotional response were measured before and after PRP. A questionnaire on acceptability of the PRP was administered. Exercise capacity, dyspnoea and HRQL significantly improved in both groups after the PRP, whereas the EG showed a greater improvement in six-minute walk test and transitional dyspnoea index than the CG. No difference in psychological status or acceptability of PRP was observed between the two groups. The addition of IV training was more effective for improving some parameters of exercise tolerance and dyspnoea, although did not result in better psychological status nor it was better accepted than the standard PRP in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ghrelin ameliorates catabolic conditions and respiratory dysfunction in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease model of chronic cigarette smoke-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiide, Yoshiyuki; Inomata, Norio; Furuya, Mayumi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2015-05-15

    Cigarette smoking, which is a well-known major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), causes both pulmonary and extrapulmonary abnormalities. Ghrelin is a gastric peptide that regulates energy homeostasis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ghrelin on the catabolic changes, respiratory function and emphysema in an animal model of COPD induced by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke. Rats were exposed to cigarette smoke, and they were administered human ghrelin (0.1 or 1 mg/kg, subcutaneous, twice daily) for 12 weeks. Compared with air-exposed rats, body weight gain, food intake, food efficiency, tidal volume, peak expiratory flow rate, and forced expiratory volume at 100 ms were significantly lower, while functional residual capacity, lung capacity, and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were significantly higher in cigarette smoke-exposed rats. These indicated that the systemic abnormalities associated with COPD developed after the exposure to cigarette smoke. Ghrelin significantly and dose-dependently increased the body weight gain and food efficiency in cigarette smoke-exposed rats. In ghrelin-treated rats, skeletal muscle strength, which tended to be lowered by cigarette smoke exposure, was improved. Ghrelin ameliorated respiratory function and emphysema in a dose-dependent manner, but did not inhibit the increase in neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The respiratory functional parameters and lung capacity were significantly correlated with body weight gain. These results suggest that ghrelin inhibited the development of the catabolic changes, respiratory dysfunction, and emphysema that were induced by cigarette smoke exposure in rats, at least in part, through the amelioration of nutritional status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of air pollution on the burden of chronic respiratory diseases in China: time for urgent action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei-Jie; Zheng, Xue-Yan; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhong, Nan-Shan

    2016-10-15

    In China, where air pollution has become a major threat to public health, public awareness of the detrimental effects of air pollution on respiratory health is increasing-particularly in relation to haze days. Air pollutant emission levels in China remain substantially higher than are those in developed countries. Moreover, industry, traffic, and household biomass combustion have become major sources of air pollutant emissions, with substantial spatial and temporal variations. In this Review, we focus on the major constituents of air pollutants and their impacts on chronic respiratory diseases. We highlight targets for interventions and recommendations for pollution reduction through industrial upgrading, vehicle and fuel renovation, improvements in public transportation, lowering of personal exposure, mitigation of the direct effects of air pollution through healthy city development, intervention at population-based level (systematic health education, intensive and individualised intervention, pre-emptive measures, and rehabilitation), and improvement in air quality. The implementation of a national environmental protection policy has become urgent.

  15. Effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation programme on physiologic and psychosocial outcomes in patients with chronic respiratory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, K C; Wong, W P; Jailani, A R; Sew, S; Ong, Y Y

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the effects of a pulmonary rehabilitation programme (PRP) conducted at our centre for patients with chronic lung disease. Thirty-four patients (27 men and 7 women, mean age 67.7 years) with predominantly moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (31 patients), bronchiectasis (2 patients) and interstitial lung disease (1 patient) completed a 6-week outpatient PRP that included education, physical and respiratory care instruction and supervised exercise training. Outcome assessment was performed at baseline, on completion of PRP and 3 months after PRP. Physiologic measures included pulmonary function, incremental exercise and 6-minute walk tests (6MWTs). Disease-specific quality of life was assessed using the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRDQ). There was no significant change in resting spirometry or lung volumes after PRP. Maximal oxygen uptake and work-rate improved significantly after PRP by 132.4 mL kg-1 min-1 and 10.7 W, respectively. 6MWT distance improved significantly by a mean of 67.3 m (P PRP. The improvements gained in maximal exercise capacity immediately following PRP were maintained in 17 patients who returned for repeat assessment 3 months after PRP. Patients who completed a comprehensive PRP at our centre showed significant increase in functional capacity, reduction of exertional dyspnoea and improvement in health status.

  16. Cardiovascular and respiratory dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated by impaired peripheral oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang ML

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ming-Lung Chuang,1,2 Shih-Feng Huang,1 Chun-Hung Su2,3 1Division of Pulmonary Medicine and Department of Critical Care Medicine, 2School of Medicine, 3Division of Cardiology and Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Impaired peripheral oxygenation (IPO-related variables readily achieved with cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET represent cardiovascular dysfunction. These variables include peak oxygen uptake (VO2 <85% predicted, anaerobic threshold <40%  VO2max predicted, VO2-work rate slope <8.6 mL/watt, oxygen pulse <80% predicted, and ventilatory equivalents for O2 and CO2 at nadir of >31 and >34, respectively. Some of these six variables may be normal while the others are abnormal in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. This may result in confusion when using the interpretation algorithm for diagnostic purposes. We therefore hypothesized that patients found to have abnormal values for all six variables would have worse cardiovascular function than patients with abnormal values for none or some of these variables.Methods: In this cross-sectional comparative study, 58 COPD patients attending a university teaching hospital underwent symptom-limited CPET with multiple lactate measurements. Patients with abnormal values in all six IPO-related variables were assigned to an IPO group while those who did not meet the requirements for the IPO group were assigned to a non-IPO group. Cardiovascular function was measured by two-dimensional echocardiography and Δlactate/ΔVO2, and respiratory dynamics were compared between the two groups.Results: Fourteen IPO and 43 non-IPO patients were entered into the study. Both groups were similar with regard to left ventricular ejection fraction and right ventricular morphology (P>0.05 for both. At peak exercise, both groups reached a similar heart rate level and Δlactate/ΔVO2. The IPO patients had an

  17. An effect of the outpatient rehabilitation programme in patients with chronic respiratory diseases

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    Jakub Zatloukal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary rehabilitation is a common type of complex treatment especially in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. By contrast, only few rehabilitation centres in the Czech Republic provide pulmonary rehabilitation programme to non-COPD patients. OBJECTIVE: To find out if the rehabilitation programme has a similar effect in patient with obstructive and restrictive ventilatory disorder. METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with either COPD or pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS have been enrolled for the 6-week rehabilitation programme. Lung functions, maximal inspiratory (MIP and expiratory (MEP mouth pressures, chest expansion at the level of the 4th intercostal space (IC and at the level of the xiphoid process (XP, six-minute walk test, health-related quality of life using the St. George’s Questionnaire (SGRQ and fatigue occurrence using the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue scale (MAF were tested at the baseline and after 6 weeks. The rehabilitation programme consisted of exercise training, ventilatory muscle training, respiratory physiotherapy and soft-tissue techniques. RESULTS: Patients with COPD improved significantly (p < .05 in MIP by 17% (10.5 cm H2O, MEP by 18% (16.8 cm H2O, IC by 65% (1.7 cm, XP by 90% (1.9 cm, six-minute walk distance (6MWD by 15% (64.1 m and SGRQ by –28% (–12.3 points. Patients with PS improved significantly (p < .05 in MIP by 25% (20.1 cm H2O, IC by 29% (1.3 cm, XP by 29% (1.3 cm and 6MWD by 6% (31.6 m. The change in lung functions and MAF in both groups; MEP and SGRQ in PS group were insignificant after the 6-week rehabilitation programme. CONCLUSIONS: The 6-week rehabilitation programme produces similar responses in functional health status of patients with either obstructive or restrictive ventilatory disorder. However, patients with restrictive ventilatory disorder in particular should be encouraged to continue in the programme to enhance the health

  18. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy - rare encephalopathy with good prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Patalong-Ogiewa, M; Krzystanek, E

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with increased level of antithyroid antibodies. Two types of clinical manifestation can be described: a vasculitic type with stroke like episodes and diffuse progressive type with deterioration of mental function. Neurologic symptoms are present in euthyreosis as well as in thyroid dysfunction. Because of good response to immunosuppressive therapy, the prompt diagnosis and management of HE are crucial. In this study we present the review of current literature and discuss two representative cases.

  19. Acute inhibition of glial cells in the NTS does not affect respiratory and sympathetic activities in rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kauê M; Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H

    2013-02-16

    Recent studies suggest that neuron-glia interactions are involved in multiple aspects of neuronal activity regulation. In the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neuron-glia interactions are thought to participate in the integration of autonomic responses to physiological challenges. However, it remains to be shown whether NTS glial cells might influence breathing and cardiovascular control, and also if they could be integral to the autonomic and respiratory responses to hypoxic challenges. Here, we investigated whether NTS glia play a tonic role in the modulation of central respiratory and sympathetic activities as well as in the changes in respiratory-sympathetic coupling induced by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a model of central autonomic and respiratory plasticity. We show that bilateral microinjections of fluorocitrate (FCt), a glial cell inhibitor, into the caudal and intermediate subnuclei of the NTS did not alter baseline respiratory and sympathetic parameters in in situ preparations of juvenile rats. Similar results were observed in rats previously exposed to CIH. Likewise, CIH-induced changes in respiratory-sympathetic coupling were unaffected by FCt-mediated inhibition. However, microinjection of FCt into the ventral medulla produced changes in respiratory frequency. Our results show that acute glial inhibition in the NTS does not affect baseline respiratory and sympathetic control. Additionally, we conclude that NTS glial cells may not be necessary for the continuous manifestation of sympathetic and respiratory adaptations to CIH. Our work provides evidence that neuron-glia interactions in the NTS do not participate in baseline respiratory and sympathetic control.

  20. Mechanisms underlying uremic encephalopathy.

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    Scaini, Giselli; Ferreira, Gabriela Kozuchovski; Streck, Emilio Luiz

    2010-06-01

    In patients with renal failure, encephalopathy is a common problem that may be caused by uremia, thiamine deficiency, dialysis, transplant rejection, hypertension, fluid and electrolyte disturbances or drug toxicity. In general, encephalopathy presents with a symptom complex progressing from mild sensorial clouding to delirium and coma. This review discusses important issues regarding the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of uremic encephalopathy. The pathophysiology of uremic encephalopathy up to now is uncertain, but several factors have been postulated to be involved; it is a complex and probably multifactorial process. Hormonal disturbances, oxidative stress, accumulation of metabolites, imbalance in excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, and disturbance of the intermediary metabolism have been identified as contributing factors. Despite continuous therapeutic progress, most neurological complications of uremia, like uremic encephalopathy, fail to fully respond to dialysis and many are elicited or aggravated by dialysis or renal transplantation. On the other hand, previous studies showed that antioxidant therapy could be used as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of these neurological complications.

  1. Reproducibility and respiratory function correlates of exhaled breath fingerprint in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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    Raffaele Antonelli Incalzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The electronic nose (e nose provides distinctive breath fingerprints for selected respiratory diseases. Both reproducibility and respiratory function correlates of breath fingerprint are poorly known. OBJECTIVES: To measure reproducibility of breath fingerprints and to assess their correlates among respiratory function indexes in elderly healthy and COPD subjects. METHOD: 25 subjects (5 COPD patients for each GOLD stage and 5 healthy controls over 65 years underwent e-nose study through a seven sensor system and respiratory function tests at times 0, 7, and 15 days. Reproducibility of the e nose pattern was computed. The correlation between volatile organic compound (VOC pattern and respiratory function/clinical parameters was assessed by the Spearman's rho. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: VOC patterns were highly reproducible within healthy and GOLD 4 COPD subjects, less among GOLD 1-3 patients.VOC patterns significantly correlated with expiratory flows (Spearman's rho ranging from 0.36 for MEF25% and sensor Co-Buti-TPP, to 0.81 for FEV1% and sensor Cu-Buti-TPP p<0.001, but not with residual volume and total lung capacity. CONCLUSIONS: VOC patterns strictly correlated with expiratory flows. Thus, e nose might conveniently be used to assess COPD severity and, likely, to study phenotypic variability. However, the suboptimal reproducibility within GOLD 1-3 patients should stimulate further research to identify more reproducible breath print patterns.

  2. Reproducibility and respiratory function correlates of exhaled breath fingerprint in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Pennazza, Giorgio; Scarlata, Simone; Santonico, Marco; Petriaggi, Massimo; Chiurco, Domenica; Pedone, Claudio; D'Amico, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    The electronic nose (e nose) provides distinctive breath fingerprints for selected respiratory diseases. Both reproducibility and respiratory function correlates of breath fingerprint are poorly known. To measure reproducibility of breath fingerprints and to assess their correlates among respiratory function indexes in elderly healthy and COPD subjects. 25 subjects (5 COPD patients for each GOLD stage and 5 healthy controls) over 65 years underwent e-nose study through a seven sensor system and respiratory function tests at times 0, 7, and 15 days. Reproducibility of the e nose pattern was computed. The correlation between volatile organic compound (VOC) pattern and respiratory function/clinical parameters was assessed by the Spearman's rho. VOC patterns were highly reproducible within healthy and GOLD 4 COPD subjects, less among GOLD 1-3 patients.VOC patterns significantly correlated with expiratory flows (Spearman's rho ranging from 0.36 for MEF25% and sensor Co-Buti-TPP, to 0.81 for FEV1% and sensor Cu-Buti-TPP p<0.001)), but not with residual volume and total lung capacity. VOC patterns strictly correlated with expiratory flows. Thus, e nose might conveniently be used to assess COPD severity and, likely, to study phenotypic variability. However, the suboptimal reproducibility within GOLD 1-3 patients should stimulate further research to identify more reproducible breath print patterns.

  3. Recommendations for fitness for work medical evaluations in chronic respiratory patients. Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez González, Cristina; González Barcala, Francisco Javier; Belda Ramírez, José; González Ros, Isabel; Alfageme Michavila, Inmaculada; Orejas Martínez, Cristina; González Rodríguez-Moro, José Miguel; Rodríguez Portal, José Antonio; Fernández Álvarez, Ramón

    2013-11-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases often cause impairment in the functions and/or structure of the respiratory system, and impose limitations on different activities in the lives of persons who suffer them. In younger patients with an active working life, these limitations can cause problems in carrying out their normal work. Article 41 of the Spanish Constitution states that «the public authorities shall maintain a public Social Security system for all citizens guaranteeing adequate social assistance and benefits in situations of hardship». Within this framework is the assessment of fitness for work, as a dual-nature process (medico-legal) that aims to determine whether it is appropriate or not to recognise a person's right to receive benefits which replace the income that they no longer receive as they cannot carry out their work, due to loss of health. The role of the pulmonologist is essential in evaluating the diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and functional capacity of respiratory patients. These recommendations seek to bring the complex setting of fitness for work evaluation to pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons, providing action guidelines that allow them to advise their own patients about their incorporation into working life. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Respiratory Consequences of Mild-to-Moderate Obesity: Impact on Exercise Performance in Health and in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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    Denis E. O'Donnell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In many parts of the world, the prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate. The association between obesity, multiple comorbidities, and increased mortality is now firmly established in many epidemiological studies. However, the link between obesity and exercise intolerance is less well studied and is the focus of this paper. Although exercise limitation is likely to be multifactorial in obesity, it is widely believed that the respiratory mechanical constraints and the attendant dyspnea are important contributors. In this paper, we examined the evidence that critical ventilatory constraint is a proximate source of exercise limitation in individuals with mild-to-moderate obesity. We first reviewed existing information on exercise performance, including ventilatory and perceptual response patterns, in obese individuals who are otherwise healthy. We then considered the impact of obesity in patients with preexisting respiratory mechanical abnormalities due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, with particular reference to the effect on dyspnea and exercise performance. Our main conclusion, based on the existing and rather sparse literature on the subject, is that abnormalities of dynamic respiratory mechanics are not likely to be the dominant source of dyspnea and exercise intolerance in otherwise healthy individuals or in patients with COPD with mild-to-moderate obesity.

  5. [IPPB therapy at home in chronic respiratory insufficiency in France. II. Indications. Technics and surveillance (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, F; Drouet, D; Brille, D; Hatzfeld, C; Liot, F; Kompalitch, M

    1979-01-01

    A survey has been conducted among French chest physicians and physicians involved in intensive care. 296 physicians have prescribed IPPB at home to 3 778 patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency between 1960 and 1977. Acute respiratory failure was the first criteria considered in the indications (57% of the patients); hypercapnia, hypoxemia and right heart failure episode frequency were the other criteria of severity the most often taken into account. Since 1960, the indications among those with airflow obstruction have decreased, whereas they have increased for those with restrictive insufficiencies, expressing the questions raised about the efficacy of IPPB in these two types. 18% of the patients have had IPPB through tracheostomy canula. 70% of the patients have used a pressure cycling respirator and 30% a volume or flow cycling respiratory. This second type was quite always used in the case of IPPB through canula. Oxygen was added for half of the patients. The physicians have regularly followed the patients. Great importance was accorded to home care surveillance.

  6. The Likelihood of Preventing Respiratory Exacerbations in Children and Adolescents with either Chronic Suppurative Lung Disease or Bronchiectasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Grady, Kerry-Ann F; Grimwood, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Chronic suppurative lung disease (CSLD) and bronchiectasis in children and adolescents are important causes of respiratory morbidity and reduced quality of life (QoL), also leading to subsequent premature death during adulthood. Acute respiratory exacerbations in pediatric CSLD and bronchiectasis are important markers of disease control clinically, given that they impact upon QoL and increase health-care-associated costs and can adversely affect future lung functioning. Preventing exacerbations in this population is, therefore, likely to have significant individual, familial, societal, and health-sector benefits. In this review, we focus on therapeutic interventions, such as drugs (antibiotics, mucolytics, hyperosmolar agents, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents), vaccines and physiotherapy, and care-planning, such as post-hospitalization management and health promotion strategies, including exercise, diet, and reducing exposure to environmental toxicants. The review identified a conspicuous lack of moderate or high-quality evidence for preventing respiratory exacerbations in children and adolescents with CSLD or bronchiectasis. Given the short- and long-term impact of exacerbations upon individuals, their families, and society as a whole, large studies addressing interventions at the primary and tertiary prevention phases are required. This research must include children and adolescents in both developing and developed countries and address long-term health outcomes. PMID:28393062

  7. Nonmalignant Respiratory Effects of Chronic Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water among Never-Smokers in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Faruque; Chen, Yu; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W.; Bernard, Alfred; Dumont, Xavier; Slavkovich, Vesna; Argos, Maria; D’Armiento, Jeanine; Foronjy, Robert; Hasan, M. Rashidul; Eunus, HEM Mahbubul; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2008-01-01

    Background Arsenic from drinking water has been associated with malignant and nonmalignant respiratory illnesses. The association with nonmalignant respiratory illnesses has not been well established because the assessments of respiratory symptoms may be influenced by recall bias or interviewer bias because participants had visible skin lesions. Objectives We examined the relationship of the serum level of Clara cell protein CC16—a novel biomarker for respiratory illnesses—with well As, total urinary As, and urinary As methylation indices. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in nonsmoking individuals (n = 241) selected from a large cohort with a wide range of As exposure (0.1–761 μg/L) from drinking water in Bangladesh. Total urinary As, urinary As metabolites, and serum CC16 were measured in urine and serum samples collected at baseline of the parent cohort study. Results We observed an inverse association between urinary As and serum CC16 among persons with skin lesions (β = −0.13, p = 0.01). We also observed a positive association between secondary methylation index in urinary As and CC16 levels (β = 0.12, p = 0.05) in the overall study population; the association was stronger among people without skin lesions (β = 0.18, p = 0.04), indicating that increased methylation capability may be protective against As-induced respiratory damage. In a subsample of study participants undergoing spirometric measures (n = 31), we observed inverse associations between urinary As and predictive FEV1 (forced expiratory volume measured in 1 sec) (r = −0.37; FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio and primary methylation index (r = −0.42, p = 0.01). Conclusions The findings suggest that serum CC16 may be a useful biomarker of epithelial lung damage in individuals with arsenical skin lesions. Also, we observed the deleterious respiratory effects of As exposure at concentrations lower than reported in earlier studies. PMID:18288317

  8. Morphological features of encephalopathy after chronic administration of the antiepileptic drug valproate to rats. A transmission electron microscopic study of capillaries in the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, M E; Sobaniec, W

    1996-01-01

    Long-term intragastric application of the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (Vupral "Polfa") at the effective dose of 200 mg/kg b. w. once daily to rats for 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months revealed neurological disorders indicating cerebellum damage ("valproate encephalopathy"). The first ultrastructural changes in structural elements of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) in the cerebellar cortex were detectable after 3 months of the experiment. They became more severe in the later months of the experiment, and were most severe after 12 months, located mainly in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Lesions of the capillary included necrosis of endothelial cells. Organelles of these cells, in particular the mitochondria (increased number and size, distinct degeneration of their matrix and cristae) and Golgi apparatus were altered. Reduced size of capillary lumen and occlusion were caused by swollen endothelial cells which had luminal protrusions and swollen microvilli. Pressure on the vessel wall was produced by enlarged perivascular astrocytic processes. Fragments of necrotic endothelial cells were in the vascular lumens and in these there was loosening and breaking of tight cellular junctions. Damage to the vascular basement lamina was also observed. Damage to the capillary was accompanied by marked damage to neuroglial cells, mainly to perivascular processes of astrocytes. The proliferation of astrocytes (Bergmann's in particular) and occasionally of oligodendrocytes was found. Alterations in the structural elements of the BBB coexisted with marked lesions of neurons of the cerebellum (Purkinje cells are earliest). In electron micrographs both luminal and antiluminal sides of the BBB of the cerebellar cortex had similar lesions. The possible influence of the hepatic damage, mainly hyperammonemia, upon the development of valproate encephalopathy is discussed.

  9. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora Nava, Luis Eduardo; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo

    2011-06-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. Physician does generally not perceive cirrhosis complications, and neuropsychological tests and another especial measurement like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography can only make diagnosis. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  10. The encephalopathy of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A C; Gilbert, J J; Young, G B; Bolton, C F

    1985-11-01

    Twelve fatal cases of encephalopathy associated with sepsis were examined in a ten-year retrospective study. The sources of infection and organisms isolated were variable. Six of the patients had focal neurologic signs; five had seizures. The level of consciousness varied from drowsiness to deep coma, and electroencephalograms revealed diffuse or multifocal abnormalities. Computed tomographic head scans and cerebrospinal fluid examinations were usually unremarkable. Eight patients had disseminated microabscesses in the brain at autopsy. Four patients had proliferation of astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral cortex, a feature associated with metabolic encephalopathies. Additional findings included cerebral infarcts, brain purpura, multiple small white matter hemorrhages, and central pontine myelinolysis. Although sepsis may cause encephalopathy by producing disturbances in cerebral synaptic transmission and cerebral energy production through a toxic mechanism, bacterial invasion of the brain with the formation of disseminated microabscesses is also an important cause.

  11. Uremic encephalopathy and other brain disorders associated with renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifter, Julian Lawrence; Samuels, Martin A

    2011-04-01

    Kidney failure is one of the leading causes of disability and death and one of the most disabling features of kidney failure and dialysis is encephalopathy. This is probably caused by the accumulation of uremic toxins. Other important causes are related to the underlying disorders that cause kidney failure, particularly hypertension. The clinical manifestations of uremic encephalopathy include mild confusional states to deep coma, often with associated movement disorders, such as asterixis. Most nephrologists consider cognitive impairment to be a major indication for the initiation of renal replacement therapy with dialysis with or without subsequent transplantation. Sleep disorders, including Ekbom's syndrome (restless legs syndrome) are also common in patients with kidney failure. Renal replacement therapies are also associated with particular neurologic complications including acute dialysis encephalopathy and chronic dialysis encephalopathy, formerly known as dialysis dementia. The treatments and prevention of each are discussed. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  12. Brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for hepatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Chin-Sing; McConnell, James R.; Chu, Wei-Kom

    1993-08-01

    Liver failure can induce gradations of encephalopathy from mild to stupor to deep coma. The objective of this study is to investigate and quantify the variation of biochemical compounds in the brain in patients with liver failure and encephalopathy, through the use of water- suppressed, localized in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (HMRS). The spectral parameters of the compounds quantitated are: N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) to Creatine (Cr) ratio, Choline (Cho) to Creatine ratio, Inositol (Ins) to Creatine ratio and Glutamine-Glutamate Amino Acid (AA) to Creatine ratio. The study group consisted of twelve patients with proven advanced chronic liver failure and symptoms of encephalopathy. Comparison has been done with results obtained from five normal subjects without any evidence of encephalopathy or liver diseases.

  13. Fundus Findings in Wernicke Encephalopathy

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    Tal Serlin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency, classically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, confusion, and ataxia. While commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, WE may also occur in the setting of poor nutrition or absorption. We present a 37-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and presented with visual disturbance with bilateral horizontal nystagmus, confusion, and postural imbalance. Fundus examination revealed bilateral optic disc edema with a retinal hemorrhage in the left eye. Metabolic workup demonstrated thiamine deficiency. Her symptoms resolved after thiamine treatment. This case raises the awareness of the possibility of posterior segment findings in WE, which are underreported in WE.

  14. Two Eyes Are Better Than One—Binocular Summation of Dark Vision in Healthy Individuals and Patients with Chronic Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thylefors, Joakim; Havelius, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    We compared monocular and binocular absolute thresholds of dark adaptation in two separate study populations. Eighteen healthy individuals (Group A) and 13 patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency (Group B) were examined three times each by computerised dark adaptometry with simultaneous but separate recordings from each eye and binocularly. The respiratory patients received oxygen supplement at visits 1 and 3. In Group A, at all three visits, binocular dark adaptation was significantl...

  15. DNM1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Spiczak, Sarah; Helbig, Katherine L; Shinde, Deepali N

    2017-01-01

    cluster within the GTPase or middle domains, and structural modeling and existing functional data suggest a dominant-negative effect on DMN1 function. CONCLUSIONS: The phenotypic spectrum of DNM1-related encephalopathy is relatively homogeneous, in contrast to many other genetic epilepsies. Up to one......-third of patients carry the recurrent p.Arg237Trp variant, which is now one of the most common recurrent variants in epileptic encephalopathies identified to date. Given the predicted dominant-negative mechanism of this mutation, this variant presents a prime target for therapeutic intervention....

  16. Stability properties of PrPSc from cattle with experimental transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), including scrapie in sheep, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), are fatal diseases of the nervous system associated with accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc). Different strains of BSE exist...

  17. Health-related quality of life and long-term prognosis in chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure: a prospective survival analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidbauer Kathrin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQL is considered as an important outcome parameter in patients with chronic diseases. This study aimed to assess the role of disease-specific HRQL for long-term survival in patients of different diagnoses with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (CHRF. Methods In a cohort of 231 stable patients (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, n = 98; non-COPD (obesity-hypoventilation syndrome, restrictive disorders, neuromuscular disorders, n = 133 with CHRF and current home mechanical ventilation (HMV, HRQL was assessed by the disease-specific Severe Respiratory Insufficiency (SRI questionnaire and its prognostic value was prospectively evaluated during a follow-up of 2–4 years, using univariate and multivariate regression analysis. Results HRQL was more impaired in COPD (mean ± SD SRI-summary score (SRI-SS 52.5 ± 15.6 than non-COPD patients (67.6 ± 16.4; p 1 turned out to be independent predictors (p Conclusion In patients with CHRF and HMV, the disease-specific SRI was an overall predictor of long-term survival in addition to established risk factors. However, the SRI predominantly beared information regarding long-term survival in non-COPD patients, while in COPD patients objective measures of the disease state were superior. This on one hand highlights the significance of HRQL in the long-term course of patients with CHRF, on the other hand it suggests that the predictive value of HRQL depends on the underlying disease.

  18. Hypoxemia during bilevel positive airway pressure treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and chronic respiratory insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzecka, Anna; Piesiak, Pawel; Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2013-01-01

    In patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome and chronic respiratory insufficiency one of the options of treatment is bilevel positive airway pressure (BPAP) during sleep. The aim of the study was to find out what are the factors influencing the early results of BPAP treatment in such OSA patients. The study was carried out in 55 adult obese patients (mean body mass index 45 ± 7 kg/m(2)), severe OSA syndrome (mean apnea/hypopnea index 62 ± 19), and chronic respiratory insufficiency (mean PaCO(2) 54 ± 5.7 torr) who underwent polysomnography during BPAP treatment. In 31 patients (56%) the mean SaO(2) during sleep was <88% despite the optimal BPAP and oxygen titration: 83 ± 4% during NREM and 81 ± 7% during REM sleep vs. 91 ± 2% and 90 ± 3%, respectively, in the remaining 24 patients (p < 0.001). The patients with advanced hypoxemia during sleep and BPAP treatment had lower forced vital capacity (2.2 ± 0.9 vs. 2.7 ± 0.8 l, p < 0.05), lower diurnal PaO(2) (49 ± 8 vs. 54 ± 7 torr), higher diurnal PaCO(2) (57 ± 5 vs. 52 ± 5 torr, p < 0.01), and higher PaCO(2) during sleep (75 ± 13 vs. 59.5 ± 7.5 torr). In conclusion, in obese patients with severe OSA syndrome and chronic alveolar hypoventilation there is a risk of sleep hypoxemia during BPAP treatment, despite optimal pressure titration.

  19. Management of covert hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghray, Abhijeet; Waghray, Nisheet; Mullen, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a reversible progressive neuropsychiatric disorder that encompasses a wide clinical spectrum. Covert hepatic encephalopathy is defined as patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy and Grade I encephalopathy by West-Haven Criteria. Terminology such as "sub-clinical", "latent", and "minimal" appear to trivialize the disease and have been replaced by the term covert. The lack of clinical signs means that covert hepatic encephalopathy is rarely recognized or treated outside of clinical trials with options for therapy based on patients with episodic hepatic encephalopathy. This review discusses the current available options for therapy in covert hepatic encephalopathy and focuses on non-absorbable disacharides (lactulose or lactitol), antibiotics (rifaximin), probiotics/synbiotics and l-ornithine-l-aspartate.

  20. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum

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    Leila Pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: ″Wernicke’s Korsakoff″ syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. The term refers to two different syndromes, each representing a different stage of the disease. Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE is an acute syndrome requiring emergent treatment to prevent death and neurologic morbidity. Korsakoff syndrome (KS refers to a chronic neurologic condition that usually occurs as a consequence of WE. It is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum that confusion, ocular signs, and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. Typical brain lesions of wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE are observed at autopsy in 0.4 to 2.8 percent of the general population in the western world and the majority of affected patients are alcoholic. The prevalence of wernicke’s encephalopathy lesions seen on autopsy was 12.5% of alcohol abusers in one report. Among those who with alcohol-related death, it has been reported to be even higher, 29 to 59%. The aim of this study was to report a case of wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old-pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria before that she had hyperemesis gravidarum with weight loss and unresponsive to outpatient and inpatient medical therapy. MRI showed hyperdense lesion around thalamus which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after high dose thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rule out and appropriate treatment of Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal and fetal death.

  1. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a Turkish case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Unver

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC is a rare form of acute encephalopathy of unknown etiology characterized by typical symmetrical lesions in the thalami, with variable involvement of the white matter, brainstem and cerebellum. Clinically there is a rapid neurologic deterioration after a short period of a nonspecific viral-like illness associated with gastrointestinal or respiratory signs. Asian children are especially affected. Here we present a 3-year-old boy admitted to our hospital with fever and deterioration of consciousness. The diagnosis of ANEC was made by radiologic findings [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 641-645

  2. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a novel contagion, known to as a prion. Prions are proteins capable of converting a normal cellular protein into a prion, thereby propagating an infection. BSE is the first known prion zoonotic. As such it has attracted broad scientific and, to a r...

  3. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing.

  4. The prevalence and identity of Chlamydia-specific IgE in children with asthma and other chronic respiratory symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Katir K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have confirmed the presence of viable Chlamydia in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid of pediatric patients with airway hyperresponsiveness. While specific IgG and IgM responses to C. pneumoniae are well described, the response and potential contribution of Ag-specific IgE are not known. The current study sought to determine if infection with Chlamydia triggers the production of pathogen-specific IgE in children with chronic respiratory diseases which might contribute to inflammation and pathology. Methods We obtained BAL fluid and serum from pediatric respiratory disease patients who were generally unresponsive to corticosteroid treatment as well as sera from age-matched control patients who saw their doctor for wellness checkups. Chlamydia-specific IgE was isolated from BAL and serum samples and their specificity determined by Western blot techniques. The presence of Chlamydia was confirmed by species-specific PCR and BAL culture assays. Results Chlamydial DNA was detected in the BAL fluid of 134/197 (68% patients. Total IgE increased with age until 15 years old and then decreased. Chlamydia-specific IgE was detected in the serum and/or BAL of 107/197 (54% patients suffering from chronic respiratory disease, but in none of the 35 healthy control sera (p p = 0.0001 tested positive for Chlamydia-specific IgE. Asthmatic patients had significantly higher IgE levels compared to non-asthmatics (p = 0.0001. Patients who were positive for Chlamydia DNA or culture had significantly higher levels of serum IgE compared to negative patients (p = 0.0071 and p = 0.0001 respectively. Only 6 chlamydial antigens induced Chlamydia-specific IgE and patients with C. pneumoniae-specific IgE had significantly greater levels of total IgE compared to C. pneumoniae-specific IgE negative ones (p = 0.0001. Conclusions IgE antibodies play a central role in allergic inflammation; therefore production of Chlamydia

  5. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza SALEHIOMRAN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Salehi Omran MR, Nooreddini H, Baghdadi F. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood; A Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Spring;7(2:51-54. AbstractAcute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood (ANEC is an atypical disease followed by respiratory or gastrointestinal infection, high fever, which is accompanied with rapid alteration of consciousness and seizures. This disease is seen nearly exclusively in East Asian infants and children who had previously a good health. Serial MRI examinations demonstrated symmetric lesions involving the thalami, brainstem, cerebellum, and white matter. This disease has a poor prognosis, often culminating in profound morbidity and mortality. A 22-month infant with ANEC hospitalized in Amirkola Children Hospital has been evaluated. References1. Mizuguchi M. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a novel form of acute encephalopathy prevalent in Japan and Taiwan. Brain Dev. 1997 Mar;19(2:81-92. Review.2. Wang HS, Huang SC. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood. Chang Gung Med J 2001 Jan;24(1:1-10.3. Campistol J, Gassió R, Pineda M, Fernandez-Alvarez E. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (infantile bilateral  thalamic necrosis: two non-Japanese cases. Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Nov;40(11:771-4.4. Ito Y, Ichiyama T, Kimura H, Shibata M, Ishiwada N, Kuroki H, Furukawa S, Morishima T. Detection of influenza virus RNA by reverse transcription-PCR and proinflammatory cytokines in influenza-virus-associated encephalopathy. J Med Virol 1999 Aug;58(4:420-5.5. Sugaya N. Influenza-associated encephalopathy in Japan. Semin Pediatr Infect Dis 2002 Apr;13(2:79-84. Review.6. Skelton BW, Hollingshead MC, Sledd AT, Phillips CD, Castillo M. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: typical findings in an atypical disease. Pediatr Radiol 2008 Jul; 38(7:810-3.7. Wong AM, Simon EM, Zimmerman RA, Wang HS, Toh CH, Ng SH. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood

  6. Chronic sleep disorders in survivors of the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christie M; Herridge, Margaret S; Gabor, Jonathan Y; Tansey, Catherine M; Matte, Andrea; Hanly, Patrick J

    2009-02-01

    Sleep disruption is well recognized in the Intensive Care Unit. Poor sleep quality likely continues following discharge from hospital in several patients and becomes a chronic disorder in some. The aim of this study was to describe the etiology of chronic sleep complaints in survivors of ARDS. Seven ARDS survivors with no previous sleep complaints who reported difficulty sleeping 6 months or more following discharge from hospital were evaluated. Sleep quality was assessed subjectively with a sleep history and the Insomnia Severity Index and objectively with polysomnography. Daytime sleepiness was assessed with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. A chronic sleep disorder was identified in each patient who reported difficulty sleeping. The primary sleep disorder was chronic conditioned insomnia (5 patients), parasomnia (1 patient) and obstructive sleep apnea (1 patient). In addition, 4 patients had periodic leg movements, which was of uncertain clinical significance. Chronic sleep disorders, which originate during the acute illness, are present in some ARDS survivors several months after discharge from hospital. If unrecognized, lack of treatment may contribute to impaired quality of life and incomplete rehabilitation from their critical illness.

  7. A review of Vitamin D effects on common respiratory diseases: Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Mohammad Esmaeil; Modarresi-Ghazani, Faezeh; Entezari-Maleki, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Despite the classic role of Vitamin D in skeletal health, new aspects of Vitamin D have been discovered in tissues and organs other than bones. Epidemiological and observational studies demonstrate a link between Vitamin D deficiency and risk of developing respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and tuberculosis (TB). To review the literature, we searched the terms "Vitamin D" (using the set operator) and "asthma," "COPD" and "TB" in electronic databases, including PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Google Scholar until July 2015. Non-English articles or articles with unavailable full text were excluded. Both in vivo and in vitro studies were included. All the reviewed articles state that Vitamin D deficiency is very common among patients with respiratory diseases. The present data regarding Vitamin D and asthma is still controversial, but data about COPD and TB are more encouraging. The relevant studies have been conducted in different populations therefore it is not particularly possible to compare the data due to genetic variations. In order to point out a role for Vitamin D, large clinical trials with Vitamin D deficient subjects and sufficient Vitamin D supplementation are needed.

  8. Chronic Stress Causes Sex-Specific and Structure-Specific Alterations in Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activity in Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Mota, Carina; Weis, Simone Nardin; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Dalmaz, Carla; Guma, Fátima Therezinha Costa; Pettenuzzo, Letícia Ferreira

    2017-09-14

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces a variety of changes in brain function, some of which are mediated by glucocorticoids. The response to stress occurs in a sex-specific way, and may include mitochondrial and synaptic alterations. The synapse is highly dependent on mitochondrial energy supply, and when mitochondria become dysfunctional, they orchestrate cell death. This study aimed to investigate the CRS effects on mitochondrial respiratory chain activity, as well as mitochondrial potential and mass in cell body and synapses using hippocampus, cortex and striatum of male and female rats. Rats were divided into non-stressed (control) and stressed group (CRS during 40 days). Results showed that CRS increased complex I-III activity in hippocampus. We also observed an interaction between CRS and sex in the striatal complex II activity, since CRS induced a reduction in complex II activity in males, while in females this activity was increased. Also an interaction was observed between stress and sex in cortical complex IV activity, since CRS induced increased activity in females, while it was reduced in males. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) content in cortex and hippocampus was sexually dimorphic, with female rats presenting higher levels compared to males. No changes were observed in GR content, mitochondrial potential or mass of animals submitted to CRS. It was concluded that CRS induced changes in respiratory chain complex activities, and some of these changes are sex-dependent: these activities are increased in the striatal mitochondria by CRS protocol mainly in females, while in males it is decreased.

  9. Chronic effects of air pollution on respiratory health in Southern California children: findings from the Southern California Children's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanghua; Salam, Muhammad T; Eckel, Sandrah P; Breton, Carrie V; Gilliland, Frank D

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution is one of the leading contributors to adverse respiratory health outcomes in urban areas around the world. Children are highly sensitive to the adverse effects of air pollution due to their rapidly growing lungs, incomplete immune and metabolic functions, patterns of ventilation and high levels of outdoor activity. The Children's Health Study (CHS) is a continuing series of longitudinal studies that first began in 1993 and has focused on demonstrating the chronic impacts of air pollution on respiratory illnesses from early childhood through adolescence. A large body of evidence from the CHS has documented that exposures to both regional ambient air and traffic-related pollutants are associated with increased asthma prevalence, new-onset asthma, risk of bronchitis and wheezing, deficits of lung function growth, and airway inflammation. These associations may be modulated by key genes involved in oxidative-nitrosative stress pathways via gene-environment interactions. Despite successful efforts to reduce pollution over the past 40 years, air pollution at the current levels still brings many challenges to public health. To further ameliorate adverse health effects attributable to air pollution, many more toxic pollutants may require regulation and control of motor vehicle emissions and other combustion sources may need to be strengthened. Individual interventions based on personal susceptibility may be needed to protect children's health while control measures are being implemented.

  10. Relationship between the use of inhaled steroids for chronic respiratory diseases and early outcomes in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Almirall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of inhaled steroids in patients with chronic respiratory diseases is a matter of debate due to the potential effect on the development and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. We assessed whether treatment with inhaled steroids in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma and CAP may affect early outcome of the acute pneumonic episode. METHODS: Over 1-year period, all population-based cases of CAP in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma were registered. Use of inhaled steroids were registered and patients were followed up to 30 days after diagnosis to assess severity of CAP and clinical course (hospital admission, ICU admission and mortality. RESULTS: Of 473 patients who fulfilled the selection criteria, inhaled steroids were regularly used by 109 (23%. In the overall sample, inhaled steroids were associated with a higher risk of hospitalization (OR=1.96, p = 0.002 in the bivariate analysis, but this effect disappeared after adjusting by other severity-related factors (adjusted OR=1.08, p=0.787. This effect on hospitalization also disappeared when considering only patients with asthma (OR=1.38, p=0.542, with COPD alone (OR=4.68, p=0.194, but a protective effect was observed in CB patients (OR=0.15, p=0.027. Inhaled steroids showed no association with ICU admission, days to clinical recovery and mortality in the overall sample and in any disease subgroup. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with inhaled steroids is not a prognostic factor in COPD and asthmatic patients with CAP, but could prevent hospitalization for CAP in patients with clinical criteria of chronic bronchitis.

  11. Supine changes in lung function correlate with chronic respiratory failure in myotonic dystrophy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussel, Mathias; Kaminsky, Pierre; Renaud, Pierre; Laroppe, Julien; Pruna, Lelia; Chenuel, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Quality of life and prognosis of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1) often depend on the degree of lung function impairment. This study was designed to assess the respective prevalence of ventilatory restriction, hypoxaemia and hypercapnia in MD1 patients and to determine whether postural changes in lung function could contribute to the early diagnosis of poor respiratory outcome. Fifty-eight patients (42.6±12.9 years) with MD1 were prospectively evaluated from April 2008 to June 2010 to determine their supine and upright lung function and arterial blood gases. The prevalence of ventilatory restriction was 36% and increased with the severity of muscular disability (from 7.7% to 70.6%). The prevalence of hypoxaemia and hypercapnia was 37.9% and 25.9%, respectively. Multiple regression analysis showed that the supine fall in FEV1 was the only variable associated with ventilatory restriction, hypoxaemia and hypercapnia. Our data indicate that supine evaluation of lung function could be helpful to predict poor respiratory outcome, which is closely correlated with hypoxaemia and/or hypercapnia.

  12. Acute and chronic respiratory lesions induced by sulfur mustard in guinea pigs: Role of tachykinins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, J.H.; Trouiller, G.; Harf, A.

    1993-05-13

    We investigated in anesthetized guinea pigs the involvement of tachykinins in respiratory alterations after an airway intoxication by sulfur mustard (SM). Early lesions were evaluated after 5h. Respiratory system resistance (R) and compliance were measured by the occlusion method and airway microvascular permeability by measuring the Evans Blue dye concentration in the trachea and main bronchi. Two groups of animals were studied treated with capsaicin (which induces a tachykinin depletion) or by its vehicle. Capsaicin pretreatment had no effect on the measured parameters. We also measured 14 J after the intoxication tracheal epithelium neutral endopeptidase (NEP) (the main enzyme which degrades tachykinins). In addition bronchial responsiveness to exogenous substance P was studied in two groups of animals intoxicated with SM or not. Tracheal epithelium NEP activity was decreased from 0.448 + or 0.027 nmol.min- 1.mg protein- 1 in controls to 0. 182 + or 0.038 in intoxicated animals. Response to substance P was greater in intoxicated animals with R=2.98 + or - 1.57 cmH20.MI-1.s versus 0.35 + or 0.02 in controls, after 5.10-5 M aerosolized substance P These results suggest tachykinins are not preponderant in the early stage lesions but that bronchial hyperactivity is present at recovery, related to epithelium NEP depletion.

  13. Pediatric respiratory and systemic effects of chronic air pollution exposure: nose, lung, heart, and brain pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Henriquez-Roldán, Carlos; Barragán-Mejía, Gerardo; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderón, Rafael; Reed, William

    2007-01-01

    Exposures to particulate matter and gaseous air pollutants have been associated with respiratory tract inflammation, disruption of the nasal respiratory and olfactory barriers, systemic inflammation, production of mediators of inflammation capable of reaching the brain and systemic circulation of particulate matter. Mexico City (MC) residents are exposed to significant amounts of ozone, particulate matter and associated lipopolysaccharides. MC dogs exhibit brain inflammation and an acceleration of Alzheimer's-like pathology, suggesting that the brain is adversely affected by air pollutants. MC children, adolescents and adults have a significant upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in olfactory bulb and frontal cortex, as well as neuronal and astrocytic accumulation of the 42 amino acid form of beta -amyloid peptide (Abeta 42), including diffuse amyloid plaques in frontal cortex. The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by brain inflammation and the accumulation of Abeta 42, which precede the appearance of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the pathological hallmarks of AD. Our findings of nasal barrier disruption, systemic inflammation, and the upregulation of COX2 and IL-1beta expression and Abeta 42 accumulation in brain suggests that sustained exposures to significant concentrations of air pollutants such as particulate matter could be a risk factor for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. RESPIRATORY VIRAL-INFECTIONS AGGRAVATE AIRWAY DAMAGE CAUSED BY CHRONIC REJECTION IN RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTER, JB; GOUW, ASH; GROEN, M; WILDEVUUR, C; PROP, J

    1994-01-01

    Airway damage resulting in bronchiolitis obliterans occurs frequently in patients after heart-lung and lung transplantation. Generally, chronic rejection is assumed to be the most important cause of bronchiolitis obliterans. However, viral infections might also be potential causes of airway damage a

  15. Preterm Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

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    Krishna G Gopagondanahalli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic ischemic injury, its clinical course, monitoring and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized, and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies.

  16. Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Laura M Stinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of cirrhotic patients. By definition, it has no obvious clinical manifestation and is characterized by neurocognitive impairment in attention, vigilance and integrative function. Although often not considered to be clinically relevant and, therefore, not diagnosed or treated, MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis of MHE has traditionally been achieved through neuropsychological examination, psychometric tests or the newer critical flicker frequency test. A new smartphone application (EncephalApp Stroop Test may serve to function as a screening tool for patients requiring further testing. In addition to physician reporting and driving restrictions, medical treatment for MHE includes non-absorbable disaccharides (eg, lactulose, probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not result in reversal of the cognitive deficits associated with MHE.

  17. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy and its differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobone, Emanuele; Bailly-Salin, Juliette; Polito, Andrea; Friedman, Diane; Stevens, Robert D; Sharshar, Tarek

    2009-10-01

    Sepsis is often complicated by an acute and reversible deterioration of mental status, which is associated with increased mortality and is consistent with delirium but can also be revealed by a focal neurologic sign. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy is accompanied by abnormalities of electroencephalogram and somatosensory-evoked potentials, increased in biomarkers of brain injury (i.e., neuron-specific enolase, S-100 beta-protein) and, frequently, by neuroradiological abnormalities, notably leukoencephalopathy. Its mechanism is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes that affect all brain cells and induce blood-brain barrier breakdown, dysfunction of intracellular metabolism, brain cell death, and brain injuries. Its diagnosis relies essentially on neurologic examination that can lead one to perform specific neurologic tests. Electroencephalography is required in the presence of seizure; neuroimaging in the presence of seizure, focal neurologic signs or suspicion of cerebral infection; and both when encephalopathy remains unexplained. In practice, cerebrospinal fluid analysis should be performed if there is any doubt of meningitis. Hepatic, uremic, or respiratory encephalopathy, metabolic disturbances, drug overdose, withdrawal of sedatives or opioids, alcohol withdrawal delirium, and Wernicke's encephalopathy are the main differential diagnoses of sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Patient management is based mainly on controlling infection, organ system failure, and metabolic homeostasis, at the same time avoiding neurotoxic drugs.

  18. [EEG manifestations in metabolic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2005-09-01

    Normal brain function depends on normal neuronal metabolism, which is closely related to systemic homeostasis of metabolites, such as glucose, electrolytes, amino acids and ammonia. "Metabolic encephalopathy" indicates diffuse brain dysfunction caused by various systemic derangements. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is widely used to evaluate metabolic encephalopathy since 1937, when Berger first observed slow brain activity induced by hypoglycemia. EEG is most useful in differentiating organic from psychiatric conditions, identifying epileptogenicity, and providing information about the degree of cortical or subcortical dysfunction. In metabolic encephalopathy, EEG evolution generally correlates well with the severity of encephalopathy. However, EEG has little specificity in differentiating etiologies in metabolic encephalopathy. For example, though triphasic waves are most frequently mentioned in hepatic encephalopathy, they can also be seen in uremic encephalopathy, or even in aged psychiatric patients treated with lithium. Spike-and-waves may appear in hyper- or hypo-glycemia, uremic encephalopathy, or vitamin deficiencies, etc. Common principles of EEG changes in metabolic encephalopathy are (1) varied degrees of slowing, (2) assorted mixtures of epileptic discharge, (3) high incidence of triphasic waves, and (4), as a rule, reversibility after treatment of underlying causes. There are some exceptions to the above descriptions in specific metabolic disorders and EEG manifestations are highly individualized.

  19. GRIN2B encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platzer, Konrad; Yuan, Hongjie; Schütz, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    presented with neurodevelopmental disorders and a spectrum of hypotonia, movement disorder, cortical visual impairment, cerebral volume loss and epilepsy. Six patients presented with a consistent malformation of cortical development (MCD) intermediate between tubulinopathies and polymicrogyria. Missense...... treatment response in the respective patients still remains to be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to previously known features of intellectual disability, epilepsy and autism, we found evidence that GRIN2B encephalopathy is also frequently associated with movement disorder, cortical visual impairment...

  20. Gender and respiratory factors associated with dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre-Jaime Armando

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rationale We had shown that COPD women expressed more dyspnea than men for the same degree of airway obstruction. Objectives Evaluate gender differences in respiratory factors associated with dyspnea in COPD patients. Methods In a FEV1 % matched population of 100 men and women with COPD we measured: age, MMRC, FEV1, FVC, TLC, IC/TLC, PaO2, PaCO2, DLCO, Pimax, P0.1, Ti/Ttot, BMI, ffmi, 6MWD and VAS scale before and after the test, the Charlson score and the SGRQ. We estimated the association between these parameters and MMRC scores. Multivariate analysis determined the independent strength of those associations. Results MMRC correlated with: BMI (men:-0.29, p = 0.04; women:-0.28, p = 0.05, ffmi (men:-0.39, p = 0.01, FEV1 % (men:-0.64, p 2 (men:-0.59, p 2 (men:0.27, p = 0.05, DLCO (men:-0.54, p 0.1/Pimax (men:0.46, p = 0.002; women:0.47, p = 0.005, dyspnea measured with the Visual Analog Scale before (men:0.37, p = 0.04; women:0.52, p = 0.004 and after 6MWD (men:0.52, p = 0.002; women:0.48, p = 0.004 and SGRQ total (men:0.50, p 0.1/Pimax in women (r2 = 0.30 and BMI, DLCO, PaO2 and P0.1/Pimax in men (r2 = 0.81 were the strongest predictors of MMRC scores. Conclusion In mild to severe COPD patients attending a pulmonary clinic, P0.1/Pimax was the unique predictor of MMRC scores only in women. Respiratory factors explain most of the variations of MMRC scores in men but not in women. Factors other than the respiratory ones should be included in the evaluation of dyspnea in women with COPD.

  1. [Inter-society consensus for the management of respiratory infections: acute bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopardo, Gustavo; Pensotti, Claudia; Scapellato, Pablo; Caberlotto, Oscar; Calmaggi, Aníbal; Clara, Liliana; Klein, Manuel; Levy Hara, Gabriel; López Furst, María J; Mykietiuk, Analía; Pryluka, Daniel; Rial, María J; Vujacich, Claudia; Yahni, Diego

    2013-01-01

    The Argentine Society for Infectious Diseases and other national societies issued updated practical guidelines for the management of acute bronchitis (AB) and reactivations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with the aim of promoting rational use of diagnostic and therapeutic resources. AB is a condition characterized by inflammation of the bronchial airways which affects adults and children without underlying pulmonary disease. It is usually caused by a virus. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings after community acquired pneumonia has been ruled out. Treatment of AB is mainly symptomatic. Antibiotics should be used in immune-compromised hosts, patients with chronic respiratory or cardiac diseases and in the elderly with co-morbidities. Reactivation of COPD is defined as an acute change in the patient's baseline clinical situation beyond normal day to day variations, with an increase in dyspnea, sputum production and/or sputum purulence, warranting a change in medication. An increase in one symptom is considered a mild exacerbation, two as moderate, and the presence of three symptoms is considered a severe exacerbation. An infectious agent can be isolated in sputum in 50 to 75% of COPD reactivations. Moderate and severe episodes must be treated with antibiotics, amoxicillin/ beta-lactamase inhibitor, macrolides and fluoroquinolones are first choice drugs.

  2. Genetic variation as a predictor of smoking cessation success. A promising preventive and intervention tool for chronic respiratory diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaak, M; van Schayck, C P; Knaapen, A M; van Schooten, F J

    2009-03-01

    Tobacco smoking continues to be the largest preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality throughout the world, including chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although most smokers are highly motivated to quit and many smoking cessation therapies are available, cessation rates remain very low. Recent research strongly suggests that variation in genetic background is an important determinant of smoking behaviour and addiction. Since these genetic variants might also influence the response to smoking cessation pharmacotherapies, it is likely that assessment of genetic background could be a promising tool to guide selection of the most effective cessation treatment for an individual smoker. Recently, it has been shown that genetic variants in the dopaminergic system, opioid receptors, the bupropion-metabolising enzyme CYP2B6 and the nicotine-metabolising enzyme CYP2A6 may play an important role in predicting smoking cessation responses to nicotine replacement therapy and bupropion treatment. Despite the progress that has been made, several challenges will still have to be overcome before genetically tailored smoking cessation therapy can be implemented in standard clinical practice.

  3. Exertional dyspnoea in chronic heart failure: the role of the lung and respiratory mechanical factors

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno-Pierre Dubé; Piergiuseppe Agostoni; Pierantonio Laveneziana

    2016-01-01

    Exertional dyspnoea is among the dominant symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure and progresses relentlessly as the disease advances, leading to reduced ability to function and engage in activities of daily living. Effective management of this disabling symptom awaits a better understanding of its underlying physiology. Cardiovascular factors are believed to play a major role in dyspnoea in heart failure patients. However, despite pharmacological interventions, such as vasodilators o...

  4. C-peptide and Diabetic Encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-jun Cai; Hui-qin Xu; Yi Lu

    2011-01-01

    With the changes of life style, diabetes and its complications have become a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is reasonable to anticipate a continued rise in the incidence of diabetes and its complications along with the aging of the population, increase in adult obesity rate, and other risk factors. Diabetic encephalopathy is one of the severe microvascular complications of diabetes, characterized by impaired cognitive functions, and electrophysiological, neurochemical, and structural abnormalities. It may involve direct neuronal damage caused by intracellular glucose. However, the pathogenesis of this disease is complex and its diagnosis is not very clear. Previous researches have suggested that chronic metabolic alterations, vascular changes, and neuronal apoptosis may play important roles in neuronal loss and damaged cognitive fimctions.Multiple factors are responsible for neuronal apoptosis, such as disturbed insulin growth factor (IGF) system,hyperglycemia, and the aging process. Recent data suggest that insulin/C-peptide defidency may exert a primary and key effect in diabetic encephalopathy. Administration of C-peptide partially improves the condition of the IGF system in the brain and prevents neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus of diabetic patients.Those Findings provide a basis for application of C-peptide as a potentially effective therapy for diabetes and diabetic encephalopathy.

  5. Mortality rates for chronic lower respiratory diseases in Italy from 1979 to 2010: an age–period–cohort analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Pesce

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lower respiratory diseases (CLRDs are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The objectives of this study were to estimate the trends in CLRD mortality in Italy, and the specific contributions of age, time period and birth cohort in driving these trends. Population and cause-of-death data in Italy between 1979 and 2010 were collected from the World Health Organization website. Age-specific mortality rates for CLRDs, and effects for age, time period and birth cohort on mortality trends were estimated using age–period–cohort models. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and chronic bronchitis represent nearly 98% of the deaths from CLRDs. Despite the overall number of deaths have been stable (in men or increasing (in women, the age-standardised rates have been steadily decreasing from 1979 to 2010, passing from 104.3 to 55.4 per 100 000 person-years in men and from 32.2 to 19.6 per 100 000 person-years in women. The average relative annual decrease was −3.6% in men and −2.7% in women. Since the end of the 1990s, the decreasing trend of CLRD mortality has started to level off, in particular in women. The decrease in CLRD mortality rates has been more accentuated in more recent cohorts and in younger age groups. Both birth cohort and time period significantly affected the CLRD mortality rates, suggesting that changes in the spread of risk factors (smoking habits, early-life and occupational exposures across different birth cohorts, as well as in advanced in healthcare and medical practice, may have played a major role in secular changes in COPD mortality rates in Italy.

  6. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970318 A study on evoked potentials in cor pul-monale patients with chronic respiratory failure.QIAO Hui(乔慧), et al. Beijing Neurosurg Instit,Beijing, 100050. Chin J Geriatr 1997; 16(1): 43-45. Objective: Evoked protential was used to detect thechange of brain function in cor pulmonale patients with

  7. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters local respiratory circuit function at the level of the preBötzinger complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J Garcia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH is a common state experienced in several breathing disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and apneas of prematurity. Unraveling how CIH affects the CNS, and in turn how the CNS contributes to apneas is perhaps the most challenging task. The preBötzinger complex (preBötC is a pre-motor respiratory network critical for inspiratory rhythm generation. Here, we test the hypothesis that CIH increases irregular output from the isolated preBötC, which can be mitigated by antioxidant treatment. Electrophysiological recordings from brainstem slices revealed that CIH enhanced burst-to-burst irregularity in period and/or amplitude. Irregularities represented a change in individual fidelity among preBötC neurons, and changed transmission from preBötC to the hypoglossal motor nucleus (XIIn, which resulted in increased transmission failure to XIIn. CIH increased the degree of lipid peroxidation in the preBötC and treatment with the antioxidant, 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis (1-methylpyridinium-4-yl-21H,23H-porphyrin manganese(III pentachloride (MnTMPyP, reduced CIH-mediated irregularities on the network rhythm and improved transmission of preBötC to the XIIn. These findings suggest that CIH promotes a pro-oxidant state that destabilizes rhythmogenesis originating from the preBötC and changes the local rhythm generating circuit which in turn, can lead to intermittent transmission failure to the XIIn. We propose that these CIH-mediated effects represent a part of the central mechanism that may perpetuate apneas and respiratory instability, which are hallmark traits in several dysautonomic conditions.

  8. Overlap Syndrome in Respiratory Medicine: Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Corlateanu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are highly prevalent chronic diseases in the general population. Both are characterized by similar mechanisms: airway inflammation, airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness. However, the distinction between the two obstructive diseases is not always clear. Multiple epidemiological studies demonstrate that in elderly people with obstructive airway disease, as many as half or more may have overlapping diagnoses of asthma and COPD. A COPD-Asthma overlap syndrome is defined as an airflow obstruction that is not completely reversible, accompanied by symptoms and signs of increased obstruction reversibility. For the clinical identification of overlap syndrome COPD-Asthma Spanish guidelines proposed six diagnostic criteria. The major criteria include very positive bronchodilator test [increase in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 ≥15% and ≥400 ml], eosinophilia in sputum, and personal history of asthma. The minor criteria include high total IgE, personal history of atopy and positive bronchodilator test (increase in FEV1 ≥12% and ≥200 ml on two or more occasions. The overlap syndrome COPD-Asthma is associated with enhanced response to inhaled corticosteroids due to the predominance of eosinophilic bronchial inflammation.The future clinical studies and multicenter clinical trials should lead to the investigation of disease mechanisms and simultaneous development of the novel treatment.

  9. Toxic encephalopathy induced by capecitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, B; Rochlitz, C; Herrmann, R; Pless, M

    2004-01-01

    Toxic encephalopathy is a rarely described side effect of 5-fluorouracil which usually presents with cerebellar, neuropsychiatric, and focal neurological symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging findings are described as patchy white matter alterations. We report the 1st case of capecitabine-induced toxic encephalopathy with epilepsy-like symptoms and diffuse white matter alterations on magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Screening of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, M; Moerland, W; Quero, J C; Hop, W C; Krabbe, P F; Schalm, S W

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Subclinical hepatic encephalopathy adversely affects daily functioning. The aim of this study was to determine which elements of daily life have predictive value for subclinical hepatic encephalopathy. METHODS: The study was performed in 179 outpatients with liver cirrhosis. Subclin

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Dara N, Sayyari AA, Imanzadeh F. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1):1-11.ObjectiveAs acute liver failure (ALF) and chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) continue to increase in prevalence, we will see more cases of hepatic encephalopathy.Primary care physician are often the first to suspect it, since they are familiar with the patient’s usual physical and mental status. This serious complic...

  12. Autologous serum skin test response in chronic spontaneous urticaria and respiratory diseases and its relationship with serum interleukin-18 level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Emel; Aktas, Ayse; Aksu, Kurtulus; Keren, Metin; Dokumacioglu, Ali; Goss, Christopher H; Alatas, Ozkan

    2011-11-01

    Autologous serum skin test (ASST) is mostly used in chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) to show autoreactivity. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) has also been shown to be involved in autoimmune conditions. To investigate the role of autoreactivity assessed by ASST in CSU and respiratory diseases and to investigate whether this autoreactive state is related to IL-18 level or other clinical covariates. Fifty-five patients with CSU (mean age: 40.3 ± 12.3 years), 70 patients with persistent asthma (mean age: 43.7 ± 9.6 years), 21 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) (mean age: 35.5 ± 11.8 years) and 20 normal controls (mean age: 37.7 ± 9.8) were included. All subjects underwent a laboratory examination and skin prick test. ASST was performed and serum IL-18 levels were measured in all subjects. Positive response to ASST and serum IL-18 levels were higher in CSU patients than those with respiratory diseases (asthma and SAR) (P = 0.034 and 0.002, respectively) and normal controls (P = 0.004 and 0.031, respectively). Considering all patients, IL-18 levels were higher in patients with positive ASST (301.8 ± 194.4 vs. 241.8 ± 206.3 pg/ml, P = 0.036) than ASST negative patients. ASST response was associated with disease severity in CSU (P = 0.037) and asthma patients (P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that positive response to ASST was significantly associated with diagnosis of CSU (OR: 3.13, 95% CI: 1.25-7.87) and female gender (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.19-13.38). ASST response could be related with activity of the disease. A positive ASST response found in respiratory diseases patients suggests that it may occur as a result of some inflammatory events during the diseases' process.

  13. [Serotype distribution and antibiotic susceptibilities of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing acute exacerbations and pneumonia in children with chronic respiratory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altınkanat Gelmez, Gülşen; Soysal, Ahmet; Kuzdan, Canan; Karadağ, Bülent; Hasdemir, Ufuk; Bakır, Mustafa; Söyletir, Güner

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates obtained from children with chronic respiratory diseases admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of acute exacerbations between 2008-2010 at Marmara University Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Sixty one S.pneumoniae strains isolated from the respiratory samples of patients were studied for erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracyline, trimethoprim-sulphametoxazole (TMP-SMX), vancomycin, levofloxacin susceptibilities by disk diffusion method; MIC values of penicillin and ceftriaxone were determined by E-test (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Results were evaluated according to the CLSI standards. The erythromycin-clindamycin double disc method was applied for the detection of macrolide resistance phenotypes. The presence of macrolide resistance genes, ermB, mef(A)/(E), ermTR were determined by PCR using specific primers for each gene. The serotypes were determined by multiplex PCR using specific primers for 40 different serotypes. According to CLSI criteria, penicillin resistance in S.pneumoniae isolates were found to be 8.2% (5/61) and intermediate resistance rate was 54% (33/61) for oral penicillin. Penicillin resistance were found to be only 1.6% (1/61) for parenteral penicillin. Resistance rates of erythromycin, clindamycin, tetracyline, TMP-SMX were detected as 55.8%, 46%, 47.5% and 67.2%; respectively. No resistance was detected to vancomycin and levofloxacin. Constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (cMLSB) phenotype and M phenotype were observed in 82.4% (n= 28) and 17.6% (n= 6) of the macrolide resistant isolates, respectively. Inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (iMLSB) phenotype was not detected. The macrolid resistance genotypes, ermB, mef(A)/(E), were positive 50% and 14.7%; respectively. Both ermB and mef(A)/(E) genes were detected 35.3% of the macrolid resistant isolates. None of the isolates were positive for ermTR gene. The most

  14. Impact of early diagnosis and control of chronic respiratory diseases on active and healthy ageing. A debate at the European Union Parliament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, J; Tanasescu, C C; Camuzat, T; Anto, J M; Blasi, F; Neou, A; Palkonen, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Antunes, J P; Samolinski, B; Yiallouros, P; Zuberbier, T

    2013-01-01

    A debate at the European Union Parliament was held on 13 November 2012 on the Impact of early diagnosis and control of chronic respiratory diseases on Active and Healthy Ageing (AHA). The debate was held under the auspices of the Cyprus Presidency of the European Union (2012) and represents a follow-up of the priorities of the Polish Presidency of the European Union (2011). It highlighted the importance of early life events on the occurrence of chronic respiratory diseases later in life and their impact on active and healthy ageing. Epidemiologic evidence was followed by actions that should be taken to prevent and manage chronic respiratory diseases in children. The debate ended by practical, feasible and achievable projects, demonstrating the strength of the political action in the field. Three projects will be initiated from this debate: The first will be a meeting sponsored by the Région Languedoc-Roussillon on the developmental origins of chronic diseases and ageing: from research to policies and value creation. The second project is being led by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Asthma and Rhinitis: Prevention of Asthma, Prevention of Allergy (PAPA). The third project is the GA(2)LEN sentinel network.

  15. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Branko; Kostić, Vladimir; Sternić, Nadezda; Kolar, Jovo; Tasić, Nebojsa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome was introduced into clinical practice in 1996 in order to describe unique syndrome, clinically expressed during hypertensive and uremic encephalopathy, eclampsia and during immunosuppressive therapy [1]. First clinical investigations showed that leucoencephalopathy is major characteristic of the syndrome, but further investigations showed no significant destruction in white cerebral tissue [2, 3, 4]. In majority of cases changes are localise in posterior irrigation area of the brain and in the most severe cases anterior region is also involved. Taking into consideration all above mentioned facts, the suggested term was Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) for the syndrome clinically expressed by neurological manifestations derived from cortical and subcortical changes localised in posterior regions of cerebral hemispheres, cerebral trunk and cerebellum [5]. Patient, aged 53 years, was re-hospitalized in Cardiovascular Institute "Dediwe" two months after successful aorto-coronary bypass performed in June 2001 due to the chest bone infection. During the treatment of the infection (according to the antibiogram) in September 2001, patient in evening hours developed headache and blurred vision. The recorded blood pressure was 210/120 mmHg so antihypertensive treatment was applied (Nifedipin and Furosemid). After this therapy there was no improvement and intensive headache with fatigue and loss of vision developed. Neurological examination revealed cortical blindness and left hemiparesis. Manitol (20%, 60 ccm every 3 hours) and i.v. Nytroglicerin (high blood pressure). Brain CT revealed oedema of parieto-occipital regions of both hemispheres, more emphasized on the right. (Figure 1a, b, c). There was no sign of focal ischemia even in deeper sections (Figure 1d, e, f). Following three days enormous high blood pressure values were registered. On the fourth day the significant clinical improvement occurred

  16. SCN2A encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Katherine B.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Tambunan, Dimira; Mackay, Mark T.; Rodriguez-Casero, Victoria; Webster, Richard; Clark, Damian; Freeman, Jeremy L.; Calvert, Sophie; Olson, Heather E.; Mandelstam, Simone; Poduri, Annapurna; Mefford, Heather C.; Harvey, A. Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: De novo SCN2A mutations have recently been associated with severe infantile-onset epilepsies. Herein, we define the phenotypic spectrum of SCN2A encephalopathy. Methods: Twelve patients with an SCN2A epileptic encephalopathy underwent electroclinical phenotyping. Results: Patients were aged 0.7 to 22 years; 3 were deceased. Seizures commenced on day 1–4 in 8, week 2–6 in 2, and after 1 year in 2. Characteristic features included clusters of brief focal seizures with multiple hourly (9 patients), multiple daily (2), or multiple weekly (1) seizures, peaking at maximal frequency within 3 months of onset. Multifocal interictal epileptiform discharges were seen in all. Three of 12 patients had infantile spasms. The epileptic syndrome at presentation was epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS) in 7 and Ohtahara syndrome in 2. Nine patients had improved seizure control with sodium channel blockers including supratherapeutic or high therapeutic phenytoin levels in 5. Eight had severe to profound developmental impairment. Other features included movement disorders (10), axial hypotonia (11) with intermittent or persistent appendicular spasticity, early handedness, and severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Mutations arose de novo in 11 patients; paternal DNA was unavailable in one. Conclusions: Review of our 12 and 34 other reported cases of SCN2A encephalopathy suggests 3 phenotypes: neonatal-infantile–onset groups with severe and intermediate outcomes, and a childhood-onset group. Here, we show that SCN2A is the second most common cause of EIMFS and, importantly, does not always have a poor developmental outcome. Sodium channel blockers, particularly phenytoin, may improve seizure control. PMID:26291284

  17. [Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis: clinical-pathophysiological correlation, diagnostics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolap, Iu P; Damulin, I V

    2013-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis are severe unfavorable forms of alcoholic brain damage with poor prognosis. Thiamine deficiency represents a common cause of both diseases. In many cases, Korsakoff's psychosis develops in the outcome of Wernicke's encephalopathy, which, along with the general etiology, lets talk about a single disease - Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, acute (usually reversible) stage of which is Wernicke's encephalopathy and a chronic one (often irreversible) is Korsakoff psychosis. The dramatic paradox of Wernicke's encephalopathy is that in most cases it is difficult to detect, but early diagnosed cases are quite easy to cure. Unrecognized and therefore go untreated Wernicke's encephalopathy is a serious threat to the health and lives of patients, worsens the processes of brain aging and increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease in later life. The basic approach to the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is long-term parenteral administration of thiamine, often in high doses. As an adjuvant means of therapy memantine is considered.

  18. Predictors of requirement of mechanical ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD leads to increased morbidity, mortality and requirement of invasive mechanical ventilation (MV. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of need of MV in these patients. Materials and Methods: Clinical symptomatology, demographic profile, biochemical parameters including renal functions, liver functions and acid base parameters, and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II score at the time of admission were recorded in 100 patients of COPD exacerbation. Various parameters were compared between patients in whom MV was required with those managed with medical therapy. Results: MV was required in 73% of the patients. Parameters found to be independent predictors of need of MV were: Admission APACHE-II score ≥ 11.5 {adjusted odds ratio (OR [95% confidence interval (CI]: 1.42 [1.08-1.86]; P = 0.012}, first day pH ≤ 7.28 (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 1.09 [1.02-1.15]; P = 0.008, first day PaCO 2 ≥ 68.6 mmHg (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 1.09 [1.02-1.15]; P = 0.004 and worse premorbid functional status (adjusted OR [95% CI]: 17.01 [1.95-148.68]; P = 0.01. Conclusions: Underlying disease severity as assessed by premorbid functional status and APACHE-II score, and the acuity of respiratory system decompensation as assessed by the admitting arterial pH and PaCO 2 , are independent predictors of need of MV in patients with exacerbation of COPD.

  19. Encephalopathy caused by lanthanum carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, Pilar; Cacharro, Luis Maria; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Rosado, Consolacion; Tabernero, Jose Matias

    2011-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is a nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate-binding agent, which is widely used in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease. Until now, no significant side-effects have been described for the clinical use of lanthanum carbonate, and there are no available clinical data regarding its tissue stores. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old patient who was admitted with confusional syndrome. The patient received 3750 mg of lanthanum carbonate daily. Examinations were carried out, and the etiology of the encephalopathy of the patient could not be singled out. The lanthanum carbonate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were high, and the syndrome eased after the drug was removed. The results of our study confirm that, in our case, the lanthanum carbonate did cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although lanthanum carbonate seems a safe drug with minimal absorption, this work reveals the problem derived from the increase of serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, and the possibility that it may cross the BBB. Further research is required on the possible pathologies that increase serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, as well as the risks and side-effects derived from its absorption.

  20. Expression of IgA Proteases by Haemophilus influenzae in the Respiratory Tract of Adults With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F; Kirkham, Charmaine; Jones, Megan M; Sethi, Sanjay; Kong, Yong; Pettigrew, Melinda M

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)A proteases of Haemophilus influenzae are highly specific endopeptidases that cleave the hinge region of human IgA1 and also mediate invasion and trafficking in human respiratory epithelial cells, facilitating persistence of H. influenzae. Little is known about the expression of IgA proteases in clinical settings of H. influenzae infection. We identified and characterized IgA protease genes in H. influenzae and studied their expression and proteolytic specificity, in vitro and in vivo in 169 independent strains of H. influenzae collected longitudinally over 10 years from adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The H. influenzae pangenome has 2 alleles of IgA protease genes; all strains have igaA, and 40% of strains have igaB. Each allele has 2 variants with differing proteolytic specificities for human IgA1. A total of 88% of 169 strains express IgA protease activity. Expression of the 4 forms of IgA protease varies among strains. Based on the presence of IgA1 fragments in sputum samples, each of the different forms of IgA protease is selectively expressed in the human airways during infection. Four variants of IgA proteases are variably expressed by H. influenzae during infection of the human airways. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Research questions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Bartolome R; Decramer, Marc; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Wilson, Kevin C; Agustí, Alvar; Criner, Gerard J; MacNee, William; Make, Barry J; Rennard, Stephen I; Stockley, Robert A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Au, David H; Barnes, Peter J; Burgel, Pierre-Regis; Calverley, Peter M; Casanova, Ciro; Clini, Enrico M; Cooper, Christopher B; Coxson, Harvey O; Dusser, Daniel J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Fahy, Bonnie; Ferguson, Gary T; Fisher, Andrew; Fletcher, Monica J; Hayot, Maurice; Hurst, John R; Jones, Paul W; Mahler, Donald A; Maltais, François; Mannino, David M; Martinez, Fernando J; Miravitlles, Marc; Meek, Paula M; Papi, Alberto; Rabe, Klaus F; Roche, Nicolas; Sciurba, Frank C; Sethi, Sanjay; Siafakas, Nikos; Sin, Don D; Soriano, Joan B; Stoller, James K; Tashkin, Donald P; Troosters, Thierry; Verleden, Geert M; Verschakelen, Johny; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John W; Washko, George R; Wise, Robert A; Wouters, Emiel F M; ZuWallack, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and resource use worldwide. The goal of this Official American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarized, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment, and management of COPD as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS Research Statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centered outcomes.

  2. Nutritional status in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and systemic sclerosis: two systemic diseases involving the respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mękal, D; Doboszyńska, A; Kądalska, E; Świetlik, E; Rudnicka, L

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess and compare the nutritional status and life quality of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). Thirty patients with stable COPD and 32 patients with SSc were examined. In all patients, the following parameters were measured: fat mass, fat-free mass, total body water, FEV1, and blood gases. COPD patients' life quality was assessed with St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, and in SSc patients with a Quality of Life Questionnaire. The results show that among COPD patients 13% had normal body weight, 60% were obese, and 27% were overweight. In SSc patients, 59% had normal body weight, 31% were overweight, 1 patient was obese, and 2 were underweight. The mean life quality score in COPD patients was 57.3±16.5, while that in SSc patients was 35.8±18.2. COPD patients had a statistically significant lower life quality than SSc patients. The mean value of FEV1 was 45.5±12.2% pred. in COPD patients, and 86.8±21.2% pred. in the SSc group. We conclude that nutritional disorders are more frequent in COPD patients compared to those with SSc.

  3. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulmonary function, chronic respiratory symptoms, and health-related quality of life among adults in the United States--National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G; Ford, Earl S; Thompson, William W; Greenlund, Kurt J; Presley-Cantrell, Letitia R; Croft, Janet B

    2013-09-17

    We examined the association of impaired lung function and respiratory symptoms with measures of health status and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among US adults. The sample included 5139 participants aged 40-79 years in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010 who underwent spirometric testing and responded to questions about respiratory symptoms, health status, and number of physically unhealthy, mentally unhealthy, or activity limitation days in the prior 30 days. Among these adults, 7.2% had restrictive impairment (FEV1/FVC ≥ 70%; FVC function (prevalence ratio (PR) =1.5 [95% CI: 1.2-1.9] and 1.5 [1.3-1.8]), after controlling for sociodemographics, non-respiratory chronic diseases, body mass index, smoking, and respiratory symptoms. Frequent mental distress (FMD; ≥14 mentally unhealthy days), frequent physical distress (FPD; ≥14 physically unhealthy days), and frequent activity limitation (FAL; ≥14 activity limitation days) did not differ by lung function status. Adults who reported any respiratory symptoms (frequent cough, frequent phlegm, or past year wheeze) were more likely to report fair/poor health (PR = 1.5 [1.3-1.7]), FPD (PR = 1.6 [1.4-1.9]), FMD (PR = 1.8 [1.4-2.2]), and FAL (PR = 1.4 [1.1-1.9]) than those with no symptoms. These results suggest the importance of chronic respiratory symptoms as potential risk factors for poor HRQOL and suggest improved symptom treatment and prevention efforts would likely improve HRQOL.

  5. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing the Effects of Antitussive Agents on Respiratory Center Output in Patients With Chronic Cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannini, Claudia; Lavorini, Federico; Zanasi, Alessandro; Saibene, Federico; Lanata, Luigi; Fontana, Giovanni

    2017-06-01

    Cough is produced by the same neuronal pool implicated in respiratory rhythm generation, and antitussive drugs acting at the central level, such as opioids, may depress ventilation. Levodropropizine is classified as a nonopioid peripherally acting antitussive drug that acts at the level of airway sensory nerves. However, the lack of a central action by levodropropizine remains to be fully established. We set out to compare the effects of levodropropizine and the opioid antitussive agent dihydrocodeine on the respiratory responses to a conventional CO2 rebreathing test in patients with chronic cough of any origin. Twenty-four outpatients (aged 39-70 years) with chronic cough were studied. On separate runs, each patient was randomly administered 60 mg levodropropizine, 15 mg dihydrocodeine, or a matching placebo. Subsequently, patients breathed a mixture of 93% oxygen and 7% CO2 for 5 min. Fractional end-tidal CO2 (Fetco2) and inspiratory minute ventilation (V˙i) were continuously monitored. Changes in breathing pattern variables were also assessed. At variance with dihydrocodeine, levodropropizine and placebo did not affect respiratory responses to hypercapnia (P levodropropizine; the assessment of ventilatory responses to CO2 may represent a useful tool to investigate the central respiratory effects of antitussive agents. European Union Clinical Trials Register (EudraCT No.: 2013-004735-68); URL: https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Comparison between acute oral/respiratory and chronic stomatitis/gingivitis isolates of feline calicivirus: pathogenicity, antigenic profile and cross-neutralisation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, H; Brunet, S; Soulier, M; Leroy, V; Goutebroze, S; Chappuis, G

    2000-01-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a major oral and respiratory pathogen of cats, able to induce subclinical infection as well as acute disease. It is also characterized by a high degree of antigenic variation. This work sought to address the question of the existence of distinct biotypes of FCV. Eight French, 6 British and 9 American FCV isolates, responsible for acute oral/respiratory disease or chronic gingivitis/stomatitis, were compared for their pathogenicity, antigenic profiles and serological relationships. Antigenic profiles were assessed by an indirect immunofluorescence assay with a large panel of characterized monoclonal antibodies. Cross-neutralisation assays were performed with specific cat antisera collected at 30 days p.i., then analysed by calculation of antigenic bilateral relatedness and dominance. Whatever their pathogenic origin, all the isolates induced an acute upper-respiratory tract infection in oronasally infected SPF kittens. Their antigenic profiles were different and did not correlate with their geographical or pathological origin. Cross-neutralisation studies and calculation of the mean bilateral relatedness allowed us to distinguish chronic original isolates from acute original ones. This study did not confirm the existence of FCV biotypes but showed that the chronic carrier state is related to the emergence of antigenically distant viruses.

  7. Wernicke's encephalopathy and anabolic steroid drug abuse. Is there any possible relation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulos, P; Katsanoulas, C; Timplalexi, G; Lathyris, D; Vasiliagkou, S; Antoniadou, E

    2012-10-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a reversible, neurologic disorder due to thiamine deficiency which is mainly related to chronic alcohol abuse. We report a case of a young male patient, who was bodybuilder and anabolic drug user, in whom encephalopathy was diagnosed after a short medical course in the ICU after a major upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Mallory-Weiss syndrome) and hypovolemic shock. His clinical condition was typical for Wernicke's encephalopathy and although neuroimaging tests were not indicative, the patient received thiamine supplement therapy, which resulted in rapid clinical improvement. The diagnosis was based only on clinical sings and anabolic drug abuse was considered as a possible predisposing factor for the manifestation of the syndrome.

  8. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in a Bone Marrow Transplant Patient: A Complication of Immunosuppressive Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad A; Jehangir, Waqas; Nai, Qiang; Jessani, Naureen; Khan, Rafay; Yousif, Abdalla; Sen, Shuvendu

    2015-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy is a complex but well-recognized clinical and radiological entity associated with a variety of benign and malignant conditions including hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia, renal failure and immunosuppressive drugs. The pathogenesis is incompletely understood, although it seems to be related to the breakthrough of auto-regulation and endothelial dysfunction. The clinical syndromes typically involve headache, altered mental status, seizures, visual disturbance and other focal neurological signs and radiographically reversible vasogenic subcortical edema without infarction. Here, we report a case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia who received allogenic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) and immunosuppressive drugs.

  9. Multicystic encephalopathy in abusive head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubat, Bela; Bilo, Rob A C; van Rijn, Rick R

    2014-01-01

    The proof of abusive head trauma (AHT) in infants is difficult, especially in cases with a long posttraumatic survival period. In the acute phase, injury to the cranio-cervical junction causes disturbances in respiratory and cardiac control, leading to apnea and bradycardia. Infants who survive the acute phase may subsequently develop multicystic encephalopathy. Because some types of changes are age-dependent, examination of the patterns of brain damage in these cases could provide information about the time in which they were inflicted. In particular, this could apply to the extent of the cystic changes, namely that the severity thereof may decrease with older age upon infliction of the trauma. This could potentially date the injury and thereby help to identify the perpetrator. We present an analysis of the patterns of brain damage in cases of AHT-induced multicystic encephalopathy and comment on the possible etiology and the implications thereof. Nine archival cases of trauma-induced multicystic encephalopathy, originating between the years 2005 and 2011, were identified. In 8 of these cases, hematoxilin-eosin-stained whole-hemisphere histologic slides, as well as small histologic slides of cerebellar hemispheres, were available for the evaluation of the topographic distribution of the macroscopic and microscopic changes. The cerebral hemispheres were more affected than the cerebellum. The magnitude of the cystic changes did not correlate with the age at which the trauma had occurred, nor the surviva period. All cases showed asymmetrical affection of the cerebral hemispheres, which in 3 cases was very pronounced. The analysis revealed both ischemia- and hypoperfusion-induced injury patterns. Analysis of the magnitude and the distribution of the damage do not assist in the estimation of the period at which the trauma had occurred. The evaluation showed that ischemia, and to a lesser extent, hypoperfusion, were the major mechanisms of brain injury in these cases

  10. Putative uremic encephalopathy in horses: five cases (1978-1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, M A; Johnson, J S; Traub-Dargatz, J L; Savage, C J; Fettman, M J; Gould, D H

    2001-02-15

    To determine historical, physical examination, clinicopathologic, and postmortem findings in horses with putative uremic encephalopathy. Design-Retrospective study. Animals-5 horses with renal failure and neurologic disease not attributable to abnormalities in any other organ system. Medical records from 1978 to 1998 were examined for horses with renal disease and neurologic signs not attributable to primary neurologic, hepatic, or other diseases. Signalment, history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, renal ultrasonographic findings, and postmortem data were reviewed. Of 332 horses with renal disease, 5 met selection criteria. Historical findings, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, ultrasonographic data, and postmortem findings were consistent with chronic renal failure. Swollen astrocytes were detected in all 4 horses examined at necropsy. A single criterion was not determined to be pathognomonic for uremic encephalopathy in horses. Uremic encephalopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with evidence of chronic renal failure and encephalopathic neurologic sign not attributable to other causes. Astrocyte swelling, which was common to all 4 horses examined at necropsy, may serve as a microscopic indicator of uremic encephalopathy in horses.

  11. Dopamine agents for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders Ellekær; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present with extrapyramidal symptoms and changes in basal ganglia. These changes are similar to those seen in patients with Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agents (such as bromocriptine and levodopa, used for patients with Parkinson's disease) have...... therefore been assessed as a potential treatment for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of dopamine agents versus placebo or no intervention for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: Trials were identified through the Cochrane...... of the trials followed participants after the end of treatment. Only one trial reported adequate bias control; the remaining four trials were considered to have high risk of bias. Random-effects model meta-analyses showed that dopamine agents had no beneficial or detrimental effect on hepatic encephalopathy...

  12. Diabetic encephalopathy: a cerebrovascular disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manschot, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Animal study: The aim was to investigate the role of vascular disturbances in the development of experimental diabetic encephalopathy. We describe the effects of treatment with the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme(ACE)-inhibitor enalapril (treatment aimed at the vasculature)

  13. Genetics Home Reference: glycine encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atypical types of glycine encephalopathy appear later in childhood or adulthood and cause a variety of medical problems that primarily affect the nervous system. Rarely, the characteristic features of ...

  14. Microparticles in nasal lavage fluids in chronic rhinosinusitis: Potential biomarkers for diagnosis of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toru; Kato, Atsushi; Berdnikovs, Sergejs; Stevens, Whitney W; Suh, Lydia A; Norton, James E; Carter, Roderick G; Harris, Kathleen E; Peters, Anju T; Hulse, Kathryn E; Grammer, Leslie C; Welch, Kevin C; Shintani-Smith, Stephanie; Tan, Bruce K; Conley, David B; Kern, Robert C; Bochner, Bruce S; Schleimer, Robert P

    2017-09-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are submicron-sized shed membrane vesicles released from activated or injured cells and are detectable by flow cytometry. MP levels have been used as biomarkers to evaluate cell injury or activation in patients with pathological conditions. We sought to compare MP types and levels in nasal lavage fluids (NLFs) from controls and patients with chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps (CRSsNP), chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP), and aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). We collected NLFs from patients with CRSsNP (n = 33), CRSwNP (n = 45), and AERD (n = 31) and control (n = 24) subjects. Standardized flow cytometry methods were used to characterize the following MP types: endothelial MPs, epithelial MPs (epithelial cell adhesion molecule [EpCAM](+)MPs, E-cadherin(+)MPs), platelet MPs (CD31(+)CD41(+)MPs), eosinophil MPs (EGF-like module-containing mucin-like hormone receptor-like 1[EMR1](+)MPs), mast cell MPs (high-affinity IgE receptor [FcεRI](+)c-kit(+)MPs), and basophil MPs (CD203c(+)c-kit(-)MPs). Basophil activation was evaluated by the mean fluorescence intensity of CD203c on basophil MPs. Activated mast cell MPs (CD137(+) FcεRI(+)c-kit(+)MPs) were significantly increased in NLFs of controls compared with NLFs of patients with CRSsNP (2.3-fold; P < .02), CRSwNP (2.3-fold; P < .03), and AERD (7.4-fold; P < .0001). Platelet MPs (3.5-fold; P < .01) and basophil MPs (2.5-fold; P < .05) were increased only in patients with AERD. Mean fluorescence intensity of CD203c on MPs was increased in patients with CRSwNP (P < .002) and AERD (P < .0001), but not in patients with CRSsNP. EpCAM(+)MPs in patients with CRSwNP were no different from control (P = .91) and lower than those in patients with CRSsNP (P < .02) and AERD (P < .002). Based on released MPs, mast cells, platelets, and basophils were more highly activated in patients with AERD than in patients with CRS. Epithelial injury was lower in

  15. Acetylcysteine and carbocysteine for acute upper and lower respiratory tract infections in paediatric patients without chronic broncho-pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalumeau, Martin; Duijvestijn, Yvonne C M

    2013-05-31

    Acetylcysteine and carbocysteine are the most commonly prescribed mucolytic drugs in Brazil and many European and African countries. To our knowledge, no systematic review has been published on their efficacy and safety for acute upper and lower respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children without chronic broncho-pulmonary disease. The objective was to assess the efficacy and safety and to establish a benefit-risk ratio of acetylcysteine and carbocysteine as symptomatic treatments for acute upper and lower RTIs in paediatric patients without chronic broncho-pulmonary disease. We searched CENTRAL (2013, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to February week 3, 2013), EMBASE (1980 to March 2013), Micromedex (2010), Pascal (1987 to 2004) and Science Citation Index (1974 to March 2013). To study efficacy, we used randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the use of acetylcysteine or carbocysteine versus placebo, either alone or as an add-on therapy. To study safety, we used trials comparing acetylcysteine or carbocysteine versus active treatment or no treatment and case reports. In this review update two review authors (YD, MC), with help from a colleague, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We performed a subgroup analysis of children younger than two years of age. We included six trials involving 497 participants to study efficacy. They showed some benefit (e.g. reduction of cough at day seven) from mucolytic agents, although differences were of little clinical relevance. No conclusion was drawn about the subgroup of infants younger than two years because data were unavailable. Thirty-four studies, including the previous six trials involving 2064 children, were eligible to study safety. Overall safety was good but very few data were available to evaluate safety in infants younger than two years. However, 59 cases of paradoxically increased bronchorrhoea observed in infants were reported to the French pharmacovigilance system. The results have to be interpreted with

  16. Effect of respiratory rehabilitation techniques on the autonomic function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Jibril; Da Silva, Hellen; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Calders, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) show several extrapulmonary abnormalities such as impairment in the autonomic function (AF). Similarly, the use of respiratory training techniques such as controlled breathing techniques, noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV), and oxygen supplementation for AF modulation in patients with COPD is popular in existing literature. However, the evidence to support their use is nonexistent. A systematic search of studies reporting on the effect of controlled breathing techniques, NIMV, and/or oxygen supplementation techniques on AF outcome parameters was conducted in three online databases: PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement, relevant studies were retained and qualitatively analyzed for evidence synthesis. The methodological quality in these studies was evaluated using the evidence based guideline development (EBRO) checklists per designs provided by the Dutch Cochrane Centre. Eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria of the review and were included and discussed. The evidence synthesis revealed that a strong and moderate level evidence supported oxygen supplementation and slow breathing techniques, respectively, in significantly enhancing the baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS) values in patients with COPD. The effect of the examined techniques on the heart rate variability and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was of a limited or inconsistent evidence. The findings from this review suggest that oxygen supplementation and controlled breathing techniques have profound positive influence on the BRS in patients with COPD. However, it is not fully clear whether these influence translates to any therapeutic benefit on the general AF of patients with COPD in the long term.

  17. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: update on limb muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N A; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M W J; Spruit, Martijn A; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D

    2014-05-01

    Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem. Strategies for early detection and specific treatments for

  18. Giving hope, ticking boxes or securing services? A qualitative study of respiratory physiotherapists' views on goal-setting with people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Rachael H; Ballinger, Claire; Nikoletou, Dimitra; Garrod, Rachel; Bruton, Anne; Leontowitsch, Miranda

    2017-07-01

    To explore respiratory physiotherapists' views and experiences of using goal-setting with people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in rehabilitation settings. A total of 17 respiratory physiotherapists with ⩾12 months current or previous experience of working with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a non-acute setting. Participants were diverse in relation to age (25-49 years), sex (13 women), experience (Agenda for Change bands 6-8) and geographic location. Data were collected via face-to-face qualitative in-depth interviews (40-70 minutes) using a semi-structured interview guide. Interview locations were selected by participants (included participants' homes, public places and University). Interviews followed an interview guide, were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using thematic analysis; constant comparison was made within and between accounts, and negative case analysis was used. Three themes emerged through the process of analysis: (1) 'Explaining goal-setting'; (2) 'Working with goals'; and (3) 'Influences on collaborative goal-setting'. Goal-setting practices among respiratory physiotherapists varied considerably. Collaborative goal-setting was described as challenging and was sometimes driven by service need rather than patient values. Lack of training in collaborative goal-setting at both undergraduate and postgraduate level was also seen as an issue. Respiratory physiotherapists reflected uncertainties around the use of goal-setting in their practice, and conflict between patients' goals and organisational demands. This work highlights a need for wider discussion to clarify the purpose and implementation of goal-setting in respiratory rehabilitation.

  19. Limited amplification of chronic wasting disease prions in the peripheral tissues of intracerebrally inoculated cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, classified as a prion disease or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) similar to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Cervids affected by CWD accumulate an abnormal protease resistant prion protein throughout the central...

  20. Tauopathy PET and amyloid PET in the diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathies: studies of a retired NFL player and of a man with FTD and a severe head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsis, E M; Riggio, S; Kostakoglu, L; Dickstein, D L; Machac, J; Delman, B; Goldstein, M; Jennings, D; D'Antonio, E; Martin, J; Naidich, T P; Aloysi, A; Fernandez, C; Seibyl, J; DeKosky, S T; Elder, G A; Marek, K; Gordon, W; Hof, P R; Sano, M; Gandy, S

    2014-09-16

    Single, severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) which elevates CNS amyloid, increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD); while repetitive concussive and subconcussive events as observed in athletes and military personnel, may increase the risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We describe two clinical cases, one with a history of multiple concussions during a career in the National Football League (NFL) and the second with frontotemporal dementia and a single, severe TBI. Both patients presented with cognitive decline and underwent [(18)F]-Florbetapir positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for amyloid plaques; the retired NFL player also underwent [(18)F]-T807 PET imaging, a new ligand binding to tau, the main constituent of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Case 1, the former NFL player, was 71 years old when he presented with memory impairment and a clinical profile highly similar to AD. [(18)F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative, essentially excluding AD as a diagnosis. CTE was suspected clinically, and [(18)F]-T807 PET imaging revealed striatal and nigral [(18)F]-T807 retention consistent with the presence of tauopathy. Case 2 was a 56-year-old man with personality changes and cognitive decline who had sustained a fall complicated by a subdural hematoma. At 1 year post injury, [(18)F]-Florbetapir PET imaging was negative for an AD pattern of amyloid accumulation in this subject. Focal [(18)F]-Florbetapir retention was noted at the site of impact. In case 1, amyloid imaging provided improved diagnostic accuracy where standard clinical and laboratory criteria were inadequate. In that same case, tau imaging with [(18)F]-T807 revealed a subcortical tauopathy that we interpret as a novel form of CTE with a distribution of tauopathy that mimics, to some extent, that of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), despite a clinical presentation of amnesia without any movement disorder complaints or signs. A key distinguishing feature is that our patient presented

  1. Defective synthesis and release of astrocytic thrombospondin-1 mediates the neuronal TDP-43 proteinopathy, resulting in defects in neuronal integrity associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Arumugam Radhakrishnan; Tong, Xiao Y; Shamaladevi, Nagarajarao; Barcelona, Stephanie; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Agarwal, Apeksha; Norenberg, Michael D

    2017-02-01

    Transactivating DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) inclusions and the accumulation of phosphorylated and ubiquitinated tau proteins (p-tau) have been identified in postmortem brain specimens from patients with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). To examine whether these proteins contribute to the development of CTE, we utilized an in vitro trauma system known to reproduce many of the findings observed in humans and experimental animals with traumatic brain injury. Accordingly, we examined the role of TDP-43 and Tau in an in vitro model of trauma, and determined whether these proteins contribute to the defective neuronal integrity associated with CNS trauma. Single or multiple episodes of trauma to cultured neurons resulted in a time-dependent increase in cytosolic levels of phosphorylated TDP-43 (p-TDP-43). Trauma to cultured neurons also caused an increase in levels of casein kinase 1 epsilon (CK1ε), and ubiquitinated p-TDP-43, along with a decrease in importin-β (all factors known to mediate the "TDP-43 proteinopathy"). Defective neuronal integrity, as evidenced by a reduction in levels of the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor, and in PSD95, along with increased levels of phosphorylated tau were also observed. Additionally, increased levels of intra- and extracellular thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) (a factor known to regulate neuronal integrity) were observed in cultured astrocytes at early stages of trauma, while at later stages decreased levels were identified. The addition of recombinant TSP-1, conditioned media from cultured astrocytes at early stages of trauma, or the CK1ε inhibitor PF4800567 hydrochloride to traumatized cultured neurons reduced levels of p-TDP-43, and reversed the trauma-induced decline in NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor and PSD95 levels. These findings suggest that a trauma-induced increase in TDP-43 phosphorylation contributes to defective neuronal integrity, and that increasing TSP-1 levels may represent a useful therapeutic approach for

  2. Adverse Respiratory Events Associated With Hypnotics Use in Patients of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-07-01

    Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the effects of hypnotics on the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD.The case-control study was investigated using data retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed adverse respiratory events (pneumonia, COPD with acute exacerbation, acute respiratory failure, and cardiopulmonary arrest) were included in the case group. Patients with COPD and no history of adverse respiratory events were randomly selected for the control group, which was frequency-matched with the case group according to index date, age (per 10 years), and sex. Patients who had used hypnotics within 1 month meant active users. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of were calculated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models.Most of the study participants were male (71.6%), and the mean ages of the participants in the case and control groups were 69.2 (±12.4) and 67.5 (±12.3) years, respectively. After potential confounding factors were adjusting for, the adjusted ORs of adverse respiratory events were 12.0 for active users of benzodiazepines (95% CI, 8.11-17.6) and 10.5 for active users of nonbenzodiazepines (95% CI, 7.68-14.2) compared with the adjusted ORs of those who never used hypnotics.The results of this epidemiological study suggested that hypnotics increased the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD.

  3. [Effects of tumor necrosis factor-α on nutritional status and proteolysis of respiratory muscles in rats with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianming; Liao, Qiande; Tang, Wenxiang; Sun, Shenghua; Liu, Beizhan; Liu, Xinmin

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the effect of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) on nutritional status and proteolysis of respiratory muscle in a rat model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Ninety healthy male adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into model group (A) and normal control group (B). COPD malnutrition rat models were established by cigarettes smoke and nutrient limitation and divided into normal nutrition COPD group (A(1)), malnutrition COPD group (A(2)), and malnutrition COPD intervention group (A(3)). In group A(3), the rats received intravenous injection of TNF-α mAb (0.1 mg/kg). TNF-α levels in the serum and respiratory muscle homogenates were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and plasma levels of glucose, albumin, and triglyceride were measured with an automatic biochemistry analyzer. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure the contents of 3-methylhistidine and tyrosine in the respiratory muscle homogenates. The serum TNF-α level and plasma levels of glucose and triglyceride were significantly higher but the plasma albumin level was significantly lower in group A(2) than in groups B, A(1), and A(3) (P<0.01). The contents of 3-MH and Tyr in the respiratory muscle homogenates were significantly higher in group A(2) than in the other 3 groups (P<0.01, P<0.01). TNF-α in the respiratory muscle showed a strong positive correlation to 3-MH and Tyr. TNF-α is one of the causes of increased proteolysis of the respiratory muscle.

  4. Evaluating respiratory musculature, quality of life, anxiety, and depression among patients with indeterminate chronic Chagas disease and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alícia Cristina Suman

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Chagas disease (CD is progressive and incapacitating, especially when cardiopulmonary function is affected. For example, respiratory muscle weakness can cause dyspnea upon exertion and fatigue, which may be exacerbated when it is associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH. The present study aimed to evaluate respiratory musculature, quality of life, anxiety, and depression among patients with indeterminate chronic CD and symptoms of PH. METHODS: All individuals completed a clinical evaluation, spirometry, a 6-min walking test, respiratory musculature testing using maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax and maximum expiratory pressure (PEmax, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the SF-36 questionnaire. RESULTS: We evaluated 107 patients who were assigned to a control group with only CD (G1, 8 patients, a group with CD and possible PH (G2, 93 patients, and a group with CD and echocardiography evidence of PH (G3, 6 patients. The three groups had similar values for PImax and PEmax. Compared to the G1 and G2 groups, the G3 group covered significantly less distance during the 6-min walking test and had a significantly shorter predicted distance (p < 0.05 vs. the G1 group. All three groups had similar values for their spirometry results, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, and SF-36 questionnaire results. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with indeterminate chronic CD and symptoms of PH did not experience significant impairment in the studied variables, with the exception of the 6-min walking test, which suggests a low exercise tolerance.

  5. Progressive Encephalopathy in Boys with Symptoms of Rett Syndrome and MECP2 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Four young boys with neonatal onset of encephalopathy, a progressive course, and MECP2 mutations are reported from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL Symptoms suggestive of Rett syndrome included failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, hypotonia, movement disorder, with myoclonic, dyskinetic, and choreiform patterns, and repetitive face scratching or nose rubbing stereotypies.

  6. Effect of meadowsweet (Filipendula vulgaris) extract on bioenergetics of the brain during experimental posthypoxic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengerovsky, A I; Suslov, N I; Kaygorodsev, A V

    2011-08-01

    We studied the effect of Filipendula vulgaris aqueous extract on mitochondrial energy production system in the brain of rats with posthypoxic encephalopathy developing 19 days after hypoxic injury. Filipendula extract more effectively than valerian extract improved kinetic characteristics of respiratory activity of mitochondria, increased substrate oxidation-phosphorylation coupling, and inhibited LPO.

  7. Probiotics for people with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Rohan; McGee, Richard G; Riordan, Stephen M; Webster, Angela C

    2017-02-23

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a disorder of brain function as a result of liver failure or portosystemic shunt or both. Both hepatic encephalopathy (clinically overt) and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (not clinically overt) significantly impair patient's quality of life and daily functioning, and represent a significant burden on healthcare resources. Probiotics are live micro-organisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, may confer a health benefit on the host. To determine the beneficial and harmful effects of probiotics in any dosage, compared with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment for people with any grade of acute or chronic hepatic encephalopathy. This review did not consider the primary prophylaxis of hepatic encephalopathy. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, conference proceedings, reference lists of included trials, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform until June 2016. We included randomised clinical trials that compared probiotics in any dosage with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment in people with hepatic encephalopathy. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We conducted random-effects model meta-analysis due to obvious heterogeneity of participants and interventions. We defined a P value of 0.05 or less as significant. We expressed dichotomous outcomes as risk ratio (RR) and continuous outcomes as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 21 trials with 1420 participants, of these, 14 were new trials. Fourteen trials compared a probiotic with placebo or no treatment, and seven trials compared a probiotic with lactulose. The trials used a variety of probiotics; the most commonly used group of probiotic was VSL#3, a proprietary name for a group of eight probiotics. Duration of administration

  8. Short-term effect of controlled instead of assisted noninvasive ventilation in chronic respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dellweg, Dominic; Schonhofer, Bernd; Haidl, Peter M; Barchfeld, Thomas; Wenzel, Markus D; Appelhans, Patrick; Kohler, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    .... We measured blood gas values, respiratory muscle strength, spontaneous breathing pattern, and lung function before and after a 3-month period of NPPV in 305 patients (213 male, mean +/- SD age 61.3 +/- 8.6 y...

  9. Need for early diagnosis of mental and mobility changes in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnia, Jan W; Oudman, Erik; Bresser, Esmay L; Gerridzen, Ineke J; van de Wiel, Albert; Beuman, Carla; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2014-12-01

    Korsakoff syndrome is a chronic form of amnesia resulting from thiamine deficiency. The syndrome can develop from unrecognized or undertreated Wernicke encephalopathy. The intra-individual course of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome has not been studied extensively, nor has the temporal progression of gait disturbances and other symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy. Here we present the detailed history of a patient whose acute symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy were far from stable. We follow his mobility changes and the shifts in his mental status from global confusion and impaired consciousness to more selective cognitive deficits. His Wernicke encephalopathy was missed and left untreated, being labeled as "probable" Korsakoff syndrome. Patients with a history of self-neglect and alcohol abuse, at risk of or suffering with Wernicke encephalopathy, should receive immediate and adequate vitamin replacement. Self-neglecting alcoholics who are bedridden may have severe illness and probably active Wernicke encephalopathy. In these patients, mobility changes, delirium, or impaired consciousness can be an expression of Wernicke encephalopathy, and should be treated to prevent further damage from the neurologic complications of thiamine deficiency.

  10. Loss of ETHE1, a mitochondrial dioxygenase, causes fatal sulfide toxicity in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Viscomi, Carlo; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Di Meo, Ivano; Mineri, Rossana; Tiveron, Cecilia; Levitt, Michael D; Prelle, Alessandro; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Rimoldi, Marco; Zeviani, Massimo

    2009-02-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is an autosomal recessive, invariably fatal disorder characterized by early-onset encephalopathy, microangiopathy, chronic diarrhea, defective cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in muscle and brain, high concentrations of C4 and C5 acylcarnitines in blood and high excretion of ethylmalonic acid in urine. ETHE1, a gene encoding a beta-lactamase-like, iron-coordinating metalloprotein, is mutated in ethylmalonic encephalopathy. In bacteria, ETHE1-like sequences are in the same operon of, or fused with, orthologs of TST, the gene encoding rhodanese, a sulfurtransferase. In eukaryotes, both ETHE1 and rhodanese are located within the mitochondrial matrix. We created a Ethe1(-/-) mouse that showed the cardinal features of ethylmalonic encephalopathy. We found that thiosulfate was excreted in massive amounts in urine of both Ethe1(-/-) mice and humans with ethylmalonic encephalopathy. High thiosulfate and sulfide concentrations were present in Ethe1(-/-) mouse tissues. Sulfide is a powerful inhibitor of COX and short-chain fatty acid oxidation, with vasoactive and vasotoxic effects that explain the microangiopathy in ethylmalonic encephalopathy patients. Sulfide is detoxified by a mitochondrial pathway that includes a sulfur dioxygenase. Sulfur dioxygenase activity was absent in Ethe1(-/-) mice, whereas it was markedly increased by ETHE1 overexpression in HeLa cells and Escherichia coli. Therefore, ETHE1 is a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase involved in catabolism of sulfide that accumulates to toxic levels in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

  11. Reversible MRI changes in a patient with uremic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Sitter, T; Lederer, S R; Held, E; Schiffl, H

    2001-01-01

    A 19-year-old patient on chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis experienced severe neurologic disturbances caused by uremia. Increased signal intensity was seen bilaterally in the cortical and subcortical areas of the occipital and parietal lobe on cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Insufficient peritoneal dialysis efficacy was documented and the patient was switched from peritoneal to hemodialysis. Cranial MRI indicated a marked regression of the lesions to nearly normal, confirming the diagnosis of uremic encephalopathy.

  12. An unusual cause of anemia and encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Kumar Sharma; Dharma Choudhary; Anil Handoo; Gaurav Dhamija; Gaurav Kharya; Vipin Khandelwal; Mayank Dhamija; Sweta Kothari

    2015-01-01

    The authors present here an interesting case of recent onset anemia that was associated with an encephalopathy of the unusual cause.Although severe anemia can theoretically result in anemic hypoxia and can then lead to hypoxic encephalopathy, it is not a primary cause of encephalopathy. More frequently anemia can contribute together with other multiple causes of encephalopathy, such as infections, metabolic abnormalities, trauma, hepatic dysfunction, hypertension, toxins.

  13. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  14. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghi DARA*

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Dara N, Sayyari AA, Imanzadeh F. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:1-11.ObjectiveAs acute liver failure (ALF and chronic liver disease (cirrhosis continue to increase in prevalence, we will see more cases of hepatic encephalopathy.Primary care physician are often the first to suspect it, since they are familiar with the patient’s usual physical and mental status. This serious complication typically occurs in patients with severe comorbidities and needs multidisciplinary evaluation and care. Hepatic encephalopathy should be considered in any patient with acute liver failure and cirrhosis who presents with neuropsychiatric manifestations, decrease level of consciousness (coma, change of personality, intellectualand behavioral deterioration, speech and motor dysfunction.Every cirrhotic patient may be at risk; potential precipitating factors should be addressed in regular clinic visits. The encephalopathy of liver disease may be prominent, or can be present in subtle forms, such as decline of school performance, emotional outbursts, or depression.“Subtle form” of hepatic encephalopathy may not be obvious on clinical examination, but can be detected by neurophysiologic and neuropsychiatric testing.References:Ferenci P, Lockwood A, Mullen K, Tarter R, Weissenborn K, Blei AT. Hepatic encephalopathy definition, nomenclature, diagnosis, and quantification: final report of the working party at the 11th World Congresses of Gastroenterology, Vienna, 1998.Hepatology 2002;35:716-21.BleiAT,Cordoba J. Hepatic encephalopathy. AmJ Gastroenterol 2001;96:1968–76.Vaquero J,Chung C, Cahill ME, BleiAT. Pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy in acute liver failure. Semin Liver Dis 2003;23:259-69.Bajaj JS, Wade JB, Sanyal AJ. Spectrum of neurocognitive impairment in cirrhosis: Implications for the assessment of hepatic encephalopathy

  15. 142 The Immune Response Against Respiratory Pathogens in Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis/Nasal Polyps and Asthma with or without Sensitivity to Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska-Ziąber, Agnieszka; Jarzębska, Marzanna; Kowalski, Marek L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Viral and bacterial infections can modulate the ongoing inflammation in both upper and lower airways of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRS/NP) and asthma. It was not clear if the protective immune response to pathogens may differ depending on the disease severity. Object: To compare serum IgG immune response against respiratory pathogens in patients with chronic airway disease (CRS/NP and asthma) with and without sensitivity to aspirin, and to refer the sensitization to severity of chronic rhinosinusitis. Methods We recruited 73 patients with CRS/NP and asthma with (43 patients) and without (30 patients) hypersensitivity to aspirin. The extent of mucosal hypertrophy in paranasal sinuses was assessed by CT scans and the sense of smell was valuated with “sniffing smell” test. Serum IgG immunoglobulin levels against respiratory pathogens: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), Adenowirus (ADV), Parainfluenza virus (PIV) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were determined by ELISA. Results Patients with ASA-hypersensitivity had history of significantly more nasal polypectomies (P = 0.002), lower smell test score (P = 0.03) and higher mean paranasal CT score (P = 0.03) as compared to ASA-tolerant patients, reflecting higher severity of the upper airway disease. The percentage of positive serological testing to respiratory pathogens was very high in the whole group of patients with CRS/NP and asthma (RSV, 95.8%; ADV, 95.9%; PIV, 84.9% and Mycoplasma pneumonieae, 100% patients) without any difference between ASA-sensitive and ASA-tolerant subjects. Patients with ASA-sensitivity had significantly lower concentrations of PIV- specific IgG (mean 188.67 ± 34.46 U/mL versus 207.56 ± 30.036 U/mL; P < 0.04) as compared to ASA-tolerant subjects. There was a significant trend (P < 0.048) for lower PIV–specific IgG concentrations with increased number of polypectomies. No correlation of IgG immunoglobulin concentrations for other pathogens with the

  16. Current trends in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae, Brendan M McGuireDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common reversible neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with chronic and acute liver dysfunction and significant morbidity and mortality. Although a clear pathogenesis is yet to be determined, elevated ammonia in the serum and central nervous system are the mainstay for pathogenesis and treatment. Management includes early diagnosis and prompt treatment of precipitating factors (infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, electrolyte disturbances, hepatocellular carcinoma, dehydration, hypotension, and use of benzodiazepines, psychoactive drugs, and/or alcohol. Clinical trials have established the efficacy of lactulose and lactitol enemas in the treatment of acute hepatic encephalopathy. Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated the efficacy of oral lactulose and lactitol with the goal of two to three soft bowel movements a day for the treatment of chronic HE. However, lactulose and lactitol have significant gastrointestinal side effects. For patients unable to tolerate lactulose or lactitol or who still have persistent chronic HE with lactulose or lactitol, neomycin, metronidazole and rifaximin are second-line agents. More recent data supports the benefits of rifaximin used solely and as an additional agent with fewer side effects than neomycin or metronidazole. Newer therapies being investigated in humans with clinical promise include nitazoxanide, the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS, L-ornithine phenylacetate, sodium benzoate, and/or sodium phenylacetate and Kremezin® (AST-120.Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, liver dysfunction, lactulose, lactitol

  17. Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca; Scott, L Keith; Minagar, Alireza; Conrad, Steven

    2004-05-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a poorly understood condition that is associated with severe sepsis and appears to have a negative influence on survival. The incidence of encephalopathy secondary to sepsis is unknown. Amino acid derangements, blood-brain barrier disruption, abnormal neurotransmitters, and direct CNS effect are possible causes of septic encephalopathy. Research has not defined the pathogenesis of SAE.

  18. Noninvasive ventilation for hypercapnic respiratory failure in COPD and initial post-support deterioration of pH and PaCO2 may not predict failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Raj

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To correlate the degree of encephalopathy, baseline values of PaCO2 and pH, and their early response to NIV with eventual in-hospital outcome in patients of severe acute-on-chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure in COPD. Design: Retrospective review. Setting: Intensive care unit. Material and methods: 24 episodes of acute exacerbation of COPD in 17 patients (10 females, 7 males with a mean age of 59.5 years (range 48 - 82 where NIV was initiated. Data collected: encephalopathy score at baseline and at 24 hours, respiratory rate, breathing pattern, serial arterial blood gases, duration of NIV support per day and hospital days. Results: All patients had severe hypercapnia (mean peak PaCO2 89.0 mm Hg ± 21; range 66-143, respiratory acidosis (mean nadir pH 7.24 ± 0.058, range 7.14 - 7.33 and tachypnoea (mean respiratory rate 29.5 ± 4.69/mt; range 24 - 40. In 17 episodes, altered mental state was present (encephalopathy score 1.92 ± 1.32, median 2.5. Clinically stable condition occurred over several days (mean 13± 9.6 days; range 5 - 40. Intubation was avoided in 22 out of 24 episodes (91.6% despite significant initial worsening of PaCO2 and pH. Two patients died. The mean time on NIV was16.5 hours/day (range 4 - 22. Conclusions: In selected patients of COPD with acute hypercapnic failure on NIV worsening PaCO2 and pH in the initial hours may not predict failure provided the level of consciousness and respiratory distress improve.

  19. [Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by the use of diet pills and unbalanced diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Adrián; Aradi, Gabriella; Várallyay, György; Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Bereczki, Dániel; Vastagh, Ildikó

    2014-03-23

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute, potentially life-threatening, neurological syndrome resulting from thiamine deficiency. The disorder is still greatly underdiagnosed and, without prompt treatment, the condition can lead to the chronic form of the disease, Korsakoff's syndrome or even death. In developed countries Wernicke's encephalopathy has been associated with alcoholism, but in recent years there has been an increasing number of non-alcoholic cases. Authors report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed oculomotor dysfunction, encephalopathy and ataxia as a result of an extreme diet and use of diet pills. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was supported by the resolution of neurological signs after parenteral thiamine replacement. This case is presented because of the rare etiology and diagnostic difficulty, and the latest diagnostic and therapic guidelines are also highlighted.

  20. The role of smoking and metabolic enzyme polymorphisms in the organic solvent induced chronic encephalopathy%有机溶剂致慢性毒性脑病中吸烟及代谢酶多态性的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏宇; 马玉美; 崔建忠; 赵迪; 刘爱军; 洪军; 卢永刚; 王凯杰

    2016-01-01

    目的 观察谷胱甘肽转移酶M1和T1(GSTM1,GSTT1)缺失突变基因型以及2种微粒体环氧化物水解酶(mEPHX)遗传多态性和吸烟对有机溶剂致慢性中毒性脑病(CTE)的影响.方法 研究对象为115名有长期有机溶剂暴露史的患者,根据临床诊断患者分为CTE组(83例),无CET组(32例).从患者白细胞中分离DNA用多重-聚合酶链式反应确定GSTM1和GSTT1缺失基因型.通过限制性片段长度多态性(PCR-RFLP)分析mEPHX的2种多态性.结果 GSTM1缺失基因型对CTE相对风险明显提高(RR=2.35,95% CI:0.96~2.90).根据患者的吸烟情况和基因型进行分类后,发现在吸烟患者中GSTM1缺失基因型患者CTE风险明显高于GSTM1(+)基因型患者(RR=3.13,95% CI 1.2~3.7),2种mEPHX多态性均与CTE风险提高无关.结论 GSTM1缺失基因型在个体对有机溶剂诱导的CTE易感性中有重要作用,同时受吸烟的影响.%Objective The organic solvents and other exogenous compounds of metabolic enzymes genetic variation may affect the risk of the toxic effect of organic solvents exposure.Therefore,this research we observed the glutathione transferase M1 and T1 (GSTM1,GSTT1) deletion mutation genotype,two kinds of microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEPHX) genetic polymorphism,organic solvents exposure and smoking effection in chronic cases of toxic encephalopathy (CTE) correlation.Methods The object was 115 patients who had a long history of organic solvents exposure,were divieded into two groups:CTE (n=83),no CET (n=32) according to clinical diagnosis.DNA was isolated from patients in white blood cells through the multiple-polymerase chain reaction to determine the loss of GSTM 1 and GSTT1 genotype,two kinds of mEPHX polymorphism were analysised through the PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism).Results The relative risk has obviously improved when lack of GSTM1 genotypes to CTE (RR=2.35,95% CI 2.35 0.96).in according to the patient's Smoking condition and

  1. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Propensity-Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data.Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure.The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52-0.62).Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases.

  2. Uremic Encephalopathy: MR Imaging Findings and Clinical Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D M; Lee, I H; Song, C J

    2016-09-01

    Uremic encephalopathy is a metabolic disorder in patients with renal failure. The purpose of this study was to describe the MR imaging findings of uremic encephalopathy. This study retrospectively reviewed MR imaging findings in 10 patients with clinically proved uremic encephalopathy between May 2005 and December 2014. Parameters evaluated were lesion location and appearance; MR signal intensity of the lesions on T1WI, T2WI, and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images; the presence or absence of restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps; and the reversibility of documented signal-intensity abnormalities on follow-up MR imaging. MR imaging abnormalities accompanying marked elevation of serum creatinine (range, 4.3-11.7 mg/dL) were evident in the 10 patients. Nine patients had a history of chronic renal failure with expansile bilateral basal ganglia lesions, and 1 patient with acute renal failure had reversible largely cortical lesions. Two of 6 patients with available arterial blood gas results had metabolic acidosis. All basal ganglia lesions showed expansile high signal intensity (lentiform fork sign) on T2WI. Varied levels of restricted diffusion and a range of signal intensities on DWI were evident and were not correlated with serum Cr levels. All cortical lesions demonstrated high signal intensity on T2WI. Four patients with follow-up MR imaging after hemodialysis showed complete resolution of all lesions. The lentiform fork sign is reliable in the early diagnosis of uremic encephalopathy, regardless of the presence of metabolic acidosis. Cytotoxic edema and/or vasogenic edema on DWI/ADC maps may be associated with uremic encephalopathy. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  3. [I.P.P.B. therapy at home in chronic respiratory insufficiency in France. I. Survey method. Description of the prescribers. 1960-1977 prescription evolution (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouet, D; Kauffmann, F; Brille, D; Hatzfeld, C; Liot, F; Kompalitch, M

    1979-01-01

    In order to assess the usage of IPPB therapy at home in chronic respiratory insufficiency in France, a mail survey has been conducted among 2,062 chest physicians and physicians involved in intensive care. The response rate was 57%. Among those caring for chronic respiratory insufficient patients, 296, i.e. 38%, have prescribed IPPB to 3,778 patients from 1960 till 1977. A study among a sample of the non-spontaneous-responders allows the estimation of about 400 physicians who prescribed IPPB on the whole for France at this time. Those who prescribed, worked more often in hospital though 4% had only a private practice. Those involved in intensive care prescribed more often than the chest physicians (47% versus 37%). The development of this therapy was different according to the different regions in France. But, in a general way, the prescription of IPPB at home particularly spread out since 1975, 65% of all the prescriptions have been done in 1975, 76, 77.

  4. Mortality among Subjects with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma at Two Respiratory Disease Clinics in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray M Finkelstein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma are common; however, mortality rates among individuals with these diseases are not well studied in North America.

  5. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Chul; Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that neuroimaging findings can improve the early diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in clinical settings. The most distinctive neuroimaging finding of acute WE are cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema, which are represented by bilateral symmetric hyperintensity alterations on T2-weighted MR images in the periphery of the third ventricle, periaqueductal area, mammillary bodies and midbrain tectal plate. An initial bout of WE can result in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), but repeated bouts in conjunction with its typical comorbidity, chronic alcoholism, can result in signs of tissue degeneration in vulnerable brain regions. Chronic abnormalities identified with neuroimaging enable examination of brain damage in living patients with KS and have expanded the understanding of the neuropsychological deficits resulting from thiamine deficiency, alcohol neurotoxicity, and their comorbidity. Brain structure and functional studies indicate that the interactions involving the thalamus, mammillary bodies, hippocampus, frontal lobes, and cerebellum are crucial for memory formation and executive functions, and the interruption of these circuits by WE and chronic alcoholism can contribute substantially to the neuropsychological deficits in KS.

  6. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, B.E.C.; Somerville, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep has not been identified under natural conditions at the time of writing and remains a hypothetical issue. However, rumours about the possible finding of a BSE-like isolate in sheep have led to great unrest within the sheep industry, among the general p

  7. Psychopathology and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gama Marques

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Hippocrates that neuropsychiatric illness secondary to liver disease fascinates physicians, but only in the XIX century Marcel Nencki and Ivan Pavlov suggested the relation between high concentrations of ammonia and Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE. The reaction of ammonia and glutamate (origins glutamine, “the Trojan Horse of neurotoxicity of ammonia continues to be the main responsible for the neurologic lesions, recently confirmed by neurochemistry and neuroimagiology studies. Glutamine starts the inflammatory reaction at the central nervous sys- tem but other important actors seem to be manganese and the neurotransmitters systems of GABA and endocanabinoids. Nowadays there are three different etiologic big groups for HE: type A associated with acute liver failure; type B associated with portosystemic bypass; and type C associated with cirrhosis of the liver. The staging of HE is still based on classic West Haven system, but a latent Grade 0 was introduced (the so called minimal HE; remaining the aggra- vating HE from Grade 1 (subtle changes at clinical examination to Grade 4 (coma. In this work a bibliographic review was made on 30 of the most pertinent and recent papers, focusing in psychopathology, physiopathology, etiology and staging of this clinical entity transversal to Psychiatry and Gastroenterology. Alterations are described in vigility and conscience like temporal, spatial and personal disorientation. Attention, concentration and memory are impaired very early, on latent phase and can be accessed through neuropsychological tests. Mood oscillates between euphoric and depressive. Personality changes begin obviously and abruptly or in a subtle and insidious way. There can be changes in perception like visual hallucinations or even of acoustic-verbal. The thought disorders can be of delusional type, paranoid, systematized or not, but also monothematic ala Capgras Syndrome. Speech can be accelerated, slowed down or completely in

  8. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, L; Thomsen, S F; Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls;

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is a common condition in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Little is known about the incidence, prevalence and determinants of CMH in younger individuals....

  9. Pulmonary infection control window in treatment of severe respiratory failure of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases: a prospective, randomized controlled, multi-centred study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Collaborating Research Group for Noninvasive Mecha

    2005-01-01

    Background Early withdraw from invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) followed by noninvasive MV is a new strategy for changing modes of treatment. This study was conducted to estimate the feasibility and the efficacy of early extubation and sequential noninvasive MV commenced at beginning of pulmonary infection control window in patients with exacerbated hypercapnic respiratory failure caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD). Methods A prospective, randomized controlled study was conducted in eleven teaching hospitals' respiratory or medical intensive care units in China. Ninety intubated COPD patients with severe hypercapnic respiratory failure triggered by pulmonary infection (pneumonia or purulent bronchitis) were involved in the study. When the pulmonary infection had been controlled by antibiotics and comprehensive therapy, the "pulmonary infection control window (PIC window)" has been reached. Each case was randomly assigned to study group (extubation and noninvasive MV via facial mask immediately) or control group (invasive MV was received continuously after PIC window by using conventional weaning technique).Results Study group (n=47) and control group (n=43) had similar clinical characteristics initially and at the time of PIC window. Compared with control group, study group had shorter duration of invasive MV [(6.4±4.4) days vs (11.3±6.2) days, P=0.000], lower rate of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) (3/47 vs 12/43, P=0.014), fewer days in ICU [(12±8) days vs (16±11) days, P=0.047] and lower hospital mortality (1/47 vs 7/43, P=0.025).Conclusions In COPD patients requiring intubation and invasive MV for hypercapnic respiratory failure, which is exacerbated by pulmonary infection, early extubation followed by noninvasive MV initiated at the start of PIC window may decrease significantly the duration of invasive MV, the risk of VAP and hospital mortality.

  10. Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 as a Predictor of Outcome During General Ward-Based Noninvasive Ventilation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease with Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jinbo; Wan, Qunfang; Wu, Xiaoling; Zeng, Yihua; Jiang, Li; Ao, Dongmei; Wang, Feng; Chen, Ting; Li, Yanli

    2015-09-18

    BACKGROUND Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) may reduce the need for intubation and mortality associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with type II respiratory failure. Early and simple predictors of NIV outcome could improve clinical management. This study aimed to assess whether nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS2002) is a useful outcome predictor in COPD patients with type II respiratory failure treated by noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). MATERIAL AND METHODS This prospective observational study enrolled COPD patients with type II respiratory failure who accepted NIPPV. Patients were submitted to NRS2002 evaluation upon admission. Biochemical tests were performed the next day and blood gas analysis was carried out prior to NIPPV treatment and 4 hours thereafter. Patients were divided into NRS2002 score ≥3 and NRS2002 score <3 groups and NIV failure rates were compared between both groups. RESULTS Of the 233 patients, 71 (30.5%) were not successfully treated by NIPPV. The failure rate was significantly higher in the NRS2002 score ≥3 group (35.23%) in comparison with patients with NRS2002 score <3 (15.79%) (p<0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that PaCO2 (OR 1.25, 95%CI 1.172-1.671, p<0.05) prior to NIPPV treatment and NRS2002 score ≥3 (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.303-2.374, p<0.05) were independent predictive factors for NIPPV treatment failure. CONCLUSIONS NRS2002 score ≥3 and PaCO2 values at admission may predict unsuccessful NIPPV treatment of COPD patients with type II respiratory failure and help to adjust therapeutic strategies. NRS2002 is a noninvasive and simple method for predicting NIPPV treatment outcome.

  11. Occurrence of respiratory symptoms in persons with restrictive ventilatory impairment compared with persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The PLATINO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonato, Nívia L; Nascimento, Oliver A; Padilla, Rogelio P; de Oca, Maria M; Tálamo, Carlos; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Lisboa, Carmen; López, Maria V; Celli, Bartolomé; Menezes, Ana Maria B; Jardim, José R

    2015-08-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) usually complain of symptoms such as cough, sputum, wheezing, and dyspnea. Little is known about clinical symptoms in individuals with restrictive ventilatory impairment. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence and type of respiratory symptoms in patients with COPD to those reported by individuals with restrictive ventilatory impairment in the Proyecto Latinoamericano de Investigacion en Obstruccion Pulmonar study. Between 2002 and 2004, individuals ≥40 years of age from five cities in Latin America performed pre and post-bronchodilator spirometry and had their respiratory symptoms recorded in a standardized questionnaire. Among the 5315 individuals evaluated, 260 (5.1%) had a restrictive spirometric diagnosis (forced vital capacity (FVC) < lower limit of normal (LLN) with forced expiratory volume in the first second to forced vital capacity ratio (FEV1/FVC) ≥ LLN; American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) 2005) and 610 (11.9%) were diagnosed with an obstructive pattern (FEV1/FVC < LLN; ATS/ERS 2005). Patients with mild restriction wheezed more ((30.8%) vs. (17.8%); p < 0.028). No difference was seen in dyspnea, cough, and sputum between the two groups after adjusting for severity stage. The health status scores for the short form 12 questionnaire were similar in restricted and obstructed patients for both physical (48.4 ± 9.4 vs. 48.3 ± 9.8) and mental (50.8 ± 10.6 vs. 50.0 ± 11.5) domains. Overall, respiratory symptoms are not frequently reported by patients with restricted and obstructed patterns as defined by spirometry. Wheezing was more frequent in patients with restricted pattern compared with those with obstructive ventilatory defect. However, the prevalence of cough, sputum production, and dyspnea are not different between the two groups when adjusted by the same severity stage. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Defining the Risk and Associated Morbidity and Mortality of Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Among Infants with Chronic Lung Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paes, Bosco; Fauroux, Brigitte; Figueras-Aloy, Josep; Bont, Louis; Checchia, Paul A; Simões, Eric A F; Manzoni, Paolo; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The REGAL (RSV evidence-a geographical archive of the literature) series provide a comprehensive review of the published evidence in the field of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in Western countries over the last 20 years. This third publication covers the risk and burden of RSV infe

  13. Transdiaphragmatic pressure and neural respiratory drive measured during inspiratory muscle training in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu W

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Weiliang Wu,1 Xianming Zhang,2 Lin Lin,1 Yonger Ou,1 Xiaoying Li,1 Lili Guan,1 Bingpeng Guo,1 Luqian Zhou,1 Rongchang Chen1 1State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Inspiratory muscle training (IMT is a rehabilitation therapy for stable patients with COPD. However, its therapeutic effect remains undefined due to the unclear nature of diaphragmatic mobilization during IMT. Diaphragmatic mobilization, represented by transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi, and neural respiratory drive, expressed as the corrected root mean square (RMS of the diaphragmatic electromyogram (EMGdi, both provide vital information to select the proper IMT device and loads in COPD, therefore contributing to the curative effect of IMT. Pdi and RMS of EMGdi (RMSdi% were measured and compared during inspiratory resistive training and threshold load training in stable patients with COPD.Patients and methods: Pdi and neural respiratory drive were measured continuously during inspiratory resistive training and threshold load training in 12 stable patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s ± SD was 26.1%±10.2% predicted.Results: Pdi was significantly higher during high-intensity threshold load training (91.46±17.24 cmH2O than during inspiratory resistive training (27.24±6.13 cmH2O in stable patients with COPD, with P<0.01 for each. Significant difference was also found in RMSdi% between high-intensity threshold load training and inspiratory resistive training (69.98%±16.78% vs 17.26%±14.65%, P<0.01.Conclusion: We concluded that threshold load training shows greater mobilization of Pdi and neural respiratory drive than inspiratory resistive training in stable patients with COPD. Keywords: diaphragmatic

  14. Contributions of microdialysis to new alternative therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides Iii; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-08-05

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease.

  15. Contributions of Microdialysis to New Alternative Therapeutics for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Carmona-Aparicio

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease.

  16. Contributions of Microdialysis to New Alternative Therapeutics for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease. PMID:23921686

  17. 慢性支气管炎呼吸内科规范治疗体会%Chronic bronchitis,respiratory medicine specification treatment experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑾瑜

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analysis using respiratory medicine in patients with chronic bronchitis clinical value and safety of treatment. Methods Randomly selected 80 cases of chronic bronchitis patients as the research object,the control group 40 cases were treated by conventional solution treatment; The experimental group 40 cases were treated by respiratory medicine standard treatment for treatment. Results The patients clinical total effective rate was 95.00%,the patient's clinical total effective rate was 67.50%,the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion In patients with chronic bronchitis with the method of combining traditional Chinese and western medicine treatment,help the patient's physical and mental rehabilitation,is worth to be widely applied in clinical.%目的:分析对慢性支气管炎患者采用呼吸内科规范治疗的临床价值及安全性。方法随机选择80例慢性支气管炎患者作为研究对象,对照组40例患者采用常规方案进行治疗;实验组40例患者采用呼吸内科规范治疗方案进行治疗。结果实验组患者的临床总有效率为95.00%,对照组患者的临床总有效率为67.50%,(P<0.05)差异有统计学意义。结论对慢性支气管炎患者采用中西医结合的方式进行治疗,有助于患者的身心康复,值得临床中广泛推广应用。

  18. Effects of indacaterol versus tiotropium on respiratory mechanics assessed by the forced oscillation technique in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inui N

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Naoki Inui,1,2 Sayomi Matsushima,1 Shinpei Kato,1 Hideki Yasui,1 Masato Kohno,1 Tomoyuki Fujisawa,1 Noriyuki Enomoto,1 Yutaro Nakamura,1 Mikio Toyoshima,3 Takafumi Suda1 1Second Division, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Handayama, Hamamatsu, Japan; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital, Shougen-cho, Hamamatsu, JapanAbstract: The forced oscillation technique (FOT can measure respiratory mechanics and has attracted attention in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We aimed to evaluate the effects of only indacaterol and tiotropium monotherapies on airflow limitation and respiratory impedance. Pulmonary function tests, COPD assessment test (CAT, and multifrequency FOT with MostGraph-01 were performed at the beginning and after 8 weeks of treatment with indacaterol or tiotropium. The resistance index, resistance at 5 Hz (R5, resistance at 20 Hz (R20, reactance index, reactance at 5 Hz (X5, resonant frequency (Fres, and low-frequency reactance area (ALX were determined at whole-breath, inspiratory, and expiratory phases. Eighty-two patients (mean age: 73 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1: 61.6%±19.0% predicted were randomized to indacaterol or tiotropium treatment. Both bronchodilators improved airflow limitation, with mean trough improvements in FEV1 of 165 mL and 80 mL in the indacaterol and tiotropium groups, respectively. The CAT score decreased in the indacaterol group (P<0.001; 11.2±6.6 to 7.5±5.6. Compared with tiotropium, indacaterol significantly improved FEV1, percent predicted FEV1, and CAT score (P=0.042, P=0.008, and P=0.027, respectively. For respiratory impedance, indacaterol and tiotropium changed R5, X5, Fres, and ALX at whole-breath, inspiratory, and expiratory phases. In the indacaterol group, the changes in R5, R5–R20, X5, Fres, and ALX were significantly correlated

  19. Anemia and performance status as prognostic markers in acute hypercapnic respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haja Mydin H

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Helmy Haja Mydin, Stephen Murphy, Howell Clague, Kishore Sridharan, Ian K TaylorDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Sunderland Royal Infirmary, Sunderland, United KingdomBackground: In patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure (AHRF during exacerbations of COPD, mortality can be high despite noninvasive ventilation (NIV. For some, AHRF is terminal and NIV is inappropriate. However there is no definitive method of identifying patients who are unlikely to survive. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with inpatient mortality from AHRF with respiratory acidosis due to COPD.Methods: COPD patients presenting with AHRF and who were treated with NIV were studied prospectively. The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, World Health Organization performance status (WHO-PS, clinical observations, a composite physiological score (Early Warning Score, routine hematology and biochemistry, and arterial blood gases prior to commencing NIV, were recorded.Results: In total, 65 patients were included for study, 29 males and 36 females, with a mean age of 71 ± 10.5 years. Inpatient mortality in the group was 33.8%. Mortality at 30 days and 12 months after admission were 38.5% and 58.5%, respectively. On univariate analysis, the variables associated with inpatient death were: WHO-PS ≥ 3, long-term oxygen therapy, anemia, diastolic blood pressure < 70 mmHg, Early Warning Score ≥ 3, severe acidosis (pH < 7.20, and serum albumin < 35 g/L. On multivariate analysis, only anemia and WHO-PS ≥ 3 were significant. The presence of both predicted 68% of inpatient deaths, with a specificity of 98%.Conclusion: WHO-PS ≥ 3 and anemia are prognostic factors in AHRF with respiratory acidosis due to COPD. A combination of the two provides a simple method of identifying patients unlikely to benefit from NIV.Keywords: acute exacerbations of COPD, noninvasive ventilation, emphysema, prognostic markers

  20. 血活素对慢性呼衰血液流变学的影响%The influence of solcoseryl over hemorheology of chronic respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王吉如

    2001-01-01

    Objective To discuss the influence of solcoseryl over hemorheology of chronic respiratory failure. Methods 79 cases of chronic respiratory failure were divided into 2 groups randomly: control group (34 cases) were given general treatment, including anti- inflammatory, antitussive, apophlegmatic, cardiac tonic, diuretic agents, et al; solcoseryl group received solcoseyl for 14 days besides general treatment. Hemorheologic indexes of both groups were detected before and after therapy. Results Blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability and erythrocyte electrophoresis time of solcoseryl group were significantly different from control group. Conclusion Solcoseryl had good effects in treating chronic respiratory failure, and the effects correlated with the changes of hemorheology.%目的从细胞代谢促进剂-血活素,对心肺循环-血液流变学的影响观察评价对慢性呼衰的治疗作用。方法 79例慢阻肺、肺心病发展而来的慢性呼衰病人随机分为两组:对照组 34例,予以抗炎、止咳化痰、强心利尿、改善心肺功能(包括硝酸甘油的使用)的综合治疗;治疗组在综合治疗基础上予以血活素 15ml+生理盐水 200ml,静滴,疗程 14天,两组在治疗前后测定血液流变学指标(包括高低切全血粘度,红细胞变形指数及电泳时间,血小板粘附率等)。结果血活素治疗组在改善全血粘度、红细胞变形指数及电泳时间等方面较对照组具有显著的效果。结论细胞代谢促进剂-血活素对慢性呼衰具有良好的治疗作用,其病情好转与血液流变学的改善呈一致性。

  1. IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency in children with recurrent respiratory infections and its relationship with chronic pulmonary damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, H; Atlihan, F; Genel, F; Targan, S; Gunvar, T

    2005-01-01

    Most patients with IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency are asymptomatic but some may suffer from frequent mainly respiratory infections. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiencies and the rate of chronic pulmonary damage secondary to recurrent pulmonary infections in these children. Serum IgA and IgG subclass levels were measured in 225 children aged 6 months to 6 years with recurrent sinopulmonary infections (44 with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, 100 with recurrent pulmonary infections and 81 with recurrent bronchiolitis). In order to determine chronic pulmonary damage due to recurrent infections in patients with recurrent pulmonary infections CT scans of thorax were also obtained. The overall frequency of antibody defects was found to be 19.1%. IgA deficiency was observed in 9.3%, IgG subclass deficiency in 8.4% and IgA + IgG subclass deficiency in 1.4%. The prevalance of IgA and/or IgG subclass deficiency was 25% in patients with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections, 22% in patients with recurrent pulmonary infections and 12.3% in patients with recurrent bronchiolitis (p>0.05). Chronic pulmonary damage in lungs was determined radiologically in 17 of 100 cases with recurrent pulmonary infection. In IgG subclass deficiencies sequel changes, although not statistically significant, were observed five times more frequently than that of IgA deficiencies. CT scans revealed pulmonary sequels in 5 of the 22 (22.7%) patients with recurrent pulmonary infections and immunodeficiency (bronchiectasis in 2 patients with IgG3 deficiency, fibrotic changes in one with IgA deficiency and in one with IgG3 deficiency, bronchiolitis obliterans in one with IgG2 + IgG3 deficiency). On the other hand, pulmonary sequels were observed in 12 patients (15.4%) with normal immunoglobulin levels. Eight of them were bronchiolitis obliterans, 2 of them were atelectasia and 1 of them was bronchiectasia. We therefore suggest

  2. Empyema and Respiratory Failure Secondary to Nephropleural Fistula Caused by Chronic Urinary Tract Infection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. Jones

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of nephropleural fistula causing empyema and respiratory failure in a 68-year-old gentleman with a long history of urological problems including recurrent nephrolithiasis and urinary tract infections. He was admitted with sepsis, a productive cough, pyuria, and reduced breath sounds over the left hemithorax. Radiological imaging revealed a fistulous connection between a left-sided perinephric abscess and the pleural space. He was commenced on broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics but developed progressive respiratory failure requiring intensive care admission. Urinary and pleural aspirates cultured facultative anaerobic pathogens with identical resistance patterns. Drainage of thoracic and perinephric collections was carried out, allowing him to be extubated after 24 hours and discharged home after 18 days on an extended course of oral antibiotics. Left nephrectomy is now planned after a period of convalescence. Empyema developing in patients with known urolithiasis should alert the treating physician to the possibility that a pathological communication has formed especially if typical urinary tract pathogens are cultured from respiratory sampling.

  3. Transdiaphragmatic pressure and neural respiratory drive measured during inspiratory muscle training in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiliang; Zhang, Xianming; Lin, Lin; Ou, Yonger; Li, Xiaoying; Guan, Lili; Guo, Bingpeng; Zhou, Luqian; Chen, Rongchang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) is a rehabilitation therapy for stable patients with COPD. However, its therapeutic effect remains undefined due to the unclear nature of diaphragmatic mobilization during IMT. Diaphragmatic mobilization, represented by transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi), and neural respiratory drive, expressed as the corrected root mean square (RMS) of the diaphragmatic electromyogram (EMGdi), both provide vital information to select the proper IMT device and loads in COPD, therefore contributing to the curative effect of IMT. Pdi and RMS of EMGdi (RMSdi%) were measured and compared during inspiratory resistive training and threshold load training in stable patients with COPD. Patients and methods Pdi and neural respiratory drive were measured continuously during inspiratory resistive training and threshold load training in 12 stable patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s ± SD was 26.1%±10.2% predicted). Results Pdi was significantly higher during high-intensity threshold load training (91.46±17.24 cmH2O) than during inspiratory resistive training (27.24±6.13 cmH2O) in stable patients with COPD, with PPdi and neural respiratory drive than inspiratory resistive training in stable patients with COPD. PMID:28280321

  4. Susceptibility of European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) to alimentary challenge with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagleish, Mark P; Martin, Stuart; Steele, Philip; Finlayson, Jeanie; Eaton, Samantha L; Sisó, Sílvia; Stewart, Paula; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Hamilton, Scott; Pang, Yvonne; Chianini, Francesca; Reid, Hugh W; Goldmann, Wilfred; González, Lorenzo; Castilla, Joaquín; Jeffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    European red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus) are susceptible to the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, when challenged intracerebrally but their susceptibility to alimentary challenge, the presumed natural route of transmission, is unknown. To determine this, eighteen deer were challenged via stomach tube with a large dose of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent and clinical signs, gross and histological lesions, presence and distribution of abnormal prion protein and the attack rate recorded. Only a single animal developed clinical disease, and this was acute with both neurological and respiratory signs, at 1726 days post challenge although there was significant (27.6%) weight loss in the preceding 141 days. The clinically affected animal had histological lesions of vacuolation in the neuronal perikaryon and neuropil, typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Abnormal prion protein, the diagnostic marker of transmissible encephalopathies, was primarily restricted to the central and peripheral nervous systems although a very small amount was present in tingible body macrophages in the lymphoid patches of the caecum and colon. Serial protein misfolding cyclical amplification, an in vitro ultra-sensitive diagnostic technique, was positive for neurological tissue from the single clinically diseased deer. All other alimentary challenged deer failed to develop clinical disease and were negative for all other investigations. These findings show that transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy to European red deer via the alimentary route is possible but the transmission rate is low. Additionally, when deer carcases are subjected to the same regulations that ruminants in Europe with respect to the removal of specified offal from the human food chain, the zoonotic risk of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, from consumption of venison is probably

  5. Risk factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li; Ang Li; Yibing Weng; Shuwen Zhang; Meili Duan

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse and acute cerebral dysfunction caused by sepsis. Many sepsis patients exhibit acute deterioration in mental status during the early stage of disease, and central nervous system dysfunction has been shown to increase patient mortality. The present study selected 284 sepsis patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, from January to December 2009. The patients were assigned to SAE and non-SAE patient groups according to SAE occurrence. SAE incidence was 37.68%, and mortality was significantly greater in SAE patients compared with non-SAE patients (41.12% vs. 17.51%, P < 0.01). Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated lower arterial partial pressure of oxygen and greater alanine aminotransferase and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores in the SAE group compared with the non-SAE group. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen, alanine aminotransferase, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores were determined to be potential risk factors for SAE.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GI Motility MalaCards: mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease Neuromuscular Disease Center, Washington University Orphanet: Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy Patient Support and Advocacy ...

  7. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Suvasini Sharma; Manjari Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  8. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvasini Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  9. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of noninvasive ventilation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related respiratory failure in Indian hospitals without ICU facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha P Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The majority of Indian hospitals do not provide intensive care unit (ICU care or ward-based noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIV. Because no mechanical ventilation or NIV is available in these hospitals, the majority of patients suffering from respiratory failure die. Objective: To perform a cost-effective analysis of two strategies (ward-based NIV with concurrent standard treatment vs standard treatment alone in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD respiratory failure patients treated in Indian hospitals without ICU care. Materials and Methods: A decision-analytical model was created to compare the cost-effectiveness for the two strategies. Estimates from the literature were used for parameters in the model. Future costs were discounted at 3%. All costs were reported in USD (2012. One-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analysis were performed. The time horizon was lifetime and perspective was societal. Results: The NIV strategy resulted in 17.7% more survival and was slightly more costly (increased cost of $101 (USD 2012 but resulted in increased quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs (1.67 QALY. The cost-effectiveness (2012 USD/QALY in the standard and NIV groups was $78/QALY ($535.02/6.82 and $75/QALY ($636.33/8.49, respectively. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER was only $61 USD/QALY. This was substantially lower than the gross domestic product (GDP per capita for India (1489 USD, suggesting the NIV strategy was very cost effective. Using a 5% discount rate resulted in only minimally different results. Probabilistic analysis suggests that NIV strategy was preferred 100% of the time when willingness to pay was >$250 2012 USD. Conclusion: Ward-based NIV treatment is cost-effective in India, and may increase survival of patients with COPD respiratory failure when ICU is not available.

  11. Utilization of the National Health and Nutrition Examination (NHANES) Survey for Symptoms, Tests, and Diagnosis of Chronic Respiratory Diseases and Assessment of Second hand Smoke Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Clark, John D; Ocasio, Manuel A; Wanner, Adam; Fleming, Lora E; Lee, David J

    2011-10-01

    Respiratory diseases encompass a number of complex disorders that constitute a major cause of both morbidity and mortality worldwide with a major burden to the afflicted as well as the health care systems that care for them. Although the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) has been decreasing in industrialized countries due to a decreasing number of smokers and stricter laws aimed at reducing exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS), the burden of CRDs in developing world populations is expected to worsen due to communicable disease prevention programs, aging populations, environmental air pollution, and continued tobacco smoke exposure. Although tobacco smoking has been shown to be significantly associated with many CRDs, evidence linking SHS exposure to different CRDs is mixed, especially with low levels of SHS exposure. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a series of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of non-institutionalized adults and children in the United States (U.S.). In addition to being used to monitor the health of the U.S. population, NHANES data allow for research into prevalent health problems and their risk factors in the population, such with CRDs and SHS exposure. NHANES data can be utilized to explore a variety of issues related to the assessment of SHS exposure and its association to respiratory symptoms and illnesses. First, we provide a brief review of NHANES including its strengths and limitations. We then provide a summary of the variables and publically available population based data that can be used to study associations between SHS exposure and CRD symptoms, testing and diagnoses. Rich and cost effective, NHANES data provide a unique opportunity for research into the risk factors for CRDs in the U.S. population, particularly into the possible health effects of low levels of SHS exposure.

  12. Effects of indacaterol versus tiotropium on respiratory mechanics assessed by the forced oscillation technique in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Naoki; Matsushima, Sayomi; Kato, Shinpei; Yasui, Hideki; Kono, Masato; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Toyoshima, Mikio; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) can measure respiratory mechanics and has attracted attention in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to evaluate the effects of only indacaterol and tiotropium monotherapies on airflow limitation and respiratory impedance. Pulmonary function tests, COPD assessment test (CAT), and multifrequency FOT with MostGraph-01 were performed at the beginning and after 8 weeks of treatment with indacaterol or tiotropium. The resistance index, resistance at 5 Hz (R5), resistance at 20 Hz (R20), reactance index, reactance at 5 Hz (X5), resonant frequency (Fres), and low-frequency reactance area (ALX) were determined at whole-breath, inspiratory, and expiratory phases. Eighty-two patients (mean age: 73 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1): 61.6%±19.0% predicted) were randomized to indacaterol or tiotropium treatment. Both bronchodilators improved airflow limitation, with mean trough improvements in FEV1 of 165 mL and 80 mL in the indacaterol and tiotropium groups, respectively. The CAT score decreased in the indacaterol group (Pindacaterol significantly improved FEV1, percent predicted FEV1, and CAT score (P=0.042, P=0.008, and P=0.027, respectively). For respiratory impedance, indacaterol and tiotropium changed R5, X5, Fres, and ALX at whole-breath, inspiratory, and expiratory phases. In the indacaterol group, the changes in R5, R5-R20, X5, Fres, and ALX were significantly correlated with the changes in FEV1. The use of the FOT may enable the evaluation of the effects of bronchodilators in addition to FEV1-indicated therapeutic effects in COPD.

  13. Atypical Presentations of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection; Case series

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    Nawal Al-Maskari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV usually causes a lower respiratory tract infection in affected patients. RSV has also been infrequently linked to extrapulmonary diseases in children. We report four children who had unusually severe clinical manifestations of RSV infections requiring critical care admission. These patients presented to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in December 2013 with acute necrotising encephalopathy (ANE, acute fulminant hepatic failure with encephalopathy, pneumatoceles and croup. A unique presentation of ANE has not previously been reported in association with an RSV infection. All patients had a positive outcome and recovered fully with supportive management.

  14. Effects of respiratory muscle unloading on leg muscle oxygenation and blood volume during high-intensity exercise in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Carrascosa, Cláudia; Oliveira, Cristino Carneiro; Barroco, Adriano C; Berton, Danilo C; Vilaça, Debora; Lira-Filho, Edgar B; Ribeiro, Dirceu; Nery, Luiz Eduardo; Neder, J Alberto

    2008-06-01

    Blood flow requirements of the respiratory muscles (RM) increase markedly during exercise in chronic heart failure (CHF). We reasoned that if the RM could subtract a fraction of the limited cardiac output (QT) from the peripheral muscles, RM unloading would improve locomotor muscle perfusion. Nine patients with CHF (left ventricle ejection fraction = 26 +/- 7%) undertook constant-work rate tests (70-80% peak) receiving proportional assisted ventilation (PAV) or sham ventilation. Relative changes (Delta%) in deoxy-hemoglobyn, oxi-Hb ([O2Hb]), tissue oxygenation index, and total Hb ([HbTOT], an index of local blood volume) in the vastus lateralis were measured by near infrared spectroscopy. In addition, QT was monitored by impedance cardiography and arterial O2 saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2). There were significant improvements in exercise tolerance (Tlim) with PAV. Blood lactate, leg effort/Tlim and dyspnea/Tlim were lower with PAV compared with sham ventilation (P 0.05). Unloaded breathing, however, was related to enhanced leg muscle oxygenation and local blood volume compared with sham, i.e., higher Delta[O2Hb]% and Delta[HbTOT]%, respectively (P < 0.05). We conclude that RM unloading had beneficial effects on the oxygenation status and blood volume of the exercising muscles at similar systemic O2 delivery in patients with advanced CHF. These data suggest that blood flow was redistributed from respiratory to locomotor muscles during unloaded breathing.

  15. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Yuezhou Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies. Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category.

  16. [Analysis of logistical and organizational aspects of a cruise for patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency. The RESpIRA Expedition and the COPD Cruise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Lobato, S; Mayoralas Alises, S; Gómez Mendieta, M A; Sanz Baena, S; Martín Sánchez, R; Díaz-Agero, P

    2003-06-01

    Patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency who are receiving domiciliary oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation report great difficulty in taking complex trips involving several destinations and prolonged stays away from home. Such patients share a common need for home equipment whose technology is relatively sophisticated, a condition that limits their freedom of movement. We are referring to systems for delivering oxygen therapy and mechanical respirators. Given that such patients have problems traveling by air, we hypothesized that a cruise would be an ideal alternative, given that travel would take place in the hotel itself. A cruise would facilitate the logistics of the journey, given that the equipment would have to be set up at only one setting. Working with these assumptions, we have thus far organized two cruises for chronic respiratory insufficiency patients: the "RESpIRA Expedition" and the "COPD Cruise". Our experience shows that the organizational problems to be coped with are patient recruitment, financing and choice of itinerary. With those aspects clear, organizers must then obtain the authorization of the cruise operator, including the approval of the medical and safety personnel on board. After obtaining permission for the cruise and as soon as the organizers know how many patients will travel, a list of oxygen therapy equipment (respirators and disposable supplies) must be compiled. Finally, equipment suppliers must be found. Afterwards, all that remains is to enjoy the trip. The participation of physicians responsible for domiciliary oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilation programs is essential for making patients feel safe and for assuring solutions for technical and medical problems that might arise.

  17. Validity, reliability, and responsiveness of a new short Visual Simplified Respiratory Questionnaire (VSRQ© for health-related quality of life assessment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Perez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available T Perez1, B Arnould2, J-M Grosbois3, V Bosch2, I Guillemin2, M-L Bravo4, M Brun4, A-B Tonnel1 on behalf of TIPHON Study Group1Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU, Lille, France; 2Mapi Values, Lyon, France; 3Service de Pneumologie, Centre Hospitalier de Béthune, Béthune, France; 4Boehringer Ingelheim France, Reims Cédex, FranceAbstract: The Visual Simplified Respiratory Questionnaire (VSRQ was designed to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. It contains eight items: dyspnea, anxiety, depressed mood, sleep, energy, daily activities, social activities and sexual life. Psychometric properties were assessed during a clinical trial that evaluated the impact of tiotropium on HRQoL of COPD patients. These included the determination of structure, internal consistency reliability, concurrent validity with the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, test – retest reliability, clinical validity and responsiveness to change over two weeks. Minimal important difference (MID was calculated; cumulative response curves (CRC were based on the dyspnea item. Psychometric analyses showed that VSRQ structure was unidimensional. The questionnaire demonstrated good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.84, good concurrent validity with SGRQ (Spearman = −0.70 and clinical validity, good test-retest reproducibility (ICC = 0.77, and satisfactory responsiveness (standardized response mean = 0.57; Guyatt’s statistic = 0.63. MID was 3.4; CRC median value of the ‘minimally improved’ patients was 3.5. In conclusion, VSRQ brevity and satisfactory psychometric properties make it a good candidate for large studies to assess HRQoL in COPD patients. Further validation is needed to extend its use in clinical practice.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, VSRQ, SGRQ, health-related quality of life, minimal important difference

  18. 慢性阻塞性肺疾病的呼吸肌功能%Respiratory muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋雷服; 殷凯生; 黄茂

    2013-01-01

    The respiratory muscle strength and (or) muscle endurance often decrease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Respiratory muscle strength and (or) muscle endurance decrease contribute to dyspnea,limit exercise performance,reduce quality of life.Hypercapnic respiratory failure duc to respiratory muscle dysfunction is associated with morbidity in these patients,Respiratory muscle function measurement is useful tool for clinical diagnosis and prognosis of patients with COPD.Maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal expiratory pressure measurement is a simple way to assess inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength.Maximal inspiratory pressure is more sensitive than forced expiratory vohume in one second.Respiratory muscle dysfunction ascribed to intrinsic muscle alterations and hyperinflation-induced diaphragm shortening.Patients with respiratory muscle dysfunction should receive treatment such as anticholincrgic drugs,β2-adrenergic agonists,exercise (including inspiratory muscle training),nutritional support,anabolic steroids,psychosocial support,and education.The clinical potential for protcasome inhibitor,peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors,magnesium sulfate therapy in COPD deserves further investigation.%慢性阻塞性肺疾病患者常存在呼吸肌收缩力和(或)耐力下降,引起呼吸困难,限制患者活动能力,使患者的运动量减少,日常生活质量降低;如果病情得不到控制,可以导致高碳酸性呼吸衰竭,严重者造成患者死亡.呼吸肌功能评价在慢性阻塞性肺疾病患者临床病情评估和预后判断方面很有应用价值.最大吸气压和最大呼气压测定是临床最常用的、可信的、非创伤性的评价呼吸肌功能的指标.研究结果显示最大吸气压较一秒量敏感.呼吸肌本身的病理改变和肺过度充气导致膈肌的收缩初长度缩短等原因可以引起呼吸肌功能障碍.可以应用抗胆碱药物、β2-受体

  19. CHRONIC RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS AND AIRWAY RESPONSIVENESS TO METHACHOLINE ARE ASSOCIATED WITH EOSINOPHILIA IN OLDER MEN - THE NORMATIVE AGING STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ANNEMA, JT; SPARROW, D; OCONNOR, GT; RIJCKEN, B; KOETER, GH; POSTMA, DS; WEISS, ST

    1995-01-01

    Identification of subsets of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) in order to determine disease outcomes and, possibly, the effects of treatment is an area of clinical interest. At present, it remains unclear which patients with COLD are most likely to benefit from anti-inflammatory

  20. Francisella philomiragia Bacteremia in a Patient with Acute Respiratory Insufficiency and Acute-on-Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relich, Ryan F; Humphries, Romney M; Mattison, H Reid; Miles, Jessica E; Simpson, Edward R; Corbett, Ian J; Schmitt, Bryan H; May, M

    2015-12-01

    Francisella philomiragia is a very uncommon pathogen of humans. Diseases caused by it are protean and have been reported largely in near-drowning victims and those with chronic granulomatous disease. We present a case of F. philomiragia pneumonia with peripheral edema and bacteremia in a renal transplant patient and review the diverse reports of F. philomiragia infections.

  1. Short-term exposure to high ambient air pollution increases airway inflammation and respiratory symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Ni, Yang; Li, Hongyu; Pan, Lu; Yang, Di; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Deng, Furong; Chen, Yahong; Shima, Masayuki; Guo, Xinbiao

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have investigated the short-term respiratory effects of ambient air pollution in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients in the context of high pollution levels in Asian cities. A panel of 23 stable COPD patients was repeatedly measured for biomarkers of airway inflammation including exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and exhaled hydrogen sulfide (FeH2S) (215 measurements) and recorded for daily respiratory symptoms (794person-days) in two study periods in Beijing, China in January-September 2014. Daily ambient air pollution data were obtained from nearby central air-monitoring stations. Mixed-effects models were used to estimate the associations between exposures and health measurements with adjustment for potential confounders including temperature and relative humidity. Increasing levels of air pollutants were associated with significant increases in both FeNO and FeH2S. Interquartile range (IQR) increases in PM2.5 (76.5μg/m(3), 5-day), PM10 (75.0μg/m(3), 5-day) and SO2 (45.7μg/m(3), 6-day) were associated with maximum increases in FeNO of 13.6% (95% CI: 4.8%, 23.2%), 9.2% (95% CI: 2.1%, 16.8%) and 34.2% (95% CI: 17.3%, 53.4%), respectively; and the same IQR increases in PM2.5 (6-day), PM10 (6-day) and SO2 (7-day) were associated with maximum increases in FeH2S of 11.4% (95% CI: 4.6%, 18.6%), 7.8% (95% CI: 2.3%, 13.7%) and 18.1% (95% CI: 5.5%, 32.2%), respectively. Increasing levels of air pollutants were also associated with increased odds ratios of sore throat, cough, sputum, wheeze and dyspnea. FeH2S may serve as a novel biomarker to detect adverse respiratory effects of air pollution. Our results provide potential important public health implications that ambient air pollution may pose risk to respiratory health in the context of high pollution levels in densely-populated cities in the developing world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental interspecies transmission studies of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies to cattle: comparison to bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamir, Amir N; Kehrli, Marcus E; Kunkle, Robert A; Greenlee, Justin J; Nicholson, Eric M; Richt, Jürgen A; Miller, Janice M; Cutlip, Randall C

    2011-05-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of animals include scrapie of sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME); chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk and moose; and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. The emergence of BSE and its spread to human beings in the form of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) resulted in interest in susceptibility of cattle to CWD, TME and scrapie. Experimental cross-species transmission of TSE agents provides valuable information for potential host ranges of known TSEs. Some interspecies transmission studies have been conducted by inoculating disease-causing prions intracerebrally (IC) rather than orally; the latter is generally effective in intraspecies transmission studies and is considered a natural route by which animals acquire TSEs. The "species barrier" concept for TSEs resulted from unsuccessful interspecies oral transmission attempts. Oral inoculation of prions mimics the natural disease pathogenesis route whereas IC inoculation is rather artificial; however, it is very efficient since it requires smaller dosage of inoculum, and typically results in higher attack rates and reduces incubation time compared to oral transmission. A species resistant to a TSE by IC inoculation would have negligible potential for successful oral transmission. To date, results indicate that cattle are susceptible to IC inoculation of scrapie, TME, and CWD but it is only when inoculated with TME do they develop spongiform lesions or clinical disease similar to BSE. Importantly, cattle are resistant to oral transmission of scrapie or CWD; susceptibility of cattle to oral transmission of TME is not yet determined.

  3. Energy expenditure at rest and during walking in patients with chronic respiratory failure: a prospective two-phase case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Crisafulli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measurements of Energy Expenditure (EE at rest (REE and during physical activities are increasing in interest in chronic patients. In this study we aimed at evaluating the validity/reliability of the SenseWear®Armband (SWA device in terms of REE and EE during assisted walking in Chronic Respiratory Failure (CRF patients receiving long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a two-phase prospective protocol we studied 40 severe patients and 35 age-matched healthy controls. In phase-1 we determined the validity and repeatability of REE measured by SWA (REEa in comparison with standard calorimetry (REEc. In phase-2 we then assessed EE and Metabolic Equivalents-METs by SWA during the 6-minute walking test while breathing oxygen in both assisted (Aid or unassisted (No-Aid modalities. When compared with REEc, REEa was slightly lower in patients (1351±169 vs 1413±194 kcal/day respectively, p<0.05, and less repeatable than in healthy controls (0.14 and 0.43 coefficient respectively. COPD patients with CRF patients reported a significant gain with Aid as compared with No-Aid modality in terms of meters walked, perceived symptoms and EE. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SWA provides a feasible and valid method to assess the energy expenditure in CRF patients on LTOT, and it shows that aided walking results in a substantial energy saving in this population.

  4. Changes in the endurance shuttle walk test in COPD patients with chronic respiratory failure after pulmonary rehabilitation: the minimal important difference obtained with anchor- and distribution-based method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburg, Wytske A; Duiverman, Marieke L; Ten Hacken, Nick H T; Kerstjens, Huib A M; de Greef, Mathieu H G; Wijkstra, Peter J; Wempe, Johan B

    2015-02-19

    Although the endurance shuttle walk test (ESWT) has proven to be responsive to change in exercise capacity after pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) for COPD, the minimally important difference (MID) has not yet been established. We aimed to establish the MID of the ESWT in patients with severe COPD and chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure following PR. Data were derived from a randomized controlled trial, investigating the value of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation added to PR. Fifty-five patients with stable COPD, GOLD stage IV, with chronic respiratory failure were included (mean (SD) FEV1 31.1 (12.0) % pred, age 62 (9) y). MID estimates of the ESWT in seconds, percentage and meters change were calculated with anchor based and distribution based methods. Six minute walking distance (6MWD), peak work rate on bicycle ergometry (Wpeak) and Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ) were used as anchors and Cohen's effect size was used as distribution based method. The estimated MID of the ESWT with the different anchors ranged from 186-199 s, 76-82% and 154-164 m. Using the distribution based method the MID was 144 s, 61% and 137 m. Estimates of the MID for the ESWT after PR showed only small differences using different anchors in patients with COPD and chronic respiratory failure. Therefore we recommend using a range of 186-199 s, 76-82% or 154-164 m as MID of the ESWT in COPD patients with chronic respiratory failure. Further research in larger populations should elucidate whether this cut-off value is also valid in other COPD populations and with other interventions. ClinicalTrials.Gov (ID NCT00135538).

  5. Respiratory acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and COPD ) Diseases of the lung tissue (such as pulmonary fibrosis , ...

  6. Ammonia and Its Role in the Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parth J; Balart, Luis A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a commonly encountered sequela of chronic liver disease and cirrhosis with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Although ammonia is implicated in the pathogenesis of HE, the exact underlying mechanisms still remain poorly understood. Its role in the urea cycle, astrocyte swelling, and glutamine and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid systems suggests that the pathogenesis is multifaceted. Greater understanding in its underlying mechanism may offer more targeted therapeutic options in the future, and thus further research is necessary to fully understand the pathogenesis of HE.

  7. Birth defects in children with newborn encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, JF; Badawi, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C; Keogh, JM; Pemberton, PJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate birth defects found in association with newborn encephalopathy. All possible birth defects were ascertained in a population-based study of 276 term infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy and 564 unmatched term control infants. A strong association

  8. Birth defects in children with newborn encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, JF; Badawi, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C; Keogh, JM; Pemberton, PJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate birth defects found in association with newborn encephalopathy. All possible birth defects were ascertained in a population-based study of 276 term infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy and 564 unmatched term control infants. A strong association betwe

  9. De novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L.; Hitomi, Yuki; Howell, Katherine B.; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Lu, Yi-Fan; Madou, Maura R. Z.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; O'Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrovski, Slave; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Yuskaitis, Christopher J.; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory D.; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B.; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L.; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Kossoff, Erich; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack M.; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Shellhaas, Renee A.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Shih, Jerry J.; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joseph; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of severe childhood epilepsy disorders for which the cause is often unknown(1). Here we report a screen for de novo mutations in patients with two classical epileptic encephalopathies: infantile spasms (n = 149) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 115)

  10. Hyperammonemia Is Associated with Increasing Severity of Both Liver Cirrhosis and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidullah Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hyperammonemia resulting from chronic liver disease (CLD can potentially challenge and damage any organ system of the body, particularly the brain. However, there is still some controversy regarding the diagnostic or prognostic values of serum ammonia in patients with over hepatic encephalopathy, especially in the setting of acute-on-chronic or chronic liver failure. Moreover, the association of serum ammonia with worsening Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis has not been studied. Objective. This study was conducted to solve the controversy regarding the association between hyperammonemia and cirrhosis, especially hepatic encephalopathy in chronically failed liver. Material and Methods. In this study, 171 cirrhotic patients had their serum ammonia measured and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Chi-squared test and one-way ANOVA were applied. Results. The study had 110 male and 61 female participants. The mean age of all the participants in years was 42.33±7.60. The mean duration (years of CLD was 10.15±3.53 while the mean Child-Pugh (CP score was 8.84±3.30. Chronic viral hepatitis alone was responsible for 71.3% of the cases. Moreover, 86.5% of participants had hepatic encephalopathy (HE. The frequency of hyperammonemia was 67.3%, more frequent in males (N=81, z-score = 2.4, and P<0.05 than in females (N=34, z-score = 2.4, and P<0.05, and had a statistically significant relationship with increasing CP grade of cirrhosis (χ2(2 = 27.46, P<0.001, Phi = 0.40, and P<0.001. Furthermore, serum ammonia level was higher in patients with hepatic encephalopathy than in those without it; P<0.001. Conclusion. Hyperammonemia is associated with both increasing Child-Pugh grade of liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

  11. A Rare Case of Wernicke’s Encephalopathy Due to Hyperemesis Gravidarum

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    Bellad AV

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A young pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum presented to casualty with ataxia, confusion and diplopia. Examination revealed nystagmus and bilateral retinal haemorrhages. Characteristic brain MRI findings and rapid response to thiamine was suggestive of Wernicke’s encephalopathy due to hyperemesis gravidarum. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a potentially reversible condition caused by thiamine deficiency. It is usually suspected in the setting of chronic alcoholosim and might not be recognised when associated with other conditions. A high index of suspicion is required since lack or delay of treatment may lead to high morbidity and mortality.

  12. Chronic aspiration of gastric and duodenal contents and their effects on inflammatory cytokine production in respiratory system of rats.

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    Mitra Samareh Fekri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is defined with clinical symptoms of heart burning and regurgitation. It may be associated with external esophageal symptoms such as chronic cough, asthma, laryngitis, chronic lung disease, sinusitis and pulmonary fibrosis. In the present study, rats with chronic aspiration of gastroduodenal contents were studied for cellular phenotypes and cytokine concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage and lung tissue. Thirty-six male Albino N-MRI rats were randomly divided into six groups. After anesthesia and tracheal intubation, the animals received either 0.5ml/kg of normal saline (control, gastric juice, pepsin, hydrochloric acid or bile salts by injection into their lungs twice a week for 8 weeks. In sham group nothing was injected. Thereafter, cellular phenotypes and cytokine concentrations of Interleukine (IL-1α, IL-1β, Transforming Growth Factor (TGF-β, Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-α, and IL-6 were assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage and lung tissue homogenates. The numbers of epithelial cells, macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes in BAL and levels of cytokines IL-1α, IL-6, TNF-α and TGF-β in BAL and lung tissue of test groups were significantly higher than the control group. Aspiration of bile salts caused more cytokine levels and inflammatory cells compared to other reflux components. It can be concluded that GERD with increased cytokines and inflammatory cells in lung could cause or exacerbate asthma and pulmonary fibrosis.

  13. Hashimoto's encephalopathy in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ilknur; Saygi, Semra; Alehan, Füsun

    2011-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an underdiagnosed, steroid-responsive, progressive or relapsing encephalopathy associated with high titers of serum antithyroid antibodies. Although Hashimoto's encephalopathy is well documented in adults, it is rarely observed or studied in children and adolescents. We describe the clinical and laboratory findings of four children (aged 9-15 years) with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The clinical features of two patients at presentation included epileptic seizures and confusion. The other presenting signs included breath-holding spells, behavioral problems, psychosis, and ataxia (one patient each). During their presentation, three patients were euthyroid, and one was hyperthyroid. All patients manifested increased antithyroid antibodies, and all improved with steroid treatment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is rarely suspected at presentation. Therefore, greater awareness of its signs by clinicians is necessary for proper diagnoses.

  14. Opsoclonus as a manifestation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, R; Mehta, C; Zaher, N; Miller, D

    2012-10-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with early manifestation of opsoclonus associated with gait ataxia as a rare clinical presentation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Empiric use of intravenous immunoglobulin followed by intravenous high dose methylprednisolone was initiated with subsequent remittance of opsoclonus, encephalopathy, ataxia, and tremor. Extensive workup for infectious, autoimmune, and paraneoplastic etiologies were undertaken and all studies were negative. Thyroglobulin antibodies (312 U/mL) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (457 U/mL) were elevated (normal antibodies were retested and found to have decreased considerably. Thus, with steroid therapy, the patient's opsoclonus and encephalopathy improved. We have presented a patient with a rare case of opsoclonus as the principal presenting feature of Hashimoto's encephalopathy that was incompletely responsive to intravenous immunoglobulin and resolved with corticosteroids. This report underscores the importance for clinical practitioners to maintain a high index of suspicion for Hashimoto's encephalopathy in cases of opsoclonus, especially when accompanied by an atypical presentation.

  15. Respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930118 Facial or nasal mask pressure supportventilation in managing acute exacerbation ofchronic respiratory failure in COPD patients.CHEN Rongchang(陈荣昌),et al.GuangzhouInstit Respir Dis,Guangzhou 510120.Chin Tu-berc & Respir Dis 1992;15(5)285-287.Eleven COPD patients(age:65±9 yrs)withacute exacerbation of chronic respiratory failure(PaCO2 11.3±1.1kPa)were treated with maskpressure support ventilation,another 10 similarpatients(age:68±12yrs)served as controls.Bi-PAP ventilator was used with the followingmodifications:(1)Non-rehreathing valve set-in proximal to mask;(2)5 LPM oxygen flow de-livered into mask to reduce the dead space ef-fect.Mask ventilation was given 2-3 hours ev-ery time and 1-2 times daily for 7 days.Syn-

  16. Tranilast reduces serum IL-6 and IL-13 and protects against thioacetamide-induced acute liver injury and hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Rania R; Elkashef, Wagdi F; Said, Eman

    2015-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious neuropsychiatric disorder usually affecting either acute or chronic hepatic failure patients. Hepatic encephalopathy was replicated in a validated rat model to assess the potential protective efficacy of tranilast against experimentally induced hepatic encephalopathy. Thioacetamide injection significantly impaired hepatic synthetic, metabolic and excretory functions with significant increase in serum NO, IL-6 and IL-13 levels and negative shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance. Most importantly, there was a significant increase in serum ammonia levels with significant astrocytes' swelling and vacuolization; hallmarks of hepatic encephalopathy. Tranilast administration (300 mg/kg, orally) for 15 days significantly improved hepatic functions, restored oxidant/antioxidant balance, reduced serum NO, IL-6 and IL-13 levels. Meanwhile, serum ammonia significantly declined with significant reduction in astrocytes' swelling and vacuolization. Several mechanisms can be implicated in the observed hepato- and neuroprotective potentials of tranilast, such as its anti-inflammatory potential, its antioxidant potential as well as its immunomodulatory properties.

  17. Cerebral pathological changes and serous ET-1 levels of rats with chronic alcoholic encephalopathy%慢性酒精中毒脑病大鼠脑部血管及组织病理改变和血浆 ET-1变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李辉; 马钊; 沈丽; 杨雪

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察慢性酒精中毒脑病大鼠脑血管和脑组织病理改变及血浆ET-1变化。方法用灌胃法制备慢性酒精中毒脑病大鼠的动物模型;提取对照组和酒精组大鼠额叶、小脑及海马进行病理学观察,并采用放免法于造模后4,8,12,16周末测定各组血浆ET-1水平。结果酒精组额叶血管出现内皮细胞脱落、内弹力膜出现皱褶、管壁轻度增厚,管腔轻度狭窄等一系列病理改变;额叶大脑皮质及海马神经细胞数目缺失,排列不规则,细胞核固缩;小脑皮质浦肯野细胞明显减少,细胞外形不规则,胞体呈明显三角形改变,部分逐渐溶解及消失,颗粒细胞层细胞减少。酒精组血浆ET-1水平较对照组显著升高( P<0.05)。结论慢性酒精中毒会导致一系列脑组织及脑血管病理改变,酒精导致的脑血管损害是酒精中毒性脑病发生的病理机制之一。ET-1参与了酒精中毒性脑病的病理过程。%Objective To investigate the cerebral pathologi-cal changes and serous ET-1 levels of rats with chronic alcoholic encephalopathy.Methods The rat models of chronic alcoholic encephalopathy were established by perfusing stomach with alcohol. The frontal lobes ,cerebellums and hippocampi of rats in control and alcohol groups were separated to investigate the pathological changes. The serous ET-1 levels were detected by ra-dioimmunoassay at the 4 ,8 ,12 ,16th weekend.Results In the alcohol group ,vascular endothelial detachment ,internal elastic lamina shrinkage and vascular lacuna narrowing were shown in frontal lobar arterioles ;neuron loss ,disordered arrangement and karyopyknosis were observed in frontal lobes and hippocampi ;Purkinje cells became less and triangle shaping in cerebellar cortex. The serous ET-1 levels of alcohol group were significantly increased than control group (P<0.05).Conclusion Chron-ic alcoholism led to pathological damages of cerebral tissues and

  18. RECENT THEORIES OF PATHOGENESIS OF HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY IN HEPATITIS C VIRAL INFECTION

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    Lidija Popović Dragonjić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is potentially reversible, or progressive neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by changes in cognitive function, behavior and personality changes, and transient neurologic symptoms and characteristic electroencephalographic patterns associated with acute and chronic liver failure. For some time, there has been controversy regarding the origin of toxins responsible for the change of mental state. It was found that the occurrence of hepatic encephalopathy is responsible for multiple organ peripheral changes (intestinal changes, abnormalities of portal-systemic circulation, liver failure, loss of muscle tissue, changes in brain intracellular communication (osmotic changes, astrocytes and axonal abnormalities in communication, changes in cerebral perfusion and ammonia, endogenous benzodiazepines, gamma amino butyric acid, derivatives of methionine and false neurotransmitters. The aforementioned metabolic factors that contribute to the development of hepatic encephalopathy are not mutually exclusive and multiple factors may be present at the same time.

  19. Correlation of hyponatremia with hepatic encephalopathy and severity of liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Omar; Khokhar, Nasir; Saleem, Atif; Niazi, Tariq Khan

    2014-02-01

    To assess the frequency of low serum sodium levels and to correlate it with the severity of liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in patients coming to the tertiary care hospital. Observational study. Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, from January 2011 to January 2012. A total of 202 patients with hepatic encephalopathy and chronic liver disease had serum sodium measured. The HE was graded according to the West Haven classification (4 grades). Relationship of hyponatremia was correlated with severity grade of encephalopathy using Spearman rank correlation test. Out of 202 patients, 62 (30.7%) patients had serum sodium less than 130 meq/l. Out of 202, HE was present in 69 (34.15%) patients and out of these, 38 had grade III-IV HE and 31 had grade I - II HE. Out of 69 patients with HE 57 had sodium less than 135 (p 135 mmol/L.

  20. How to recognize and treat metabolic encephalopathy in Neurology intensive care unit

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    Ivana I Berisavac

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic encephalopathy (ME represents a syndrome of temporary or permanent disturbance of brain functions that occurs in different diseases and varies in clinical presentation. It can be manifested in a range from very mild mental disorders to deep coma and death. Clinically, it is characterized by a variety of psychiatric and neurological symptoms and signs. The most common causes of ME are: hypoxia, ischemia, systemic diseases and toxic agents. ME is the most frequent in elderly people who have previously been exhausted by chronic illnesses and prolonged stay in bed. ME is a very common complication in patients treated in intensive care units. Treatment and prognosis of the disease are varied and depend on aetiology, as well as on the type and severity of clinical presentation. Mortality of patients with septic encephalopathy ranges from 16-65%, while the one-year survival of patients with encephalopathy and liver cirrhosis is less than 50%.

  1. Occupation, smoking, and chronic obstructive respiratory disorders: a cross sectional study in an industrial area of Catalonia, Spain

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    Kogevinas Manolis

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have investigated the independent effects of occupational exposures and smoking on chronic bronchitis and airflow obstruction. We assessed the association between lifetime occupational exposures and airflow obstruction in a cross-sectional survey in an urban-industrial area of Catalonia, Spain. Methods We interviewed 576 subjects of both sexes aged 20–70 years (response rate 80% randomly selected from census rolls, using the ATS questionnaire. Forced spirometry was performed by 497 subjects according to ATS normative. Results Lifetime occupational exposure to dust, gases or fumes was reported by 52% of the subjects (63% in men, 41% in women. Textile industry was the most frequently reported job in relation to these exposures (39%. Chronic cough, expectoration and wheeze were more prevalent in exposed subjects with odds ratios ranging from 1.7 to 2.0 being highest among never-smokers (2.1 to 4.3. Lung function differences between exposed and unexposed subjects were dependent on duration of exposure, but not on smoking habits. Subjects exposed more than 15 years to dusts, gases or fumes had lower lung function values (FEV1 -80 ml, 95% confidence interval (CI -186 to 26; MMEF -163 ml, CI -397 to 71; FEV1/FVC ratio -1.7%, CI -3.3 to -0.2 than non-exposed. Conclusion Chronic bronchitis symptoms and airflow obstruction are associated with occupational exposures in a population with a high employment in the textile industry. Lung function impairment was related to the duration of occupational exposure, being independent of the effect of smoking.

  2. Functional plasticity in the respiratory drive to thoracic motoneurons in the segment above a chronic lateral spinal cord lesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ford, T W; Anissimova, Natalia P; Meehan, Claire Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A previous neurophysiological investigation demonstrated an increase in functional projections of expiratory bulbospinal neurons (EBSNs) in the segment above a chronic lateral thoracic spinal cord lesion that severed their axons. We have now investigated how this plasticity might be manifested...... following these lesions were made to neurons other than α-motoneurons. However, a previously unidentified form of functional plasticity was seen in that there was a significant increase in the excitation of motoneurons during postinspiration, being manifest either in increased incidence of expiratory...

  3. Prognostic Assessment in Patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Rita García-Martínez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common complication of liver failure that is associated with poor prognosis. However, the prognosis is not uniform and depends on the underlying liver disease. Acute liver failure is an uncommon cause of HE that carries bad prognosis but is potentially reversible. There are several prognostic systems that have been specifically developed for selecting patients for liver transplantation. In patients with cirrhosis the prognosis of the episode of HE is usually dictated by the underlying precipitating factor. Acute-on-chronic liver failure is the most severe form of decompensation of cirrhosis, the prognosis depends on the number of associated organ failures. Patients with cirrhosis that have experienced an episode of HE should be considered candidates for liver transplant. The selection depends on the underlying liver function assessed by the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD index. There is a subgroup that exhibits low MELD and recurrent HE, usually due to the coexistence of large portosystemic shunts. The recurrence of HE is more common in patients that develop progressive deterioration of liver function and hyponatremia. The bouts of HE may cause sequels that have been shown to persist after liver transplant.

  4. L-carnitine as an ergogenic aid for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease submitted to whole-body and respiratory muscle training programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borghi-Silva A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of adding L-carnitine to a whole-body and respiratory training program were determined in moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. Sixteen COPD patients (66 ± 7 years were randomly assigned to L-carnitine (CG or placebo group (PG that received either L-carnitine or saline solution (2 g/day, orally for 6 weeks (forced expiratory volume on first second was 38 ± 16 and 36 ± 12%, respectively. Both groups participated in three weekly 30-min treadmill and threshold inspiratory muscle training sessions, with 3 sets of 10 loaded inspirations (40% at maximal inspiratory pressure. Nutritional status, exercise tolerance on a treadmill and six-minute walking test, blood lactate, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory muscle strength were determined as baseline and on day 42. Maximal capacity in the incremental exercise test was significantly improved in both groups (P < 0.05. Blood lactate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and heart rate at identical exercise levels were lower in CG after training (P < 0.05. Inspiratory muscle strength and walking test tolerance were significantly improved in both groups, but the gains of CG were significantly higher than those of PG (40 ± 14 vs 14 ± 5 cmH2O, and 87 ± 30 vs 34 ± 29 m, respectively; P < 0.05. Blood lactate concentration was significantly lower in CG than in PG (1.6 ± 0.7 vs 2.3 ± 0.7 mM, P < 0.05. The present data suggest that carnitine can improve exercise tolerance and inspiratory muscle strength in COPD patients, as well as reduce lactate production.

  5. Respiratory muscle strength and muscle endurance are not affected by acute metabolic acidemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizet, T.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Ven, M.J.T. van de; Bosch, F.H.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) contributes to respiratory failure with hypercapnia, and subsequent respiratory acidosis. Therapeutic induction of acute metabolic acidosis further increases the respiratory drive and, therefore, may diminish ventilator

  6. Behavioral and electroencephalographic manifestations of thioacetamide-induced encephalopathy: Possible mechanisms of neurotoxic effects

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    Mladenović D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is still no ideal experimental model of hepatic encephalopathy, thioacetamide is widely used for the induction of acute and chronic liver failure. Thioacetamide exerts hepatotoxic effects through the formation of toxic metabolites in hepatocytes, oxidative stress and calcium mobilization. An ideal experimental model of hepatic encephalopathy should have similar behavioral and electroencephalographic manifestations as human encephalopathy. Thioacetamide induces motor manifestations in a dose-dependent manner. Milder forms of thioacetamide-induced encephalopathy are associated with an increase in relative alpha power, while more severe forms are followed by a flattening of the electroencephalogram. liver failure-induced hyperammonemia has a pivotal role in the neurotoxic effects of thioacetamide. Hyperammonemia induces brain edema, alterations in neurotransmission, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal death. The aim of this article is to review the behavioral and electroencephalographic manifestations of thioacetamide-induced encephalopathy, as well as to summarize potential mechanisms involved in thioacetamide neurotoxicity.[Acknowledgments. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of Serbia, Grant No 175032

  7. Efficiency and outcome of non-invasive versus invasive positive pressure ventilation therapy in respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri Maleh, Valiollah; Monadi, Mahmood; Heidari, Behzad; Maleh, Parviz Amri; Bijani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Application noninvasive ventilation in the patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) reduced mortality. This case-control study was designed to compare efficiency and outcome of non-invasive (NIV) versus invasive positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) in respiratory failure due to COPD. Methods: The patients were assigned to NIV or IPPV intermittantly.The clinical parameters, including RR (respiratory rate), BP (blood pressure), HR (heart rate) and PH, PaCO2, PaO2 before and 1, 4 and 24 h after treatment were measured. Demographic information such as age, sex, severity of disease based on APACHE score, length of stay and outcome were recorded. Results: Fifty patients were enrolled in the NIV group and 50 patients in IPPV. The mean age was 70.5 in NIV and 63.9 in invasive ventilation group (p>0.05). In IPPV group, the average values of PH: PCO2: and PO2, were 7.22±0.11, 69.64 + 24.25: and 68.86±24.41 .In NIV, the respective values were 7.30±0.07, 83.94±18.95, and 60.60±19.88. In NIV group, after 1, 4 and 24 h treatment, the clinical and ventilation parameters were stable. The mean APACHE score in was IPPV, 26.46±5.45 and in NIV was 12.26±5.54 (p<0.05). The average length of hospital stay in IPPV was 15.90±10 and in NIV 8.12±6.49 days (p<0.05). The total mortality in the NIV was 4 (8%) and in IPPV, 27 patients (54%) (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study indicates that using NIPPV is a useful therapeutic mode of treatment for respiratory failure with acceptable success rate and lower mortality. The application of NIPPV reduces hospital stay, intubation and its consequent complications. PMID:27386061

  8. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Taylor, Alexandra C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-10-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of hepatic encephalopathy and can affect up to 80% of patients with liver cirrhosis. By definition, MHE is characterized by cognitive function impairment in the domains of attention, vigilance and integrative function, but obvious clinical manifestation are lacking. MHE has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. The diagnosis can be achieved through neuropsychological testing, recently developed computerized psychometric tests, such as the critical flicker frequency and the inhibitory control tests, as well as neurophysiological procedures. Event related potentials can reveal subtle changes in patients with normal neuropsychological performances. Spectral analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) and quantitative analysis of sleep EEG provide early markers of cerebral dysfunction in cirrhotic patients with MHE. Neuroimaging, in particular MRI, also increasingly reveals diffuse abnormalities in intrinsic brain activity and altered organization of functional connectivity networks. Medical treatment for MHE to date has been focused on reducing serum ammonia levels and includes non-absorbable disaccharides, probiotics or rifaximin. Liver transplantation may not reverse the cognitive deficits associated with MHE. We performed here an updated review on epidemiology, burden and quality of life, neuropsychological testing, neuroimaging, neurophysiology and therapy in subjects with MHE.

  9. Self-administration and interviewer-administration of the German Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire: instrument development and assessment of validity and reliability in two randomised studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lichtenschopf Alfred

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQL is important in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Despite the high prevalence of COPD in Germany, Switzerland and Austria there is no validated disease-specific instrument available. The objective of this study was to translate the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ, one of the most widely used respiratory HRQL questionnaires, into German, develop an interviewer- and self-administered version including both standardised and individualised dyspnoea questions, and validate these versions in two randomised studies. Methods We recruited three groups of patients with COPD in Switzerland, Germany and Austria. The 44 patients of the first group completed the CRQ during pilot testing to adapt the CRQ to German-speaking patients. We then recruited 80 patients participating in pulmonary rehabilitation programs to assess internal consistency reliability and cross-sectional validity of the CRQ. The third group consisted of 38 patients with stable COPD without an intervention to assess test-retest reliability. To compare the interviewer- and self-administered versions, we randomised patients in groups 2 and 3 to the interviewer- or self-administered CRQ. Patients completed both the standardised and individualised dyspnoea questions. Results For both administration formats and all domains, we found good internal consistency reliability (Crohnbach's alpha between 0.73 and 0.89. Cross-sectional validity tended to be better for the standardised compared to the individualised dyspnoea questions and cross-sectional validity was slightly better for the self-administered format. Test-retest reliability was good for both the interviewer-administered CRQ (intraclass correlation coefficients for different domains between 0.81 and 0.95 and the self-administered format (intraclass correlation coefficients between 0.78 and 0.86. Lower within-person variability was

  10. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy Presenting with Acute Cognitive Dysfunction and Convulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo-Hyuk; Na, Ju-Young; Kim, Meyung-Kug; Yoo, Bong-Goo

    2013-12-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by acute or subacute encephalopathy related to increased anti-thyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy may include stroke-like episodes, altered consciousness, psychosis, myoclonus, abnormal movements, seizures, and cognitive dysfunction. Acute cognitive dysfunction with convulsion as initial clinical manifestations of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is very rare. We report a 65-year-old man who developed acute onset of cognitive decline and convulsion due to Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

  11. Chronic respiratory disfunction due to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and primary vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Aceves, Eva; Pérez Cristóbal, Mario; Espinola Reyna, Gerardo A; Ariza Andraca, Raul; Xibille Fridmann, Daniel; Barile Fabris, Leonor A

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage (PH) occurs in 2-5% of SLE patients, and is associated with a high mortality rate (79-90%). Diagnostic criteria for this complication include: 1) Pulmonary infiltrates, with at least ¾ of lung tissue involved in a chest x ray, 2) Acute respiratory failure, 3) A decrease of 3g/dL or more in hemoglobin levels. PH might lead to organized pneumonia, collagen deposition, and pulmonary fibrosis which in time might cause changes in pulmonary function tests with either restrictive or obstructive patterns. To evaluate the existence of abnormalities in pulmonary function tests after a PH episode. We included patients with SLE and primary vasculitis that developed PH. During the acute episode, we measured SLEDAI in SLE patients, five factor score in microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Store (BVAS) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) (Wegener). We determined the number of PH events, treatment, and ventilator assistance requirements and correlated its association with abnormal pulmonary function tests. We included 10 patients, 7 with SLE, 2 with MPA and 1 with GPA (Wegener). The mean activity measures were: SLEDAI 20.4 ± 7.5, FFS 2, and BVAS 36. Treatment consisted in methylprednisolone (MPD) in 3 patients, MPD plus cyclophosphamide (CY) in 6 patients, and MPD, CY, IV immunoglobulin, and plasmapheresis in one patient. Five patients required ventilatory support. We found abnormalities in pulmonary function tests in 8 patients, three had an obstructive pattern and five a restrictive pattern; 2 patients did not show any change. We did not find a significant association with any of the studied variables. PH might cause abnormalities in pulmonary function tests and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment could be required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Biallelic TBCD Mutations Cause Early-Onset Neurodegenerative Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Noriko; Fukai, Ryoko; Ohba, Chihiro; Chihara, Takahiro; Miura, Masayuki; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Imagawa, Eri; Shiina, Masaaki; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Okuno-Yuguchi, Jiu; Fueki, Noboru; Ogiso, Yoshifumi; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Watabe, Yoshiyuki; Imataka, George; Leong, Huey Yin; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Kramer, Uri; Miyatake, Satoko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Sato, Yoshinori; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo; Kaneko, Naofumi; Nishiyama, Akira; Tamura, Tomohiko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-10-06

    We describe four families with affected siblings showing unique clinical features: early-onset (before 1 year of age) progressive diffuse brain atrophy with regression, postnatal microcephaly, postnatal growth retardation, muscle weakness/atrophy, and respiratory failure. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified biallelic TBCD mutations in eight affected individuals from the four families. TBCD encodes TBCD (tubulin folding co-factor D), which is one of five tubulin-specific chaperones playing a pivotal role in microtubule assembly in all cells. A total of seven mutations were found: five missense mutations, one nonsense, and one splice site mutation resulting in a frameshift. In vitro cell experiments revealed the impaired binding between most mutant TBCD proteins and ARL2, TBCE, and β-tubulin. The in vivo experiments using olfactory projection neurons in Drosophila melanogaster indicated that the TBCD mutations caused loss of function. The wide range of clinical severity seen in this neurodegenerative encephalopathy may result from the residual function of mutant TBCD proteins. Furthermore, the autopsied brain from one deceased individual showed characteristic neurodegenerative findings: cactus and somatic sprout formations in the residual Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, which are also seen in some diseases associated with mitochondrial impairment. Defects of microtubule formation caused by TBCD mutations may underlie the pathomechanism of this neurodegenerative encephalopathy. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of conventional physical therapy and Pilates in functionality, respiratory muscle strength and ability to exercise in hospitalized chronic renal patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Lais A; Pinto, Juliana Sst; da Silva, Ana Pp; Cabral, Cristina Mn; Chiavegato, Luciana D

    2017-04-01

    To compare the effect of conventional physical therapy and Pilates on function, restoration, and exercise ability in hospitalized chronic renal patients. A total of 56 inpatients were randomized into two groups: Conventional physical therapy and Pilates. The primary outcomes were functionality (Barthel Index), respiratory muscle strength (manovacuometry), and ability to exercise (step test) evaluated in the following periods: preintervention, after the 5th session, and after the 10th session or at discharge. Three months after randomization, the Barthel Index was applied over the phone. At the end of the 10 sessions or at discharge, the length of hospital stay was calculated and the level of satisfaction with physical therapy care was assessed (MedRisk). Linear mixed models were used for the primary outcomes and the Student's t-test was used for length of stay and satisfaction. There was no significant between-group difference in functionality (MD -1.3; 95% CI -2.8 to 5.4), inspiratory and expiratory muscle strength (MD -1.3; 95% CI -7.3 to 4.5/MD -4.5; 95% CI -0.7 to 9.7, respectively), performance in the step test (MD -3.3; 95% CI -6.2 to 12.8), patient satisfaction with physical therapy care (MD -2.0; 95% CI -5.1 to 9.1), and length of stay (MD 4.5; 95% CI -15.9 to 6.8). Both interventions, conventional physical therapy and Pilates, showed improvements and there is no difference between them. Therefore both can be used in chronic renal patients.

  14. Clinical profile and outcome of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra C Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinico-radiographic syndrome of multiple etiologies. Still, the exact pathophysiology of PRES is not clear. Aims and Objectives: To study demographic, etiological, and clinic-radiological profiles of patients presenting with PRES and their outcome at the tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: A retrospective observational and non-interventional study was conducted at tertiary care center in from January 2009 to December 2013 at Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad. Inclusion Criteria: The clinical history of acute neurologic change including headache, encephalopathy, seizure, visual disturbance, or focal deficit with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI brain imaging findings of focal vasogenic edema with clinical or radiologic proof of reversibility. Results: Of a total 43 patients with suspected diagnosis of PRES, 29 patients were included fulfilling all inclusion criteria of PRES. Of total the 29 patients with confirmed diagnosis of PRES, 22 (75.86% were female and 7 (24.13% were male patients, predominated by female population (relative risk [RR]: 3.14; odds ration [OR]: 9.87; ′P′ < 0.001. The overall mean age was 33.65 years (±15.26 and mean duration of stay was 10.13 days (±4.98. The most common clinical presentation was generalized tonic-clonic seizures, seen in 23 (79.31% patients, headache in 21 (72.41% patients, and visual disturbances 13 (44.82% patients. A total of 18 (62.06% patients were hypertensive and 11 (37.93% were normotensive [RR: 1.63]. A total of 6 (27.27% females and 5 (71.42% males were normotensive and total 16 (72.72% females and 2 (28.57% males were hypertensive (RR: 1.12. Of a total of 22 female patients with PRES, 19 (86.36% were in a postpartum state, one (4.45% had systemic lupus erythematous (SLE, one (4.54% had community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS with septicemia and one (4

  15. Noninvasive ventilation in hypercapnic acute respiratory failure due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease vs. other conditions: effectiveness and predictors of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Jason; Kong, Kien; Lee, Kang Hoe; Shen, Liang; Lim, T K

    2005-04-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and the risk factors for NIV failure in hypercapnic acute respiratory failure (ARF) due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) vs. non-COPD conditions. Prospective cohort study in the medical intensive care unit of a university hospital. 111 patients with hypercapnic ARF, 43 of whom had COPD exacerbations and 68 other conditions. Baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. The risk of NIV failure, defined as the need for endotracheal intubation, was significantly lower in COPD than in other conditions (19% vs. 47%). High APACHE II score was an independent predictor of NIV failure in COPD (OR 5.38 per 5 points). The presence of pneumonia (OR 5.63), high APACHE II score (OR 2.59 per 5 points), rapid heart rate (OR 1.22 per 5 beats/min), and high PaCO(2) 1 h after NIV (OR 1.22 per 5 mmHg) were independent predictors of NIV failure in the non-COPD group. Failure of NIV independently predicted mortality (OR 10.53). Noninvasive ventilation was more effective in preventing endotracheal intubation in hypercapnic ARF due to COPD than non-COPD conditions. High APACHE II score predicted NIV failure in both groups. Noninvasive ventilation was least effective in patients with hypercapnic ARF due to pneumonia.

  16. The effects of Chinese yam-epimedium mixture on respiratory function and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-ling; Song, Hong-ru; Fei, Jin-xiu; Liang, Ying; Zhang, Bing-hua; Liu, Qiu-ping; Wang, Juan; Hu, Ping

    2012-06-01

    To examine the clinical effects of a mixture of Chinese Yam and epimedium in patients with stable moderate or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Forty-nine patients with COPD were randomly allocated to a group whose usual treatment was supplemented with oral Chinese yam-epimedium mixture, or a control group given placebo. For each patient, body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity were measured and converted into the BODE index before treatment and at one and three months after initiation of treatment. Participants also completed the St. George's respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ) at the same intervals. After one month, improvements were seen in the BODE index and SGRQ of participants taking Chinese yam-epimedium mixture compared to controls. There were statistically significant differences in the SGRQ: three of its components and the total SGRQ scores were significantly decreased (P yam-epimedium mixture can significantly improve dyspnea, exercise capacity, and the quality of life of patients with stable moderate or severe COPD.

  17. Contemporary management of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: an evidence-based review with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joshua M; Rudmik, Luke; Peters, Anju T; Wise, Sarah K; Rotenberg, Brian W; Smith, Timothy L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) represents a recalcitrant form of sinonasal inflammation for which a multidisciplinary consensus on patient management has not been reached. Several medical interventions have been investigated, but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach for the multidisciplinary management of CRS in AERD. A systematic review of the literature was performed and the guidelines for development of an evidence-based review with recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria included: adult population >18 years old; CRS based on published diagnostic criteria, and a presumptive diagnosis of AERD. We focused on reporting higher-quality studies (level 2 or higher) when available, but reported lower-quality studies if the topic contained insufficient evidence. Treatment recommendations were based on American Academy of Otolaryngology (AAO) guidelines, with defined grades of evidence and evaluation of research quality and risk/benefits associated with each treatment. This review identified and evaluated the literature on 3 treatment strategies for CRS in AERD: dietary salicylate avoidance, leukotriene modification, and desensitization with daily aspirin therapy. Based on the available evidence, dietary salicylate avoidance and leukotriene-modifying drugs are options following appropriate treatment with nasal corticosteroids and saline irrigation. Desensitization with daily aspirin therapy is recommended following revision endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  18. Predictors of mortality of patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to an intensive care unit: A one year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banga Amit

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD commonly require hospitalization and admission to intensive care unit (ICU. It is useful to identify patients at the time of admission who are likely to have poor outcome. This study was carried out to define the predictors of mortality in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD and to device a scoring system using the baseline physiological variables for prognosticating these patients. Methods Eighty-two patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to COPD admitted to medical ICU over a one-year period were included. Clinical and demographic profile at the time of admission to ICU including APACHE II score and Glasgow coma scale were recorded at the time of admission to ICU. In addition, acid base disorders, renal functions, liver functions and serum albumin, were recorded at the time of presentation. Primary outcome measure was hospital mortality. Results Invasive ventilation was required in 69 patients (84.1%. Fifty-two patients survived to hospital discharge (63.4%. APACHE II score at the time of admission to ICU {odds ratio (95 % CI: 1.32 (1.138–1.532; p Conclusion APACHE II score at admission and SA levels with in 24 hrs after admission are independent predictors of mortality for patients with COPD admitted to ICU. The equation derived from these two parameters is useful for predicting outcome of these patients.

  19. Short-term respiratory effects of 0. 12 ppm ozone exposure in volunteers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, W.S.; Fischer, D.A.; Medway, D.A.; Anzar, U.T.; Spier, C.E.; Valencia, L.M.; Venet, T.G.; Hackney, J.D.

    1982-06-01

    Twenty-five volunteers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease of mild to moderately severe degree underwent 1-h exposures to 0.12 ppm ozone (O/sub 2/) in purified air with intermittent mild exercise. Their responses were assessed in terms of forced expiratory performance, ear oximetry, and reported symptoms. Control studied consisted of similar exposures to purified air alone. Control studies were separated from O/sub 2/ exposures by 1 month, and the order was randomized. All studies took place in a controlled-environment chamber, and were preceded by approximately 1 h of rest in a purified-air environment. No significant disturbances in forced expiratory performance or symptoms attributable to O/sub 2/ exposure were found. A slight but significant tendency to decreased arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SaO/sub 2/) during exercise in O/sub 2/ was observed. The decrement in SaO/sub 2/ with O/sub 2/ relative to clean air (mean 1.3%) was near the limit of resolution of the ear oximeter test and was detected by signal averaging, thus its physiologic or clinical significance is uncertain.

  20. Betaine Treatment Attenuates Chronic Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Alterations to the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Proteome

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    Kusum K. Kharbanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mitochondrial damage and disruption in oxidative phosphorylation contributes to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the hepatoprotective actions of betaine against alcoholic liver injury occur at the level of the mitochondrial proteome. Methods. Male Wister rats were pair-fed control or ethanol-containing liquid diets supplemented with or without betaine (10 mg/mL for 4-5 wks. Liver was examined for triglyceride accumulation, levels of methionine cycle metabolites, and alterations in mitochondrial proteins. Results. Chronic ethanol ingestion resulted in triglyceride accumulation which was attenuated in the ethanol plus betaine group. Blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE revealed significant decreases in the content of the intact oxidative phosphorylation complexes in mitochondria from ethanol-fed animals. The alcohol-dependent loss in many of the low molecular weight oxidative phosphorylation proteins was prevented by betaine supplementation. This protection by betaine was associated with normalization of SAM : S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH ratios and the attenuation of the ethanol-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide generation in the liver. Discussion/Conclusion. In summary, betaine attenuates alcoholic steatosis and alterations to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Therefore, preservation of mitochondrial function may be another key molecular mechanism responsible for betaine hepatoprotection.

  1. Research advances of the correlation between chronic rhinosinusitis and lower respiratory tract diseases%慢性鼻-鼻窦炎与下呼吸道疾病的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱旭利; 高静

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis is an inflammatory disease of the upper respiratory tract, and has an important impact on the lower respiratory tract diseases. Epidemiological and clinical studies have proved that the upper and lower respiratory tract inflammatory diseases are usually combined. The view of the"united airway disease"is widely accepted by the medical community. The upper and lower respiratory tract are continued in anatomical structure, and have similar morphology and physiological function, so that the inlfammation can be mutually involved. In this paper, the relationship and possible mechanisms between chronic rhinosinusitis and lower respiratory tract diseases are reviewed, which provide theoretical basis for the comprehensive treatment and prevention of upper and lower respiratory tract diseases.%慢性鼻-鼻窦炎作为上呼吸道炎症性疾病,对下呼吸道疾病有重要影响。流行病学和临床研究已证明上、下呼吸道炎性疾病通常合并存在,“联合气道疾病”观点随着研究的深入,逐渐得到医学界的广泛认同。上、下呼吸道各部在解剖结构上延续,组织形态及生理功能上相似,所以炎症发生时可以相互累及。本文就慢性鼻-鼻窦炎与下呼吸道疾病的相关关系及可能机制进行综述,为上、下呼吸道疾病的综合治疗和预防提供理论依据。

  2. Immediate and long-term effects in the hematopoietic system and the morphology of the respiratory system in experimental animals under chronic combined action of external gamma exposure and inhalation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarkin, Sergey; Moukhamedieva, Lana; Aleksandr, Shafirkin; Barantseva, Maria; Ivanova, Svetlana

    The need to solve hygiene problems valuation of environmental factors in the implementation of the projected manned interplanetary missions, determined the relevance of studying the effect of external gamma-irradiation with inhalation of mixtures of chemicals on the parameters of major critical body systems: hematopoiesis and respiratory (morphological and morphometric parameters) in the short and long periods. The study conducted on 504 male mice F1 (CBA × C57BL6) under chronic fractional gamma-irradiation (within 10 weeks at a total dose 350sGr) and then under inhalation by mixtures of chemicals in low concentrations. Duration of the experiment (124 days) and 90 -day recovery period. Displaying adaptive reorganization in hematopoietic system, which was characterized by a tension of regulatory systems of animals and by a proliferation of bone marrow cells and by dynamic changes in amount of lymphoid cells in peripheral blood, elevated levels of the antioxidant activity of red blood cells, and morphological manifestations of "incomplete recovery " of the spleen, which are retained in the recovery period. Morphological changes in the respiratory organs of animals testified about immunogenesis activation and development of structural changes as a chronic inflammatory process. Increase of fibrous connective tissue in the walls of the trachea, bronchus and lung, against reduction of loose fibrous connective tissue (more pronounced in respiratory parts of the respiratory system) in experimental animals, which may indicate a reduction of the functional reserves of the body and increase the risk of adverse long-term effects.

  3. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jan-Shun; Chang, Tien-Chun

    2014-11-01

    Both severe thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism may affect brain function and cause a change in consciousness, as seen with a thyroid storm or myxedema coma. However, encephalopathy may also develop in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases independent of actual thyroid function level, and this is known as Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Although most patients are found to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, less frequently they have Graves' disease. Clinical manifestations include epilepsy, disturbance of consciousness, cognitive impairment, memory loss, myoclonus, hallucinations, stroke-like episodes, tremor, involuntary movements, language impairment, and gait impairment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a relatively rare disease. As a good response can be obtained with corticosteroid therapy, early diagnosis and treatment is very beneficial for patients. Here we report three patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy with typical manifestations of hallucinations that were associated with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and euthyroid status, respectively. They all showed a dramatic response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: Report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Shun Chang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Both severe thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism may affect brain function and cause a change in consciousness, as seen with a thyroid storm or myxedema coma. However, encephalopathy may also develop in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases independent of actual thyroid function level, and this is known as Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Although most patients are found to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, less frequently they have Graves' disease. Clinical manifestations include epilepsy, disturbance of consciousness, cognitive impairment, memory loss, myoclonus, hallucinations, stroke-like episodes, tremor, involuntary movements, language impairment, and gait impairment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a relatively rare disease. As a good response can be obtained with corticosteroid therapy, early diagnosis and treatment is very beneficial for patients. Here we report three patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy with typical manifestations of hallucinations that were associated with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and euthyroid status, respectively. They all showed a dramatic response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  5. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: a rare pediatric brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Ryan M; Foster, Michael B; Omoruyi, Adetokunbo O; Kingery, Suzanne E; Wintergerst, Kupper A

    2015-05-01

    We report a 9-year-old female who presented with new onset intractable seizure activity followed by a prolonged encephalopathic state. After ruling out common etiologies, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) was considered, and antibody levels to thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin were both markedly elevated in her serum. She was euthyroid at the time of presentation. Upon treatment with high dose methylprednisolone, the patient demonstrated a significant improvement in her encephalopathy. The diagnosis of HE requires strong clinical suspicion with evidence of antithyroid antibodies, as well as an encephalopathy not explained by another etiology. While well documented in the adult literature, only a handful of pediatric cases have been described to date. Patients with HE have a nearly universal response to high dose glucocorticoids. HE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient, adult or pediatric, who displays prolonged, unexplainable encephalopathy.

  6. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis...

  7. Hypoxic Ischaemic Encephalopathy among Asphyxiated Nigeran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... A significantly higher proportion of the babies with HIE had seizures ... Keywords: Asphyxia, Encephalopathy, Neurodevelopmental outcome, Newborn, Seizure.

  8. Metabolic encephalopathy in Egyptian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindawy, A; Gouda, A; El-Ayyadi, A; Megahed, H; Bazaraa, H

    2007-01-01

    Fatty Acid Oxidation disorders represent an expanding group of inborn errors of metabolism. Clinical manifestations include episodic encephalopathy, hypoketotic hypoglycemia, Reye like episodes, hepatic, muscular, cardiac affection and sudden death. Analysis of urinary organic acids and plasma fatty acids of 44 clinically suspected patients by Gas Chromatography Mass spectrometry revealed 4 cases of Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD), 3 cases of Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, 9 cases of multiple defects of acyl-CoA dehydrogenation in addition to 3 patients with other metabolic disorders. Timely detection of these disorders including screening for MCADD can have a favorable impact on the outcome of these patients (Tab. 11, Fig. 3, Ref. 24) Full Text (Free, PDF).

  9. Relationships between respiratory and airway resistances and activity-related dyspnea in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plantier L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Mahut1,2, Aurore Caumont-Prim3,4, Laurent Plantier1,5, Karine Gillet-Juvin1,6, Etienne Callens1, Olivier Sanchez5,6, Brigitte Chevalier-Bidaud3, Plamen Bokov1, Christophe Delclaux1,5,71Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Service de Physiologie – Clinique de la Dyspnée, F-75015 Paris, France; 2Cabinet La Berma, 4 avenue de la Providence; F-92160 Antony, France; 3AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Unité d'Épidémiologie et de Recherche Clinique, F-75015 Paris, France; 4INSERM, Centre d'Investigation Épidémiologique 4, F-75015 Paris, France; 5Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculté de Médecine, F-75015 Paris, France; 6AP-HP, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Service de Pneumologie; F-75015 Paris, France; 7CIC 9201 Plurithématique, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, F-75015 Paris, FranceBackground: The aims of the study were: (1 to compare numerical parameters of specific airway resistance (total, sRawtot, effective, sRaweff and at 0.5 L • s-1, sRaw0.5 and indices obtained from the forced oscillation technique (FOT: resistance extrapolated at 0 Hz [Rrs0 Hz], mean resistance [Rrsmean], and resistance/frequency slope [Rrsslope] and (2 to assess their relationships with dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Methods: A specific statistical approach, principal component analysis that also allows graphic representation of all correlations between functional parameters was used. A total of 108 patients (mean ± SD age: 65 ± 9 years, 31 women; GOLD stages: I, 14; II, 47; III, 39 and IV, 8 underwent spirometry, body plethysmography, FOT, and Medical Research Council (MRC scale assessments.Results: Principal component analysis determined that the functional parameters were described by three independent dimensions (airway caliber, lung volumes and their combination, specific resistance and that resistance parameters of the two techniques

  10. Differentiation of ruminant transmissible spongiform encephalopathy isolate types, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy and CH1641 scrapie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.G.; Sauer, M.; Keulen, van L.J.M.; Tang, Y.; Bossers, A.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    With increased awareness of the diversity of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) strains in the ruminant population, comes an appreciation of the need for improved methods of differential diagnosis. Exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been associated with the human TSE,

  11. Epidemiological features and risk factors of sepsis-associated encephalopathy in intensive care unit patients: 2008-2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-na; WANG Xiao-ting; AI Yu-hang; GUO Qu-lian; HUANG Li; LIU Zhi-yong; Yao Bo

    2012-01-01

    Background Encephalopathy is a common complication of sepsis,and its onset can occur at any stage of sepsis and implies worse prognosis.However,the incidence,epidemiology,and pathogenesis of sepsis-associated encephalopathy remain controversial.The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiological features and risk factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy.Methods Our retrospective study included all patients with sepsis admitted to our intensive care unit from 2008 to 2011.After excluding 91 patients,232 patients were assigned to either a sepsis-associated encephalopathy group or sepsis without encephalopathy group.Between-group differences in baseline patient data including vital signs,disease severity,pathogens,sites of infection,biochemical indicators,and time on a mechanical ventilator,intensive care unit (ICU) stay,and 28-day mortality rate were analyzed.Results The incidence of sepsis-associated encephalopathy was 17.7%.The sepsis-associated encephalopathy group had significantly higher 28-day mortality (56.1% vs.35.1%; P=0.013),spent a significantly longer time on a ventilator ((8.2±2.2) days vs.(2.9±0.4) days; P=0.021),and had a significantly longer ICU stay ((12.4±2.4) days vs.(7.1±0.6) days;P=0.042).Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation Ⅱ score,Glasgow coma scale,heart rate,blood lactate,serum sodium,platelets,serum albumin,and pH values were related to the presence of encephalopathy.Patients with biliary tract infections and intestinal infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus,Enterococcus faecium,Acinetobacter spp,Pseudomonas aeruginosa,and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia,were more prone to develop sepsis-associated encephalopathy.Conclusions Encephalopathy increases mortality rate in septic patients.Clinical intervention to reduce risk factors and thereby morbidity and mortality depends on a correct understanding of the differences between patients with sepsis and patients with both sepsis and encephalopathy.

  12. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: state of the art (II part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last years Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV has been playing an important role in the treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF. Prospective randomised controlled trials have shown improvements in clinical features (respiratory rate, neurological score, pH and arterial blood gases and in particular clinical conditions (Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema, ACPE, and acute exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, COPD systematic reviews and metha-analysis confirm a reduction in the need for intubation and in-hospital mortality compared to standard medical treatment. Methods: The most important techniques of ventilation in spontaneous breathing are: Continuous Positive Airway Pression (CPAP, usually performed with Venturi-like flow generators, and bi-level positive pressure ventilation (an high inspiratory pressure and a low expiratory pressure, performed with ventilators. Facial mask rather than nasal mask is used in ARF: the helmet is useful for prolonged treatments. Results: NIV’s success seems to be determined by early application, correct selection of patients and staff training. Controindications to NIV are: cardiac or respiratory arrest, a respiratory rate < 12 per minute, upper airway obstruction, hemodynamic instability or unstable cardiac arrhythmia, encephalopathy (Kelly score > 3, facial surgery trauma or deformity, inability to cooperate or protect the airway, high risk of aspiration and an inability to clear respiratory secretions. Conclusions: Bi-level ventilation for ARF due to COPD and CPAP or bi-level bentilation for ARF due to ACPE are feasible, safe and effective also in a General Medical ward if the selection of patients, the staff’s training and the monitoring are appropriate: they improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, prevent ETI, decrease mortality and hospitalisation. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting.

  13. Association of serum interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score with clinical outcome in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaroopa, Deme; Bhaskar, Kakarla; Mahathi, T.; Katkam, Shivakrishna; Raju, Y. Satyanarayana; Chandra, Naval; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: Studies on potential biomarkers in experimental models of acute lung injury (ALI) and clinical samples from patients with ALI have provided evidence to the pathophysiology of the mechanisms of lung injury and predictor of clinical outcome. Because of the high mortality and substantial variability in outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), identification of biomarkers such as cytokines is important to determine prognosis and guide clinical decision-making. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have included thirty patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit diagnosed with ARDS, and serum samples were collected on day 1 and 7 and were analyzed for serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 by ELISA method, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scoring was done on day 1. Results: The mortality in the patients observed with ARDS was 34%. APACHE II score was significantly higher in nonsurvivors as compared to survivors. There were no significant differences in gender and biochemical and hematological parameters among the survivors and nonsurvivors. Serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels on day 1 were significantly higher in all the ARDS patients as compared to healthy controls and these levels were returned to near-normal basal levels on day 7. The serum IL-6 and IL-8 levels measured on day 7 were of survivors. As compared to survivors, the IL-6 and IL-8 levels were significantly higher in nonsurvivors measured on day 1. Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive correlation of APACHE II with IL-8. By using APACHE II score, IL-6, and IL-8, the receiver operating characteristic curve was plotted and the provided predictable accuracy of mortality (outcome) was 94%. Conclusion: The present study highlighted the importance of measuring the cytokines such as IL-6 and IL-8 in patients with ARDS in predicting the clinical outcome. PMID:27688627

  14. Significance of Aspergillus spp.isolation from lower respiratory tract samples for the diagnosis and prognosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hang-yong; CHANG Shuo; DING Lin; SUN Bing; LI Fang; ZHAN Qing-yuan

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) is an emerging population at risk for invasive infection of Aspergillus.Isolation of Aspergillus from lower respiratory tract (LRT) samples is important for the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA).The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of Aspergillus isolation from LRT samples for the diagnosis and prognosis of IPA in COPD population.Methods Clinical record with Aspergillus spp.isolation in COPD and immunocompromised patients was reviewed in a retrospective study.Patients were categorized and compared according to their severity of illness (admitted to general ward or ICU) and immunological function (COPD or immunocompromised).Results Multivariate statistical analysis showed that,combined with Aspergillus spp.isolation,APACHE Ⅱ scores >18,high cumulative doses of corticosteroids (>350 mg prednisone or equivalent dose) and more than four kinds of broad-spectrum antibiotics received in hospital may be predictors of IPA in COPD (OR=9.076,P=0.001; OR=4.073,P=-0.026; OR=4.448,P=0.021,respectively).The incidence of IPA,overall mortality,mortality of patients with IPA and mortality of patients with Aspergillus spp.colonization were higher in COPD patients in ICU than in general ward,but were similar between COPD and immunocompromised patients.Conclusions Aspergilltus spp.isolation from LRT in COPD may be of similar importance as in immunocompromised patients,and may indicate an increased diagnosis possibility of IPA and worse prognosis when these patients received corticosteroids,antibiotics,and need to admit to ICU.Aspergillus spp.isolation from LRT samples combined with certain risk factors may be useful in differentiating colonization from IPA and evaluating the prognosis of IPA in COPD patients.

  15. Respiratory health effects in pig farmers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes a cross-sectional study of risk factors of chronic respiratory health effects in pig farmers working in the South of the Netherlands. The study population comprised 100 pig farmers with and 100 pig farmers without chronic respiratory symptoms. Base-line lung function, non-speci

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishnavi Chandramohan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by headache, nausea, vomiting, seizures and visual disturbances. PRES has been usually associated with hypertension, chronic renal disease, malignancy and chemotherapeutic agents. We report the association of PRES with Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, which to our best knowledge has not been reported before.

  17. Is Encephalopathy a Mechanism to Renew Sulfate in Autism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Lentz-Marino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes two claims: (1 autism can be characterized as a chronic low-grade encephalopathy, associated with excess exposure to nitric oxide, ammonia and glutamate in the central nervous system, which leads to hippocampal pathologies and resulting cognitive impairment, and (2, encephalitis is provoked by a systemic deficiency in sulfate, but associated seizures and fever support sulfate restoration. We argue that impaired synthesis of cholesterol sulfate in the skin and red blood cells, catalyzed by sunlight and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, creates a state of colloidal instability in the blood manifested as a low zeta potential and increased interfacial stress. Encephalitis, while life-threatening, can result in partial renewal of sulfate supply, promoting neuronal survival. Research is cited showing how taurine may not only help protect neurons from hypochlorite exposure, but also provide a source for sulfate renewal. Several environmental factors can synergistically promote the encephalopathy of autism, including the herbicide, glyphosate, aluminum, mercury, lead, nutritional deficiencies in thiamine and zinc, and yeast overgrowth due to excess dietary sugar. Given these facts, dietary and lifestyle changes, including increased sulfur ingestion, organic whole foods, increased sun exposure, and avoidance of toxins such as aluminum, mercury, and lead, may help to alleviate symptoms or, in some instances, to prevent autism altogether.

  18. Current status of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penders J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE encompass subacute neurological degenerative diseases for which the prototypes are scrapie in sheep and some forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in man. The emergence of a new form of TSE in cattle in United Kingdom (UK since 1986, namely bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, sharply increased the interest for these diseases, especially because of the epidemic nature of BSE in UK, its subsequent spread in continental Europe and the later discovery of its zoonotic character. The number of measures of veterinary public health taken to control the disease and to prevent its spread to animals and human beings increased in time and culminated by the total feed ban. Indeed, since the beginning of 2001, feed containing proteins of animal origin is prohibited for the feeding of production animals, including ruminants and monogastric species. The effect of this total ban of mammalian meat and bone meal needs to be evaluated. The incidence of BSE has a trend to decrease in UK and in most of the other European member states. However, as BSE is a rare event distributed in a large bovine population, it is difficult to state unambiguously whether this trend is significant. Furthermore, the evaluation of this measure will be only effective at least five years after its introduction, since this period is the mean incubation time of BSE. The main concern is currently the eradication of BSE in the infected countries. Additionally, the control of scrapie is also carried out due to the possible contamination of sheep with the BSE agent. These actions must take into account several new facts: the recent discovery of BSE cases in countries with a low geographical BSE risk level as Japan, Canada and the United States of America (USA; the growing incidence of chronic wasting disease, a spongiform encephalopathy observed in deer in USA; the characterization of a new pattern of bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy in

  19. Cognitive impairments in Hashimoto's encephalopathy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhong; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Lan; Shi, Yunbo; Wu, Xunyi; Guo, Qihao

    2013-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is considered as a treatable dementia, but it is often misdiagnosed. We investigated cognitive impairment and the MRI pathology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients. The study comprised eight patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy, 16 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and 24 healthy subjects. A neuropsychological battery included assessments of memory, language, attention, executive function and visuospatial ability. Cranial MRI was obtained from all Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients. Hashimoto's encephalopathy and mild Alzheimer's disease showed cognitive impairments in episodic memory, attention, executive function and visuospatial ability, but naming ability was unaffected in Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The MRI of Hashimoto's encephalopathy showed leukoencephalopathy-like type or limbic encephalitis-like type; the lesions did not affect the temporal cortex which plays a role in naming ability. Except that the naming ability was retained, the impairments in cognitive functions for the Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients were similar to those of Alzheimer's disease patients. These results were consistent with the MRI findings.

  20. Nonabsorbable disaccharides for hepatic encephalopathy. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergaard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    Nonabsorbable disaccharides (lactulose or lactitol) are considered the treatment of choice for hepatic encephalopathy.......Nonabsorbable disaccharides (lactulose or lactitol) are considered the treatment of choice for hepatic encephalopathy....

  1. Genetics Home Reference: familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions FENIB familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies ( FENIB ) is a disorder that causes progressive ...

  2. Encephalopathy and Hypotonia due to Baclofen Toxicity in a Patient with End-Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Tariq, Hassan; KASHIF,MUHAMMAD; Marquez, Jose Gomez

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 57 Final Diagnosis: Baclofen toxicity Symptoms: Encephalopathy • hypotonia Medication: Baclofen Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis Specialty: Critical Care Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Baclofen is a centrally acting gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist used for the symptomatic relief of skeletal muscle spasm and spasticity in traumatic spinal cord lesions, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, and stroke. It is also used in the treatment of chronic ...

  3. RECURRENT HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY IN A CIRRHOTIC PATIENT WITH LARGE GASTRORENAL SHUNT: ONE CASE REPORT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪余勤; 汪保灿; 顾胜利; 范建高

    2011-01-01

    We presented a case of chronic recurrent hepatic encephalopathy occurring in a liver cirrhosis patient (Child Pugh A) with a large gastrorenal shunt and a review of the literature focusing on diagnosis and management. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated an atrophic liver, splenomegaly, varices at the gastric fundic and the splenic hilum, and a highly tortuous shunt vessel between the gastric fundic varices and the left renal vein. Ultrasonography revealed the portal vein diameter was 0.8 cm; and portal ve...

  4. Continuous intravenous flumazenil infusion in a patient with chlordiazepoxide toxicity and hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh′d Al-Halawani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flumazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, is the drug of choice for the diagnosis and treatment of benzodiazepine overdose. We are presenting a patient with chronic alcoholism and alcoholic liver disease, who came with alcohol withdrawal symptoms and treated chlordiazepoxide. Subsequently he developed a prolonged change in mental status that required treatment for benzodiazepine overdose and hepatic encephalopathy with flumazenil infusion for 28 days.

  5. Hashimoto's encephalopathy : epidemiology, pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Ramon; Walterfang, Mark; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a term used to describe an encephalopathy of presumed autoimmune origin characterised by high titres of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. In a similar fashion to autoimmune thyroid disease, Hashimoto's encephalopathy is more common in women than in men. It has been reported in paediatric, adult and elderly populations throughout the world. The clinical presentation may involve a relapsing and remitting course and include seizures, stroke-like episodes, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms and myoclonus. Thyroid function is usually clinically and biochemically normal.Hashimoto's encephalopathy appears to be a rare disorder, but, as it is responsive to treatment with corticosteroids, it must be considered in cases of 'investigation negative encephalopathies'. Diagnosis is made in the first instance by excluding other toxic, metabolic and infectious causes of encephalopathy with neuroimaging and CSF examination. Neuroimaging findings are often not helpful in clarifying the diagnosis. Common differential diagnoses when these conditions are excluded are Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, rapidly progressive dementias, and paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis. In the context of the typical clinical picture, high titres of antithyroid antibodies, in particular antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, are diagnostic. These antibodies, however, can be detected in elevated titres in the healthy general population. Treatment with corticosteroids is almost always successful, although relapse may occur if this treatment is ceased abruptly. Other forms of immunomodulation, such as intravenous immune-globulin and plasma exchange, may also be effective. Despite the link to autoimmune thyroid disease, the aetiology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is unknown. It is likely that antithyroid antibodies are not pathogenic, but titres can be a marker of treatment response. Pathological findings can suggest an inflammatory process, but features

  6. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDY OF SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

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    J. Meenupriya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spongiform encephalopathies, categorized as a subclass of neuro-degenerative diseases and commonly known as prion diseases, are a group of progressive conditions that affect the brain and nervous system of many animals, including humans. Prion diseases are common among cannibalistic communities; further research has revealed that the infected or malformed prion protein (named PrPsc spreads its virulence to the normal, healthy prion protein (named PrPc when people consume infected tissues. Knowing that a small interaction between normal and infected prion protein creates virulence, this relationship can be studied as a simple antigen-antibody interaction to understand the series of events that transform a normal prion protein into a virulent misfolded protein. Thoroughly modeled and validated structures of both PrPsc and PrPc can be effectively used to map the epitopes and thereby screen the antigen-antibody interaction using docking studies for a particular organism of concern. This simple immunological approach is used to understand the vital interaction between the normal and malformed proteins that is involved in the disease-spreading mechanism. Clarification of this mechanism could be used in various immune- and bioinformatics algorithms to map the interaction epitopes, furthering an understanding of these pathologies.

  7. Gut microbiota and hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Radha K

    2013-06-01

    There is a strong relationship between liver and gut; while the portal venous system receives blood from the gut, and its contents may affect liver functions, liver in turn, affects intestinal functions through bile secretion. There is robust evidence that the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is linked to alterations in gut microbiota and their by-products such as ammonia, indoles, oxindoles, endotoxins, etc. In the setting of intestinal barrier and immune dysfunction, these by-products are involved in the pathogenesis of complications of liver cirrhosis including HE and systemic inflammation plays an important role. Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics may exhibit efficacy in the treatment of HE by modulating the gut flora. They improve derangement in flora by decreasing the counts of pathogenic bacteria and thus improving the endotoxemia, HE and the liver disease. Current evidence suggest that the trials evaluating the role of probiotics in the treatment of HE are of not high quality and all trials had high risk of bias and high risk of random errors. Therefore, the use of probiotics for patients with HE cannot be currently recommended. Further RCTs are required. This review summarizes the main literature findings about the relationships between gut flora and HE, both in terms of the pathogenesis and the treatment of HE.

  8. Therapeutic approach to epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigevano, Federico; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Plouin, Perrine; Specchio, Nicola

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies (EEs) are electroclinical entities with a peculiar course of disease; seizures and electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptiform abnormalities, ictal and interictal, contribute to progressive disturbance of cerebral functions. Frequently EEs are drug resistant, and consequences may be catastrophic. The main goal of treatment is to stop the peculiar course of epilepsy, operating on three parameters: seizure control, reduction of EEG abnormalities, and developmental outcome. For a correct therapeutic approach it is mandatory to have an as accurate as possible syndromic and etiologic diagnosis. Given the poor efficacy of conventional antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), the use of specific drugs for EEs, such as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosteroids or stiripentol is suggested. In some cases the choice of treatment is strictly related to the etiology: vigabatrin in tuberous sclerosis, ketogenic diet in glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency, and pyridoxine in pyridoxine deficiency. Some AEDs combinations, such as sodium valproate with lamotrigine, have also provided interesting results, for example, in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, although controlled studies are lacking. Finally, early surgery can be an option in children with focal structural abnormalities responsible for EEs preferably before irreversible damage on developmental outcome. Multispecialist support is recommended in EE. Management should be global from the onset, integrating not only seizure control but also all issues related to comorbidities, particularly neuropsychological and psychiatric.

  9. Posterior encephalopathy with vasospasm: MRI and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidauer, S.; Gaa, J.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt, Schleusenweg 2-16, 60528, Frankfurt (Germany); Sitzer, M.; Hefner, R. [Department of Neurology, University of Frankfurt, Schleusenweg 2-16, 60528, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2003-12-01

    Posterior encephalopathy is characterised by headache, impairment of consciousness, seizures and progressive visual loss. MRI shows bilateral, predominantly posterior, cortical and subcortical lesions with a distribution. Our aim was to analyse the MRI lesion pattern and angiographic findings because the pathophysiology of posterior encephalopathy is incompletely understood. We report three patients with clinical and imaging findings consistent with posterior encephalopathy who underwent serial MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and construction of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and four-vessel digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DWI revealed symmetrical subcortical and cortical parieto-occipital high signal. High and also low ADCs indicated probable vasogenic and cytotoxic oedema. On follow-up there was focal cortical laminar necrosis, while the white-matter lesions resolved almost completely, except in the arterial border zones. DSA revealed diffuse arterial narrowing, slightly more marked in the posterior circulation. These findings suggest that posterior encephalopathy may in some cases be due to diffuse, severe vasospasm affecting especially in the parieto-occipital grey matter, with its higher vulnerability to ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm due to digitoxin intoxication, resulting in posterior encephalopathy, has not yet been described previously. (orig.)

  10. Early detection of hepatic encephalopathy by recording visual evoked potential (VEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Doron; Storch, Shimon; Kovach, Ivan; Storch, Rita; Zamir, Chen

    2002-01-01

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) record in response to a pattern stimulus is a non invasive and reliable method of detecting central and peripheral nerve system abnormalities. VEP recording have been used in animals with fulminant hepatic failure, and also in-patients with hepatic encephalopathy and acute severe hepatitis. Our aims were: a. to evaluate the potency of PVEP in assessing hepatic encephalopathy. b. to find the rate of pathologic PVEP in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. VEP was recorded in 14 chronic liver cirrhotic patients (6 alcoholic, 6 HCV-related, 2 cryptogenic) and 14 controls. Patients with any neurologic abnormalities were excluded from the study. All patients were subjected to the Mental State Score (MSS) test, and venous blood ammonia was measured on the same day of VEP recording. In 10/14 (71%) patients some VEP recording abnormality was detected. In the cirrhotic patients, P100 latency was significantly longer (P VEP developed hepatic encephalpathy during a follow-up of one year, compared to one out of 4 patients with no pathology on VEP recording. VEP recording may be a valuable tool in assessing patients with early hepatic encephalopathy and in predicting encephalopathy.

  11. Respiratory alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, G T; Vaziri, N D; Sassoon, C S

    2001-04-01

    Respiratory alkalosis is an extremely common and complicated problem affecting virtually every organ system in the body. This article reviews the various facets of this interesting problem. Respiratory alkalosis produces multiple metabolic abnormalities, from changes in potassium, phosphate, and calcium, to the development of a mild lactic acidosis. Renal handling of the above ions is also affected. The etiologies may be related to pulmonary or extrapulmonary disorders. Hyperventilation syndrome is a common etiology of respiratory alkalosis in the emergency department setting and is a diagnosis by exclusion. There are many cardiac effects of respiratory alkalosis, such as tachycardia, ventricular and atrial arrhythmias, and ischemic and nonischemic chest pain. In the lungs, vasodilation occurs, and in the gastrointestinal system there are changes in perfusion, motility, and electrolyte handling. Therapeutically, respiratory alkalosis is used for treatment of elevated intracranial pressure. Correction of a respiratory alkalosis is best performed by correcting the underlying etiology.

  12. CONSENSO CHILENO DE REHABILITACIÓN RESPIRATORIA EN EL PACIENTE CON EPOC: INTRODUCCIÓN Consensus of Respiratory Rehabilitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO ARANCIBIA H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available En Chile y el mundo, la enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica (EPOC es un problema de salud pública, debido a su alta prevalencia, su condición progresiva, el deterioro de la calidad de vida y el gran impacto económico. La rehabilitación respiratoria (RR es un tratamiento multidisciplinario y en los pacientes con EPOC permite intervenir el círculo vicioso que limita la capacidad de ejercicio en estos pacientes. Los objetivos de la RR son: reducir los síntomas, mejorar la tolerancia al ejercicio físico y la calidad de vida. Presentamos el primer Consenso Chileno de Rehabilitación Respiratoria en pacientes con EPOC. Estas guías tienen por objetivo que la RR pueda aplicarse en todo el país, tanto en hospitales como en la atención primaria. Para la elaboración de este documento, un grupo de neumonólogos, kinesiólogos, enfermeras, nutricionistas y psicólogos realizó un análisis sistemático de la evidencia científica disponible hasta diciembre de 20l0. La evidencia fue analizada según el sistema GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation modificado. El consenso se dividió en capítulos los cuales analizan en profundidad cada uno de los tópicos de la RR. Estos incluyen fisiopatologia, evaluación y programas, entrenamiento muscular de: extremidades inferiores, superiores y musculatura inspiratoria, oxígenoterapia, ventilación no invasiva, educación, nutrición, aspectos psicológicos y costo-efectividad.In Chile and the world, the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a problem of public health, due to its high prevalence, its progressive condition, the deterioration of the quality of life and its great economic impact. The respiratory rehabilitation (RR is a multidisciplinary treatment and in COPD patients allows to control the vicious circle that limits the capacity of exercise in these patients. The aims of the RR are: to reduce the symptoms, to improve the tolerance to the physical

  13. No oxygen delivery limitation in hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a condition of reduced brain functioning in which both blood flow and brain energy metabolism declined. It is not known whether blood flow or metabolism is the primary limiting factor of brain function in this condition. We used calculations of mitochondrial oxygen tension...... to choose between cause and effect in three groups of volunteers, including healthy control subjects (HC), patients with cirrhosis of the liver without hepatic encephalopathy (CL), and patients with cirrhosis with acute hepatic encephalopathy. Compared to HC subjects, blood flow and energy metabolism had...... declined in all gray matter regions of the brain in patients with HE but not significantly in patients with CL. Analysis of flow-metabolism coupling indicated that blood flow declined in HE as a consequence of reduced brain energy metabolism implied by the calculation of increased mitochondrial oxygen...

  14. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Godinho Zampieri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations.

  15. Altered Sulfide (H2S) Metabolism in Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H2S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H2S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed “gasotransmitters.” This review will cover the physiological role and the pathogenic effects of H2S, focusing on ethylmalonic encephalopathy, a human mitochondrial disorder caused by genetic abnormalities of sulfide metabolism. We will also discuss the options that are now conceivable for preventing genetically driven chronic H2S toxicity, taking into account that a complete understanding of the physiopathology of H2S has still to be achieved. PMID:23284046

  16. Altered sulfide (H(2)S) metabolism in ethylmalonic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (sulfide, H(2)S) is a colorless, water-soluble gas with a typical smell of rotten eggs. In the past, it has been investigated for its role as a potent toxic gas emanating from sewers and swamps or as a by-product of industrial processes. At high concentrations, H(2)S is a powerful inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase; in trace amounts, it is an important signaling molecule, like nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), together termed "gasotransmitters." This review will cover the physiological role and the pathogenic effects of H(2)S, focusing on ethylmalonic encephalopathy, a human mitochondrial disorder caused by genetic abnormalities of sulfide metabolism. We will also discuss the options that are now conceivable for preventing genetically driven chronic H(2)S toxicity, taking into account that a complete understanding of the physiopathology of H(2)S has still to be achieved.

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following a scorpion sting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcello Marrone, Luiz Carlos; Marrone, Bianca Fontana; Neto, Felipe Kalil; Costa, Francisco Cosme; Thomé, Gustavo Gomes; Aramburu, Martin Brandolt; Schilling, Lucas Porcello; Pascoal, Tharick Ali; Gadonski, Giovani; Huf Marrone, Antônio Carlos; da Costa, Jaderson Costa

    2013-10-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiologic entity not yet understood, that is present with transient neurologic symptoms and particular radiological findings. The most common imaging pattern in PRES is the presence of edema in the white matter of the posterior portions of both cerebral hemispheres. The cause of PRES is unclear. We report a case of 13-year-old male who was stung by a scorpion and developed a severe headache, visual disturbance, and seizures and had the diagnosis of PRES with a good outcome. Numerous factors can trigger this syndrome, most commonly: acute elevation of blood pressure, abnormal renal function, and immunosuppressive therapy. There are many cases described showing the relationship between PRES and eclampsia, transplantation, neoplasia and chemotherapy treatment, systemic infections, renal disease acute, or chronic. However, this is the first case of PRES following a scorpion sting.

  18. Wernicke's encephalopathy following Hyperemesis gravidarum. A report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, V K; De Souza, A

    2013-02-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) due to causes other than chronic alcohol abuse is an uncommon and often misdiagnosed condition. In the setting of hyperemesis gravidarum, an acute deficiency of thiamine results from body stores being unable to meet increased metabolic demands. The condition produces typical clinical and radiological findings and when diagnosed early and treated promptly has a good prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sensitive and specific for diagnosis. We describe three patients with hyperemesis gravidarum who developed WE, and highlight a range of clinical and imaging features important for appropriate diagnosis. A high degree of clinical suspicion is essential. Treatment is often empirical pending results of investigation, and consists of parenteral repletion of thiamine stores. Reversal of MRI findings parallels clinical improvement. Neurologic outcomes are usually good, but half the pregnancies complicated by this condition do not produce healthy children.

  19. Epileptic Encephalopathies in Adults and Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekiye Kural

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathies are motor-mental retardations or cognitive disorders secondary to epileptic seizures or epileptiform activities. Encephalopaties due to brain damage, medications, or systemic diseases are generally not in the scope of this definition, but they may rarely accompany the condition. Appropriate differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures as well as subclinical electroencephalographic discharges are crucial for management of seizures and epileptiform discharges and relative regression of cognitive deterioration in long-term followup. Proper antiepileptic drug, hormonal treatment, or i.v. immunoglobulin choice play major role in prognosis. In this paper, we evaluated the current treatment approaches by reviewing clinical electrophysiological characteristics of epileptic encephalopathies.

  20. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet İbrahim Turan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is a major cause of death following attempted suicide and accidental exposures. Although clinical presentation depends on the duration and the intensity of exposure, the assessment of the severity of intoxication is difficult. A small percentage of patients who show complete initial recovery may develop delayed neurological deficits. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning is a rare and poor prognosis neurologic disorders and there is no specific treatment. We present a case with early onset of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning with typical cranial imaging findings in a child with atypical history and clinical presentation.

  1. Immune pathogenesy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with respiratory syncytial virus infection%呼吸道合胞病毒感染与慢性阻塞性肺疾病发病的免疫机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马冠华; 杨昆; 李敏

    2009-01-01

    慢性阻塞性肺疾病(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,COPD)是一种常见的呼吸系统疾病.随着近年来对病毒导致慢性阻塞性肺疾病急性加重(AECOPD)机制的深入研究以及呼吸道病毒检出率的提高,病毒感染在COPD发病机制中的作用受到了更多关注.呼吸道合胞病毒(respiratory syncytial vius,RSV)是常见的呼吸道病毒.有关RSV与宿主的免疫学的研究提示了COPD中RSV的易感性,可能成为某些COPD患者防治疾病发展的新方向.本文对病毒感染在AECOPD中的作用以及RSV感染与COPD发病机制的免疫研究进展现状作一综述.%Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD)is a kind of common disease in respiratory system.With the recent advances in virus-induced acute exacerbations and elevated detection rates of viruses,the etiological status of virus in COPD is getting more attention.Respiratory syncytial virus is a common respiratory virus,some researchers suggest susceptibility of RSV to COPD,which may suggest prospective prevention and therapy to certain kind of COPD patients.This article summarizes the function of virus infection in acute exacerbation COPD and makes a review of the update on the immune pathogenesy of COPD with RSV infection.

  2. Prevalence of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Yuan Li; Yu-Qiang Nie; Wei-Hong Sha; Zheng Zeng; Fu-Ying Yang; Li Ping; Lin Jia

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Subclinical hepatic encephalopathy (SHE) is a common complication of liver diseases. The aim of this study was to find out the normal value of psychometric test and to investigate the prevalence of SHE in Chinese patients with stabilized hepatic cirrhosis.METHODS: Four hundred and nine consecutive cirrhotic patients without overt clinical encephalopathy were screened for SHE by using number connection test part A (NCT-A) and symbol digit test (SDT). SHE was defined as presence of at least one abnormal psychometric test. The age-corrected normal values were defined as the mean±2times standard deviation (2SD), and developed in 356 healthy persons as normal controls. Four hundred and sixteen patients with chronic viral hepatitis were tested as negative controls to assess the diagnostic validity of this test battery.RESULTS: There was no significant difference in NCT scores and SDT quotients between healthy controls and chronic hepatitis group (P>0.05). In all age subgroups,the NCT and SDT measurements of cirrhotic patients differed significantly from those of the controls (P<0.05).When mean±2SD of SDT and NCT measurements from healthy control group was set as the normal range, 119cirrhotic patients (29.1%) were found to have abnormal NCT-A and SDT tests, 53 (13.0%) were abnormal only in SDT and 36 (8.8%) only in NCT-A. Taken together, SHE was diagnosed in 208 (50.9%) cirrhotic patients by this test battery. The prevalence of SHE increased from 39.9%and 55.2% in Child-Pugh's grade A and B groups to 71.8%in Child-Pugh's grade C group (P<0.05). After the adjustment of age and residential areas required from the tests, no correlation was found in the rate of SHE and causes of cirrhosis, education level and smoking habit.CONCLUSION: Psychometric tests are simple and reliable indicators for screening SHE among Chinese cirrhotic patients. By using a NCT and SDT battery, SHE could be found in 50.9% of cirrhotic patients without overt clinical encephalopathy. The

  3. A cross-sectional study of the association between ventilation of gas stoves and chronic respiratory illness in U.S. children enrolled in NHANESIII

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kile, Molly L; Coker, Eric S; Smit, Ellen; Sudakin, Daniel; Molitor, John; Harding, Anna K

    2014-01-01

    Gas stoves emit pollutants that are respiratory irritants. U.S. children under age 6 who live in homes where gas stoves are used for cooking or heating have an increased risk of asthma, wheeze and reduced lung function...

  4. Comparison of exercise capacity in COPD and other etiologies of chronic respiratory failure requiring non-invasive mechanical ventilation at home: retrospective analysis of 1-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salturk C

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cuneyt Salturk,1 Zuhal Karakurt,1 Huriye Berk Takir,1 Merih Balci,2 Feyza Kargin,1 Ozlem Yazıcıoglu Mocin,1 Gokay Gungor,1 Ipek Ozmen,1 Selahattin Oztas,1 Murat Yalcinsoy,3 Ruya Evin,1 Murat Ozturk,1 Nalan Adiguzel1 1Respiratory Intensive Care Unit, Sureyyapasa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Teaching and Research Hospital, 2Respiratory Intensive Care Unit, Kartal Kosuyolu Cardiovascular Disease and Surgery Teaching and Research Hospital, Istanbul, 3Respiratory Intensive Care Unit, Department of Chest Disease and Pulmonology, Inonu University Medical Faculty, Malatya, Turkey Introduction: The objective of this study was to compare the change in 6-minute walking distance (6MWD in 1 year as an indicator of exercise capacity among patients undergoing home non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV due to chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (CHRF caused by different etiologies.Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary pulmonary disease hospital in patients who had completed 1-year follow-up under home NIMV because of CHRF with different etiologies (ie, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], obesity hypoventilation syndrome [OHS], kyphoscoliosis [KS], and diffuse parenchymal lung disease [DPLD], between January 2011 and January 2012. The results of arterial blood gas (ABG analyses and spirometry, and 6MWD measurements with 12-month interval were recorded from the patient files, in addition to demographics, comorbidities, and body mass indices. The groups were compared in terms of 6MWD via analysis of variance (ANOVA and multiple linear regression (MLR analysis (independent variables: analysis age, sex, baseline 6MWD, baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and baseline partial carbon dioxide pressure, in reference to COPD group.Results: A total of 105 patients with a mean age (± standard deviation of 61±12 years of whom 37 had COPD, 34 had OHS, 20 had KS, and 14 had DPLD were included in statistical

  5. Brain CT Images Analysis of Chronic Alcoholism Encephalopathy%60例慢性酒精中毒所致精神障碍患者颅脑CT图像分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏从羊; 冯晓强; 王德阳

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析慢性酒精中毒所致精神障碍颅脑CT表现特征.方法 对60例慢性酒精中毒所致精神障碍患者颅脑CT表现进行总结.结果 主要表现为不同程度的脑萎缩,脑白质区缺血、变性,脱髓鞘改变,腔隙性脑梗死和脑内软化灶.其中,大脑萎缩20例,小脑萎缩19例,大脑与小脑同时萎缩12例,脑萎缩合并软化灶9例,脑萎缩合并脑白质区缺血、变性,腔隙性脑梗死6例.结论 慢性酒精中毒所致精神障碍颅脑CT表现特征是不同程度的脑萎缩,脑白质缺血、变性脱髓鞘改变,腔隙性脑梗死和脑内软化灶.%Objective To Analyze of characteristics of chronic alcoholism due to mental disorder in brain CT manifestations.Method 60 cases of chronic alcoholism induced mental disorders in patients with biain CT findings were summarized.Results Main features are varying degrees of brain atrophy,white matter ischemia,degenation, demyelination,lacunar infarction and cerebral softening foci.Among them are 20 cases of brain atrophy,cerebellar atrophy in 19 cases,the brain and cerebellar atrophy simultaneously in 12 cases,9 cases of brain atrophy with softening,brain atrophy and white matter ischemia,degeneration,cerebral lacunar infarction in 6.Conclusion Chronic alcoholism mental disorder in brain CT manifestations characterized by varying degrees of brain atrophy,degeneration of ischemia,cerebral white matter areas,lacunar cerebral infarction and cerebral softening foci.

  6. 慢性呼吸道疾病患者呼吸道微生物群研究进展%Role of lung microbiome in chronic respiratory diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯东妮; 童琳; 宋元林

    2016-01-01

    过去认为健康人肺部是无菌的,对疾病状态下呼吸道菌群的研究依赖传统培养技术。近年来,DNA测序技术应用于呼吸道标本的微生物检测,发现健康肺部存在复杂的微生物群。越来越多的证据表明,呼吸道微生物群在多种慢性呼吸道疾病发生和发展过程中扮演重要角色,与哮喘、慢性阻塞性肺病等疾病的临床表现、急性加重及预后相关。通过比较急性加重期与稳定期患者的呼吸道标本微生物群,形成了新的疾病假说,阐释了慢性呼吸道疾病急性加重的微生物学基础。未来对微生物测序数据的深度挖掘及基于临床问题的研究,有望为慢性呼吸道疾病的治疗提供新的靶点。%The lungs of healthy individuals are previously considered to be sterile . However , modern microbiological techniques using DNA sequencing reveal the existence of a complex and dynamic microbiome in the normal respiratory tract .There is growing evidence that the respiratory microbiome has an important effect on the development and progression of chronic respiratory diseases and the features of respiratory microbe are associated with clinical phenotypes and prognosis .Comparison of respiratory samples of patients between stable and exacerbation phases leads to new hypothesis for exacerbation of these diseases .Future studies of lung microbe , with progresses in sequencing data analysis and study design focused on clinical problems ,will provide a potential therapeutic target for chronic respiratory diseases .

  7. Diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a clinical practice guideline update from the American College of Physicians, American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Wilt, Timothy J; Weinberger, Steven E; Hanania, Nicola A; Criner, Gerard; van der Molen, Thys; Marciniuk, Darcy D; Denberg, Tom; Schünemann, Holger; Wedzicha, Wisia; MacDonald, Roderick; Shekelle, Paul

    2011-08-02

    This guideline is an official statement of the American College of Physicians (ACP), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS). It represents an update of the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is intended for clinicians who manage patients with COPD. This guideline addresses the value of history and physical examination for predicting airflow obstruction; the value of spirometry for screening or diagnosis of COPD; and COPD management strategies, specifically evaluation of various inhaled therapies (anticholinergics, long-acting β-agonists, and corticosteroids), pulmonary rehabilitation programs, and supplemental oxygen therapy. This guideline is based on a targeted literature update from March 2007 to December 2009 to evaluate the evidence and update the 2007 ACP clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and management of stable COPD. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that spirometry should be obtained to diagnose airflow obstruction in patients with respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). Spirometry should not be used to screen for airflow obstruction in individuals without respiratory symptoms (Grade: strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) between 60% and 80% predicted, ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS suggest that treatment with inhaled bronchodilators may be used (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 3: For stable COPD patients with respiratory symptoms and FEV(1) 50% predicted. (Grade: weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 7: ACP, ACCP, ATS, and ERS recommend that clinicians should prescribe continuous oxygen therapy in patients with COPD who have severe resting hypoxemia (Pao(2) ≤55 mm Hg or Spo(2)

  8. PARP inhibition delays progression of mitochondrial encephalopathy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Roberta; Cavone, Leonardo; Lapucci, Andrea; Guasti, Daniele; Bani, Daniele; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are deadly childhood diseases for which therapeutic remedies are an unmet need. Given that genetic suppression of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase(PARP)-1 improves mitochondrial functioning, we investigated whether pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme affords protection in a mouse model of a mitochondrial disorder. We used mice lacking the Ndufs4 subunit of the respiratory complex I (Ndufs4 knockout [ KO] mice); these mice undergo progressive encephalopathy and die around postnatal day 50. Mice were treated daily with the potent PARP inhibitor N-(6-oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-(N,N-dimethylamino)acetamide hydrochloride (PJ34); neurological parameters, PARP activity, and mitochondrial homeostasis were evaluated. We found that mice receiving N-(6-oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-(N,N-dimethylamino)acetamide hydrochloride from postnatal day 30 to postnatal day 50 show reduced neurological impairment, and increased exploratory activity and motor skills compared with vehicle-treated animals. However, drug treatment did not delay or reduce death. We found no evidence of increased PARP activity within the brain of KO mice compared with heterozygous, healthy controls. Conversely, a 10-day treatment with the PARP inhibitor significantly reduced basal poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in different organs of the KO mice, including brain, skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas, and spleen. In keeping with the epigenetic role of PARP-1, its inhibition correlated with increased expression of mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits and organelle number. Remarkably, pharmacological targeting of PARP reduced astrogliosis in olfactory bulb and motor cortex, but did not affect neuronal loss of KO mice. In light of the advanced clinical development of PARP inhibitors, these data emphasize their relevance to treatment of mitochondrial respiratory defects.

  9. Respiratory mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2016-01-01

    This book thoroughly covers each subfield of respiratory mechanics: pulmonary mechanics, the respiratory pump, and flow. It presents the current understanding of the field and serves as a guide to the scientific literature from the golden age of respiratory mechanics, 1960 - 2010. Specific topics covered include the contributions of surface tension and tissue forces to lung recoil, the gravitational deformation of the lung, and the interdependence forces that act on pulmonary airways and blood vessels. The geometry and kinematics of the ribs is also covered in detail, as well as the respiratory action of the external and internal intercostal muscles, the mechanics of the diaphragm, and the quantitative compartmental models of the chest wall is also described. Additionally, flow in the airways is covered thoroughly, including the wave-speed and viscous expiratory flow-limiting mechanisms; convection, diffusion and the stationary front; and the distribution of ventilation. This is an ideal book for respiratory ...

  10. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke′s encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushree Sangita Behura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Wernicke′s encephalopathy (WE is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1 deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion, oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia. Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning, which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. Materials and Methods: In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. Discussion: As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs ( global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings, the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases.Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but

  11. Obesity and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Zammit

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Zammit, Helen Liddicoat, Ian Moonsie, Himender MakkerSleep and Ventilation Unit, Department of Respiratory Medicine, North Middlesex University Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The obesity epidemic is a global problem, which is set to increase over time. However, the effects of obesity on the respiratory system are often underappreciated. In this review, we will discuss the mechanical effects of obesity on lung physiology and the function of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ producing systemic inflammation and effecting central respiratory control. Obesity plays a key role in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Asthma is more common and often harder to treat in the obese population, and in this study, we review the effects of obesity on airway inflammation and respiratory mechanics. We also discuss the compounding effects of obesity on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the paradoxical interaction of body mass index and COPD severity. Many practical challenges exist in caring for obese patients, and we highlight the complications faced by patients undergoing surgical procedures, especially given the increased use of bariatric surgery. Ultimately, a greater understanding of the effects of obesity on the respiratory disease and the provision of adequate health care resources is vital in order to care for this increasingly important patient population.Keywords: obesity, lung function, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anesthesia

  12. Hepatic encephalopathy: clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThe pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is still unsolved. Therapy, therefore, is often insufficient. For the development of effective, new therapies insight into the disease-inducing substrates and the mechanisms of its toxic actions in the central nervous system ·are required. For b

  13. PRIONS AND THE TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter is an invited, scholarly review of the mechanism(s) of TSEs for the 2nd edition of Metabolic Encephalopathies. Each chapter in the book assumes a professional knowledge of neuroscience and biochemistry, and the focus of the book is on the metabolic basis of dise...

  14. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Dolstra, C.H.; Bossers, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrPSc was dete

  15. Wernicke encephalopathy in children and adolescents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matt Lallas; Jay Desai

    2014-01-01

    Background: Wernicke encephalopathy is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) defi ciency. It is generally considered to be a disease of adult alcoholics. However, it is known to occur in the pediatric population and in non-alcoholic conditions. Data sources: We searched PubMed with the key words Wernicke, thiamine, pediatric, children and adolescents and selected publications that were deemed appropriate. Results: The global prevalence rates of hunger, poverty and resultant nutrient deprivation have decreased in the 21st century. However, several scenarios which may predispose to Wernicke encephalopathy may be increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents such as malignancies, intensive care unit stays and surgical procedures for the treatment of obesity. Other predisposing conditions include magnesium defi ciency and defects in the SLC19A3 gene causing thiamine transporter-2 deficiency. The classic triad consists of encephalopathy, oculomotor dysfunction and gait ataxia but is not seen in a majority of patients. Treatment should be instituted immediately when the diagnosis is suspected clinically without waiting for laboratory confi rmation. Common magnetic resonance findings include symmetric T2 hyperintensities in dorsal medial thalamus, mammillary bodies, periaqueductal gray matter, and tectal plate. Conclusions: Wernicke encephalopathy is a medical emergency. Delay in its recognition and treatment may lead to significant morbidity, irreversible neurological damage or even death. This article aims to raise the awareness of this condition among pediatricians.

  16. STXBP1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamberger, Hannah; Nikanorova, Marina; Willemsen, Marjolein H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give a comprehensive overview of the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of STXBP1 encephalopathy (STXBP1-E) by systematically reviewing newly diagnosed and previously reported patients. METHODS: We recruited newly diagnosed patients with STXBP1 mutations through an international networ...

  17. An availability of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the early diagnosis of latent hepatic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, Noaki; Tanabe, Masako; Fujiwara, Akiko; Minato, Takeshi; Sasaki, Hiromasa [Hiroshima Posts and Telecommunications Hospital (Japan); Higashi, Toshihiro; Tsuji, Takao

    1996-03-01

    Brain MRI was carried out in patients with chronic liver diseases. No abnormal findings were recognized in patients with chronic viral hepatitis, while 59.2% of cirrhotics showed a symmetrically strong signal in basal ganglia on T1 weighted image in MRI. This finding significantly related with lowered Fischer`s ratio of serum amino acid, increased levels of serum phenylalanine, tyrosine and hyaluronic acid, prolonged prothrombin time and decreased platelet counts in the peripheral blood. Overt hepatic encephalopathy was observed in 6 of 34 patients with the strong signal in MRI during follow-up period, while none of patients without that finding developed hepatic encephalopathy. These results have indicated that the strong signal in basal ganglia on MRI appears in cirrhotic patients with severe liver dysfunction, and it is an useful index in the early diagnosis of latent hepatic encephalopathy. An improvement of this MRI finding was not observed by long-term oral administration of branched-chain amino acid. (author).

  18. No evidence of ischemia in stroke-like lesions of mitochondrial POLG encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoulis, Charalampos; Henriksen, Eilen; Miletic, Hrvoje; Bindoff, Laurence A

    2017-01-01

    Stroke-like lesions are characteristically associated with mitochondrial encephalopathies such as those caused by mutations of polymerase gamma (POLG) and the m.3243A>G mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation. The combination of acute clinical onset, MRI and pathological abnormalities, have led to the suggestion that these lesions are ischemic. Here, we sought to determine the role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial stroke-like lesions. We performed a systematic study of cerebral blood vessel morphology, density and distribution in post mortem brain tissue from nine patients with POLG-encephalopathy and seven neurologically healthy controls. We found that patients had significantly higher cerebral vascular density than controls: this was more pronounced in areas of chronic neurodegeneration, where vascular density correlated with the severity of neuronal loss, but was also seen in acute lesions. Further, blood vessels were patent and, in acute lesions, dilated suggesting increased perfusion. In contrast to what would be expected in ischemia, stroke-like lesions were not pan-necrotic and were highly vascularized. Our results suggest that ischemia does not contribute to the pathogenesis of either the chronic neurodegeneration or acute lesions in POLG encephalopathy. Neovascularization and vascular dilatation does occur and suggests a compensatory response. We suggested the acute lesions are more likely to reflect energy insufficiency and our earlier studies suggest that this is driven in large part by seizure activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  19. A Fatal Case of Wernicke’s Encephalopathy after Sleeve Gastrectomy for Morbid Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios K. Manatakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy is an acute neuropsychiatric disorder, due to thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency. It is traditionally described in chronic alcohol abusers; however obesity surgery is an emerging cause, as the number of bariatric procedures increases. A high index of clinical suspicion is required, since initial symptoms may be nonspecific and the classic triad of ophthalmoplegia, gait and stance disorders, and mental confusion is present only in one-third of patients. Laboratory tests can be within normal range and typical MRI brain lesions are found only in 50% of cases. Aggressive supplementation with intravenous thiamine should not be