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Sample records for chronic rectal bleeding

  1. Chronic rectal bleeding after high dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer warrants modification of existing morbidity scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, A.L.; Schulthiess, T.E.; Hunt, M.A.; Movsas, B.; Peter, R.; Hanks, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Serious late morbidity (Grade (3(4))) from the conformal treatment of prostate cancer has been reported in <1% to 6% of patients. This study demonstrates that the reported frequency of Grade (3(4)) complications varies by the morbidity scale selected and that no existing morbidity scale adequately represents chronic rectal bleeding, which is our most frequent persisting late sequela of high dose conformal treatment. Materials and Methods: Between (5(89)) and (12(93)), 352 patients with T1-3 NXM0 prostate cancers were treated with our 4-field conformal technique without special rectal blocking. This technique includes a 1 cm margin from the CTV to the PTV in all directions. The median follow-up for these patients was 38 mos (4 to 78), and the median ICRU reporting point dose was 74 Gy (63 to 81). Patients are followed at six month intervals, and no patient is lost to follow-up. Three morbidity scales are assessed, the RTOG, the late effects group (LENT), and our modification of the LENT (FC-LENT). This modification registers chronic rectal bleeding requiring more than two coagulations as a grade 3 event. Estimates for Grade (3(4)) late GI complication rates were determined using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Differences in morbidity rates were evaluated using the log-rank test and differences in time to latency of complications were evaluated using the nonparametric Wilcoxon test. The duration of severe symptoms with chronic rectal bleeding is measured from the first to the last transrectal coagulation. Results: Sixteen patients developed Grade (3(4)) complications by one of the three morbidity scales. Two patients required surgery (colostomy, sigmoid resection), 5 required a transfusion, and 9 required more than two coagulations. The median latency to the third coagulation (plus or minus transfusions) was 24 mos (17 to 40). The median duration of bleeding between the first and last coagulation was 6 mos (3 to 25), illustrating the chronicity of this problem

  2. Chronic rectal bleeding after high-dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer warrants modification of existing morbidity scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Peter, Ruth S.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Serious late morbidity (Grade (3(4))) from the conformal treatment of prostate cancer has been reported in <1% to 6% of patients based on existing late gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity scales. None of the existing morbidity scales include our most frequently observed late GI complication, which is chronic rectal bleeding requiring multiple fulgerations. This communication documents the frequency of rectal bleeding requiring multiple fulgerations and illustrates the variation in reported late serious GI complication rates by the selection of morbidity scale. Methods and Materials: Between May 1989 and December 1993, 352 patients with T1-T3 nonmetastatic prostate cancers were treated with our four-field conformal technique without special rectal blocking. This technique includes a 1-cm margin from the clinical target volume (CTV) to the planning target volume (PTV) in all directions. The median follow-up for these patients was 36 months (range 2-76), and the median center of prostate dose was 74 Gy (range 63-81). Three morbidity scales are assessed: the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), the Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force (LENT), and our modification of the LENT (FC-LENT). This modification registers chronic rectal bleeding requiring at least one blood transfusion and/or more than two coagulations as a Grade 3 event. Estimates for Grade (3(4)) late GI complication rates were determined using Kaplan-Meier methodology. The duration of severe symptoms with chronic rectal bleeding is measured from the first to the last transrectal coagulation. Latency is measured from the end of radiotherapy to surgery, first blood transfusion, or third coagulation procedure. Results: Sixteen patients developed Grade (3(4)) complications by one of the three morbidity scales. Two patients required surgery (colostomy or sigmoid resection), three required multiple blood transfusions, two required one or two blood transfusions, and nine required at least three

  3. Evaluation of rectal bleeding factors associated with prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Manabu; Miki, Kenta; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Kido, Masato; Shirahama, Jun; Takagi, Sayako; Kobayashi, Masao; Honda, Chikara; Kanehira, Chihiro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze rectal bleeding prognostic factors associated with prostate brachytherapy (PB) or in combination with external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and to examine dosimetric indications associated with rectal bleeding. The study included 296 patients followed up for >36 months (median, 48 months). PB was performed alone in 252 patients and in combination with EBRT in 44 patients. PB combined with EBRT is indicated for patients with a Gleason score >6. The prescribed dose was 144 Gy for monotherapy and 110 Gy for PB+EBRT (44-46 Gy). Although 9.1% who received monotherapy had 2.3% grade 2 rectal bleeding, 36.3% who received combined therapy had 15.9% grade 2 rectal bleeding. Combined therapy was associated with higher incidence of rectal bleeding (P=0.0049) and higher percentage of grade 2 bleeding (P=0.0005). Multivariate analysis revealed that R-150 was the only significant factor for rectal bleeding, and modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade in monotherapy and biologically equivalent dose (BED) were significant for combined therapy. Moreover, grade 2 rectal bleeding increased significantly at D90 >130 Gy. Although R-150 was the significant prognostic factor for rectal bleeding and modified RTOG rectal toxicity grade, BED was the significant prognostic factor for modified RTOG rectal toxicity grade. (author)

  4. Rectal bleeding after hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Correlation between clinical and dosimetric parameters and the incidence of grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Harashima, Koichi; Miyazawa, Yasushi; Yamada, Masami; Ito, Kazuto; Kurokawa, Kouhei; Yamanaka, Hidetoshi; Nakano, Takashi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and severity of rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer, and to explore the factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. Methods and materials: The data of 52 patients who had been treated by external beam RT for localized prostate cancer between 1999 and 2002 were analyzed. All the patients had received hypofractionated external beam RT to a total dose of 69 Gy in 3-Gy fractions, three fractions weekly. The clinical and dosimetric factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse late rectal bleeding were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The effect of the percentage of the whole rectal volume receiving 30%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed radiation dose (V 30 , V 50 , V 80 , and V 90 , respectively) on the incidence of rectal bleeding was evaluated. Results: Of the 52 patients, 13 (25%) developed Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. One patient who needed laser coagulation and blood transfusion for the treatment of rectal bleeding was classified as having Grade 3 rectal bleeding. The median time to the development of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding was 11 months. The results of the univariate analysis revealed that the presence of a history of diabetes mellitus (p 30 ≥ 60%, V 50 ≥ 40% (p 80 ≥ 25%, and V 90 ≥ 15% (p < 0.001) were statistically significant risk factors for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. The results of the multivariate analysis revealed that a history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of rectal bleeding after hypofractionated RT for prostate cancer (p < 0.05). Conclusion: A history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated RT, although dosimetric factors were also closely associated with the risk of rectal bleeding

  5. Rectal bleeding in children: endoscopic evaluation revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ridder, Lissy; van Lingen, Anna V.; Taminiau, Jan A. J. M.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Rectal bleeding is an alarming event both for the child and parents. It is hypothesized that colonoscopy instead of sigmoidoscopy and adding esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy in case of accompanying complaints, improves the diagnostic accuracy in children with prolonged rectal bleeding. Study

  6. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Jeremy G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stone, Nelson N. [Department of Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: Richard.Stock@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  7. Rectal bleeding and its management after irradiation for cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Mi Son; Kang, Seung Hee; Kil, Hoon Jong; Oh, Young Taek; Sohn, Jeong Hye; Ryu, Hee Suk; Lee, Kwang Jae; Jung, Hye Young

    2002-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the main treatment modality for uterine cervix cancer. Since the rectum is in the radiation target volume, rectal bleeding is a common late side effect. The study evaluates the risk factors of radiation induced rectal bleeding and discusses its optimal management. A total of 213 patients who completed external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and intracavitary radiation (ICR) between September 1994 and December 1999 were included in this study. No patient had undergone concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Ninety patients received radiotherapy according to a modified hyperfractionated schedule. A midline block was placed at a pelvic dose of between 30.6 Gy to 39.6 Gy. The total parametrial dose from the EBRT was 51 to 59 Gy depending on the extent of their disease. The point A dose from the HDR brachytherapy was 28 Gy to 30 Gy (4 Gy x 7, or 5 Gy x 6). The rectal point dose was calculated either by the ICRU 38 guideline, or by anterior rectal wall point seen on radiographs, with barium contrast. Rectal bleeding was scored by the LENT/SOMA criteria. For the management of rectal bleeding, we opted for observation, sucralfate enema or coagulation based on the frequency or amount of bleeding. The median follow-up period was 39 months (12 ∼ 86 months). The incidence of rectal bleeding was 12.7% (27/213); graded as 1 in 9 patients, grade 2 in 16 and grade 3 in 2. The overall moderate and severe rectal complication rate was 8.5%. Most complications (92.6%) developed within 2 years following completion of radiotherapy (median 16 months). No patient progressed to rectal fistula or obstruction during the follow-up period. In the univariate analysis, three factors correlated with a high incidence of bleeding: an icruCRBED greater than 100 Gy (19.7% vs. 4.2%), an EBRT dose to the parametrium over 55 Gy (22.1% vs. 5.1%) and higher stages of III and IV (31.8% vs. 10.5%). In the multivariate analysis, the icruCRBED was the only significant factor (ρ > 0.0432). The total

  8. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeoh, Eric, E-mail: eric.yeoh@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark [School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle [School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  9. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction

  10. Argon plasma coagulation for rectal bleeding after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Stephen; Wallner, Kent; Dominitz, Jason A.; Han, Ben; True, Lawrence; Sutlief, Steven; Billingsley, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To better define the efficacy and safety of argon plasma coagulation (APC), specifically for brachytherapy-related proctitis, we reviewed the clinical course of 7 patients treated for persistent rectal bleeding. Approximately 2-10% of prostate cancer patients treated with 125 I or 103 Pd brachytherapy will develop radiation proctitis. The optimum treatment for patients with persistent bleeding is unclear from the paucity of available data. Prior reports lack specific dosimetric information, and patients with widely divergent forms of radiation were grouped together in the analyses. Methods and Materials: Seven patients were treated with APC at the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System and the University of Washington from 1997 to 1999 for persistent rectal bleeding due to prostate brachytherapy-related proctitis. Four patients received supplemental external beam radiation, delivered by a four-field technique. A single gastroenterologist at the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System treated 6 of the 7 patients. If the degree of proctitis was limited, all sites of active bleeding were coagulated in symptomatic patients. An argon plasma coagulator electrosurgical system was used to administer treatments every 4-8 weeks as needed. The argon gas flow was set at 1.6 L/min, with an electrical power setting of 40-45 W. Results: The rectal V100 (the total rectal volume, including the lumen, receiving the prescription dose or greater) for the 7 patients ranged from 0.13 to 4.61 cc. Rectal bleeding was first noticed 3-18 months after implantation. APC (range 1-3 sessions) was performed 9-22 months after implantation. Five patients had complete resolution of their bleeding, usually within days of completing APC. Two patients had only partial relief from bleeding, but declined additional APC therapy. No patient developed clinically evident progressive rectal wall abnormalities after APC, (post-APC follow-up range 4-13 months). Conclusions: Most

  11. Effects of Aglumin on the rectal bleeding following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Michitaka; Tanaka, Motoshi; Yoshimura, Osamu; Matsubayashi, Shigeru

    1978-01-01

    Aglumin was administered to 20 cases which had rectal bleeding following radiotherapy. The results were as follows. Rectal bleeding decreased in 16 of 20 cases (80%): remarkably effective, 15%; effective, 25%; slightly effective, 40%. Bleeding time decreased in 11 cases (55%). Rumpel-Leede test gave remarkable improvement in 10 of 14 cases which had been abnormal (71.4%). Platelet increased in 18 of 20 cases (90%). Liver function test and peripheral blood findings showed no remarkable changes. No side effects such as intestinal disturbance etc were noted. In the series of symptomatic treatment for rectal disturbance resulting from radiotherapy, this drug had considerable effect of hemostasis. It was concluded that this drug is useful in combined use with other antiphlogistics, analgesic, and hematinic etc. (Ueda, J.)

  12. Prospective comparison of double contrast barium enema plus flexible sigmoidoscopy v colonoscopy in rectal bleeding: barium enema v colonoscopy in rectal bleeding.

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, E J; O'Connor, J; Frost, R A; Shorvon, P; Somers, S; Stevenson, G W; Hunt, R H

    1988-01-01

    Rectal bleeding often heralds serious colonic disease. The literature suggests that colonoscopy is superior to barium enema plus sigmoidoscopy, although no good comparative studies exist. Seventy one patients with overt rectal bleeding had prospectively flexible sigmoidoscopy, double contrast barium enema and colonoscopy completed independently. Against the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of colonoscopy were 0.69 and 0.78 respectively for a spectrum of colonic lesions, while fo...

  13. Rectal bleeding after conformal 3D treatment of prostate cancer: Time to occurrence, response to treatment and duration of morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Hanks, Gerald E.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Peter, Ruth S.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    1997-01-01

    care. Conclusions: Chronic rectal bleeding is a sequelae of high-dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer. Grade 2 morbidity responds to medication or limited coagulation (≤2) in 90% of patients. Grade 3 morbidity responds to medication and multiple coagulations (≥3) in 75% of patients. The chronicity of Grade 3 morbidity is illustrated by a 10-month median duration for response to treatment, with a range of response extending to 34 months. Nonresponders to treatment have continued to bleed up to 35 months after the third coagulation. Appropriate shielding of the rectal mucosa limiting dose to <72 Gy is required to avoid a high incidence of these complications, as dose is the only significant variable associated with rectal bleeding

  14. The effect of rectal Foley catheterization on rectal bleeding rates after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilciler, Mete; Erdemir, Fikret; Demir, Erkan; Güven, Oğuz; Avci, Ali

    2008-09-01

    To assess whether Foley catheterization of the rectum after transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy decreases complication rates. Between June 2000 and September 2006, 275 consecutive patients were evaluated after undergoing TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. All procedures were performed on an outpatient basis. Patients were divided into two groups. In the first group (n = 134), a Foley catheter was inserted into the rectum and inflated to 50 cm(3) after TRUS-guided biopsy. In the second group (n = 141), catheterization was performed without balloon placement. Rectal bleeding, hematuria, hematospermia, infection, and acute urinary retention rates were compared between groups. The mean ages of the patients were 63.3 years +/- 5.6 and 62.1 years +/- 7.2 years in the Foley catheter group and control group, respectively (P = .112). Hematuria, hematospermia, infection, and rectal bleeding occurred in 31 (23.1%), 30 (22.4), nine (6.7%), and two patients (1.5%), respectively, in the Foley catheter group; and in 36 (25.5%), 36 (25.5%), 11 (7.8%), and 25 patients (17.7%), respectively, in the control group. The incidences of infection, hematuria, and hematospermia were not significantly different between groups (P > .05). In contrast, the rectal bleeding rate was significantly lower in the Foley catheter group (1.5%) than in the control group (17.7%; P = .001). Although it has no effect on other complications, TRUS-guided prostate biopsy with rectal Foley catheterization is a useful, practical method to decrease or prevent rectal bleeding.

  15. Health-Seeking Behavior and Barriers to Care in Patients With Rectal Bleeding in Nigeria

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    Olusegun I. Alatise

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Colorectal cancer (CRC incidence rates are steadily increasing in Nigeria. Organized screening is still largely unused because of financial and logistical barriers; most CRCs are detected by symptoms. One symptom of CRC is rectal bleeding. This study sought to determine health-seeking behavior and barriers to care in patients with rectal bleeding in Nigeria. This study also surveyed physicians to determine major breakdowns in access to care. Methods: The recruitment process for this study involved patients referred for colonoscopy because of rectal bleeding as well as response to a media advertisement for a free colonoscopy. Physicians were recruited at the African Research Group for Oncology meeting. Patient responses were scored on the basis of knowledge of rectal bleeding. The physician questionnaire was supporting information and mainly descriptive in nature. Results: A total of 82 patients and 45 physicians participated in this study. Less than 40% of patients knew that rectal bleeding could be caused by cancer. Major barriers to care were resolution of the symptom (42%, no consideration of the bleeding as problematic (40%, and financial constraint (22%. Education was strongly correlated with knowledge of rectal bleeding and health-seeking behavior. Although physicians regularly saw patients with rectal bleeding, most of them provided a differential diagnosis of hemorrhoids and few referred patients for colonoscopy. Conclusion: General awareness about the signs of colorectal cancer is lacking. This demonstrates the strong need for patient education programs about this issue. Physicians should also receive additional training on differentiation of a potential cancer diagnosis from something more benign, such as hemorrhoids.

  16. Health-Seeking Behavior and Barriers to Care in Patients With Rectal Bleeding in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatise, Olusegun I; Fischer, Sara E; Ayandipo, Omobolaji O; Omisore, Akinlolu G; Olatoke, Samuel A; Kingham, T Peter

    2017-12-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates are steadily increasing in Nigeria. Organized screening is still largely unused because of financial and logistical barriers; most CRCs are detected by symptoms. One symptom of CRC is rectal bleeding. This study sought to determine health-seeking behavior and barriers to care in patients with rectal bleeding in Nigeria. This study also surveyed physicians to determine major breakdowns in access to care. Methods The recruitment process for this study involved patients referred for colonoscopy because of rectal bleeding as well as response to a media advertisement for a free colonoscopy. Physicians were recruited at the African Research Group for Oncology meeting. Patient responses were scored on the basis of knowledge of rectal bleeding. The physician questionnaire was supporting information and mainly descriptive in nature. Results A total of 82 patients and 45 physicians participated in this study. Less than 40% of patients knew that rectal bleeding could be caused by cancer. Major barriers to care were resolution of the symptom (42%), no consideration of the bleeding as problematic (40%), and financial constraint (22%). Education was strongly correlated with knowledge of rectal bleeding and health-seeking behavior. Although physicians regularly saw patients with rectal bleeding, most of them provided a differential diagnosis of hemorrhoids and few referred patients for colonoscopy. Conclusion General awareness about the signs of colorectal cancer is lacking. This demonstrates the strong need for patient education programs about this issue. Physicians should also receive additional training on differentiation of a potential cancer diagnosis from something more benign, such as hemorrhoids.

  17. Ozone Therapy in the Management of Persistent Radiation-Induced Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Persistent radiation-induced proctitis and rectal bleeding are debilitating complications with limited therapeutic options. We present our experience with ozone therapy in the management of such refractory rectal bleeding. Methods. Patients (n=12 previously irradiated for prostate cancer with persistent or severe rectal bleeding without response to conventional treatment were enrolled to receive ozone therapy via rectal insufflations and/or topical application of ozonized-oil. Ten (83% patients had Grade 3 or Grade 4 toxicity. Median follow-up after ozone therapy was 104 months (range: 52–119. Results. Following ozone therapy, the median grade of toxicity improved from 3 to 1 (p<0.001 and the number of endoscopy treatments from 37 to 4 (p=0.032. Hemoglobin levels changed from 11.1 (7–14 g/dL to 13 (10–15 g/dL, before and after ozone therapy, respectively (p=0.008. Ozone therapy was well tolerated and no adverse effects were noted, except soft and temporary flatulence for some hours after each session. Conclusions. Ozone therapy was effective in radiation-induced rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients without serious adverse events. It proved useful in the management of rectal bleeding and merits further evaluation.

  18. Multinational Prospective Study of Patient-Reported Outcomes After Prostate Radiation Therapy: Detailed Assessment of Rectal Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Y.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Heath, Gerard; Scarlett, Sarah; Sanda, Martin G.; Chang, Peter; Regan, Meredith M.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Sandler, Howard M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Kaplan, Irving D.; Crociani, Catrina; McLaughlin, William P.; Mantz, Constantine A.; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The new short Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) patient-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) tool has removed the rectal bleeding question from the previous much longer version, EPIC-26. Herein, we assess the impact of losing the dedicated rectal bleeding question in 2 independent prospective multicenter cohorts. Methods and Materials: In a prospective multicenter test cohort (n=865), EPIC-26 patient-reported HRQOL data were collected for 2 years after treatment from patients treated with prostate radiation therapy from 2003 to 2011. A second prospective multicenter cohort (n=442) was used for independent validation. A repeated-effects model was used to predict the change from baseline in bowel summary scores from longer EPIC instruments using the change in EPIC-CP bowel summary scores with and without rectal bleeding scores. Results: Two years after radiation therapy, 91% of patients were free of bleeding, and only 2.6% reported bothersome bleeding problems. Correlations between EPIC-26 and EPIC-CP bowel scores were very high (r"2=0.90-0.96) and were statistically improved with the addition of rectal bleeding information (r"2=0.94-0.98). Considering all patients, only 0.2% of patients in the test cohort and 0.7% in the validation cohort reported bothersome bleeding and had clinically relevant HRQOL changes missed with EPIC-CP. However, of the 2.6% (n=17) of men with bothersome rectal bleeding in the test cohort, EPIC-CP failed to capture 1 patient (6%) as experiencing meaningful declines in bowel HRQOL. Conclusions: Modern prostate radiation therapy results in exceptionally low rates of bothersome rectal bleeding, and <1% of patients experience bothersome bleeding and are not captured by EPIC-CP as having meaningful HRQOL declines after radiation therapy. However, in the small subset of patients with bothersome rectal bleeding, the longer EPIC-26 should strongly be considered, given its superior

  19. Multinational Prospective Study of Patient-Reported Outcomes After Prostate Radiation Therapy: Detailed Assessment of Rectal Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Y.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Heath, Gerard; Scarlett, Sarah [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sanda, Martin G. [Emory University Department of Urology, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chang, Peter [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Regan, Meredith M. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kuban, Deborah A. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ciezki, Jay P. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Kaplan, Irving D.; Crociani, Catrina [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McLaughlin, William P. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mantz, Constantine A. [21st Century Oncology, Fort Myers, Florida (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E. [21st Century Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Suy, Simeng; Collins, Sean P. [Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); and others

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: The new short Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) patient-reported health-related quality of life (HRQOL) tool has removed the rectal bleeding question from the previous much longer version, EPIC-26. Herein, we assess the impact of losing the dedicated rectal bleeding question in 2 independent prospective multicenter cohorts. Methods and Materials: In a prospective multicenter test cohort (n=865), EPIC-26 patient-reported HRQOL data were collected for 2 years after treatment from patients treated with prostate radiation therapy from 2003 to 2011. A second prospective multicenter cohort (n=442) was used for independent validation. A repeated-effects model was used to predict the change from baseline in bowel summary scores from longer EPIC instruments using the change in EPIC-CP bowel summary scores with and without rectal bleeding scores. Results: Two years after radiation therapy, 91% of patients were free of bleeding, and only 2.6% reported bothersome bleeding problems. Correlations between EPIC-26 and EPIC-CP bowel scores were very high (r{sup 2}=0.90-0.96) and were statistically improved with the addition of rectal bleeding information (r{sup 2}=0.94-0.98). Considering all patients, only 0.2% of patients in the test cohort and 0.7% in the validation cohort reported bothersome bleeding and had clinically relevant HRQOL changes missed with EPIC-CP. However, of the 2.6% (n=17) of men with bothersome rectal bleeding in the test cohort, EPIC-CP failed to capture 1 patient (6%) as experiencing meaningful declines in bowel HRQOL. Conclusions: Modern prostate radiation therapy results in exceptionally low rates of bothersome rectal bleeding, and <1% of patients experience bothersome bleeding and are not captured by EPIC-CP as having meaningful HRQOL declines after radiation therapy. However, in the small subset of patients with bothersome rectal bleeding, the longer EPIC-26 should strongly be considered, given its superior

  20. Rectal bleeding after conformal 3D treatment of prostate cancer: time to occurrence, response to treatment and duration of morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshina, Teruki; Hanks, Gerald E.; Peters, Ruth S.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    1996-01-01

    Grade 3 bleeding, they continue to bleed 1, 9, 32 and 35 months after the 3rd coagulation. Conclusions: Chronic rectal bleeding is a sequelae of high dose conformal treatment of prostate cancer. Grade 2 (LENT) morbidity responds to medication or limited coagulation (≤2) in 90% of patients. Grade 3 (FC-LENT) morbidity responds to medication and multiple coagulations (≥3) in 75% of patients. The chronicity of Grade 3 morbidity is illustrated by a 10 month median duration of active bleeding with a range extending to 34 months and non-responders have continued to bleed up to 35 months after the third coagulation. Appropriate shielding of the rectal mucosa is required to avoid a high incidence of these complications as dose is the only significant variable in rectal bleeding

  1. Randomized Prospective Study of Endoscopic Rubber Band Ligation Compared With Bipolar Coagulation for Chronically Bleeding Internal Hemorrhoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutabha, Rome; Jensen, Dennis M.; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our purpose was to compare the efficacy, complications, success rate, recurrence rate at 1 year, and crossovers of rubber band ligation (RBL) with those of bipolar electrocoagulation (BPEC) treatment for chronically bleeding internal hemorrhoids. METHODS: A total of 45 patients of mean age 51.5 years, who had rectal bleeding from grade II or III hemorrhoids and in whom intensive medical therapy failed, were randomized in a prospective study comparing RBL with BPEC. Treatment failure was predefined as continued bleeding, occurrence of a major complication, or failure to reduce the size of all internal hemorrhoidal segments to grade I in ≤ 3 treatments. Patients were followed up for 1 year. RESULTS: With similar patients, rectal bleeding and other symptoms were controlled with significantly fewer treatments of RBL than of BPEC (2.3±0.2 vs. 3.8±0.4, P 0.05), but significantly fewer failures and crossovers (8% vs. 38%). Symptomatic recurrence at 1 year was 10% RBL and 15% BPEC. CONCLUSIONS: For patients with chronically bleeding grade II or III internal hemorrhoids that are unresponsive to medical therapy, safety and complication rates of banding and BPEC were similar. The success rate was significantly higher with RBL than with BPEC. Symptom recurrence rates at 1 year were similar. PMID:19513028

  2. Visual diagnosis: 12-year-old girl with constipation and rectal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinath, Arvind; Wendel, Danielle; Bond, Geoffrey; Lowe, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare, thought to be due to defects in embryologic development, and often associated with other structural abnormalities. Clues to the existence of a rectal cyst are mainly due to bowel compression and presence of ectopic gastric mucosa within the cyst, leading to rectal bleeding. The diagnosis of a rectal duplication cyst requires a high index of suspicion. Confirming the diagnosis can be difficult based on the location of the cyst. Efforts to confirm the diagnosis include digital rectal examination, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and Meckel scan. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice, especially because of the cyst’s potential for malignant transformation. Because of the cyst’s proximal location to the nerves innervating the anal canal and sphincters, surgical resection can lead to fecal incontinence.

  3. Ileocecal resection for massive rectal bleeding due to Yersinia enterocolitica: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azghari, Ilham; Bargach, Aicha; Billah, Nabil Moatassim; Essaoudi, Mohamed Amine; Jahid, Ahmed; Kabbaj, Nawal

    2016-01-19

    Massive gastrointestinal bleeding is an emergency that can sometimes require immediate surgery. We report the first case, to the best of our knowledge, of massive rectal bleeding due to Yersinia enterocolitica, requiring ileocecal resection. A 41-year-old North African woman was admitted to our emergency department for massive rectal bleeding. She had a history of an iron deficiency anemia of unknown cause, and diarrhea 2 months before the admission. On admission to our emergency unit, she was in a state of hemodynamic collapse. An examination showed discolored conjunctivas, massive rectal bleeding with clots and no abdominal pain. The first medical treatment included the use of noradrenaline. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed and did not show any lesions. Computed tomography of her abdomen showed significant and hypervascular wall thickening of her terminal ileum suggestive of a tumor. Because her massive rectal bleeding worsened and her collapse persisted, an exploratory laparotomy and ileocecal resection were immediately performed on the patient. Histopathological analysis showed enteritis caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. Her outcome was favorable. Enteritis due to Yersinia enterocolitica can take a pseudotumoral form and mislead the diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  4. [Electrocoagulation on a fragment of anterior abdominal rectal muscle for the control of presacral bleeding during rectal resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal Núñez, José Enrique; Martínez, María Teresa García; Poblador, Alejandro Ruano

    2012-03-01

    Presacral venous haemorrhage during rectal movement is low, but is often massive, and even fatal. Our objective is the "in vitro" determination of the results of electrocoagulation applied to a fragment of muscle on the sacral bone surface during rectal resection due to a malignant neoplasm of the rectum. Single-pole coagulation was applied "in vitro" with the selector at maximum power on a 2×2 cms muscle fragment, applied to the anterior side of the IV sacral vertebra until reaching boiling point. The method was used on 6 patients with bleeding of the presacral venous plexus. In the "in vitro" study, boiling point was reached in 90 seconds from applying the single-pole current on the muscle fragment. Electrocoagulation was applied to a 2×2 cm rectal muscle fragment in 6 patients with presacral venous haemorrhage, using pressure on the surface of the presacral bone, with the stopping of the bleeding being achieved in all cases. The use of indirect electrocoagulation on a fragment of the rectus abdominis muscle is a straightforward and highly effective technique for controlling presacral venous haemorrhage. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Colonic duplication in adults: Report of two cases presenting with rectal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C Fotiadis; M Genetzakis; I Papandreou; EP Misiakos; E Agapitos; GC Zografos

    2005-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplication is an uncommon congenital abnormality in two-thirds of cases manifesting before the age of 2 years. Ileal duplication is common while colonic duplication, either cystic or tubular, is a rather unusual clinical entity that remains asymptomatic and undiagnosed in most cases. Mostly occurring in pediatric patients,colonic duplication is encountered in adults only in a few cases. This study reports two cases of colonic duplication in adults. Both cases presented with rectal bleeding on admission. The study was focused on clinical, imaging,histological, and therapeutical aspects of the presenting cases. Gastrografin enema established the diagnosis in both cases. The cystic structure and the adjacent part of the colon were excised en-block. The study implies that colonic duplication, though uncommon, should be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal bleeding.

  6. Colonic duplication in adults: report of two cases presenting with rectal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiadis, C; Genetzakis, M; Papandreou, I; Misiakos, E P; Agapitos, E; Zografos, G C

    2005-08-28

    Gastrointestinal duplication is an uncommon congenital abnormality in two-thirds of cases manifesting before the age of 2 years. Ileal duplication is common while colonic duplication, either cystic or tubular, is a rather unusual clinical entity that remains asymptomatic and undiagnosed in most cases. Mostly occurring in pediatric patients, colonic duplication is encountered in adults only in a few cases. This study reports two cases of colonic duplication in adults. Both cases presented with rectal bleeding on admission. The study was focused on clinical, imaging, histological, and therapeutical aspects of the presenting cases. Gastrografin enema established the diagnosis in both cases. The cystic structure and the adjacent part of the colon were excised en-block. The study implies that colonic duplication, though uncommon, should be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal bleeding.

  7. Results and DVH analysis of late rectal bleeding in patients treated with 3D-CRT or IMRT for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Someya, Masanori; Hori, Masakazu; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Nakata, Kensei; Saito, Masato; Hirokawa, Naoki; Sakata, Koh-ichi; Takagi, Masaru; Hareyama, Masato

    2015-01-01

    In patients undergoing radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, dose-volume histograms and clinical variables were examined to search for correlations between radiation treatment planning parameters and late rectal bleeding. We analyzed 129 patients with localized prostate cancer who were managed from 2002 to 2010 at our institution. They were treated with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT, 70 Gy/35 fractions, 55 patients) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 76 Gy/38 fractions, 74 patients). All radiation treatment plans were retrospectively reconstructed, dose-volume histograms of the rectum were generated, and the doses delivered to the rectum were calculated. Time to rectal bleeding ranged from 9 - 53 months, with a median of 18.7 months. Of the 129 patients, 33 patients had Grade 1 bleeding and were treated with steroid suppositories, while 25 patients with Grade 2 bleeding received argon plasma laser coagulation therapy (APC). Three patients with Grade 3 bleeding required both APC and blood transfusion. The 5-year incidence rate of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding was 21.8% for the 3D-CRT group and 21.6% for the IMRT group. Univariate analysis showed significant differences in the average values from V65 to V10 between Grades 0 - 1 and Grades 2 - 3. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that patients with V65 ≥ 17% had a significantly increased risk (P = 0.032) of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding. Of the 28 patients of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding, 17 patients (60.7%) were cured by a single session of APC, while the other 11 patients required two sessions. Thus, none of the patients had any further rectal bleeding after the second APC session. (author)

  8. Gastric duplication cyst: A cause of rectal bleeding in a young child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surridge, Clare A; Goodier, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts are an uncommon congenital anomaly and rectal bleeding is a rare presentation of a complicated gastric duplication cyst. This case report describes the radiological findings in a child with a complicated gastric duplication cyst.

  9. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  10. Gastric duplication cyst: A cause of rectal bleeding in a young child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare A Surridge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric duplication cysts are an uncommon congenital anomaly and rectal bleeding is a rare presentation of a complicated gastric duplication cyst. This case report describes the radiological findings in a child with a complicated gastric duplication cyst.

  11. Implant R100 Predicts Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with IG-IMRT to 45 Gy and Pd-103 Implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packard, M.; Fuhrer, R.; Valakh, V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To define factors associated with rectal bleeding in patients treated with IG-IMRT followed by Pd-103 seed implant. Methods and Materials. We retrospectively reviewed 61 prostate adenocarcinoma patients from 2002 to 2008. The majority (85.2%) were of NCCN intermediate risk category. All received IG-IMRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles followed by Pd-103 implant delivering a mean D90 of 100.7 Gy. Six patients received 45 Gy to the pelvic nodes and 10 received androgen deprivation. Results. Ten patients (16.4%) developed rectal bleeding: 4 were CTCAE v.3 grade 1, 5 were grade 2, and 1 was grade 3. By univariate analysis, age, stage, Gleason sum, PSA, hormonal therapy, pelvic radiation, postoperative prostate volume, D9, V100, individual source activity, total implanted activity per cm 3 , and duration of interval before implant did not impact rectal bleeding. Implant R100 was higher in patients with rectal bleeding: on average, 0.885 versus 0.396 cm 3 ,(Ρ =0.02) , odds ratio of 2.26 per .5 cm 3 (95% CI, 1.16–4.82). A trend for significance was seen for prostate V200 and total implanted activity. Conclusion. Higher implant R100 was associated with development of rectal bleeding in patients receiving IG-IMRT to 45 Gy followed by Pd-103 implant. Minimizing implant R100 may reduce the rate of rectal bleeding in similar patients.

  12. Conformal irradiation of the prostate: estimating long-term rectal bleeding risk using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Adams, Judith A.; Urie, Marcia M.; Shipley, William U.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) may be very useful tools for estimating probability of normal tissue complications (NTCP), but there is not yet an agreed upon method for their analysis. This study introduces a statistical method of aggregating and analyzing primary data from DVHs and associated outcomes. It explores the dose-volume relationship for NTCP of the rectum, using long-term data on rectal wall bleeding following prostatic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Previously published data were reviewed and updated on 41 patients with Stages T3 and T4 prostatic carcinoma treated with photons followed by perineal proton boost, including dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient's anterior rectal wall and data on the occurrence of postirradiation rectal bleeding (minimum FU > 4 years). Logistic regression was used to test whether some individual combination of dose and volume irradiated might best separate the DVHs into categories of high or low risk for rectal bleeding. Further analysis explored whether a group of such dose-volume combinations might be superior in predicting complication risk. These results were compared with results of the 'critical volume model', a mathematical model based on assumptions of underlying radiobiological interactions. Results: Ten of the 128 tested dose-volume combinations proved to be 'statistically significant combinations' (SSCs) distinguishing between bleeders (14 out of 41) and nonbleeders (27 out of 41), ranging contiguously between 60 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent) to 70% of the anterior rectal wall and 75 CGE to 30%. Calculated odds ratios for each SSC were not significantly different across the individual SSCs; however, analysis combining SSCs allowed segregation of DVHs into three risk groups: low, moderate, and high. Estimates of probabilities of normal tissue complications (NTCPs) based on these risk groups correlated strongly with observed data (p = 0.003) and with biomathematical model-generated NTCPs

  13. Significant correlation between rectal DVH and late bleeding in patients treated after radical prostatectomy with conformal or conventional radiotherapy (66.6-70.2 Gy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Fiorino, Claudio; Ceresoli, Giovanni Luca; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Bolognesi, Angelo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Villa, Eugenio

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Investigating the correlation between dosimetric/clinical parameters and late rectal bleeding in patients treated with adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Data of 154 consecutive patients, including three-dimensional treatment planning and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum (including filling), were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-six of 154 patients presenting a (full) rectal volume >100 cc were excluded from the analysis. All patients considered for the analysis (n=128) were treated at a nominal dose equal to 66.6-70.2 Gy (ICRU dose 68-72.5 Gy; median 70 Gy) with conformal (n=76) or conventional (n=52) four-field technique (1.8 Gy/fr). Clinical parameters such as diabetes mellitus, acute rectal bleeding, hypertension, age, and hormonal therapy were considered. Late rectal bleeding was scored using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, and patients experiencing ≥Grade 2 were considered bleeders. Median follow-up was 36 months (range 12-72). Mean and median rectal dose were considered, together with rectal volume and the % fraction of rectum receiving more than 50, 55, 60, and 65 Gy (V50, V55, V60, V65, respectively). Median and quartile values of all parameters were taken as cutoff for statistical analysis. Univariate (log-rank) and multivariate (Cox hazard model) analyses were performed. Results: Fourteen of 128 patients experienced ≥Grade 2 late bleeding (3-year actuarial incidence 10.5%). A significant correlation between a number of cutoff values and late rectal bleeding was found. In particular, a mean dose ≥54 Gy, V50 ≥63%, V55 ≥57%, and V60 ≥50% was highly predictive of late bleeding (p≤0.01). A rectal volume <60 cc and type of treatment (conventional vs. conformal) were also significantly predictive of late bleeding (p=0.05). Concerning clinical variables, acute bleeding (p < 0.001) was significantly related to late bleeding, and a trend was found for

  14. Rectal fistulas after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Audrey; Wallner, Kent; Merrick, Gregory; Seeberger, Jergen M.S.; Armstrong, Julius R.T.T.; Mueller, Amy; Cavanagh, William M.S.; Lin, Daniel; Butler, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the rectal and prostatic radiation doses for a prospective series of 503 patients, 44 of whom developed persistent rectal bleeding, and 2 of whom developed rectal-prostatic fistulas. Methods and Materials: The 503 patients were randomized and treated by implantation with 125 I vs. 103 Pd alone (n = 290) or to 103 Pd with 20 Gy vs. 44 Gy supplemental external beam radiotherapy (n = 213) and treated at the Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Medical Center (n = 227), Schiffler Cancer Center (n 242) or University of Washington (n = 34). Patients were treated between September 1998 and October 2001 and had a minimum of 24 months of follow-up. The patient groups were treated concurrently. Treatment-related morbidity was monitored by mailed questionnaires, using standard American Urological Association and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria, at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Patients who reported Grade 1 or greater Radiation Therapy Oncology Group rectal morbidity were interviewed by telephone to clarify details regarding their rectal bleeding. Those who reported persistent bleeding, lasting for >1 month were included as having Grade 2 toxicity. Three of the patients with rectal bleeding required a colostomy, two of whom developed a fistula. No patient was lost to follow-up. The rectal doses were defined as the rectal volume in cubic centimeters that received >50%, 100%, 200%, or 300% of the prescription dose. The rectum was considered as a solid structure defined by the outer wall, without attempting to differentiate the inner wall or contents. Results: Persistent rectal bleeding occurred in 44 of the 502 patients, 32 of whom (73%) underwent confirmatory endoscopy. In univariate analysis, multiple parameters were associated with late rectal bleeding, including all rectal brachytherapy indexes. In multivariate analysis, however, only the rectal volume that received >100% of the dose was significantly predictive of bleeding. Rectal fistulas occurred

  15. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Shinya; Kataoka, Hiromi; Mimura, Mikio; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ayakawa, Shiho; Nagai, Aiko; Hayashi, Akihiro; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Baba, Fumiya; Yanagi, Takeshi; Sugie, Chikao

    2012-01-01

    Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC) was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS), which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding) and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding). Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months). Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42%) observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%), although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62%) treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003) and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%). One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p < 0.001) and bleeding stopped in 5 (42%). After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories/enemas are expected to be effective. However, short

  16. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in an older man presenting as rectal bleeding and IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Howarth Charles B; Jirajariyavej Teeranun; Cheungpasitporn Wisit; Rosen Raquel M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the most common systemic vasculitis in children. Typical presentations are palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria. This vasculitic syndrome can present as an uncommon cause of rectal bleeding in older patients. We report a case of an older man with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. He presented with rectal bleeding and acute kidney injury secondary to IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. Case presentation A 75-year-old Pol...

  17. Treatment and prognosis of patients with late rectal bleeding after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemoto Shinya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation proctitis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT differs from that seen after pelvic irradiation in that this adverse event is a result of high-dose radiation to a very small area in the rectum. We evaluated the results of treatment for hemorrhagic proctitis after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods Between November 2004 and February 2010, 403 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT at 2 institutions. Among these patients, 64 patients who developed late rectal bleeding were evaluated. Forty patients had received IMRT using a linear accelerator and 24 by tomotherapy. Their median age was 72 years. Each patient was assessed clinically and/or endoscopically. Depending on the severity, steroid suppositories or enemas were administered up to twice daily and Argon plasma coagulation (APC was performed up to 3 times. Response to treatment was evaluated using the Rectal Bleeding Score (RBS, which is the sum of Frequency Score (graded from 1 to 3 by frequency of bleeding and Amount Score (graded from 1 to 3 by amount of bleeding. Stoppage of bleeding over 3 months was scored as RBS 1. Results The median follow-up period for treatment of rectal bleeding was 35 months (range, 12–69 months. Grade of bleeding was 1 in 31 patients, 2 in 26, and 3 in 7. Nineteen of 45 patients (42% observed without treatment showed improvement and bleeding stopped in 17 (38%, although mean RBS did not change significantly. Eighteen of 29 patients (62% treated with steroid suppositories or enemas showed improvement (mean RBS, from 4.1 ± 1.0 to 3.0 ± 1.8, p = 0.003 and bleeding stopped in 9 (31%. One patient treated with steroid enema 0.5-2 times a day for 12 months developed septic shock and died of multiple organ failure. All 12 patients treated with APC showed improvement (mean RBS, 4.7 ± 1.2 to 2.3 ± 1.4, p  Conclusions After adequate periods of observation, steroid suppositories

  18. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in an older man presenting as rectal bleeding and IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Jirajariyavej, Teeranun; Howarth, Charles B; Rosen, Raquel M

    2011-08-10

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the most common systemic vasculitis in children. Typical presentations are palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria. This vasculitic syndrome can present as an uncommon cause of rectal bleeding in older patients. We report a case of an older man with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. He presented with rectal bleeding and acute kidney injury secondary to IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. A 75-year-old Polish man with a history of diverticulosis presented with a five-day history of rectal bleeding. He had first noticed colicky left lower abdominal pain two months previously. At that time he was treated with a 10-day course of ciprofloxacin and metronidazole for possible diverticulitis. He subsequently presented with rectal bleeding to our emergency department. Physical examination revealed generalized palpable purpuric rash and tenderness on his left lower abdomen. Laboratory testing showed a mildly elevated serum creatinine of 1.3. Computed tomography of his abdomen revealed a diffusely edematous and thickened sigmoid colon. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed severe petechiae throughout the colon. Colonic biopsy showed small vessel acute inflammation. Skin biopsy resulted in a diagnosis of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Due to worsening kidney function, microscopic hematuria and new onset proteinuria, he underwent a kidney biopsy which demonstrated IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. A diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura was made. Intravenous methylprednisolone was initially started and transitioned to prednisone tapering orally to complete six months of therapy. There was marked improvement of abdominal pain. Skin lesions gradually faded and gastrointestinal bleeding stopped. Acute kidney injury also improved. Henoch-Schönlein purpura, an uncommon vasculitic syndrome in older patients, can present with lower gastrointestinal bleeding, extensive skin lesions and renal involvement which responds well to

  19. Late rectal bleeding after 3D-CRT for prostate cancer: development of a neural-network-based predictive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatis, S.; Rancati, T.; Fiorino, C.; Vavassori, V.; Fellin, G.; Cagna, E.; Mauro, F. A.; Girelli, G.; Monti, A.; Baccolini, M.; Naldi, G.; Bianchi, C.; Menegotti, L.; Pasquino, M.; Stasi, M.; Valdagni, R.

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a model exploiting artificial neural networks (ANNs) to correlate dosimetric and clinical variables with late rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy and to compare the ANN results with those of a standard logistic regression (LR) analysis. 718 men included in the AIROPROS 0102 trial were analyzed. This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity, with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. Radiotherapy doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Information was recorded for comorbidity, previous abdominal surgery, use of drugs and hormonal therapy. For each patient, a rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the whole treatment was recorded and the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) evaluated as an effective descriptor of the whole DVH. Late rectal bleeding of grade ≥ 2 was considered to define positive events in this study (52 of 718 patients). The overall population was split into training and verification sets, both of which were involved in model instruction, and a test set, used to evaluate the predictive power of the model with independent data. Fourfold cross-validation was also used to provide realistic results for the full dataset. The LR was performed on the same data. Five variables were selected to predict late rectal bleeding: EUD, abdominal surgery, presence of hemorrhoids, use of anticoagulants and androgen deprivation. Following a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the independent test set, the areas under the curves (AUCs) were 0.704 and 0.655 for ANN and LR, respectively. When evaluated with cross-validation, the AUC was 0.714 for ANN and 0.636 for LR, which differed at a significance level of p = 0.03. When a practical discrimination threshold was selected, ANN could classify data with sensitivity and specificity both equal to 68.0%, whereas these values were 61.5% for LR. These data provide reasonable evidence that results obtained with

  20. Transcatheter emboilization therapy of massive colonic bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, G. H.; Oh, J. H.; Yoon, Y.

    1996-01-01

    To evaulate the efficacy and safety of emergent superselective transcatheter embolization for controlling massive colonic bleeding. Six of the seven patients who had symptom of massive gastrointestinal bleeding underwent emergent transcatheter embolization for control of the bleeding. Gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients was originated from various colonic diseases: rectal cancer(n=1), proctitis(n=1), benign ulcer(n=1), mucosal injury by ventriculoperitoneal shunt(n=1), and unknown(n=2). All patients except one with rectal cancer were critically ill. Superselective embolization were done by using Gelfoam particles and/or coils. The vessels embolized were ileocolic artery(n=1). superior rectal artery(n=2), inferior rectal artery (n=1), and middle and inferior rectal arteries(n=1). Hemostasis was successful immediately in all patients. Two underwnet surgery due to recurrent bleeding developed 3 days after the procedure(n=1) or in associalion with underlying rectal cancer(n=1). On surgical specimen of two cases, there was no mucosal ischemic change. Transcatheter embolization is a safe and effective treatment of method for the control of massive colonic bleeding

  1. Rectal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Rectal Prolapse in a Toddler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushbakht, Samreen; ul Haq, Anwar

    2015-12-01

    Rectal duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies. They constitute only 4% of the total gastrointestinal anomalies. They usually present in childhood. The common presenting symptoms are mass or pressure effects like constipation, tenesmus, urinary retention, local infection or bleeding due to presence of ectopic gastric mucosa. We are reporting a rare presenting symptom of rectal duplication cyst in a 4-year-old boy/toddler who presented with rectal prolapse. He also had bleeding per rectum. Rectal examination revealed a soft mass palpable in the posterior rectal wall. CT scan showed a cystic mass in the posterior wall of the rectum. It was excised trans-anally and the postoperative recovery was uneventful. Biopsy report showed rectal duplication cyst.

  2. Rectal Bleeding After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: The Relationship Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and the Occurrence Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ebara, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Tamaki, Tomoaki; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Miyakubo, Mai; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the predictive risk factors for Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer using dose–volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: The records of 216 patients treated with HDR-BT combined with EBRT were analyzed. The treatment protocols for HDR-BT were 5 Gy × five times in 3 days or 7 Gy × three, 10.5 Gy × two, or 9 Gy × two in 2 days. The EBRT doses ranged from 45 to 51 Gy with a fractional dose of 3 Gy. Results: In 20 patients Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding developed, and the cumulative incidence rate was 9% at 5 years. By converting the HDR-BT and EBRT radiation doses into biologic effective doses (BED), the BED 3 at rectal volumes of 5% and 10% in the patients who experienced bleeding were significantly higher than those in the remaining 196 patients. Univariate analysis showed that a higher rectal BED 3–5% and the use of fewer needles in brachytherapy were correlated with the incidence of bleeding, but BED 3–5% was found to be the only significant factor on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The radiation dose delivered to small rectal lesions as 5% is important for predicting Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after HDR-BT combined with EBRT for prostate cancer.

  3. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in an older man presenting as rectal bleeding and IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howarth Charles B

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the most common systemic vasculitis in children. Typical presentations are palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria. This vasculitic syndrome can present as an uncommon cause of rectal bleeding in older patients. We report a case of an older man with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. He presented with rectal bleeding and acute kidney injury secondary to IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. Case presentation A 75-year-old Polish man with a history of diverticulosis presented with a five-day history of rectal bleeding. He had first noticed colicky left lower abdominal pain two months previously. At that time he was treated with a 10-day course of ciprofloxacin and metronidazole for possible diverticulitis. He subsequently presented with rectal bleeding to our emergency department. Physical examination revealed generalized palpable purpuric rash and tenderness on his left lower abdomen. Laboratory testing showed a mildly elevated serum creatinine of 1.3. Computed tomography of his abdomen revealed a diffusely edematous and thickened sigmoid colon. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed severe petechiae throughout the colon. Colonic biopsy showed small vessel acute inflammation. Skin biopsy resulted in a diagnosis of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Due to worsening kidney function, microscopic hematuria and new onset proteinuria, he underwent a kidney biopsy which demonstrated IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. A diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura was made. Intravenous methylprednisolone was initially started and transitioned to prednisone tapering orally to complete six months of therapy. There was marked improvement of abdominal pain. Skin lesions gradually faded and gastrointestinal bleeding stopped. Acute kidney injury also improved. Conclusion Henoch-Schönlein purpura, an uncommon vasculitic syndrome in older patients, can present with lower gastrointestinal bleeding

  4. Per-rectal portal scintigraphy in chronic liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frusciante, V.; Barbano, F.; Btuno, M.; Facciorusso, D.; Tonti, P.; Giacobbe, A.; Andriulli, A.; Vettori, P.G.P.

    1993-01-01

    Portal circulation has been evaluated by per-rectal portal scintigraphy in 21 controls and in 30 pts affected by chronic liver diseases. Tc99m-pertechnetate (10 mci) was given through a Nelaton's catheter in the upper rectum; a per-rectal portal shunt index (SI) was calculated. A relevant overlap is evident between controls and CHP pts; no overlap exists between controls and B or C graded cirrhosis. We conclude that the technique may be suggested to monitor the course of chronic liver diseases and different therapeutic regimens. (orig.) [de

  5. Incidence of late rectal bleeding in high-dose conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer using equivalent uniform dose-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Yan Di; Liang Jian; Meldolesi, Elisa; Vargas, Carlos; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade ≥ 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman model and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed worse

  6. Detection of colorectal cancer in symptomatic outpatients without visible rectal bleeding: Validity of the fecal occult blood test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Niels Christian; Tøttrup, Anders; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2009-01-01

    In 2002, a new diagnostic strategy in symptomatic outpatients without known established colorectal cancer risk factors aged 40 years or older was implemented in Denmark. Fecal occult blood test (Hemoccult Sensa®) was a part of that strategy in patients without visible rectal bleeding....

  7. Causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding on colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.U.; Gul, R.; Khursheed, L.; Hadayat, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bleeding from anus is usually referred as rectal bleeding but actually rectal bleeding is defined as bleeding from lower colon or rectum, which means bleeding from a place distal to ligament of Treitz. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of different causes of rectal bleeding in patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad. Methods: One hundred and seventy-five patients with evidence of rectal bleed, without gender discrimination were selected by non-probability convenient sampling from the out-patient department and general medical wards. Patients with suspected upper GI source of bleeding; acute infectious bloody diarrhoea and any coagulopathy were excluded from the study. All patients were subjected to fibre optic colonoscopy after preparation of the gut and findings were recorded. Where necessary, biopsy samples were also taken. Diagnosis was based on colonoscopic findings. Results: A total of 175 patients (92 males and 83 females) with mean age 35.81±9.18 years were part of the study. Colonoscopy showed abnormal findings in 150 (85.7%) patients. The commonest diagnosis was haemorrhoids, which was found in 39 (22.3%) patients. It was followed by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 30 (17.1%) patients, solitary rectal ulcer in 13 (7.4%) patients and polyps in 25 (14.3%) patients. Other less frequent findings were non-specific inflammation and fungating growths in rectum. Conclusion: Haemorrhoids was the leading cause of bleeding per rectum in this study, followed by evidence of IBD while infrequent findings of polyps and diverticuli indicate that these are uncommon in this region. (author)

  8. An unusual presentation of a rectal duplication cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Katharine L; Peche, William J; Rollins, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal duplications are rare developmental anomalies that can occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract. Rectal duplication cysts account for approximately 4% of all duplication cysts. They usually present in childhood with symptoms of mass effect, local infection or more rarely with rectal bleeding from ectopic gastric mucosa. A 26year old male presented with a history of bright red blood per rectum. On examination a mucosal defect with an associated cavity adjacent to the rectum was identified. This was confirmed with rigid proctoscopy and CT scan imaging. A complete transanal excision was performed. Rectal duplication cysts are more common in pediatric patients. They more frequently present with symptoms of mass effect or local infection than with rectal bleeding. In adult patients they are a rare cause of rectal bleeding. Definitive treatment is with surgical excision. A transanal, transcoccygeal, posterior sagittal or a combined abdominoperineal approach may be used depending on anatomic characteristics of the duplication cyst. We present a rare case of a rectal duplication cyst presenting in adulthood with rectal bleeding, managed with transanal excision. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Late rectal bleeding and genitourinary morbidity after high dose rate brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Takeshi; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate late rectal bleeding and genitourinary (GU) morbidity in patients consecutively treated with combined high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Data from 80 patients treated consecutively from October 2000 to May 2004 were analyzed. The median age was 69 years old, median follow-up 31 months, ranging from 17-59 months. All patients received endocrine therapy before radiation therapy. The patients were divided into low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups (4/24/52 patients) according to the risk factors defined by T-classification, prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and Gleason score. Fractionation schedules for HDR brachytherapy were prospectively changed, and EBRT was fixed with 3 Gy fractions to 51 Gy. The distribution of fractionation was scheduled as follows; 5 Gy x 5 times in 14 patients, 7 Gy x 3 times in 19 patients, and 9 Gy x 2 times in 47 patients. The rectal bleeding was graded using the toxicity criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer while the genitourinary morbidities were graded using the toxicity criteria of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v.3.0. Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding developed in 9 patients (11.3%) with the 2-year actuarial probability at 11.2%. Grade 2 and 3 rectal bleeding was recognized in 8 and 1 patients, respectively. Grade 3 morbidity developed in the biopsied sites that were performed in the other hospital. No significant difference was observed in any HDR brachytherapy fractionation schedule. Grade 2 or worse GU morbidities were recognized in 30 patients (37.5%), consisting of 29 Grade 2 patients and 1 Grade 3 patient. Twenty-one patients in Grade 2 morbidity had an increase in the frequency of urination or nocturia, and urethral strictures developed in 3 patients. The 3-year actuarial probability of urethral stricture was 6.0%. One patient experienced Grade 3

  10. Comparison of rectal volume definition techniques and their influence on rectal toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy: a dose-volume analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan; Efe, Esma; Yavuz, Melek; Sonmez, Serhat; Yavuz, Aydin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of four different rectum contouring techniques and rectal toxicities in patients with treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Clinical and dosimetric data were evaluated for 94 patients who received a total dose 3DCRT of 70 Gy, and rectal doses were compared in four different rectal contouring techniques: the prostate-containing CT sections (method 1); 1 cm above and below the planning target volume (PTV) (method 2); 110 mm starting from the anal verge (method 3); and from the anal verge to the sigmoid flexure (method 4). The percentage of rectal volume receiving RT doses (30–70 Gy) and minimum, mean rectal doses were assessed. Median age was 69 years. Percentage of rectal volume receiving high doses (≥ 70 Gy) were higher with the techniques that contoured smaller rectal volumes. In methods 2 and 3, the percentage of rectal volume receiving ≥ 70 Gy was significantly higher in patients with than without rectal bleeding (method 2: 30.8% vs. 22.5%, respectively (p = 0.03); method 3: 26.9% vs. 18.1%, respectively (p = 0.006)). Mean rectal dose was significant predictor of rectal bleeding only in method 3 (48.8 Gy in patients with bleeding vs. 44.4 Gy in patients without bleeding; p = 0.02). Different techniques of rectal contouring significantly influence the calculation of radiation doses to the rectum and the prediction of rectal toxicity. Rectal volume receiving higher doses (≥ 70 Gy) and mean rectal doses may significantly predict rectal bleeding for techniques contouring larger rectal volumes, as was in method 3

  11. Validating the Use of Rectus Muscle Fragment Welding to Control Presacral Bleeding During Rectal Mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ayuste, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of presacral bleeding during rectal mobilization is low, but such bleeding may be massive and even fatal. Haemostasis can be difficult to achieve using conventional methods because of the complex interlacing of the venous network at the sacral periosteum. Historically, pelvic packing and metallic thumbtacks have been the more commonly used methods in our institution. However, the need for repeat surgery to remove the packs and the difficulties encountered in tack application have forced us to explore other methods. In 1994, the procedure termed muscle fragment welding, which uses electrocautery through a rectus muscle fragment, was introduced to control presacral bleeding. From January 1999 to February 2002, six of 416 patients undergoing pelvic surgery in our institution developed massive presacral haemorrhage and, therefore, this technique was used. Haemostasis was immediate and permanent. No major untoward postoperative events such as re-bleeding or infection were noted. One case developed a second-degree burn in the right elbow due to a misplaced ground conduction plate. Rectus muscle fragment welding is, in our experience, an effective and practical method of controlling presacral haemorrhage.

  12. An Alternative Technique in the Control of Massive Presacral Rectal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bleeding control was provided by GORE‑TEX® graft. We conclude that fıxatıon of GORE‑TEX® aortic patch should be kept in mind for uncontrolled massive presacral bleeding. KEYWORDS: GORE‑TEX® graft, presacral bleeding, rectal cancer. An Alternative Technique in the Control of Massive Presacral Rectal. Bleeding: ...

  13. Management and outcome of bleeding pseudoaneurysm associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Yi-Yin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A bleeding pseudoaneurysm in patients with chronic pancreatitis is a rare and potentially lethal complication. Optimal treatment of bleeding peripancreatic pseudoaneurysm remains controversial. This study reports on experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH in managing of bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis. Methods The medical records of 9 patients (8 males and 1 female; age range, 28 – 71 years; median, 36 years with bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis treated at CGMH between Aug. 1992 and Sep. 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Alcohol abuse (n = 7;78% was the predominant predisposing factor. Diagnoses of bleeding pseudoaneurysms were based on angiographic (7/7, computed tomographic (4/7, ultrasound (2/5, and surgical (2/2 findings. Whether surgery or angiographic embolization was performed was primarily based on patient clinical condition. Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 4 – 87 months. Results Abdominal computed tomography revealed bleeding pseudoaneurysms in 4 of 7 patients (57%. Angiography determined correct diagnosis in 7 patients (7/7, 100%. The splenic artery was involved in 5 cases, the pancreaticoduodenal artery in 2, the gastroduodenal artery in 1, and the middle colic artery in 1. Initial treatment was emergency (n = 4 or elective (n = 3 surgery in 7 patients and arterial embolization in 2. Rebleeding was detected after initial treatment in 3 patients. Overall, 5 arterial embolizations and 9 surgical interventions were performed; the respective rates of success of these treatments were 20% (1/5 and 89% (8/9. Five patients developed pseudocysts before treatment (n = 3 or following intervention (n = 2. Pseudocyst formation was identified in 2 of the 3 rebleeding patients. Five patients underwent surgical treatment for associated pseudocysts and bleeding did not recur. One patient died from angiography-related complications. Overall mortality

  14. Chronic kidney disease and bleeding risk in patients at high cardiovascular risk: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, G; Rookmaaker, M B; Algra, A; de Borst, G J; Doevendans, P A; Kappelle, L J; Verhaar, M C; Visseren, F L

    2018-01-01

    Essentials The association between chronic kidney disease and bleeding is unknown. We followed 10 347 subjects at high cardiovascular risk for bleeding events. Chronic kidney disease was associated with a 1.5-fold increased bleeding risk. Especially albuminuria rather than decreased kidney function was associated with bleeding events. Background There are indications that patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased bleeding risk. Objectives To investigate the association between chronic kidney disease and bleeding in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Methods We included 10 347 subjects referred to the University Medical Center Utrecht (the Netherlands) from September 1996 to February 2015 for an outpatient visit with classic risk factors for arterial disease or with symptomatic arterial disease (Second Manifestation of Arterial disease [SMART] cohort). Patients were staged according to the KDIGO guidelines, on the basis of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria, and were followed for the occurrence of major hemorrhagic events until March 2015. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for bleeding were calculated with Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results The incidence rate for bleeding in subjects with chronic kidney disease was 8.0 per 1000 person-years and that for subjects without chronic kidney disease was 3.5 per 1000 person-years. Patients with chronic kidney disease (n = 2443) had a 1.5-fold (95% CI 1.2-1.9) increased risk of bleeding as compared with subjects without chronic kidney disease (n = 7904) after adjustment. Subjects with an eGFR of Chronic kidney disease is a risk factor for bleeding in patients with classic risk factors for arterial disease or with symptomatic arterial disease, especially in the presence of albuminuria. © 2017 University Medical Center Utrecht. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. Effect of a prostaglandin - given rectally for prevention of radiation-induced acute proctitis - on late rectal toxicity. Results of phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kertesz, Tereza; Herrmann, Markus K.A.; Christiansen, Hans; Hermann, Robert M.; Hess, Clemens F.; Hille, Andrea; Zapf, Antonia; Pradier, Olivier; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: to assess the late effect of a prostaglandin, given rectally during irradiation, on late rectal toxicity. In the acute treatment setting no significant differences in reducing the incidence of acute proctitis symptoms in patients receiving misoprostol, however, significantly more rectal bleeding had been reported. Patients and methods: a total of 100 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for prostate cancer had been entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. The toxicity was evaluated yearly after cessation of irradiation by the RTOG/LENT-SOMA scale. Results: the median follow-up was 50 months. 20 patients suffered from grade 1, four patients from grade 2 as well, and three patients only from grade 2 toxicity. Frequency, bleeding and urgency were the most commonly reported symptoms. In keeping with other studies and clinical experience, the symptoms peaked within the first 2 years with a median for grade 1 of 13 months and for grade 2 of 15 months. The presence of acute toxicity grade 2 showed a correlation with the development of any late toxicity (p = 0.03). Any acute rectal bleeding was significant correlated with any late rectal bleeding (p = 0.017). Conclusion: misoprostol given as once-daily suppository for prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis does neither influence the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute nor late rectal toxicity. Misoprostol has no negative impact on the incidence and severity of late rectal bleeding, in contrast to acute rectal bleeding. The routine clinical use of misoprostol suppositories cannot be recommended. (orig.)

  16. Effect of a prostaglandin - given rectally for prevention of radiation-induced acute proctitis - on late rectal toxicity. Results of phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertesz, Tereza; Herrmann, Markus K.A.; Christiansen, Hans; Hermann, Robert M.; Hess, Clemens F.; Hille, Andrea [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Zapf, Antonia [Dept. of Medical Statistics, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Pradier, Olivier [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Brest (France); Schmidberger, Heinz [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Background and purpose: to assess the late effect of a prostaglandin, given rectally during irradiation, on late rectal toxicity. In the acute treatment setting no significant differences in reducing the incidence of acute proctitis symptoms in patients receiving misoprostol, however, significantly more rectal bleeding had been reported. Patients and methods: a total of 100 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for prostate cancer had been entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. The toxicity was evaluated yearly after cessation of irradiation by the RTOG/LENT-SOMA scale. Results: the median follow-up was 50 months. 20 patients suffered from grade 1, four patients from grade 2 as well, and three patients only from grade 2 toxicity. Frequency, bleeding and urgency were the most commonly reported symptoms. In keeping with other studies and clinical experience, the symptoms peaked within the first 2 years with a median for grade 1 of 13 months and for grade 2 of 15 months. The presence of acute toxicity grade 2 showed a correlation with the development of any late toxicity (p = 0.03). Any acute rectal bleeding was significant correlated with any late rectal bleeding (p = 0.017). Conclusion: misoprostol given as once-daily suppository for prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis does neither influence the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute nor late rectal toxicity. Misoprostol has no negative impact on the incidence and severity of late rectal bleeding, in contrast to acute rectal bleeding. The routine clinical use of misoprostol suppositories cannot be recommended. (orig.)

  17. Limitations of combined flexible sigmoidoscopy and double contrast barium enema in patients with rectal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixson, L.J.; Sampliner, R.E.; Chernin, M.; Amberg, J.; Kogan, F.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, Tucson, AZ

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-seven outpatients with non-massive rectal bleeding or asymptomatic positive fecal occult blood were evaluated with 35 cm flexible sigmoidoscopy, double contrast barium enema (DBCE) and colonoscopy. 82% had hemorrhoids and 35% harbored colorectal neoplasia. The combination of flexible sigmoidoscopy and DCBE missed none of 7 malignant lesions. However, 35% of benign polyps ≥ 1 cm and 60.5% of those < 1 cm were not detected by this combination. The presence of hemorrhoids should not prevent a search for colon neoplasia and colonoscopy is the preferred method. (orig.)

  18. SU-D-204-06: Integration of Machine Learning and Bioinformatics Methods to Analyze Genome-Wide Association Study Data for Rectal Bleeding and Erectile Dysfunction Following Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, J; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Kerns, S [University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States); Ostrer, H [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Rosenstein, B [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We investigated whether integration of machine learning and bioinformatics techniques on genome-wide association study (GWAS) data can improve the performance of predictive models in predicting the risk of developing radiation-induced late rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction in prostate cancer patients. Methods: We analyzed a GWAS dataset generated from 385 prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Using genotype information from these patients, we designed a machine learning-based predictive model of late radiation-induced toxicities: rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction. The model building process was performed using 2/3 of samples (training) and the predictive model was tested with 1/3 of samples (validation). To identify important single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we computed the SNP importance score, resulting from our random forest regression model. We performed gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis for nearby genes of the important SNPs. Results: After univariate analysis on the training dataset, we filtered out many SNPs with p>0.001, resulting in 749 and 367 SNPs that were used in the model building process for rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction, respectively. On the validation dataset, our random forest regression model achieved the area under the curve (AUC)=0.70 and 0.62 for rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction, respectively. We performed GO enrichment analysis for the top 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% SNPs out of the select SNPs in the univariate analysis. When we used the top 50% SNPs, more plausible biological processes were obtained for both toxicities. An additional test with the top 50% SNPs improved predictive power with AUC=0.71 and 0.65 for rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction. A better performance was achieved with AUC=0.67 when age and androgen deprivation therapy were added to the model for erectile dysfunction. Conclusion: Our approach that combines machine learning and bioinformatics techniques

  19. SU-D-204-06: Integration of Machine Learning and Bioinformatics Methods to Analyze Genome-Wide Association Study Data for Rectal Bleeding and Erectile Dysfunction Following Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, J; Deasy, J; Kerns, S; Ostrer, H; Rosenstein, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether integration of machine learning and bioinformatics techniques on genome-wide association study (GWAS) data can improve the performance of predictive models in predicting the risk of developing radiation-induced late rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction in prostate cancer patients. Methods: We analyzed a GWAS dataset generated from 385 prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Using genotype information from these patients, we designed a machine learning-based predictive model of late radiation-induced toxicities: rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction. The model building process was performed using 2/3 of samples (training) and the predictive model was tested with 1/3 of samples (validation). To identify important single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we computed the SNP importance score, resulting from our random forest regression model. We performed gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis for nearby genes of the important SNPs. Results: After univariate analysis on the training dataset, we filtered out many SNPs with p>0.001, resulting in 749 and 367 SNPs that were used in the model building process for rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction, respectively. On the validation dataset, our random forest regression model achieved the area under the curve (AUC)=0.70 and 0.62 for rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction, respectively. We performed GO enrichment analysis for the top 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% SNPs out of the select SNPs in the univariate analysis. When we used the top 50% SNPs, more plausible biological processes were obtained for both toxicities. An additional test with the top 50% SNPs improved predictive power with AUC=0.71 and 0.65 for rectal bleeding and erectile dysfunction. A better performance was achieved with AUC=0.67 when age and androgen deprivation therapy were added to the model for erectile dysfunction. Conclusion: Our approach that combines machine learning and bioinformatics techniques

  20. Benign (solitary) ulcer of the rectum - another cause for rectal stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapa, H.J.; Smith, H.J.; Dickinson, T.A.; Veterans Administration Hospital, Dallas, TX; Texas Univ., Dallas

    1981-01-01

    Benign rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients may present with mild, often recurrent, rectal bleeding frequently ascribed to hemorrhoids. Barium enema may be normal during the early, nonulcerative phase of proctitis. Single (or multiple) uclers with or without rectal stricture are the hallmarks of the radiographic diagnosis. Radiologic demonstration of the ulcer(s) is not required, however, for the diagnosis. Benign rectal ulcer should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign-appearing rectal strictures. (orig.) [de

  1. Benign (solitary) ulcer of the rectum - another cause for rectal stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapa, H.J.; Smith, H.J.; Dickinson, T.A.

    1981-01-15

    Benign rectal ulcer syndrome is an uncommon cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients may present with mild, often recurrent, rectal bleeding frequently ascribed to hemorrhoids. Barium enema may be normal during the early, nonulcerative phase of proctitis. Single (or multiple) ulcers with or without rectal stricture are the hallmarks of the radiographic diagnosis. Radiologic demonstration of the ulcer(s) is not required, however, for the diagnosis. Benign rectal ulcer should be included in the differential diagnosis of benign-appearing rectal strictures.

  2. Dose-volume analysis of predictors for chronic rectal toxicity after treatment of prostate cancer with adaptive image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Martinez, Alvaro; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Brabbins, Donald S.; Lockman, David M.; Liang Jian; Gustafson, Gary S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Vicini, Frank A.; Wong, John W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed our experience treating localized prostate cancer with image-guided off-line correction with adaptive high-dose radiotherapy (ART) in our Phase II dose escalation study to identify factors predictive of chronic rectal toxicity. Materials and Methods From 1999-2002, 331 patients with clinical stage T1-T3N0M0 prostate cancer were prospectively treated in our Phase II 3D conformal dose escalation ART study to a median dose of 75.6 Gy (range, 63.0-79.2 Gy), minimum dose to confidence limited-planning target volume (cl-PTV) in 1.8 Gy fractions (median isocenter dose = 79.7 Gy). Seventy-four patients (22%) also received neoadjuvant/adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. A patient-specific cl-PTV was constructed using 5 computed tomography scans and 4 sets of electronic portal images by applying an adaptive process to assure target accuracy and minimize PTV margin. For each case, the rectum (rectal solid) was contoured from the sacroiliac joints or rectosigmoid junction (whichever was higher) to the anal verge or ischial tuberosities (whichever was lower), with a median volume of 81.2 cc. The rectal wall was defined using the rectal solid with an individualized 3-mm wall thickness (median volume = 29.8 cc). Rectal wall dose-volume histogram was used to determine the prescribed dose. Toxicity was quantified using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0. Multiple dose-volume endpoints were evaluated for their association with chronic rectal toxicity. Results Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Thirty-four patients (crude rate 10.3%) experienced Grade 2 chronic rectal toxicity at a median interval of 1.1 years. Nine patients (crude rate = 2.7%) experienced Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity (1 was Grade 4) at a median interval of 1.2 years. The 3-year rates of Grade ≥2 and Grade ≥3 chronic rectal toxicity were 20% and 4%, respectively. Acute toxicity predicted for chronic: Acute Grade 2-3 rectal toxicity (p 40% respectively. The volume

  3. Treatment of Rectal Hemorrhage by Coil Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, Craig Charles; Nicholson, Anthony A.

    1998-01-01

    Four patients, aged 54-84 years, presenting with life-threatening rectal bleeding from the superior hemorrhoidal artery, underwent percutaneous fibered platinum coil embolization via coaxial catheters. Pre-procedure sigmoidoscopy had failed to identify the source of hemorrhage, because the rectum was filled with fresh blood. Embolization was technically and clinically successful in all four patients. Subsequent sigmoidoscopy confirmed the diagnoses in three patients as a solitary rectal ulcer, iatrogenic traumatic ulceration following manual evacuation, and a rectal Dieulafoy's lesion. The other case was angiographically seen to be due to a rectal angiodysplasia. Embolization is an effective procedure in life-threatening superior hemorrhoidal arterial bleeding when endoscopic treatment fails, and should be preferred to rectosigmoid resection

  4. Transitioning from conventional radiotherapy to intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Changing focus from rectal bleeding to detailed quality of life analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Nakamura, Satoaki; Nishimura, Takuya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of modern radiation techniques, we have been able to deliver a higher prescribed radiotherapy dose for localized prostate cancer without severe adverse reactions. We reviewed and analyzed the change of toxicity profiles of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from the literature. Late rectal bleeding is the main adverse effect, and an incidence of >20% of Grade ≥2 adverse events was reported for 2D conventional radiotherapy of up to 70 Gy. 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) was found to reduce the incidence to ∼10%. Furthermore, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduced it further to a few percentage points. However, simultaneously, urological toxicities were enhanced by dose escalation using highly precise external radiotherapy. We should pay more attention to detailed quality of life (QOL) analysis, not only with respect to rectal bleeding but also other specific symptoms (such as urinary incontinence and impotence), for two reasons: (1) because of the increasing number of patients aged >80 years, and (2) because of improved survival with elevated doses of radiotherapy and/or hormonal therapy; age is an important prognostic factor not only for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control but also for adverse reactions. Those factors shift the main focus of treatment purpose from survival and avoidance of PSA failure to maintaining good QOL, particularly in older patients. In conclusion, the focus of toxicity analysis after radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients is changing from rectal bleeding to total elaborate quality of life assessment. (author)

  5. Low Interrater Reliability in Grading of Rectal Bleeding Using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Toxicity Scales: A Survey of Radiation Oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh-Le, Minh-Phuong; Zhang, Zhe; Tran, Phuoc T.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Song, Daniel Y.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To measure concordance among genitourinary radiation oncologists in using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI CTC) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading scales to grade rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: From June 2013 to January 2014, a Web-based survey was sent to 250 American and Canadian academic radiation oncologists who treat prostate cancer. Participants were provided 4 case vignettes in which patients received radiation therapy and developed rectal bleeding and were asked for management plans and to rate the bleeding according to NCI CTC v.4 and RTOG late toxicity grading (scales provided). In 2 cases, participants were also asked whether they would send the patient for colonoscopy. A multilevel, random intercept modeling approach was used to assess sources of variation (case, respondent) in toxicity grading to calculate the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Agreement on a dichotomous grading scale (low grades 1-2 vs high grades 3-4) was also assessed, using the κ statistic for multiple respondents. Results: Seventy-two radiation oncologists (28%) completed the survey. Forty-seven (65%) reported having either written or been principal investigator on a study using these scales. Agreement between respondents was moderate (ICC 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47-0.58) when using NCI CTC and fair using the RTOG scale (ICC 0.28, 95% CI 0.20-0.40). Respondents who chose an invasive management were more likely to select a higher toxicity grade (P<.0001). Using the dichotomous scale, we observed moderate agreement (κ = 0.42, 95% CI 0.40-0.44) with the NCI CTC scale, but only slight agreement with the RTOG scale (κ = 0.19, 95% CI 0.17-0.21). Conclusion: Low interrater reliability was observed among radiation oncologists grading rectal bleeding using 2 common scales. Clearer definitions of late rectal bleeding toxicity should be constructed to reduce this variability and avoid ambiguity in both

  6. Principal Component Analysis-Based Pattern Analysis of Dose-Volume Histograms and Influence on Rectal Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soehn, Matthias; Alber, Markus; Yan Di

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The variability of dose-volume histogram (DVH) shapes in a patient population can be quantified using principal component analysis (PCA). We applied this to rectal DVHs of prostate cancer patients and investigated the correlation of the PCA parameters with late bleeding. Methods and Materials: PCA was applied to the rectal wall DVHs of 262 patients, who had been treated with a four-field box, conformal adaptive radiotherapy technique. The correlated changes in the DVH pattern were revealed as 'eigenmodes,' which were ordered by their importance to represent data set variability. Each DVH is uniquely characterized by its principal components (PCs). The correlation of the first three PCs and chronic rectal bleeding of Grade 2 or greater was investigated with uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Rectal wall DVHs in four-field conformal RT can primarily be represented by the first two or three PCs, which describe ∼94% or 96% of the DVH shape variability, respectively. The first eigenmode models the total irradiated rectal volume; thus, PC1 correlates to the mean dose. Mode 2 describes the interpatient differences of the relative rectal volume in the two- or four-field overlap region. Mode 3 reveals correlations of volumes with intermediate doses (∼40-45 Gy) and volumes with doses >70 Gy; thus, PC3 is associated with the maximal dose. According to univariate logistic regression analysis, only PC2 correlated significantly with toxicity. However, multivariate logistic regression analysis with the first two or three PCs revealed an increased probability of bleeding for DVHs with more than one large PC. Conclusions: PCA can reveal the correlation structure of DVHs for a patient population as imposed by the treatment technique and provide information about its relationship to toxicity. It proves useful for augmenting normal tissue complication probability modeling approaches

  7. Using narrow-band imaging with conventional hysteroscopy increases the detection of chronic endometritis in abnormal uterine bleeding and postmenopausal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mustafa; Ulubay, Mustafa; Alanbay, Ibrahim; Keskin, Uğur; Karasahin, Emre; Yenen, Müfit Cemal

    2016-01-01

    A preliminary study was designed to evaluate whether a narrow-band imaging (NBI) endoscopic light source could detect chronic endometritis that was not identifiable with a white light hysteroscope. A total of 86 patients with endometrial pathology (71 abnormal uterine bleeding and 15 postmenopausal bleeding) were examined by NBI endoscopy and white light hysteroscopy between February 2010 and February 2011. The surgeon initially observed the uterine cavity using white light hysteroscopy and made a diagnostic impression, which was recorded. Subsequently, after pressing a button on the telescope, NBI was used to reevaluate the endometrial mucosa. The median age of the patients was 40 years (range: 30-60 years). Endometritis was diagnosed histologically. Six cases of abnormal uterine bleeding (6/71, 8.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.03-0.17) and one case of postmenopausal bleeding (1/15, 6%, 95%CI 0.01-0.29) were only diagnosed with chronic endometritis by NBI (7/86, 8.1%, 95%CI 0.04-0.15). Capillary patterns of the endometrium can be observed by NBI and this method can be used to assess chronic endometritis. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. Impact of dose-distribution uncertainties on rectal ntcp modeling I: Uncertainty estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenwick, John D.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2001-01-01

    A trial of nonescalated conformal versus conventional radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer has been carried out at the Royal Marsden NHS Trust (RMH) and Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), demonstrating a significant reduction in the rate of rectal bleeding reported for patients treated using the conformal technique. The relationship between planned rectal dose-distributions and incidences of bleeding has been analyzed, showing that the rate of bleeding falls significantly as the extent of the rectal wall receiving a planned dose-level of more than 57 Gy is reduced. Dose-distributions delivered to the rectal wall over the course of radiotherapy treatment inevitably differ from planned distributions, due to sources of uncertainty such as patient setup error, rectal wall movement and variation in the absolute rectal wall surface area. In this paper estimates of the differences between planned and treated rectal dose-distribution parameters are obtained for the RMH/ICR nonescalated conformal technique, working from a distribution of setup errors observed during the RMH/ICR trial, movement data supplied by Lebesque and colleagues derived from repeat CT scans, and estimates of rectal circumference variations extracted from the literature. Setup errors and wall movement are found to cause only limited systematic differences between mean treated and planned rectal dose-distribution parameter values, but introduce considerable uncertainties into the treated values of some dose-distribution parameters: setup errors lead to 22% and 9% relative uncertainties in the highly dosed fraction of the rectal wall and the wall average dose, respectively, with wall movement leading to 21% and 9% relative uncertainties. Estimates obtained from the literature of the uncertainty in the absolute surface area of the distensible rectal wall are of the order of 13%-18%. In a subsequent paper the impact of these uncertainties on analyses of the relationship between incidences of bleeding

  9. [Three methods for controlling presacral massive bleeding during pelvic operations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Liu, Zhimin; Xie, Shangkui; Ren, Donglin; Wu, Yin'ai

    2017-12-25

    To evaluate three different methods for controlling presacral massive bleeding during pelvic operations. Clinical data of 11 patients with presacral massive bleeding during pelvic operation at The Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University and 157 Branch Hospital of Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command from January 2001 to January 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. Hemostasis methods for presacral massive bleeding during operation included gauze packing (whole pressure), drawing pin (local pressure) and absorbable gauze (absorbable gauze was adhered to bleeding position with medical glue after local pressure). Efficacy of these 3 methods for controlling bleeding was evaluated and compared. Ten patients were male and 1 was female with average age of 65.2 (40 to 79) years old. Eight cases were rectal cancer, 2 were presacral malignancies and 1 was rectal benign lesion. Bleeding volume during operation was 300 to 2 500 (median 800) ml. From 2001 to 2012, 4 cases received gauze packing, of whom, 3 cases were scheduled Dixon resection before operation and then had to be referred to Hartman resection; 3 cases died of systemic failure due to postoperative chronic errhysis and infection, and 1 underwent re-operation. At the same time from 2001 to 2012, 5 cases received drawing pin, of whom, bleeding of 3 cases was successfully controlled and Dixon resection was completed. In other 2 cases with hemostasis failure, 1 case underwent re-operation following the use of gauze packing, and another 1 case received absorbable gauze hemostasis. All the 5 patients were healing. From 2013 to 2016, 2 cases completed scheduled anterior resection of rectum after successful hemostasis with absorbable gauze and were healing and discharged. Gauze packing hemostasis is a basic method for controlling presacral massive bleeding. Drawing pin and absorbable gauze hemostasis are more precise and may avoid the change of surgical procedure. But drawing pin has the

  10. Massive rectal bleeding from colonic diverticulosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Rapport De Cas: Nous mettons un cas d'un homme de 79 ans quiàprésente une hémorragie rectal massive ... cause of overt lower gastrointestinal (GI) ... vessels into the intestinal lumen results in ... placed on a high fibre diet, and intravenous.

  11. An Unusual Cause of Rectal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Gruber

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS is a benign disease that is often misdiagnosed. It is characterized by a combination of symptoms, endoscopic findings and histology. Patients present with constipation, rectal bleeding, mucous discharge, pain and a sensation of incomplete defecation. There are many different manifestations of this disease, with or without rectal prolapse. We report an unusual presentation of SRUS as a circular stenosis in a middle-aged male.

  12. Reoccurrence of Bleeding of a Chronic Subdural Haematoma Following a Fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carretero Rafael García

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 60-year-old patient who presented with an acute-on-chronic subdural haematoma is reported. Chronic haematoma usually remains asymptomatic, and this is considered to be an unusual course of events. Trivial or minor injury may cause the cortical bridge veins and fragile vessels in the former haematoma to rupture with concomitant reoccurrence of bleeding. Old age, repeated traumatic brain injuries, brain atrophy, antiplatelet agents and oral anticoagulants such as warfarin are considered to be the underlying conditions to cause the reoccurrence of bleeding. However, our patient did not have any of those conditions.

  13. Embolization of a Hemorrhoid Following 18 Hours of Life-Threatening Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berczi, Viktor; Gopalan, Deepa; Cleveland, Trevor J

    2008-01-01

    Hemorrhoids usually do not pose diagnostic difficulties and they rarely cause massive bleeding. We report a case of massive rectal bleeding over 18 h needing 22 U blood transfusion treated by superselective transcatheter coil embolization 12 h following operative treatment performed in a different hospital. Diagnostic angiography with a view to superselective embolization, following failure of sigmoidoscopy to localize and treat the cause of hemorrhage, might act as a life-saving treatment in massive rectal bleeding, obviating the need for repeated endoscopy or emergency surgery

  14. Chronic liver disease and 90-day mortality in 21,359 patients following peptic ulcer bleeding--a Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland-Bill, L; Christiansen, C F; Gammelager, H; Mortensen, R N; Pedersen, L; Sørensen, H T

    2015-03-01

    Bleeding is a serious and frequent complication of peptic ulcer disease. Hepatic dysfunction can cause coagulopathy and increases the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding. However, whether chronic liver disease increases mortality after peptic ulcer bleeding remains unclear. To examine the prognostic impact of chronic liver disease on mortality after peptic ulcer bleeding. We used population-based medical registries to conduct a cohort study of all Danish residents hospitalised with incident peptic ulcer bleeding from 2004 through 2011. We identified patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis or non-cirrhotic chronic liver disease before their admission for peptic ulcer bleeding. We then computed 90-day mortality after peptic ulcer bleeding based on the Kaplan-Meier method (1 - survival function) and used a Cox regression model to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs), controlling for potential confounders. We identified 21,359 patients hospitalised with peptic ulcer bleeding. Among these, 653 (3.1%) had a previous diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and 474 (2.2%) had a history of non-cirrhotic chronic liver disease. Patients with liver cirrhosis and non-cirrhotic chronic liver disease had a cumulative 90-day mortality of 25.3% and 20.7%, respectively, compared to 18.3% among patients without chronic liver disease. Liver cirrhosis was associated with an adjusted 90-day MRR of 2.38 (95% CI: 2.02-2.80), compared to 1.49 (95% CI: 1.22-1.83) among patients with non-cirrhotic chronic liver disease. Patients with chronic liver disease, particularly liver cirrhosis, are at increased risk of death within 90 days after hospitalisation for peptic ulcer bleeding compared to patients without chronic liver disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Yasuyuki, E-mail: onoyasy@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Kariya, Shuji, E-mail: kariyas@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Nakatani, Miyuki, E-mail: nakatanm@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Yoshida, Rie, E-mail: yagir@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Kono, Yumiko, E-mail: kohnoy@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Kan, Naoki, E-mail: kanna@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Ueno, Yutaka, E-mail: uenoyut@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: komemush@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru, E-mail: tanigano@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization.

  16. [Total tubular colonic duplication in a neonate with rectal bleeding: value of the endoscopy in the diagnose and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñera, M J Guirao; Morote, J M Sánchez; Bermejo, J P Hernández; Vallejo, O Girón; Alberca, F; Ruiz, S Chacón; Serradilla, J L Roqués; Carmona, G A Zambudio; Cantó, M A Gutiérrez

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplication is an infrequent congenital abnormality. Colonic and tubular duplications are the least common. In neonates there are few described cases. It's difficult to identify the duplication preoperatively and a standard surgical approach has not been developped. We report a neonate with bleeding of the digestive tube who presented a colonic duplication who required multiple diagnostic test before the diagnosis was made for colonoscopy. Laparotomy showed a total tubular duplication of the right, transverse and left colon with proximal and distal communication. Exclusion of the duplicated segment was performed, but three months after the operation, subocclusion due to stenosis of the colonic distal loop was developed. This finding was confirmed by a second colonoscopy and septum was partially removed. The study implies that CD, though uncommon, should be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal bleeding and the importance of the colonoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of this malformation.

  17. Late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer (I): multivariate analysis and dose-response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Jackson, Andrew; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Cowen, Didier M.; Levegruen, Sabine; Burman, Chandra M.; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the outcome of a dose escalation protocol for three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer to study the dose-response for late rectal toxicity and to identify anatomic, dosimetric, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal bleeding in multivariate analysis. Methods and Materials: Seven hundred forty-three patients with T1c-T3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT with prescribed doses of 64.8 to 81.0 Gy. The 5-year actuarial rate of late rectal toxicity was assessed using Kaplan-Meier statistics. A retrospective dosimetric analysis was performed for patients treated to 70.2 Gy (52 patients) or 75.6 Gy (119 patients) who either exhibited late rectal bleeding (RTOG Grade 2/3) within 30 months after treatment (i.e., 70.2 Gy--13 patients, 75.6 Gy--36 patients) or were nonbleeding for at least 30 months (i.e., 70.2 Gy--39 patients, 75.6 Gy--83 patients). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was performed to correlate late rectal bleeding with several anatomic, dosimetric, and clinical variables. Results: A dose response for ≥ Grade 2 late rectal toxicity was observed. By multivariate analysis, the following factors were significantly correlated with ≥ Grade 2 late rectal bleeding for patients prescribed 70.2 Gy: 1) enclosure of the outer rectal contour by the 50% isodose on the isocenter slice (i.e., Iso50) (p max (p max

  18. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Jérémie; Projetti, Fabrice; Legros, Romain; Valgueblasse, Virginie; Sarabi, Matthieu; Carrier, Paul; Fredon, Fabien; Bouvier, Stéphane; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis

    2013-09-21

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two other massive rectal bleeds occurred 8 h after each cessation of PPI which led to a hemostatic laparotomy after negative gastroscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy. This showed long tubular duplication of the right colon, with fresh blood in the duplicated colon. Obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a difficult medical situation and potentially life-threatening. The presence of ulcerated ectopic gastric mucosa in the colonic duplication explains the partial efficacy of PPI therapy. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding responding to empiric anti-acid therapy should probably evoke the diagnosis of bleeding ectopic gastric mucosa such as Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication, and gastroenterologists should be aware of this potential medical situation.

  19. Carcinoma of the prostate treated by pelvic node dissection, iodine-125 seed implant and external irradiation; a study of rectal complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abadir, R.; Ross, G. Jr.; Weinstein, S.H. (Missouri Univ., Columbia (USA). Hospital and Clinics)

    1984-09-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia protocol for localised cancer of the prostate calls for pelvic node dissection, 10 000 cGy at the periphery of the prostate from /sup 125/I and 4000 cGy in 20 fractions to the whole pelvis using supervoltage X-ray therapy. Rectal complications were studied in 104 patients; acute and chronic reactions were defined. During external irradiation 54% did not develop diarrhoea, 43% had mild diarrhoea and 3% had severe diarrhoea. In the chronic stage 77% did not have diarrhoea, 12% had delayed, non-distressing rectal bleeding which did not need specific treatment or needed only simple treatment, 7% had prolonged distressing proctitis and 4% had rectal ulceration or recto-urethral fistula necessitating colostomy. Each of the four patients who had colostomy had an additional aetiological factor (arterial disease, pelvic inflammation, additional radiation, pelvic malignancy or second operation). None of the patients entered in the combined brachytherapy and teletherapy programme, and in whom 0.5 cm space was maintained between the closest seed and the rectal mucosa, developed prolonged proctitis.

  20. [Rectal mucosal prolapse syndrome: study of cases. Hospital Daniel A Carrion, Lima, Peru, 2010-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo Suarez, Fernando; Cárdenas Vela, Irene; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Kriss; Pérez Narrea, María Teresa; Rodríguez Vargas, Omar; Montes Teves, Pedro; Monge Salgado, Eduardo

    2014-04-01

    to describe the clinical, endoscopic, and histological characteristics of rectal mucosal prolapse syndrome, formerly known as Solitary rectal ulcer, in patients from a general hospital. All patient diagnosed as rectal mucosal prolapse syndrome during 2010-2013 was selected; the medical history war reviewed and the histological slides were reevaluated by two pathologists. 17 cases of rectal mucosal prolapse syndrome were selected, the majority were males under 50 years, the most common clinical findings were rectal bleeding (82%) and constipation (65%), the endocopic findings were heterogeneous,: erythema (41%), ulcers (35%) and elevated lesions (29%). All cases presented fibromuscularhyperplasia in lamina propia and crypt distortion in the microscopic evaluation. In our study of rectal mucosal prolapse syndrome. The most common clinical findings were rectal bleeding and constipation. Erythematous mucosa was the most common endoscopic finding.

  1. Colostomy is a simple and effective procedure for severe chronic radiation proctitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zi-Xu; Ma, Teng-Hui; Wang, Huai-Ming; Zhong, Qing-Hua; Yu, Xi-Hu; Qin, Qi-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Lei

    2016-06-28

    To assess the efficacy and safety of diverting colostomy in treating severe hemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). Patients with severe hemorrhagic CRP who were admitted from 2008 to 2014 were enrolled into this study. All CRP patients were diagnosed by a combination of pelvic radiation history, clinical rectal bleeding, and endoscopic findings. Inclusion criteria were CRP patients with refractory bleeding with moderate to severe anemia with a hemoglobin level colostomy, while the control group included patients who received conservative treatment. The remission of bleeding was defined as complete cessation or only occasional bleeding that needed no further treatment. The primary outcome was bleeding remission at 6 mo after treatment. Quality of life before treatment and at follow-up was evaluated according to EORTC QLQ C30. Severe CRP complications were recorded during follow-up. Forty-seven consecutive patients were enrolled, including 22 in the colostomy group and 27 in the conservative treatment group. When compared to conservative treatment, colostomy obtained a higher rate of bleeding remission (94% vs 12%), especially in control of transfusion-dependent bleeding (100% vs 0%), and offered a better control of refractory perianal pain (100% vs 0%), and a lower score of bleeding (P colostomy achieved better remission of both moderate bleeding (100% vs 21.5%, P = 0.002) and severe bleeding (100% vs 0%, P colostomy, which included global health, function, and symptoms, but it was not improved in the control group. Pathological evaluation after colostomy found diffused chronic inflammation cells, and massive fibrosis collagen depositions under the rectal wall, which revealed potential fibrosis formation. Diverting colostomy is a simple, effective and safe procedure for severe hemorrhagic CRP. Colostomy can improve quality of life and reduce serious complications secondary to radiotherapy.

  2. Is argon plasma coagulation an effective and safe treatment option for patients with chronic radiation proctitis after high doses of radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Hortelano

    Full Text Available Introduction: In severe cases refractory to medical treatment, APC appears to be the preferred alternative to control persistent rectal bleeding of patients with chronic radiation proctitis. Although successful outcomes have been demonstrated in patients previously treated with moderate doses of radiotherapy, there is reluctance towards its indication due to the concern of severe adverse events in patients treated with high doses of radiation. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of APC in the management of bleeding radiation-induced proctitis in patients treated with high doses of radiation for prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Data from 30 patients were treated with APC due to chronic radiation proctitis, were reviewed retrospectively. All cases had prostate cancer and 9 of them (30 % underwent previous radical prostatectomy. The median dose of conformal 3D External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT delivered was 74 Gy (range 46-76. Median rectal D1cc and D2cc was 72.5 and 72.4 Gy respectively. Median rectal V70, V60 and V40 was 12, 39.5 and 80 %. Cardiovascular and digestive disease, diabetes, smoking behaviour, lowest haemoglobin and transfusion requirements were recorded. Indications for treatment with APC were anemia and persistent bleeding despite medical treatment. Argon gas flow was set at 1.8 l/min with an electrical power setting of 50 W. Results: Median age of all patients was 69.6 years. The median lowest haemoglobin level was 9.6 g/dL. Median time between completion of radiotherapy and first session of APC was 13 months. Ninety-four therapeutic sessions were performed (median 3 sessions. Median time follow-up was 14.5 months (range 2-61. Complete response with resolved rectal bleeding was achieved in 23 patients (77 %, partial response in 5 (16 % and no control in 2 (6 %. No patients required transfusion following therapy. Two patients developed long-term (> 6 weeks grade 2 rectal ulceration and

  3. An alternative technique in the control of massive presacral rectal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... use of all technical possibilities such as packing, ligation, and hemostatic agents. Bleeding control was provided by GORE‑TEX® graft. We conclude that fıxatıon of GORE‑TEX® aortic patch should be kept in mind for uncontrolled massive presacral bleeding. Keywords: GORE‑TEX® graft, presacral bleeding, rectal cancer ...

  4. Continuous Aspirin Use Does Not Increase Bleeding Risk of Split-Thickness Skin Transplantation Repair to Chronic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanwei; Wang, Yibing; Li, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Ning; Wu, Dan

    Discontinuation of aspirin therapy before cutaneous surgery may cause serious complications. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the bleeding risk of split-thickness skin transplantation repair to chronic wounds in patients on aspirin therapy. A total of 97 patients who underwent split-thickness skin transplantation surgery of chronic wounds during a 2-year period were enrolled. They were categorized on the basis of aspirin therapies. The primary outcome was postoperative bleeding and bleeding complications. Univariate analysis was performed to examine the association between aspirin and bleeding complications. Among the 26 patients taking aspirin continuously in group A, there were 5 bleeding complications (19.23%). Among the 55 nonusers in group B, there were 10 bleeding complications (18.18%). Among the 16 discontinuous patients in group C, there were 3 bleeding complications (18.75%). No statistical differences were found among the groups ( P = .956). Univariate analysis showed that continuous aspirin use was not significantly associated with bleeding complications (odds ratio, 0.933; 95% confidence interval, 0.283-3.074; P = .910 in the aspirin and control groups) and that discontinuous aspirin use was not significantly associated with bleeding complications (odds ratio, 0.963; 95% confidence interval, 0.230-4.025; P = .959 in the aspirin and control groups; odds ratio, 0.969; 95% confidence interval, 0.198-4.752; P = .969 in the aspirin and discontinuous groups). Continuous aspirin use does not produce an additional bleeding risk in patients who undergo split-thickness skin transplantation repair of chronic wounds.

  5. Massive rectal bleeding from colonic diverticulosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    barium enema studies have indicated increasing world prevalence ... Other diagnostic modalities include barium enema, computerised ... This is in contrast to the findings in our patient when colonoscopy was carried out, in which the diverticula were more at the descending colon-left sided, and were found to be bleeding.

  6. Implant R100 Predicts Rectal Bleeding in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with IG-IMRT to 45 Gy and Pd-103 Implant

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Packard; Vladimir Valakh; Russell Fuhrer

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To define factors associated with rectal bleeding in patients treated with IG-IMRT followed by Pd-103 seed implant. Methods and Materials. We retrospectively reviewed 61 prostate adenocarcinoma patients from 2002 to 2008. The majority (85.2%) were of NCCN intermediate risk category. All received IG-IMRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles followed by Pd-103 implant delivering a mean D90 of 100.7 Gy. Six patients received 45 Gy to the pelvic nodes and 10 received androgen deprivation...

  7. Random Forests to Predict Rectal Toxicity Following Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ospina, Juan D.; Zhu, Jian; Chira, Ciprian; Bossi, Alberto; Delobel, Jean B.; Beckendorf, Véronique; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Léon; Correa, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a random forest normal tissue complication probability (RF-NTCP) model to predict late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiation therapy, and to compare its performance to that of classic NTCP models. Methods and Materials: Clinical data and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were collected from 261 patients who received 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer with at least 5 years of follow-up. The series was split 1000 times into training and validation cohorts. A RF was trained to predict the risk of 5-year overall rectal toxicity and bleeding. Parameters of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model were identified and a logistic regression model was fit. The performance of all the models was assessed by computing the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: The 5-year grade ≥2 overall rectal toxicity and grade ≥1 and grade ≥2 rectal bleeding rates were 16%, 25%, and 10%, respectively. Predictive capabilities were obtained using the RF-NTCP model for all 3 toxicity endpoints, including both the training and validation cohorts. The age and use of anticoagulants were found to be predictors of rectal bleeding. The AUC for RF-NTCP ranged from 0.66 to 0.76, depending on the toxicity endpoint. The AUC values for the LKB-NTCP were statistically significantly inferior, ranging from 0.62 to 0.69. Conclusions: The RF-NTCP model may be a useful new tool in predicting late rectal toxicity, including variables other than DVH, and thus appears as a strong competitor to classic NTCP models

  8. The value of colonoscopy to assess rectal bleeding in patients referred from Primary Care Units Utilidad de la colonoscopia en pacientes derivados desde Atención Primaria por rectorragia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sánchez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: rectal bleeding is very common in the general population. It is produced mainly because of benign disease originating in the anus and the rectum. Our aim was to evaluate the need for colonoscopy in patients presenting with rectal bleeding. Patients and methods: patients referred from Primary Care Units and complaining of rectal bleeding were included prospectively in a three-month study. All patients underwent a careful medical history along with physical examination, laboratory tests, and colonoscopy. Results: 126 patients with a mean age of 49.2 years (range: 19-80 were studied. Rectal digital examination was abnormal in 75 cases (59.5%. Severe disease was encountered in 22 patients (neoplasm, angiodysplasia, and inflammatory bowel disease; 10 patients had polyps, 6 had colorectal cancer, and 6 had inflammatory bowel disease. Out of 63 patients younger than 50 years, 5 had severe disease, all of them in the form of inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusions: a neoplasm of the rectum and colon in patients younger than 50 years is a rare event. A colonoscopy must be performed in this group of patients to rule out inflammatory bowel disease.Objetivos: la rectorragia es frecuente en la población general. En la mayoría de las ocasiones está producida por patología anorrectal benigna. Nuestro objetivo era determinar la necesidad de realizar pruebas endoscópicas en pacientes con rectorragia. Pacientes y métodos: se incluyeron de forma prospectiva durante tres meses todos los pacientes que eran derivados desde la Atención Primaria por rectorragia. En todos los pacientes se realizó historia clínica y exploración física que incluía tacto rectal, analítica básica y una colonoscopia. Resultados: se incluyeron 126 pacientes con una edad media de 49,2 años (19-80. El tacto rectal fue anormal en 75 (59,5%. En 22 pacientes se encontró patología severa o positiva (lesiones neoplásicas, angiodisplasias y enfermedad inflamatoria

  9. Local Hypothermia as a Radioprotector of the Rectal Wall During Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrycushko, Brian A., E-mail: Brian.Hrycushko@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sayre, James W. [Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Richardson, James A. [Department of Pathology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Department of Molecular Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Folkert, Michael R.; Timmerman, Robert D.; Medin, Paul M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the single-fraction dose-related incidence of rectal obstruction and/or bleeding in normothermic and hypothermic rectums of a rat model. Methods and Materials: A 1.9-cm length of rectum was irradiated with a single fraction in 57 Sprague-Dawley rats using a dedicated image-guided small animal irradiator and Monte Carlo–based treatment planning system. All rats had a rectal temperature control apparatus placed during irradiation and were stratified to achieve either a normothermic (37°C) or hypothermic (15°C) rectal wall temperature. Radiation was delivered to a 1-cm-diameter cylindrical volume about the cooling device and rectal wall. The radiation dose was escalated from 16 Gy up to 37 Gy to assess the dose response in each arm. The primary endpoint of this study was rectal obstruction and/or bleeding during a follow-up of 180 to 186 days. Histologic scoring was performed on all study rats. Results: Probit analysis showed a dose associated with a 50% incidence of rectal obstruction of 24.6 Gy and 40.8 Gy for normothermic and hypothermic arms, respectively. The occurrence of obstruction and/or bleeding correlated with the posttreatment histologic score for normothermic rats; however, there was no difference in histologic score between normothermic and hypothermic rats at the highest dose levels evaluated. Conclusions: A significant radioprotective effect was observed using local hypothermia during a single large dose of radiation for the functional endpoint of rectal obstruction and/or bleeding. A confirmatory study in a large animal model with anatomic and physiologic similarities to humans is suggested.

  10. Local Hypothermia as a Radioprotector of the Rectal Wall During Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrycushko, Brian A.; Chopra, Rajiv; Sayre, James W.; Richardson, James A.; Folkert, Michael R.; Timmerman, Robert D.; Medin, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the single-fraction dose-related incidence of rectal obstruction and/or bleeding in normothermic and hypothermic rectums of a rat model. Methods and Materials: A 1.9-cm length of rectum was irradiated with a single fraction in 57 Sprague-Dawley rats using a dedicated image-guided small animal irradiator and Monte Carlo–based treatment planning system. All rats had a rectal temperature control apparatus placed during irradiation and were stratified to achieve either a normothermic (37°C) or hypothermic (15°C) rectal wall temperature. Radiation was delivered to a 1-cm-diameter cylindrical volume about the cooling device and rectal wall. The radiation dose was escalated from 16 Gy up to 37 Gy to assess the dose response in each arm. The primary endpoint of this study was rectal obstruction and/or bleeding during a follow-up of 180 to 186 days. Histologic scoring was performed on all study rats. Results: Probit analysis showed a dose associated with a 50% incidence of rectal obstruction of 24.6 Gy and 40.8 Gy for normothermic and hypothermic arms, respectively. The occurrence of obstruction and/or bleeding correlated with the posttreatment histologic score for normothermic rats; however, there was no difference in histologic score between normothermic and hypothermic rats at the highest dose levels evaluated. Conclusions: A significant radioprotective effect was observed using local hypothermia during a single large dose of radiation for the functional endpoint of rectal obstruction and/or bleeding. A confirmatory study in a large animal model with anatomic and physiologic similarities to humans is suggested.

  11. Antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan

    2015-06-09

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in the course of liver cirrhosis. People with liver disease frequently have haemostatic abnormalities such as hyperfibrinolysis. Therefore, antifibrinolytic amino acids have been proposed to be used as supplementary interventions alongside any of the primary treatments for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. This is an update of this Cochrane review. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Controlled Trials Register (February 2015), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2 of 12, 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1946 to February 2015), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1974 to February 2015), Science Citation Index EXPANDED (1900 to February 2015), LILACS (1982 to February 2015), World Health Organization Clinical Trials Search Portal (accessed 26 February 2015), and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (accessed 26 February 2015). We scrutinised the reference lists of the retrieved publications. Randomised clinical trials irrespective of blinding, language, or publication status for assessment of benefits and harms. Observational studies for assessment of harms. We planned to summarise data from randomised clinical trials using standard Cochrane methodologies and assessed according to the GRADE approach. We found no randomised clinical trials assessing antifibrinolytic amino acids for treating upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver disease. We did not identify quasi-randomised, historically controlled, or observational studies in which we could assess harms. This updated Cochrane review identified no randomised clinical trials assessing the benefits and harms of antifibrinolytic amino acids for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or

  12. Nd:YAG laser therapy for rectal and vaginal venous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurien, Lori A; Jackson, Richard J; Kiser, Michelle M; Richter, Gresham T

    2017-08-01

    Limited therapeutic options exist for rectal and vaginal venous malformations (VM). We describe our center's experience using Nd:YAG laser for targeted ablation of abnormal veins to treat mucosally involved pelvic VM. Records of patients undergoing non-contact Nd:YAG laser therapy of pelvic VM at a tertiary children's hospital were reviewed. Symptoms, operative findings and details, complications, and outcomes were evaluated. Nine patients (age 0-24) underwent Nd:YAG laser therapy of rectal and/or vaginal VM. Rectal bleeding was present in all patients and vaginal bleeding in all females (n = 5). 5/7 patients had extensive pelvic involvement on MRI. Typical settings were 30 (rectum) and 20-25 W (vagina), with 0.5-1.0 s pulse duration. Patients underwent the same-day discharge. Treatment intervals ranged from 14 to 180 (average = 56) weeks, with 6.1-year mean follow-up. Five patients experienced symptom relief with a single treatment. Serial treatments managed recurrent bleeding successfully in all patients, with complete resolution of vaginal lesions in 40% of cases. No complications occurred. Nd:YAG laser treatment of rectal and vaginal VM results in substantial improvement and symptom control, with low complication risk. Given the high morbidity of surgical resection, Nd:YAG laser treatment of pelvic VM should be considered as first line therapy.

  13. Endoscopic diode laser therapy for chronic radiation proctitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Lino; Marini, Lucia; Rizzato, Roberto; Picardi, Edgardo; Merigliano, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of endoscopic diode laser therapy in patients presenting rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). A retrospective analysis of CRP patients who underwent diode laser therapy in a single institution between 2010 and 2016 was carried out. The patients were treated by non-contact fibers without sedation in an outpatient setting. Fourteen patients (median age 77, range 73-87 years) diagnosed with CRP who had undergone high-dose radiotherapy for prostatic cancer and who presented with rectal bleeding were included. Six required blood transfusions. Antiplatelet (three patients) and anticoagulant (two patients) therapy was not suspended during the treatments. The patients underwent a median of two sessions; overall, a mean of 1684 J of laser energy per session was used. Bleeding was resolved in 10/14 (71%) patients, and other two patients showed improvement (93%). Only one patient, who did not complete the treatment, required blood transfusions after laser therapy; no complications were noted during or after the procedures. Study findings demonstrated that endoscopic non-contact diode laser treatment is safe and effective in CRP patients, even in those receiving antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant therapy.

  14. Effect of treatment on rectal and sigmoid motility in chronically constipated children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loening-Baucke, V A; Younoszai, M K

    1984-02-01

    Using three pressure transducers, motility of the lower and upper rectum and sigmoid was recorded in 18 healthy and 18 chronically constipated children. The 36 children had a wide range of values for frequency of contractions, duration, amplitude, percent of activity, and surface area under the contraction curves. The mean values for percent of activity and surface area were significantly lower in the constipated than in the control children in all three recording areas (P less than .05). Motility in the constipated children, after 2 months of treatment that included milk of magnesia, showed significant increase when compared with corresponding pretreatment values (P less than .05), and were not different from corresponding values of the control children (P greater than .1). Seven to 12 months and 3 years later, rectal and sigmoid motility remained normal. Three-year follow-up revealed that most of the constipated children were not completely free of constipation and fecal soiling in spite of normal motility. Therefore, it appears that the hypomotility in the untreated patients was the result of the chronic fecal impaction and rectal distension and while it was not the cause of the constipation, it may have contributed to its severity.

  15. Prediction of late rectal complication following high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy in cancer of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeung Eun; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Lim, Do Hoon; Ahn, Yong Chan

    2003-01-01

    Although high-dose-rate intracavitary radiotherapy (HDR ICR) has been used in the treatment of cervical cancer, the potential for increased risk of late complication, most commonly in the rectum, is a major concern. We have previously reported on 136 patients treated with HDR brachytherapy between 1995 and 1999. The purpose of this study is to upgrade the previous data and confirm the correlation between late rectal complication and rectal dose in cervix cancer patients treated with HDR ICR. A retrospective analysis was performed for 222 patients with cervix cancer who were treated for curative intent with extemal beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR ICR from July 1995 to December 2001. The median dose of EBRT was 50.4 (30.6-56.4) Gy with a daily fraction size 1.8 Gy. A total of six fractions of HDR ICR were given twice weekly with fraction size of 4 (3-5.5) Gy to A point by Iridium-192 source. The rectal dose was calculated at the rectal reference point using the barium contrast criteria in vivo measurement of the rectal dose was performed with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) during HDR ICR. The median follow-up period was 39 months, ranging from 6 to 90 months. Twenty-one patients (9.5%) experienced late rectal bleeding, from 3 to 44 months (median, 13 months) after the completion of RT. The calculated rectal doses were not different between the patients with rectal bleeding and those without, but the measured rectal doses were higher in the complicated patients. The differences of the measured ICR rectal fractional dose, ICR total rectal dose, and total rectal biologically equivalent dose (BED) were statistically significant. When the measured ICR total rectal dose was beyond 16 Gy, when the ratio of the measured rectal dose to A point dose was beyond 70%, or when the measured rectal BED was over 110 GY 3 , a high possibility of late rectal complication was found. Late rectal complication was closely correlated with measured rectal dose by in vivo dosimetry using

  16. Endothelial dysfunction in rectal cancer patients chronically exposed to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Pak, Laura; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Manambayeva, Zukhra; Tokanova, Sholpan; Madiyeva, Madina [Semey State Medical University, Semey (Kazakhstan); Inoue, Ken [Kochi University, Health Service Center, Kochi (Japan); Kawano, Noriyuki; Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Takeichi, Nobuo [Takeichi Clinic, Hiroshima (Japan); Noso, Yoshihiro [Shimane University, Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane (Japan); Khozhayev, Arman; Molgazhdarov, Maulen [The Kazakh National Medical University of S.D.Asfendiyarov, Department of Oncology, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Olzhaev, Sayakhat [Almaty Regional Oncologic Hospital, Department of Oncology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2017-08-15

    We sought to identify the features of endothelial function in rectal cancer patients who were exposed to chronic ionizing radiation from a nuclear test site in Kazakhstan. We examined 146 individuals, 76 of whom were rectal cancer patients. The existence of a complex of disturbances of the endothelium and hemostasis systems in patients vs non-patients was revealed. Endothelial dysfunction was expressed as an increase of nitric oxide (NO) production along with decreases in vasodilatation function, and increased levels of von Willebrand factor in blood, along with an increase in the number of circulating endotheliocytes. Significant correlations between indicators of endothelial function and vascular-platelet hemostasis were observed. These changes and their interrelations were expressed more strongly in the patients who lived in the contaminated area around the nuclear test site. Such patients could have an increased risk of thrombosis and other complications after the treatment of a malignant neoplasm. (orig.)

  17. The effect of ultrasound-guided compression immediately after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy on postbiopsy bleeding: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bong Hee; Kim, Jung Im; Bae, Sang Rak; Lee, Yong Seok; Kang, Sung Hak; Han, Chang Hee

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate whether ultrasound-guided compression performed immediately after transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy decreases bleeding complications. We prospectively evaluated a total of 148 consecutive patients who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy between March 2015 and July 2016. Systematic 12-core prostate biopsy was performed in all patients. Of these, 100 patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the compression group (n = 50) underwent TRUS-guided compression on bleeding biopsy tracts immediately after prostate biopsy, while the non-compression group (n = 50) underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy alone. The incidence rate and duration of hematuria, hematospermia, and rectal bleeding were compared between the two groups. The incidence rates of hematuria and hematospermia were not significantly different between the two groups (60 vs. 64%, p = 0.68; 22 vs. 30%, p = 0.362, respectively, for compression vs. non-compression group). The rectal bleeding incidence was significantly lower in the compression group as compared to the non-compression group (20 vs. 44%, p = 0.01). However, there were no significant differences in the median duration of hematuria, hematospermia, or rectal bleeding between the two groups (2, 8, and 2 days vs. 2, 10, and 1 days, p > 0.05, respectively, for compression vs. non-compression group). TRUS-guided compression [p = 0.004, odds ratio (OR) 0.25] and patient age (p = 0.013, OR 0.93) were significantly protective against the occurrence of rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy in multivariable analysis. Although it has no impact on other complications, ultrasound-guided compression on bleeding biopsy tracts performed immediately after TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is an effective and practical method to treat or decrease rectal bleeding.

  18. Finding dose-volume constraints to reduce late rectal toxicity following 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco, Carlo; Mazzetta, Chiara; Cattani, Federica; Tosi, Giampiero; Castiglioni, Simona; Fodor, Andrei; Orecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The rectum is known to display a dose-volume effect following high-dose 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The aim of the study is to search for significant dose-volume combinations with the specific treatment technique and patient set-up currently used in our institution. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of 135 patients with stage T1b-T3b prostate cancer treated consecutively with 3D-CRT between 1996 and 2000 to a total dose of 76 Gy. The median follow-up was 28 months (range 12-62). All late rectal complications were scored using RTOG criteria. Time to late toxicity was assessed using the Kaplan-Meyer method. The association between variables at baseline and ≥2 rectal toxicity was tested using χ 2 test or Fisher's exact test. A multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed. Results: Late rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was observed in 24 of the 135 patients (17.8%). A 'grey area' of increased risk has been identified. Average DVHs of the bleeding and non-bleeding patients were generated. The area under the percent volume DVH for the rectum of the bleeding patients was significantly higher than that of patients without late rectal toxicity. On multivariate analysis the correlation between the high risk DVHs and late rectal bleeding was confirmed. Conclusions: The present analysis confirms the role of the rectal DVH as a tool to discriminate patients undergoing high-dose 3D-CRT into a low and a high risk of developing late rectal bleeding. Based on our own results and taking into account the data published in the literature, we have been able to establish new dose-volume constraints for treatment planning: if possible, the percentage of rectal volume exposed to 40, 50, 60, 72 and 76 Gy should be limited to 60, 50, 25, 15 and 5%, respectively

  19. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F.; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Calciphylaxis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis • blood transfusions Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. Case Report: A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  20. Evaluation of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding in chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sinan Dal

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of gastrointestinal complications especially gastric bleeding increased in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. The aim of this study was to comparatively investigate upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB in patients with non-hemodialysis CRF and the patients without CRF.Materials and Methods: Seventy-six patients (55 men and 21 women with and without CRF and UGB was included. The first group who had CRF consisted of 23 patients and the control group 53. All patients were evaluated in the view point of age, gender, smoking status, other illnesses, medicine usage, laboratory parameters, endoscopic evidence and endoscopic intervention (scleroteraphy.Results: Calcium levels of patients with a history of previous UGB was significantly lower compared with those bleeding for the first time (p<0.05. The mean parathormon level was higher in patients with CRF (171.24 ± 141.96 pg/ml (p<0.05. Serum albumin level was negatively correlated with urea and creatinine (p<0.001, and positively correlated with hemoglobin and hematocrit levels (p=0.003 and p=0.005. The patients undergoing sclerotherapy more frequently needed transfusions (p<0.05. The hospitalization time found to be shortening with increasing hemoglobin, hematocrit, calcium and albumin levels; and lengthens with increased urea and creatinine.Conclusion: The history of previous gastrointestinal bleeding and detection of pathological findings in endoscopy were more frequent in patients with CRF. Gastrointestinal bleeding risk did not reduce using by gastric protection against acetylsalicylic acid and other non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Also, low albumin levels and secondary hiperparathyroidism in these patients may be risky for gastrointestinal bleeding. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:207-13

  1. Vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with acute or chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Solà, Ivan

    2015-06-09

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in the course of liver cirrhosis. Several treatments are used for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. One of them is vitamin K administration, but it is not known whether it benefits or harms people with acute or chronic liver disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This is an update of this Cochrane review. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin K for people with acute or chronic liver disease and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Controlled Trials Register (February 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2 of 12, 2015), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1946 to February 2015), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1974 to February 2015), Science Citation Index EXPANDED (1900 to February 2015), and LILACS (1982 to 25 February 2015). We sought additional randomised trials from two registries of clinical trials: the World Health Organization Clinical Trials Search Portal and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials. We looked through the reference lists of the retrieved publications and review articles. Randomised clinical trials irrespective of blinding, language, or publication status for assessment of benefits and harms. We considered observational studies for assessment of harms only. \\We aimed to summarise data from randomised clinical trials using Standard Cochrane methodology and assess them according to the GRADE approach. We found no randomised trials on vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases assessing benefits and harms of the intervention. We identified no quasi-randomised studies, historically controlled studies, or observational studies assessing harms. This updated review found no randomised clinical trials of vitamin K for upper gastrointestinal bleeding in people with liver diseases. The benefits and harms of vitamin K need to be tested

  2. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Andrew H.; Farooqui, Mohammed Z.H.; Tian, Xin; Martyr, Sabrina; Cullinane, Ann M.; Nghiem, Khanh; Sun, Clare; Valdez, Janet; Niemann, Carsten U.; Herman, Sarah E. M.; Saba, Nakhle; Soto, Susan; Marti, Gerald; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steve M.; Lozier, Jay N.; Wiestner, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator-initiated trial of single-agent ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At a median follow-up of 24 months we recorded grade ≤2 bleeding-related adverse events in 55% of 85 patients. No grade ≥3 events occurred. Median time to event was 49 days. The cumulative incidence of an event plateaued by 6 months, suggesting that the risk of bleeding decreases with continued therapy. At baseline, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII levels were often high and normalized on treatment. Platelet function measured via the platelet function analyzer (PFA-100™) was impaired in 22 patients at baseline and in an additional 19 patients on ibrutinib (often transiently). Collagen and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was tested using whole blood aggregometry. Compared to normal controls, response to both agonists was decreased in all patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, whether on ibrutinib or not. Compared to untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, response to collagen showed a mild further decrement on ibrutinib, while response to adenosine diphosphate improved. All parameters associated with a significantly increased risk of bleeding-related events were present at baseline, including prolonged epinephrine closure time (HR 2.74, P=0.012), lower levels of von Willebrand factor activity (HR 2.73, P=0.009) and factor VIII (HR 3.73, P=0.0004). In conclusion, both disease and treatment-related factors influence the risk of bleeding. Patients at greater risk for bleeding of grade ≤2 can be identified by clinical laboratory tests and counseled to avoid aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and fish oils. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01500733 PMID

  3. Incidence and risk factors of bleeding-related adverse events in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with ibrutinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipsky, Andrew H; Farooqui, Mohammed Z H; Tian, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator-initiated t......Ibrutinib is associated with bleeding-related adverse events of grade ≤2 in severity, and infrequently with grade ≥3 events. To investigate the mechanisms of bleeding and identify patients at risk, we prospectively assessed platelet function and coagulation factors in our investigator......-initiated trial of single-agent ibrutinib for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. At a median follow-up of 24 months we recorded grade ≤2 bleeding-related adverse events in 55% of 85 patients. No grade ≥3 events occurred. Median time to event was 49 days. The cumulative incidence of an event plateaued by 6 months...... 19 patients on ibrutinib (often transiently). Collagen and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation was tested using whole blood aggregometry. Compared to normal controls, response to both agonists was decreased in all patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, whether on ibrutinib or not...

  4. Rectal cancer associated with radiation colitis after treatment for cancer of uterine corpus, report of a case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igari, Tohru; Takizawa, Touichirou; Koike, Morio [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Mori, Takeo; Funada, Nobuaki [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome General Hospital (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A 62-year-old woman who had received extended hysterectomy and radium-needle insertion for cancer of the uterine corpus at 32 years of age. Following that episode, rectal bleeding persisted for several years before it spontaneously cleared up. Rectal bleeding recurred 29 years later, and a small ulcer was revealed radiographically and endoscopically. The surgically resected specimen showed well differentiated adenocarcinoma penetrating the proper muscle layer. The effect of former radiotherapy remained as around the lesion intimal thickening and obstruction of small arteries. (author)

  5. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose–response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, C; Thor, M; Apte, A; Deasy, J O; Liu, M; Moissenko, V; Petersen, S E; Høyer, M

    2014-01-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose–response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman–Kutcher–Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose–response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice

  6. Rectal ulcer in a patient with VZV sacral meningoradiculitis (Elsberg syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tokushige, Shin-ichi; Mizuno, Hideo; Igeta, Yukifusa; Hashida, Hideji

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 55-year-old woman with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) sacral meningoradiculitis (Elsberg syndrome) who presented with herpes zoster in the left S2 dermatome area, urinary retention, and constipation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging showed the left sacral nerve root swelling with enhancement. Thereafter, she suddenly showed massive hematochezia and hemorrhagic shock because of a rectal ulcer. To elucidate the relation between Elsberg syndrome and rectal ulcer, accumulation of similar cases is necessary. To avoid severe complications, attention must be devoted to the possibility of rectal bleeding in the early stage of Elsberg syndrome.

  7. Risk of stroke and bleeding in patients with heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgaard, Line; Overvad, Thure Filskov; Skjøth, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in relation to ischaemic stroke, intracranial haemorrhage, major bleeding, and all-cause death in heart failure patients without atrial fibrillation. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this observational cohort...

  8. A refractory case of radiation proctitis. Effectiveness of argon plasma coagulation therapy and the rectal stenosis after therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Katsunobu; Morita, Akihiko; Terada, Itsuro

    2006-01-01

    A 75-years-old man received external radiation with a cumulative dose of 60 Gy for prostatic cancer. Severe hematochezia occurred approximately 16 months after irradiation. A extensive and circumferential telangiectatic lesion in the lower segment of the rectum was detected, then he was diagnosed as having radiation proctitis. Pharmacotherapy was employed at first, but the bleeding was uncontrollable. Colostomy was performed, but the bleeding could not be controlled. Argon plasma coagulation therapy (APC) was applied, and the bleeding ceased after first session of APC. But the severe rectal stricture appeared three months after APC. APC is effective treatment for refractory radiation proctitis, but the rectal stenosis was occurred three months after APC. (author)

  9. [Anterior rectal duplication in adult patient: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cabrera, J; Villanueva-Sáenz, E; Bolaños-Badillo, L E

    2009-01-01

    To report a case of rectal duplication in the adult and make a literature review. The intestinal duplications are injuries of congenital origin that can exist from the base of the tongue to the anal verge, being the most frequent site at level of terminal ileum (22%) and at the rectal level in 5% To date approximately exist 80 reports in world-wide Literature generally in the pediatric population being little frequent in the adult age. Its presentation could be tubular or cystic. The recommended treatment is the surgical resection generally in block with coloanal anastomosis. A case review of rectal duplication in the adult and the conducted treatment. The case of a patient appears with diagnose of rectal duplication with tubular type,whose main symptom was constipation and fecal impactation. In the exploration was detect double rectal lumen (anterior and posterior) that it above initiates by of the anorectal ring with fibrous ulcer of fibrinoid aspect of 3 approx cm of length x 1 cm wide, at level of the septum that separates both rectal lumina. The rectal duplication is a rare pathology in the adult nevertheless is due to suspect before the existence of alterations in the mechanics of the defecation, rectal prolapse and rectal bleeding,the election treatment is a protectomy with colonic pouch in "J" and coloanal anastomosis.

  10. Dose/volume–response relations for rectal morbidity using planned and simulated motion-inclusive dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thor, Maria; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O.; Karlsdóttir, Àsa; Moiseenko, Vitali; Liu, Mitchell; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Many dose-limiting normal tissues in radiotherapy (RT) display considerable internal motion between fractions over a course of treatment, potentially reducing the appropriateness of using planned dose distributions to predict morbidity. Accounting explicitly for rectal motion could improve the predictive power of modelling rectal morbidity. To test this, we simulated the effect of motion in two cohorts. Materials and methods: The included patients (232 and 159 cases) received RT for prostate cancer to 70 and 74 Gy. Motion-inclusive dose distributions were introduced as simulations of random or systematic motion to the planned dose distributions. Six rectal morbidity endpoints were analysed. A probit model using the QUANTEC recommended parameters was also applied to the cohorts. Results: The differences in associations using the planned over the motion-inclusive dose distributions were modest. Statistically significant associations were obtained with four of the endpoints, mainly at high doses (55–70 Gy), using both the planned and the motion-inclusive dose distributions, primarily when simulating random motion. The strongest associations were observed for GI toxicity and rectal bleeding (Rs = 0.12–0.21; Rs = 0.11–0.20). Applying the probit model, significant associations were found for tenesmus and rectal bleeding (Rs = 0.13, p = 0.02). Conclusion: Equally strong associations with rectal morbidity were observed at high doses (>55 Gy), for the planned and the simulated dose distributions including in particular random rectal motion. Future studies should explore patient-specific descriptions of rectal motion to achieve improved predictive power

  11. Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome: A Biopsychosocial Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Daghaghzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS is a chronic disorder of the gastrointestinal tract and its etiology is not well understood. There is no specific treatment for this syndrome and patients with SRUS may, for years, experience many complications. The aim of the present research was the biopsychosocial study of patients with SRUS.Methods: The study participants consisted of 16 patients with SRUS (7 men and 9 women. Their medical records were reviewed retrospectively to evaluate the clinical spectrum of the patients along with the endoscopic and histological findings. Moreover, psychiatric and personality disorders [based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed, Text Revision (DSM IV-TR], psychosocial stressors, early life traumas, and coping mechanisms were assessed through structured interviews.Results: At presentation, mean age of the patients was 39 years (16 to 70. Common symptoms reported included rectal bleeding (93.8%, rectal self-digitations (81.2%, passage of mucous (75%, anal pain (75%, and straining (75%. Endoscopically, solitary and multiple lesions were present in 9 (60% and 4 (26.7% patients, respectively, and 87% of lesions were ulcerative and 13.3% polypoidal. The most common histological findings were superficial ulceration (92.85% and intercryptic fibromuscular obliteration (87.71%. Common psychosocial findings included anxiety disorders (50%, depression (37.5%, obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD or traits (62.5%, interpersonal problems (43.75%, marital conflicts (43.75%, occupational stress (37.5%, early life traumas, physical abuse (31.25%, sexual abuse (31.25%, dysfunctional coping mechanisms, emotional inhibition (50%, and non-assertiveness (37.5%.Conclusion: Given the evidence in this study, we cannot ignore the psychosocial problems of patients with SRUS and biopsychosocial assessment of SRUS is more appropriate than biomedical evaluation alone.

  12. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  13. Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy is effective for solitary rectal ulcer syndrome when associated with rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C; Ong, E; Jones, O M; Cunningham, C; Lindsey, I

    2014-03-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is uncommon and its management is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with SRUS who underwent laparoscopic ventral rectopexy (LVR). A review was performed of a prospective database at the Oxford Pelvic Floor Centre to identify patients between 2004 and 2012 with a histological diagnosis of SRUS. All were initially treated conservatively and surgical treatment was indicated only for patients with significant symptoms after failed conservative management. The primary end-point was healing of the ulcer. Secondary end-points included changes in the Wexner Constipation Score and Faecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI). Thirty-six patients with SRUS were identified (31 women), with a median age of 44 (15–81) years. The commonest symptoms were rectal bleeding (75%) and obstructed defaecation (64%). The underlying anatomical diagnosis was internal rectal prolapse (n = 20), external rectal prolapse (n = 14) or anismus (n = 2). Twenty-nine patients underwent LVR and one a stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) procedure. Nine (30%) required a further operation, six required posterior STARR for persistent SRUS and two a per-anal stricturoplasty for a narrowing at the healed SRUS site. Healing of the SRU was seen in 27 (90%) of the 30 patients and was associated with significant improvements in Wexner and FISI scores at a 3-year follow-up. Almost all cases of SRUS in the present series were associated with rectal prolapse. LVR resulted in successful healing of the SRUS with good function in almost all patients, but a significant number will require further surgery such as STARR for persistent obstructed defaecation.

  14. Acute intracranial bleeding and recurrence after bur hole craniostomy for chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Chang Hyeun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Chi Heon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Chun Kee; Jung, Hee-Won; Yoo, Heon

    2015-07-01

    There is inconsistency among the perioperative management strategies currently used for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Moreover, postoperative complications such as acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence affect clinical outcome of cSDH surgery. This study evaluated the risk factors associated with acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence and identified an effective perioperative strategy for cSDH patients. A retrospective study of patients who underwent bur hole craniostomy for cSDH between 2008 and 2012 was performed. A consecutive series of 303 cSDH patients (234 males and 69 females; mean age 67.17 years) was analyzed. Postoperative acute intracranial bleeding developed in 14 patients (4.57%) within a mean of 3.07 days and recurrence was observed in 37 patients (12.21%) within a mean of 31.69 days (range 10-104 days) after initial bur hole craniostomy. The comorbidities of hematological disease and prior shunt surgery were clinical factors associated with acute bleeding. There was a significant risk of recurrence in patients with diabetes mellitus, but recurrence did not affect the final neurological outcome (p = 0.776). Surgical details, including the number of operative bur holes, saline irrigation of the hematoma cavity, use of a drain, and type of postoperative ambulation, were not significantly associated with outcome. However, a large amount of drainage was associated with postoperative acute bleeding. Bur hole craniostomy is an effective surgical procedure for initial and recurrent cSDH. Patients with hematological disease or a history of prior shunt surgery are at risk for postoperative acute bleeding; therefore, these patients should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage. Surgeons should consider informing patients with diabetes mellitus that this comorbidity is associated with an increased likelihood of recurrence.

  15. Impact of chronic kidney disease on long-term ischemic and bleeding outcomes in medically managed patients with acute coronary syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melloni, Chiara; Cornel, Jan H; Hafley, Gail

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: We aimed to study the relationship of chronic kidney disease stages with long-term ischemic and bleeding outcomes in medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients and the influence of more potent antiplatelet therapies on platelet reactivity by chronic kidney disease stage. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: We estimated creatinine clearance for 8953 medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients enrolled in the Targeted Platelet Inhibition to Clarify the Optimal Strategy to Medically Manage Acute Coronary Syndromes trial. Patients were classified by chronic kidney disease stage: normal renal...... function/mild (creatinine clearance >60 mL/min); moderate (creatinine clearance 30-60 mL/min); severe (creatinine clearance event rates through 30 months were evaluated for ischemic (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke; primary end point) and bleeding (Global Use...

  16. Is It Time to Tailor the Prediction of Radio-Induced Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients? Building the First Set of Nomograms for Late Rectal Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Kattan, Michael W.; Rancati, Tiziana; Yu Changhong; Vavassori, Vittorio; Fellin, Giovanni; Cagna, Elena; Gabriele, Pietro; Mauro, Flora Anna; Baccolini, Micaela; Bianchi, Carla; Menegotti, Loris; Monti, Angelo F.; Stasi, Michele; Giganti, Maria Olga

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Development of user-friendly tools for the prediction of single-patient probability of late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity through self-assessed questionnaires (minimum follow-up, 36 months) by 718 adult men in the AIROPROS 0102 trial. Doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Nomograms were created based on multivariable logistic regression analysis. Three endpoints were considered: G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding (52/718 events), G3 late rectal bleeding (24/718 events), and G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence (LINC, 19/718 events). Results: Inputs for the nomogram for G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding estimation were as follows: presence of abdominal surgery before RT, percentage volume of rectum receiving >75 Gy (V75Gy), and nomogram-based estimation of the probability of G2 to G3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (continuous variable, which was estimated using a previously published nomogram). G3 late rectal bleeding estimation was based on abdominal surgery before RT, V75Gy, and NOMACU. Prediction of G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence was based on abdominal surgery before RT, presence of hemorrhoids, use of antihypertensive medications (protective factor), and percentage volume of rectum receiving >40 Gy. Conclusions: We developed and internally validated the first set of nomograms available in the literature for the prediction of radio-induced toxicity in prostate cancer patients. Calculations included dosimetric as well as clinical variables to help radiation oncologists predict late rectal morbidity, thus introducing the possibility of RT plan corrections to better tailor treatment to the patient’s characteristics, to avoid unnecessary worsening of quality of life, and to provide support to the patient in selecting the best therapeutic approach.

  17. Is It Time to Tailor the Prediction of Radio-Induced Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients? Building the First Set of Nomograms for Late Rectal Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS - Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Kattan, Michael W. [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Rancati, Tiziana, E-mail: tiziana.rancati@istitutotumori.mi.it [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Yu Changhong [Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Vavassori, Vittorio [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, Humanitas - Gavazzeni, Bergamo (Italy); Fellin, Giovanni [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Cagna, Elena [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Gabriele, Pietro [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo (Italy); Mauro, Flora Anna; Baccolini, Micaela [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Villa Maria Cecilia, Lugo (Italy); Bianchi, Carla [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy); Menegotti, Loris [Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Monti, Angelo F. [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Stasi, Michele [Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Physics, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo (Italy); Giganti, Maria Olga [Prostate Program, Scientific Directorate, Fondazione IRCCS-Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Dept. of Oncology, Ospedale Niguarda, Milan (Italy); and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Development of user-friendly tools for the prediction of single-patient probability of late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This multicenter protocol was characterized by the prospective evaluation of rectal toxicity through self-assessed questionnaires (minimum follow-up, 36 months) by 718 adult men in the AIROPROS 0102 trial. Doses were between 70 and 80 Gy. Nomograms were created based on multivariable logistic regression analysis. Three endpoints were considered: G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding (52/718 events), G3 late rectal bleeding (24/718 events), and G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence (LINC, 19/718 events). Results: Inputs for the nomogram for G2 to G3 late rectal bleeding estimation were as follows: presence of abdominal surgery before RT, percentage volume of rectum receiving >75 Gy (V75Gy), and nomogram-based estimation of the probability of G2 to G3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity (continuous variable, which was estimated using a previously published nomogram). G3 late rectal bleeding estimation was based on abdominal surgery before RT, V75Gy, and NOMACU. Prediction of G2 to G3 late fecal incontinence was based on abdominal surgery before RT, presence of hemorrhoids, use of antihypertensive medications (protective factor), and percentage volume of rectum receiving >40 Gy. Conclusions: We developed and internally validated the first set of nomograms available in the literature for the prediction of radio-induced toxicity in prostate cancer patients. Calculations included dosimetric as well as clinical variables to help radiation oncologists predict late rectal morbidity, thus introducing the possibility of RT plan corrections to better tailor treatment to the patient's characteristics, to avoid unnecessary worsening of quality of life, and to provide support to the patient in selecting the best therapeutic approach.

  18. Efficacy and safety of argon plasma coagulation for the treatment of hemorrhagic radiation proctitis Eficacia y seguridad de la electrocoagulación con plasma de argón en el tratamiento del sangrado rectal secundario a proctitis por radioterapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. de la Serna Higuera

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy, safety and medium-/long-term clinical course of patients undergoing endoscopic treatment with argon plasma coagulation for hemorrhagic radiation proctopathy. Design: descriptive, retrospective study with medium- and long-term follow-up. Patients, material and methods: ten patients were treated with argon plasma coagulation for hemorrhagic radiation proctopathy between July 1998 and February 2003. Inclusion criteria were: evidence of chronic rectal bleeding, consistent endoscopic findings, and absence of any other cause of hematochezia after a comprehensive ano-rectal examination and complete colonoscopy. The equipment used was a standard colonoscope, an argon delivery unit, an argon plasma coagulation probe 1.5 mm in internal diameter, and a high-frequency electrosurgical generator. Consecutive treatment sessions were programmed whenever it was considered necessary until all mucosal lesions had been treated. Clinical and evolutive follow-up was performed with a focus on tolerance, efficacy, and potential argon plasma coagulation-related complications. Data were updated by personal or telephonic interview. Results: in all patients, chronic rectal bleeding stopped after the last treatment session. The mean number of treatment sessions to stop symptoms was 1.7. Mean follow-up was 31.1 months. All sessions were well tolerated, similarly to standard rectoscopy. In one case a recurrence of rectal bleeding was observed four months later, which required two repeat sessions. Four patients were anemic at inclusion. Three of them reported a resolved anemia at the end of the study. No delayed argon plasma coagulation-related complications such us ulcers or strictures were seen. Conclusions: argon plasma coagulation appears to be a useful, effective and safe treatment for rectal bleeding resulting from chronic radiation proctitis when compared to standard medical and endoscopic treatments. These successful outcomes seem

  19. Management of stage IV rectal cancer: Palliative options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean M; Kennedy, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients with rectal cancer present with metastatic disease. Many of these patients have symptoms of bleeding or obstruction. Several treatment options are available to deal with the various complications that may afflict these patients. Endorectal stenting, laser ablation, and operative resection are a few of the options available to the patient with a malignant large bowel obstruction. A thorough understanding of treatment options will ensure the patient is offered the most effective therapy with the least amount of associated morbidity. In this review, we describe various options for palliation of symptoms in patients with metastatic rectal cancer. Additionally, we briefly discuss treatment for asymptomatic patients with metastatic disease. PMID:21412493

  20. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011–0.013) clinical factor was “previous abdominal surgery.” As second significant (p = 0.012–0.016) factor, “cardiac history” was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including “diabetes” was significant (p = 0.039–0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003–0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D 50 . Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions

  1. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defraene, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.defraene@uzleuven.be [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Van den Bergh, Laura [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Haustermans, Karin [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Heemsbergen, Wilma [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lebesque, Joos V. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints

  2. Rectal malignant melanoma mistaken for thrombotic hemorrhoids - rare tumor with poor prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacova, E.; Hvizdakova, A.; Vyskocil, M.; Kinova, S.; Sesovsky, V.; Kobzova, D.; Palkovic, M.

    2011-01-01

    Rectal malignant melanoma originates in the melanocytes of the anorectal area. Represent less than 1 % of all melanomas, and 4 % of all malignant tumors of the rectum and anus. The most common clinical manifestation is bleeding, the clinical examination may be mistaken for benign lesions or hemorrhoids. Given the rarity of the diagnosis are not well-defined therapeutic procedures. Prognosis for patient is poor. The authors present a case of 70-year old patient with rectal melanoma diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, initially with diagnosis a thrombotic hemorrhoid. (author)

  3. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: aspirin increases the incidence of minor bleeding complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliwell, O.T.; Yadegafar, G.; Lane, C.; Dewbury, K.C.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess whether patients taking aspirin were more likely to experience bleeding complications after transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and methods: Three hundred and eighty-seven patients taking aspirin who underwent prostate biopsy over a 3.5 year period and 731 patients not taking aspirin over a 2 year period returned a questionnaire assessing the incidence and severity of bleeding complications. Results: Patients taking aspirin had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of haematuria and rectal bleeding, but not of haemospermia. They also had a longer mean duration of bleeding, but no increase in bleeding severity. Severe bleeding was very uncommon in both groups and no patients required intervention for bleeding complications. Conclusion: Aspirin exacerbates minor bleeding complications in patients undergoing TRUS guided biopsy of the prostate, but in this large group of aspirin-taking patients no dangerous bleeding complications were encountered. It may be that the risks associated with aspirin cessation outweigh the risks of haemorrhagic complications

  4. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: aspirin increases the incidence of minor bleeding complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliwell, O.T. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: hallo99@doctors.org.uk; Yadegafar, G. [Public Health Sciences and Medical Statistics Division, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton University, Southampton (United Kingdom); Lane, C.; Dewbury, K.C. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Aim: To assess whether patients taking aspirin were more likely to experience bleeding complications after transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and methods: Three hundred and eighty-seven patients taking aspirin who underwent prostate biopsy over a 3.5 year period and 731 patients not taking aspirin over a 2 year period returned a questionnaire assessing the incidence and severity of bleeding complications. Results: Patients taking aspirin had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of haematuria and rectal bleeding, but not of haemospermia. They also had a longer mean duration of bleeding, but no increase in bleeding severity. Severe bleeding was very uncommon in both groups and no patients required intervention for bleeding complications. Conclusion: Aspirin exacerbates minor bleeding complications in patients undergoing TRUS guided biopsy of the prostate, but in this large group of aspirin-taking patients no dangerous bleeding complications were encountered. It may be that the risks associated with aspirin cessation outweigh the risks of haemorrhagic complications.

  5. Predictors for Rectal and Intestinal Acute Toxicities During Prostate Cancer High-Dose 3D-CRT: Results of a Prospective Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavassori, Vittorio; Fiorino, Claudio; Rancati, Tiziana; Magli, Alessandro; Fellin, Gianni; Baccolini, Michela; Bianchi, Carla; Cagna, Emanuela; Mauro, Flora A.; Monti, Angelo F.; Munoz, Fernando; Stasi, Michele; Franzone, Paola; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To find predictors for rectal and intestinal acute toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with ≥70 Gy conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between July 2002 and March 2004, 1,132 patients were entered into a cooperative study (AIROPROS01-02). Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale and by considering the changes (before and after treatment) of the scores of a self-administered questionnaire on rectal/intestinal toxicity. The correlation with a number of parameters was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Concerning the questionnaire, only moderate/severe complications were considered. Results: Of 1,132 patients, 1,123 were evaluable. Of these patients, 375, 265, and 28 had Grade 1, 2, and 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity, respectively. The mean rectal dose was the most predictive parameter (p = 0.0004; odds ratio, 1.035) for Grade 2 or worse toxicity, and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants (p 0.02; odds ratio, 0.63) and hormonal therapy (p = 0.04, odds ratio, 0.65) were protective. The questionnaire-based scoring revealed that a greater mean rectal dose was associated with a greater risk of bleeding; larger irradiated volumes were associated with frequency, tenesmus, incontinence, and bleeding; hormonal therapy was protective against frequency and tenesmus; hemorrhoids were associated with a greater risk of tenesmus and bleeding; and diabetes associated highly with diarrhea. Conclusion: The mean rectal dose correlated with acute rectal/intestinal toxicity in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and hormonal therapy and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants were protective. According to the moderate/severe injury scores on the self-assessed questionnaire, several clinical and dose-volume parameters were independently predictive for

  6. Risk of stroke and bleeding in patients with heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgaard, Line; Overvad, Thure Filskov; Skjøth, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in relation to ischaemic stroke, intracranial haemorrhage, major bleeding, and all-cause death in heart failure patients without atrial fibrillation. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this observational cohort...... study, heart failure patients without atrial fibrillation were identified using Danish nationwide registries. Risk of stroke, major haemorrhage, and death were calculated after 1 and 5 years to compare patients with and without CKD, ±dialysis [dialysis: CKD with renal replacement therapy (CKD......-RRT); no dialysis: CKD-no RRT]. A total of 43 199 heart failure patients were included, among which 0.8% had CKD-RRT and 5.9% had CKD-no RRT. When compared with heart failure patients without CKD, both CKD-RRT and CKD-no RRT were associated with a higher 5 year rate of major bleeding (CKD-RRT: adjusted hazard ratio...

  7. Clinical need for both scintigraphy with technetium-99m GSA and per-rectal portal scintigraphy in some patients with chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiomi, Susumu; Iwata, Yoshinori; Sasaki, Nobumitsu [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Medical School] (and others)

    1999-08-01

    Scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate with galactosyl human serum albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-GSA) and per-rectal portal scintigraphy are useful for evaluating hepatic functional reserve and portal circulation, respectively. We did the procedures simultaneously in some patients to examine the relationship between hepatic functional reserve and portal circulation in chronic liver disease. Scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-GSA was done in 10 healthy subjects, 45 patients with chronic hepatitis, and 165 patients with cirrhosis. Fifty-seven patients (13 with hepatitis and 44 with cirrhosis) also underwent per-rectal portal scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate within two weeks. A receptor index was calculated by dividing the radioactivity of the liver region of interest (ROI) by that of the liver-plus-heart ROI at 15 min after the injection of {sup 99m}Tc-GSA. The index of blood clearance was calculated by dividing the radioactivity of the heart ROI at 15 min by that of the heart ROI at 3 min. A solution containing {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate was instilled into the rectum, and serial scintigrams were taken while radioactivity curves for the liver and heart were recorded sequentially. A per-rectal portal shunt index was determined by calculating the ratio of counts for the liver to counts for the heart integrated for 24 seconds immediately after the appearance of the liver time-activity curve. The median receptor index was lower for more severe liver disorders, increasing in the order of chronic hepatitis, compensated cirrhosis and decompensated cirrhosis, and the median index of blood clearance was higher. The median receptor index was significantly lower when a complication (varices, ascites, or encephalopathy) was present, and the median index of blood clearance was higher. The shunt index was correlated significantly with the two other indices, but these values for some one-third of the patients disagreed in either indices. Scintigraphy with {sup 99m

  8. [Anatomical planes and landmarks of transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer and prophylaxis of intraoperative complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhanlong; Ye, Yingjiang; Wang, Shan

    2017-07-25

    Total mesorectal excision (TME) is a mile-stone procedure in the history of rectal cancer surgery, but the exposure of surgical field of distal rectum is usually poor in patients with male, obese and narrow pelvis, which may lead to tumor residue and relative complications. Recently, a new technique called transanal TME (taTME) is considered to solve the above problems, but most medical centers are still in the learning curve of this procedure. Therefore, anatomical planes and landmarks of taTME for rectal cancer and prophylaxis of intraoperative complications are induced in this paper, which includes posterior plane: angle of anus and distal mesorectum and bleeding of mesorectum; rectosacral fascia and presacral bleeding; lateral and posterior-lateral plane: posterior branches of pelvic plexus and damage of anal function; anterior plane: vessel branches of neurovascular bundle and bleeding. Familiarity with the specific anatomical planes and landmarks plays an important role in shortening the learning curve, decreasing the complications, increasing the success rate of operation and standardization of taTME.

  9. Liver cirrhosis is a risk factor of repeat acute hemorrhagic rectal ulcer in intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi-Kai Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute hemorrhagic rectal ulcer (AHRU can be found in patients with severe comorbid illness, who are bedridden for a long time. Per anal suturing is a quick and feasible treatment. However, recurrent bleeding occurs frequently after suture ligation of a bleeder and can be life-threatening. However, the risk factor for recurrent bleeding is not well known. Our study tries to clarify the risk factor of repeat AHRU in Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients. Materials and Methods: From January 2004 to December 2009, the medical records of 32 patients, who were admitted to the ICU of the Tri-Service General Hospital, a tertiary referral center in Taiwan, and who underwent per anal suturing of acute hemorrhagic rectal ulcer were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of the 96 patients who received emergency treatment for acute massive hematochezia, 32 patients were diagnosed with AHRU. Eight (25% patients had recurrent bleeding following suture ligation of AHRU and underwent a reoperation; no patient had recurrent bleeding after the second operation. The duration from the first hematochezia attack to surgery (P = 0.04, liver cirrhosis (P = 0.002, and coagulopathy (P = 0.01 were the risk factors of recurrent bleeding after suture ligation of a bleeder. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that liver cirrhosis (OR = 37.77, P = 0.014 was an independent risk factor for recurrent bleeding. Conclusion: AHRU could be a major cause of acute massive hematochezia in patients with severe illness. Our data showed that per anal suturing could quickly and effectively control bleeding. We found that liver cirrhosis was an independent risk factor for recurrent bleeding. Therefore, treatment of a liver cirrhosis patient with AHUR should be more aggressive, such as, early detection and proper suture ligation.

  10. Rectal dose during radiotherapy: how much is too much?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, J.; Adelaide University,

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The clinical intent of radiotherapy for prostate cancer is to deposit high radiation dose to the prostate and as low as possible to healthy tissue. The rectum is one adjacent structure that is very sensitive to side effects including rectal bleeding, stricture, and ulceration. The dose that the rectum receives is often difficult to predict because its position and size will differ on each treatment day from the original planning CT images. The aim of this work is to use current measured values from the literature on rectal wall motion to mathematically model the dynamic rectal wall. The model is used with a pre calculated dose distribution to evaluate the difference between planned anticipated and actually delivered rectal radiation doses. The dose delivered will depend on the status of the rectum in the preliminary planning CT scan. Deviations from the planned dose were larger if the rectum was empty in the planning CT scan (ΔD = ± 25%) than if it was full (ΔD = ± 15%). If the planning CT scan demonstrated the rectum in the mean treatment position the dose variation is reduced (ΔD = ± 10%). These results support the conclusion that care should be taken to plan treatments using CT images that contain reproducible information

  11. Nomogram to predict rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Bernard Delobel

    Full Text Available To identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT, while integrating the potential impact of RT technique, dose escalation, and moderate hypofractionation, thus enabling us to generate a nomogram for individual prediction.In total, 972 patients underwent RT for localized prostate cancer, to a total dose of 70 Gy or 80 Gy, using two different fractionations (2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/day, by means of several RT techniques (3D conformal RT [3DCRT], intensity-modulated RT [IMRT], or image-guided RT [IGRT]. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity. A nomogram was generated based on the logistic regression model used to predict the 3-year rectal toxicity risk, with its accuracy assessed by dividing the cohort into training and validation subgroups.Mean follow-up for the entire cohort was 62 months, ranging from 6 to 235. The rate of acute Grade ≥2 rectal toxicity was 22.2%, decreasing when combining IMRT and IGRT, compared to 3DCRT (RR = 0.4, 95%CI: 0.3-0.6, p<0.01. The 5-year Grade ≥2 risks for rectal bleeding, urgency/tenesmus, diarrhea, and fecal incontinence were 9.9%, 4.5%, 2.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. The 3-year Grade ≥2 risk for overall rectal toxicity increased with total dose (p<0.01, RR = 1.1, 95%CI: 1.0-1.1 and dose per fraction (2Gy vs. 2.5Gy (p = 0.03, RR = 3.3, 95%CI: 1.1-10.0, and decreased when combining IMRT and IGRT (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.3-0.8, p<0.01. Based on these three parameters, a nomogram was generated.Dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation increase late rectal toxicity. IMRT combined with IGRT markedly decreases acute and late rectal toxicity. Performing combined IMRT and IGRT can thus be envisaged for dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation. Our nomogram predicts the 3-year rectal toxicity risk by integrating total dose, fraction dose, and RT technique.

  12. Lymphogranuloma venereum as a cause of rectal strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagrigoriadis, S.; Rennie, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Rectal strictures are uncommon in young patients without a history of malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease or previous surgery. Lymphogranuloma venereum of the rectum has been described as a rare cause of rectal strictures in the western world, mainly in homosexual men and in blacks. It presents with nonspecific symptoms, rectal ulcer, proctitis, anal fissures, abscesses and rectal strictures. Clinical and endoscopic findings as well as histology resemble Crohn's disease, which may be misdiagnosed. Serology is often positive for Chlamydia trachomatis but negative serology is not uncommon. We present two young black women who suffered from chronic diarrhoea, abdominal pain and weight loss. There was no previous history and investigations showed in both cases a long rectal stricture. Serology was positive in one patient. They were treated with erythromycin and azithromycin and they both underwent an anterior resection of the rectum. Postoperative histology confirmed the presence of lymphogranuloma venereum of the rectum. We conclude that rectal lymphogranuloma venereum is a rare cause of rectal strictures but surgeons should be aware of its existence and include it in the differential diagnosis of unexplained strictures in high-risk patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9640444

  13. Renal Bleeding Due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Patient With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Zettner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative disorder that normally presents in middle-aged adults. Renal infiltration and extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal tissue has been rarely reported. This case report presents a patient with CML and renal insufficiency who developed gross hematuria. Efforts at controlling the hematuria led to a cascade of events propelled by the underlying disorder that ultimately led to a radical nephrectomy, multiorgan failure, and prolonged hospitalization. We suggest that management of gross hematuria in clinically stable patients with CML, suspected of having extramedullary hematopoiesis, should prioritize treatment of the myeloproliferative disorder over efforts to control bleeding.

  14. Renal Bleeding Due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Patient With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettner, Stephanie; Mistry, Sandeep G

    2014-11-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder that normally presents in middle-aged adults. Renal infiltration and extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal tissue has been rarely reported. This case report presents a patient with CML and renal insufficiency who developed gross hematuria. Efforts at controlling the hematuria led to a cascade of events propelled by the underlying disorder that ultimately led to a radical nephrectomy, multiorgan failure, and prolonged hospitalization. We suggest that management of gross hematuria in clinically stable patients with CML, suspected of having extramedullary hematopoiesis, should prioritize treatment of the myeloproliferative disorder over efforts to control bleeding.

  15. An Unusual Cause of Rectal Bleeding -Report of Three Cases and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahidul Haq

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Haemangioma of the rectum and colon is very rare malformation with only around 100 cases have been reported so far. Most commonly young adult is affected. Common site is recto sigmoid junction. Here we present three cases of rectal haemangioma affecting two males and one female patient. All were having cavernous type of haemangioma at rectum and recto sigmoid junction with one involving additional caecum and ascending colon. All the cases were misdiagnosed previously. Colonoscopy is the cornerstone for evaluation of these patients showing bluish discoloration with engorged mucosa. Rectum and sigmoid colon are commonly affected. Abdominoperineal resection was the favored procedure in the past. At present, definitive treatment of diffuse cavernous haemangioma (DCH of rectum and sigmoid colon is excision of the involved bowel with sphincter saving procedure with either stapling or hand sewn anastomosis of colon and anal canal. Key words: Rectal haemangioma; sphincter saving surgery.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v2i1.3709 BSMMU J 2009; 2(1: 36-38

  16. An Unusual Cause of Rectal Bleeding - Report of Three Cases and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahidul Haq

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Haemangioma of the rectum and colon is very rare malformation with only around 100 cases have been reported so far. Most commonly young adult is affected. Common site is recto sigmoid junction. Here we present three cases of rectal haemangioma affecting two males and one female patient. All were having cavernous type of haemangioma at rectum and recto sigmoid junction with one involving additional caecum and ascending colon. All the cases were misdiagnosed previously. Colonoscopy is the cornerstone for evaluation of these patients showing bluish discoloration with engorged mucosa. Rectum and sigmoid colon are commonly affected. Abdominoperineal resection was the favored procedure in the past. At present, definitive treatment of diffuse cavernous haemangioma (DCH of rectum and sigmoid colon is excision of the involved bowel with sphincter saving procedure with either stapling or hand sewn anastomosis of colon and anal canal. Key words : Rectal haemangioma; sphincter saving surgery. DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v2i2.4767 BSMMU J 2009; 2(2: 92-94

  17. Adenocarcinoma within a rectal duplication cyst: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, D; Cohen, C R; Northover, J M

    1999-05-01

    Intestinal duplications are uncommon but recognised developmental anomalies. Duplications of the rectum are the most uncommon of these anomalies. They may present with perianal fistulae, bleeding, a pelvic mass or symptoms produced by a mass, or, rarely, malignant change. We present a case of an adenocarcinoma within a rectal duplication cyst which was initially thought to be inoperable but was treated by radical surgery.

  18. Dynamics of rectal balloon implant shrinkage in prostate VMAT. Influence on anorectal dose and late rectal complication risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanneste, Ben G.L.; Wijk, Y. van; Lutgens, L.C.; Limbergen, E.J. van; Lambin, P.; Lin, E.N. van; Beek, K. van de; Hoffmann, A.L.

    2018-01-01

    To assess the effect of a shrinking rectal balloon implant (RBI) on the anorectal dose and complication risk during the course of moderately hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy. In 15 patients with localized prostate cancer, an RBI was implanted. A weekly kilovolt cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan was acquired to measure the dynamics of RBI volume and prostate-rectum separation. The absolute anorectal volume encompassed by the 2 Gy equieffective 75 Gy isodose (V 75Gy ) was recalculated as well as the mean anorectal dose. The increase in estimated risk of grade 2-3 late rectal bleeding (LRB) between the start and end of treatment was predicted using nomograms. The observed acute and late toxicities were evaluated. A significant shrinkage of RBI volumes was observed, with an average volume of 70.4% of baseline at the end of the treatment. Although the prostate-rectum separation significantly decreased over time, it remained at least 1 cm. No significant increase in V 75Gy of the anorectum was observed, except in one patient whose RBI had completely deflated in the third week of treatment. No correlation between mean anorectal dose and balloon deflation was found. The increase in predicted LRB risk was not significant, except in the one patient whose RBI completely deflated. The observed toxicities confirmed these findings. Despite significant decrease in RBI volume the high-dose rectal volume and the predicted LRB risk were unaffected due to a persistent spacing between the prostate and the anterior rectal wall. (orig.) [de

  19. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: clinical findings, surgical treatment, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos; Khaikin, Marat; Bracho, Jorge; Luo, Cheng Hua; Weiss, Eric G; Sands, Dana R; Cera, Susan; Nogueras, Juan J; Wexner, Steven D

    2007-11-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a rare disorder often misdiagnosed as a malignant ulcer. Histopathological features of SRUS are characteristic and pathognomonic; nevertheless, the endoscopic and clinical presentations may be confusing. The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical findings, surgical treatment, and outcomes in patients who suffer from SRUS. A retrospective chart review was undertaken, from January 1989 to May 2005 for all patients who were diagnosed with SRUS. Data recorded included: patient's age, gender, clinical presentation, past surgical history, diagnostic and preoperative workup, operative procedure, complications, and outcomes. During the study period, 23 patients were diagnosed with SRUS. Seven patients received only medical treatment, and in three patients, the ulcer healed after medical treatment. Sixteen patients underwent surgical treatment. In four patients, the symptoms persisted after surgery. Two patients presented with postoperative rectal bleeding requiring surgical intervention. Three patients developed late postoperative sexual dysfunction. One patient continued suffering from rectal pain after a colostomy was constructed. Median follow-up was 14 (range 2-84) months. The results of this study show clearly that every patient with SRUS must be assessed individually. Initial treatment should include conservative measures. In patients with refractory symptoms, surgical treatment should be considered. Results of anterior resection and protocolectomy are satisfactory for solitary rectal ulcer.

  20. Treatment of locally recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kococik, Z.; Kococik, M.

    2007-01-01

    The suggested classifications of locally recurrent rectal cancer are based on the presence of symptoms and the degree of tumour fixation to the pelvic wall, or, otherwise, account for factor T in the TMN system. Although the results of rectal cancer treatment have improved, which may be attributed to total meso rectal excision and application of perioperative radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy, the ratio of cases of locally recurrent rectal cancer still amount from several to over a dozen percent. Among the available diagnostic methods for detecting locally recurrent rectal cancer after anterior rectal resection, endorectal sonography is of special importance. In the estimation of prognostic factors the lack of vascular invasion in recurrent cancer and the long period between the treatment of primary rectal cancer and the development of recurrence are a sign of good prognosis, while pain prior to recurrence treatment and male sex diminish the chances for cure. Locally recurrent rectal cancer impairs the patient's quality of life in all measurable aspects, but even after complete recovery we observe severe disturbances of sexual activity in most patients, and a number of patients require hygiene pads or suffer from chronic pain. Local recurrence of rectal cancer is more commonly qualified for excision after surgical treatment only, than after preoperative radiotherapy. The probability of total recurrent rectal cancer excision increases when the patient is younger, the primary tumours was less advanced and the first operation was sphincter-sparing surgery. Progress in the surgical treatment of recurrent rectal cancer was brought on by the introduction of the composite musculocutaneous flap to compensate the loss of perineal tissue. The application of intraoperative radiotherapy improves treatment results of recurrent rectal cancer, however at the cost of more frequent, serious postoperative complications and intense pain. In inoperable cases high dose regional

  1. Rectal duplication presenting as colonic subocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuilleumier, H; Maternini, M

    2006-04-01

    Rectal duplication cyst is a rare congenital lesion which is known to be associated with other congenital defects, especially genitourinary and vertebral anomalies. Infections with fistulization, bleeding, and malignant degeneration are the major complications of developmental cysts. The case of an 83-year-old woman referred for acute constipation associated with abdominal distension is reported. CT and MRI showed a large cystic mass of the pelvis with extrinsic compression of the rectum. Surgical excision would have been the treatment of choice. In this case, the patient was unfortunately not eligible for surgery due to her poor general condition but responded well to conservative treatment.

  2. Heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce positive scintiscan in occult gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, T.K.; Brantly, M.

    1984-01-01

    The value of using heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce a positive scintiscan was studied in a patient with chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding. When all standard diagnostic tests (upper and lower gastrointestinal series, upper and lower endoscopy, and conventional noninterventional Tc-99m RBC imaging) fail to detect and localize gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient who has definite clinical evidence (guaiac positive stool and dropping hemoglobin, hematocrit) of chronic occult gastrointestinal oozing, heparin may be used (with proper precaution) as a last resort to aid in the scintigraphic detection and localization of chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding

  3. Risk of bleeding with dabigatran in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Inmaculada; Baik, Seo Hyon; Piñera, Antonio; Zhang, Yuting

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear whether dabigatran etexilate mesylate is associated with higher risk of bleeding than warfarin sodium in real-world clinical practice. To compare the risk of bleeding associated with dabigatran and warfarin using Medicare data. In this retrospective cohort study, we used pharmacy and medical claims in 2010 to 2011 from a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries. We identified participants as those newly diagnosed as having atrial fibrillation from October 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011, and who initiated dabigatran or warfarin treatment within 60 days of initial diagnosis. We followed up patients until discontinued use or switch of anticoagulants, death, or December 31, 2011. Dabigatran users (n = 1302) and warfarin users (n = 8102). We identified any bleeding events and categorized them as major and minor bleeding by anatomical site. Major bleeding events included intracranial hemorrhage, hemoperitoneum, and inpatient or emergency department stays for hematuria, gastrointestinal, or other hemorrhage. We used a propensity score weighting mechanism to balance patient characteristics between 2 groups and Cox proportional hazards regression models to evaluate the risk of bleeding. We further examined the risk of bleeding for 4 subgroups of high-risk patients: those 75 years or older, African Americans, those with chronic kidney disease, and those with more than 7 concomitant comorbidities. Dabigatran was associated with a higher risk of bleeding relative to warfarin, with hazard ratios of 1.30 (95% CI, 1.20-1.41) for any bleeding event, 1.58 (95% CI, 1.36-1.83) for major bleeding, and 1.85 (95% CI, 1.64-2.07) for gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of intracranial hemorrhage was higher among warfarin users, with a hazard ratio of 0.32 (95% CI, 0.20-0.50) for dabigatran compared with warfarin. Dabigatran was consistently associated with an increased risk of major bleeding and gastrointestinal hemorrhage for all subgroups analyzed. The risk of

  4. Consolidating Risk Estimates for Radiation-Induced Complications in Individual Patient: Late Rectal Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prior, Phillip; Devisetty, Kiran [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Tarima, Sergey S. [Division of Biostatistics, Institute for Health and Society, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawton, Colleen A.F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Semenenko, Vladimir A., E-mail: vsemenenko@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a new approach to synthesize published normal tissue complication data using late rectal toxicity in prostate cancer as an example. Methods and Materials: A data survey was performed to identify the published reports on the dose-response relationships for late rectal toxicity. The risk estimates for Grade 1 or greater, Grade 2 or greater, and Grade 3 or greater toxicity were obtained for a test cohort of patients treated at our institution. The influence of the potential factors that might have affected the reported toxicity levels was investigated. The studies that did not conform to the general data trends were excluded, and single, combined risk estimates were derived for each patient and toxicity level. Results: A total of 21 studies of nonoverlapping patient populations were identified. Three studies provided dose-response models for more than one level of toxicity. Of these 21 studies, 6, 14, and 5 were used to derive the initial risk estimates for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. A comparison of risk estimates between the studies reporting rectal bleeding and rectal toxicity (bleeding plus other symptoms) or between studies with follow-up <36 months and {>=}36 months did not reveal significant differences (p {>=} .29 for all comparisons). After excluding three reports that did not conform to the general data trends, the combined risk estimates were derived from 5 reports (647 patients), 11 reports (3,369 patients), and 5 reports (1,330 patients) for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed approach is feasible and allows for more systematic use of published dose-response data to estimate the complication risks for the individual patient.

  5. Consolidating Risk Estimates for Radiation-Induced Complications in Individual Patient: Late Rectal Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, Phillip; Devisetty, Kiran; Tarima, Sergey S.; Lawton, Colleen A.F.; Semenenko, Vladimir A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of a new approach to synthesize published normal tissue complication data using late rectal toxicity in prostate cancer as an example. Methods and Materials: A data survey was performed to identify the published reports on the dose–response relationships for late rectal toxicity. The risk estimates for Grade 1 or greater, Grade 2 or greater, and Grade 3 or greater toxicity were obtained for a test cohort of patients treated at our institution. The influence of the potential factors that might have affected the reported toxicity levels was investigated. The studies that did not conform to the general data trends were excluded, and single, combined risk estimates were derived for each patient and toxicity level. Results: A total of 21 studies of nonoverlapping patient populations were identified. Three studies provided dose–response models for more than one level of toxicity. Of these 21 studies, 6, 14, and 5 were used to derive the initial risk estimates for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. A comparison of risk estimates between the studies reporting rectal bleeding and rectal toxicity (bleeding plus other symptoms) or between studies with follow-up <36 months and ≥36 months did not reveal significant differences (p ≥ .29 for all comparisons). After excluding three reports that did not conform to the general data trends, the combined risk estimates were derived from 5 reports (647 patients), 11 reports (3,369 patients), and 5 reports (1,330 patients) for Grade 1, 2, and 3 or greater toxicity, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed approach is feasible and allows for more systematic use of published dose–response data to estimate the complication risks for the individual patient.

  6. Wide rectal duplication cyst in an adult resected by anterior approach: efficacy and recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Michela; Saccomani, Giorgia; Lacelli, Francesca; Saccomani, Giovanni E

    2017-06-01

    Alimentary tract duplications are uncommon congenital abnormalities usually diagnosed and treated in childhood. Rectal involvement is extremely rare. We report the case of a 22-year-old female who presented with chronic abdominal and perianal pain; feeling of rectal fullness. Workup revealed a rectal duplication cyst. The patient underwent a complete transabdominal excision of the cyst: an hybrid laparoscopic and laparotomic technique was adopted. The hybrid isolated anterior abdominal approach is safe and feasible even for the treatment of wide rectal duplication cysts. Real recurrence in rectal duplication cysts is uncommon when the first operation was performed with radical intent.

  7. Clinical approach to a patient with abnormal uterine bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bleeding, type, appearance, duration, cyclicity and associated ... Clinical approach. In all cases where the main complaint is that of excessive menstrual bleeding, an immediate differentiation must be made between acute severe blood loss and chronic excessive ... management rules can be implemented. In such patients ...

  8. Rectal and urinary morbidity in patients undergoing prostate I-125 implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Kenneth; Wallner, Kent

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the risk of urinary incontinence or severe rectal complications in patients who have TURP/TUIP or rectal bleeding after I-125 prostate brachytherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred nine patients with T1-T2 prostatic carcinoma were treated with I-125 implantation from 1988 through 1994. Ten patients underwent TURP/TUIP after brachtherapy to relieve urinary obstruction refractory to non-surgical management. Twenty-two developed rectal morbidity and were subsequently followed with endoscopy and serial clinical evaluation. RESULTS: Permanent urinary incontinence following TURP/TUIP developed in seven of 10 patients. Urinary incontinence was mild in three patients (LENT score = 1) and severe in 4 additional patients (LENT score = 3). There was no relationship between the degree of incontinence and the use of TURP versus TUIP, mass of tissue resected, or time between brachytherapy and TURP/TUIP. Urethral doses were higher than we generally recommend (> 140 Gy) in the 5 patients for whom detailed urethral radiation dose information was available, Rectal morbidity developed in twenty-two patients. Twenty experienced radiation proctitis-related bright red blood per rectum (BRBPR), the majority of which ((15(20))) were mild (RTOG score = 1) and treated with medical management. The other 5 developed either a rectal ulcer ((3(5))) or fistula ((2(5))). The two patients without significant BRBPR developed a fistula and ulcer. Two of three patients with fistulas had predisposing conditions (pre-implant history of fistula and previous pelvic radiation for rectal cancer). All four rectal ulcers healed with conservative management. CONCLUSION: Permanent urinary incontinence is common in patients who require a TURP/TUIP after prostate brachytherapy. Its cause is multifactorial and may include surgically-related damage to the urinary sphincters and radiation dose to the uretha. Rectal morbidity after prostate brachtherapy is mild in the majority of cases and

  9. Non-surgical interventions for late rectal problems (proctopathy) of radiotherapy in people who have received radiotherapy to the pelvis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, Fleur T.; Verleye, Leen; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.; Maher, Jane; Vlayen, Joan; Pieters, Bradley R.; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Scholten, Rob J.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2002, and previously updated in 2007. Late radiation rectal problems (proctopathy) include bleeding, pain, faecal urgency, and incontinence and may develop after pelvic radiotherapy treatment for cancer. Objectives: To assess the

  10. Should warfarin or aspirin be stopped prior to prostate biopsy? An analysis of bleeding complications related to increasing sample number regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, R.; Abbas, A.; Idriz, S.; Hoy, A.; Rutherford, E.E.; Smart, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy with increased sampling numbers are more likely to experience bleeding complications and whether warfarin or low-dose aspirin are independent risk factors. Materials and methods: 930 consecutive patients with suspected prostatic cancer were followed up after biopsy. Warfarin/low-dose aspirin was not stopped prior to the procedure. An eight to 10 sample regime TRUS-guided prostate biopsy was performed and patients were offered a questionnaire to complete 10 days after the procedure, to determine any immediate or delayed bleeding complications. Results: 902 patients returned completed questionnaires. 579 (64.2%) underwent eight core biopsies, 47 (5.2%) underwent nine, and 276 (30.6%) underwent 10. 68 were taking warfarin [mean international normalized ratio (INR) = 2.5], 216 were taking low-dose aspirin, one was taking both, and 617 were taking neither. 27.9% of those on warfarin and 33.8% of those on aspirin experienced haematuria. 37% of those on no blood-thinning medication experienced haematuria. 13.2% of those on warfarin and 14.4% of those on aspirin experienced rectal bleeding. 11.5% of those on no blood-thinning medication experienced rectal bleeding. 7.4% of those on warfarin and 12% of those on aspirin experienced haematospermia. 13.8% of those on neither experienced haematospermia. Regression analysis showed a significant association between increasing sampling number and occurrence of all bleeding complication types. There was no significant association between minor bleeding complications and warfarin use; however, there was a significant association between minor bleeding complications and low-dose aspirin use. There was no severe bleeding complication. Conclusion: There is an increased risk of bleeding complications following TRUS-guided prostate biopsy with increased sampling numbers but these are minor. There is also an increased risk with low

  11. A case of radiation-induced rectal cancer developing after a long-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirouzu, Kazuo; Isomoto, Hiroharu; Morodomi, Tatsuhisa; Ogata, Yutaka; Araki, Yasumi; Kakegawa, Teruo

    1994-01-01

    A case of radiation-induced rectal cancer is presented. In November, 1971, a 58-year-old woman had a stage II squamous cell carcinoma in the uterine cervix. She underwent a hysterectomy and postoperative radiotherapy. External pelvic irradiation of 10 MV x-ray was carried out in 15 fractions of 2 Gy daily, with a total dose of 30 Gy, and intracavitary radium insertion with a total dose of 960 mg hours (20 mg x 48 hour). She had been followed-up in our department since 1972, when rectal bleeding occurred. Proctoscopy and periodical biopsies were performed when the patient visited our hospital. There was no evidence of malignant tumor cells nor of recurrent cervical cancer from 1973 to 1989. In August, 1990, a biopsy specimen taken from a rectal ulcer revealed a malignant mucinous adenocarcinoma. The time interval between the radiotherapy and the development of the rectal cancer was 19 years. Microscopically, the main lesion was situated in the granulation tissue covered with the regenerating mucosal epithelium, and histologically was found to be a mucinous adenocarcinoma. Other radiation damage was additionally found including colitis, endarteritis and intestinal wall fibrosis. The evidence strongly suggested the present case to be one of radiation-induced rectal cancer. (author)

  12. Rectal Cancer Survivors' Participation in Productive Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, Mark C; Grant, Marcia; Wendel, Christopher; Bulkley, Joanna E; Mcmullen, Carmit K; Altschuler, Andrea; Temple, Larissa Kf; Herrinton, Lisa J; Krouse, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Rectal cancer and its treatment impair survivors' productivity. To assess determinants of market and nonmarket employment, job search, volunteering, and homemaking among survivors five years or longer after diagnosis. We mailed questionnaires to 1063 survivors who were members of Kaiser Permanente (Northern California, Northwest) during 2010 and 2011. Productive activities, functional health status, and bowel management at the time of the survey. Response rate was 60.5% (577/953). Higher comorbidity burdens were associated with lower productivity for men and women rectal cancer survivors. Productive survivors were younger and had lower disease stage and age at diagnosis, higher household income and educational attainment, and fewer comorbidity burdens and workplace adjustments than did nonproductive survivors (p < 0.05 each; 2-sided). Productive rectal cancer survivors were evenly split by sex. Staying productive is associated with better mental health for rectal cancer survivors. Rectal cancer survivors with multiple chronic conditions, higher disease stage, lower productive activities, and older age need better access to medical care and closer monitoring of the quality of their care, including self-care. To capture the full extent of the involvement of survivors in all types of productive activities, research should routinely include measures of employment, searching for employment, homemaking, and volunteering. Counting market and nonmarket productive activities is innovative and recognizes the continuum of contributions survivors make to families and society. Health care systems should routinely monitor rectal cancer survivors' medical care access, comorbidities, health-related quality of life, and productive activities.

  13. Non-surgical interventions for late rectal problems (proctopathy) of radiotherapy in people who have received radiotherapy to the pelvis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, Fleur T.; Verleye, Leen; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.; Maher, Jane; Vlayen, Joan; Pieters, Bradley R.; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2002, and previously updated in 2007. Late radiation rectal problems (proctopathy) include bleeding, pain, faecal urgency, and incontinence and may develop after pelvic radiotherapy treatment for cancer. To assess the effectiveness and safety

  14. Clinical usefulness of Tc-99M pertechnetate per-rectal portal scintigraphy in evaluation the severity of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namwongprom, S.; Ekmahachai, M.; Boonyaprapa, S.; Vilasdechanon, N.; Taya, P.; Chankaew, N.; Chitapanarux, T.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Variceal hemorrhage is a potentially life-threatening complication in cirrhotic patients. Identification of patients at high risk for bleeding is particularly important. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical usefulness of per-rectal portal scintigraphy in evaluation the severity of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients in terms of correlation between cirrhosis and classic indicators of hepatic functional reserve and identifying the difference of the portal shunt index (PSI) of the bleeding esophageal varices group and non-bleeding esophageal varices group. Material and methods: Portal circulations in 15 healthy volunteer's and in 67 patients with cirrhosis were evaluated by Tc-99m pertechnetate per-rectal p. ortal scintigraphy. Tc-99m pertechnetate (550 MBq) was instilled into the upper rectum, and dynamic images were taken. Radioactivity curves of the liver and the heart were generated sequentially. Through the analysis of these curves, the PSI was determined by calculating the ratio of counts of the liver to counts of the heart integrated for 24 seconds immediately after the appearance of the liver time-activity curve. Results: The results, expressed as PSI were: 13.63 +/- 6.28 % in healthy subjects and 66.32+/-22.80 % in cirrhotic patients. Of these, the PSIs were 56036 +/- 27.14 % in 31 cirrhotic patients without esophageal varices, and 74.89 +/- 13.62 % in 36 cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices. The PSI was significantly lower in cirrhotic patients without bleeding esophageal vances (BEV) than those with BEV (p=0.001). The PSI calculated with this method was correlated with the serum albumin, the serum bilirubin and the Child-Pugh's score. Conclusion: The Tc-99m pertechnetate per-rectal portal scintigraphy has clinical usefulness as a relatively non-invasive method of choice for quantitative evaluating the severity of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. (authors)

  15. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  16. Use of heparin in the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, J.R.; O'Donovan, N.; Somers, S.; Gill, G.; Sridhar, S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine if the administration of heparin improves the predictive value of angiography in the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. 18 patients with a history of chronic GI bleeding were investigated with angiography. For 6 patients, the cause of GI bleeding was established with angiography; the 12 patients who had negative results were given heparin for 24 h and were reassessed with angiography. After heparin administration, the source of GI bleeding was determined with angiography for 6 of the remaining 12 patients. Thus, heparinization increased diagnostic yield from 33% (6 of 18) to 67% (12 of 18). No significant complications, such as uncontrolled GI bleeding, occurred. Heparinization improves the diagnostic yield of angiography when obscure GI bleeding is being investigated. (author)

  17. Studies of GI bleeding with scintigraphy and the influence of vasopressin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, A.; McLean, G.K.

    1981-01-01

    The management of patients with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding depends on accurate localization of the site of hemorrhage. Endoscopy and arteriography, although successful in achieving this goal in the majority of patients, are invasive and have other shortcomings. The introduction of the 99mTc-sulfur colloid technique has greatly simplified the evaluation and management of these patients. This test is useful in detecting and localizing the bleeding site in the lower GI tract. Scintigraphy is now used as the initial study of choice in patients with rectal bleeding. Advances made in angiography and nuclear medicine techniques also have resulted in improved management of patients. Conservative approaches succeed in controlling hemorrhage in most patients. Vasopressin is the most widely tested agent and has been adopted by many as the preferred preparation for this purpose. Before the introduction of the 99mTc-sulfur colloid technique, angiography was used to monitor the effectiveness of this drug, whether administered intravenously or intraarterially. With the use of scintigraphy and intravenous administration of vasopressin, these patients now can be managed noninvasively. Only when the intravenous Pitressin infusion fails to stop hemorrhage, is the intraarterial approach considered. Surgery is used as a last resort when these measures fail to stop the bleeding

  18. Rectal complications associated with transperineal interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Potters, Louis

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: As transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB) grows in acceptance as an option in the treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer, its associated toxicities are being defined. This clinical report documents rectal toxicity from a large cohort of men treated by a single practitioner for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Eight hundred twenty-five men were treated from September 1992 to September 1998 with TIPPB. One hundred-forty were treated in conjunction with external beam irradiation (EBRT) and 685 with TIPPB alone. All patients were implanted under real-time ultrasound guidance. No dose-volume histogram analysis was performed for this study. All patients were followed at 5 weeks after the procedure, then every 3-6 months thereafter. Rectal morbidity was graded by a modified RTOG toxicity scale. Therapy to control symptoms was recommended on an individual basis. Results: The median follow-up for the cohort is 48 months. A total of 77 patients (9.4%) reported Grade 1 toxicity at some time following an implant whereas 54 patients (6.6%) reported Grade 2 toxicity. The peak post-TIPPB time for experiencing rectal toxicity was 8 months at which time Grade 1 and 2 rectal toxicity was reported in 9.5% of the patients. This improved over the subsequent months and resolved in all patients by 3((1)/(2)) years. Four patients (0.5%) reported Grade 3 rectal toxicity with rectal ulceration identified on colonoscopy at 1 year from implant. Two of the four patients had colonic manipulation in the radiated portion of the colon which subsequently caused it to bleed. None of the patients required blood product transfusion. In 3 of the 4 patients the Grade 3 rectal toxicity has resolved spontaneously and 1 patient continues to heal at the time of this report. No patient required hospitalization or surgical intervention. Conclusion: TIPPB is a tolerable and acceptable treatment option when used alone in early-stage, organ

  19. Dental postoperative bleeding complications in patients with suspected and documented liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, C H; Scobey, M W; Napenas, J J; Brennan, M T; Lockhart, P B

    2012-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of bleeding complications following dental procedures in patients with known or suspected chronic liver disease and whether international normalized ratio (INR) determination could aid in predicting bleeding complications in these patients. We identified 90 patients (mean age: 51 ± 9 years) in this retrospective chart review. Sixty-nine patients had a known history of chronic liver disease and 21 had suspected chronic liver disease. Descriptive statistics were determined. Independent sample t-test and one-way variance test were utilized for continuous variables and chi-square test for dichotomous variables. The mean INR value for all patients was 1.2 ± 0.3. The INR value was significantly associated with the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis, the diagnoses of Hepatitis B and C together, the presence of ascites alone, and the number of clinical signs and symptoms (i.e. ascites, jaundice and encephalopathy) present. Nine patients with INR values between 1.5 and 2 underwent invasive dental procedures without postoperative bleeding complications. There were no episodes of postoperative bleeding in patients. The findings suggest that clinicians should not rely solely on an INR value to predict post-procedure bleeding in patients with liver disease. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Endocavitary radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, Steven E.; Martenson, James A.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: This analysis was performed to evaluate the results of endocavitary radiotherapy (RT) administered for early rectal cancer at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed to determine the results of endocavitary RT regarding survival, local control, and complications. Between 1987 and 1994, 25 patients were treated with endocavitary RT for early rectal cancer. Twenty had early, low grade tumors and met the criteria for treatment with curative intent. Five had more advanced, high grade, or multiple recurrent tumors and were treated with palliative intent. The tumors were treated to between 20 and 155 Gy in one to four fractions with 50 KV x-rays given through a specialized proctoscope. Patients were followed for 5 to 84 months (median = 55 months) after therapy. Local control and survival were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control was achieved in 18 of the 20 patients treated with curative intent and 4 of 5 treated with palliative intent. For those patients treated with curative intent, the 5-year local control rate was 89% and the 5-year survival rate was 76%. The most significant toxicity was ulceration that occurred in 5 of the 25 patients. The ulcers were asymptomatic in three cases and associated with bleeding in one case. The fifth patient had pain. One ulcer was biopsied, resulting in perforation that was treated with an abdominal perineal resection (APR). There was no tumor found upon pathologic evaluation. Conclusions: Endocavitary RT can be used to treat patients with early, low-grade rectal cancers and will yield a high level of disease control and a low risk of serious complications. Major advantages of this treatment technique are that it requires neither general anesthesia nor hospitalization

  1. Scintigraphy in gastrointestinal bleeding in the pediatric population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, T.R.; Miller, J.H.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) tract bleeding in the pediatric population is not uncommon, especially in chronically ill patients. A total of 29 patients with GI tract bleeding were studied scintigraphically using Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) or sulfur colloid (SC). The patients ranged in age from 3 weeks to 20 years, with an equal sex distribution. Of 19 patients studied with Tc-99m-labeled RBCs using an in vitro labeling technique, evidence of GI tract bleeding was documented scintigraphically in 15. Tc-99m-labeled SC scans in the remaining ten patients demonstrated GI tract bleeding in six. The Tc-99m RBC method was slightly more sensitive than the Tc-99m SC method. Advantages of using labeled RBCs include increased sensitivity in detecting upper abdominal bleeding, ability to delay imaging for up to 18-24 hours, and the use of provocative testing

  2. Acute radiologic intervention in gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesak, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a 38-year old man with chronic pancreatitis and uncontrollable bleeding is presented. The advantage of this interventional radiologic procedure is discussed and in selective cases it seems to be the choice of treatment.

  3. Evaluation of stapled versus hand-sewn techniques for colo- rectal anastomosis after low anterior resection of mid-rectal carcinoma: a study on 50 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayek, Ihab Samy

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of stapled versus sutured colo-rectal anastomosis after low anterior resection of mid-rectal carcinoma. A prospective study of fifty patients who underwent colo-rectal anastomosis following low anterior resection (LAR) of T2 mid-rectal cancers at the Egyptian National Cancer Institute during the time period from June 2010 to June 2013 was conducted. Classification was into two groups; a stapled anastomosis group I (25 patients) and a hand-sewn anastomosis group II (25 patients). All operations are evaluated regarding intra-operative complications such as anastomotic line bleeding, visceral injuries or major blood loss. The anastomotic time and operative time are documented for each operation. All patients are evaluated post-operatively for anastomotic leakage (AL), wound infection and ileus. The distance of the tumor from the anal verge was 9.6 ± 2.0 cm in group I and 9.9 ± 2.4 cm in group II. The mean operative time was 191.5 ± 16.2 min in the stapled group and 208 ± 18.6 min in the sutured group (p=0.002). The mean anastomotic times were 9.0 ± 1.9 min and 19.7 ± 12.2 min (p=0.001). Anastomotic leakage developed in three (12.0%) patients in the stapled group and in four (16.0%) patients in the sutured group (p=1.000). Post-operative ileus was observed in 3 patients in group I and one patient in group II. Wound infection developed in three (12.0%) patients in the stapled group and four (16.0%) patients in the sutured group (p=1.000). Colo-rectal anastomosis after low anterior resection for mid rectal carcinoma can be conducted safely either by stapling or hand-sewn techniques; however the stapling technique showed shorter anastomotic and operative times with no significant advantages regarding intra- or post-operative complications or hospital stay.

  4. The Traumatic Tube: Bleeding Rectal Ulcer Caused by Flexi-Seal Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Tiwari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea and fecal incontinence are common in critically ill patients and present a challenging problem in patient management. The Flexi-Seal® Fecal Management System is a device to divert the stools away from the patient, thus improving the care to patients with fecal incontinence. There have been only few case reports describing the complications with the use of this device. Here, we present a case of a 77-year-old woman who was admitted due to massive hematochezia while on anticoagulation. She was found to have a large rectal ulcer caused by the Flexi-Seal device, used during the last hospital stay for fecal incontinence. Flexi-Seal device can be effective for the management of incontinence; however, caution should be exercised during handling and pressure from the retention balloon should be relieved periodically.

  5. Acute radiologic intervention in gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesak, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of embolization of the gastroduodenal artery in a 38-year old man with chronic pancreatitis and uncontrollable bleeding is presented. The advantage of this interventional radiologic procedure is discussed and in selective cases it seems to be the choice of treatment. (orig.) [de

  6. Rectal duplication cyst presenting as rectal prolapse in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Zaiem

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Rectal duplication is a rare variety of gastrointestinal duplication. It accounts 4% of the total gastrointestinal duplications.In this paper, we are reporting a case of an 8 months old male who presented with rectal prolapse. Digital rectal examination revealed a soft mass bulging through the posterior wall of rectum. Computed tomography (CT scan showed a cystic mass compressing the posterior wall of the rectum. The mass was excised using a Muscle Complex Saving Posterior Sagittal approach (MCS-PSA. The pathology report confirmed the diagnosis of the rectal duplication cyst. The postoperative recovery was uneventful. Keywords: Intestinal duplication, Cystic rectal duplication, Rectal prolapse

  7. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: demographic, clinical, endoscopic and histological panorama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, A.; Bhutto, K. A.R.; Baloch, A.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the demographic, clinical, endoscopic and histological spectrum of Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome (SRUS). Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical Unit-III, Civil Hospital Karachi (CHK) and Ward 7, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC), Karachi, from January 2009 to June 2012. Methodology: Patients with SRUS, based on characteristic endoscopic and histological findings, were enrolled. Patients were excluded if they had other causes of the rectal lesions (neoplasm, infection, inflammatory bowel disease, and trauma). Endoscopically, lesions were divided on the basis of number (solitary or multiple) and appearance (ulcerative, polypoidal/nodular or erythematous mucosa). Demographic, clinical and endoscopic characteristics of subjects were evaluated. Results: Forty-four patients met the inclusion criteria; 21 (47.7%) were females and 23 (52.3%) were males with overall mean age of 33.73 ±13.28 years. Symptom-wise 41 (93.2%) had bleeding per rectum, 39 (88.6%) had mucous discharge, 34 (77.3%) had straining, 34 (77.3%) had constipation, 32 (72.7%) had tenesmus, 5 (11.4%) had rectal prolapse and 2 (4.5%) had fecal incontinence. Twelve (27.27%) patients presented with hemoglobin less 10 gm/dl, 27 (61.36%) with 10 - 12 gm/dl and 05 (11.36%) subjects had hemoglobin more than 12 gm/dl. Endoscopically, 26 (59.1%) patients had mucosal ulceration, 11 (25.0%) had mucosal ulceration with polypoid characteristics; while only polypoid features were found in 7 (15.9%) subjects. Conclusion: Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome affects adults of both genders with diverse clinical presentation and nonspecific endoscopic features. (author)

  8. Lateral rectal shielding reduces late rectal morbidity after high dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer: further evidence for a dose effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W Robert; Hanks, Gerald E; Hanlon, Alexandra; Schultheiss, Timothy E

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Using conventional treatment methods for the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer central axis doses must be limited to 65-70 Gy to prevent significant damage to nearby normal tissues. A fundamental hypothesis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) is that, by defining the target organ(s) accurately in three dimensions, it is possible to deliver higher doses to the target without a significant increase in normal tissue complications. This study examines whether this hypothesis holds true and whether a simple modification of treatment technique can reduce the incidence of late rectal morbidity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3DCRT to minimum planning target volume (PTV) doses of 71-75 Gy. Materials and Methods: 257 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer completed 3DCRT by December 31, 1993 and received a minimum PTV dose of 71-75 Gy. The median follow-up time was 22 months (range 4-67 months) and 98% of patients had followup of longer than 12 months. The calculated dose at the center of the prostate was <74 Gy in 19 patients, 74-76 Gy in 206 patients and >76 Gy in 32 patients. Late rectal morbidity was graded according to the LENT scoring system. Eighty-eight consecutive patients were treated with a rectal block added to the lateral fields. In these patients the posterior margin from the prostate to the block edge was reduced from the standard 15 mm to 7.5 mm for the final 10 Gy which reduced the dose to portions of the anterior rectal wall by approximately 4-5 Gy. Estimates of rates for rectal morbidity were determined by Kaplan-Meier actuarial analyses. Differences in morbidity percentages were evaluated by the Pearson chi square test. Results: Grade 2-3 rectal morbidity developed in 46 of 257 patients (18%) and in the majority of cases consisted of rectal bleeding. No patient has developed grade 4 or 5 rectal morbidity. The actuarial rate of grade 2-3 morbidity is 22% at 24 months and the median

  9. Acquired Inhibitors: A Special Case of Bleeding in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Stefanacci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This literature review is intended to familiarize physicians and healthcare providers of older adults with the potential causes of acute bleeding in older adults and to review diagnostic approaches that can produce prompt identification of acute bleeding and facilitate timely treatment. Adverse events from anticoagulant treatment and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID and aspirin use and abuse are among the most common causes of bleeding in older adults. Diagnoses infrequently considered—mild congenital hemophilia, acquired hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, and platelet dysfunction—can contribute to acute bleeding in older adults. The approach to management of bleeding varies. Management of acute bleeding in older adults can be challenging because these patients often have chronic comorbidity and have been prescribed long-term concomitant medications that can complicate diagnosis and treatment. Prompt recognition of acquired hemophilia, referral to an expert hematologist, and timely initiation of treatment could improve outcome in older patients who experience bleeding episodes resulting from this condition.

  10. Risk factors for nasal bleeding in patients undergoing transnasal gastrointestinal endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyo Mieda

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Transnasal endoscopy is widely used in screening for upper gastrointestinal lesions because of less associated pain. Nasal bleeding is the most severe adverse effect, but specific risk factors have not been identified. The aim of this study is to identify risk factors for nasal bleeding during transnasal endoscopy. Nasal bleeding occurred in 160/3035 (5.3% of patients undergoing transnasal endoscopy as part of health checkups. Patient data were retrospectively evaluated including anthropometric, medical, and life-style parameters with multiple logistic regression analysis. Multiple logistic regression revealed that nasal bleeding was significantly associated with age in decades [odds ratio/10 years 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.63–0.97, p = 0.027], female gender (2.15, 95% CI 1.48–3.12, p < 0.001, a history of previous upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (0.55, 95% CI 0.36–0.82, p = 0.004, and chronic/allergic rhinitis (0.60, 95% CI 0.36–0.98, p = 0.043. Other factors including the use of antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant drugs were not significantly associated with nasal bleeding. Female and young patients are significantly associated with an increased risk of bleeding from transnasal endoscopy, but antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant medications and a history of chronic/allergic rhinitis may not be associated. Keywords: Transnasal endoscopy, Nasal bleeding, Risk factors

  11. Laparoscopic correction of enterocele associated to stapled transanal rectal resection for obstructed defecation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriero, Alfonso; Picchio, Marcello; Martellucci, Jacopo; Talento, Pasquale; Palimento, Domenico; Spaziani, Erasmo

    2010-03-01

    We report our experience of concomitant laparoscopic treatment for enterocele and stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) for rectocele and/or rectal prolapse in patients with complex obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). From June 2005 to June 2007, we submitted 20 patients with ODS due to rectal prolapse and/or rectocele, combined with stable enterocele, to STARR and laparoscopic correction of the enterocele. Preoperative assessment included symptom evaluation with standardized questionnaires, clinical examination, colonoscopy, proctoscopy, anal sphincter ultrasonography, video-defecography with synchronous opacification of the ileal loops in all patients and colpography in female patients, and anorectal manometry. Follow-up was performed in the first, third, sixth, 12th, and 24th month after surgery. Eighteen (90%) patients were submitted to both procedures, simultaneously. One patient, previously submitted to STARR, underwent laparoscopic treatment of the enterocele. Postoperative complications occurred in two (10%) patients: one case of postoperative rectal bleeding and one case of retropneumoperitoneum. Median (range) preoperative and postoperative Altomare's obstructed defecation score was ten (6-14) and two (0-14), respectively (p<0.001). Median (range) preoperative and postoperative quality of life score was 79 (39-109) and 109 (50-126), respectively (p<0.001). No symptom related to ODS was detected at 6-month follow-up (19 patients) and at 24-month follow-up (19 patients). The combination of STARR and laparoscopy provides a safe and effective method to treat ODS caused by rectal internal prolapse and/or rectocele combined with enterocele.

  12. Feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for lower rectal tumors with hemorrhoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shinwa; Toyonaga, Takashi; Morita, Yoshinori; Hoshi, Namiko; Ishida, Tsukasa; Ohara, Yoshiko; Yoshizaki, Tetsuya; Kawara, Fumiaki; Umegaki, Eiji; Azuma, Takeshi

    2016-07-21

    To evaluate the feasibility and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids. The outcome of ESD for 23 lesions with hemorrhoids (hemorrhoid group) was compared with that of 48 lesions without hemorrhoids extending to the dentate line (non-hemorrhoid group) during the same study period. Median operation times (ranges) in the hemorrhoid and non-hemorrhoid groups were 121 (51-390) and 130 (28-540) min. The en bloc resection rate and the curative resection rate in the hemorrhoid group were 96% and 83%, and they were 100% and 90% in the non-hemorrhoid group, respectively. In terms of adverse events, perforation and postoperative bleeding did not occur in both groups. In terms of the clinical course of hemorrhoids after ESD, the rate of complete recovery of hemorrhoids after ESD in lesions with resection of more than 90% was significantly higher than that in lesions with resection of less than 90%. ESD on lower rectal lesions with hemorrhoids could be performed safely, similarly to that on rectal lesions extending to the dentate line without hemorrhoids. In addition, all hemorrhoids after ESD improved to various degrees, depending on the resection range.

  13. Is palliative resection of the primary tumour, in the presence of advanced rectal cancer, a safe and useful technique for symptom control?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sanea, N.; Isbister, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    Over an 8-year period 22 patients (average age 54 years) underwent rectal resectional surgery in the presence of metastatic disease. There were 13 men and nine women. The commonest complaint was rectal bleeding. All patients had chest radiographs. Pulmonary metastases were identified in four patients. Nineteen abdominal and pelvic computed tomography scans were performed and eight showed evidence of metastases. Skeletal radiographs in two patients showed evidence of bone metastasis. At operation, intraperitoneal metastases were found in 18 patients. Nine of these were not identified preoperatively. Six patients underwent abdomino-perineal resection, nine anterior resection and seven a Hartmann's procedure. Eight patients developed a significant postoperative complication and one died 42 days after surgery. The mean length of hospital stay was 18.6 days. Nine patients received preoperative radiotherapy. Four patients had palliative radiotherapy, two for bony, one for liver and one for peritoneal metastases. Patients were followed up for a mean of 1.1 years. During follow up, 11 returned to the emergency room on 24 occasions. Two patients required readmission. No patient had further rectal bleeding. The mean survival was 1.3 years. It is concluded that patients with rectal cancer and unresectable distant metastases can be successfully palliated by resection of the primary tumour with low morbidity and mortality. The early involvement of a palliative care team facilitates patient management and helps patients enjoy what remains of the rest of their lives at home, in comfort and with good symptom control. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing

  14. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug related upper gastrointestinal bleeding: types of drug use and patient profiles in real clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostres, Carlos; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patrica; Lanas, Angel

    2017-10-01

    The best available evidence regarding non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding comes from randomized controlled trials including patients who use NSAIDs to manage chronic rheumatic diseases; however, patients with varying background profiles commonly take NSAIDs for many other reasons, often without prescription, and such usage has not been well studied. To define the characteristics of patients hospitalized for upper GI bleeding in clinical practice, we conducted a case-control study among patients with endoscopy-proven major upper GI bleeding due to gastroduodenal peptic lesions and control subjects. We used adjusted logistic regression models to estimate bleeding risks. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 22.0. Our analysis included 3785 cases and 6540 controls, including 1270 cases (33.55%) and 834 controls (12.75%) reporting recent use (upper GI bleeding, with an adjusted relative risk of 4.86 (95% CI, 4.32-5.46). Acute musculoskeletal pain (36.1%), chronic osteoarthritis (13.5%), and headache (13.6%) were the most common reasons for NSAID use. Among cases, only 17.31% took NSAIDs and 6.38% took high dose ASA due to chronic osteoarthritis. Demographic characteristics significantly differed between subjects with chronic vs. acute musculoskeletal pain. Proton pump inhibitor use was significantly higher in patients who used NSAIDs due to chronic osteoarthritis compared to patients with acute musculoskeletal pain. NSAID (65.15%) or high-dose ASA use (65.83%) preceding upper GI bleeding was most often short-term. In over half of cases (63.62%), the upper GI bleeding event was not preceded by dyspeptic warning symptoms. The majority of patients hospitalized due to NSAID-related upper GI bleeding reported short-term NSAID use for reasons other than chronic rheumatic disease. These findings suggest that current prevention strategies may not reach a wide population of short-term NSAID users.

  15. Assessing correlations between the spatial distribution of the dose to the rectal wall and late rectal toxicity after prostate radiotherapy: an analysis of data from the MRC RT01 trial (ISRCTN 47772397)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettner, Florian; Gulliford, Sarah L; Webb, Steve; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R; Dearnaley, David P

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have been performed to assess correlations between measures derived from dose-volume histograms and late rectal toxicities for radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to quantify correlations between measures describing the shape and location of the dose distribution and different outcomes. The dose to the rectal wall was projected on a two-dimensional map. In order to characterize the dose distribution, its centre of mass, longitudinal and lateral extent, and eccentricity were calculated at different dose levels. Furthermore, the dose-surface histogram (DSH) was determined. Correlations between these measures and seven clinically relevant rectal-toxicity endpoints were quantified by maximally selected standardized Wilcoxon rank statistics. The analysis was performed using data from the RT01 prostate radiotherapy trial. For some endpoints, the shape of the dose distribution is more strongly correlated with the outcome than simple DSHs. Rectal bleeding was most strongly correlated with the lateral extent of the dose distribution. For loose stools, the strongest correlations were found for longitudinal extent; proctitis was most strongly correlated with DSH. For the other endpoints no statistically significant correlations could be found. The strengths of the correlations between the shape of the dose distribution and outcome differed considerably between the different endpoints. Due to these significant correlations, it is desirable to use shape-based tools in order to assess the quality of a dose distribution.

  16. Rectal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pale skin Low urine output Seek immediate medical attention Have someone drive you to an emergency room ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  17. Patterns of Traumatic Intracranial Bleeds at Kenyatta National

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valued eMachines Customer

    Conclusion: Acute subdural hematomas are the commonest traumatic ... Most of the intracranial bleeds were acute, 27.5% (n=14) followed by chronic, 9.8% .... Gentry LR, Godersky JC, Thomson B. MR imaging of head trauma: review of the ...

  18. Early complications after stapled transanal rectal resection performed using the Contour® Transtar™ device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martellucci, J; Talento, P; Carriero, A

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the early results (with particular reference to complications) of stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) carried out using the CCS-30 Contour® Transtar™ device. The procedure was performed in a single centre on patients with obstucted defecation caused by rectocele or rectal intussusception. From July 2007 to February 2009, 133 patients were treated. Preoperatively, all underwent clinical examination, transanal ultrasonography, anorectal manometry and cinedefaecography. Obstructed defaecation syndrome was assessed using the Cleveland Clinic Constipation Score (CCC-S). Early postoperative complications and those occurring within 6 months were recorded. The median follow-up period was 19 (range 12-30) months. The mean ± standard deviation preoperative CCC-S of 19.4 ± 7.1 decreased to 10.1 ± 9.0 postoperatively. The early complication rate was 15.7% and included rectovaginal fistula (n = 1), rectal perforation (n = 1), posterior dehiscence (n = 4), further surgery for retained staples (n = 2), postoperative bleeding (n = 2) and postoperative impaired continence (n = 11). STARR using the Contour Transtar device seems to be effective for treating obstructed defaecation. However, serious complications may occur. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex

  20. Polyethylene glycol hydrogel rectal spacer implantation in patients with prostate cancer undergoing combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jekwon; Lehrich, Brandon; Tran, Carolyn; Mesa, Albert; Baghdassarian, Ruben; Yoshida, Jeffrey; Torrey, Robert; Gazzaniga, Michael; Weinberg, Alan; Chalfin, Stuart; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    To present rectal toxicity rates in patients administered a polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel rectal spacer in conjunction with combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. Between February 2010 and April 2015, 326 prostate carcinoma patients underwent combination high-dose-rate brachytherapy of 16 Gy (average dose 15.5 Gy; standard deviation [SD] = 1.6 Gy) and external beam radiotherapy of 59.4 Gy (average dose 60.2 Gy; SD = 2.9 Gy). In conjunction with the radiation therapy regimen, each patient was injected with 10 mL of a PEG hydrogel in the anterior perirectal fat space. The injectable spacer (rectal spacer) creates a gap between the prostate and the rectum. The rectum is displaced from the radiation field, and rectal dose is substantially reduced. The goal is a reduction in rectal radiation toxicity. Clinical efficacy was determined by measuring acute and chronic rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Center Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 grading scheme. Median followup was 16 months. The mean anterior-posterior separation achieved was 1.6 cm (SD = 0.4 cm). Rates of acute Grade 1 and 2 rectal toxicity were 37.4% and 2.8%, respectively. There were no acute Grade 3/4 toxicities. Rates of late Grade 1, 2, and 3 rectal toxicity were 12.7%, 1.4%, and 0.7%, respectively. There were no late Grade 4 toxicities. PEG rectal spacer implantation is safe and well tolerated. Acute and chronic rectal toxicities are low despite aggressive dose escalation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rectal Prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ball”. Rectal prolapse may be confused with significant hemorrhoid disease and can even be confusing at times ... and treating this problem. A = Rectal Prolapse B = Hemorrhoids Once a prolapse is apparent, fecal incontinence (inability ...

  2. Hydrocortisone Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also used to relieve itching and swelling from hemorrhoids and other rectal problems. Hydrocortisone is in a ... may improve within 5 to 7 days.For hemorrhoids, hydrocortisone rectal cream usually is used in adults ...

  3. Bisacodyl Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisac-Evac® Suppositories ... Dulcolax® Suppositories ... Rectal bisacodyl comes as a suppository and enema to use rectally. It is usually used at the time that a bowel movement is desired. The suppositories usually ...

  4. Gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sigmoidoscopy Alternative Names Lower GI bleeding; GI bleeding; Upper GI bleeding; Hematochezia Images GI bleeding - series Fecal occult blood test References Kovacs TO, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman- ...

  5. Digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasonography in staging of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Kronborg, Ole; Fenger, Claus

    1994-01-01

    Staging of rectal carcinoma before surgical treatment was performed in a prospective blind study, comparing digital rectal exploration and transrectal linear ultrasonography (TRUS) with the resulting pathological examination. TRUS underestimated depth of penetration in 3 of 33 patients...... and overestimation resulted in 9 of 74. The figures for digital examination were 5 of 18 and 20 of 76, respectively. Penetration of the rectal wall was correctly identified in 56 of 61 patients by digital examination and in 59 of 61 by TRUS. Specimens without penetration of the rectal wall were identified in 26...

  6. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  7. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  8. Turhan et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2011) 8(1):61-65

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    1Department of Pathology, Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Teaching and Research ... 5Department of Chest Diseases, Ataturk Chest Disease and Chest Surgery ... the management of chronic bleeding due to a solitary rectal ulcer (Ibis et al., 2008). .... all the animals, findings consistent with acute hepatic venous outflow obstruction,.

  9. Early rectal stenosis following stapled rectal mucosectomy for hemorrhoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuster Anja

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the last years, stapled rectal mucosectomy (SRM has become a widely accepted procedure for second and third degree hemorrhoids. One of the delayed complications is a stenosis of the lower rectum. In order to evaluate the specific problem of rectal stenosis following SRM we reviewed our data with special respect to potential predictive factors or stenotic events. Methods A retrospective analysis of 419 consecutive patients, which underwent SRM from December 1998 to August 2003 was performed. Only patients with at least one follow-up check were evaluated, thus the analysis includes 289 patients with a mean follow-up of 281 days (±18 days. For statistic analysis the groups with and without stenosis were evaluated using the Chi-Square Test, using the Kaplan-Meier statistic the actuarial incidence for rectal stenosis was plotted. Results Rectal stenosis was observed in 9 patients (3.1%, eight of these stenoses were detected within the first 100 days after surgery; the median time to stenosis was 95 days. Only one patient had a rectal stenosis after more than one year. 8 of the 9 patients had no obstructive symptoms, however the remaining patients complained of obstructive defecation and underwent surgery for transanal strictureplasty with electrocautery. A statistical analysis revealed that patients with stenosis had significantly more often prior treatment for hemorrhoids (p Conclusion Rectal stenosis is an uncommon event after SRM. Early stenosis will occur within the first three months after surgery. The majority of the stenoses are without clinical relevance. Only one of nine patients had to undergo surgery for a relevant stenosis. The predictive factor for stenosis in the patient-characteristics is previous interventions for hemorrhoids, severe postoperative pain might also predict rectal stenosis.

  10. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis with prostato-rectal fistula: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing L

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liyong Xing, Zhifei Liu, Gang Deng, Huan Wang, Yanfeng Zhu, Peng Shi, Bingyue Huo, Yindong Li Department of Urology, Tangshan People’s Hospital, Tangshan, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis (XP is a rare form of nonspecific granulomatous prostatitis that can clinically mimic high-grade prostatic carcinoma. It is difficult to diagnose it definitely in clinical settings. Methods: We report a case of XP with prostate-rectal fistula and review the relevant literatures. Result: A 75-year-old man presented with rectal bleeding when he urinated. A locally advanced carcinoma of prostate was suspected initially following the physical, imaging, and hematologic examinations. Subsequently on histopathological and immunohistochemical staining after needle biopsy of the prostate, a diagnosis of XP was made definitely. The patient was catheterized temporarily and treated with tamsulosin and estrogen. The patient underwent uneventful recovery after this conservative therapy. Conclusion: Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses are valuable in differentially diagnosing XP from high-grade prostate carcinoma. Treatment strategy of XP in principle is recommended to be the conservative method. Long-term follow-up earns are highly regarded considering the possibility of coexisting prostate cancer. Keywords: xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, prostate-rectal fistula

  11. Frequency of endometrial carcinoma in patients with postmenopausal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, S.; Shaheen, M.; Rana, T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Postmenopausal bleeding (PMB) is defined as bleeding that occurs after 1 year of amenorrhea in a woman who is not receiving hormone replacement therapy (HRT). About 10% of women with postmenopausal bleeding have a primary or secondary malignancy. Common malignancies among them are endometrial cancer (80%), cervical cancer or an ovarian tumour. Endometrial cancer is the second most common cancer associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Ninety percent of patients have benign causes. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of endometrial carcinoma in patients with post-menopausal bleeding. Study Design: Descriptive case series study. Setting: Department of obstetrics and gynaecology, Lady Willingdon, Lahore. Duration of Study: This study was conducted over a period of six months from January, 1 2009 to June 30, 2009. Subjects and Methods: 50 cases with postmenopausal bleeding. Results: During the period of this study a total number of 50 consecutive patients who met inclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. Ages of the patients who presented with PMB ranged between 48 years and 80 years with a mean age of 59 years. Malignancy was found in 18 out of 50 cases (36%).Cases with endometrial CA were 14 out of 50 cases (28%) and CA cervix constituted 4 out of 50 cases (8%). Benign pathology was more frequent (64%). 13 of 50 cases (26%) had hyperplasia out of which 1 case (2%) was of atypical hyperplasia. Endometrial polyp was found in 4 of 50 cases (8%). 3 of 50 cases (6%) had chronic endometritis. 5 of 50 cases (10%) had chronic cervicitis. While 7 cases (14%) had postmenopausal bleeding due to decubitus ulcer of uterovaginal prolapse. Among malignancies (36%), endometrial cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women with postmenopausal bleeding with mean age of 65 years. Conclusion: In this study it was concluded that the majority of cases of PMB would be expected to be suffering from benign problems

  12. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudaira Miwako

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS, and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS.

  13. Health-related Quality of Life after complex rectal surgery for primary advanced rectal cancer and locally recurrent rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Henriette Vind

    2013-01-01

    postoperative morbidity, Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) is an important issue. The overall aim of this thesis was therefore to evaluate HRQoL in patients with PARC and LRRC treated with COMP-RCS and curative intent. In study I a review of the literature was undertaken to provide an overview of HRQo......Advances in the treatment of rectal cancer, have made it possible to perform complex rectal cancer surgery (COMP-RCS) with curative intent in patients with primary advanced rectal caner (PARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC). Due to the complexity of the treatment and its high...... in the study was 164 (86%) patients treated with standard rectal cancer surgery (STAN-RCS). The Danish version showed satisfactory psychometric properties for the scales concerning body image, sexual functioning, male sexual problems and defecations problems. Reduced psychometric properties were found...

  14. Mesalamine Rectal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rectal mesalamine comes as a suppository and an enema to use in the rectum. The suppository and the enema are usually used once a day at bedtime. ... rectal mesalamine without talking to your doctor.Mesalamine suppositories and enemas may stain clothing and other fabrics, ...

  15. Evaluating the effect of rectal distension and rectal movement on prostate gland position using cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhani, Anwar R.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Suckling, John; Husband, Janet E.; Leach, Martin O.; Dearnaley, David P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dynamic interrelationship between rectal distension and rectal movements, and to determine the effect of rectal movement on the position of the prostatic gland using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with biopsy-proven or suspected prostate cancer were examined in the axial plane using repeated spoiled gradient-echo sequences every 10 seconds for 7 minutes. Twenty-four patients received bowel relaxants before imaging. Images were analyzed for the degree of rectal distension, for the incidence, magnitude, and number of rectal and prostate movements. Results: Rectal movements were seen in 28 (51%) patients overall, in 10 (42%) of those receiving bowel relaxants and in 18 (58%) not receiving bowel relaxants. The incidence of rectal movements correlated with the degree of rectal distension (p = 0.0005), but the magnitude of rectal movements did not correlate with the degree of rectal distension. Eighty-six rectal movements resulting in 33 anterior-posterior (AP) prostate movements were seen. The magnitude of rectal movements correlated well with degree of prostate movements (p < 0.001). Prostate movements in the AP direction were seen in 16 (29%) patients, and in 9 (16%) patients the movement was greater than 5 mm. The median prostate AP displacement was anterior by 4.2 (-5 to +14 mm). Conclusions: Cine MRI is able to demonstrate near real time rectal and associated prostate movements. Rectal movements are related to rectal distension and result in significant displacements of the prostate gland over a time period similar to that used for daily fractionated radiotherapy treatments. Delivery of radiotherapy needs to take into account these organ movements

  16. Rectal cooling test in the differentiation between constipation due to rectal inertia and anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A; Shafik, I; El Sibai, O; Shafik, A A

    2007-03-01

    The differentiation between constipation due to rectal inertia and that due to outlet obstruction from non-relaxing puborectalis muscle (PRM) is problematic and not easily achieved with one diagnostic test. Therefore, we studied the hypothesis that the rectal cooling test (RCT) can effectively be used to differentiate between those two forms of constipation. The study enrolled 28 patients with constipation and abnormal transit study in whom radio-opaque markers accumulated in the rectum; 15 healthy volunteers acted as controls. Electromyographic activity of the external anal sphincter (EAS) and PRM was initially recorded. Subsequently rectal wall tone was assessed by a barostat system during rectal infusion with normal saline at 30 degrees C and at 4 degrees C with simultaneous electromyography (EMG). There was a significant increase in EMG activity of the EAS and PRM on strain- ing (panismus, in 10 of 28 patients and 0 of 15 controls. Rectal tone in controls did not respond to saline infusion at 30 degrees C, but it increased at 4 degrees C (panismus (panismus while it had no effect in the remaining patients. Lack of increase of rectal tone may be secondary to rectal inertia. According to these preliminary observations, the rectal cooling test may be useful in differentiating between rectal inertia and anismus.

  17. Immunohistochemical findings in rectal duplication mimicking rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, M G; Pucci, A; Macchieraldo, R; Sacco Casamassima, M G; Canavese, F

    2008-08-01

    Alimentary tract duplications represent rare anomalies, with only 5 % occurring in the rectum. The variety in clinical presentation may lead to a delay in diagnosis or to incorrect and multiple surgical procedures. We report the clinical, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a rectal duplication occurring in a 3-month-old male with an unusual clinical presentation. Using routine histology and immunohistochemistry, the rectal duplication showed the diffuse presence of gastric mucosa with a characteristic immunophenotype (i.e., diffuse cytokeratin 7 positivity and scattered chromogranin immunoreactivity). As far as we know, this is the first report showing an immunohistochemical differentiation pattern of gastric lining in a rectal duplication. Our results, showing the presence of gastric mucosa, are suggestive of a possible origin from the embryonic foregut.

  18. X-ray diagnostic features of acute bleeding ulcers of the stomach and duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbatenko, M.K.; Selina, I.E.; Chekalina, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    The paper is based on the analysis of clinical, X-ray, and morphological studies in 74 patients with massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The paper presents the specific features of X-ray studies of patients with bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. X-ray studies shout be twice performed in these patients. The first study is conducted if gastroscopic findings are unclear, the repeated one is carried out while assessing changes in disease regression. X-ray diagnosis of bleeding ulcers is determined by their sites and the nature of an ulcerous process. The X-ray diagnosis of chronic callous gastric ulcers accompanied by hemorrhage was based on the detection of two direct symptoms of a niche on the gastric outlines and configuration and an inflammatory mound on the gastric outline and configuration. That of chronic bleeding ulcers of the duodenal bulb is based not only on searches niche, but other signs of the disease - the deformed organ, and the magnitude of a periprocess. 10 refs., 5 figs

  19. Vaginal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or period, is a woman's monthly bleeding.Abnormal vaginal bleeding is different from normal menstrual periods. It ... therapy) Cancer of the cervix, ovaries, uterus or vagina Thyroid problems Bleeding during pregnancy can have several ...

  20. Complete Neoadjuvant Treatment for Rectal Cancer: The Brown University Oncology Group CONTRE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Kimberly; Safran, Howard; Sikov, William; Vrees, Matthew; Klipfel, Adam; Shah, Nishit; Schechter, Steven; Oldenburg, Nicklas; Pricolo, Victor; Rosati, Kayla; Dipetrillo, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Following preoperative chemoradiation and surgery, many patients with stage II to III rectal cancer are unable to tolerate full-dose adjuvant chemotherapy. BrUOG R-224 was designed to assess the impact of COmplete Neoadjuvant Treatment for REctal cancer (CONTRE), primary chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation and surgery, on treatment delivery, toxicities, and pathologic response at surgery. Patients with clinical stage II to III (T3 to T4 and/or N1 to N2) rectal cancer received 8 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 followed by capecitabine 825 mg/m bid concurrent with 50.4 Gy intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Surgery was performed 6 to 10 weeks after chemoradiation. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled between August 2010 and June 2013. Median age was 61 years (30 to 79 y); 7 patients (18%) were clinical stage II and 32 (82%) stage III. Thirty-six patients (92%) received all 8 cycles of mFOLFOX6, of whom 35 completed subsequent chemoradiation; thus 89% of patients received CONTRE as planned. No unexpected toxicities were reported. All patients had resolution of bleeding and improvement of obstructive symptoms, with no complications requiring surgical intervention. Pathologic complete response (ypT0N0) was demonstrated in 13 patients (33%; 95% CI, 18.24%-47.76%). CONTRE seems to be a well-tolerated alternative to the current standard treatment sequence. Evaluating its impact on long-term outcomes would require a large randomized trial, but using pathologic response as an endpoint, it could serve as a platform for assessing the addition of novel agents to preoperative treatment in stage II to III rectal cancer.

  1. Transvaginal coloanal anastomosis after rectal resection for the treatment of a rectovaginal fistula induced by radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezean, I

    2014-01-01

    Although decreasing in number, radiation induced rectovaginal fistulas are caused by some radiation injuries and chronic ischemic lesions. Most of the experienced authors recommend anterior rectal resection with coloanal anastomosis accessed through the abdominal-perineum area for high fistula. We present a patient with a fistula that developed 23 years after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. In this case we performed an abdominal-transvaginal rectal resection with transverse coloplastypouch, coloanal anastomosis and protection ileostomy three months after a terminal sigmoidostomy. The dissection of the distal rectum by posteriour colpotomy and coloanal transvaginalan astomosis is a technical variant that may prove advantage ous compared to the procedures featured in the literature as solutions by rectal resection for rectovaginal fistula. Celsius.

  2. Bleeding Meckel’s diverticulum in a 4-month-old infant: Treatment with laparoscopic diverticulectomy. A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rainer Poley

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available J Rainer Poley1, Thomas E Thielen2, Jeffrey C Pence31Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition; 2Resident in Pediatrics; 3Assistant Professor of Surgery and Pediatrics, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USAAbstract: A bleeding Meckel’s diverticulum is presented in a 4-month-old African American infant. This event is rare at this age, and our patient is only the second 4-month-old infant reported in the English literature. The infant presented with painless frank rectal bleeding, the blood being maroon-colored, and clots were found in the diaper. There was also anemia, with an hemoglobin of less than 8 gm/dl. The color of the blood suggested a bleeding site in the ileocecal region, a Meckel’s diverticulum was suspected, which was then confirmed by an isotope scan. A typical Meckel’s diverticulum was found on laparoscopic surgery, was excised, and the infant made an uneventful recovery. Keywords: infant-bleeding Meckel’s diverticulum, laparoscopic diverticulectomy

  3. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. www. ...

  4. Digital rectal exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  5. Oral administration of a medium containing both D-aspartate-producing live bacteria and D-aspartate reduces rectal temperature in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, P H; Tran, P V; Bahry, M A; Yang, H; Han, G; Tsuchiya, A; Asami, Y; Furuse, M; Chowdhury, V S

    2017-10-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects on the rectal temperature of young chicks of the oral administration of a medium that contained both live bacteria that produce D-aspartate (D-Asp) and D-Asp. 2. In Experiment 1, chicks were subjected to chronic oral administration of either the medium (containing live bacteria and 2.46 μmol D-Asp) or water from 7 to 14 d of age. Plasma-free amino acids as well as mitochondrial biogenic gene expression in the breast muscle were analysed. In Experiment 2, 7-d-old chicks were subjected to acute oral administration of the above medium or of an equimolar amount of D-Asp to examine their effect on changes in rectal temperature. In Experiment 3, after 1 week of chronic oral administration of the medium, 14-d-old chicks were exposed to either high ambient temperature (HT; 40 ± 1°C, 3 h) or control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30 ± 1°C, 3 h) to monitor the changes in rectal temperature. 3. Chronic, but not acute, oral administration of the medium significantly reduced rectal temperature in chicks, and a chronic effect also appeared under HT conditions. 4. Chronic oral administration of the medium significantly reduced the mRNA abundance of the avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) in the breast muscle, but led to a significant increase in avian adenine nucleotide translocator (avANT) mRNA in the same muscle. 5. (a) These results indicate that the medium can reduce body temperature through the decline in avUCP mRNA expression in the breast muscle that may be involved in reduced mitochondrial proton leaks and heat production. (b) The increase in avANT further suggests a possible enhancement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis.

  6. Splenic vein thrombosis with chronic pancreatitis: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasiri SH, Khorgami J, Donboli K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Chronic pancreatitis and perivasculitis is the most common etiology of splenic vein thrombosis (SVT. Reported in up to 45% of patients with chronic pancreatitis, SVT may also be seen in patients with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. It causes a localized portal hypertension called sinistral portal hypertension. Unlike those with generalized portal hypertension, patients with sinistral portal hypertension are asymptomatic and have normal liver function. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding from gastric varices is a life threatening complication of SVT. In patients with gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to esophageal or gastric varices, late-phase celiac angiography is used to determine the presence SVT. Splenectomy is effective in treating the collateral outflow for patients with massive gastrointestinal bleeding."n"nCase report: a 23-year-old patient with SVT due to chronic pancreatitis with gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient came to the hospital with upper gastrointestinal bleeding of unknown etiology. Diagnostic workups revealed chronic pancreatitis and SVT with bleeding gastric fundal varices, after which the patient underwent splenectomy. A review of current literature on SVT, known etiologies, diagnosis and treatment is discussed

  7. Stapled transanal rectal resection in solitary rectal ulcer associated with prolapse of the rectum: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccasanta, Paolo; Venturi, Marco; Calabro, Giuseppe; Maciocco, Marco; Roviaro, Gian Carlo

    2008-03-01

    At present, none of the conventional surgical treatments of solitary rectal ulcer associated with internal rectal prolapse seems to be satisfactory because of the high incidence of recurrence. The stapled transanal rectal resection has been demonstrated to successfully cure patients with internal rectal prolapse associated with rectocele, or prolapsed hemorrhoids. This prospective study was designed to evaluate the short-term and long-term results of stapled transanal rectal resection in patients affected by solitary rectal ulcer associated with internal rectal prolapse and nonresponders to biofeedback therapy. Fourteen patients were selected on the basis of validated constipation and continence scorings, clinical examination, anorectal manometry, defecography, and colonoscopy and were submitted to biofeedback therapy. Ten nonresponders were operated on and followed up with incidence of failure, defined as no improvement of symptoms and/or recurrence of rectal ulceration, as the primary outcome measure. Operative time, hospital stay, postoperative pain, time to return to normal activity, overall patient satisfaction index, and presence of residual rectal prolapse also were evaluated. At a mean follow-up of 27.2 (range, 24-34) months, symptoms significantly improved, with 80 percent of excellent/good results and none of the ten operated patients showed a recurrence of rectal ulcer. Operative time, hospital stay, and time to return to normal activity were similar to those reported after stapled transanal rectal resection for obstructed defecation, whereas postoperative pain was slightly higher. One patient complained of perineal abscess, requiring surgery. The stapled transanal rectal resection is safe and effective in the cure of solitary rectal ulcer associated with internal rectal prolapse, with minimal complications and no recurrences after two years. Randomized trials with sufficient number of patients are necessary to compare the efficacy of stapled transanal

  8. Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngu, JH; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Chin, YK

    2017-01-01

    Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study.......Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study....

  9. Hemangioma colorretal Colon rectal hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Pinheiro Barreto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O hemangioma colorretal (HCR é uma lesão vascular benigna rara, com manifestação clínica geralmente entre 5 e 25 anos de idade. Faz parte do diagnóstico diferencial das causas de hemorragia digestiva baixa, sendo confundido, na maioria das vezes, com entidades mais comuns, como hemorróidas e doenças inflamatórias intestinais. O retardo do diagnóstico ocorre freqüentemente devido ao desconhecimento da doença, com taxas de mortalidade alcançando 40 a 50% na presença de sangramento importante. O caso relatado é de uma paciente de 17 anos de idade, admitida no Serviço de Colo-proctologia do Hospital Universitário - HUUFMA, em setembro de 2005, com anemia e sangramento retal, desde a infância, de forma intermitente e não dolorosa. Apresentado sua história clínica e propedêutica diagnóstica, realizada por meio de exames laboratoriais, endoscopia digestiva alta, colonoscopia e arteriografia de mesentéricas e ilíacas internas. O tratamento cirúrgico realizado foi retossigmoidectomia convencional com anastomose colorretal baixa, com boa evolução pós-operatória, tendo o exame histopatológico da peça cirúrgica ressecada, confirmado o diagnostico.The colon and rectum hemangioma is a rare benign vascular lesion, with clinical features usually between 5 and 25 years of age. It is included in the differential diagnose of the lower digestive bleeding causes, and has been frequently misdiagnosed with other more common entities, like hemorrhoids and bowel inflammatory disease. The late diagnose occurs usually because of the rarity of the disease, with mortality rates reaching 40 to 50% in presence of severe bleeding. We report a case of a 17 years old girl who was admitted at the Coloproctology Service of the Academic Hospital - HUUFMA, in September 2005, with anemia and intermittent rectal bleeding since childhood. Laboratorial findings included laboratorial exams, GI endoscopy, colonoscopy and arteriography of mesenteric and

  10. A method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated and rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yong; Song, Paul Y.; Li Shidong; Spelbring, Danny R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Haraf, Daniel J.; Chen, George T.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated and rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose-surface histograms of the rectum, which state the rectal surface area irradiated to any given dose, were calculated for a group of 27 patients treated with a four-field box technique to a total (tumor minimum) dose ranging from 68 to 70 Gy. Occurrences of rectal toxicities as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) were recorded and examined in terms of dose and rectal surface area irradiated. For a specified end point of rectal complication, the complication probability was analyzed as a function of dose irradiated to a fixed rectal area, and as a function of area receiving a fixed dose. Lyman's model of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was used to fit the data. Results: The observed occurrences of rectal complications appear to depend on the rectal surface area irradiated to a given dose level. The patient distribution of each toxicity grade exhibits a maximum as a function of percentage surface area irradiated, and the maximum moves to higher values of percentage surface area as the toxicity grade increases. The dependence of the NTCP for the specified end point on dose and percentage surface area irradiated was fitted to Lyman's NTCP model with a set of parameters. The curvature of the NTCP as a function of the surface area suggests that the rectum is a parallel structured organ. Conclusions: The described method of analyzing rectal surface area irradiated yields interesting insight into understanding rectal complications in prostate conformal radiotherapy. Application of the method to a larger patient data set has the potential to facilitate the construction of a full dose-surface-complication relationship, which would be most useful in guiding clinical practice

  11. A splenic artery aneurysm presenting with multiple episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, W S L; Gamlaksha, D S; Jayasekara, D P; Rajamanthri, S D

    2017-05-03

    Splenic artery aneurysm is rare and its diagnosis is challenging due to the nonspecific nature of the clinical presentation. We report a case of a splenic artery aneurysm in which the patient presented with chronic dyspepsia and multiple episodes of minor intragastric bleeding. A 60-year-old, previously healthy Sri Lankan man presented with four episodes of hematemesis and severe dyspeptic symptoms over a period of 6 months. The results of two initial upper gastrointestinal endoscopies and an abdominal ultrasound scan were unremarkable. A third upper gastrointestinal endoscopy detected a pulsatile bulge at the posterior wall of the gastric antrum. A contrast-enhanced computed tomogram of his abdomen detected a splenic artery aneurysm measuring 3 × 3 × 2.5 cm. While awaiting routine surgery, he developed a torrential upper gastrointestinal bleeding and shock, leading to emergency laparotomy. Splenectomy and en bloc resection of the aneurysm with the posterior stomach wall were performed. Histology revealed evidence for a true aneurysm without overt, acute, or chronic inflammation of the surrounding gastric mucosa. He became completely asymptomatic 2 weeks after the surgery. Splenic artery aneurysms can result in recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The possibility of impending catastrophic bleeding should be remembered when managing patients with splenic artery aneurysms after a minor bleeding. Negative endoscopy and ultrasonography should require contrast-enhanced computed tomography to look for the cause of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  12. Rectal Toxicity After Proton Therapy For Prostate Cancer: An Analysis of Outcomes of Prospective Studies Conducted at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella [The University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); McKibben, Brian T. [Baptist Health Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Henderson, Randal H.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng; Su, Zhong [The University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [Baptist Health Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Mendenhall, Nancy P., E-mail: menden@floridaproton.org [The University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Study goals were to characterize gastrointestinal effects of proton therapy (PT) in a large cohort of patients treated for prostate cancer, identify factors associated with rectal bleeding (RB), and compare RB between patients receiving investigational protocols versus those in outcome-tracking protocols. Methods and Materials: A total of 1285 consecutive patients were treated with PT between August 2006 and May 2010. Potential pre-existing clinical and treatment-related risk factors for rectal toxicity were recorded. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to score toxicity. Results: Transient RB was the predominant grade 2 or higher (GR2+) toxicity after PT, accounting for 95% of gastrointestinal events. GR1 RB occurred in 217 patients (16.9%), GR2 RB in 187 patients (14.5%), and GR3 in 11 (0.9%) patients. There were no GR4 or GR5 events. Univariate analyses showed correlations between GR2+ RB and anticoagulation therapy (P=.008) and rectal and rectal wall dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, anticoagulation therapy (P=.0034), relative volume of rectum receiving 75 Gy (V75; P=.0102), and relative rectal wall V75 (P=.0017) were significant predictors for G2+ RB. Patients treated with investigational protocols had toxicity rates similar to those receiving outcome-tracking protocols. Conclusions: PT was associated with a low rate of GR2+ gastrointestinal toxicity, predominantly transient RB, which was highly correlated with anticoagulation and rectal DVH parameters. Techniques that limit rectal exposure should be used when possible.

  13. Rectal Toxicity After Proton Therapy For Prostate Cancer: An Analysis of Outcomes of Prospective Studies Conducted at the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; McKibben, Brian T.; Henderson, Randal H.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng; Su, Zhong; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Study goals were to characterize gastrointestinal effects of proton therapy (PT) in a large cohort of patients treated for prostate cancer, identify factors associated with rectal bleeding (RB), and compare RB between patients receiving investigational protocols versus those in outcome-tracking protocols. Methods and Materials: A total of 1285 consecutive patients were treated with PT between August 2006 and May 2010. Potential pre-existing clinical and treatment-related risk factors for rectal toxicity were recorded. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to score toxicity. Results: Transient RB was the predominant grade 2 or higher (GR2+) toxicity after PT, accounting for 95% of gastrointestinal events. GR1 RB occurred in 217 patients (16.9%), GR2 RB in 187 patients (14.5%), and GR3 in 11 (0.9%) patients. There were no GR4 or GR5 events. Univariate analyses showed correlations between GR2+ RB and anticoagulation therapy (P=.008) and rectal and rectal wall dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, anticoagulation therapy (P=.0034), relative volume of rectum receiving 75 Gy (V75; P=.0102), and relative rectal wall V75 (P=.0017) were significant predictors for G2+ RB. Patients treated with investigational protocols had toxicity rates similar to those receiving outcome-tracking protocols. Conclusions: PT was associated with a low rate of GR2+ gastrointestinal toxicity, predominantly transient RB, which was highly correlated with anticoagulation and rectal DVH parameters. Techniques that limit rectal exposure should be used when possible

  14. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified

  15. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effect of rectal enemas on rectal dosimetric parameters during high-dose-rate vaginal cuff brachytherapy. A prospective trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabater, Sebastia; Andres, Ignacio; Sevillano, Marimar; Berenguer, Roberto; Aguayo, Manuel; Villas, Maria Victoria; Gascon, Marina; Arenas, Meritxell; Rovirosa, Angeles; Camacho-Lopez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of rectal enemas on rectal doses during postoperative high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB). This prospective trial included 59 patients. Two rectal cleansing enemas were self-administered before the second fraction, and fraction 1 was considered the basal status. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) values were generated for the rectum and correlated with rectal volume variation. Statistical analyses used paired and unpaired t-tests. Despite a significant 15 % reduction in mean rectal volume (44.07 vs. 52.15 cc, p = 0.0018), 35.6 % of patients had larger rectums after rectal enemas. No significant rectal enema-related DVH differences were observed compared to the basal data. Although not statistically significant, rectal cleansing-associated increases in mean rectal DVH values were observed: D 0.1 cc : 6.6 vs. 7.21 Gy; D 1 cc : 5.35 vs. 5.52 Gy; D 2 cc : 4.67 vs. 4.72 Gy, before and after rectal cleaning, respectively (where D x cc is the dose to the most exposed x cm 3 ). No differences were observed in DVH parameters according to rectal volume increase or decrease after the enema. Patients whose rectal volume increased also had significantly larger DVH parameters, except for D 5 % , D 25 % , and D 50 % . In contrast, in patients whose rectal volume decreased, significance was only seen for D 25 % and D 50 % (D x % dose covering x % of the volume). In the latter patients, nonsignificant reductions in D 2 cc , D 5 cc and V 5 Gy (volume receiving at least 5 Gy) were observed. The current rectal enemas protocol was ineffective in significantly modifying rectal DVH parameters for HDR-VCB. (orig.) [de

  17. External cystic rectal duplication: an unusual presentation of rectal duplication cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, I; Karaman, A; Arda, N; Cakmak, O

    2007-11-01

    Duplications of gastrointestinal tract are rare anomalies, and rectal duplications account for five percent of the alimentary tract duplications. We present an unusual case of rectal duplication, which was located externally in a newborn female, and discuss the types of distal hindgut duplications.

  18. Perineal mass protrusion with rectal mucosa: a rectal duplication that underwent exstrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjie; Vongphet, Soulithone; Zhang, Zhichong; Mo, Jiacong

    2011-08-01

    We present a rare case of a male neonate with a perineal mass with rectal mucosa, diagnosed as an exstrophic duplication of the rectum. It was accompanied by a cord that was deeply invested in the pelvic diaphragm and was composed of smooth muscle, fibrous tissue, and some rectal glands. The association of exstrophic rectal duplication with a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and normal anus has not been described previously in the literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sigmoidoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexible sigmoidoscopy; Sigmoidoscopy - flexible; Proctoscopy; Proctosigmoidoscopy; Rigid sigmoidoscopy; Colon cancer sigmoidoscopy; Colorectal sigmoidoscopy; Rectal sigmoidoscopy; Gastrointestinal bleeding - sigmoidoscopy; Rectal bleeding - sigmoidoscopy; Melena - ...

  20. Menstrual Patterns and Treatment of Heavy Menstrual Bleeding in Adolescents with Bleeding Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowlut-McElroy, Tazim; Williams, Karen B; Carpenter, Shannon L; Strickland, Julie L

    2015-12-01

    To characterize menstrual bleeding patterns and treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding in adolescents with bleeding disorders. We conducted a retrospective review of female patients aged nine to 21 years with known bleeding disorders who attended a pediatric gynecology, hematology, and comprehensive hematology/gynecology clinic at a children's hospital in a metropolitan area. Prevalence of heavy menstrual bleeding at menarche, prolonged menses, and irregular menses among girls with bleeding disorders and patterns of initial and subsequent treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding in girls with bleeding disorders. Of 115 participants aged nine to 21 years with known bleeding disorders, 102 were included in the final analysis. Of the 69 postmenarcheal girls, almost half (32/69, 46.4%) noted heavy menstrual bleeding at menarche. Girls with von Willebrand disease were more likely to have menses lasting longer than seven days. Only 28% of girls had discussed a treatment plan for heavy menstrual bleeding before menarche. Hormonal therapy was most commonly used as initial treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding. Half (53%) of the girls failed initial treatment. Combination (hormonal and non-hormonal therapy) was more frequently used for subsequent treatment. Adolescents with bleeding disorders are at risk of heavy bleeding at and after menarche. Consultation with a pediatric gynecologist and/or hematologist prior to menarche may be helpful to outline abnormal patterns of menstrual bleeding and to discuss options of treatment in the event of heavy menstrual bleeding. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Histology and cell kinetics of rectal mucosa of A/HeJ mice administered syngeneic rectal antigen and its effects on radiation induced rectal cancer, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Yoritaka

    1980-01-01

    1. Four-week-old A/HeJ mice were immunized by rectal antigen and at the age of 6 weeks the pelvic region was exposed to 2,000 rad of X-ray for two times. They were observed for a maximum period of 84 weeks. The first rectal cancer detected 36 days after irradiation was histologically found to be mucous-secreting-adenocarinoma. Within 32 weeks after irradiation, rectal cancer was observed in 21 (61.76%) of the 34 autopsied mice. During the entire period of observation, rectal cancer was observed in 25 (55.56%) of the 45 mice. 2. On the other hand, among the mice whose pelvic region was exposed to 2,000 rad for two times, the first cancer was observed 56 days after irradiation. Within 32 weeks after irradiation, rectal cancer was observed in 4 (18.18%) of the 22 autopsied mice. During the entire period of observation, rectal cancer was observed in 12 (33.33%) of the 36 mice. 3. In the group of 51 non-irradiated mice, no rectal cancer was observed. 4. The stainability of HID-AB stain of the histologically normal mucosa near irradiated site was compared between cancer induced cases and normal cases. In 22 (84.62%) mice among 26 with induced cancer and in 9 (45%) among 20 mice without cancer, rectal crypt with AB positive goblet cells could be observed. (author)

  2. Is rectal MRI beneficial for determining the location of rectal cancer with respect to the peritoneal reflection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Eun Joo; Ryu, Chun Geun; Kim, Gangmi; Kim, Su Ran; Nam, Sang Eun; Park, Hee Sun; Kim, Young Jun; Hwang, Dae-Yong

    2012-01-01

    An objective method for determining the location of the cancer with respect to peritoneal reflection would be helpful to decide the treatment modality for rectal cancer. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of rectal MRI to determine spatial relations between the peritoneal reflection and rectal cancer and to compare these with operative findings. Patients that underwent a rectal cancer operation after a rectal MRI check between November 2008 and June 2010 were considered for the study. The patients that received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation or trans-anal local excision were excluded. Fifty-four patients constituted the study cohort. By comparing surgical and radiologic findings, the accuracy for predicting tumour location in relation to the peritoneal reflection by rectal MRI in all patients was 90.7%. In terms of tumour location in relation to peritoneal reflection, the accuracy of rectal MRI was 93.5% in patients with a tumour located above the peritoneal reflection, 90.0% in patients with a tumour located on the peritoneal reflection, and 84.6% in patients with a tumour located below the peritoneal reflection (p=0.061). When the cohort was subdivided by gender, body mass index (BMI), operative findings, or tumour size, no significant difference was observed among subgroups. Rectal MRI could be a useful tool for evaluating the relation between rectal cancer and peritoneal reflection especially when tumour size is less than 8cm. Rectal MRI can provide information regarding the location of rectal cancer in relation to the peritoneal reflection for treatment planning purposes

  3. Rectal cancer: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  4. Rectal red blood loss in a healthy toddler is not always a juvenile polyp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseff, T; Matthyssens, L; Van Renterghem, K; Van de Putte, D; De Wulf, D; Van Winckel, M; Van de Velde, S; De Bruyne, R; Van Biervliet, S

    2017-01-01

    Aim Heterotopic gastric mucosa is a well-known congenital anomaly in Meckel's diverticula and duplication cysts. Solitary heterotopic gastric mucosa in the rectum is a rare and frequently overlooked abnormality. Starting from a patient history, the literature is searched and all cases reported over the past 20 years are reviewed and compared to a summary of the older cases. Differences between adult and childhood presentation are outlined and our patient is compared with prior reported cases. Case A 3-year-old girl presented with recurrent rectal blood loss caused by heterotopic gastric mucosa without duplication cyst. She was endoscopically treated with two-stage endoscopic surgical dissection (ESD). Up to now, rectal heterotopic gastric mucosa has been reported in 34 adults and 24 children, including this patient. There is an overall male dominance (69%). Presenting complaints in children were recurrent fresh blood loss per anum (96%), pain (46%), perineal ulcers (25%), diarrhoea (8%) and one patient had an ano-cutaneous fistula. Endoscopy revealed a mucosal elevation with a slightly different aspect (33%), a polyp (42%) and a solitary ulcer (25%). Endoscopy in adults reveals more frequently polyps compared to children. Treatment in childhood is mainly surgical where adults are more frequently treated with endoscopic techniques. Conclusion In a child with recurrent rectal bleeding in good general health, it is important to withhold heterotopic gastric mucosa in the differential diagnosis and take sufficient biopsies during endoscopy. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  5. Scintigraphic pattern of small bowel bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshu Rajnish Sharma; Charan, S.; Silva, I.

    2004-01-01

    . Scintigraphy was false negative in cases of systemic diseases like chronic renal failure (n=2) and hepatic cirrhosis (n=l). In these patients, scan showed diffusely high background without localization of source of bleed (Sixth pattern). Conclusion: Tc-99m RBC scan was found to be sensitive and accurate in localization of small bowel lesions with bleeding. (authors)

  6. Rectal lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucci, L.; Salfi, R.; Meraviglia, F.; Mazzeo, F.

    1984-01-01

    Regional lymph nodes of the rectum are not demonstrable by pedal lymphoscintigraphy. The authors have evaluated the technique of rectal lymphoscintigraphy, using a technique similar to that which has been used in the assessment of lymph nodes in breast and prostatic cancer. Thirty-five patients were studied: ten normal subjects and 25 patients with rectal cancer. In normal subjects, the lymph nodes accompanying the superior hemorrhoidal artery and the inferior mesenteric artery are demonstrable in succession; after three hours the aortic lymph nodes are demonstrable. The 25 patients with rectal cancer underwent resection of their primary tumor and the stage was defined according to Dukes (1932). In five patients (stage A) no alteration was demonstrable. In 11 patients (stage B) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed vs. the control group. In nine cases (stage C) the demonstration of regional lymph nodes was delayed and defective versus the control group

  7. Invasive amebiasis and ameboma formation presenting as a rectal mass: An uncommon case of malignant masquerade at a western medical center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A 54-year-old man presented with rectal pain and bleeding secondary to ulcerated, necrotic rectal and cecal masses that resembled colorectal carcinoma upon colonoscopy. These masses were later determined to be benign amebomas caused by invasive Entamoeba histolytica, which regressed completely with medical therapy. In Western countries, the occurrence of invasive protozoan infection with formation of amebomas is very rare and can mistakenly masquerade as a neoplasm. Not surprisingly, there have been very few cases reported of this clinical entity within the United States. Moreover, we report a patient that had an extremely rare occurrence of two synchronous lesions, one involving the rectum and the other situated in the cecum. We review the current literature on the pathogenesis of invasive E. Histolytica infection and ameboma formation, as well as management of this rare disease entity at a western medical center.

  8. Anal and Rectal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse The ... cancer Foreign objects in the anus and rectum Hemorrhoids Levator syndrome Pilonidal disease Proctitis Rectal prolapse Diagnosis ...

  9. Modelling the variation in rectal dose due to inter-fraction rectal wall deformation in external beam prostate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Jeremy; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2005-01-01

    Prostate radiotherapy inevitably deposits radiation dose in the rectal wall, and the dose delivered to prostate is limited by the expected rectal complications. Accurate evaluation of the rectal dose is non-trivial due to a number of factors. One of these is variation of the shape and position of the rectal wall (with respect to the clinical target volume (CTV)), which may differ daily from that taken during planning CT acquisition. This study uses data currently available in the literature on rectal wall motion to provide estimates of mean population rectal wall dose. The rectal wall geometry is characterized by a population mean radius of the rectum as well as inter-patient and inter-fraction standard deviations in rectum radius. The model is used to evaluate the range of inter-fraction and inter-patient rectal dose variations. The simulation of individual patients with full and empty rectum in the planning CT scan showed that large variations in rectal dose (>15 Gy) are possible. Mean calculated dose accounting for treatment and planning uncertainties in the rectal wall surface was calculated as well as the map of planning dose over/underpredictions. It was found that accuracy of planning dose is dependent on the CTV-PTV margin size with larger margins producing more accurate estimates. Over a patient population, the variation in rectal dose is reduced by increasing the number of pre-treatment CT scans

  10. Biopsy of the prostate guided by transrectal ultrasound: relation between warfarin use and incidence of bleeding complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihezue, C.U. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital (United Kingdom); Smart, J. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital (United Kingdom); Dewbury, K.C. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: keith.dewbury@suht.swest.nhs.uk; Mehta, R. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital (United Kingdom); Burgess, L. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    AIM: To determine the relation between warfarin use and the frequency of bleeding complications after biopsy of the prostate guided by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). METHODS: Overall, 1022 consecutive patients with suspected prostatic disease were followed after biopsy. Warfarin and aspirin use was determined on the day of the procedure. A TRUS-guided biopsy was performed and patients were offered a questionnaire to complete 10 days after the procedure, to determine any immediate or delayed bleeding complications. Follow-up telephone calls were made to those who had not replied within the stipulated period. RESULTS: Of the 1000 patients who replied, 49 were receiving warfarin, 220 were receiving aspirin and 731 were not receiving any anticoagulant drugs. Of the 49 subjects reporting current use of warfarin, 18 (36.7%) experienced haematuria, compared with 440 (60.2%) of the patients receiving no anti-coagulant drugs who reported haematuria. This was statistically significant (p=0.001). Of the group receiving warfarin, 4 (8.2%) experienced haematospermia whereas 153 (21%) of the group receiving no anticoagulant medication reported haematospermia. This difference also was statistically significant (p=0.030). Rectal bleeding was experienced by 7 (14.3%) of the group receiving warfarin compared with 95 (13%) in the group without anticoagulant medication, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.80). We also demonstrated that there was no statistically significant association between the severity of the bleeding complications and medication with warfarin. CONCLUSION: None of the group receiving warfarin experienced clinically important bleeding complications. Our results suggest that the frequency and severity of bleeding complications were no worse in the warfarin group than in the control group and that discontinuing anticoagulation medication before prostate biopsy may be unnecessary.

  11. Biopsy of the prostate guided by transrectal ultrasound: relation between warfarin use and incidence of bleeding complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihezue, C.U.; Smart, J.; Dewbury, K.C.; Mehta, R.; Burgess, L.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the relation between warfarin use and the frequency of bleeding complications after biopsy of the prostate guided by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). METHODS: Overall, 1022 consecutive patients with suspected prostatic disease were followed after biopsy. Warfarin and aspirin use was determined on the day of the procedure. A TRUS-guided biopsy was performed and patients were offered a questionnaire to complete 10 days after the procedure, to determine any immediate or delayed bleeding complications. Follow-up telephone calls were made to those who had not replied within the stipulated period. RESULTS: Of the 1000 patients who replied, 49 were receiving warfarin, 220 were receiving aspirin and 731 were not receiving any anticoagulant drugs. Of the 49 subjects reporting current use of warfarin, 18 (36.7%) experienced haematuria, compared with 440 (60.2%) of the patients receiving no anti-coagulant drugs who reported haematuria. This was statistically significant (p=0.001). Of the group receiving warfarin, 4 (8.2%) experienced haematospermia whereas 153 (21%) of the group receiving no anticoagulant medication reported haematospermia. This difference also was statistically significant (p=0.030). Rectal bleeding was experienced by 7 (14.3%) of the group receiving warfarin compared with 95 (13%) in the group without anticoagulant medication, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.80). We also demonstrated that there was no statistically significant association between the severity of the bleeding complications and medication with warfarin. CONCLUSION: None of the group receiving warfarin experienced clinically important bleeding complications. Our results suggest that the frequency and severity of bleeding complications were no worse in the warfarin group than in the control group and that discontinuing anticoagulation medication before prostate biopsy may be unnecessary

  12. Role of the double-contrast barium enema in rectal stenosis due to suppositories containing paracetamol and acetylsalicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannouri, F.; Lalmand, B.; Zalcman, M.; Gansbeke, D. van; Gevenois, P.A.; Struyven, J.; Peny, M.O.; Gossum, A. van

    1998-01-01

    Self-treatment of chronic headache with suppositories containing paracetamol and acetylsalaicylic acid may lead to serious complications. We report the radiological features of five cases of rectal stenosis following the use of such suppositories. The role of the double-contrast barium enema in suggesting the diagnosis of this complication of a chronic and often unrecognized self-treatment is emphasized. (orig.)

  13. Bleeding during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in pregnancy? • What problems with the placenta can cause bleeding during pregnancy? • Can bleeding be a sign of preterm labor? • ... the hospital. What problems with the placenta can cause bleeding during pregnancy? Several problems with the placenta later in pregnancy ...

  14. Severe bleeding events in adults and children with primary immune thrombocytopenia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neunert, C; Noroozi, N; Norman, G; Buchanan, G R; Goy, J; Nazi, I; Kelton, J G; Arnold, D M

    2015-03-01

    The burden of severe bleeding in adults and children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) has not been established. To describe the frequency and severity of bleeding events in patients with ITP, and the methods used to measure bleeding in ITP studies. We performed a systematic review of all prospective ITP studies that enrolled 20 or more patients. Two reviewers searched Medline, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane registry up to May 2014. Overall weighted proportions were estimated using a random effects model. Measurement properties of bleeding assessment tools were evaluated. We identified 118 studies that reported bleeding (n = 10 908 patients). Weighted proportions for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) were 1.4% for adults (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.9-2.1%) and 0.4% for children (95% CI, 0.2-0.7%; P bleeding was 9.6% for adults (95% CI, 4.1-17.1%) and 20.2% for children (95% CI, 10.0-32.9%; P bleeding were highly variable in primary studies. Two bleeding assessment tools (Buchanan 2002 for children; Page 2007 for adults) demonstrated adequate inter-rater reliability and validity in independent assessments. ICH was more common in adults and tended to occur during chronic ITP; other severe bleeds were more common in children and occurred at all stages of disease. Reporting of non-ICH bleeding was variable across studies. Further attention to ITP-specific bleeding measurement in clinical trials is needed to improve standardization of this important outcome for patients. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. Per-rectal portal scintigraphy for the evaluation of portal circulation in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiomi, Susumu; Seki, Shuichi; Harihara, Shigeyoshi; Kuroki, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Kenzo; Kurai, Osamu; Ikeoka, Naoko; Monna, Takeyuki; Yamamoto, Sukeo

    1988-10-01

    Portal circulation in patients with chronic liver diseases was evaluated by a new method named per-rectal portal scintigraphy. Following instillation of a solution containing 10 mCi of /sup 99m/TcO/sub 4//sup -/ into the upper part of the rectum, serial scintigrams were taken sequentially. At the same time, the radioactivity curves over the liver and the heart were recorded sequentially. Per-rectal portal shunt indices were calculated from serial radioactivities on the liver and the heart. 1) Per-rectal portal shunt indices (SI) were ranged from 1.9 % to 5.2 % (mean 4.1 %) in the healthy subjects. In patients with hepatitis the mean SI was 6.9 %, in patients with cirrhosis it was 52.9 %, in patients with PBC it was 46.8 % and in patients with IPH it was 54.4 %. 2) The SI was higher in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices than in those without (p < 0.001). The SI was higher in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without (p < 0.01). 3) A good correlation (r = 0.774) was obtained between SI and ICGR-15. But in the patients with PBC and IPH, ICGR-15 was lower than that of the patients with chronic liver diseases who show same SI as the patients with PBC and IPH. A good correlation (r = -0.716) was obtained between SI and cholinesterase. But in the patients with PBC and IPH, cholinesterase was lower than that of the patients with chronic liver diseases who show same SI as the patients with PBC and IPH.

  16. Irradiation of low rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardiet, J.M.; Coquard, R.; Romestaing, P.; Fric, D.; Baron, M.H.; Rocher, F.P.; Sentenac, I.; Gerard, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The low rectal cancers are treated by anorectal amputation and pose the problem of the sphincter conservation. Some authors extend the clinical definition to developed injuries until 12 cm from the anal margin. The rectal cancer is a frequent tumour which remains serious. When the tumour is low, the treatment consists in an anorectal amputation with a permanent colostomy. The radical non preserving surgery is the usual treatment of these injuries. Until 1960 the rectal adenocarcinoma was considered as a radioresistant tumour because of the impossibility to deliver an enough dose to the tumour by external radiotherapy. But other studies showed that those lesions were radiosensitive and often radiocurable. The medical treatments haven't yet demonstrated their efficiency in the treatment of the rectal cancer. We'll study the radiotherapy in the treatment of the low rectal cancer, solely radiotherapy, radiosurgical associations. 32 refs., 5 tabs

  17. Evaluation and management of abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Mary Gayle; Schmidt-Dalton, Tarin A; Weiss, Patrice M; Madsen, Keith P

    2012-01-01

    Up to 14 percent of women experience irregular or excessively heavy menstrual bleeding. This abnormal uterine bleeding generally can be divided into anovulatory and ovulatory patterns. Chronic anovulation can lead to irregular bleeding, prolonged unopposed estrogen stimulation of the endometrium, and increased risk of endometrial cancer. Causes include polycystic ovary syndrome, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction, hyperprolactinemia, and use of antipsychotics or antiepileptics. Women 35 years or older with recurrent anovulation, women younger than 35 years with risk factors for endometrial cancer, and women with excessive bleeding unresponsive to medical therapy should undergo endometrial biopsy. Treatment with combination oral contraceptives or progestins may regulate menstrual cycles. Histologic findings of hyperplasia without atypia may be treated with cyclic or continuous progestin. Women who have hyperplasia with atypia or adenocarcinoma should be referred to a gynecologist or gynecologic oncologist, respectively. Ovulatory abnormal uterine bleeding, or menorrhagia, may be caused by thyroid dysfunction, coagulation defects (most commonly von Willebrand disease), endometrial polyps, and submucosal fibroids. Transvaginal ultrasonography or saline infusion sonohysterography may be used to evaluate menorrhagia. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is an effective treatment for menorrhagia. Oral progesterone for 21 days per month and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are also effective. Tranexamic acid is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ovulatory bleeding, but is expensive. When clear structural causes are identified or medical management is ineffective, polypectomy, fibroidectomy, uterine artery embolization, and endometrial ablation may be considered. Hysterectomy is the most definitive treatment.

  18. Hepatitis C infection in patients with hereditary bleeding disorders: epidemiology, natural history, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Nikolaos; Argiana, Vasiliki; Deutsch, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    Hereditary bleeding disorders include a group of diseases with abnormalities of coagulation. Prior to 1990, infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) was mainly transmitted via pooled plasma products as a treatment for hereditary bleeding disorders. Anti-HCV positivity in these patients may be as high as >70% in some areas, while some of them have also been coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. Since about 20% of HCV-infected patients clear the infection naturally, chronic HCV infection represents a significant health problem in this group of patients. Mortality due to chronic HCV infection is estimated to be >10 times higher in patients with hemophilia than in the general population, and is mainly due to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The antiviral treatment of HCV in patients with hereditary bleeding disorders is not different from that of any other infected patients. Nevertheless, many patients with hereditary bleeding disorders have declined (Peg)interferon-based treatment because of side effects. In recent years, multiple orally administrated direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have been approved for HCV treatment. Unfortunately, there is not much experience from treating these patients with DAA regimens, as major studies and real-life data did not include adequate numbers of patients with inherited hemorrhagic disorders. However, the available data indicate that DAAs have an excellent safety profile with a sustained virological response rate of >90%.

  19. Test-positive rate at CT colonography is increased by rectal bleeding and/or unexplained weight loss, unlike other common gastrointestinal symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hock, D.; Materne, R.; Ouhadi, R.; Mancini, I.; Aouachria, S.A.; Nchimi, A.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the rate of significant colonic and extra-colonic abnormalities at computed tomography colonography (CTC), according to symptoms and age. We retrospectively evaluated 7361 consecutive average-risk subjects (3073 males, average age: 60.3 ± 13.9; range 18–96 years) for colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent CTC. They were divided into three groups according to clinical symptoms: 1343 asymptomatic individuals (group A), 899 patients with at least one “alarm” symptom for CRC, including rectal bleeding and unexplained weight loss (group C), and 5119 subjects with other gastrointestinal symptoms (group B). Diagnostic and test-positive rates of CTC were established using optical colonoscopy (OC) and/or surgery as reference standard. In addition, clinically significant extra-colonic findings were noted. 903 out of 7361 (12%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11–0.13) subjects had at least one clinically significant colonic finding at CTC. CTC true positive fraction and false positive fraction were respectively 637/642 (99.2%, 95%CI 0.98–0.99) and 55/692 (7.95%, 95%CI 0.05–0.09). The pooled test-positive rate in group C (138/689, 20.0%, 95%CI 0.17–0.23) was significantly higher than in both groups A (79/1343, 5.9%, 95%CI 0.04–0.07) and B (420/5329, 7.5%, 95%CI 0.07–0.08) (p < 0.001). Aging and male gender were associated to a higher test positive rate. The rate of clinically significant extra-colonic findings was significantly higher in group C (44/689, 6.4%, 95%CI 0.04–0.08) versus groups A (26/1343, 1.9%, 95%CI 0.01–0.02) and B (64/5329, 1.2%, 95%CI 0.01–0.02) (p < 0.001). Both test-positive and significant extra-colonic finding rates at CTC are significantly increased in the presence of “alarm” gastrointestinal symptoms especially in older patients

  20. Unexplained occurrence of multiple de novo pseudoaneurysms in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing angioembolization for bleeding following percutaneous renal intervention: Are we dealing with infection or vasculitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debansu Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD are more prone for bleeding following percutaneous renal intervention, as compared to those with normal renal function. Causes are multi-factorial. Finding multiple aneurysms away from the site of renal intervention following initial angioembolization for hemorrhage is very unusual in these patients. Materials and Methods: Clinical and radiological findings of all the patients who underwent renal angiography for post-intervention bleed for a period of 5 years were reviewed and analyzed. Results: A total of 29 patients required angiography for post-intervention hemorrhage. Six patients had recurrence of hemorrhage for which they underwent repeat angiography. Four of these patients had appearance of multiple new aneurysms away from the site of percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN/percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL puncture and the site of previous bleeding. All the patients had CKD (creatinine >2.5 mg/dl. They were on prolonged preoperative urinary diversion and had polymicrobial urinary infection. Three patients had candiduria. None of these patients had re-bleeding after repeat embolization and treatment with antibacterial and antifungal agents. Conclusions: Development of multiple aneurysms away from the sites of punctures in patients with CKD following percutaneous intervention is very unusual. Its causation including infection with bacteria and fungus, reaction of embolizing material, and angiopathy needs to be explored.

  1. The relationship between technical parameters of external beam radiation therapy and complications for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Shirato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Keishiro

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to review retrospectively the clinical course of chronic rectal bleeding as a complication of external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer and to analyze the relationship between technical parameters of radiation therapy and the complications. Seventy-one patients with stages A2, B and C were treated with local-field radiotherapy (total dose 52.5-66 Gy, daily dose 2.0-3.28 Gy, field area 30-81 cm 2 , number of fields 3-15 ports, planning simulations X-ray or CT-based) between 1989 and 1998 at three institutions. The protocols were consistent during this same period at these institutions. Multivariate analysis revealed pretreatment PSA and Gleason sum to be statistically significant predictors of 5 year prostatic specific antigen (PSA) relapse-free rates in a median follow-up period of 42 months (range 12-119 months). The significant risk factors for higher grading of acute morbidity were a biological equivalent dose, α/β=10 (BED 10 ) ≥65 Gy, dose per fraction ≥3.0 Gy, field area ≥42 cm 2 , fewer ports and X-ray planning simulation. However, no parameter was associated with higher grading of late morbidity. Eleven patients (15.4%) experienced a late GI complication: grade 1 (4.2%), grade 2 (9.8%), grade 3 (1.4%). The median time to occurrence of rectal bleeding was 12 months after radiotherapy and the mean duration of morbidity was 11 months. Higher total dose and dose per fraction, larger field area, fewer ports and X-ray simulation increased the grades of acute morbidity. A majority of chronic rectal bleedings were transient and responded to conservative treatment. (author)

  2. Internal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fractures (Part II) Additional Content Medical News Internal Bleeding By Amy H. Kaji, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, ... Emergency First Aid Priorities Cardiac Arrest Choking Internal Bleeding Severed or Constricted Limbs or Digits Soft-Tissue ...

  3. Role of rectal myomectomy in refractory chronic constipation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: To assess the role of diagnostic and therapeutic value of anorectal myectomy in cases of chronic refractory constipation. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight patients 11 months to 9 years of age presenting with chronic constipation, with contrast enema showing dilated rectum and sigmoid colon were included ...

  4. Quality of life after surgery for rectal cancer: do we still need a permanent colostomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, K; Rosen, H R; Novi, G; Hölbling, N; Schiessel, R

    1999-09-01

    A permanent colostomy is a serious limitation of the quality of life. Besides cure of cancer, preservation of sphincter function is an important goal of surgery for rectal cancer. In a prospective study a concept offering every patient with rectal cancer either sphincter salvage or a "neosphincter" was investigated, and the impact of this strategy on oncologic results, sphincter function, and quality of life was analyzed. From 1992 to 1997, 276 patients were accepted for the study. Two hundred sixty-one patients had elective surgery, and 15 patients had emergency surgery for their rectal tumors. The postoperative mortality rate was 4 percent. A radical resection (R0) was possible in 197 patients (75 percent). Anterior resection was the most common procedure (n = 87), and intersphincteric resection with coloanal anastomosis was the preferred method for low tumors (n = 65). Abdominoperineal resection was necessary in 15 cases. Thirteen patients had an immediate restoration of sphincter function by means of a dynamic graciloplasty, and 2 patients needed emergency abdominoperineal resection for bleeding. The follow-up was relatively short (median, 36.4 months) at the time of data analysis and showed a local recurrence rate of 8 percent. Although postoperative continence according to the Williams score revealed satisfactory results, subjective quality of life and the scale for specific symptoms showed a significantly worse outcome in patients with ultralow (coloanal) anastomoses compared with those with anterior resection. We conclude that for elective curative surgery of rectal cancer, a permanent colostomy is not necessary provided all presently available techniques of sphincter salvage and restoration are applied. However, the patient has to be informed about possible side effects associated with surgical procedures such as coloanal anastomosis or neosphincter reconstruction, to avoid severe psychological difficulties.

  5. Bleeding and starving: fasting and delayed refeeding after upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jorge; Meira, Tânia; Nunes, Ana; Santos, Carla Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Early refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is safe and reduces hospital stay/costs. The aim of this study was obtaining objective data on refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. From 1 year span records of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients that underwent urgent endoscopy: clinical features; rockall score; endoscopic data, including severity of lesions and therapy; feeding related records of seven days: liquid diet prescription, first liquid intake, soft/solid diet prescription, first soft/solid intake. From 133 patients (84 men) Rockall classification was possible in 126: 76 score ≥5, 50 score bleeding, eight rebled, two underwent surgery, 13 died. Ulcer was the major bleeding cause, 63 patients underwent endoscopic therapy. There was 142/532 possible refeeding records, no record 37% patients. Only 16% were fed during the first day and half were only fed on third day or later. Rockall upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients must be refed earlier, according to guidelines.

  6. Rectal HSV-2 Infection May Increase Rectal SIV Acquisition Even in the Context of SIVΔnef Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Guerra-Pérez

    Full Text Available Prevalent HSV-2 infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition both in men and women even in asymptomatic subjects. Understanding the impact of HSV-2 on the mucosal microenvironment may help to identify determinants of susceptibility to HIV. Vaginal HSV-2 infection increases the frequency of cells highly susceptible to HIV in the vaginal tissue of women and macaques and this correlates with increased susceptibility to vaginal SHIV infection in macaques. However, the effect of rectal HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition remains understudied. We developed a model of rectal HSV-2 infection in macaques in combination with rectal SIVmac239Δnef (SIVΔnef vaccination and our results suggest that rectal HSV-2 infection may increase the susceptibility of macaques to rectal SIVmac239 wild-type (wt infection even in SIVΔnef-infected animals. Rectal SIVΔnef infection/vaccination protected 7 out of 7 SIVΔnef-infected macaques from SIVmac239wt rectal infection (vs 12 out of 16 SIVΔnef-negative macaques, while 1 out of 3 animals co-infected with SIVΔnef and HSV-2 acquired SIVmac239wt infection. HSV-2/SIVmac239wt co-infected animals had increased concentrations of inflammatory factors in their plasma and rectal fluids and a tendency toward higher acute SIVmac239wt plasma viral load. However, they had higher blood CD4 counts and reduced depletion of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells compared to SIVmac239wt-only infected animals. Thus, rectal HSV-2 infection generates a pro-inflammatory environment that may increase susceptibility to rectal SIV infection and may impact immunological and virological parameters during acute SIV infection. Studies with larger number of animals are needed to confirm these findings.

  7. Role of the double-contrast barium enema in rectal stenosis due to suppositories containing paracetamol and acetylsalicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tannouri, F.; Lalmand, B.; Zalcman, M.; Gansbeke, D. van; Gevenois, P.A.; Struyven, J. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Erasme, University of Brussels (Belgium); Peny, M.O. [Department of Pathology, University of Brussels (Belgium); Gossum, A. van [Department of Gastroenterology, University of Brussels (Belgium)

    1998-09-01

    Self-treatment of chronic headache with suppositories containing paracetamol and acetylsalaicylic acid may lead to serious complications. We report the radiological features of five cases of rectal stenosis following the use of such suppositories. The role of the double-contrast barium enema in suggesting the diagnosis of this complication of a chronic and often unrecognized self-treatment is emphasized. (orig.) With 6 figs., 20 refs.

  8. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang; Golzarian, Jafar

    2007-01-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  9. Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Stephen J.; Weldon, Derik; Sun, Shiliang [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); Golzarian, Jafar [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa, IA (United States); University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NUGB) remains a major medical problem even after advances in medical therapy with gastric acid suppression and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors. Although the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding presenting to the emergency room has slightly decreased, similar decreases in overall mortality and rebleeding rate have not been experienced over the last few decades. Many causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding have been identified and will be reviewed. Endoscopic, radiographic and angiographic modalities continue to form the basis of the diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with new research in the field of CT angiography to diagnose gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic and angiographic treatment modalities will be highlighted, emphasizing a multi-modality treatment plan for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. (orig.)

  10. Relationships Between Rectal Wall Dose-Volume Constraints and Radiobiologic Indices of Toxicity for Patients With Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzi, Simona; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Saracino, Bianca; Petrongari, Maria G.; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Iaccarino, Giuseppe; Landoni, Valeria; Soriani, Antonella; Benassi, Marcello

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to investigate how exceeding specified rectal wall dose-volume constraints impacts on the risk of late rectal bleeding by using radiobiologic calculations. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the rectal wall of 250 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. All patients were treated by three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, receiving mean target doses of 80 Gy. To study the main features of the patient population, the average and the standard deviation of the distribution of DVHs were generated. The mean dose , generalized equivalent uniform dose formulation (gEUD), modified equivalent uniform dose formulation (mEUD) 0 , and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) distributions were also produced. The DVHs set was then binned into eight classes on the basis of the exceeding or the fulfilling of three dose-volume constraints: V 40 = 60%, V 50 = 50%, and V 70 = 25%. Comparisons were made between them by , gEUD, mEUD 0 , and NTCP. Results: The radiobiologic calculations suggest that late rectal toxicity is mostly influenced by V 70 . The gEUD and mEUD 0 are risk factors of toxicity always concordant with NTCP, inside each DVH class. The mean dose, although a reliable index, may be misleading in critical situations. Conclusions: Both in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and particularly in intensity-modulated radiation therapy, it should be known what the relative importance of each specified dose-volume constraint is for each organ at risk. This requires a greater awareness of radiobiologic properties of tissues and radiobiologic indices may help to gradually become aware of this issue

  11. Thrombosed hemorrhoid mimicking rectal carcinoma at CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Bar-Ziv, J.

    1992-01-01

    A 46-year-old male with cirrhosis and portal hypertension complained of lower pelvic pain. CT of the rectum raised a strong suspicion of a rectal tumor. However, rectal examination, anoscopy, direct rectoscopy, and, unfortunately, post-mortem dissection, failed to confirm its existence. Nevertheless, large flat hemorrhoids were evident. Review of the patient's chart disclosed the presence of large thrombosed hemorrhoids detected by rectal examination prior to the CT examination. It is suggested that rectal hemorrhoids be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal tumor shown by CT in patients with portal hypertension. (orig.)

  12. Severe rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Kent; Sutlief, Stephen; Bergsagel, Carl; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Some investigators have reported severe rectal complications after brachytherapy. Due to the low number of such events, their relationship to dosimetric parameters has not been well characterized. Methods and materials: A total of 3126 patients were treated with low dose rate brachytherapy from 1998 through 2010. 2464 had implant alone, and 313 had implant preceded by 44–46 Gy supplemental external beam radiation (EBRT). Post-implant dosimetry was based on a CT scan obtained on the day of implant, generally within 30 min of the procedure. Every patient’s record was reviewed for occurrence of rectal complications. Results: Eight of 2464 patients (0.32%) treated with brachytherapy alone developed a radiation-related rectal fistula. Average prostatic and rectal dose parameters were moderately higher for fistula patients than for patients without a severe rectal complication. For instance, the average R100 was 1.2 ± 0.75 cc for fistula patients, versus 0.37 ± 0.88 cc for non-fistula patients. However, the fistula patients’ values were well within the range of values for patients without a rectal complication. Four patients had some attempt at repair or reconstruction, but long-term functional outcomes were not favorable. Conclusions: Rectal fistulas are a very uncommon potential complication of prostate brachytherapy, which can occur even in the setting of acceptable day 0 rectal doses. Their occurrence is not easily explained by standard dosimetric or clinical factors

  13. A pilot study of topical intrarectal application of amifostine for prevention of late radiation rectal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Han, Sue; Tobi, Martin; Shaw, Leslie M.; Bonner, Heather S.; Vargas, Barbara J.; Prokop, Sharon; Stamos, Beth; Kelly, Laura; Biggar, Sandra; Kaplan, Irving

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical symptomatic late injury to the rectal wall occurs in about one-third of patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation. Reducing the physical dose to the anterior rectal wall without a similar reduction in the posterior peripheral zone is difficult because of the proximity of the prostate to the anterior rectal wall. On the basis of our previous observations in an animal model that intrarectal application of amifostine resulted in very high concentrations of amifostine and its active metabolite WR-1065 in the rectal wall, a Phase I dose-escalation clinical trial was undertaken. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients with localized prostate cancer were accrued. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma, Karnofsky performance status ≥70, and no pelvic lymphadenopathy or distant metastases. The total dose to the prostate was 70.2 Gy in 20 patients and 73.8 Gy in 9 patients. Therapy was delivered using a 4-field technique with three-dimensional conformal planning. Amifostine was administered intrarectally as an aqueous solution 30 min before irradiation on the first 15 days of therapy. Amifostine was escalated in cohorts from 500 to 2500 mg. Proctoscopy was performed before therapy and at 9 months after completion. Most patients underwent repeat proctoscopy at 18 months. On Days 1 and 10 of radiotherapy, serum samples were collected for pharmacokinetic studies. The clinical symptoms (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale) and a proctoscopy score were assessed during follow-up. Results: All patients completed therapy with no amifostine-related toxicity at any dose level. The application was feasible and well tolerated. No substantial systemic absorption occurred. With a median follow-up of 26 months, 9 patients (33%) developed rectal bleeding (8 Grade 1, 1 Grade 2). At 9 months, 16 and 3 patients developed Grade 1 and Grade 2 telangiectasia, respectively. This was mostly confined to the anterior

  14. Rectal prolapse in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Rasmussen, L; Klaaborg, K E

    1986-01-01

    In infancy there are two types of rectal prolapse. One type is less pronounced and intermittent. This type occurred in 9 out of 17 children referred for rectal prolapse and ceased after a few weeks' conservative treatment. The other type is a more pronounced prolapse occurring at nearly each...

  15. 3-D conformal radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer: A subgroup analysis of rectoscopic findings prior to radiotherapy and acute/late rectal side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldner, Gregor; Zimmermann, Frank; Feldmann, Horst; Glocker, Stefan; Wachter-Gerstner, Natascha; Geinitz, Hans; Becker, Gerd; Poetzi, Regina; Wambersie, Andre; Bamberg, Michael; Molls, Michael; Wachter, Stefan; Poetter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To identify endoscopic pathological findings prior to radiotherapy and a possible correlation with acute or chronic rectal side effects after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: Between 03/99 and 07/02, a total of 298 patients, who consented in a voluntary rectoscopy prior to radiotherapy were included into the analysis. Patients were treated with a total dose of either 70 or 74 Gy. Pathological rectoscopic findings like hemorrhoids, polyps or diverticula were documented. Acute and late rectal side effects were scored using the EORTC/RTOG score. Results: The most frequent pathological endosopic findings were hemorrhoids (35%), polyps (24%) and diverticula (13%). Rectal toxicity was mostly low to moderate. Grade 0/1 cumulative acute and late rectal side effects were 82 and 84%, grade 2 were 18 and 17%, respectively. We could not identify any correlation between preexisting pathological findings and rectal side effects by statistical analysis. Conclusions: There is no evidence that prostate cancer patients presenting with endoscopic verified pathological findings in the rectal mucosa at diagnosis are at an increased risk to develop rectal side effects when treated with 3D-CRT of the prostatic region

  16. Locations and Mucosal Lesions Responsible for Major Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients on Warfarin or Dabigatran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Jennifer M; Flack, Kathryn Friedman; Chatterjee-Murphy, Prapti; Desai, Jay; Wallentin, Lars C; Ezekowitz, Michael; Connolly, Stuart; Reilly, Paul; Brueckmann, Martina; Ilgenfritz, John; Aisenberg, James

    2018-03-27

    Different oral anticoagulants may be associated with gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) from different locations or mucosal lesions. We aimed to test this hypothesis. Two blinded gastroenterologists independently analyzed source documents from the randomized evaluation of long-term anticoagulant therapy (RE-LY) trial of dabigatran 150 mg BID (D150), dabigatran 110 mg BID (D110) versus warfarin in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Major GIB events (total n = 546) and life-threatening GIB events (n = 258) were more common with D150 versus warfarin (RR 1.57 [1.28-1.92] and RR 1.62 [1.20-2.18], respectively) and similar for D110 compared to warfarin (RR 1.11 [0.89-1.38] and RR 1.16 [0.84-1.61], respectively). Fatal bleeding was similarly rare across treatment groups. Lower GI major bleeding and life-threatening bleeding were more common with D150 compared to warfarin (RR 2.23 [1.47, 3.38] and RR 2.64 [1.36, 5.13], respectively) and with D110 compared to warfarin (RR 1.78 [1.16, 2.75] and RR 2.00 [1.00, 4.00], respectively). MGIB from colonic angiodysplasia was increased with dabigatran versus warfarin (P < 0.01 for both dose comparisons). Subacute and chronic MGIB events were more common with D150 than with warfarin (RR 1.72 [1.06, 2.78] and RR 1.66 [1.12, 2.45], respectively), as were hematochezia or melena (RR 1.67 [1.18, 2.36] and RR 1.72 [1.20, 2.47], respectively). In a chronic NVAF population, D150 but not D110 is associated with increased major and life-threatening GI bleeding in comparison with warfarin. At both dabigatran doses, increased bleeding from the colorectum, in particular from angiodysplasia, is seen.

  17. PET-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Colon or Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  18. Dietary supplementation of resveratrol attenuates chronic colonic inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fidalgo, Susana; Cárdeno, Ana; Villegas, Isabel; Talero, Elena; de la Lastra, Catalina Alarcón

    2010-05-10

    Ulcerative colitis is a nonspecific inflammatory disorder characterized by oxidative and nitrosative stress, leucocyte infiltration and upregulation of inflammatory mediators. Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound found in grapes and wine, with multiple pharmacological actions, mainly anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antitumour and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary resveratrol on chronic dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Six-week-old mice were randomized into two dietary groups: one standard diet and the other enriched with resveratrol at 20mg/kg of diet. After 30days, mice were exposed to 3% DSS for 5days developing acute colitis that progressed to severe chronic inflammation after 21days of water. Our results demonstrated that resveratrol group significantly attenuated the clinical signs such as loss of body weight, diarrhea and rectal bleeding improving results from disease activity index and inflammatory score. Moreover, the totality of resveratrol-fed animals survived and finished the treatment while animals fed with standard diet showed a mortality of 40%. Three weeks after DSS removal, the polyphenol caused substantial reductions of the rise of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-alpha and IL-1beta and an increase of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Also resveratrol reduced prostaglandin E synthase-1 (PGES-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) proteins expression, via downregulation of p38, a mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signal pathway. We conclude that resveratrol diet represents a novel approach to the treatment of chronic intestinal inflammation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rectal duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni B

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Duplications of the alimentary tract are of a great rarity, particularly so in the rectum. Because of its rarity, the difficulty of making a correct diagnosis and of selection of proper approach for treatment, this entity bears a special significance. The present case report deals with a female newborn who presented with imperforate anus and a rectovestibular fistula and a mass prolapsing at the introitus. Complete excision of the mass was carried out through the perineal approach and the child then underwent, a PSARP for the correction of the rectal anomaly. Histology confirmed the mass to be a rectal duplication.

  20. Hemosuccus pancreaticus as a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding: a report of two cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodratollah Maddah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic diseases are known to be associated with complications such as pseudocyst and abscess. A pseudoaneurysm associated with pancreatitis may develop as well. The pseudoaneurysm may rupture into various parts of the gastrointestinal tract; the peritoneal cavity, or the retroperitoneum. We report two cases of Hemosuccus pancreaticus admitted to our center in the past five years. One case was associated with acute pancreatitis, and another case was associated with chronic pancreatitis. A pseudocyst was found in two cases. Both were successfully managed by emergency surgery. So, Hemosuccus pancreaticus is a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding with difficult diagnosis, and surgery is the effective treatment for the patient with severe bleeding. However in cases with no life-threatening bleeding angiography and embolization can be performed.

  1. Juvenile polyposis syndrome: An unusual case report of anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding in young infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Wei, Chin-Hung; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chang, Lung; Fu, Yu-Wei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Yeung, Chun-Yan

    2016-09-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome, a rare disorder in children, is characterized with multiple hamartomatous polyps in alimentary tract. A variety of manifestations include bleeding, intussusception, or polyp prolapse. In this study, we present an 8-month-old male infant of juvenile polyposis syndrome initially presenting with chronic anemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature. We report a rare case of an 8-month-old male infant who presented with chronic anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding initially. Panendoscopy and abdominal computed tomography showed multiple polyposis throughout the entire alimentary tract leading to intussusception. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell (RBC) bleeding scan revealed the possibility of gastrointestinal tract bleeding in the jejunum. Histopathological examination on biopsy samples showed Peutz-Jeghers syndrome was excluded, whereas the diagnosis of juvenile polyposis syndrome was established. Enteroscopic polypectomy is the mainstay of the treatment. However, polyps recurred and occupied the majority of the gastrointestinal tract in 6 months. Supportive management was given. The patient expired for severe sepsis at the age of 18 months. Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an inherited disease, so it is not possible to prevent it. Concerning of its poor outcome and high mortality rate, it is important that we should increase awareness and education of the parents at its earliest stages.

  2. Thrombosed hemorrhoid mimicking rectal carcinoma at CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Chetrit, E.; Bar-Ziv, J. (Dept. of Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel))

    1992-09-01

    A 46-year-old male with cirrhosis and portal hypertension complained of lower pelvic pain. CT of the rectum raised a strong suspicion of a rectal tumor. However, rectal examination, anoscopy, direct rectoscopy, and, unfortunately, post-mortem dissection, failed to confirm its existence. Nevertheless, large flat hemorrhoids were evident. Review of the patient's chart disclosed the presence of large thrombosed hemorrhoids detected by rectal examination prior to the CT examination. It is suggested that rectal hemorrhoids be included in the differential diagnosis of rectal tumor shown by CT in patients with portal hypertension. (orig.).

  3. Injection therapy for chronic prostatitis: A retrospective analysis of 77 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Toth

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare pre- and post-therapy symptom scores reported on the National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIHCPSI after trans-rectal antibiotic injections therapy for men suffering from chronic prostatitis. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of NIHCPSI symptom scores obtained from chart reviews of 77 treated males suffering from chronic prostatitis before and after trans rectal injections for the treatment of chronic prostatitis. Results: Most patients reported a 40% to 60% improvement in symptom scores. In subgroups comparing scores in patients with less than 5 injections, the improvement was less than in patients who received 10 or more injections. Patients’ responses after a shorter (3 months follow up showed better pain scores than patient’s scores after longer, over one-year or more, follow- up periods. Conclusion: Our findings show that direct antibiotic injection for chronic prostatitis is a viable addition to standard therapies. Improvements in symptom scores are long lasting. Discomfort is minimal and side effects are rare and avoidable

  4. Rectal duplication cyst in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kook, Peter H; Hagen, Regine; Willi, Barbara; Ruetten, Maja; Venzin, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    Enteric duplication is a rare developmental malformation in people, dogs and cats. The purpose of the present report is to describe the first case of a rectal duplication cyst in a 7-year-old domestic shorthair cat presenting for acute constipation and tenesmus. On rectal palpation a spherical mass compressing the lumen of the rectum could be felt in the dorsal wall of the rectum. A computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the presence of a well demarcated cystic lesion in the pelvic canal, dorsal to the rectum. The cyst was surgically removed via a perineal approach. No communication with the rectal lumen could be demonstrated. Histopathological examination was consistent with a rectal duplication cyst. Clinical signs resolved completely after excision of this conjoined non-communicating cystic rectal duplicate. Copyright © 2010 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring in critically ill pediatric patients at risk of bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Soler, P; Camacho Alonso, J M; González-Gómez, J M; Milano-Manso, G

    2017-05-01

    To determine the accuracy and usefulness of noninvasive continuous hemoglobin (Hb) monitoring in critically ill patients at risk of bleeding. An observational prospective study was made, comparing core laboratory Hb measurement (LabHb) as the gold standard versus transcutaneous hemoglobin monitoring (SpHb). Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary University Hospital. Patients weighing >3kg at risk of bleeding. SpHb was measured using the Radical7 pulse co-oximeter (Masimo Corp., Irvine, CA, USA) each time a blood sample was drawn for core laboratory analysis (Siemens ADVIA 2120i). Sociodemographic characteristics, perfusion index (PI), pleth variability index, heart rate, SaO 2 , rectal temperature, low signal quality and other events that can interfere with measurement. A total of 284 measurements were made (80 patients). Mean LabHb was 11.7±2.05g/dl. Mean SpHb was 12.32±2g/dl (Pearson 0.72, R 2 0.52). The intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.69 (95%CI 0.55-0.78)(p<0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of 0.07 ±1.46g/dl. A lower PI and higher temperature independently increased the risk of low signal quality (OR 0.531 [95%CI 0.32-0.88] and 0.529 [95%CI 0.33-0.85], respectively). SpHb shows a good overall correlation to LabHb, though with wide limits of agreement. Its main advantage is continuous monitoring of patients at risk of bleeding. The reliability of the method is limited in cases with poor peripheral perfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  6. Bleeding Disorders in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... might be heavy, print and use a menstrual chart to track your bleeding and talk to your ... you’re “low in iron.” Heavy bleeding after dental surgery, other surgery, or childbirth. Prolonged bleeding episodes ...

  7. Vaginal bleeding in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - vaginal bleeding; Maternal blood loss - vaginal ... Up to 1 in 4 women have vaginal bleeding at some time during their pregnancy. Bleeding is more common in the first 3 months (first trimester), especially with twins.

  8. High-Resolution MRI in Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieguez, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution MRI is the best method of assessing the relation of the rectal tumor with the potential circumferential resection margin (CRM). Therefore it is currently considered the method of choice for local staging of rectal cancer. The primary surgery of rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision (TME), which plane of dissection is formed by the mesorectal fascia surrounding mesorectal fat and rectum. This fascia will determine the circumferential margin of resection. At the same time, high resolution MRI allows adequate pre-operative identification of important prognostic risk factors, improving the selection and indication of therapy for each patient. This information includes, besides the circumferential margin of resection, tumor and lymph node staging, extramural vascular invasion and the description of lower rectal tumors. All these should be described in detail in the report, being part of the discussion in the multidisciplinary team, the place where the decisions involving the patient with rectal cancer will take place. The aim of this study is to provide the information necessary to understand the use of high resolution MRI in the identification of prognostic risk factors in rectal cancer. The technical requirements and standardized report for this study will be describe, as well as the anatomical landmarks of importance for the total mesorectal excision (TME), as we have said is the surgery of choice for rectal cancer. (authors) [es

  9. Rectal toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Which rectal dose volume constraints should we use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonteyne, Valérie; Ost, Piet; Vanpachtenbeke, Frank; Colman, Roos; Sadeghi, Simin; Villeirs, Geert; Decaestecker, Karel; De Meerleer, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Background: To define rectal dose volume constraints (DVC) to prevent ⩾grade2 late rectal toxicity (LRT) after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods: Six hundred thirty-seven PC patients were treated with primary (prostate median dose: 78 Gy) or postoperative (prostatic bed median dose: 74 Gy (adjuvant)–76 Gy (salvage)) IMRT while restricting the rectal dose to 76 Gy, 72 Gy and 74 Gy respectively. The impact of patient characteristics and rectal volume parameters on ⩾grade2 LRT was determined. DVC were defined to estimate the 5% and 10% risk of developing ⩾grade2 LRT. Results: The 5-year probability of being free from ⩾grade2 LRT, non-rectal blood loss and persisting symptoms is 88.8% (95% CI: 85.8–91.1%), 93.4% (95% CI: 91.0–95.1%) and 94.3% (95% CI: 92.0–95.9%) respectively. There was no correlation with patient characteristics. All volume parameters, except rectal volume receiving ⩾70 Gy (R70), were significantly correlated with ⩾grade2 LRT. To avoid 10% and 5% risk of ⩾grade2 LRT following DVC were derived: R40, R50, R60 and R65 <64–35%, 52–22%, 38–14% and 5% respectively. Conclusion: Applying existing rectal volume constraints resulted in a 5-year estimated risk of developing late ⩾grade2 LRT of 11.2%. New rectal DVC for primary and postoperative IMRT planning of PC patients are proposed. A prospective evaluation is needed

  10. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: low risk of chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large series of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, Howard M.; McLaughlin, P. William; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Addison, Heather; Forman, Jeffrey; Lichter, Allen

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) may provide a technique to increase the dose delivered to target tissues while sparing uninvolved normal structures. To evaluate the role of 3D treatment in reducing the treatment toxicity, we analyzed the chronic rectal morbidity observed in a large group of patients undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1987 through 1992, 721 prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D CRT at the University of Michigan or Providence Hospital. All had axial computed tomography (CT) specifically for RT planning, multiple structures contoured on the axial images, and beam's-eye-view conformal beams edited to provide 3D dose coverage. Using current American Joint Commission (AJCC) staging, 537 patients had T1-T2 tumors, 123 had T3-T4 tumors, and 60 were treated postprostatectomy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated in 462 patients. Prostate boosts were delivered with four-field axial, six-field axial, or four-field oblique, nonaxial fields. The median dose was 68.40 Gy (range 59.4-80.4). Median follow-up was 20.4 months; 175 were followed more than 3 years. All complications have been graded conservatively using the RTOG system. Results: Using a Cox proportional hazard's model, patient age, T-stage, prescribed dose, pelvic treatment, and boost technique were analyzed. The factor most strongly related to risk of morbidity was dose (p = 0.05); however, the boost technique was also related: the four-field oblique field had the lowest relative risk. Most episodes of rectal morbidity have been mild: 82 Grade 1 or 2. There have been only 14 more serious complications including 12 Grade 3 and 2 Grade 4. The actuarial risk of a Grade 3 or 4 complication is 3% at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions: A very small proportion of patients treated with 3D CRT had significant rectal morbidity related to RT, supporting the use of conformal treatment planning and dose delivery as a mechanism to minimize complications

  11. TRREMS procedure (transanal repair of rectocele and rectal mucosectomy with one circular stapler: a prospective multicenter trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vinicius Cruz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Since anorectocele is usually associated with mucosa prolapse and/or rectal intussusceptions, it was developed a stapled surgical technique using one circular stapler. OBJECTIVE: To report the results of Transanal Repair of Rectocele and Rectal Mucosectomy with one Circular Stapler (TRREMS procedure in the treatment of anorectocele with mucosa prolapse in a prospective multicenter trial. METHODS: It was conducted by 14 surgeons and included 75 female patients, mean aged 49.6 years, with symptoms of obstructed defecation due to grade 2 (26.7% and grade 3 (73.3% anorectocele associated with mucosa prolapse and/or rectal intussusception (52.0% and an average validated Wexner constipation score of 16. All patients were evaluated by a proctological examination, cinedefecography, anal manometry and colonic transit time. The TRREMS procedure consists of the manual removal of the rectocele wall with circumferential rectal mucosectomy performed with a circular stapler. The mean follow-up time was 21 months. RESULTS: All patients presented obstructed defecation and they persisted with symptoms despite conservative treatment. The mean operative time was 42 minutes. In 13 (17.3% patients, bleeding from the stapled line required hemostatic suture. Stapling was incomplete in 2 (2.6%. Forty-nine patients (65.3% required 1 hospitalization day, the remainder (34.7% 2 days. Postoperatively, 3 (4.0% patients complained of persistent rectal pain and 7 (9.3% developed stricture on the stapled suture subsequently treated by stricturectomy under anesthesia (n = 1, endoscopic stricturectomy with hot biopsy forceps (n = 3 and digital dilatation (n = 3. Postoperative cinedefecography showed residual grade I anorectoceles in 8 (10.6%. The mean Wexner constipation score decreased significantly from 16 to 4 (0-4: n = 68 (6: n = 6 (7: n = 1 (P<0.0001. CONCLUSION: Current trial results suggest that TRREMS procedure is a safe and effective technique for the treatment

  12. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinman, Marcie; Haut, Elliott R

    2014-02-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding remains a commonly encountered diagnosis for acute care surgeons. Initial stabilization and resuscitation of patients is imperative. Stable patients can have initiation of medical therapy and localization of the bleeding, whereas persistently unstable patients require emergent endoscopic or operative intervention. Minimally invasive techniques have surpassed surgery as the treatment of choice for most upper GI bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bleeding from gastrointestinal angioectasias is not related to bleeding disorders - a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lärfars Gerd

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angioectasias in the gastrointestinal tract can be found in up to 3% of the population. They are typically asymptomatic but may sometimes result in severe bleeding. The reasons for why some patients bleed from their angioectasias are not fully understood but it has been reported that it may be explained by an acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS. This condition has similar laboratory findings to congenital von Willebrand disease with selective loss of large von Willebrand multimers. The aim of this study was to find out if AVWS or any other bleeding disorder was more common in patients with bleeding from angioectasias than in a control group. Methods We compared bleeding tests and coagulation parameters, including von Willebrand multimers, from a group of 23 patients with anemia caused by bleeding from angioectasias, with the results from a control group lacking angioectasias. Results No significant differences between the two groups were found in coagulation parameters, bleeding time or von Willebrand multimer levels. Conclusion These results do not support a need for routine bleeding tests in cases of bleeding from angioectasias and do not show an overall increased risk of AVWS among these patients.

  14. Minor Bleeds Alert for Subsequent Major Bleeding in Patients Using Vitamin K Antagonists.

    OpenAIRE

    Veeger , Nic J.G.M.; Piersma-Wichers , Margriet; Meijer , Karina; Hillege , Hans L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) have shown to be effective in primary and secondary prevention of thromboembolism, but the associated risk of bleeding is an important limitation. The majority of the bleeds are clinically mild. In this study, we assessed whether these minor bleeds are associated with major bleeding, when controlling for other important risk indicators, including the achieved quality of anticoagulation. For this, 5898 patients of a specialised anticoagulation cl...

  15. Diagnosis, management, and long-term outcomes of rectovaginal endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moawad NS

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nash S Moawad,1 Andrea Caplin21Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Florida, 2University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Rectovaginal endometriosis is the most severe form of endometriosis. Clinically, it presents with a number of symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, deep dyspareunia, dyschezia, and rectal bleeding. The gold standard for diagnosis is laparoscopy with histological confirmation; however, there are a number of options for presurgical diagnosis, including clinical examination, transvaginal/transrectal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imagining, colonoscopy, and computed tomography colonography. Treatment can be medical or surgical. Medical therapies include birth control pills, oral progestins, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, danazol, and injectable progestins. Analgesics are often used as well. Surgery improves up to 70% of symptoms. Surgery is either ablative or excisional, and is conducted via transvaginal, laparoscopic, laparotomy, or combined approaches. Common surgical techniques involve shaving of the superficial rectal lesion, laparoscopic anterior discoid resection, and low anterior bowel resection and reanastomosis. Outcomes are generally favorable, but postoperative complications may include intra-abdominal bleeding, anastomotic leaks, rectovaginal fistulas, strictures, chronic constipation, and the need for reoperation. Recurrence of rectal endometriosis is a possibility as well. Other outcomes are improved pain-related symptoms and fertility. Long-term outcomes vary according to the management strategy used. This review will provide the most recent approaches and techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of rectovaginal endometriosis.Keywords: pelvic pain, dyspareunia, bowel resection, endometriosis, rectovaginal

  16. Meat and colo-rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M J

    1999-05-01

    In early epidemiological studies of diet and cancer the stress was on the search for causal factors. Population (ecological) studies tended to show a strong correlation between meat intake, particularly red meat, and the risk of colo-rectal cancer. They also tended to show meat to be strongly inversely correlated with cancers of the stomach and oesophagus and liver. Early case-control studies tended to support the postulated role for red meat in colo-rectal carcinogenesis, although more recent case-control studies, particularly those from Europe, have tended to show no relationship. The cohort studies in general failed to detect any relationship between meat intake and colo-rectal cancer risk. The available evidence points to the intake of protective factors such as vegetables and whole-grain cereals being the main determinants of colo-rectal cancer risk, with meat intake only coincidentally related.

  17. Chronic inflammatory diseases of the rectum and prostate: a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Kadyrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the Russian and foreign literature on chronic inflammatory diseases of the rectum and chronic prostatitis. The universally known anatomic and vascular relationships of the prostate and rectum indicate that there is a correlation of the development of chronic prostatitis and rectal diseases.

  18. The International Bleeding Risk Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Laine, L.; Dalton, H.

    2017-01-01

    The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding.......The International Bleeding Risk Score: A New Risk Score that can Accurately Predict Mortality in Patients with Upper GI-Bleeding....

  19. Derivation and validation of a novel risk score for safe discharge after acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, Kathryn; Jairath, Vipul; Uberoi, Raman; Guy, Richard; Ayaru, Lakshmana; Mortensen, Neil; Murphy, Mike F; Collins, Gary S

    2017-09-01

    Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency hospital admission, and identification of patients at low risk of harm, who are therefore suitable for outpatient investigation, is a clinical and research priority. We aimed to develop and externally validate a simple risk score to identify patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding who could safely avoid hospital admission. We undertook model development with data from the National Comparative Audit of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding from 143 hospitals in the UK in 2015. Multivariable logistic regression modelling was used to identify predictors of safe discharge, defined as the absence of rebleeding, blood transfusion, therapeutic intervention, 28 day readmission, or death. The model was converted into a simplified risk scoring system and was externally validated in 288 patients admitted with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (184 safely discharged) from two UK hospitals (Charing Cross Hospital, London, and Hammersmith Hospital, London) that had not contributed data to the development cohort. We calculated C statistics for the new model and did a comparative assessment with six previously developed risk scores. Of 2336 prospectively identified admissions in the development cohort, 1599 (68%) were safely discharged. Age, sex, previous admission for lower gastrointestinal bleeding, rectal examination findings, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and haemoglobin concentration strongly discriminated safe discharge in the development cohort (C statistic 0·84, 95% CI 0·82-0·86) and in the validation cohort (0·79, 0·73-0·84). Calibration plots showed the new risk score to have good calibration in the validation cohort. The score was better than the Rockall, Blatchford, Strate, BLEED, AIMS65, and NOBLADS scores in predicting safe discharge. A score of 8 or less predicts a 95% probability of safe discharge. We developed and validated a novel clinical prediction model with good discriminative

  20. Adverse outcomes of anticoagulant use among hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease: a comparison of the rates of major bleeding events between unfractionated heparin and enoxaparin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Saheb Sharif-Askari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anticoagulation therapy is usually required in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD for treatment or prevention of thromboembolic diseases. However, this benefit could easily be offset by the risk of bleeding. OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of adverse outcomes of anticoagulants in hospitalized patients with CKD, and to compare the rates of major bleeding events between the unfractionated heparin (UFH and enoxaparin users. METHODS: One year prospective observational study was conducted in patients with CKD stages 3 to 5 (estimated GFR, 10-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2 who were admitted to the renal unit of Dubai Hospital. Propensity scores for the use of anticoagulants, estimated for each of the 488 patients, were used to identify a cohort of 117 pairs of patients. Cox regression method was used to estimate association between anticoagulant use and adverse outcomes. RESULTS: Major bleeding occurred in 1 in 3 patients who received anticoagulation during hospitalization (hazard ratio [HR], 4.61 [95% confidence interval [CI], 2.05-10.35]. Compared with enoxaparin users, patients who received anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin had a lower mean [SD] serum level of platelet counts (139.95 [113] × 10(3/µL vs 205.56 [123] × 10(3/µL; P<0.001, and had a higher risk of major bleeding (HR, 4.79 [95% CI, 1.85-12.36]. Furthermore, compared with those who did not receive anticoagulants, patients who did had a higher in-hospital mortality (HR, 2.54 [95% CI, 1.03-6.25]; longer length of hospitalization (HR, 1.04 [95% CI, 1.01-1.06]; and higher hospital readmission at 30 days (HR, 1.79 [95% CI, 1.10-2.91]. CONCLUSIONS: Anticoagulation among hospitalized patients with CKD was significantly associated with an increased risk of bleeding and in-hospital mortality. Hence, intensive monitoring and preventive measures such as laboratory monitoring and/or dose adjustment are warranted.

  1. Biofeedback training in chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninga, M A; Büller, H A; Taminiau, J A

    1993-01-01

    Twenty nine patients, aged 5-16 years, were studied to evaluate whether biofeedback training is effective in treating children with chronic constipation and encopresis; the clinical outcome at six weeks and 12 months was also evaluated. Patients received on average five biofeedback training sessions. The existence of external anal contraction or decreased rectal sensation in 16 (55%) and eight (27%) of the children, respectively was identified on manometry. After biofeedback training, 26 (90%) of the patients learned to relax the external anal sphincter; 18 (63%) normalised rectal sensation. The training resulted in a significant increase in defecation frequency and a significant decrease in encopresis. At six weeks, 16 (55%) of the patients were clinically symptom free. At follow up after 12 months the results were sustained. Only three patients showed a relapse within six months, of whom two were successfully treated with one extra training session. Biofeedback training might be a useful therapeutical approach in children with chronic constipation and encopresis. PMID:8434996

  2. Laparoscopic excision of a newborn rectal duplication cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartin, Charles W; Lau, Stanley T; Escobar, Mauricio A; Glick, Philip L

    2008-08-01

    Congenital rectal duplication cyst is a rare entity treated with surgical excision. Without treatment, a rectal duplication cyst may cause a variety of complications, most notably, transforming into a malignancy. We report on a 7-week-old girl who was found to have a rectal duplication cyst. The rectal duplication cyst was successfully excised laparoscopically. Rectal duplication cysts are rare alimentary tract anomalies generally discovered during childhood. Complications include symptoms arising from the cyst and the possibility of malignant degeneration. They are typically managed by surgical excision.

  3. Dynamics of rectal balloon implant shrinkage in prostate VMAT. Influence on anorectal dose and late rectal complication risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanneste, Ben G.L.; Wijk, Y. van; Lutgens, L.C.; Limbergen, E.J. van; Lambin, P. [Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lin, E.N. van [Radiotherapy Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, Troisdorf (Germany); Beek, K. van de [Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Urology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hoffmann, A.L. [Maastricht University Medical Center+, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiooncology - OncoRay, Dresden (Germany); University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy, Dresden (Germany)

    2018-01-15

    To assess the effect of a shrinking rectal balloon implant (RBI) on the anorectal dose and complication risk during the course of moderately hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy. In 15 patients with localized prostate cancer, an RBI was implanted. A weekly kilovolt cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan was acquired to measure the dynamics of RBI volume and prostate-rectum separation. The absolute anorectal volume encompassed by the 2 Gy equieffective 75 Gy isodose (V{sub 75Gy}) was recalculated as well as the mean anorectal dose. The increase in estimated risk of grade 2-3 late rectal bleeding (LRB) between the start and end of treatment was predicted using nomograms. The observed acute and late toxicities were evaluated. A significant shrinkage of RBI volumes was observed, with an average volume of 70.4% of baseline at the end of the treatment. Although the prostate-rectum separation significantly decreased over time, it remained at least 1 cm. No significant increase in V{sub 75Gy} of the anorectum was observed, except in one patient whose RBI had completely deflated in the third week of treatment. No correlation between mean anorectal dose and balloon deflation was found. The increase in predicted LRB risk was not significant, except in the one patient whose RBI completely deflated. The observed toxicities confirmed these findings. Despite significant decrease in RBI volume the high-dose rectal volume and the predicted LRB risk were unaffected due to a persistent spacing between the prostate and the anterior rectal wall. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung der Wirkung eines schrumpfenden rektalen Ballonimplantats (RBI) auf die anorektale Dosis und das Komplikationsrisiko im Verlauf einer maessig hypofraktionierten Strahlentherapie der Prostata. Ein RBI wurde 15 Patienten mit lokal begrenztem Prostatakarzinom implantiert. Zur Messung der Dynamik des RBI-Volumens und der Prostata-Rektum-Trennung wurde eine woechentliche Kilovolt-Cone-beam-Computertomographie (CBCT

  4. Diagnostic evaluation and aggressive surgical approach in bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with pancreatic pseudocysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaeranta, P.; Haapiainen, R.; Kivisaari, L.; Schroeder, T.

    1991-01-01

    Hemorrhage is an uncommon but serious complication of pancreatic pseudocysts. When gastrointestinal bleeding or intra-abdominal hemorrhage is associated with a pancreatic pseudocysts and the usual sources of bleeding are not detected by endoscopy, the rupture of a pseudoaneurysm inside the pseudocyst should be suspected. The article present 13 cases, 11 associated with chronic and 2 with late complications after acute necrotizing pancreatitis. On the basis of sonographic findings, bleeding site was suspected in 8 of 11 patients. Computed tomography (CT) was performed on 10, and bleeding was suspected in 8. The pseudoaneurysm itself was detected by CT in one and by ultrasonography in none. Visceral angiography was performed on five patients, and the pseudoaneurysm was evident in all. External drainage with arterial ligation was done as a primary operation in five patients; four of them later underwent pancreatic resection because of rebleeding. In eight cases pancreatic resection was the initial operation; none of these patients continued to bleed or needed reoperation because of the same pseudoaneurysm. There were no intraoperative deaths, but one patient died postoperatively. Aggressive diagnostic evaluation and surgical approach are associated with a reduction in mortality and morbidity in this serious complication of pancreatic pseudocysts. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Whan; Ryu, Sie Tae; Park, Ki Soon; Lee, Yul; Chung, Soo Young

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of preoperative staging of rectal cancer by transrectal US(7.5MHz linear array transducer), 17 cases with primary rectal cancer who were examined by transrectal US and histopathologically proven, were analyzed. We correlated the sonographic features of the depth of rectal wall invasion, perirectal fat infiltration and perirectal lymph node metastasis with histopathologic findings. The tumor staging was analyzed according to the TNM classification. The depth of rectal wall invasion was in accordance with histopathologic findings in 15 of 17 cases (accuracy:88.2%). The sensitivity and specificity of transrectal US in predicting perirectal lymph node metastasis were 20% and 75%, respectively (accuracy : 58.8%). The sensitivity and specificity in predicting perirectal fat infiltration were 92.9% and 100%, respectively (accuracy : 94%). Perirectal fat infiltration and depth of rectal wall invasion were preoperatively diagnosed with relatively high accuracy, while perirectal lymph node metastasis with low accuracy. In conclusion, transrectal US is a useful imaging modality for preoperative staging of rectal cancer

  6. Wind sock deformity in rectal atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed M V; Ghahramani, Farhad; Shamsaeefar, Alireza; Razmi, Tannaz; Zarenezhad, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Rectal atresia is a rare anorectal deformity. It usually presents with neonatal obstruction and it is often a complete membrane or severe stenosis. Windsock deformity has not been reported in rectal atresia especially, having been missed for 2 years. A 2-year-old girl reported only a severe constipation despite having a 1.5-cm anal canal in rectal examination with scanty discharge. She underwent loop colostomy and loopogram, which showed a wind sock deformity of rectum with mega colon. The patient underwent abdominoperineal pull-through with good result and follow-up. This is the first case of the wind sock deformity in rectal atresia being reported after 2 years of age. (author)

  7. Defecography of rectal wall prolapse conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzano, A.; Muto, M.; De Rosa, A.; Ginolfi, F.; Carbone, M.; Amodio, F.; Rossi, E.; Tuccillo, M.

    1999-01-01

    Pelvic floor and rectal prolapse conditions have greatly benefited by new imaging and instrumental diagnostic approaches, and especially defecography, for both pathophysiological interpretation and differential diagnosis. The authors investigated the efficacy of defecography in the assessment of rectal prolapse, and in particular the role of videproctography in diagnosis such dynamic disorders. The dynamic changes of ampulla are well depicted by videoproctography, which showed anorectum normalization and spontaneous reduction of invagination after intussusception. Defecography exhibited good capabilities in showing rectal wall function abnormalities. Finally, some features of videoproctography such as low radiation dose, non-invasiveness and ease of execution, make the examination acceptable to patients with anorectal disorders and for the follow-up of rectal prolapse [it

  8. Fetal extraperitoneal rectal perforation: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Buttock swelling from a perineal hernia through a levator ani defect has been reported previously [12]. There have also been similar presentations due to rupture of rectal diverticular duplications [6]. Apart from the embryological causes, rectal perforation has been also reported because of rectal thermometers or probes and ...

  9. Complex endoscopic treatment of acute gastrointestinal bleeding of ulcer origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Izbitsky

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB is determined in 20-30% of patients with peptic ulcer disease. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is on the first place as the main cause of deaths from peptic ulcer ahead of the other complications. Rebleeding occurs in 30-38% of patients. Materials and Methods For getting of the objective endoscopic picture in patients with bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers we used the classification of J.A. Forrest in our study: Type I - active bleeding: • I a - pulsating jet; • I b - stream. Type II - signs of recent bleeding: • II a - visible (non-bleeding visible vessel; • II b - fixed thrombus - a clot; • II c - flat black spot (black bottom ulcers. Type III - ulcer with a clean (white down. Integrated endoscopic hemostasis included: irrigation of ulcer defect and area around it with 3% hydrogen peroxide solution in a volume of 10 - 30ml; Injection of 2-4 mL of diluted epinephrine (1:10000 for hemostasis; use of Argon plasma coagulation. Results and Discussion Integrated endoscopic stop of bleeding was performed in 57 patients who were examined and treated at the Department of Surgery from 2006 to 2012. In 16 patients bleeding was caused by gastric ulcer. Gastric ulcer type I localization according to classification (HD Johnson, 1965 was determined in 9 patients, type II - in 2 patients, type III – in 5 patients. In 31 patients bleeding was caused by duodenal peptic ulcer, in 4 patients - erosive gastritis, 1 - erosive esophagitis, and in 5 patients - gastroenteroanastomosis area peptic ulcer. Final hemostasis was achieved in 55 (96.5% patients. In 50 (87.7% patients it was sufficient to conduct a single session of complex endoscopic treatment. In 5 (8.8% patients – it was done two times. In 2 (3.5% cases operation was performed due to the recurrent bleeding. The source of major bleeding in these patients was: chronic, duodenal ulcer penetrating into the head of the pancreas in one case complicated by subcompensated

  10. Risk Factors for Post-TAVI Bleeding According to the VARC-2 Bleeding Definition and Effect of the Bleeding on Short-Term Mortality: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayang; Yu, Wenyuan; Jin, Qi; Li, Yaqiong; Liu, Nan; Hou, Xiaotong; Yu, Yang

    2017-04-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) bleeding (per Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 [VARC-2] bleeding criteria) on 30-day postoperative mortality and examined the correlation between pre- or intraoperative variables and bleeding. Multiple electronic literature databases were searched using predefined criteria, with bleeding defined per Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 criteria. A total of 10 eligible articles with 3602 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that post-TAVI bleeding was associated with a 323% increase in 30-day postoperative mortality (odds risk [OR]; 4.23, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.80-6.40; P logistic regression analysis revealed that atrial fibrillation (AF) was independently correlated with TAVI-associated bleeding (OR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.33-5.21; P = 0.005). Meta-regression showed that potential modifiers like the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) score, mortality, the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE), aortic valve area, mean pressure gradient, left ventricular ejection fraction, preoperative hemoglobin and platelet levels, and study design had no significant effects on the results of the meta-analysis. Post-TAVI bleeding, in particular, major bleeding/life-threatening bleeding, increased 30-day postoperative mortality. Transapical access was a significant bleeding risk factor. Preexisting AF independently correlated with TAVI-associated bleeding, likely because of AF-related anticoagulation. Recognition of the importance and determinants of post-TAVI bleeding should lead to strategies to improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Artificial liver support with the molecular adsorbent recirculating system: activation of coagulation and bleeding complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachli, Esther B; Schuepbach, Reto A; Maggiorini, Marco; Stocker, Reto; Müllhaupt, Beat; Renner, Eberhard L

    2007-05-01

    Numerous, mostly uncontrolled, observations suggest that artificial liver support with the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) improves pathophysiologic sequelae and outcome of acute and acute-on-chronic liver failure. MARS is felt to be safe, but extracorporeal circuits may activate coagulation. To assess the frequency of and risk factors for activation of coagulation during MARS treatment. Retrospective analysis of coagulopathy/bleeding complications observed during 83 consecutive MARS sessions in 21 patients (11 men; median age 46 years; median three sessions per patient; median duration of session 8 h). Nine clinically relevant episodes of coagulopathy/bleeding were observed in eight patients, forced to premature cessation of MARS in seven and ended lethal in four. Four complications occurred during the first, five during later (third to seventh) MARS sessions and two bleeders tolerated further sessions without complications. Coagulation parameters worsened significantly also during MARS sessions not associated with bleeding (PMARS therapy, potentially leading to bleeding complications and mortality.

  12. Effect of oral sucralfate on late rectal injury associated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer: A double-blind, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneebone, Andrew; Mameghan, Hedy; Bolin, Terry; Berry, Martin; Turner, Sandra; Kearsley, John; Graham, Peter; Fisher, Richard; Delaney, Geoff

    2004-11-15

    To assess whether oral sucralfate is effective in preventing late rectal injury in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial was conducted across four institutions in Australia. Patients receiving definitive radiotherapy for prostate cancer were randomized to receive either 3 g of oral sucralfate suspension or placebo twice daily. Data on patients' symptoms were collected for 2 years, and flexible sigmoidoscopy was scheduled at 12 months after treatment. A total of 338 patients were randomized, of whom 298 had adequate follow-up data available for an analysis of late symptoms. Of the 298 patients, 143 were randomized to receive sucralfate and 155 placebo. The cumulative incidence of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 or worse late rectal toxicity at 2 years was 28% for placebo and 22% for the sucralfate arm (p = 0.23; 95% confidence interval for the difference -3% to 16%). Seventeen percent of patients in the sucralfate group had significant bleeding (Grade 2 or worse) compared with 23% in the placebo group (p = 0.18, 95% confidence interval -15% to 3%). No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups with respect to bowel frequency (p = 0.99), mucus discharge (p = 0.64), or fecal incontinence (p = 0.90). Sigmoidoscopy findings showed a nonstatistically significant reduction in Grade 2 or worse rectal changes from 32% with placebo to 27% in the sucralfate group (p = 0.25). This trial demonstrated no statistically significant reduction in the incidence of late rectal toxicity in patients randomized to receive sucralfate. However, this result was considered inconclusive, because the trial was unable to exclude clinically important differences in the late toxicity rates.

  13. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000268.htm Bleeding esophageal varices To use the sharing features on ... veins in the esophagus to balloon outward. Heavy bleeding can occur if the veins break open. Any ...

  14. High-dose chemoradiotherapy and watchful waiting for distal rectal cancer: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelt, Ane L; Pløen, John; Harling, Henrik; Jensen, Frank S; Jensen, Lars H; Jørgensen, Jens C R; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Søren R; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-08-01

    observation group at 1 year was 15·5% (95% CI 3·3-26·3). The most common acute grade 3 adverse event during treatment was diarrhoea, which affected four (8%) of 51 patients. Sphincter function in the observation group was excellent, with 18 (72%) of 25 patients at 1 year and 11 (69%) of 16 patients at 2 years reporting no faecal incontinence at all and a median Jorge-Wexner score of 0 (IQR 0-0) at all timepoints. The most common late toxicity was bleeding from the rectal mucosa; grade 3 bleeding was reported in two (7%) in 30 patients at 1 year and one (6%) of 17 patients at 2 years. There were no unexpected serious adverse reactions or treatment-related deaths. High-dose chemoradiotherapy and watchful waiting might be a safe alternative to abdominoperineal resection for patients with distal rectal cancer. CIRRO-The Lundbeck Foundation Center for Interventional Research in Radiation Oncology and The Danish Council for Strategic Research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Locally advanced rectal cancer: management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokelaar RF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available RF Kokelaar, MD Evans, M Davies, DA Harris, J Beynon Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, UK Abstract: Between 5% and 10% of patients with rectal cancer present with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, and 10% of rectal cancers recur after surgery, of which half are limited to locoregional disease only (locally recurrent rectal cancer. Exenterative surgery offers the best long-term outcomes for patients with LARC and locally recurrent rectal cancer so long as a complete (R0 resection is achieved. Accurate preoperative multimodal staging is crucial in assessing the potential operability of advanced rectal tumors, and resectability may be enhanced with neoadjuvant therapies. Unfortunately, surgical options are limited when the tumor involves the lateral pelvic sidewall or high sacrum due to the technical challenges of achieving histological clearance, and must be balanced against the high morbidity associated with resection of the bony pelvis and significant lymphovascular structures. This group of patients is usually treated palliatively and subsequently survival is poor, which has led surgeons to seek innovative new solutions, as well as revisit previously discarded radical approaches. A small number of centers are pioneering new techniques for resection of beyond-total mesorectal excision tumors, including en bloc resections of the sciatic notch and composite resections of the first two sacral vertebrae. Despite limited experience, these new techniques offer the potential for radical treatment of previously inoperable tumors. This narrative review sets out the challenges facing the management of LARCs and discusses evolving management options. Keywords: rectal cancer, exenteration, pelvic sidewall, sacrectomy

  16. GI bleeding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100162.htm GI bleeding - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Gastrointestinal Bleeding A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  17. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Tai; Lee, Choon Keun; Lee, Sun Wha; Choi, Woo Suk; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1988-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major diagnostic problem. Although advances have been made in the medical and surgical methods of managing gastrointestinal bleeding, the commonly employed techniques of barium radiography, endoscopy, and angiography may not successfully localize the site and define the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two widely available technetium-99m-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, sulfur colloid and red blood cells are currently used in the evaluation of patients who are bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract. Surgically confirmed 19 patients with use of 99m Tc-sulfur colloid (7 cases) and 99m Tc-RBC (12 cases) were retrospectively evaluated. The overall sensitivity of scintigraphy in detection of bleeding and localization of bleeding site was 68% and 84%, respectively. The authors conclude that bleeding scintigraphy is a safe, sensitive, and non-invasive method as an effective screening test before performing angiography or surgery.

  18. Clinical utility of new bleeding criteria: a prospective study of evaluation for the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium definition of bleeding in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Hyuk; Seo, Jeong-Min; Lee, Dong Hyun; Park, Kyungil; Kim, Young-Dae

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the new bleeding criteria, proposed by the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC), compared with the old criteria for determining the action of physicians in contact with bleeding events, after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The BARC criteria were independently associated with an increased risk of 1-year mortality after PCI, and provided a predictive value, in regard to 1-year mortality. The standardized bleeding definitions will be expected to help the physician to correctly analyze the bleeding events, to select an optimal treatment, and to objectively compare the results of multiple trials and registries. All the patients undergoing PCI from June to September 2012 were prospectively enrolled. Patients who experienced a bleeding event were further classified, based on three different bleeding severity criteria: BARC, Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI), and Global Use of Strategies To Open coronary arteries (GUSTO). The primary outcome was the occurrence of bleeding events requiring interruption of antiplatelet therapy (IAT) by physicians. A total of 376 consecutive patients were included in this study. Total bleeding events occurred in 46 patients (12.2%). BARC type ≥2 bleeding occurred in 30 patients (8.0%); however, TIMI major or minor bleeding, and GUSTO moderate or severe bleeding occurred in 6 (1.6%) and 11 patients (2.9%), respectively. Of the 46 patients, 28 (60.9% of patients) required IAT. On receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, bleeding defined BARC type ≥2 effectively predicted IAT, with a sensitivity of 89.3%, and a specificity of 98.5% (pdefinition may be a more useful tool for the detection of bleeding with clinical relevance, for patients undergoing PCI. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of rectal enemas on rectal dosimetric parameters during high-dose-rate vaginal cuff brachytherapy. A prospective trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabater, Sebastia; Andres, Ignacio; Sevillano, Marimar; Berenguer, Roberto; Aguayo, Manuel; Villas, Maria Victoria [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete (CHUA), Department of Radiation Oncology, Albacete (Spain); Gascon, Marina; Arenas, Meritxell [Hospital Universitari Sant Joan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Reus (Spain); Rovirosa, Angeles; Camacho-Lopez, Cristina [University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, Gynecological Cancer Unit, Radiation Oncology Department, ICMHO, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate the effects of rectal enemas on rectal doses during postoperative high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB). This prospective trial included 59 patients. Two rectal cleansing enemas were self-administered before the second fraction, and fraction 1 was considered the basal status. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) values were generated for the rectum and correlated with rectal volume variation. Statistical analyses used paired and unpaired t-tests. Despite a significant 15 % reduction in mean rectal volume (44.07 vs. 52.15 cc, p = 0.0018), 35.6 % of patients had larger rectums after rectal enemas. No significant rectal enema-related DVH differences were observed compared to the basal data. Although not statistically significant, rectal cleansing-associated increases in mean rectal DVH values were observed: D{sub 0.1} {sub cc}: 6.6 vs. 7.21 Gy; D{sub 1} {sub cc}: 5.35 vs. 5.52 Gy; D{sub 2} {sub cc}: 4.67 vs. 4.72 Gy, before and after rectal cleaning, respectively (where D{sub x} {sub cc} is the dose to the most exposed x cm {sup 3}). No differences were observed in DVH parameters according to rectal volume increase or decrease after the enema. Patients whose rectal volume increased also had significantly larger DVH parameters, except for D{sub 5} {sub %}, D{sub 25} {sub %}, and D{sub 50} {sub %}. In contrast, in patients whose rectal volume decreased, significance was only seen for D{sub 25} {sub %} and D{sub 50} {sub %} (D{sub x} {sub %} dose covering x % of the volume). In the latter patients, nonsignificant reductions in D{sub 2} {sub cc}, D{sub 5} {sub cc} and V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (volume receiving at least 5 Gy) were observed. The current rectal enemas protocol was ineffective in significantly modifying rectal DVH parameters for HDR-VCB. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung der Auswirkungen von rektalen Dosen waehrend postoperativer High-Dose-Rate-(HDR-)Brachytherapie an der Scheidenmanschette (''vaginal cuff brachytherapy'', VCB). An

  20. Evaluation of portal circulation by 99mTcO4-per-rectal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiomi, Susumu; Kuroki, Tetsuo; Kurai, Osamu

    1987-01-01

    Portal circulation in patients with chronic liver diseases was evaluated by a new method named per-rectal portal scintigraphy. Following instillation of a solution containing 10 mCi of 99m TcO 4 - into the upper part of the rectum, serial scintigrams were taken sequentially. At the same time, the radioactivity curves over the liver and the heart were recorded sequentially. 1) The findings of per-rectal portal scintigrams were classified into two basic patterns. In pattern (I), the inferior mesenteric vein, portal vein, liver and the heart were visualized continuously after rectal instillation of the radioisotope. This pattern reflects direct blood flow from the rectum to the liver via the portal vein. In contrast, in pattern (II), the portal scintigrams demonstrated the vena cava inferior and the heart at an early phase when neither the portal system nor the liver have received the isotope. This pattern indicates that a part or all of the blood flow from the rectum is directed to the vena caval system via the portacaval shunts on the periphery of the inferior mesenteric vein. 2) Per-rectal portal shunt indices (SI) were calculated from serial radioactivities on the liver and the heart. In the healthy subjects, SI ranged from 1.9 % to 5.2 % (mean 4.1 %). In patients with hepatitis the mean SI was 6.9 %, and in patients with cirrhosis it was 52.9 %. 3) The SI was higher in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices than in those without (p < 0.001). The SI was higher in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without (p < 0.01). Thus, per-rectal portal scintigraphy is a simple, noninvasive and practical method for analyzing portal hemodynamics. (author)

  1. Clinical target volume for rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorchel, F.; Bossel, J.F.; Baron, M.H.; Goubard, O.; Bartholomot, B.; Mantion, G.; Pelissier, E.P.; Maingon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The total meso-rectal excision allows the marked increase of the local control rate in rectal cancer. Therefore, the meso-rectal space is the usual field for the spread of rectal cancer cells. It could therefore be considered as the clinical target volume in the preoperative plan by the radiation oncologist. We propose to identify the mesorectum on anatomical structures of a treatment-position CT scan. (authors)

  2. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and other menstrual conditions; Abnormal menstrual periods; Abnormal vaginal bleeding ... There are many causes of abnormal vaginal bleeding. HORMONES ... Doctors call the problem abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) . AUB ...

  3. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Jennifer L., E-mail: peterson.jennifer2@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Buskirk, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Bernard, Johnny R. [Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southern Ohio Medical Center, Portsmouth, OH (United States); Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  4. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm 3 of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications

  5. The approach of ischemic colitis case followed by the lower gastrointesitnal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUKSEL ALTINEL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Colonic vascular ischemia is commonly seen in the descending colon and causes malnutrition and is to be commensurate with the duration of clinical myocardial ischemia. History of cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, with coronary hearth disease, 68-year-old female patient was followed for about 2 weeks with the occasional massive gastrointestinal bleeding complaint. After ceasing oral intake, fluid and electrolyte replacement and a broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was established. Abdomen bowel wall thickening of the colon in continuity in the CT results were observed with the open SMA SMV. Follow-up colonoscopy was performed from the dentate line at 5 cm starting hemorrhagic and ischemic segments was seen as an area of ​​about 40 cm long. After hemodynamic deterioration she was underwent emergency surgery because of abdominal sensitivity increase. Hartman procedure was performed. Postop pneumonia and pulmonary embolism were suspected. Candida was observed in urine infection. The sudden improving of the patient's postoperative bleeding from the rectal stump where the staple line was, has evolved on the 7th day. The sponges with the adrenaline stopped the bleeding and the hemodynamic support was stabilized with it. The minimal fluid in pelvis was also monitored by ultrasound . The colostomy was fine following the blood supply to the bowel. Later oral intake was started, the general condition of the patient was improved. But on the postoperative day 12 she had suddenly respiratory and cardiac arrest . Finally, the histopathological examination revealed that the ischemic necrosis and purulent some areas could be selected as a morphologic ischemic and necrotic (the intraoperative peritoneal reflection of the level of false membrane formation at the perforation focus off ischemic colitis. Approximately 20% of similar cases were followed with the clinical practice under medical treatment and surgical approach. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(1.000: 74-76

  6. Magnetic resonance in the diagnosing of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perczynski, W.; Walecki, J.; Schier, J.F.; Salamon, Z.

    1994-01-01

    MR has not yet come into widespread use for the staging of rectal cancer. However use of MR imaging in diagnosis of rectal cancer gains clinical acceptance. Use contrast media enables exact staging of rectal cancer. MR multiplaner and noninvasive imaging with excellent spatial and contrast resolution has rising popularity in diagnosis of rectal cancer, especially in cases where it is impossible to insert endorectal US-probe because of stenosis. (author)

  7. Rectal duplication with sciatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Marzena; Golonka, Anna; Kalińska-Lipert, Anita; Nachulewicz, Paweł

    2015-07-01

    Rectal duplications represent 5% of all duplications in the alimentary tract, and they are very rarely diagnosed during the neonatal period. The authors present the method of investigation and the results of surgical treatment of a full-term neonate with a sciatic hernia containing a rectal duplication. The procedure started with three-port laparoscopy, but excision of the tubular duplication of the rectum was possible only by a transanal endorectal pull-through approach. The sciatic hernia was closed, and plastic sutures on the buttock finished the procedure. The coincidence of sciatic hernia with rectal duplication is extremely rare, and the method of treatment depends exclusively on the anatomical conditions.

  8. Sucralfate or placebo following argon plasma coagulation for chronic radiation proctitis: a randomized double blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruscielewska-Kiliszek, M R; Regula, J; Polkowski, M; Rupinski, M; Kraszewska, E; Pachlewski, J; Czaczkowska-Kurek, E; Butruk, E

    2013-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctitis is a long-term complication of radiation therapy for pelvic malignancy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of two treatment regimens, sucralfate or placebo, following argon plasma coagulation (APC) for chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis. A single-centre, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was performed on patients with haemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis after irradiation for prostate, uterine, cervical, rectal or vaginal cancer. All patients received APC, and were then randomized to oral sucralfate (6 g twice a day) or placebo treatment for 4 weeks. APC was repeated every 8 weeks if necessary after the first session. Patients were graded clinically and endoscopically according to the Chutkan and Gilinski scales before and at 8 and 16 weeks after initial APC treatment (1.5-2 l/min, 25-40 W) and after 52 weeks (clinical only). Of 122 patients, 117 completed the entire protocol, with 57/60 in the sucralfate group and 60/62 in the placebo group. At baseline there were no significant differences between the sucralfate and placebo groups. At 1 year, a significant improvement in the clinical scale in both groups occurred compared with baseline. After 16 weeks, the median overall clinical severity scores fell from 4 to 2 points and the median bleeding score from 2 to 0 in both groups. APC is safe and effective for the management of chronic radiation proctitis. Additional sucralfate treatment did not influence the clinical or endoscopic outcome. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Rectal carcinoids: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Frank D

    2014-07-01

    Rectal carcinoids are increasing in incidence worldwide. Frequently thought of as a relatively benign condition, there are limited data regarding optimal treatment strategies for both localized and more advanced disease. The aim of this study was to summarize published experiences with rectal carcinoids and to present the most current data.

  10. OUR EXPERINCE WITH USE OF POSTERIOR MESH RECTOPEXY IN COMPLETE RECTAL PROLAPSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mohanty

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Mesh rectopexy is one of the accepted treatment options for rectal prolapse. We used polypropylene posterior mesh rectopexy for prolapse rectum. The aim of the study was to see demographic, clinical and functional outcome of posterior mesh rectopexy in our setup. MATERIALS AND METHODS The case report of 33 patients under gone posterior abdominal mesh rectopexy in MKCG medical college and hospital from 1st July 2012 to 1st July 2017 were reviewed retrospectively and the patients were followed up in surgical OPD/telephonic questionnaire. All patients had undergone standard posterior abdominal mesh rectopexy without the division of lateral ligaments with utmost care for prevention of bleeding and nerve damage. RESULTS Out of 33 cases of abdominal rectopexy, 12 (36% were males and 21 (64% were females. 27 (82% were within 61-80 years of age group. The most common symptoms were mass per annum (100% followed by incontinence for liquid stool and flatus 24 (72%. There was no operative mortality. The average hospital stay 7.8 days (5-11 days. The constipation (p=0.019 and incontinence (p=0.0165 were better postoperatively. There was 1 (3% partial recurrence of rectal prolapse in 91-year-old lady in 2 years follow up. CONCLUSION The recurrence rate as well as clinical and functional outcome of open abdominal mesh rectopexy seems to be satisfactory, however, long-term effect has to be seen.

  11. The Great Pretender: Rectal Syphilis Mimic a Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pisani Ceretti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal syphilis is a rare expression of the widely recognised sexual transmitted disease, also known as the great imitator for its peculiarity of being confused with mild anorectal diseases because of its vague symptoms or believed rectal malignancy, with the concrete risk of overtreatment. We present the case of a male patient with primary rectal syphilis, firstly diagnosed as rectal cancer; the medical, radiological, and endoscopic features are discussed below.

  12. The Rectal Cancer Female Sexuality Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyø, Anne; Emmertsen, Katrine J; Laurberg, Søren

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual dysfunction and impaired quality of life is a potential side effect to rectal cancer treatment. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and validate a simple scoring system intended to evaluate sexual function in women treated for rectal cancer. DESIGN......: This is a population-based cross-sectional study. SETTINGS: Female patients diagnosed with rectal cancer between 2001 and 2014 were identified by using the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's database. Participants filled in the validated Sexual Function Vaginal Changes questionnaire. Women declared to be sexually active...... in the validation group. PATIENTS: Female patients with rectal cancer above the age of 18 who underwent abdominoperineal resection, Hartmann procedure, or total/partial mesorectal excision were selected. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measured was the quality of life that was negatively affected because...

  13. Breast metastases from rectal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia; FANG Yu; LI Ang; LI Fei

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from extramammary neoplasms are very rare, constituting 2.7% of all malignant breast tumours. The most common primary tumor metastatic to the breast is primary breast cancer. Rectal cancer metastasizing to the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of aggressive rectal carcinoma with metastasis to the breast.

  14. Rectal balloon use limits vaginal displacement, rectal dose, and rectal toxicity in patients receiving IMRT for postoperative gynecological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Chia; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Yanagihara, Theodore; Jani, Ashish; Xanthopoulos, Eric P; Tiwari, Akhil; Wright, Jason D; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel

    2018-01-01

    Pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies traditionally used a 4-field box technique. Later trials have shown the feasibility of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) instead. But vaginal movement between fractions is concerning when using IMRT due to greater conformality of the isodose curves to the target and the resulting possibility of missing the target while the vagina is displaced. In this study, we showed that the use of a rectal balloon during treatment can decrease vaginal displacement, limit rectal dose, and limit acute and late toxicities. Little is known regarding the use of a rectal balloon (RB) in treating patients with IMRT in the posthysterectomy setting. We hypothesize that the use of an RB during treatment can limit rectal dose and acute and long-term toxicities, as well as decrease vaginal cuff displacement between fractions. We performed a retrospective review of patients with gynecological malignancies who received postoperative IMRT with the use of an RB from January 1, 2012 to January 1, 2015. Rectal dose constraint was examined as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1203 and 0418. Daily cone beam computed tomography (CT) was performed, and the average (avg) displacement, avg magnitude, and avg magnitude of vector were calculated. Toxicity was reported according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Acute toxicity was defined as less than 90 days from the end of radiation treatment. Late toxicity was defined as at least 90 days after completing radiation. Twenty-eight patients with postoperative IMRT with the use of an RB were examined and 23 treatment plans were reviewed. The avg rectal V40 was 39.3% ± 9.0%. V30 was65.1% ± 10.0%. V50 was 0%. Separate cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images (n = 663) were reviewed. The avg displacement was as follows: superior 0.4 + 2.99 mm, left 0.23 ± 4.97 mm, and anterior 0.16 ± 5.18 mm. The avg magnitude of displacement was superior

  15. Rectal hydrocortisone during vomiting in children with adrenal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Chróinín, M; Fallon, M; Kenny, D; Moriarty, S; Hoey, H; Costigan, C

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate rectal hydrocortisone as an emergency glucocorticoid replacement therapy in adrenal insufficient children. A parental questionnaire evaluated preferred treatment, problems or benefits of i.m. and rectal hydrocortisone, frequency and indications for administration and who administered treatment. Admissions of children with adrenal insufficiency were monitored. There were 39/52 families who responded to the questionnaire. 93% (26/28) preferred rectal hydrocortisone. Parents or children who previously received emergency treatment from a doctor now self-administered rectal hydrocortisone. The cost of suppositories and i.m. hydrocortisone is similar; however, storage of suppositories was inconvenient. One girl presented with pneumonia and collapse despite rectal hydrocortisone and a hydrocortisone level at admission of >2000 nmol/l with normal electrolytes. Rectal hydrocortisone is an acceptable and safe emergency therapy. We still advise i.m. hydrocortisone if rectal administration is not possible or with suppository extrusion.

  16. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit blood ...

  17. CT diagnosis of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Hiroshi; Hachisuka, Kitao; Yamaguchi, Akihiro

    1986-01-01

    Preoperative diagnosis of the depth of invasion and lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer were studied using the findings of computed tomography (CT). Of one hundred and four cases operated on for rectal cancer over a period of 32 months, thirty five cases were examined by CT with the use of olive oil enema and contrast enhancement using a 60 % Conray drip infusion with reference to the histological findings. For direct invasion into the wall, the diagnoses by CT were coincident with microscopic findings in 75 % of cancers of the rectosigmoid, in 75 % of the upper rectum and in 84 % of the lower rectum. Of all cases, 28 (80 %) were diagnosed correctly. As to local lymph node metastasis, 74 % of all diagnoses by CT corresponded with the histological diagnosis. Moreover, seventeen cases were evaluated for lateral lymph node metastasis, and the diagnostic accuracy by CT was 88 %. In conclusion, preoperative CT evaluation of the extension into the rectal wall and lymph node metastasis in rectal cancer was considesed useful. (author)

  18. Approach to Rectal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence C. Chua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal cancer is a distinct subset of colorectal cancer where specialized disease-specific management of the primary tumor is required. There have been significant developments in rectal cancer surgery at all stages of disease in particular the introduction of local excision strategies for preinvasive and early cancers, standardized total mesorectal excision for resectable cancers incorporating preoperative short- or long-course chemoradiation to the multimodality sequencing of treatment. Laparoscopic surgery is also increasingly being adopted as the standard rectal cancer surgery approach following expertise of colorectal surgeons in minimally invasive surgery gained from laparoscopic colon resections. In locally advanced and metastatic disease, combining chemoradiation with radical surgery may achieve total eradication of disease and disease control in the pelvis. Evidence for resection of metastases to the liver and lung have been extensively reported in the literature. The role of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for peritoneal metastases is showing promise in achieving locoregional control of peritoneal dissemination. This paper summarizes the recent developments in approaches to rectal cancer surgery at all these time points of the disease natural history.

  19. Clinical results and toxicity for short-course preoperative radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision in rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra; Debus, Jürgen; Hoehle, Frieder; Ulrich, Alexis; Muenter, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Short-course preoperative radiotherapy (SCPRT) is an alternative method to chemoirradiation for patients with Stage II and III rectal cancer when no downsizing is needed, but there is still widespread reluctance to use this method because of fear of side effects from high-fraction doses. This paper reports on a single institution patient cohort of operated rectal cancer patients after SCPRT, evaluated for chronic adverse effects, local control, progression-free survival and overall survival. Altogether, 257 patients were treated with SCPRT and surgery including total mesorectal excision (92% total mesorectal excision = TME) between 2002 and 2009. Local control and survival were analyzed. Chronic adverse effects for 154 patients without local relapse were evaluated according to the NCI–CTCAE version 4.0 classification, with a median follow-up of 48 months. We found a 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of 71%. The 5-year estimated local control (LC) rate was 94%. A positive resection margin was found in 4% of the patients and was significantly correlated with decreased DFS, OS and LC. Chronic adverse effects were reported by 58% of the patients, of which 10% were Grade 3 toxicities. The most frequent Grade 2 toxicity was stool incontinence (13%). Sexual dysfunction was found in 36% of the patients (31% Grade 1 or 2, and only 5% Grade 3). SCPRT combined with TME produced excellent LC rates together with a low rate of high-grade chronic adverse effects. (author)

  20. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  1. [Combined physiotherapy of chronic infectious prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churakov, A A; Popkov, V M; Zemskov, S P; Glybochko, P V; Bliumberg, B I

    2007-01-01

    Our experience with therapy of 259 outpatients with chronic infectious prostatitis (CIP) aged 16-55 years has demonstrated that combined treatment of CIP with rectal digital massage of the prostate, electrophoresis of chimotripsin solution with dimexide and local magnetotherapy (Intramag unit) significantly raises treatment efficacy, shortens treatment, prevents complications.

  2. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus following a Puestow Procedure in a Patient with Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Hirotaka; Miura, Kazuo; Fujii, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding that occurs as a complication of chronic or acute pancreatitis. We report a case of extremely acute-onset hemosuccus pancreaticus occurring in a patient with chronic pancreatitis over a long-term follow-up after a Puestow procedure (side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy). The patient was admitted to our hospital due to severe anemia and tarry stools indicative of gastrointestinal bleeding. Emergent endoscopy, including gas...

  3. Evaluation of portal circulation by /sup 99m/TcO/sub 4/-per-rectal scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiomi, S; Kuroki, T; Kurai, O

    1987-04-01

    Portal circulation in patients with chronic liver diseases was evaluated by a new method named per-rectal portal scintigraphy. Following instillation of a solution containing 10 mCi of /sup 99m/TcO/sub 4//sup -/ into the upper part of the rectum, serial scintigrams were taken sequentially. At the same time, the radioactivity curves over the liver and the heart were recorded sequentially. 1) The findings of per-rectal portal scintigrams were classified into two basic patterns. In pattern (I), the inferior mesenteric vein, portal vein, liver and the heart were visualized continuously after rectal instillation of the radioisotope. This pattern reflects direct blood flow from the rectum to the liver via the portal vein. In contrast, in pattern (II), the portal scintigrams demonstrated the vena cava inferior and the heart at an early phase when neither the portal system nor the liver have received the isotope. This pattern indicates that a part or all of the blood flow from the rectum is directed to the vena caval system via the portacaval shunts on the periphery of the inferior mesenteric vein. 2) Per-rectal portal shunt indices (SI) were calculated from serial radioactivities on the liver and the heart. In the healthy subjects, SI ranged from 1.9 % to 5.2 % (mean 4.1 %). In patients with hepatitis the mean SI was 6.9 %, and in patients with cirrhosis it was 52.9 %. 3) The SI was higher in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices than in those without. The SI was higher in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without. Thus, per-rectal portal scintigraphy is a simple, noninvasive and practical method for analyzing portal hemodynamics.

  4. Comparison of the preventive analgesic effect of rectal ketamine and rectal acetaminophen after pediatric tonsillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Morteza Heidari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is a little data about rectal administration of Ketamine as a postoperative analgesic, so we compared the efficacy of rectal ketamine with rectal acetaminophen, which is applied routinely for analgesia after painful surgeries like tonsillectomy. Methods: In this single-blinded comparative trial, we enrolled 70 children undergoing elective tonsillectomy, and divided them randomly in two groups. Patients received rectal ketamine (2 mg / kg or rectal acetaminophen (20 mg / kg at the end of surgery. The children′s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain scale was used to estimate pain in children. Also the vital signs, Wilson sedation scale, and side effects in each group were noted and compared for 24 hours. Results: The ketamine group had a lower pain score at 15 minutes and 60 minutes after surgery in Recovery (6.4 ± 0.8, 7.4 ± 1 vs. 7.1 ± 1.2, 7.8 ± 1.2 in the acetaminophen group, P < 0.05 and one hour and two hours in the ward (7.2 ± 0.7, 7 ± 0.5 vs. 7.9 ± 1.2, 7.5 ± 1.2 in the acetaminophen group, P < 0.05, with no significant differences till 24 hours. Dreams and hallucinations were not reported in the ketamine group. Systolic blood pressure was seen to be higher in the ketamine group (104.4 ± 7.9 vs. 99.8 ± 7.7 in the acetaminophen group and nystagmus was reported only in the ketamine group (14.2%. Other side effects were equivalent in both the groups. Conclusions: With low complications, rectal ketamine has analgesic effects, especially in the first hours after surgery in comparison with acetaminophen, and it can be an alternative analgesic with easy administration in children after tonsillectomy.

  5. Enteric and rectal duplications and duplication cysts in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Abdurrahman; Zeybek, Nazif; Yagci, Gokhan; Kaymakcioglu, Nihat; Tas, Huseyin; Saglam, Mutlu; Cetiner, Sadettin

    2005-03-01

    Alimentary tract duplication and duplication cysts are rare congenital malformations. The ileum is the most frequently affected site. However, alimentary tract duplication and duplication cysts can occur at any point along the gastrointestinal tract. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment is the best way to prevent associated morbidity. This article presents the cases of three patients admitted to Gulhane Military Medical Academy with signs of acute abdomen, intra-abdominal mass and chronic abdominal pain. These patients were found to have enteric duplication, duplication cyst and/or retro-rectal cyst. The literature on alimentary tract duplications is reviewed.

  6. Radiological imaging of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Lincender-Cvijetić

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibilities of diagnosing abdominal imaging in patients with rectal cancer, detecting lesions and assessing the stage of the lesions, in order to select the appropriate therapy. Before the introduction of imaging technologies, the diagnosis of colorectal pathology was based on conventional methods of inspecting intestines with a barium enema, with either a single or double contrast barium enema. Following the development of endoscopic methods and the wide use of colonoscopy, colonoscopy became the method of choice for diagnosing colorectal diseases. The improvement of Computerized Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, gave us new possibilities for diagnosing colorectal cancer. For rectal cancer, trans-rectal US (TRUS or endo-anal US (EAUS have a significant role. For staging rectal cancer, the Multi Slice Computed Tomography (MSCT is not the method of choice, but Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is preferred when it comes to monitoring the rectum. Therole of the MRI in the T staging of rectal cancer is crucial in preoperative assessment of: thickness – the width of the tumor, the extramural invasion, the circumference of resection margin (CRM, andthe assessment of the inclusion of mesorectal fascia. For successful execution of surgical techniques, good diagnostic imaging of the cancer is necessary in order to have a low level of recurrence. According to medical studies, the sensitivity of FDG-PET in diagnosing metastatic nodals is low, but for now it is not recommended in routine diagnosis of metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

  7. Giant sigmoid diverticulum with coexisting metastatic rectal carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Aidan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant diverticulum of the colon is a rare but clinically significant condition, usually regarded as a complication of an already existing colonic diverticular disease. This is the first report of a giant diverticulum of the colon with a co-existing rectal carcinoma. Case presentation We report a case of a 66-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with lower abdominal pain, chronic constipation and abdominal swelling. Preoperative abdominal computed tomography revealed a giant diverticulum of the colon with a coexisting rectal carcinoma and pulmonary metastasis revealed on a further thoracic computed tomography. An en bloc anterior resection of the rectum along with sigmoid colectomy, partial hysterectomy and right salpingoophorectomy was subsequently performed due to extensive adhesions. Conclusion This report shows that the presence of a co-existing distal colorectal cancer can potentially lead to progressive development of a colonic diverticulum to become a giant diverticulum by increasing colonic intra-luminal pressure and through the ball-valve mechanism. This may be of interest to practising surgeons and surgical trainees.

  8. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) KidsHealth / For Teens / Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) ... Print en español Sangrado uterino anormal What Is Abnormal Uterine Bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the name doctors ...

  9. Rectally administered indomethacin to prevent post-ESWL-pancreatitis (RIPEP): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yang-Yang; Chen, Hui; Tang, Xin-Ying; Jiang, Xi; Qian, Wei; Zou, Wen-Bin; Xin, Lei; Li, Bo; Qi, Yan-Fen; Hu, Liang-Hao; Zou, Duo-Wu; Jin, Zhen-Dong; Wang, Dong; Du, Yi-Qi; Wang, Luo-Wei; Liu, Feng; Li, Zhao-Shen; Liao, Zhuan

    2017-11-02

    Pancreatic extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (P-ESWL) is the first-line therapy for large pancreatic duct stones. Although it is a highly effective and safe procedure for the fragmentation of pancreatic stones, it is still not complication-free. Just like endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), pancreatitis is the most common complication. To date, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have proven to be the only effective prophylactic medication for post-ERCP pancreatitis and the European, American and Japanese Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy guidelines have recommended prophylactic rectally administered indomethacin for all patients undergoing ERCP. Given the little research about effective prevention for post P-ESWL pancreatitis, we aim to determine whether rectally administered indomethacin can reduce post-ESWL-pancreatitis. The RIPEP study is a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. One thousand three hundred and seventy patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic stones (>5 mm in diameter) treated with P-ESWL at Changhai Hospital will be randomly allocated to rectally administered indomethacin or placebo therapy before the procedure. The primary endpoint is the incidence of post-ESWL pancreatitis. Secondary endpoints include the severity of pancreatitis, occurrence rate of asymptomatic hyperamylasemia and other complications. The RIPEP trial is designed to show that rectally administered indomethacin reduces the development and severity of post-ESWL pancreatitis and benefits patients treated with P-ESWL. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02797067 . Registered on 17 November 2016.

  10. Rectal drug administration: clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A G; Moolenaar, F; de Leede, L G; Breimer, D D

    1982-01-01

    The human rectum represents a body cavity in which drugs can be easily introduced and retained and from which absorption is well possible. There are important therapeutic reasons why it is sometimes preferable to give a drug rectally rather than orally, e.g. in cases of nausea and vomiting. Drawbacks of rectal drug administration include the interruption of absorption by defaecation and lack of patient acceptability. The mechanism of drug absorption from the rectum is probably no different to that in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract, despite the fact that the physiological circumstances (e.g. pH, fluid content) differ substantially, Absorption from aqueous and alcoholic solutions may occur very rapidly, which has proved to be of considerable therapeutic value in the rapid suppression of acute convulsive attacks by diazepam (e.g. in children), but absorption from suppositories is generally slower and very much dependent on the nature of the suppository base, the use of surfactants or other additives, particle size of the active ingredient, etc. There is some evidence that hepatic first-pass elimination of high clearance drugs is partially avoided after rectal administration, e.g. lignocaine. This can be explained by the rectal venous blood supply: the upper part is connected with the portal system, whereas the lower part is directly connected with the systemic circulation. Plasma concentration data following rectal administration of representatives of several classes of drugs are reviewed: anticonvulsants, non-narcotic analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, hypnosedatives and anaesthetics, strong analgesics, theophylline and derivatives, corticosteroids, antibacterial agents, thiazinamium, promethazine, hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide, streptokinase, progesterone, ergotamine tartrate and levodopa. Only limited number of cases has it been adequately shown that the rectal route of administration gives plasma concentrations which are comparable to

  11. Rectal Lymphogranuloma Venereum in HIV-infected Patients Can Mimic Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickx, Etienne; Meignin, Véronique; Gérard, Laurence; Plantier-Colcher, Isabelle; Walker-Combrouze, Francine; Boutboul, David; Galicier, Lionel; Fieschi, Claire; Oksenhendler, Eric

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of rectal lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) has been reported since 2003 in men who have sex with men, most of them being infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In these patients, unusual clinical presentations such as rectal tumor or intense lymphoproliferation on rectal biopsies may lead to an erroneous diagnosis of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Three patients were referred to our center for the management of rectal B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma on the basis of a rectal pathologic specimen showing intense lymphoproliferation, the very suspect of lymphoma. Because of anamnesis of anal intercourses and venereal diseases, additional study revealed that all 3 had a positive Chlamydia trachomatis polymerase chain reaction on the rectal biopsy specimen. Rectal LGV was therefore considered and successfully treated with antibiotics. We propose that all patients presenting with a suspected rectal lymphoma should have a careful anamnesis of sexual behavior and a specific detection of C. trachomatis using polymerase chain reaction analysis on biopsy specimen to rule out the possibility of rectal LGV.

  12. A Single Centre Retrospective Evaluation of Laparoscopic Rectal Resection with TME for Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Cancer-Specific Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Quarati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic colon resection has established its role as a minimally invasive approach to colorectal diseases. Better long-term survival rate is suggested to be achievable with this approach in colon cancer patients, whereas some doubts were raised about its safety in rectal cancer. Here we report on our single centre experience of rectal laparoscopic resections for cancer focusing on short- and long-term oncological outcomes. In the last 13 years, 248 patients underwent minimally invasive approach for rectal cancer at our centre. We focused on 99 stage I, II, and III patients with a minimum follow-up period of 5 years. Of them 43 had a middle and 56 lower rectal tumor. Laparoscopic anterior rectal resection was performed in 71 patients whereas laparoscopic abdomino-perineal resection in 28. The overall mortality rate was 1%; the overall morbidity rate was 29%. The 5-year disease-free survival rate was 69.7%, The 5-year overall survival rate was 78.8%.

  13. Vascular gastric anomalies as a cause of relapsing bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Gradimir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although relatively rare, gastric vascular anomalies can be recognized as a source of both chronic and acute blood loss, most often presenting as long term iron deficiency anemia, rarely as severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Case report. We present five patients with various gastric vascular anomalies, diagnosed during the year of 2003. in the Clinical Hospital Center Zemun. The diagnosis was based on endoscopic appearances, clinical history and characteristic histological findings. Gastric vascular anomalies presented in our review were: portal hypertensive gastropathy, gastric antral vascular ectasia, angiodysplasia, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and Dieulafoy lesion. The used treatment modalities included surgery and various endoscopic techniques (schlerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation. Conclusion. Patients presented with chronic iron deficiency anemia or acute and recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage should be considered as having one of gastric vascular anomalies.

  14. Management of severe perioperative bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A; Ahmed, Aamer B; Afshari, Arash

    2017-01-01

    : The management of perioperative bleeding involves multiple assessments and strategies to ensure appropriate patient care. Initially, it is important to identify those patients with an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. Next, strategies should be employed to correct preoperative anaemia...... and to stabilise macrocirculation and microcirculation to optimise the patient's tolerance to bleeding. Finally, targeted interventions should be used to reduce intraoperative and postoperative bleeding, and so prevent subsequent morbidity and mortality. The objective of these updated guidelines is to provide...

  15. Accuracy of rockall score for in hospital re bleeding among cirrhotic patients with variceal bleed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgher, S.; Saleem, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of Roc kall scoring system for predicting in-hospital re-ble- eding in cirrhotic patients presenting with variceal bleed. Material and Methods: This descriptive case series study was conducted at Department of Medicine Combined Military Hospital Lahore from December 2013 to May 2014. We included patients with liver cirrhosis who presented with upper GI bleeding and showed varices as the cause of bleeding on endoscopy. Clinical and endoscopic features were noted to calculate Rockall score. Patients with score < 2 and > 8 were included. After treating with appropriate pharmacological and endoscopic therapy, patients were followed for re-bleeding for 10 days. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values using 2 x 2 tables. Results: In the study, 175 patients were included. Mean age was 51.5 ± 1.22 years. Male to female ratio was 1.5 to 1.0 out of 175 patients, 157 patients (89.7%) were of low risk group (score = 2) while 18 patients (10.3%) were in high risk group (score > 8). In low risk group, re-bleeding occurred only in 2 patients (1.2%) while in high risk group, re-bleeding occurred in 14 patients (78%). Rockall score was found to have good diagnostic accuracy with sensitivity of 87.5%, specificity of 97.48%, positive predictive value of 77.8% and negative predictive value of 98.7%. Conclusion: In cases of variceal bleed, frequency of re-bleed is less in patients who are in low risk category with lower Rockall score and high in high risk patients with higher rockall score. The Rockall score has a good diagnostic accuracy in prediction of re-bleed in variceal bleeding. (author)

  16. Anterior colorectal duplication presenting as rectal prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Resendiz, Amador; Asz, Jose; Medina-Vega, F Antonio; Ortega-Salgado, J Arturo

    2007-09-01

    Duplications of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are rare. Only 5% of them are rectal and there are very few reports of rectal prolapse (RP) caused by a duplication. An 11 month-old female presented with a RP caused by a blind-ended anterior tubular colorectal duplication. The duplication was successfully opened and connected to the normal rectum without complications. Although infrequent, a rectal duplication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of RP.

  17. [Colonic angiodysplasia in a chronic renal failure patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, S; Dima, B; Herlea, V; Chiriac-Babei, Gh; Vasilescu, C

    2006-01-01

    An important cause of intestinal bleeding in patients with chronic renal failure is angiodysplasia. In retrospective reports up to 19-32% of patients had bleeding from angiodysplastic lesions. These are usually multiple, have a high tendency of rebleeding (25-47%) and are often located in the stomach and duodenum, but can affect the colon and the jejunum as well. Bleeding from angiodysplastic lesions is usually low grade and stops spontaneously in more than 90% of patients, but some times may be life threatening necessitate therapeutic interventions to achieve hemostasis. We report a case of an 18-year old female with renal failure on CAPD who presented a massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding and imposed emergency surgery.

  18. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  19. Predictors of a variceal source among patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Ahmad; Almadi, Majid; Barkun, Alan; Martel, Myriam

    2012-04-01

    Patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require an early, tailored approach best guided by knowledge of the bleeding lesion, especially a variceal versus a nonvariceal source. To identify, by investigating a large national registry, variables that would be predictive of a variceal origin of UGIB using clinical parameters before endoscopic evaluation. A retrospective study was conducted in 21 Canadian hospitals during the period from January 2004 until the end of May 2005. Consecutive charts for hospitalized patients with a primary or secondary discharge diagnosis of UGIB were reviewed. Data regarding demographics, including historical, physical examination, initial laboratory investigations, endoscopic and pharmacological therapies administered, as well as clinical outcomes, were collected. Multivariable logistic regression modelling was performed to identify clinical predictors of a variceal source of bleeding. The patient population included 2020 patients (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Overall, 215 (10.6%) were found to be bleeding from upper gastrointestinal varices. Among 26 patient characteristics, variables predicting a variceal source of bleeding included history of liver disease (OR 6.36 [95% CI 3.59 to 11.3]), excessive alcohol use (OR 2.28 [95% CI 1.37 to 3.77]), hematemesis (OR 2.65 [95% CI 1.61 to 4.36]), hematochezia (OR 3.02 [95% CI 1.46 to 6.22]) and stigmata of chronic liver disease (OR 2.49 [95% CI 1.46 to 4.25]). Patients treated with antithrombotic therapy were more likely to experience other causes of hemorrhage (OR 0.44 [95% CI 0.35 to 0.78]). Presenting historical and physical examination data, and initial laboratory tests carry significant predictive ability in discriminating variceal versus nonvariceal sources of bleeding.

  20. Determinants and modifiers of bleeding phenotypes in haemophilia-A: General and tropical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umma A. Ibrahim

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Haemophilia-A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder characterized by deficiency of FVIII. Although severity of haemophilia is largely determined by the extent to which different mutations abolish FVIII production, the overall phenotypic variations among haemophiliacs is determined by a combination of several other factors, which range from general to tropical factors on the one hand, and from genetic to immunologic and infective factors on the other hand. Determinants and modifiers of haemophilic bleeding phenotypes are important predictors of prognosis. However, tropical determinants of haemophilic bleeding phenotypes are virtually ignored because majority of haemophilia research originated from developed non-tropical countries. The aim of this paper is to present a balanced review of the haemophilic bleeding phenotypes from general and tropical perspectives. Hence, we present a concisely updated comprehensive review of the pathophysiologic and clinical significance of general vis-à-vis tropical determinants and modifiers of haemophilic bleeding phenotypes from genetic, immunologic and infective perspectives. Understanding of general phenotypic determinants such as FVIII gene mutations, immunological (inhibitors and infective (e.g. hepatitis and HIV complications, classical thrombophilias (e.g. FV-Leiden and non-classical thrombophilias (e.g. non-O blood groups will throw more light into the mechanisms by which some tropical prothrombotic gene mutations (such as sickle β-globin gene and certain chronic tropical pro-haemorrhagic parasitic infections (such as urinary and gastrointestinal helminthiasis may modify frequency, intensity and pattern of bleeding among haemophiliacs in the tropics. The clinical significance of iron deficiency within the context of helminthiasis and haemophilia is also reviewed. More research is needed to determine the precise effect of non-classical thrombophilias such as sickling disorders and ABO blood groups

  1. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus following a Puestow Procedure in a Patient with Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hirotaka; Miura, Kazuo; Fujii, Hideki

    2011-05-01

    Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding that occurs as a complication of chronic or acute pancreatitis. We report a case of extremely acute-onset hemosuccus pancreaticus occurring in a patient with chronic pancreatitis over a long-term follow-up after a Puestow procedure (side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy). The patient was admitted to our hospital due to severe anemia and tarry stools indicative of gastrointestinal bleeding. Emergent endoscopy, including gastrointestinal fiberscopy and colon fiberscopy, showed no abnormal findings. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography and hemorrhagic scintigraphy did not detect a hemorrhagic lesion. Although interventional radiology was considered for diagnosis and treatment, conservative therapy seemed sufficient to affect hemostasis. Two weeks later, however, acute intestinal bleeding with hemodynamic shock occurred, and exploration was performed without delay. Intraoperative endoscopy through an incision of the reconstructed jejunal loop in the close proximal end revealed a site of active bleeding from the side-to-side anastomotic pancreatic duct. Following a longitudinal incision of the jejunal loop, a bleeding point was sutured and ligated on direct inspection. The patient showed a good postoperative course.

  2. To Bleed or Not to Bleed: That is the Question. The Side Effects of Apixaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Zito, Annapaola; Devito, Fiorella; Maiello, Maria; Palmiero, Pasquale

    2018-01-01

    Apixaban is a new oral anticoagulant (NOACs: Novel Oral Anticoagulant), like dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban. All of them are prescribed to patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thromboembolism, to replace warfarin, because of the lower probability of bleeding, however they can cause bleeding by themselves. Bleeding is an adverse event in patients taking anticoagulants. It is associated with a significant increase of morbidity and risk of death. However, these drugs should be used only for the time when anticoagulation is strictly required, especially when used for preventing deep vein thrombosis. Prolonged use increases the risk of bleeding. In the ARISTOTLE Trial Apixaban, compared with warfarin, was associated with a lower rate of intracranial hemorrhages and less adverse consequences following extracranial hemorrhage. Many physicians still have limited experience with new oral anticoagulants and about bleeding risk managment. We reviewed the available literature on extracranial and intracranial bleeding concerning apixaban. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Bleeding into the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003235.htm Bleeding into the skin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bleeding into the skin can occur from broken blood ...

  4. Major bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage risk prediction in patients with atrial fibrillation: Attention to modifiable bleeding risk factors or use of a bleeding risk stratification score? A nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tze-Fan; Lip, Gregory Y H; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Chang, Shih-Lin; Lo, Li-Wei; Hu, Yu-Feng; Tuan, Ta-Chuan; Liao, Jo-Nan; Chung, Fa-Po; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2018-03-01

    While modifiable bleeding risks should be addressed in all patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), use of a bleeding risk score enables clinicians to 'flag up' those at risk of bleeding for more regular patient contact reviews. We compared a risk assessment strategy for major bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) based on modifiable bleeding risk factors (referred to as a 'MBR factors' score) against established bleeding risk stratification scores (HEMORR 2 HAGES, HAS-BLED, ATRIA, ORBIT). A nationwide cohort study of 40,450 AF patients who received warfarin for stroke prevention was performed. The clinical endpoints included ICH and major bleeding. Bleeding scores were compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (areas under the ROC curves [AUCs], or c-index) and the net reclassification index (NRI). During a follow up of 4.60±3.62years, 1581 (3.91%) patients sustained ICH and 6889 (17.03%) patients sustained major bleeding events. All tested bleeding risk scores at baseline were higher in those sustaining major bleeds. When compared to no ICH, patients sustaining ICH had higher baseline HEMORR 2 HAGES (p=0.003), HAS-BLED (pbleeding scores, c-indexes were significantly higher compared to MBR factors (pbleeding. C-indexes for the MBR factors score was significantly lower compared to all other scores (De long test, all pbleeding risk scores for major bleeding (all pbleeding risk scores had modest predictive value for predicting major bleeding but the best predictive value and NRI was found for the HAS-BLED score. Simply depending on modifiable bleeding risk factors had suboptimal predictive value for the prediction of major bleeding in AF patients, when compared to the HAS-BLED score. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Profiling lifetime episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among patients from rural Sub-Saharan Africa where schistosoma mansoni is endemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opio, Christopher Kenneth; Kazibwe, Francis; Ocama, Ponsiano; Rejani, Lalitha; Belousova, Elena Nikolaevna; Ajal, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Severe chronic hepatic schistosomiasis is a common cause of episodes upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). However, there is paucity of data on clinical epidemiology of episodes of UGIB from rural Africa despite on going public health interventions to control and eliminate schistosomiasis. Through a cross sectional study we profiled lifetime episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and associated factors at a rural primary health facility in sub-Saharan Africa were schistosomiasis is endemic. The main outcome was number of lifetime episodes of UGIB analyzed as count data. From 107 enrolled participants, 323 lifetime episodes of UGIB were reported. Fifty-seven percent experienced ≥ 2 lifetime episodes of UGIB. Ninety-four percent had severe chronic hepatic schistosomiasis and 80% esophageal varices. Alcohol use and viral hepatitis was infrequent. Eighty-eight percent were previously treated with praziquantel and 70% had a history of blood transfusion. No patient had ever had an endoscopy or treatment for prevention of recurrent variceal bleeding. Multivariable analysis identified a cluster of eight clinical factor variables (age ≥ 40, female sex, history of blood transfusion, abdominal collaterals, esophageal varices, pattern x periportal fibrosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia) significantly associated (P-value Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common health problem in this part of rural SSA where schistosomiasis is endemic. The clinical profile described is unique and is important for improved case management, and for future research.

  6. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Menorrhagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Information For… Media Policy Makers Blood Disorders Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... It can also be bleeding that is very heavy. How do you know if you have heavy ...

  7. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, W. Warren; Blackstock, A. William; Herman, Joseph; Konski, Andre A.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Poggi, Matthew M.; Regine, William F.; Cosman, Bard C.; Saltz, Leonard; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria on Resectable Rectal Cancer was updated by the Expert Panel on Radiation Oncology-Rectal/Anal Cancer, based on a literature review completed in 2007

  8. Rectal cancer surgery: volume-outcome analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Emmeline

    2010-12-01

    There is strong evidence supporting the importance of the volume-outcome relationship with respect to lung and pancreatic cancers. This relationship for rectal cancer surgery however remains unclear. We review the currently available literature to assess the evidence base for volume outcome in relation to rectal cancer surgery.

  9. Masquerading Mycobacterium: Rectal Growth or Tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: A 37-year old male presented to us with history of lower abdominal pain for 6 months. His physical examination revealed a rectal mass of approximately 1centimeter. He was investigated for possible rectal growth with sigmoidoscopy and biopsy. The histopathological examination (HPE) showed a non-specific ...

  10. Comparing Bleeding Risk Assessment Focused on Modifiable Risk Factors Only Versus Validated Bleeding Risk Scores in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yutao; Zhu, Hang; Chen, Yundai

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUNDThere is uncertainty whether a focus on modifiable bleeding risk factors offers better prediction of major bleeding than other existing bleeding risk scores.METHODSThis study compared a score based on numbers of the modifiable bleeding risk factors recommended in the 2016 European...... guidelines ("European risk score") versus other published bleeding risk scores that have been derived and validated in atrial fibrillation subjects (HEMORR2HAGES, HAS-BLED, ATRIA, and ORBIT) in a large hospital-based cohort of Chinese inpatients with atrial fibrillation.RESULTSThe European score had modest...... predictive ability for major bleeding (c-index 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.56-0.69) and intracranial hemorrhage (0.72, 0.65-0.79) but nonsignificantly (and poorly) predicted extracranial bleeding (0.55, 0.54-0.56; P = .361). The HAS-BLED score was superior to predict bleeding events compared...

  11. The use of 111In-labelled platelets for scintigraphic localization of gastrointestinal bleeding with special reference to occult bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjerloeff Schmidt, K.; Waever Rasmussen, J.; Grove, O.; Andersen, D.

    1986-01-01

    Gamma-camera imaging of the abdomen after injection of autologous 111 In-labelled platelets was applied for localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in a study of 22 patients. In 15 studies showing scintigraphic signs of bleeding, the clinical presentation included occult bleeding in 6, melaena in 4, and bloody stools in 5 patients. Scintigraphy could be done repeatedly for up to 1 week after a single tracer injection. The time interval between the injection and scintigraphic visualization of bleeding ranged from 10 min to 68 h, being longest in cases of occult bleeding. In most cases the scintigraphic findings were supported by other diagnostic modalities, including surgical removal of presumed sources of bleeding. In seven studies without scintigraphic signs of bleeding, a probable source of bleeding was identified by other means in one patient. The 111 In-platelet method seems to be a promising method for localization of gastrointestinal bleeding which may prove particularly useful in cases of occult or recurrent bleeding

  12. Vaginal bleeding between periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003156.htm Vaginal bleeding between periods To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. This article discusses vaginal bleeding that occurs between a woman's monthly menstrual ...

  13. Rectal toxicity profile after transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy: Use of a comprehensive toxicity scoring system and identification of rectal dosimetric toxicity predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Jinesh N.; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To better understand rectal toxicity after prostate brachytherapy, we employed the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 3.0), a comprehensive system with distinct and separately reported gastrointestinal adverse event items (unlike Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity scoring), to evaluate item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 135 patients treated with brachytherapy ± hormonal therapy, using CTCAE v3.0 to score acute/late rectal toxicities (median follow-up, 41 months). Dosimetric parameters were evaluated for ability to predict toxicities. Results: Use of CTCAE yielded a novel rectal toxicity profile consisting of diarrhea, incontinence, urgency, proctitis, pain, spasms, and hemorrhage event rates. No item had a 25 (percent of rectal volume receiving 25% of prescribed prostate dose) ≤ 25% vs. 60% for %V 25 > 25% (p 1 ≤ 40% vs. 44% for %V 1 > 40% (p = 0.007). Conclusions: A comprehensive understanding of item-specific postimplant rectal toxicities was obtained using CTCAE. Rectal %V 25 > 25% and %V 1 > 40% predicted worse late diarrhea and maximum toxicity, respectively

  14. Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma Presenting as a Rectal Polyp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Fitzgerald

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Appendiceal adenocarcinoma typically presents as an incidentally noted appendiceal mass, or with symptoms of right lower quadrant pain that can mimic appendicitis, but local involvement of adjacent organs is uncommon, particularly as the presenting sign. We report on a case of a primary appendiceal cancer initially diagnosed as a rectal polyp based on its appearance in the rectal lumen. The management of the patient was in keeping with standard practice for a rectal polyp, and the diagnosis of appendiceal adenocarcinoma was made intraoperatively. The operative strategy had to be adjusted due to this unexpected finding. Although there are published cases of appendiceal adenocarcinoma inducing intussusception and thus mimicking a cecal polyp, there are no reports in the literature describing invasion of the appendix through the rectal wall and thus mimicking a rectal polyp. The patient is a 75-year-old female who presented with spontaneous hematochezia and, on colonoscopy, was noted to have a rectal polyp that appeared to be located within a diverticulum. When endoscopic mucosal resection was not successful, she was referred to colorectal surgery for a low anterior resection. Preoperative imaging was notable for an enlarged appendix adjacent to the rectum. Intraoperatively, the appendix was found to be densely adherent to the right lateral rectal wall. An en bloc resection of the distal sigmoid colon, proximal rectum and appendix was performed, with pathology demonstrating appendiceal adenocarcinoma that invaded through the rectal wall. The prognosis in this type of malignancy weighs heavily on whether or not perforation and spread throughout the peritoneal cavity have occurred. In this unusual presentation, an en bloc resection is required for a complete resection and to minimize the risk of peritoneal spread. Unusual appearing polyps do not always originate from the bowel wall. Abnormal radiographic findings adjacent to an area of

  15. Local radiological staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, V.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.

    2004-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a common malignancy with a highly variable outcome. Local recurrence is dependent upon tumour stage and surgical technique. The role of pre-operative imaging is to determine which patients may be safely managed by surgery alone and which need additional therapy in order to facilitate surgery and improve outcome. This decision depends on the distinction between those with early and advanced disease. While trans-rectal ultrasound has traditionally been used to answer this question, a role for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly argued. This review will focus on the treatment options for rectal cancer and the clinical questions that subsequently arise for the radiologist to answer

  16. Value of Adjusted Blood Requirement Index in determining failure to control bleed in patients with variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Shahab; Khalid, Abdullah B; Awan, Safia; Shah, Hasnain A; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2015-03-01

    Variceal bleeding is a serious complication in patients with cirrhosis. Among the criteria that were proposed in Baveno conferences, the Adjusted Blood Requirement Index (ABRI) has not been validated prospectively in clinical practice. We therefore aim to evaluate the measurement of ABRI as a marker of failure to control bleeding and to evaluate the consistency of ABRI in relation to other criteria of failure to control variceal bleeding. All patients with variceal bleeding who presented to Aga Khan University Hospital from January 2010 to December 2012 who were administered transfusion of packed red blood cells were included after obtaining informed consent. All patients were managed as per the standard protocol with intravenous terlipressin along with band ligation and injection of cyanoacrylate in cases of esophageal and fundal varices, respectively. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were measured every 6 h for 48 h and then every 12 h until 5 days of index bleed in each patient. Packed cells were transfused if hemoglobin decreased below 8 g/dl. The number of blood units transfused, change in hemoglobin values, and ABRI were calculated after each unit of blood transfusion till 120 h. In patients in whom bleed could not be controlled, an ABRI value of 0.75 or more was compared with other Baveno IV-based parameters that define failure to control variceal bleeding. During the study period, 137 eligible patients with variceal bleed were admitted. The mean age of the patients was 52±12 years. The majority of patients (50.4%) were in Child-Pugh class B, followed by 38% in Child-Pugh class C. According to the Baveno IV criteria, overall failure to control acute variceal bleeding occurred in 52 (37.9%) patients. Excluding ABRI, failure to control bleeding was found in 22/137 (16%) patients, whereas ABRI-based criteria showed that in 34/137 (24.8%) patients, bleeding could not be controlled. There were only four (2.9%) patients with variceal bleeding in whom ABRI and

  17. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid —This medication treats heavy menstrual bleeding. • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs—These drugs, which include ibuprofen, may help control heavy bleeding and relieve menstrual cramps. • Antibiotics—If you have an infection, you may be ...

  18. A Macaque Model for Rectal Lymphogranuloma Venereum and Non-Lymphogranuloma Venereum Chlamydia trachomatis: Impact on Rectal Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanathan, Sundaram Ajay; Aubert, Rachael D; Morris, Monica R; Zhao, Chunxia; Philips, Christi; Khalil, George M; Deyounks, Frank; Kelley, Kristen; Ritter, Jana M; Chen, C Y; Kersh, Ellen N; McNicholl, Janet M

    2017-09-01

    Sustained genital tract inflammation caused by sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is known to increase risk of vaginal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections but, to our knowledge, there are no nonhuman primate studies that have evaluated its link to rectal HIV acquisition. Rhesus macaques inoculated with Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) (serovars LGV-L2 and CT-E; n = 7) or saline (n = 7) received up to 20 rectal challenges twice a week of simian/HIV immunodeficiency virus (SHIVSF162p3). SHIV viremia was determined by real-time PCR and Chlamydia infection by APTIMA Combo 2 testing. The rectal cytokine-chemokine levels were evaluated by multiplex bead assays. Rectal Chlamydia infection was maintained throughout the study. We did not observe significant differences (P = 1.0) in frequency of SHIV acquisition between the STI and control arms. It took fewer SHIV challenges to infect the STI animals although the difference was not significant (P = 0.59). There were no significant differences in peak plasma viremia between STI and control arms (P = 0.63). The association of plasma viremia with rectal shedding was significantly different by arm (P = 0.038). In the first such study in a macaque model, we did not observe an increased risk of SHIV acquisition due to rectal Chlamydia coinfection. This macaque model can be further developed and expanded to better investigate the impact of different rectal STIs on HIV acquisition.

  19. Colorectal Polyposis in a 15 Year Old Boy in Uganda - Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colorectal polyps usually present as rectal bleeding and are associated with increased risk of colorectal carcinoma. This is a 15 year old boy who presented with painless rectal bleeding for 9 years and mass protruding from the anus for 2 years after passing stool. He had history of 3 nephews with similar symptoms.

  20. Automated registration of tail bleeding in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Peter B; Henriksen, Lars; Andresen, Per R; Lauritzen, Brian; Jensen, Kåre L; Juhl, Trine N; Tranholm, Mikael

    2008-05-01

    An automated system for registration of tail bleeding in rats using a camera and a user-designed PC-based software program has been developed. The live and processed images are displayed on the screen and are exported together with a text file for later statistical processing of the data allowing calculation of e.g. number of bleeding episodes, bleeding times and bleeding areas. Proof-of-principle was achieved when the camera captured the blood stream after infusion of rat whole blood into saline. Suitability was assessed by recording of bleeding profiles in heparin-treated rats, demonstrating that the system was able to capture on/off bleedings and that the data transfer and analysis were conducted successfully. Then, bleeding profiles were visually recorded by two independent observers simultaneously with the automated recordings after tail transection in untreated rats. Linear relationships were found in the number of bleedings, demonstrating, however, a statistically significant difference in the recording of bleeding episodes between observers. Also, the bleeding time was longer for visual compared to automated recording. No correlation was found between blood loss and bleeding time in untreated rats, but in heparinized rats a correlation was suggested. Finally, the blood loss correlated with the automated recording of bleeding area. In conclusion, the automated system has proven suitable for replacing visual recordings of tail bleedings in rats. Inter-observer differences can be eliminated, monotonous repetitive work avoided, and a higher through-put of animals in less time achieved. The automated system will lead to an increased understanding of the nature of bleeding following tail transection in different rodent models.

  1. Evaluation of the formation of esophageal varices by per-rectal portal scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeoka, Naoko; Monna, Takeyuki; Shiomi, Susumu; Kuroki, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Kenzo; Ochi, Hironobu; Onoyama, Yasuto (Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Yamamoto, Sukeo

    1989-12-01

    Portal circulation in patients with liver diseases was evaluated by {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate per-rectal portal scintigraphy, and we retrospectively examined the relationship between the extent of abnormality in the portal circulation and the development of esophageal varices. The per-rectal portal shunt index (PRPSI) was calculated for 13 healthy subjects and 79 patients with chronic hepatitis and 214 with cirrhosis of the liver. In the healthy subjects, the mean PRPSI was 4.8%. In the patients with hepatitis, the mean PRPSI was 8.4%, and in the patients with cirrhosis, it was 48.5%. The PRPSI was significantly higher in the cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices than in those without it, and also in the cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without it. The cumulative incidence of esophageal varices in the 3 years of the study in patients whose PRPSI was 20% or over was significantly higher than that in patients whose PRPSI was under 20%. The results suggested that this non-invasive method should be useful for predictions of the formation of esophageal varices. (author).

  2. Evaluation of the formation of esophageal varices by per-rectal portal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeoka, Naoko; Monna, Takeyuki; Shiomi, Susumu; Kuroki, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Kenzo; Ochi, Hironobu; Onoyama, Yasuto; Yamamoto, Sukeo.

    1989-01-01

    Portal circulation in patients with liver diseases was evaluated by 99m Tc-pertechnetate per-rectal portal scintigraphy, and we retrospectively examined the relationship between the extent of abnormality in the portal circulation and the development of esophageal varices. The per-rectal portal shunt index (PRPSI) was calculated for 13 healthy subjects and 79 patients with chronic hepatitis and 214 with cirrhosis of the liver. In the healthy subjects, the mean PRPSI was 4.8%. In the patients with hepatitis, the mean PRPSI was 8.4%, and in the patients with cirrhosis, it was 48.5%. The PRPSI was significantly higher in the cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices than in those without it, and also in the cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without it. The cumulative incidence of esophageal varices in the 3 years of the study in patients whose PRPSI was 20% or over was significantly higher than that in patients whose PRPSI was under 20%. The results suggested that this non-invasive method should be useful for predictions of the formation of esophageal varices. (author)

  3. Management of acute gastric varices bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Jung Chang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal varices bleeding is a major complication in patients with cirrhosis. Gastric varices (GVs occur in approximately 20% of patients with portal hypertension. However, GV bleeding develops in only 25% of patients with GV and requires more transfusion and has higher mortality than esophageal variceal (EV bleeding. The best strategy for managing acute GV bleeding is similar to that of acute EV bleeding, which involves airway protection, hemodynamic stabilization, and intensive care. Blood transfusion should be cautiously administered in order to avoid rebleeding. Vasoactive agents such as terlipressin or somatostatin should be used when GV bleeding is suspected. Routine use of prophylactic antibiotics reduces bacterial infection and lowers rebleeding rates. By administering endoscopic cyanoacrylate injection, the initial hemostasis rate achieved is at least 90% in most cases; the average mortality rate of GV bleeding is approximately 10–30% and the rebleeding rate is between 22% and 37%. Although endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate is superior to sclerotherapy and band ligation, and has remained the treatment of choice for treating acute GV bleeding, the outcome of this treatment is still unsatisfactory. New treatment options, such as thrombin injection, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, or balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration, have shown promising results for acute GV bleeding. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to compare the efficacy of these therapies with cyanoacrylate.

  4. Palliative Short-Course Radiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picardi, Vincenzo; Deodato, Francesco [Department of Radiotherapy, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Campobasso (Italy); Guido, Alessandra; Giaccherini, Lucia [Radiation Oncology Center, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES), University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiotherapy, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Campobasso (Italy); Frazzoni, Leonardo; Farioli, Andrea; Cuicchi, Dajana [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Cilla, Savino [Department of Radiotherapy, Fondazione di Ricerca e Cura “Giovanni Paolo II,” Campobasso (Italy); Cellini, Francesco [Radiation Oncology Department, Policlinico Universitario Campus Bio-Medico, Rome (Italy); Uddin, A.F.M. Kamal [Department of Radiation Oncology, United Hospital Limited, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario “A. Gemelli,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); Buwenge, Milly [Radiation Oncology Center, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine (DIMES), University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ardizzoni, Andrea [Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Poggioli, Gilberto [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Valentini, Vincenzo [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario “A. Gemelli,” Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (Italy); and others

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The management of patients with symptomatic rectal cancer not amenable to curative treatment may be challenging. The aim of this phase 2 study was to evaluate the efficacy of short-course radiation therapy in patients with obstructing rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients who were not candidates for surgical resection because of synchronous metastases, age, and/or comorbidities were considered eligible. The sample size was calculated based on the 2-stage design of Simon. Short-course radiation therapy was delivered with an isocentric 4-field box technique (total, 25 Gy; 5 fractions in 5 days). Chemotherapy was suspended during radiation treatment. Clinical outcome measures were symptomatic response rate, toxicity, colostomy-free survival, and overall survival. Results: From October 2003 to November 2012, 18 patients (median age, 77.5 years) were enrolled. The median follow-up was 11.5 months (range, 3-36 months). Four weeks after treatment, a complete response (ie, complete symptom resolution) was observed in 38.9% of patients and a partial response in 50.0% cases, whereas 11.1% had no response. The rates of reduction or resolution of pain and bleeding were 87.5% and 100%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year colostomy-free survival rates were 100%, 71.4%, and 47.6%, respectively (median, 30 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year cumulative overall survival rates were 85.2%, 53%, and 39.8%, respectively (median, 25 months). No patients stopped treatment because of gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities: 38.9% of patients had grade 1 to 2 toxicity, and 16.7% had grade 3 toxicity. Only 1 patient had hematologic grade 2 toxicity, and 2 patients had grade 2 skin toxicity. Conclusions: Short-course radiation therapy may represent a safe and effective alternative treatment option in patients with obstructing rectal cancer not eligible for curative treatment, allowing colostomy to be avoided in a substantial proportion of patients.

  5. Provocative Endoscopy to Identify Bleeding Site in Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Novel Approach in Transarterial Embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Minobu; Fuwa, Sokun; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yoshiyuki; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2016-07-01

    This report describes a novel approach to endoscopically induce bleeding by removing a clot from the bleeding site during angiography for upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage. This procedure enabled accurate identification of the bleeding site, allowing for successful targeted embolization despite a negative initial angiogram. Provocative endoscopy may be a feasible and useful option for angiography of obscure bleeding sites in patients with UGI arterial hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Severe Bleeding: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 12, 2017. Jevon P, et al. Part 5 — First-aid treatment for severe bleeding. Nursing Times. 2008;104:26. Oct. 19, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-severe-bleeding/basics/ART-20056661 . Mayo ...

  7. Recurrent Bleeding After Perimesencephalic Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauw, Frans; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Kizilates, Ufuk; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-12-01

    Perimesencephalic hemorrhage (PMH) is a type of subarachnoid hemorrhage with excellent long-term outcomes. Only 1 well-documented case of in-hospital rebleeding after PMH is described in the literature, which occurred after initiating antithrombotic treatment because of myocardial ischemia. We describe a patient with PMH without antithrombotic treatment who had 2 episodes of recurrent bleeding on the day of ictus. To validate the radiologic findings, we conducted a case-control study. Six neuroradiologists and 2 neuroradiology fellows performed a blinded assessment of serial unenhanced head computed tomography (CT) scans of 8 patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern (1 index patient, 6 patients with PMH, 1 patient with perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and basilar artery aneurysm) to investigate a potential increase in amount of subarachnoid blood. A 56-year-old woman with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and negative CT angiography had 2 episodes after the onset headache with a sudden increase of the headache. Blinded assessment of serial head CT scans of 8 patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern identified the patient who was clinically suspected to have 2 episodes of recurrent bleeding to have an increased amount of subarachnoid blood on 2 subsequent CT scans. Recurrent bleeding after PMH may also occur in patients not treated with antithrombotics. Even after early rebleeding, the prognosis of PMH is excellent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of detectable bleeding rates of radiopharmaceuticals for localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in sheep using a closed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owunwanne, A.; Sadek, S.; Yacoub, T.; Awdeh, M.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Al-Wafai, I.; Vallgren, S.

    1989-01-01

    The closed experimental animal model system was used to compare the detectable gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding rates of 99m Tc-DTPA, 99m Tc-RBCs and 99m Tc tin colloid in sheep. The three radiopharmaceuticals were used to detect the upper GI bleeding sites at rates of 0.57 and 0.25 ml/min. At the lower bleeding rate of 0.1 ml/min, both 99m Tc-DTPA and 99m Tc-RBCs were successful in detecting the bleeding site. At the lowest rate of 0.07 ml/min only 99m Tc-DTPA was successful in detecting the bleeding site. The results indicate that 99m Tc-DTPA is the most useful 99m Tc radiopharmaceutical for detecting the upper GI bleeding site at the slowest bleeding rate studied. (orig.) [de

  9. Laparoscopic versus open total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennix, Sandra; Pelzers, Loeki; Bouvy, Nicole; Beets, Geerard L; Pierie, Jean-Pierre; Wiggers, Theo; Breukink, Stephanie

    2014-04-15

    effects on five-year disease-free survival (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.76 to1.38, 4 studies, N = 943). The estimated effects of laparoscopic and open TME on local recurrence and overall survival were similar, although confidence intervals were wide, both with moderate quality evidence (local recurrence: OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.57 to1.39 and overall survival rate: OR 1.15; 95% CI 0.87 to1.52). There was moderate to high quality evidence that the number of resected lymph nodes and surgical margins were similar between the two groups.For the short-term results, length of hospital stay was reduced by two days (95% CI -3.22 to -1.10), moderate quality evidence), and the time to first defecation was shorter in the LTME group (-0.86 days; 95% CI -1.17 to -0.54). There was moderate quality evidence that 30 days morbidity were similar in both groups (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.8 to 1.1). There were fewer wound infections (OR 0.68; 95% CI 0.50 to 0.93) and fewer bleeding complications (OR 0.30; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.93) in the LTME group.There was no clear evidence of any differences in quality of life after LTME or OTME regarding functional recovery, bladder and sexual function. The costs were higher for LTME with differences up to GBP 2000 for direct costs only. We have found moderate quality evidence that laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) has similar effects to open TME on long term survival outcomes for the treatment of rectal cancer. The quality of the evidence was downgraded due to imprecision and further research could impact on our confidence in this result. There is moderate quality evidence that it leads to better short-term post-surgical outcomes in terms of recovery for non-locally advanced rectal cancer. Currently results are consistent in showing a similar disease-free survival and overall survival, and for recurrences after at least three years and up to 10 years, although due to imprecision we cannot rule out superiority of either approach. We await long-term data from a number of

  10. [Antithrombotic therapy and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanová, Veronika; Gřiva, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is about 85-108/100,000 inhabitants per year, nonvariceal bleeding accounts for 80-90%. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation treatment are the significant risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. To evaluate the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the general community of patients in a county hospital. And to compare the role played by antiplatelet and anticoagulation drugs and other risk medication. Retrospective analysis of patients over 18 years of age who underwent endoscopy for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia (haemoglobinupper gastrointestinal tract during a hospital stay in 2013 (from January to June). We included 111 patients of average age 69±15 years, men 60%. Nonvariceal bleeding accounted for 90% of the cases. None of the patients with variceal bleeding (10% of patients) took antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy. There were 100 patients with nonvariceal bleeding of average age 70±15, 61% men. With the symptoms of acute bleeding (hematemesis, melena) presented in 73% of patients. The most frequent cause of bleeding was gastric and duodenal ulcer (54%). 32% of patients with nonvariceal bleeding had antiplatelets, 19% anticoagulants and 10% used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or corticosteroids. 30-days mortality of patients with nonvariceal bleeding was 11%, annual mortality was 23%. There was no significant difference in mortality, blood transfusion requirements or surgical intervention between the patients with antithrombotic agents and without them. 25% of patients (8 patients) using acetylsalicylic acid did not fulfil the indication for this treatment. Among the patients examined by endoscopy for symptomatic nonvariceal bleeding and/or anaemia (haemoglobingastrointestinal bleeding. With regard to that, it is alarming, that there still exists a nonnegligible percentage of patients taking acetylsalicylic acid even

  11. Prospective analysis of delayed colorectal post-polypectomy bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Kyung; Seo, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Min-Gu; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Choi, Kyu Yong; Kim, Hungdai; Kim, Hyung Ook; Jung, Kyung Uk; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Park, Dong Il

    2018-01-17

    Although post-polypectomy bleeding is the most frequent complication after colonoscopic polypectomy, only few studies have investigated the incidence of bleeding prospectively. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of delayed post-polypectomy bleeding and its associated risk factors prospectively. Patients who underwent colonoscopic polypectomy at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 were prospectively enrolled in this study. Trained nurses contacted patients via telephone 7 and 30 days after polypectomy and completed a standardized questionnaire regarding the development of bleeding. Delayed post-polypectomy bleeding was categorized as minor or major and early or late bleeding. Major delayed bleeding was defined as a > 2-g/dL drop in the hemoglobin level, requiring hospitalization for control of bleeding or blood transfusion; late delayed bleeding was defined as bleeding occurring later than 24 h after polypectomy. A total of 8175 colonoscopic polypectomies were performed in 3887 patients. Overall, 133 (3.4%) patients developed delayed post-polypectomy bleeding. Among them, 90 (2.3%) and 43 (1.1%) patients developed minor and major delayed bleeding, respectively, and 39 (1.0%) patients developed late delayed bleeding. In the polyp-based multivariate analysis, young age ( 10 mm (OR 2.45; 95% CI 1.38-4.36) were significant risk factors for major delayed bleeding, while young age (< 50 years; OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.35-5.12) and immediate bleeding (OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.49-7.30) were significant risk factors for late delayed bleeding. Young age, aspirin use, polyp size, and immediate bleeding were found to be independent risk factors for delayed post-polypectomy bleeding.

  12. Diagnosis and Management of Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Chablaney

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs has increased by almost ten-fold over the past 30 years. There has been a heightened awareness of the malignant potential of rectal NETs. Fortunately, many rectal NETs are discovered at earlier stages due to colon cancer screening programs. Endoscopic ultrasound is useful in assessing both residual tumor burden after retrospective diagnosis and tumor characteristics to help guide subsequent management. Current guidelines suggest endoscopic resection of rectal NETs ≤10 mm as a safe therapeutic option given their low risk of metastasis. Although a number of endoscopic interventions exist, the best technique for resection has not been identified. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD has high complete and en-bloc resection rates, but also an increased risk of complications including perforation. In addition, ESD is only performed at tertiary centers by experienced advanced endoscopists. Endoscopic mucosal resection has been shown to have variable complete resection rates, but modifications to the technique such as the addition of band ligation have improved outcomes. Prospective studies are needed to further compare the available endoscopic interventions, and to elucidate the most appropriate course of management of rectal NETs.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for the management of abnormal uterine bleeding (heavy menstrual bleeding and post-menopausal bleeding): a decision analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, Natalie A. M.; Barton, Pelham M.; Breijer, Maria; Caffrey, Orla; Opmeer, Brent C.; Timmermans, Anne; Mol, Ben W. J.; Khan, Khalid S.; Clark, T. Justin

    2014-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) and post-menopausal bleeding (PMB) together constitute the commonest gynaecological presentation in secondary care and impose substantial demands on health service resources. Accurate diagnosis is of key importance to realising effective treatment, reducing morbidity

  14. Rectal motility after sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, H B; Worsøe, J; Krogh, K

    2010-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is effective against faecal incontinence, but the mode of action is obscure. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of SNS on fasting and postprandial rectal motility. Sixteen patients, 14 women age 33-73 (mean 58), with faecal incontinence of various...... contractions, total time with cyclic rectal contractions, the number of aborally and orally propagating contractions, the number of anal sampling reflexes or rectal wall tension during contractions. Postprandial changes in rectal tone were significantly reduced during SNS (P

  15. ENDOSCOPIC TECHNOLOGIES IN EARLY RECTAL CANCER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Samsonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mesorectal excision is the “golden standard” of surgical treatment for rectal cancer. Development of endoscopic technologies allowed to implement the benefits of minimally invasive surgery in early rectal cancer treatment, decrease morbidity and mortality, improve functional outcome and quality of life. Oncological safety of this method is still a subject for discussion due to lack of lymph node harvest. Endoscopic operations for early rectal cancer are being actively implemented in daily practice, but lack of experience does not allow to include this method in national clinical prac-tice guidelines.

  16. National and international guidelines for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2014-01-01

    , this might not be the case between guidelines. No formal evaluation of the contrasting guidance has been reported. METHOD: A systematic search for national and international guidelines on rectal cancer was performed. Eleven guidelines were identified for further analysis. RESULTS: There was no consensus...... concerning the definition of rectal cancer. Ten of the 11 guidelines use the TNM staging system and there was general agreement regarding the recommendation of MRI and CT in rectal cancer. There was consensus concerning a multidisciplinary approach, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal...

  17. Radiologic features of the solitary rectal ulcer syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnone, D.; Ranzi, T.; Velio, P.; Polli, E.E.; Bianchi, P.

    1984-05-01

    A radiologic study of 4 biopsy-proven cases of the solitary rectal ulcer (S.R.U.) syndrome was undertaken. The radiologic findings of S.R.U. were rectal stenosis (one with ulcer), polypoid rectal mass, and multiple sub-mucosal defects with shallow ulcers. The S.R.U., which is benign and requires only dietetic treatment, must be differentiated from other more serious entities such as neoplastic and inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. Comparison of detectable bleeding rates of radiopharmaceuticals for localization of gastrointestinal bleeding in sheep using a closed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owunwanne, A.; Sadek, S.; Yacoub, T.; Awdeh, M.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M. (Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Al-Wafai, I.; Vallgren, S. (Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait). Dept. of Surgery)

    1989-06-01

    The closed experimental animal model system was used to compare the detectable gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding rates of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA, {sup 99m}Tc-RBCs and {sup 99m}Tc tin colloid in sheep. The three radiopharmaceuticals were used to detect the upper GI bleeding sites at rates of 0.57 and 0.25 ml/min. At the lower bleeding rate of 0.1 ml/min, both {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA and {sup 99m}Tc-RBCs were successful in detecting the bleeding site. At the lowest rate of 0.07 ml/min only {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA was successful in detecting the bleeding site. The results indicate that {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA is the most useful {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceutical for detecting the upper GI bleeding site at the slowest bleeding rate studied. (orig.).

  19. In vivo real-time rectal wall dosimetry for prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Cutajar, Dean L; Metcalfe, Peter E; Lerch, Michael L F; Tome, Wolfgang A; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Perevertaylo, Vladimir L

    2010-01-01

    Rectal balloons are used in external beam prostate radiotherapy to provide reproducible anatomy and rectal dose reductions. This is an investigation into the combination of a MOSFET radiation detector with a rectal balloon for real-time in vivo rectal wall dosimetry. The MOSFET used in the study is a radiation detector that provides a water equivalent depth of measurement of 70 μm. Two MOSFETs were combined in a face-to-face orientation. The reproducibility, sensitivity and angular dependence were measured for the dual MOSFET in a 6 MV photon beam. The dual MOSFET was combined with a rectal balloon and irradiated with hypothetical prostate treatments in a phantom. The anterior rectal wall dose was measured in real time and compared with the planning system calculated dose. The dual MOSFET showed angular dependence within ±2.5% in the azimuth and +2.5%/-4% in the polar axes. When compared with an ion chamber measurement in a phantom, the dual MOSFET agreed within 2.5% for a range of radiation path lengths and incident angles. The dual MOSFET had reproducible sensitivity for fraction sizes of 2-10 Gy. For the hypothetical prostate treatments the measured anterior rectal wall dose was 2.6 and 3.2% lower than the calculated dose for 3DCRT and IMRT plans. This was expected due to limitations of the dose calculation method used at the balloon cavity interface. A dual MOSFET combined with a commercial rectal balloon was shown to provide reproducible measurements of the anterior rectal wall dose in real time. The measured anterior rectal wall dose agreed with the expected dose from the treatment plan for 3DCRT and IMRT plans. The dual MOSFET could be read out in real time during the irradiation, providing the capability for real-time dose monitoring of the rectal wall dose during treatment.

  20. Clinical Fact of Rectal Duplication with gastric heterotopy | Atmani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enteric duplication could occur through the entire alimentary tract. A case of rectal duplication cyst with heterotopic gastric mucosa in a chid is described. MRI scan is shown useful in the diagnosis of the duplication. The treatment is the complete local resection of the rectal duplication. Keywords: duplication, rectal, MRI, ...

  1. Changes in Treatment Volume of Hormonally Treated and Untreated Cancerous Prostate and its Impact on Rectal Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilleby, Wolfgang; Dale, Einar; Olsen, Dag R.; Gude, Unn; Fossaa, Sophie D.

    2003-01-01

    Late chronic side effects of the rectum constitute one of the principal limiting factors for curative radiation therapy in patients with prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of immediate androgen deprivation (IAD) prior to conformal radiotherapy on rectal volume exposed to high doses, as compared with a deferred treatment strategy (DAD). Twenty-five patients (13 in the IAD group and 12 in the DAD group) with bulky tumours of the prostate, T3pN1-2M0 from the prospective EORTC trial 30846 were analysed. Three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment plans (3D CRT) using a 4-field box technique were generated based on the digitized computed tomographic or magnetic resonance findings acquired during the first 9 months after inclusion in the EORTC trial. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated for the prostate and rectum. In the DAD group, there was no obvious alteration in the mean size of the prostate or other evaluated structures. In the IAD patients, a statistically significant reduction of approximately 40% of the gross tumour volume (GTV) was reached after a 6 months' course of hormonal treatment (p<0.001). High-dose rectal volume was correlated with the volume changes of the GTV (p<0.001). Mean rectal volume receiving 95% or more of the target dose was significantly reduced by 20%. Our study confirms the effect of downsizing of locally advanced prostate tumours following AD treatment and demonstrates the interdependence of the high-dose rectal volume with the volume changes of the GTV. However, the mean beneficial sparing of rectal volume was outweighed in some patients by considerable inter-patient variations

  2. Bleeding rates necessary for detecting acute gastrointestinal bleeding with technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells in an experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, D.A.; Datz, F.L.; Remley, K.; Christian, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    Proponents of [/sup 99m/Tc]sulfur colloid for GI bleeding studies argue that, although labeled red blood cells are useful for intermittent bleeding, they are not capable of detecting low bleeding rates. Studies of dogs with experimental GI bleeding have indicated bleeding rates of 0.05 ml/min can be detected with [/sup 99m/Tc]sulfur colloid. Since similar data in the dog model were unavailable for /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells, we undertook this study. To simulate lower GI bleeding, catheters were inserted into the bowel lumen. Each dog's blood was labeled with /sup 99m/Tc using an in vitro technique. Venous blood was then withdrawn and re-infused into the lumen of the bowel using a Harvard pump. Fourteen dogs were studied, ten receiving a bleeding rate from 4.6-0.02 ml/min in the descending colon and four with proximal jejunal bleeds of 0.20-0.02 ml/min. Bleeding rates of 4.6-0.2 ml/min were detected within 10 min in the colon and bleeding rates as low as 0.04 ml/min were seen by 55 min. Slower bleeding rates were not detected. Similar findings were noted for proximal jejunal bleeds. Based on the time of appearance, a minimum volume of approximately 2-3 ml labeled blood was necessary to detect bleeding. We conclude that /sup 99m/Tc-labeled RBCs are sensitive for low bleeding rates in the dog model. The rates are comparable to those described for [/sup 99m/Tc]sulfur colloid in this experimental setting. The time of appearance of activity is related to the bleeding rate

  3. Assessment of chronic constipation: colon transit time versus defecography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokesch, R.W.; Breitenseher, M.J.; Kettenbach, J.; Herbst, F.; Maier, A.; Lechner, G.; Mahieu, P.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the value of radiological colon transit time (CTT) measurements in relation to defecography (DFG) in chronically constipated patients. Materials and methods: In 30 patients with chronic constipation, total and segmental CTT was determined using radiopaque markers. In all of these patients defecography (DFG) was obtained. The patients were divided into three groups: In group I, 11 patients were classified with idiopathic constipation based on low stool frequency, normal DFG, or absence of symptoms of abnormal defecation. In group II, ten patients with rectal intussusception were diagnosed by DFG. In group III, there were nine patients with rectal prolapse or spastic pelvic floor syndrome, based on results of DFG. Results: Group I, idiopathic constipation (n=11), showed increased total CTT (mean, 93 h) and segmental CTT (right colon, 33 h (36%), left colon, 31 h (33%), rectosigmoid, 29 h (31%)). In group II, intussusception (n=10), patients had normal mean total CTT (54 h) and a relative decrease in rectosigmoid CTT (mean, 13 h (24%)). In group III (n=9), rectal prolapse (n=5) or spastic pelvic floor syndrome (n=4), patients showed elevated total (mean, 167 h) and rectosigmoidal CTT (mean, 95 h (57%)). Mean total CTT was significantly different between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and mean rectosigmoidal CTT was significantly different between all three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of total and rectosigmoidal CTT helps to identify the underlying pathophysiology of chronic constipation. Furthermore CTT helps to identify patients, who may benefit from DFG

  4. Assessment of chronic constipation: colon transit time versus defecography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokesch, R.W. E-mail: rupert.prokesch@univie.ac.at; Breitenseher, M.J.; Kettenbach, J.; Herbst, F.; Maier, A.; Lechner, G.; Mahieu, P

    1999-12-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the value of radiological colon transit time (CTT) measurements in relation to defecography (DFG) in chronically constipated patients. Materials and methods: In 30 patients with chronic constipation, total and segmental CTT was determined using radiopaque markers. In all of these patients defecography (DFG) was obtained. The patients were divided into three groups: In group I, 11 patients were classified with idiopathic constipation based on low stool frequency, normal DFG, or absence of symptoms of abnormal defecation. In group II, ten patients with rectal intussusception were diagnosed by DFG. In group III, there were nine patients with rectal prolapse or spastic pelvic floor syndrome, based on results of DFG. Results: Group I, idiopathic constipation (n=11), showed increased total CTT (mean, 93 h) and segmental CTT (right colon, 33 h (36%), left colon, 31 h (33%), rectosigmoid, 29 h (31%)). In group II, intussusception (n=10), patients had normal mean total CTT (54 h) and a relative decrease in rectosigmoid CTT (mean, 13 h (24%)). In group III (n=9), rectal prolapse (n=5) or spastic pelvic floor syndrome (n=4), patients showed elevated total (mean, 167 h) and rectosigmoidal CTT (mean, 95 h (57%)). Mean total CTT was significantly different between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and mean rectosigmoidal CTT was significantly different between all three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of total and rectosigmoidal CTT helps to identify the underlying pathophysiology of chronic constipation. Furthermore CTT helps to identify patients, who may benefit from DFG.

  5. Clinical and endorectal ultrasound staging of circumferential rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.; Farmer, K.C.; Chapple, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Circumferential rectal cancers present at a more advanced stage than those located in a single quadrant. Although accurate staging is an important aspect of the preoperative management of the patient with a rectal cancer, the clinical and radiological staging of this subgroup of rectal cancer patients has been poorly studied. All patients with a rectal cancer were assessed clinically (by digital rectal examination and rigid sigmoidoscopy) before the radiological assessment by endorectal ultrasound (ERUS). Data collected included tumour height (distance from anal verge in centimetre) and tumour type (circumferential or non-circumferential). Radiological tumour staging was with the TNM system. Fifty-nine subjects (33 men, 26 women; median age 65 years (range 38-86 years)) were identified with a circumferential rectal cancer. Mean height of the cancer was 8 - 0.4 cm (standard error of the mean; range 2-13 cm). Forty-two cancers were palpable, and 17 cancers were impalpable. All cancers assessed clinically as circumferential were confirmed as circumferential on ERUS scanning. Tumour stage as assessed by ERUS was either T3 (n = 57) or T4 (n = 2). Nodal status was NO (n = 29) and N1 (n = 30). All rectal cancers assessed as circumferential on clinical examination have an ERUS stage of T3 or greater.

  6. Fournier gangrene: rare complication of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossibi, Pierlesky Elion; Souiki, Tarik; Ibn Majdoub, Karim; Toughrai, Imane; Laalim, Said Ait; Mazaz, Khalid; Tenkorang, Somuah; Farih, My Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Fournier's Gangrene is a rare complication of rectal cancer. Its discovery is often delayed. It's incidence is about 0.3/100,000 populations in Western countries. We report a patient with peritoneal perforation of rectal cancer revealed by scrotal and perineal necrotizing fasciitis.

  7. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus following a Puestow Procedure in a Patient with Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Okamoto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding that occurs as a complication of chronic or acute pancreatitis. We report a case of extremely acute-onset hemosuccus pancreaticus occurring in a patient with chronic pancreatitis over a long-term follow-up after a Puestow procedure (side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy. The patient was admitted to our hospital due to severe anemia and tarry stools indicative of gastrointestinal bleeding. Emergent endoscopy, including gastrointestinal fiberscopy and colon fiberscopy, showed no abnormal findings. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography and hemorrhagic scintigraphy did not detect a hemorrhagic lesion. Although interventional radiology was considered for diagnosis and treatment, conservative therapy seemed sufficient to affect hemostasis. Two weeks later, however, acute intestinal bleeding with hemodynamic shock occurred, and exploration was performed without delay. Intraoperative endoscopy through an incision of the reconstructed jejunal loop in the close proximal end revealed a site of active bleeding from the side-to-side anastomotic pancreatic duct. Following a longitudinal incision of the jejunal loop, a bleeding point was sutured and ligated on direct inspection. The patient showed a good postoperative course.

  8. Palliative reirradiation of recurrent rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingareddy, Vasudha; Ahmad, Neelofur; Mohiuddin, Mohammed

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This report will summarize symptom palliation, complication rate, and survival outcome of an aggressive reirradiation policy for patients with recurrent rectal cancer. MATERIALS and METHODS: From 1987 - 1993, 83 patients with recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma following previous pelvic irradiation (RT) underwent reirradiation. Thirty-one patients were treated with radical intent, and underwent reirradiation followed by planned surgical resection. The remaining fifty-two patients underwent reirradiation alone and are the basis of this study. Median initial RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range 40.0 - 70.2 Gy), and median time to recurrence was 24 months. Reirradiation was delivered with two lateral fields (7x7 - 12x10 cm) encompassing recurrent tumor with a minimum of 2 cm margin and excluding all small bowel. Thirty patients received 1.8 - 2.0 Gy daily fractions, and 22 patients received 1.2 Gy BID fractions. Median reirradiation dose was 30.6 Gy (range 19.8 - 40.8 Gy). Median total cumulative dose was 84.6 Gy (range 66.6 - 104.9 Gy). Forty-seven of the 52 patients received concurrent 5-FU based chemotherapy. Median follow up for the entire group was 16 months (range 2 - 53 months). Eight patients who remain alive at the time of this study had a median follow up of 22 months (range 13 - 48 months). RESULTS: Patients' presenting symptoms included bleeding, pain and mass effect. Results of treatment are shown in Table 1. Treatment was well tolerated. Using the RTOG toxicity scale, 16 patients required a treatment break for grade 3 toxicity including severe diarrhea, moist desquamation, and mucositis. No patient developed grade 4 acute toxicity. Eighteen patients (35%) developed late grade 3 or 4 morbidity, including bowel obstruction in 9 patients, cystitis in 3 patients, fistula in 4 patients and skin ulceration in 1 patient. There was no difference in incidence of late complications by time to recurrence, reirradiation dose, or total cumulative dose. However, there was

  9. Rectal prolapse as initial clinical manifestation of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-W; Hsiao, C-W; Wu, C-C; Jao, S-W

    2008-04-01

    Rectal prolapse as the initial clinical manifestation of colorectal cancer is uncommon. We describe the case of a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon after presenting with complete rectal prolapse. The tumor caused rectosigmoid intussusception and then it prolapsed out through the anus. She underwent rectosigmoidectomy and rectopexy. The postoperative course was uneventful. The relationship between colorectal cancer and rectal prolapse has not been clearly established. This case report describes an unusual presentation of colorectal cancer. It suggests that rectal prolapse can present as the initial symptom of colorectal cancer and may also be a presenting feature of the occult intra-abdominal pathology. The importance of adequate investigation such as colonoscopy should be emphasized in patients who develop a new onset of rectal prolapse.

  10. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Patient Assessment of Constipation-Symptoms (PAC-SYM) among patients with chronic constipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neri, Luca; Conway, Paul Maurice; Basilisco, Guido

    2015-01-01

    the psychometric properties of PAC-SYM in patients with chronic constipation. METHODS: We enrolled 2,203 outpatients with chronic constipation in two waves. We used wave I sample to test the psychometric properties of the PAC-SYM and wave II sample to cross-validate its factor structure, to assess criterion...... validity, responsiveness to clinical change, and its minimal clinically important difference. RESULTS: Only a minority of patients reported any rectal tearing (38 %). Deletion of such item leads to a 11-item version (M:PAC-SYM). The remaining items in the rectal domain were moderately correlated.......28-0.45), discrimination across Rome III criteria for functional constipation and abdominal pain, and responsiveness to clinical change (β = -0.49; ω (2) = 0.25). M:PAC-SYM minimal clinically important difference was 0.24. CONCLUSION: Our analysis shows that the rectal domain may not represent a relevant cluster...

  11. Satisfaction with life after rectal prolapse surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarski, Michał; Jóźwiak, Daria; Pusty, Michal; Dziki, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of satisfaction with life, as a result of comparing own life situation with the individualised personal standards, is an important element for measuring satisfaction with life of the patients suffering from somatic disorders. Literature provides numerous data on satisfaction with life of different groups of patients suffering from somatic disorders. Little space is devoted to the study of the level of satisfaction of patients with rectal prolapse, which is particularly evident in relation to the Polish patient population. The aim of the study was planned to determine the level of satisfaction with life and its determinants among patients with full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery as well as to assess the improvement of continence after this surgery. The study group consisted of 20 patients operated on for full-thickness rectal prolapse in the Department of General and Colorectal Surgery, Medical University in Lódź. SWLS (Satisfaction with Life Scale) Diener et al. in the Polish adaptation by Juczyński was used to assess global life satisfaction. Assessment of the incontinence severity and the postoperative improvement was made with Jorge and Wexner scale. The average level of global life satisfaction among patients with rectal prolapse surgery is 21.05 (SD = 4.68) and it corresponds to the level of satisfaction of the total population. In the study group, there were no statistically significant differences in the level of global satisfaction with life depending on age, disease recurrence and continence improvement after surgery. The continence after rectal prolapse surgery improved significantly (plife satisfaction of patients operated on for rectal prolapse.

  12. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions.......Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  13. Rectal cancer and Fournier's gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-08-14

    Fournier's gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects.

  14. Lower rectal cancer. Preoperative staging with CT air enema technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Amane; Fujii, Shouichi; Iwata, Seiichirou

    2009-01-01

    Preoperative assessment of rectal cancer wall invasion is an important indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy rates and clinical usefulness of air-enema CT in preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer. A total of 88 patients diagnosed with lower rectal cancer were examined with an air-enema CT preoperatively and had surgical resection performed. One group was T1-T2 while the other was T3-T4. Forty-two patients were T1-T2, and 46 patients were T3-T4. In univariate and multivariate analysis, irregularities of the rectal wall and spiculated appearance of the rectal wall were significant predictive factors in T3-T4. In patients with air-enema CT findings of rectal wall irregularities and speculated appearance, the accuracy rate for detecting T3-T4 was 85.2-86.45 percent. These results show that air-enema CT is useful for determining the preoperative staging of lower rectal cancer and indication of the need for lateral side wall dissection. (author)

  15. Postpartum bleeding: efficacy of endovascular management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Young; Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo; Yoon, Hyun Ki

    2003-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization for the treatment of massive postpartum bleeding. Transcatheter arterial embolization was attempted in 25 patients with massive postpartum bleeding. After identification at bilateral internal iliac arteriography, the bleeding artery was embolized using gelfoam, polyvinyl alcohol particles or microcoils, and to prevent rebleeding through collateral pathways, the contralateral uterine artery or anterior division of the internal iliac artery was also embolized. Clinical success and complications were retrospectively assessed and documented. Active bleeding foci were detected in 13 patients (52%), and involved the unilateral (n=10) or bilateral (n=2) uterine artery and unilateral vaginal artery (n=1). Twelve (92%) of the 13 patients recovered completely following embolization, but one underwent hysterectomy due to persistent bleeding. The focus of bleeding was not detected in 12 patients (48%), but 11 (92%) of these also recovered following embolization of the bilateral uterine or internal iliac arteries. One patient, however, died due to sepsis. Two of the 12 patients underwent hysterectomy due ro rebleeding on the 12 th and 13 th day, respectively, after embolization. Transcatheter arterial embolization is relatively safe and effective for the treatment massive postpartum bleeding

  16. Postpartum bleeding: efficacy of endovascular management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Young; Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo; Yoon, Hyun Ki [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of transcatheter arterial embolization for the treatment of massive postpartum bleeding. Transcatheter arterial embolization was attempted in 25 patients with massive postpartum bleeding. After identification at bilateral internal iliac arteriography, the bleeding artery was embolized using gelfoam, polyvinyl alcohol particles or microcoils, and to prevent rebleeding through collateral pathways, the contralateral uterine artery or anterior division of the internal iliac artery was also embolized. Clinical success and complications were retrospectively assessed and documented. Active bleeding foci were detected in 13 patients (52%), and involved the unilateral (n=10) or bilateral (n=2) uterine artery and unilateral vaginal artery (n=1). Twelve (92%) of the 13 patients recovered completely following embolization, but one underwent hysterectomy due to persistent bleeding. The focus of bleeding was not detected in 12 patients (48%), but 11 (92%) of these also recovered following embolization of the bilateral uterine or internal iliac arteries. One patient, however, died due to sepsis. Two of the 12 patients underwent hysterectomy due ro rebleeding on the 12{sup th} and 13{sup th} day, respectively, after embolization. Transcatheter arterial embolization is relatively safe and effective for the treatment massive postpartum bleeding.

  17. Intestinal Obstruction Due to Rectal Endometriosis: A Surgical Enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razman Jarmin

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstructed rectal endometriosis is an uncommon presentation. The clinical and intraoperative presentation may present as malignant obstruction. The difficulty in making the diagnosis may delay the definitive management of the patient. We report a unique case of rectal endometriosis mimicking malignant rectal mass causing intestinal obstruction and discuss the management of the case.

  18. Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health; Social Services and Public Safety

    2004-01-01

    The Directory of Colon and Rectal Cancer Specialist Teams has been produced under the auspices of the Northern Ireland Regional Advisory Committee on Cancer. It contains details of the full membership of the clinical teams providing care for colon and rectal cancer in each of Health and Social Services Board Area. Lead Clinicians For Colon and Rectal Cancer Services (PDF 74 KB) EHSSB (PDF 198 KB) NHSSB (PDF 107 KB) SHSSB (PDF 130 KB) WHSSB (PDF 131 KB)

  19. Abnormal rectoanal function in children recovered from chronic constipation and encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loening-Baucke, V A

    1984-12-01

    It is unknown if abnormal anal sphincter function as assessed by anorectal manometry is still present years after resolution of chronic constipation and encopresis. Twenty healthy controls, 12 children with constipation but no encopresis, and 20 children with chronic constipation and encopresis underwent anorectal manometric testing, using intraluminal pressure transducers and a balloon for rectal distention. Anorectal measurements were repeated in the 20 constipated and encopretic children 2.5-4 yr after treatment began; 11 children had recovered for at least 1 yr. The mean values of anal resting tone and of anal pull-through pressure were lower in the constipated and encopretic children than in the 20 control children (p less than 0.003). Percent relaxation of the rectosphincteric reflex after rectal distention of 30 and 60 ml was lower in constipated children with and without encopresis than in controls (p less than 0.003), whereas the means of rectosphincteric reflex threshold were comparable in the three groups of children. Three years after initiation of treatment with milk of magnesia, high-fiber diet, and bowel training techniques, the mean values of anal resting tone, anal pull-through pressure, and percent relaxation of rectosphincteric reflex remained significantly lower in both recovered and nonrecovered constipated and encopretic patients compared with controls. It was suggested that the underlying cause of chronic constipation is the decreased ability of the internal anal sphincter to relax with rectal distention, and the hypotonia of the anal canal is responsible for the encopresis. Abnormal anorectal functions were still present years after cessation of treatment and recovery and put the recovered patient at risk for recurrence of chronic constipation and encopresis.

  20. [A Case of Rectal Syphilis Incidentally Found at Regular Medical Check-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ji Hong; Cho, Ki Won; Cha, Yoon Jin; Park, Hyo Jin

    2016-10-25

    Syphilis is a rare disease in the rectum. It is difficult to diagnose because the characteristics of the rectal syphilis rectal lesion are highly varied. The endoscopic findings of rectal syphilis are proctitis, ulcers, and masses. If rectal syphilis is suspected to be the cause for rectal lesions, it is important for physicians to consider the sexual history and sexual orientation of the patient. We report a case of incidental rectal syphilis in a 41-year-old man diagnosed during a regular medical check-up.

  1. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Su-Ming; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Wang, I-Kuan; Yang, Ya-Fei; Lu, Yueh-Ju; Chou, Che-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2014-08-07

    Patients with CKD receiving maintenance dialysis are at risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with early CKD who are not receiving dialysis is unknown. The hypothesis was that their risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is negatively linked to renal function. To test this hypothesis, the association between eGFR and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis was analyzed. Patients with stages 3-5 CKD in the CKD program from 2003 to 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until December of 2012 to monitor the development of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was analyzed using competing-risks regression with time-varying covariates. In total, 2968 patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis were followed for a median of 1.9 years. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 100 patient-years was 3.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 3.9) in patients with stage 3 CKD, 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 4.8 to 5.3) in patients with stage 4 CKD, and 13.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.1 to 14.8) in patients with stage 5 CKD. Higher eGFR was associated with a lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (P=0.03), with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 0.99) for every 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) higher eGFR. A history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. In patients with CKD who are not receiving dialysis, lower renal function is associated with higher risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk is higher in patients with previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding history and low serum albumin. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Comparison of rectal and axillary temperatures in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goic, Joana B; Reineke, Erica L; Drobatz, Kenneth J

    2014-05-15

    To compare rectal versus axillary temperatures in dogs and cats. Prospective observational study. 94 dogs and 31 cats. Paired axillary and rectal temperatures were measured in random order with a standardized method. Animal signalment, initial complaint, blood pressure, blood lactate concentration, and variables associated with vascular perfusion and coat were evaluated for associations with axillary and rectal temperatures. Axillary temperature was positively correlated with rectal temperature (ρ = 0.75 in both species). Median axillary temperature (38.4°C [101.1°F] in dogs, and 38.4°C [101.2°F] in cats) was significantly different from median rectal temperature in dogs (38.9°C [102.0°F]) but not in cats (38.6°C [101.5°F]). Median rectal-axillary gradient (difference) was 0.4°C (0.7°F; range, -1.3° to 2.3°C [-2.4° to 4.1°F]) in dogs and 0.17°C (0.3°F; range -1.1° to 1.6°C [-1.9° to 3°F]) in cats. Sensitivity and specificity for detection of hyperthermia with axillary temperature were 57% and 100%, respectively, in dogs and 33% and 100%, respectively, in cats; sensitivity and specificity for detection of hypothermia were 86% and 87%, respectively, in dogs and 80% and 96%, respectively, in cats. Body weight (ρ = 0.514) and body condition score (ρ = 0.431) were correlated with rectal-axillary gradient in cats. Although axillary and rectal temperatures were correlated in dogs and cats, a large gradient was present between rectal temperature and axillary temperature, suggesting that axillary temperature should not be used as a substitute for rectal temperature.

  3. The usefulness of MDCT in acute intestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kum Rae; Park, Won Kyu; Kim, Jae Woon; Chang, Jay Chun; Jang, Han Won

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of MDCT for localizing a bleeding site and for helping make a decision on further management for acute intestinal bleeding. We conducted a retrospective review of 17 consecutive patients who presented with acute intestinal bleeding and who also underwent MDCT before angiography or surgery. The sensitivity of MDCT for detecting acute intestinal bleeding was assessed and compared with that of conventional angiography. The sensitivity of MDCT for the detection of acute intestinal bleeding was 77% (13 or 17), whereas that of angiography was 46% (6 or 13). All the bleeding points that were subsequently detected on angiography were visualized on MDCT. In three cases, the bleeding focus was detected on MDCT and not on angiography. In four cases, both MDCT and angiography did not detect the bleeding focus; for one of these cases, CT during SMA angiography was performed and this detected the active bleeding site. In patients with acute intestinal bleeding, MDCT is a useful image modality to detect the bleeding site and to help decide on further management before performing angiography or surgery. When tumorous lesions are detected, invasive angiography can be omitted

  4. Use of recombinant alpha-2b-interferon in combination with antioxidants in the form of rectal suppositories (viferon) in children with chronic hepatitides B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchaikin, V; Cherednichenko, T; Malinovskaya, V; Orlova, T; Kovalev, O; Kharlamova, F; Chaplygina, G; Konev, V; Voronina, F; Delenian, N

    2000-04-01

    A new antiviral and immunomodulating preparation Viferon, produced as rectal suppositories containing recombinant alpha-2b-interferon (IFN) and antioxidants, was used in complex therapy of viral chronic hepatitides B and C (ChHB and ChHC) in children. Results of our investigation showed a high efficiency of Viferon. Viferon was found to suppress replication of hepatotropic viruses and to decrease activity of the pathologic process in the liver of children with ChHB and ChHC. After a Viferon treatment with daily doses of (1-2) x 10(6) IU of IFN (3.0 x 10(6) IU/m2) primary remission was registered in 78% of patients with ChHB and in 44% of patients with ChHC, while lasting remission was found in 82% of ChHB and in 33% of ChHC patients. Thus, a more marked effect was observed with ChHB, in which 3.0 x 10(6) IU/m2 was the optimal daily dose for children. Increasing the dose to 5.0 x 10(6) IU/m2 did not result in rise of the percentage of the remissions. Side effects, which are characteristic for injection of IFN preparations, were never found even after a longterm treatment. Absence of induction of neutralizing antibodies was observed after administration of alpha-2b-IFN, an integral part of Viferon. In pediatrics, the method of rectal administration has advantages over parenteral delivery due to its convenience, non-traumatic character and possibility of use for prolonged periods.

  5. Early lactate clearance for predicting active bleeding in critically ill patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Tatsuki; Yahagi, Naoki; Kimura, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Not all patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require emergency endoscopy. Lactate clearance has been suggested as a parameter for predicting patient outcomes in various critical care settings. This study investigates whether lactate clearance can predict active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included critically ill patients with UGIB who met all of the following criteria: admission to the emergency department (ED) from April 2011 to August 2014; had blood samples for lactate evaluation at least twice during the ED stay; and had emergency endoscopy within 6 h of ED presentation. The main outcome was active bleeding detected with emergency endoscopy. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were performed using variables associated with active bleeding to derive a prediction rule for active bleeding in critically ill UGIB patients. A total of 154 patients with UGIB were analyzed, and 31.2 % (48/154) had active bleeding. In the univariate analysis, lactate clearance was significantly lower in patients with active bleeding than in those without active bleeding (13 vs. 29 %, P bleeding is derived, and includes three variables: lactate clearance; platelet count; and systolic blood pressure at ED presentation. The rule has 97.9 % (95 % CI 90.2-99.6 %) sensitivity with 32.1 % (28.6-32.9 %) specificity. Lactate clearance may be associated with active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB, and may be clinically useful as a component of a prediction rule for active bleeding.

  6. Rectal necrosis following external radiation therapy for carcinoma of the prostate: report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, S.H.Q.; O'Kelly, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the use of radiation therapy in the management of primary carcinoma of the prostate. Since 1965, radical radiation therapy has been used at Memorial Hospital to treat primary carcinoma of the prostate. Small primary tumors are treated by implantation with radioactive iodine ( 125 I) seeds and larger tumors considered unsuitable for implantation are treated by external supervoltage beam therapy. Fifty patients had been treated by implantation and 30 by external beam therapy at the time of this report. None of the patients treated by implantation developed rectal symptoms. Proctitis developed in all patients treated by external radiation therapy and in half the patients chronic proctitis ensued, accompanied by the passage of mucus. The constant leaking of mucus through the anal sphincter produces irritation of the skin and intermittent attacks of pruritus ani, a discomfiting sequel. Apart from the proctitis, most patients tolerated treatment well, with one notable exception, in whom rectal necrosis developed. This case is described

  7. Extensive hemangiomatosis diagnosed by scintigraphy with 99mTc-labeled red blood cells in a patient with lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, D.S.F.; Ichiki, W.A.; Borges, A.C.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Vecchia, J.F.; Sapienza, M.T.; Ono, C.R.; Watanabe, T.; Costa, P.L.A.; Hironaka, F.; Cerri, G.G.; Buchpiguel, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The gastrointestinal bleeding may be caused by vascular tumors and other lesions like inflammatory disorders, intestinal obstruction or vascular malformation. The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome and blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome are hemangiomatosis diseases that may involve the gastrointestinal tract and cause recurrent hemorrhage. The signs and symptoms usually appear at childhood. Case report: male patient, 31 years old, presenting three days of gastrointestinal bleeding and an hemorrhage shock (Hb=3,9). Previous reports of small volume bleeding since childhood and schistossomosis. Dilated veins, hemorrhoid and port wine stain lesions were detected at physical examination in perineal region, penis and scrotum. Inferior limbs were symmetric at inspection. The upper endoscopy showed esophageal varices with no signs of active bleeding. The scintigraphy with 99m Tc-labeled red blood cells showed active hemorrhage at recto-sigmoid topography during the first hour of study. Extensive and heterogeneous uptake was seen in gluteus, posterior right thigh and scrotum at the second and fifth hours of study. Then the hypothesis of vascular tumor was considered. The magnetic resonance (MR) of pelvis demonstrated extensive hemangiomatosis at the regions described by the scintigraphy. The clinical and imaging findings suggested the diagnosis of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. Discussion: The Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is a rare disease characterized by congenital vascular and lymphatic malformations (port wine stain lesions, congenital varices) and bone growth and soft tissue disorder. Dilated veins may involve abdominal and pelvic structures, with rectal bleeding and haematuria occurring on average of 20%. The clinical investigation must approach the type, the extent and the severity of the malformation, since the morbidity and the mortality depends on the visceral involvement. The Doppler ultrasound, scanometry of lower extremities, MR, angiography and

  8. MRI in staging of rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyianni, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: MRI of the rectum is performed for initial local staging of primary rectal cancer in order to identify locally advanced rectal cancers and for assessment of treatment response after completion of neoadjuvant therapy. Introduction of new generation MRI scanners with optimal phased array body coils, resulting in improved contrast and spatial resolution images due to better signal to noise ratio, have contributed to production of high resolution images in which visualization of anatomical details such as the mesorectal fascia and the bowel wall layers are feasible. Pre-operative MRI of the rectum using mainly high resolution T2 weighted sequences has gained significant accreditation, especially after the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and neoadjuvant therapy in the treatment regimen of rectal cancer. MR Imaging is so far the only method that can preoperatively identify patients most likely to benefit from neoadjuvant therapy as well as demonstrate high risk patients for local recurrence. Regarding N stage besides of mesorectal lymph nodes which are removed during TME, especially in case of low lying rectal cancers, MRI may provide information regarding external/internal iliac lymph node involvement. High resolution MRI images may demonstrate lymph nodes with a diameter down to 2 mm, however these are still characterized based on their morphological features. Patients identified at initial MRI staging as having locally advanced rectal cancer undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in order for their tumor to be downsized and downstaged, especially in low rectal cancers so that sphincter sparing surgery may be performed. In 15-30% of patients complete pathological response is achieved. Reimaging with MRI at 6 weeks post treatment is of great importance for assessing tumor response. Conventional MRI has a reported moderate accuracy for prediction of mesorectal fascia (MF) involvement after CRT therapy, mainly due to its

  9. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  10. Endoscopic management of bleeding peptic ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, J.I.; Farooqi, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Peptic ulcers account for more than half of the cases of non variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and therefore, are the focus of most of the methods of endoscopic hemostasis. Surgical intervention is now largely reserved for patients in whom endoscopic hemostasis has failed. A variety of endoscopic techniques have been employed to stop bleeding and reduce the risk of rebleeding, with no major differences in outcome between these methods. These include injection therapy, fibrin injection, heater probe, mono polar electrocautery, bipolar electrocautery, lasers and mechanical hemo clipping. The most important factor in determining outcome after gastrointestinal bleeding is rebleeding or persistent bleeding. The endoscopic appearance of an ulcer, however, provides the most useful prognostic information for bleeding. Recurrent bleeding after initial endoscopic hemostasis occurs in 15-20% of patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer. The best approach to these patients remains controversial; the current options are repeat endoscopic therapy with the same or a different technique, emergency surgery or semi elective surgery after repeat endoscopic hemostasis. The combination of epinephrine injection with thermal coagulation may be more effective than epinephrine injection alone. Newer modalities such as fibrin injection or the application of hemo clips appear promising and comparative studies are awaited. (author)

  11. Rectal Balloon for the Immobilization of the Prostate Internal Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Kyu; Beak, Jong Geal; Kim, Joo Ho; Jeon, Byong Chul; Cho, Jeong Hee; Kim, Dong Wook; Song, Tae Soo; Cho, Jae Ho; Na, Soo Kyong

    2005-01-01

    The using of endo-rectal balloon has proposed as optimal method that minimized the motion of prostate and the dose of rectum wall volume for treated prostate cancer patients, so we make the customized rectal balloon device. In this study, we analyzed the efficiency of the Self-customized rectal balloon in the aspects of its reproducibility. In 5 patients, for treatment planning, each patient was acquired CT slice images in state of with and without rectal balloon. Also they had CT scanning same repeated third times in during radiation treatment (IMRT). In each case, we analyzed the deviation of rectal balloon position and verified the isodose distribution of rectum wall at closed prostate. Using the rectal balloon, we minimized the planning target volume (PTV) by decreased the internal motion of prostate and overcome the dose limit of radiation therapy in prostate cancer by increased the gap between the rectum wall and high dose region. The using of rectal balloon, although, was reluctant to treat by patients. View a point of immobilization of prostate internal motion and dose escalation of GTV (gross tumor volume), its using consider large efficient for treated prostate cancer patients.

  12. Rectal culture (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rectal culture test is performed by inserting a cotton swab in the rectum. The swab is rotated gently, and withdrawn. A smear of the swab is placed in culture media to encourage the growth of microorganisms. The ...

  13. Scintigraphic detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, A.

    1988-01-01

    Successful management of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding usually depends on accurate localization of the bleeding site. History and clinical findings are often misleading in determination of the site of hemorrhage. The widespread application of flexible endoscopy and selective arteriography now provide accurate diagnoses for the majority of patients bleeding from the upper GI tract, but lower GI bleeding still poses a serious diagnostic challenge. Endoscopy and barium studies are of limited value in examining the small bowel and colon in the face of active hemorrhage. Arteriography, although successful in many cases (3-5), has limitations. The angiographic demonstration of bleeding is possible only when the injection of contrast material coincides with active bleeding at a rate greater than 0.5 ml/min, and since lower GI bleeding is commonly intermittent rather than continuous, a high rate of negative angiographic examinations has been reported. The diagnosis of lower GI bleeding is usually easy to make. In contrast, localizing the site of bleeding may be extremely difficult. Using the techniques described the nuclear physician may be able to detect the bleeding site precisely. However, if the cautions detailed are not observed, the tracer studies will show GI bleeding, but not at the true bleeding site. This must be carefully understood and avoided. Done correctly, these tests can have a major impact on patient care

  14. Evidences in multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bari, B.; Bosset, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Valentini, V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last 10 years, a number of important European randomized published studies investigated the optimal management of rectal cancer. In order to define an evidence-based approach of the clinical practice based, an international consensus conference was organized in Italy under the endorsement of European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO) and European Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ESTRO). The aim of this article is to present highlights of multidisciplinary rectal cancer management and to compare the conclusions of the international conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) with the new National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. (authors)

  15. Bupivacaine administered intrathecally versus rectally in the management of intractable rectal cancer pain in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak I

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Iwona Zaporowska-Stachowiak,1,2 Grzegorz Kowalski,3 Jacek Łuczak,2 Katarzyna Kosicka,4 Aleksandra Kotlinska-Lemieszek,3 Maciej Sopata,3 Franciszek Główka4 1Chair and Department of Pharmacology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2Palliative Medicine In-patient Unit, University Hospital of Lord's Transfiguration, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 3Palliative Medicine Chair and Department, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 4Department of Physical Pharmacy and Pharmacokinetics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland Background: Unacceptable adverse effects, contraindications to and/or ineffectiveness of World Health Organization step III "pain ladder" drugs causes needless suffering among a population of cancer patients. Successful management of severe cancer pain may require invasive treatment. However, a patient's refusal of an invasive procedure necessitates that clinicians consider alternative options. Objective: Intrathecal bupivacaine delivery as a viable treatment of intractable pain is well documented. There are no data on rectal bupivacaine use in cancer patients or in the treatment of cancer tenesmoid pain. This study aims to demonstrate that bupivacaine administered rectally could be a step in between the current treatment options for intractable cancer pain (conventional/conservative analgesia or invasive procedures, and to evaluate the effect of the mode of administration (intrathecal versus rectal on the bupivacaine plasma concentration.Cases: We present two Caucasian, elderly inpatients admitted to hospice due to intractable rectal/tenesmoid pain. The first case is a female with vulvar cancer, and malignant infiltration of the rectum/vagina. Bupivacaine was used intrathecally (0.25–0.5%, 1–2 mL every 6 hours. The second case is a female with ovarian cancer and malignant rectal infiltration. Bupivacaine was adminstered rectally (0.05–0.1%, 100 m

  16. A novel mutation in the P2Y12 receptor and a function-reducing polymorphism in protease-activated receptor 1 in a patient with chronic bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Y M; Lordkipanidzé, M; Lowe, G C; Nisar, S P; Garner, K; Stockley, J; Daly, M E; Mitchell, M; Watson, S P; Austin, S K; Mundell, S J

    2014-05-01

    The study of patients with bleeding problems is a powerful approach in determining the function and regulation of important proteins in human platelets. We have identified a patient with a chronic bleeding disorder expressing a homozygous P2RY(12) mutation, predicting an arginine to cysteine (R122C) substitution in the G-protein-coupled P2Y(12) receptor. This mutation is found within the DRY motif, which is a highly conserved region in G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that is speculated to play a critical role in regulating receptor conformational states. To determine the functional consequences of the R122C substitution for P2Y(12) function. We performed a detailed phenotypic analysis of an index case and affected family members. An analysis of the variant R122C P2Y(12) stably expressed in cells was also performed. ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation was reduced as a result of a significant impairment of P2Y(12) activity in the patient and family members. Cell surface R122C P2Y(12) expression was reduced both in cell lines and in platelets; in cell lines, this was as a consequence of agonist-independent internalization followed by subsequent receptor trafficking to lysosomes. Strikingly, members of this family also showed reduced thrombin-induced platelet activation, owing to an intronic polymorphism in the F2R gene, which encodes protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1), that has been shown to be associated with reduced PAR-1 receptor activity. Our study is the first to demonstrate a patient with deficits in two stimulatory GPCR pathways that regulate platelet activity, further indicating that bleeding disorders constitute a complex trait. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. Procedural Sedation for the removal of a rectal foreign body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Costumbrado, MD, MPH

    2018-04-01

    the RFB. In some cases, RFBs can create a vacuum effect for which Foley catheters may be used to break the seal and provide additional traction. After the lubricated Foley passes proximal to the RFB and the balloon is inflated, gentle traction should be employed to move the object closer. Sedation can also be employed to decrease rectal tone and make the procedure more tolerable for the patient. Complications prior to or during removal of the RFB include tearing of the rectal mucosa, perforation, infection, fecal incontinence, bladder and vessel injury or migration of the RFB to the chest wall.3,5 Uncontrollable rectal bleeding, peritonitis, or perforation are contraindications to ED RFB removal and warrant surgery or gastroenterology consultation. General anesthesia can be used for laparotomy with single incision to remove RFBs in the operating room.2 In this case, procedural sedation was utilized to facilitate removal of the object. Ketamine (2 mg/kg intravenously was initially proposed, but due to concerns of the patient’s history of drug abuse, alternatives were considered. While Ketamine is generally well-tolerated, the incidence of dysphoric reactions has been estimated to occur in 10%-20% of patients.6 There is also some evidence that patients with a history of drug abuse may be more likely to have tolerance to Ketamine that requires higher dosing.7 Taking these factors into account, Etomidate (0.2 mg/kg intravenously was used instead with favorable results. A metallic flashlight was removed by grasping the object with a combination of forceps and manual manipulation. After RFB removal, sigmoidoscopy was recommended to assess for rectal mucosal injuries or tears.8 No additional injuries were found on sigmoidoscopy and the patient tolerated the procedure well without complications. Topics: Abdominal pain, computed tomography, CT, foreign body, procedural sedation

  18. [Retrospective statistical analysis of clinical factors of recurrence in chronic subdural hematoma: correlation between univariate and multivariate analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Motoharu; Terui, Keita; Oiwa, Yoshitsugu

    2012-10-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is common in elderly individuals and surgical procedures are simple. The recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma, however, varies from 9.2 to 26.5% after surgery. The authors studied factors of the recurrence using univariate and multivariate analyses in patients with chronic subdural hematoma We retrospectively reviewed 239 consecutive cases of chronic subdural hematoma who received burr-hole surgery with irrigation and closed-system drainage. We analyzed the relationships between recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma and factors such as sex, age, laterality, bleeding tendency, other complicated diseases, density on CT, volume of the hematoma, residual air in the hematoma cavity, use of artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Twenty-one patients (8.8%) experienced a recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. Multiple logistic regression found that the recurrence rate was higher in patients with a large volume of the residual air, and was lower in patients using artificial cerebrospinal fluid. No statistical differences were found in bleeding tendency. Techniques to reduce the air in the hematoma cavity are important for good outcome in surgery of chronic subdural hematoma. Also, the use of artificial cerebrospinal fluid reduces recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. The surgical procedures can be the same for patients with bleeding tendencies.

  19. Combined curative radiation therapy alone in (T1) T2-3 rectal adenocarcinoma: a pilot study of 29 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, J.P.; Roy, P.; Coquard, R.; Barbet, N.; Romestaing, P.; Ayzac, L.; Ardiet, J.M.; Thalabard, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Aim: Analysis of a pilot study including 29 consecutive patients with high surgical risk or refusal of colostomy treated with radiation therapy alone with curative intent. Patients: Between 1986 and 1992, 29 patients were treated for infiltrating adenocarcinoma of the rectum. Median age was 72 years. Transrectal ultrasound staging was used in 24 patients (T1, 2; T2, 14; T3, 13; N0, 23; N1, 6). In 20 patients the lower border of the tumor was at 5 cm or less from the anal verge and in 19 patients the diameter exceeded 3 cm. CEA was elevated in seven cases. Treatment: Contact X-ray (50 kV) was given first (70 Gy/3 fractions). External beam radiation therapy used a three-field technique in the prone position. Accelerated schedule (39 Gy/13 fractions/17 days) with a concomitant boost 'field within the field' (4 Gy/4 fractions). Six weeks later an iridium-192 implant was performed in 21 (20 Gy/22 h). Results: Median follow-up time was 46 months. Overall and specific survival at 5 years was 68% (SE = 0.09) and 76% (SE = 0.08). Local control was obtained in (21(29)) patients (72%). There was one grade 2 rectal bleeding and five grade 2 rectal necroses. The overall tolerance was good in these frail patients. Discussion: For T2. T3 or T1 > 3 cm diameter rectal adenocarcinoma, where contact X-ray alone is not recommended, a combined treatment with radiation therapy alone is able to give good local control with acceptable toxicity. This treatment should be restricted to inoperable patients

  20. Disseminated lung cancer presenting as a rectal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Mia M; Stamp, Inger M H; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, and approximately 50% had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. A rectal mass and unintended weight loss are common manifestations of rectal cancer. Our case presented with a rectal mass, but workup revealed...... a metastatic lesion from lung cancer. Lung cancer metastases to the lower gastrointestinal tract imply reduced survival compared with the already poor mean survival of stage IV lung cancer. Despite relevant therapy, the patient died 5 months after referral....

  1. Synergistic shortening of the bleeding time by desmopressin and ethamsylate in patients with various constitutional bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrinsky, N L; Israels, E D; Bickis, M G

    1991-01-01

    Desmopressin and ethamsylate were evaluated for possible synergistic effects on the bleeding time. The drugs were administered individually and together to 12 patients with markedly prolonged bleeding times known to be relatively or absolutely unresponsive to desmopressin alone. The bleeding disorders studied included Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (one), other disorders of platelet function (four), pseudo-von Willebrand disease (one), and von Willebrand disease type I (three), type II (two), and type III (one). Desmopressin alone shortened the bleeding time from 23.9 +/- 1.5 to 19.5 +/- 2.3 min (p = 0.03). Ethamsylate alone was without effect. Desmopressin and ethamsylate together shortened the bleeding time to 11.2 +/- 1.4 min (p less than 0.01 compared to baseline, p = 0.02 compared to desmopressin alone). The combination was ineffective in three patients, with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (one), and von Willebrand disease type I (one) and type III (one). Toxic effects of the drugs were not observed. Five patients received desmopressin and ethamsylate prior to dental work with mandibular block (one), heart surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (two), and adenotonsillectomy surgery (two). Normal hemostasis was achieved in each case. A synergistic shortening of the bleeding time was observed with the combination of desmopressin and ethamsylate in a wide range of bleeding disorders.

  2. Helical CT in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, Olivier; Leroy, Christophe; Sergent, Geraldine; Bulois, Philippe; Saint-Drenant, Sophie; Paris, Jean-Claude

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of helical CT in depicting the location of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A three-phase helical CT of the abdomen was performed in 24 patients referred for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The diagnosis of the bleeding site was established by CT when there was at least one of the following criteria: spontaneous hyperdensity of the peribowel fat; contrast enhancement of the bowel wall; vascular extravasation of the contrast medium; thickening of the bowel wall; polyp or tumor; or vascular dilation. Diverticula alone were not enough to locate the bleeding site. The results of CT were compared with the diagnosis obtained by colonoscopy, enteroscopy, or surgery. A definite diagnosis was made in 19 patients. The bleeding site was located in the small bowel in 5 patients and the colon in 14 patients. The CT correctly located 4 small bowel hemorrhages and 11 colonic hemorrhages. Diagnosis of the primary lesion responsible for the bleeding was made in 10 patients. Our results suggest that helical CT could be a good diagnostic tool in acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding to help the physician to diagnose the bleeding site. (orig.)

  3. Rectal duplication cyst in adults treated with transanal endoscopic microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ishay, O; Person, B; Eran, B; Hershkovitz, D; Duek, D Simon

    2011-12-01

    Rectal duplication cyst is a rare entity that accounts for approximately 4% of all alimentary tract duplications. To the best of our knowledge, the presented cases are the first reports in the English literature of rectal duplication cyst resection by transanal endoscopic microsurgery. We present two patients; both are 41-year-old women with a palpable rectal mass. Workup revealed a submucosal posterior mass that was then resected by transanal endoscopic microsurgery. The pathology report described cystic lesions with squamous and columnar epithelium and segments of smooth muscle. These findings were compatible with rectal duplication cyst. Our limited experience showed good results with minimal morbidity and mortality for resection of rectal duplication cysts of limited size with no evidence of malignancy.

  4. Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000627.htm Vaginal bleeding in late pregnancy To use the sharing ... JavaScript. One out of 10 women will have vaginal bleeding during their 3rd trimester. At times, it ...

  5. Reverse-hybrid robotic mesorectal excision for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Ja; You, Y Nancy; Schlette, Erika; Nguyen, Sa; Skibber, John M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Chang, George J

    2012-02-01

    The robotic system offers potential technical advantages over laparoscopy for total mesorectal excision with radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer. However, the requirement for fixed docking limits its utility when the working volume is large or patient repositioning is required. The purpose of this study was to evaluate short-term outcomes associated with a novel setup to perform total mesorectal excision and radical lymphadenectomy for rectal cancer by the use of a "reverse" hybrid robotic-laparoscopic approach. This is a prospective consecutive cohort observational study of patients who underwent robotic rectal cancer resection from January 2009 to March 2011. During the study period, a technique of reverse-hybrid robotic-laparoscopic rectal resection with radical lymphadenectomy was developed. This technique involves reversal of the operative sequence with lymphovascular and rectal dissection to precede proximal colonic mobilization. This technique evolved from a conventional-hybrid resection with laparoscopic vascular control, colonic mobilization, and robotic pelvic dissection. Perioperative and short-term oncologic outcomes were analyzed. Thirty patients underwent reverse-hybrid resection. Median tumor location was 5 cm (interquartile range 3-9) from the anal verge. Median BMI was 27.6 (interquartile range 25.0-32.1 kg/m). Twenty (66.7%) received neoadjuvant chemoradiation. There were no conversions. Median blood loss was 100 mL (interquartile range 75-200). Total operation time was a median 369 (interquartile range 306-410) minutes. Median docking time was 6 (interquartile range 5-8) minutes, and console time was 98 (interquartile range 88-140) minutes. Resection was R0 in all patients; no patients had an incomplete mesorectal resection. Six patients (20%) underwent extended lymph node dissection or en bloc resection. Reverse-hybrid robotic surgery for rectal cancer maximizes the therapeutic applicability of the robotic and conventional laparoscopic

  6. Laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery: Where do we stand?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukta K Krane; Alessandro Fichera

    2012-01-01

    Large comparative studies and multiple prospective randomized control trials (RCTs) have reported equivalence in short and long-term outcomes between the open and laparoscopic approaches for the surgical treatment of colon cancer which has heralded widespread acceptance for laparoscopic resection of colon cancer.In contrast,laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) for the treatment of rectal cancer has been welcomed with significantly less enthusiasm.While it is likely that patients with rectal cancer will experience the same benefits of early recovery and decreased postoperative pain from the laparoscopic approach,whether the same oncologic clearance,specifically an adequate TME can be obtained is of concern.The aim of the current study is to review the current level of evidence in the literature on laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery with regard to short-term and long-term oncologic outcomes.The data from 8 RCTs,3 metaanalyses,and 2 Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was reviewed.Current data suggests that laparoscopic rectal cancer resection may benefit patients with reduced blood loss,earlier retum of bowel function,and shorter hospital length of stay.Concerns that laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery compromises shortterm oncologic outcomes including number of lymph nodes retrieved and circumferential resection margin and jeopardizes long-term oncologic outcomes has not conclusively been refuted by the available literature.Laparoscopic rectal cancer resection is feasible but whether or not it compromises short-term or long-term results still needs to be further studied.

  7. Physical therapy for chronic scrotal content pain with associated pelvic floor pain on digital rectal exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, M Ryan; Dugan, Sheila A; Levine, Laurence A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic scrotal content pain (CSCP) is a common condition that can be challenging to manage definitively. A cohort of patients with CSCP have referred pain from myofascial abnormalities of the pelvic floor and therefore require treatment modalities that specifically address the pelvic floor such as pelvic floor physical therapy (PFPT). Retrospective chart review of all men with a pelvic floor component of CSCP presenting to our tertiary care medical center and undergoing PFPT from 2011-2014. Patients with CSCP and pain/tightness on pelvic floor evaluation with 360° digital rectal exam (DRE) were referred to a physiotherapist for PFPT. CSCP was defined as primary unilateral or bilateral pain of the testicle, epididymis and/or spermatic cord that was constant or intermittent, lasted greater than 3 months, and significantly interfered with daily activities. Long term follow up was conducted by office visit and physical therapy chart review. Thirty patients, mean age of 42 years (range 18-75), were followed for a median of 13 months (range 3-48). Median pre-PFPT pain score was 6/10 (range 2-10). After a mean of 12 PFPT sessions (IQR 6-16), pain improved in 50.0% of patients, median decrease in pain was 4.5/10 (range 1-10). Complete resolution of pain occurred in 13.3%, 44.0% had none to minor residual pain. Following PFPT, fewer subjects required pain medication compared with prior to PFPT (44.0% versus 73.3%, p = 0.03). For men with CSCP and a positive pelvic floor exam with DRE, we recommend a trial of PFPT as an effective and non-operative treatment modality.

  8. Sphincter Saving Surgery in Low Rectal Carcinoma in a Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgery is the principal modality of treatment of rectal carcinoma in order to achieve cure. Sphincter saving surgery improves the quality of life of patients with low rectal carcinoma. Aim: To report a case of sphincter saving low anterior resection for low rectal cancer with hand sown colorectal anastomosis

  9. Association of anorectal malformation with anal and rectal duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla A. Santos-Jasso

    2014-08-01

    We present three cases of rectal duplications with anorectal malforma- tion with recto-perineal fistula and colonic duplication. Two of them with delayed diagnosis and bowel obstruction, treated with laparotomy, colostomy and side-to-side anastomosis of the proximal colonic duplica- tion; in the third case the diagnosis of the colonic and rectal duplication was made during a colostomy opening. For definitive correction, the three patients underwent abdomino-perineal approach and side-to-side anastomosis of the rectal duplication, placement of the rectum within the muscle complex, and later on colostomy closure. In a fourth patient with anorectal malformation and colostomy after birth, the perineal electro-stimulation showed two muscle complexes. A posterior sagittal approach in both showed two separate blind rectal pouches; an end- to-side anastomosis of the dilated rectum was made, and the muscle complex with stronger contraction was used for the anoplasty. The posterior sagittal approach is the best surgical option to preserve the muscle complex, with a better prognosis for rectal continence.

  10. MRI in local staging of rectal cancer: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapan, Ümit; Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative imaging for staging of rectal cancer has become an important aspect of current approach to rectal cancer management, because it helps to select suitable patients for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and determine the appropriate surgical technique. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in assessing the depth of tumor penetration, lymph node involvement, mesorectal fascia and anal sphincter invasion, and presence of distant metastatic diseases. Currently, there is no consensus on a preferred imaging technique for preoperative staging of rectal cancer. However, high-resolution phased-array MRI is recommended as a standard imaging modality for preoperative local staging of rectal cancer, with excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and absence of ionizing radiation. This review will mainly focus on the role of MRI in preoperative local staging of rectal cancer and discuss recent advancements in MRI technique such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. PMID:25010367

  11. Bleeding Risk Profile in Patients With Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Frederic; Husmann, Marc; Benenati, James F; Katzen, Barry T; Del Conde, Ian

    2016-06-01

    To assess the bleeding risk profile using the HAS-BLED score in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD). A post hoc analysis was performed using data from a series of 115 consecutive patients (mean age 72.4±11.4 years; 68 men) with symptomatic PAD undergoing endovascular revascularization. The endpoint of the study was to assess bleeding risk using the 9-point HAS-BLED score, which was previously validated in cohorts of patients with and without atrial fibrillation. For the purpose of this study, the low (0-1), intermediate (2), and high-risk (≥3) scores were stratified as low/intermediate risk (HAS-BLED risk (HAS-BLED ≥3). The mean HAS-BLED score was 2.76±1.16; 64 (56%) patients had a HAS-BLED score ≥3.0. Patients with PAD Rutherford category 5/6 ischemia had an even higher mean HAS-BLED score (3.20±1.12). Logistic regression analysis revealed aortoiliac or femoropopliteal segment involvement, chronic kidney disease, as well as Rutherford category 5/6, to be independent risk factors associated with a HAS-BLED score ≥3. Patients with PAD, especially those presenting with Rutherford category 5/6 ischemic symptoms, have high HAS-BLED scores, suggesting increased risk for major bleeding. Prospective clinical validation of the HAS-BLED score in patients with PAD may help with the risk-benefit assessment when prescribing antithrombotic therapy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius

    2015-01-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper...... gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended...... for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women

  13. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Krag, Aleksander Ahm; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The management of variceal bleeding remains a clinical challenge with a high mortality. Standardisation in supportive and new therapeutic treatments seems to have improved survival within the last 25 years. Although overall survival has improved in recent years, mortality is still closely related...... to failure to control initial bleeding or early re-bleeding occurring in up to 30-40% of patients. Initial procedures are to secure and protect the airway, and administer volume replacement to stabilize the patient. Treatment with vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as possible, since a reduction...... in portal pressure is associated with a better control of bleeding and may facilitate later endoscopic procedures. Vasopressin and its analogues Terlipressin and somatostatin and analogues are the two types of medicine, which has been evaluated. In meta-analysis, only Terlipressin have demonstrated effects...

  14. Anterior rectal duplication: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjadi, K; Poenaru, D; Soboleski, D; Hurlbut, D; Kamal, I

    2000-04-01

    The authors present an anterior rectal cyst in a 14-month-old girl. This rare variant of rectal duplications presented with recurrent urinary infections. The diagnosis was challenging in view of the multiple differential diagnoses to be considered. Magnetic resonance imaging appeared to be the most accurate preoperative investigation. The cyst was removed uneventfully by partial excision and mucosal ablation. An awareness of this variant can lead to early diagnosis and curative resection.

  15. Preliminary results of the study about predictors of rectal side effects in radical radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, L; Barrios, E; Kasdorf, P; Valdagni, R; Paolini, G

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze quantitatively and qualitatively the rectal side effect of radical radiotherapy applied to prostate cancer in patients treated at the National Cancer Institute (INCA) with three-dimensional external radiotherapy which the purposes is to determine predictions of this. Materials and Methods: From July 2008 to July 2010 98 patients were recruited, 63 of whom were followed up for 6 months. The gastrointestinal secondary effects occurred in different times of monitoring patients with RTOG / EORTC classifications (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) and SOMA / LENT, is also used a questionnaire specifically constructed and validated by the cooperative Italian group . The results were correlated with clinical parameters (PSA, Gleason score, clinical T, risk class, hypertension and diabetes) and dosimetry (treatment volume, rectal volume, Total Dose, Dose Maximum rectum, mean dose to the rectum) to assess the correlation between them and the appearance of gastrointestinal secondary effects. Results: 27% and 28% patients experienced grade 1 and 2 RTOG rectal secondary effect at 1 and 3 months and 6 months the SOMA / LENT classification determined by 25%. Qualitatively altered intestinal transit is the most affected in these patients, it is having also found some relationship between the probability of occurrence of abnormal intestinal transit, and the tracking time passed. Conclusions: The rectal secondary effects is one of the major side effects both acute an chronic of the prostate radiotherapy, identify the determinants effects of the INCA patient population implies a substantial improvement in the quality of prostate cancer patients. Patients treated with radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer often have long survivals and consequently may suffer chronic effects of radiation therapy. We have verified the existence of secondary effects in the intestine but the results are very preliminary

  16. Rectal dexmedetomidine in rats: evaluation of sedative and mucosal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Hanci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we investigated the anesthetic and mucosal effects of the rectal application of dexmedetomidine to rats. METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats weighing 250-300 g were divided into four groups: Group S (n = 8 was a sham group that served as a baseline for the normal basal values; Group C (n = 8 consisted of rats that received the rectal application of saline alone; Group IPDex (n = 8 included rats that received the intraperitoneal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1; and Group RecDex (n = 8 included rats that received the rectal application of dexmedetomidine (100 µg kg-1. For the rectal drug administration, we used 22 G intravenous cannulas with the stylets removed. We administered the drugs by advancing the cannula 1 cm into the rectum, and the rectal administration volume was 1 mL for all the rats. The latency and anesthesia time (min were measured. Two hours after rectal administration, 75 mg kg-1 ketamine was administered for intraperitoneal anesthesia in all the groups, followed by the removal of the rats' rectums to a distal distance of 3 cm via an abdominoperineal surgical procedure. We histopathologically examined and scored the rectums. RESULTS: Anesthesia was achieved in all the rats in the Group RecDex following the administration of dexmedetomidine. The onset of anesthesia in the Group RecDex was significantly later and of a shorter duration than in the Group IPDEx (p < 0.05. In the Group RecDex, the administration of dexmedetomidine induced mild-moderate losses of mucosal architecture in the colon and rectum, 2 h after rectal inoculation. CONCLUSION: Although 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine administered rectally to rats achieved a significantly longer duration of anesthesia compared with the rectal administration of saline, our histopathological evaluations showed that the rectal administration of 100 µg kg-1 dexmedetomidine led to mild-moderate damage to the mucosal structure of the

  17. Use of Foley Catheter Instead of Digital Rectal Examination for Detection of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Infants and Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazish Baig

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A digital rectal examination is a highly important procedure carried out on infants and children during visits to the gastroenterology clinic, but is often accompanied with physiologic and psychologic trauma in patients, along with being diagnostically inaccurate in the results obtained from it. In order to avoid causing discomfort to the patients, and to improve the accuracy of the results obtained from a DRE, we have articulated a much safer and more precise method of conducting the examination. The use of a 16 French Foley Catheter in the collection of stool samples during a DRE has proved to be an innovative technique, which eliminates discomfort in patients, provides a less stressful environment for both the physician and the family of the patient, along with providing unambiguous results for the FOBT. The use of this technique will not only produce accurate results, but will also eliminate reasons to avoid such an important examination due to the uncomfortable situation a normal DRE would cause.

  18. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy.

  19. Rectal cancer and Fournier’s gangrene - current knowledge and therapeutic options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruketa, Tomislav; Majerovic, Matea; Augustin, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Fournier’s gangrene (FG) is a rapid progressive bacterial infection that involves the subcutaneous fascia and part of the deep fascia but spares the muscle in the scrotal, perianal and perineal region. The incidence has increased dramatically, while the reported incidence of rectal cancer-induced FG is unknown but is extremely low. Pathophysiology and clinical presentation of rectal cancer-induced FG per se does not differ from the other causes. Only rectal cancer-specific symptoms before presentation can lead to the diagnosis. The diagnosis of rectal cancer-induced FG should be excluded in every patient with blood on digital rectal examination, when urogenital and dermatological causes are excluded and when fever or sepsis of unknown origin is present with perianal symptomatology. Therapeutic options are more complex than for other forms of FG. First, the causative rectal tumor should be removed. The survival of patients with rectal cancer resection is reported as 100%, while with colostomy it is 80%. The preferred method of rectal resection has not been defined. Second, oncological treatment should be administered but the timing should be adjusted to the resolution of the FG and sometimes for the healing of plastic reconstructive procedures that are commonly needed for the reconstruction of large perineal, scrotal and lower abdominal wall defects. PMID:26290629

  20. Genomic Basis of Prostate Cancer Health Disparity Among African-American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    prostatectomy or radiation therapy, the risk of metastasis is reduced, but erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence , and rectal bleeding may occur...or radiation therapy, the risk of metastasis is reduced, but erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence and rectal bleeding may occur, affecting the...ProstateCancer/index. 2. Dash A, Lee P, Zhou Q, Jean-Gilles J, Taneja S, Satagopan J, et al. Impact of socioeconomic factors on prostate cancer

  1. Serendipity in scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goergen, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    A retrospective review of 80 scintigraphic bleeding studies performed with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m labeled red blood cells showed five cases where there were abnormal findings not related to bleeding. In some cases, the abnormalities were initially confused with bleeding or could obscure an area of bleeding, while in other cases, the abnormalities represented additional clinical information. These included bone marrow replacement related to tumor and radiation therapy, hyperemia related to a uterine leiomyoma and a diverticular abscess, and a dilated abdominal aorta (aneurysm). Recognition of such abnormalities should prevent an erroneous diagnosis and the additional information may be of clinical value

  2. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  3. Synchronous gastric and duodenal metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a unique presentation of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarangelo, Nicholas P; Kistler, C Andrew; Daitch, Zachary; Jiang, Wei; Quirk, Daniel M

    2018-01-01

    Metastatic disease to the stomach or duodenum is an infrequent diagnosis, and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is one of the least common primary malignancies that lead to gastric or duodenal metastases. We report the case of a 65-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus infection and previously diagnosed HNSCC who presented with melena. The patient had a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placed 3 months prior to his presentation. Laboratory testing was significant for normocytic anemia and a digital rectal examination was positive for melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed numerous cratered nodules with contact bleeding in the stomach as well as the duodenum that appeared malignant. Biopsies of the gastric and duodenal nodules were positive for p40 and CK 5/6, consistent with metastatic squamous cell carcinoma.

  4. Single-port laparoscopic rectal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolle, Ida; Rosenstock, Steffen; Bulut, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Single-port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS) for colonic disease has been widely described, whereas data for SPLS rectal resection are sparse. This review aimed to evaluate the feasibility, safety and complication profile of SPLS for rectal diseases. METHODS: A systematic literature search...

  5. Rectal prolapse : in search of the holy grail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Iersel, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of (internal and external) rectal prolapse (IRP/ERP), and its affiliated rectocele and enterocele, has become an increasingly important part of health care over the years. Although benign, rectal prolapse is associated with a myriad of debilitating symptoms including fecal

  6. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often ...

  7. [Rectal tonsil or lymphoid follicular hyperplasia of the rectum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillo Fandiño, L; Arias González, M; Iglesias Castañón, A; Fernández Eire, M P

    2014-01-01

    The rectal tonsil is a reactive proliferation of lymphoid tissue located in the rectum. The morphology of the lymphoid proliferation of the colon is usually polypoid or, less commonly, nodular. Only in exceptional cases does lymphoid proliferation of the colon present as a mass in the rectum (rectal tonsil), although this is the most common presentation in middle-aged patients. It is important to be familiar with the rectal tonsil because in cases of exuberant growth it can be difficult to distinguish it from other types of masses. We present the case of rectal tonsil in a four-year-old girl. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings and review the literature. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. ¹H NMR-based metabolic profiling of human rectal cancer tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectal cancer is one of the most prevalent tumor types. Understanding the metabolic profile of rectal cancer is important for developing therapeutic approaches and molecular diagnosis. Methods Here, we report a metabonomics profiling of tissue samples on a large cohort of human rectal cancer subjects (n = 127) and normal controls (n = 43) using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) based metabonomics assay, which is a highly sensitive and non-destructive method for the biomarker identification in biological systems. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were applied to analyze the 1H-NMR profiling data to identify the distinguishing metabolites of rectal cancer. Results Excellent separation was obtained and distinguishing metabolites were observed among the different stages of rectal cancer tissues (stage I = 35; stage II = 37; stage III = 37 and stage IV = 18) and normal controls. A total of 38 differential metabolites were identified, 16 of which were closely correlated with the stage of rectal cancer. The up-regulation of 10 metabolites, including lactate, threonine, acetate, glutathione, uracil, succinate, serine, formate, lysine and tyrosine, were detected in the cancer tissues. On the other hand, 6 metabolites, including myo-inositol, taurine, phosphocreatine, creatine, betaine and dimethylglycine were decreased in cancer tissues. These modified metabolites revealed disturbance of energy, amino acids, ketone body and choline metabolism, which may be correlated with the progression of human rectal cancer. Conclusion Our findings firstly identify the distinguishing metabolites in different stages of rectal cancer tissues, indicating possibility of the attribution of metabolites disturbance to the progression of rectal cancer. The altered metabolites may be as potential biomarkers, which would

  9. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus postoperative chemoradiotherapy for stage II–III resectable rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jin Ho [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Uk [Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeon Min [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Um, Jun Won [University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is better than postoperative CRT in oncologic outcome and toxicity is contentious in prospective randomized clinical trials. We systematically analyze and compare the treatment result, toxicity, and sphincter preservation rate between preoperative CRT and postoperative CRT in stage II–III rectal cancer. We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library from 1990 to 2014 for relevant trials. Only phase III randomized studies performing CRT and curative surgery were selected and the data were extracted. Meta-analysis was used to pool oncologic outcome and toxicity data across studies. Three randomized phase III trials were finally identified. The meta-analysis results showed significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence rate in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.41–0.84; p = 0.004). The 5-year distant recurrence rate (p = 0.55), relapse-free survival (p = 0.14), and overall survival (p = 0.22) showed no significant difference between two groups. Acute toxicity was significantly lower in the preoperativeCRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between two groups in perioperative and chronic complications (p = 0.53). The sphincter-saving rate was not significantly different between two groups (p = 0.24). The conversion rate from abdominoperineal resection to low anterior resection in low rectal cancer was significantly higher in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). As compared to postoperative CRT, preoperative CRT improves only locoregional control, not distant control and survival, with similar chronic toxicity and sphincter preservation rate in rectal cancer patients.

  10. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  11. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bleeding during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DO NOT drink alcohol. DO NOT use enemas, rectal suppositories, or vaginal douches. Women should not use ... Copyright 1997-2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing ...

  13. Mortality in high-risk patients with bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome is similar to that of peptic ulcer bleeding. Results of a prospective database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubičić, Neven; Budimir, Ivan; Pavić, Tajana; Bišćanin, Alen; Puljiz, Zeljko; Bratanić, Andre; Troskot, Branko; Zekanović, Dražen

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the predictive factors influencing mortality in patients with bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome in comparison with peptic ulcer bleeding. Between January 2005 and December 2009, 281 patients with endoscopically confirmed Mallory-Weiss syndrome and 1530 patients with peptic ulcer bleeding were consecutively evaluated. The 30-day mortality and clinical outcome were related to the patients' demographic data, endoscopic, and clinical characteristics. The one-year cumulative incidence for bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome was 7.3 cases/100,000 people and for peptic ulcer bleeding 40.4 cases/100,000 people. The age-standardized incidence for both bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome and peptic ulcer bleeding remained unchanged during the observational five-year period. The majority of patients with bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome were male patients with significant overall comorbidities (ASA class 3-4). Overall 30-day mortality rate was 5.3% for patients with bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome and 4.6% for patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (p = 0.578). In both patients with bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome and peptic ulcer bleeding, mortality was significantly higher in patients over 65 years of age and those with significant overall comorbidities (ASA class 3-4). The incidence of bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome and peptic ulcer bleeding has not changed over a five-year observational period. The overall 30-day mortality was almost equal for both bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome and peptic ulcer bleeding and was positively correlated to older age and underlying comorbid illnesses.

  14. [Related factors to re-bleeding and mortality in cirrhotic patients with acute variceal bleeding at Hipolito Unanue Hospital, Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Pérez, Víctor Felipe; Raymundo Cajo, Roxana Magali; Gutiérrez de Aranguren, Constantino Fernando

    2013-01-01

    To determine related factors to 5 days re-bleeding and 6 week-mortality of an episode of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients. Observational, descriptive, co relational, retrospective study. In this study were included the cirrhotic patients who entered to Hipolito Unanue Hospital, Lima, Peru, between January 2006 and February 2012 with suspicion of variceal bleeding. Were excluded patients who bled from nonvariceal origin, or that did not have the data in clinical history to calculate the Child Pugh score, the Model for terminal diseases of the liver (MELD), or the endoscopic report detailing the bleeding source and the presence of esophageal and/or gastric varices. We include 63 patients, 35 (55.6%) were men. The median of age was of 64 years. 26 of them (41.3%) were Child Pugh C, where as the median of MELD score was 9. The multivariate analysis found that the Child Pugh score was related to 6 weeks-mortality (p=0,003), where as the presence of active bleeding during endoscopy (p=0.012) and the value of creatinine (p=0.012) were related to 5 days re-bleeding. The Child Pugh score was related to 6 weeks-mortality in cirrhotic patients with variceal bleeding. Active bleeding during endoscopy and the value of creatinine were related to 5 days re-bleeding.

  15. Angiographic diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Sung, Kyu Bo; Koo, Kyung Hoi; Bae, Tae Young; Chung, Eun Chul; Han, Man Chung

    1986-01-01

    Diagnostic angiographic evaluations were done in 33 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding for recent 5 years at Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. On 11 patients of them, therapeutic interventional procedures were made and the results were analysed. 1. In a total of 33 cases, there were 18 cases of upper GI bleeding and 15 cases of lower GI bleeding. The most frequent causes were peptic ulcer in the former and intestinal typhoid fever in the latter. 2. Bleeding sites were localized angiographically in 28 cases, so the detection rate was 85%. Four of the five angiographically negative cases were lower GI bleeding cases. 3. The most frequent bleeding site was left gastric artery (7/33). The next was ileocecal branch of superior mesenteric artery (6/33). 4. Among the 11 interventional procedures, Gelfoam embolization was done in 7 cases and Vasopressin infusion was tried in 4 cases. They were successful in 4 and 3 cases, suggesting 57% and 47% success rates respectively.

  16. Angiographic diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Sung, Kyu Bo; Koo, Kyung Hoi; Bae, Tae Young; Chung, Eun Chul; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    Diagnostic angiographic evaluations were done in 33 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding for recent 5 years at Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. On 11 patients of them, therapeutic interventional procedures were made and the results were analysed. 1. In a total of 33 cases, there were 18 cases of upper GI bleeding and 15 cases of lower GI bleeding. The most frequent causes were peptic ulcer in the former and intestinal typhoid fever in the latter. 2. Bleeding sites were localized angiographically in 28 cases, so the detection rate was 85%. Four of the five angiographically negative cases were lower GI bleeding cases. 3. The most frequent bleeding site was left gastric artery (7/33). The next was ileocecal branch of superior mesenteric artery (6/33). 4. Among the 11 interventional procedures, Gelfoam embolization was done in 7 cases and Vasopressin infusion was tried in 4 cases. They were successful in 4 and 3 cases, suggesting 57% and 47% success rates respectively.

  17. Radiological diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufang, K.F.R.; Gross-Fengels, W.; Lorenz, R.

    1990-01-01

    In the diagnosis of acute gastrointestinal bleeding, endoscopy holds the first place today. Radiological investigations are indispensable whenever endoscopy cannot precisely localise the bleeding site, whenever a tumour is present or suspected, in all cases of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and in haemobilia. A tailored radiological approach is recommended. The radiological basis programme should be at least a complete abdominal ultrasound study and plain abdominal radiograms. CT and ERCP scans may become necessary in selected cases. As a rule, angiographical localisation of the bleeding site will be successful only in the acute stage; selective visceral arteriograms have to be obtained, which may be executed in the digital subtraction technique in patients who are cooperating and clinically stable. Angiodysplasias and aneurysms, however, may be demonstrated angiographically in the interval as well. Upper and/or lower G.I. tract studies with barium or water-soluble contrast media may be indicated in the interval in order to demonstrate tumours, metastatic lesions, diverticula and gut malformations. (orig.) [de

  18. Rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fossati, V; Antognoni, P; Villa, E and others

    1985-01-01

    Records of 135 patients with rectal carcinoma were reviewed and correlations between survival rate, extent of tumor and radiotherapy were investigated. The survival rate at 5 years was 16% for C Astler Coller's stage patients and without metastases, but the prognosis was much less favourable for advanced tumors and/or subjects with distant metastases. Preliminary results of another series of patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy are discussed.

  19. Rectal cancer : developments in multidisciplinary treatment, quality control and European collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijn, Willem van

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, treatment of rectal cancer has considerably improved in Europe. Although this applies to most solid malignancies, improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of rectal cancer surpass virtually all others. In the early 1990s, outcome after rectal cancer treatment was poor,

  20. A rare case of bleeding disorder: Glanzmann's thrombasthenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi, Jami; Gowrishankar, A; Jayakumar, S A; Jain, Karun

    2017-01-01

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) is a rare bleeding disorder, which is characterized by a lack of platelet aggregation. It is characterized by qualitative or quantitative abnormalities of the platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Physiologically, this platelet receptor normally binds several adhesive plasma proteins, and this facilitates attachment and aggregation of platelets to ensure thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. The lack of resultant platelet aggregation in GT leads to mucocutaneous bleeding whose manifestation may be clinically variable, ranging from easy bruising to severe and potentially life-threatening hemorrhages. To highlight this rare but potentially life-threating disorder, GT. We report a case of GT that was first detected because of the multiple episodes of gum bleeding. The patient was an 18-year-old girl who presented with a history of repeated episodes of gum bleeding since childhood. Till the first visit to our hospital, she had not been diagnosed with GT despite a history of bleeding tendency, notably purpura in areas of easy bruising, gum bleeding, and prolonged bleeding time after abrasions and insect stings. GT was diagnosed on the basis of prolonged bleeding time, lack of platelet aggregation with adenosine di phosphate, epinephrine and collagen. GT should always be considered as differential diagnosis while evaluating any case of bleeding disorder.

  1. Photocoagulation in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Wlodzimierz; Paczkowski, Pawel M.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present their experience in the endoscopic laser photocoagulation of bleeding peptic ulcer. From 1991 to June 1995, 203 patients admitted for UGI bleeding from peptic ulcer have been treated by this method. The source of bleeding was confirmed by endoscopy. The patients were divided into two groups: actively bleeding peptic ulcer (group IA and IB according to Forrest's classification) and ulcer with stigmata of recent bleeding (group IIA/IIB). The former group consisted of 106 patients, among whom over 40 percent (45 patients) presented signs of hypovolemic shock on admission. Nd:YAG laser (Surgical Laser Technologies) was used in a continuous mode with a contact (8 - 20 watts) or non-contact (over 50 watts) method of coagulation. In actively bleeding patients photocoagulation resulted in stopping the hemorrhage in 95 (90%). Recurrent bleeding occurred in 16 cases; in 9 of them it was stopped by repeated photocoagulation. In this group 18 patients required surgical intervention. The mortality was of 10.3% (11 patients). In 97 patients with recent bleeding stigmata photocoagulation provoked heavy hemorrhage in 3 (in 2 cases stopped by prolonged coagulation). In 9 of the remaining 94 patients recurrent bleeding occurred. Nine patients required surgical intervention. Mortality in this group was of 6%.

  2. Bronchial artery embolization for therapy of pulmonary bleeding in patients with cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Balzer, J.; Straub, R.; Vogl, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Acute pulmonary emergencies in patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) can be found in cases of pneumothorax as well as hemoptysis. If the bleeding cannot be stopped by conservative methods, an embolization of the bronchial arteries should be done. Materials and Method: 11 patients were embolized using a combination of PVA particles and microcoils. Results: From January 1996 to June 2001 17 bronchial arteries in 11 patients were embolized. 7 patients suffered from chronical hemoptysis, 4 patients had an acute hemoptysis. In 4 patients both sides were embolized, in 3 patients only one side. The remaining 4 patients needed a second intervention, embolizing the other side. The primary embolizated bronchial artery was still closed in all 4 patients. In 1 patient the selective catheterization of a bronchial artery was not successful, thus the embolization could not be carried out. 1 patient died 5 days after the intervention due to a fulminant pneumonia (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) without recurrent bleeding. In two patients atypical branches from intercostal arteries feeding the bronchial arteries were detected and successfully embolized. All patients profited from the therapy, as bleeding could be stopped or at least be reduced. 3 patients suffered from back pain during or after intervention. There were no severe complications like neurological deficiencies or necroses. (orig.) [de

  3. [Severe vaginal discharge following rectal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, L C; Bremers, A J A; Heesakkers, J P F A; Kluivers, K B

    2018-01-01

    Almost 50% of women who have had rectal surgery subsequently develop vaginal discharge. Due to the recurrent and unexpected nature of this heavy discharge, they often experience it as very distressing. Many of these women undergo extensive diagnostic tests that are mainly focused on identifying fistula formation. If no fistula is found, in most cases no other cause for severe vaginal discharge can be demonstrated. In our practice, we saw three patients (49-, 54- and 74-years-old, respectively) with similar severe vaginal discharge after rectal surgery and in whom no explanation for the vaginal discharge could be found. For this reason we conducted a literature search into this condition. Anatomical changes appear to be responsible for heavy vaginal discharge following rectal surgery. Changes in pelvic floor muscles and compression of the distal part of the vagina may lead to pooling of fluid in the proximal part of the vagina, resulting in severe discharge. Symptomatic treatment may reduce the symptoms.

  4. Fournier gangrene: first manifestation of occult rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, J; Córdoba, L; Devesa, J M

    2011-01-01

    Fournier gangrene is a necrotizing fasciitis of the genital and perineal region. Diverse factors predispose to Fournier gangrene, such as diabetes mellitus, ethylism, liver dysfunction, haematological disorders, obesity or recent regional instrumentation. Rectal tumours can also predispose to Fournier gangrene; most of the reported cases are perforated or unresectable colorectal tumours, but some cases of anorectal cancer diagnosed after recovery from Fournier gangrene have also been reported. In these cases, the presence of a rectal tumour at the time of, or prior to, diagnosis of Fournier gangrene could not be ruled out. We present three cases of rectal cancer whose first manifestation was as Fournier gangrene.

  5. The analysis of the causes of uterine bleeding occurred after cesarean section and the evaluation of interventional therapy for bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Peng; Li Yuwei; Li Yunhui; Luo Bin; Wen Wen; Yang Bo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the causes of uterine hemorrhage occurred after cesarean section and to investigate the value of angiography and transcatheter artery embolization (TAE) in the diagnosis and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage after cesarean section. Methods: During the period from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2011, a total of 65 cases suffering from uterine bleeding after cesarean section had underwent uterine arteriography to clarify the diagnosis, which was followed by transcatheter uterine artery embolization (TUAE). The clinical data, the causes of bleeding and the angiographic features were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The causes of uterine bleeding after cesarean section included uterine artery pseudoaneurysm (n=26), uterine atony (n=18), placental factors (n=11), gestational hypertension (n=8), coexisting uterine fibroids (n=1) and uterine bleeding of unknown reason (n=1). Uterine artery angiography revealed contrast extravasation in all patients except one patient. The angiographic findings confirmed the diagnosis of uterine artery bleeding after cesarean section. The bleeding stopped after TUAE, and the patients were in stable condition. No serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Pseudoaneurysm is the primary cause of postpartum uterine hemorrhage after cesarean section. Transcatheter uterine artery angiography can promptly and reliably determine the causes of bleeding, and, at the same time, embolization therapy can be carried out to effectively stop the bleeding. (authors)

  6. THROMBIN GENERATION AND BLEEDING IN HEMOPHILIA A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Whelihan, Matthew F.; Gissel, Matthew; Mann, Kenneth G.; Rivard, Georges E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A displays phenotypic heterogeneity with respect to clinical severity. Aim To determine if tissue factor (TF)-initiated thrombin generation profiles in whole blood in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) are predictive of bleeding risk in hemophilia A. Methods We studied factor(F) VIII deficient individuals (11 mild, 4 moderate and 12 severe) with a well-characterized five-year bleeding history that included hemarthrosis, soft tissue hematoma and annual FVIII concentrate usage. This clinical information was used to generate a bleeding score. The bleeding scores (range 0–32) were separated into three groups (bleeding score groupings: 0, 0 and ≤9.6, >9.6), with the higher bleeding tendency having a higher score. Whole blood collected by phlebotomy and contact pathway suppressed by 100μg/mL CTI was stimulated to react by the addition of 5pM TF. Reactions were quenched at 20min by inhibitors. Thrombin generation, determined by ELISA for thrombin – antithrombin was evaluated in terms of clot time (CT), maximum level (MaxL) and maximum rate (MaxR) and compared to the bleeding score. Results Data are shown as the mean±SD. MaxL was significantly different (phemophilia A. PMID:19563500

  7. UFT (tegafur-uracil) in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casado, E; Pfeiffer, P; Feliu, J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major achievements in the treatment of localised rectal cancer include the development of total mesorectal excision and the perioperative administration of radiotherapy in combination with continuous infusion (CI) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). This multimodal approach has resulted in extended...... and abstracts relating to clinical studies of UFT in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Pre- and postoperative studies carried out in patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent disease were included. RESULTS: The combination of UFT and radiotherapy was effective and well tolerated...

  8. Monitoring and treatment of acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenjani, Basri; Zeka, Sadik; Krasniqi, Salih; Bunjaku, Ilaz; Jakupi, Arianit; Elshani, Besni; Xhafa, Agim

    2012-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding-massive acute bleeding from gastrointestinal section is one of the most frequent forms of acute abdomen. The mortality degree in emergency surgery is about 10%. It's very difficult to identify the place of bleeding and etiology. The important purpose of this research is to present the cases of acute gastrointestinal bleeding from the patients which were monitored and treated at The University Clinical Center of Kosova-Emergency Center in Pristina. These inquests included 137 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding who were treated in emergency center of The University Clinical Center in Pristina for the period from January 2005 until Dec