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Sample records for chronic psychiatric patients

  1. Across-sectional study of prescribing patterns in chronic psychiatric patients living in sheltered housing facilities

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    Schorr, S.G.; Loonen, A.J.M.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.; Taxis, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze prescribing patterns of chronic psychiatric patients living in sheltered housing facilities, to identify the extent of polypharmacy and to estimate associated risks in this patient group. Methods: In a retrospective cross-sectional study the prescription data of 323 chronic psy

  2. Psychiatric morbidity, pain perception, and functional status of chronic pain patients in palliative care

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    V Rajmohan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Psychological factors, such as that exist when we experience pain, can profoundly alter the strength of pain perception. Aim: The study aims to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders, and its association with perception of pain and functional status in chronic patients in palliative care. Materials and Methods: The sample was selected via simple randomisation and post consent were assessed using (1 a semi- structured questionnaire to elicit socio-demographic information and medical data (2 Brief Pain Inventory (3 ICD-10 Symptom Checklist (4 ICD-10-Diagnostic Criteria for Research (DCR (5 Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS (6 Covi Anxiety Rating Scale (7 Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Data was analysed using independent sample t test and chi square test. Results: The psychiatric morbidity was 67% with depression and adjustment disorders being the major diagnosis. There was a significant association between psychiatric morbidity pain variables (P = 0.000. Psychiatric morbidity significantly impaired activity, mood, working, walk, sleep, relationship, and enjoyment. There was no association between aetiology of pain, type of cancer, treatment for primary condition and treatment for pain and psychiatric morbidity. The functional status of cancer patients was also poorer in patients with psychiatric morbidity (P = 0.008. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of psychiatric illness in chronic pain patients of any aetiology. Psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased pain perception, impairment in activity and poor functional status.

  3. Psychiatric comorbidity and suicide risk in patients with chronic migraine

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    Maurizio Pompili

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Pompili1,2, Gianluca Serafini1, Daniela Di Cosimo1, Giovanni Dominici1, Marco Innamorati1, David Lester3, Alberto Forte1, Nicoletta Girardi1, Sergio De Filippis4, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Martelletti41Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston,  Massachusetts, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, USA; 4Department of Medical Sciences, Second School of Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ItalyAbstract: The aim of this study was to explore the impact of mental illness among patients with migraine. We performed MedLine and PsycINFO searches from 1980 to 2008. Research has systematically documented a strong bidirectional association between migraine and psychiatric disorders. The relationship between migraine and psychopathology has often been clinically discussed rather than systematically studied. Future research should include sound methodologically-based studies focusing on the interplay of factors behind the relationship between migraine, suicide risk, and mental illness.Keywords: headache, migraine, suicide*, psychiatric disorders

  4. Psychiatric adverse effects induced by recombinant interferon alfa in patients with chronic hepatitis C

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    Nešić Zorica I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hepatitis C virus infection is a slowly progressive chronic disease and the most common cause of chronic liver disease. Presently, interferon alfa based therapies, with or without ribavirin, are standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The most troublesome psychiatric side effects of interferon therapy in our patients are: insomnia, irritability, anxiety, mood changes, short temper, emotional and affective lability, impaired cognitive function, apathy, loss of motivation and the most serious depression with or without suicidal ideas. Material and methods In our study we treated 82 patients chronically infected with HCV divided into 3 groups: the first group of 31 patients (20 male and 11 female received IFN-alfa in standard doses of 3 MU three times a week (t.i.w during 24 weeks; the second group of 36 patients (25 male and 11 female received IFN-alfa, 3 MU t.i.w plus ribavirin 1000-1200 mg per day during 24 weeks; the third group of 15 patients (11 male and 4 female received IFN-alfa, 3 MU t.i.w plus ribavirin 1000-1200 mg per day during 48 weeks. The follow-up period after therapy in all groups lasted 24 weeks. Results During treatment, we observed at least one psychiatric side effect in 21 (26% patients: insomnia in 11 (13%, emotional and affective lability in 9 (11%, anxiety, irritability and short temper in 8 (10%, impaired cognitive function in 7 (8% apathia and loss of motivation in 6 (7% treated patients. Depression, the most serious side effect, was established in 8 (10% patients. All of these side effects were observed during later stages of treatment (between 5th and 22nd weeks of treatment. The incidence of all psychiatric side effects was significantly higher in women than in men (p < 0,01. We observed higher prevalence of depression among patients with history of alcohol and drug abuse. Treatment was temporarily discontinued (from 2 to 4 weeks in all patients with depression, but it was not

  5. Attitudes toward psychotropic medications among patients with chronic psychiatric disorders and their family caregivers

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    Sandeep Grover

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To examine attitudes towards psychotropic medications among patients with chronic psychiatric disorders as well as their family caregivers by using factor analysis. Materials and Methods: The study included 200 patients and their family caregivers with chronic psychiatric disorders who are attending the psychiatry outpatient services. A self-designed 18-item self-rated questionnaire was used to evaluate the attitude toward psychotropics and factor analysis was done to study the different models of attitudes. Results: In general both patients and caregivers had positive attitude toward the psychotropic medications and there was no significant difference between the patients and caregivers on the various items of the questionnaire assessing the attitude. Factor analysis of the questionnaire indicated that either two-factor or four-factor models explained the attitude of the patients and caregivers. In the two-factor model there was one positive and one negative attitude factor, whereas the four-factor model comprised of two positive and two negative attitude factors. The four-factor model of attitudes provided a more comprehensive solution to how attitudes might be formed among patients and their family caregivers. Factors one and four in the four-factor solution still reflected positive attitudes, but appeared to portray a risk-benefit approach, in which benefits such as the efficacy of psychotropic medications in treating mental illnesses and preventing relapse, and medications being better than other options were being contrasted with the risks of side effects and permanent damage or harm. Conclusion: Attitudes of patients with chronic psychiatric disorders and their caregivers toward psychotropic medications appear to be shaped by factors such as perceived efficacy or benefit from medicines, the necessity for taking treatment and concerns such as side effects, harm or expense.

  6. A cross-sectional study of prescribing patterns in chronic psychiatric patients living in sheltered housing facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorr, S. G.; Loonen, A. J. M.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.; Taxis, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze prescribing patterns of chronic psychiatric patients living in sheltered housing facilities, to identify the extent of polypharmacy and to estimate associated risks in this patient group. Methods: In a retrospective cross-sectional study the prescription data of 323 chronic psy

  7. "Chronicity," "nervios" and community care: a case study of Puerto Rican psychiatric patients in New York City.

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    Swerdlow, M

    1992-06-01

    The role of ethnicity, community structure, and folk concepts of mental illness in facilitating the adaptation of long term psychiatric patients to community living has received little attention. This article examines the cultural concepts of mental illness and the community involvement of 30 Puerto Rican psychiatric patients participating in a New York City treatment program. It is shown that many of the attributes usually associated with chronic mental illness do not apply to this population. It is argued that the folk concept of nervios helps to foster the integration of these patients in a wide range of community networks. The impact of gentrification on these patients' community integration is also discussed. PMID:1395696

  8. Psychiatric comorbidity reduces quality of life in chronic methadone maintained patients

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    Carpentier, Pieter J; Krabbe, Paul F M; van Gogh, Mijke T; Knapen, Lieke J M; Buitelaar, Jan K; de Jong, Cor A J

    2009-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), opioid dependence still involves severe impairment of functioning and low quality of life. This study examines the influence of the psychiatric comorbidity of MMT patients on their quality of life. A total of 193 middle-aged patients in

  9. Psychiatric disorders in chronic periodic haemodialysis

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    Paraskevi Theofilou

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The progress in Medical and Nursing Science has contributed significantly to the lengthening of life expectancy regarding several categories of ill people with chronic diseases. However, when the quality of life depends on the periodic correction of biological parameters, as with people with chronic renal failure, this situation affects both the patient and the environment. The aim of the present study is the evaluation of psychiatric disorders which are presented in haemodialysis patients as well as the influence of these disorders on their quality of life. Material and method: Review of relative bibliography was made in electronic basis of Medline (1980‐2009 using as key words haemodialysis, chronic renal failure, quality of life, psychiatric disorders. Complementary bibliography was found through other electronic search engines. Results: The chronic character and the frequency of renal failure, the possible dysfunction in the movement as well as the necessary long treatment cause problems, which extend the disease beyond the medical area offering socioeconomic dimensions, which complicate the associated psychiatric disorders. Conclusions: These patients suffer from the disease as well as from the treatment and at the same time they are faced with the number of the accompanying and interrelated problems, which come up in their everyday living and prescribe restrictively their way of life.

  10. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

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    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago. PMID:26668224

  11. A comparison of social skills training and contingent attention to improve behavioural deficits of chronic psychiatric patients.

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    Matson, J L; Zeiss, A M; Zeiss, R A; Bowman, W

    1980-02-01

    Twelve chronic psychiatric patients were treated with either social skills training or contingent attention to improve behavioural assets or deficits noted on the ward by independently trained raters blind to experimental conditions. Treatment was applied across groups using a multiple-baseline format. Inspection of the data revealed that clinically significant improvements in socially appropriate assets and deficits observed on the ward resulted with social skills training but no substantiative change accrued due to the contingent attention. The behaviours selected for treatment were those which staff were most willing to reinforce. This variable may account, in part at least, for the generalization of treatment effects to the natural environment with persons who received social skills training. PMID:7357230

  12. Time to gain trust and change--experiences of attachment and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy among patients with chronic pain and psychiatric co-morbidity.

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    Peilot, Birgitta; Andréll, Paulin; Samuelsson, Anita; Mannheimer, Clas; Frodi, Ann; Sundler, Annelie J

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of patients with chronic pain disorders is complex. In the rehabilitation of these patients, coping with chronic pain is seen as important. The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of attachment and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (CT) among patients with chronic pain and psychiatric co-morbidity. A phenomenological approach within a lifeworld perspective was used. In total, 10 patients were interviewed after completion of 7- to 13-month therapy. The findings reveal that the therapy and the process of interaction with the therapist were meaningful for the patients' well-being and for a better management of pain. During the therapy, the patients were able to initiate a movement of change. Thus, CT with focus on attachment and mindfulness seems to be of value for these patients. The therapy used in this study was adjusted to the patients' special needs, and a trained psychotherapist with a special knowledge of patients with chronic pain might be required.

  13. Psychiatric manifestation of chronic subdural hematoma: The unfolding of mystery in a homeless patient

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    Sujita Kumar Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestation of chronic subdural hematoma is not limited to neurological deficits or cognitive impairment. It may present with behavioral abnormalities. When the behavioral abnormalities present without obvious neurological deficits and in the absence of trauma, it leads to misdiagnosis. A trivial trauma may cause intracranial bleed that is either missed or ignored in the clinical history. This case report highlights the clinical picture of a homeless patient who presented with withdrawn and disorganized behavior, apathy and poverty of speech in the absence of any neurological deficit. His clinical presentation led to a possibility of psychosis and he was started on antipsychotics. He had developed extrapyramidal side effects in low dose of antipsychotic without any clinical benefit in his clinical picture. Neuroimaging done to rule out any possible organicity-revealed bilateral subdural hematoma, which was later evacuated by neurosurgical intervention in multiple settings and the patient had improved. This case report unfolds the mystery behind the psychotic presentation in a homeless adult.

  14. Effects of Positive and Negative Reinforcement on Daily Living Skills in Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Community Residences.

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    Lippman, Matthew R.; Motta, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Examined contingent positive and negative reinforcement and adaptive behavior and mood among 36 chronic, psychiatric outpatients who received either contingent positive token reinforcement to improve daily living skills, negative reinforcement procedure based on removal of free-tokens, or no treatment. Found significant differences between control…

  15. The role of Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury

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    So, Young [Nuclear Medicne, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Sun Woo; Ghi, Lek Sung; Song, Chang June [College of Medicine, Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    We studied whether brain perfusion SPECT is useful in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-nine patients (M:F=58:11, age 39 {+-} 14 years) who underwent Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT, brain MRI and neuropsychological (NP) tests during hospitalization in psychiatric wards for the psychiatric disability evaluation were included; the severity of injury was mild in 31, moderate in 17 and severe in 21. SPECT, MRI, NP tests were performed 6 {approx} 61 months (mean 23 months) post-injury. Diagnostic accuracy of SPECT and MRI to show hypoperfusion or abnormal signal intensity in patients with cognitive impairment represented by NP test results were compared. Forty-two patients were considered to have cognitive impairment on NP tests and 27 not. Brain SPECT showed 71% sensitivity and 85% specificity, while brain MRI showed 62% sensitivity and 93% specificity (p>0.05, McNemar test). SPECT found more cortical lesions and MRI was superior in detecting white matter lesions. sensitivity and specificity of 31 mild TBI patients were 45%, 90% for SPECT and 27%, 100% for MRI (p>0.05, McNemar test). Among 41 patients with normal brain MRI, SEPCT showed 63% sensitivity (50% for mild TBI) and 88% specificity (85% for malingerers). Brain SPECT has a supplementary role to neuropsychological tests in the psychiatric disability evaluation of chronic TBI patients by detecting more cortical lesions than MRI.

  16. The role of Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury

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    We studied whether brain perfusion SPECT is useful in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-nine patients (M:F=58:11, age 39 ± 14 years) who underwent Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT, brain MRI and neuropsychological (NP) tests during hospitalization in psychiatric wards for the psychiatric disability evaluation were included; the severity of injury was mild in 31, moderate in 17 and severe in 21. SPECT, MRI, NP tests were performed 6 ∼ 61 months (mean 23 months) post-injury. Diagnostic accuracy of SPECT and MRI to show hypoperfusion or abnormal signal intensity in patients with cognitive impairment represented by NP test results were compared. Forty-two patients were considered to have cognitive impairment on NP tests and 27 not. Brain SPECT showed 71% sensitivity and 85% specificity, while brain MRI showed 62% sensitivity and 93% specificity (p>0.05, McNemar test). SPECT found more cortical lesions and MRI was superior in detecting white matter lesions. sensitivity and specificity of 31 mild TBI patients were 45%, 90% for SPECT and 27%, 100% for MRI (p>0.05, McNemar test). Among 41 patients with normal brain MRI, SEPCT showed 63% sensitivity (50% for mild TBI) and 88% specificity (85% for malingerers). Brain SPECT has a supplementary role to neuropsychological tests in the psychiatric disability evaluation of chronic TBI patients by detecting more cortical lesions than MRI

  17. The influences of chronic illness and ego development on self-esteem in diabetic and psychiatric adolescent patients.

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    Jacobson, A M; Hauser, S T; Powers, S; Noam, G

    1984-12-01

    Self-esteem as measured by the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory [Coopersmith, S. (1967),The Antecedents of Self-Esteem, Freeman, San Francisco] and ego development as measured by the Washington University Sentence Completion Test [Loevinger, J., and Wessler, R. (1970),Measuring Ego Development, Vol. I, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco] were evaluated in three groups of early adolescents: diabetic patients, nonpsychotic psychiatric patients, and a nonpatient group of high-school students. We found that low levels of ego development were associated with low levels of global and domain-specific self-esteem in all three subject groups. Levels of self-esteem among diabetic patients were not significantly different from those of nonpatients. While psychiatric patients had significantly lower self-esteem levels than the other groups, this difference was accounted for by preconformists, i.e., those at the lowest stages of ego development. Psychiatric patients reaching higher ego levels showed self-esteem levels indistinguishable from those of the diabetics and nonpatients.

  18. Drug Compliance and the Psychiatric Patient

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    Seltzer, Allan; Hoffman, Brian F.

    1980-01-01

    Non-compliance is one of the commonest causes of therapeutic failure in both medicine and psychiatry. With psychiatric patients the factors contributing to non-compliance are related to: illness variables (schizophrenia, mania, paranoia, chronicity), patient variables (inappropriate health beliefs, need to rebel against authority, a wish to remain sick, defective memory), medication variables (inefficient and ineffective regimens, side effects) and patient-therapist variables (degree of super...

  19. A primary care, multi-disciplinary disease management program for opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain and a high burden of psychiatric comorbidity

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    Malone Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic non-cancer pain is a common problem that is often accompanied by psychiatric comorbidity and disability. The effectiveness of a multi-disciplinary pain management program was tested in a 3 month before and after trial. Methods Providers in an academic general medicine clinic referred patients with chronic non-cancer pain for participation in a program that combined the skills of internists, clinical pharmacists, and a psychiatrist. Patients were either receiving opioids or being considered for opioid therapy. The intervention consisted of structured clinical assessments, monthly follow-up, pain contracts, medication titration, and psychiatric consultation. Pain, mood, and function were assessed at baseline and 3 months using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale scale (CESD and the Pain Disability Index (PDI. Patients were monitored for substance misuse. Results Eighty-five patients were enrolled. Mean age was 51 years, 60% were male, 78% were Caucasian, and 93% were receiving opioids. Baseline average pain was 6.5 on an 11 point scale. The average CESD score was 24.0, and the mean PDI score was 47.0. Sixty-three patients (73% completed 3 month follow-up. Fifteen withdrew from the program after identification of substance misuse. Among those completing 3 month follow-up, the average pain score improved to 5.5 (p = 0.003. The mean PDI score improved to 39.3 (p Conclusions A primary care disease management program improved pain, depression, and disability scores over three months in a cohort of opioid-treated patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Substance misuse and depression were common, and many patients who had substance misuse identified left the program when they were no longer prescribed opioids. Effective care of patients with chronic pain should include rigorous assessment and treatment of these comorbid disorders and intensive efforts to insure follow up.

  20. Time to gain trust and change—Experiences of attachment and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy among patients with chronic pain and psychiatric co-morbidity

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    Birgitta Peilot

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with chronic pain disorders is complex. In the rehabilitation of these patients, coping with chronic pain is seen as important. The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of attachment and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (CT among patients with chronic pain and psychiatric co-morbidity. A phenomenological approach within a lifeworld perspective was used. In total, 10 patients were interviewed after completion of 7- to 13-month therapy. The findings reveal that the therapy and the process of interaction with the therapist were meaningful for the patients’ well-being and for a better management of pain. During the therapy, the patients were able to initiate a movement of change. Thus, CT with focus on attachment and mindfulness seems to be of value for these patients. The therapy used in this study was adjusted to the patients’ special needs, and a trained psychotherapist with a special knowledge of patients with chronic pain might be required.

  1. Oral Health in Psychiatric Patients

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    Ozlem Gurbuz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although oral health is a major determinant of general health and quality of life, it has a low priority in the context of mental illness. Chronic mental illness and its treatment carry inherent risks for significant oral diseases. Both the disease itself and its various pharmacologic management modalities lead to a range of oral complications and side effects, with caries, periodontal disease and xerostomia being encountered most frequently. Older age, female gender, length of hospitalization, duration of mental illness, psychiatric diagnosis are the most discussed predictors for adverse dental outcomes in the reviewed studies. Poor oral hygiene, higher intake of carbonates, smoking, poor perception of oral health self-needs, length of psychiatric disorder, length of psychotropic treatment, and less access to dental care pose at high risk for poor oral health among this population. This article emphasizes the importance of preventive dentistry programs to improve dental healthcare psychiatric chronic inpatients and the signifance of bridging dental health education to psychiatric rehabilitation programs. In this review, general information concerning the oral manifestations of mental illness, effect of medication of mental illness on oral health, the factors affecting oral health among this special population have been provided.

  2. Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment for non-psychotic chronic patients and nurses in outpatient mental health care: A controlled pilot study on feasibility and effects

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    Koekkoek, B.; Meijel, B. van; Schene, A.; Smit, A.; Kaasenbrood, A.; Hutschemaekers, G.

    2011-01-01

    In psychiatric care professionals perceive some patients as 'difficult', especially patients with long-term non-psychotic disorders. For these patients few evidence-based treatments exist. An intervention program, Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment (ICPT), was developed by the authors. It

  3. Sleep disordered breathing in community psychiatric patients

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    Kirstie N. Anderson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Sleep disturbance is prominent in many neuropsychiatric disorders and may precipitate or exacerbate a range of psychiatric conditions. Few studies have investigated sleep disordered breathing and in particular obstructive sleep apnoea in community psychiatric patients and the commonly used screening instruments have not been evaluated in patients with psychiatric disorders. The objective is to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing in a community cohort with chronic mental illness on long term psychotropic medication, and to assess the effectiveness of commonly used screening instruments to detect abnormal sleep. Methods: 52 patients completed sleep questionnaires and 50 undertook overnight oximetry. Results: 52% (n = 26 had sleep-disordered breathing; 20% (n = 10 had moderate/severe sleep apnoea. The Epworth Sleepiness Score and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory did not predict sleep disordered breathing. Conclusions: Patients with psychiatric disorders in the community have a high rate of undiagnosed sleep disordered breathing, which is not reliably detected by established sleep disorder screening questionnaires.

  4. Chronic psychiatric status and satisfaction with life

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    Arrindell, W.A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch; Luteijn, F.

    2001-01-01

    The present study represents the first to administer the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) as part of a. semi-structured interview to a large sample of psychiatric patients with severe mental illness. psychometric appraisal of the SWLS demonstrated that figures on its internal structure were quite

  5. Comorbidade psiquiátrica diminui a qualidade de vida de pacientes com enxaqueca crônica Psychiatric comorbidities decrease quality of life in chronic migraine patients

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    Juliane Prieto Peres Mercante

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A enxaqueca apresenta elevada comorbidade com os transtornos de humor e de ansiedade e extremo impacto no grau de incapacidade e qualidade de vida do indivíduo afetado, mas pouco se sabe sobre a qualidade de vida dos pacientes com enxaqueca crônica e o impacto das comorbidades psiquiátricas. MÉTODO: Cinquenta pacientes com diagnóstico de enxaqueca crônica (Sociedade Internacional de Cefaléias, 2004 foram diagnosticados quanto à presença de transtornos mentais, através da entrevista estruturada SCID-I/P e do questionário de qualidade de vida SF-36. Pacientes foram divididos nos seguintes grupos: enxaqueca crônica com transtornos de ansiedade, transtorno de ansiedade generalizada, transtornos de ansiedade com pelo menos um episódio depressivo maior, com episódio depressivo maior, comparados a pacientes sem comorbidade psiquiátrica. RESULTADOS: Constatou-se qualidade de vida significativamente inferior nos oito domínios da SF-36, nos pacientes com enxaqueca crônica associada a comorbidade psiquiátrica tais como transtornos de ansiedade, transtorno de ansiedade generalizada, transtornos de ansiedade com pelo menos um episódio depressivo maior, assim como nos pacientes apenas com episódio depressivo maior, comparados a pacientes com enxaqueca crônica sem comorbidade psiquiátrica (pINTRODUCTION: Chronic migraine is a common, debilitating condition affecting quality of life and social functioning with significant impact. Migraine is highly comorbid with anxiety and mood disorders, but little is known about psychiatric comorbidities impact in the migraine patient quality of life. METHOD: Fifty patients with chronic migraine diagnosed according to the International Headache Society (2004 were interviewed and met diagnostic criteria for mental disorders, according to the structured interview SCID-I/P and were evaluated by the SF-36 Health Survey questionnaire. Patients were divided in the following groups: chronic

  6. Continuity of pharmaceutical care for psychiatric patients

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    Abdullah-Koolmees, Heshu

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric diseases are common. The effective treatment of a psychiatric disease, its (somatic) side effects and any concurrent somatic diseases is important for the patient’s overall health and wellbeing. The studies conducted in psychiatric patients generally focus on the continuation of psychiat

  7. Psychiatric disorders and muscle tenderness in episodic and chronic migraine.

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    Mongini, Franco; Deregibus, Andrea; Rota, Eugenia

    2005-09-01

    This review first reports on the data concerning the relationship between migraine and personality traits and psychiatric disorders. The relationship between migraine and tenderness of the pericranial and cervical muscles is then discussed. In one study, a psychologic assessment was performed in 56 women with migraine, and the Minnesota Multiphase Personality Inventory (MMPI) and State Trait Anxiety Inventory were administered at baseline (T0) and after 6-7 years (T2). Frequency, severity and duration of migraine were recorded at T0, after treatment (T1) and at T2, and their relationship to the prevalence of depression, MMPI and State Trait Anxiety Inventory data were examined. Pain parameters improved in all patients in T0-1, but were higher at T2 in patients with depression at T0. The patients whose migraine improved at T2 had significantly lower MMPI and State Trait Anxiety Inventory scores at T0 and T2. Moreover, the prevalence of depression of the patients whose migraine improved at T2 was 37.5% at T0 and decreased to 12.5% at T2. The authors subsequently studied the function of the frontal lobe in 23 female patients previously treated for chronic migraine and 23 controls by applying three neuropsychologic tests (gambling task, tower of hanoi-3 and object alternation test). The patient group performed significantly worse on the tower of hanoi-3 and the object alternation test. In order to assess the extent to which muscle tenderness may relate to psychiatric disorders in patients with migraine and tension-type headache, diagnosed according International Headache Society criteria [2004], a psychologic assessment was performed and palpation tenderness scores calculated for the pericranial and cervical muscles in 459 patients. In total, 125 patients had frequent episodic migraine, 97 had chronic migraine, 82 had frequent episodic tension-type headache and chronic tension-type headache was present in 83. In a further 72 patients, both episodic migraine and

  8. Incidence and risk factors of workplace violence on nursing staffs caring for chronic psychiatric patients in taiwan.

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    Chen, Wen-Ching; Sun, Yu-Hua; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Chiu, Hsien-Jane

    2009-11-01

    This one-year follow-up study determined the incidence and risk factors of workplace violence against nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital. The cohort members had a website to report events whenever they came across violence. A total of 971 events were reported. The incidence rates of physical violence, verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 1.7, 3.7, 0.2, 0.3, and 0 per staff-year, respectively. Young age, female sex, lower education, shorter duration of employment, and high level of anxiety of staff seemed to be the determinants of violence. Pre-placement education should focus on these staff to reduce workplace violence. PMID:20049226

  9. Incidence and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence on Nursing Staffs Caring for Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Taiwan

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    Hsien-Jane Chiu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This one-year follow-up study determined the incidence and risk factors of workplace violence against nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital. The cohort members had a website to report events whenever they came across violence. A total of 971 events were reported. The incidence rates of physical violence, verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 1.7, 3.7, 0.2, 0.3, and 0 per staff-year, respectively. Young age, female sex, lower education, shorter duration of employment, and high level of anxiety of staff seemed to be the determinants of violence. Pre-placement education should focus on these staff to reduce workplace violence.

  10. [Mental capacity of psychiatric patients].

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    Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang

    2010-12-01

    Nearly every society maintains legal norms that define those members of society qualified to participate in social affairs. Mental capacity and legal competence are deemed necessary conditions for legal actions to have legal validity. On Nov. 23, 2009, newly revised adult guardianship provisions came into effect in Taiwan. However, there has been lack of discussion with regard to how assessments of mental capacity and legal competence should be conducted on psychiatric patients. This paper reviewed relevant overseas literature on this subject and followed common practice in separating legal mental capacity into causal and functional components. The causal component predicates the diseases and illnesses that render the disability, while the functional component represents legally substantial impairments in terms of cognition, emotion and behavior. The paper explored functional component contents, including finance management, individual health care, independence in daily life, interpersonal relationships and communing. Findings pointed out that in setting up competence standards, a trade-off between respect for autonomy and beneficence is unavoidable. As Taiwan does not have rich empirical data on competence assessments and decisions, collaboration between the legal and psychiatric professions is recommended to engage in relevant research to enhance legal consistencies and the science of competence assessment.

  11. Psychiatric Symptoms in Patients with Alopecia Areata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Alopecia areata is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by sudden hair loss. Existing evidence suggests that alopecia areata may be associated with personality traits altering the susceptibility to stress and psychiatric conditions associated with stress. The aim of this study was to compare the intensity of depressive and anxiety symptoms and the level of alexithymia in patients with alopecia areata and healthy control subjects.Materials and methods: Fifty patients with the diagnosis of alopecia areata and 30 healthy volunteers were compared in terms of scores of Beck depression inventory, Beck anxiety inventory, and Toronto alexithymia scale.Results: There were no statistically significant differences between alopecia areata cases and healthy controls regarding intensity of anxiety and level of alexythimia (p=0.053 and p=0.120, respectively. The intensity of depressive symptoms exhibited by alopecia areata patients was found to be significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p=0.010 and there was no statistically significant relationship between intensity of depressive symptoms and duration of the current alopecia areata episode (p=0.873.Conclusion: It is suggested that psychiatric evaluation should also be performed in all alopecia areata cases during the clinical follow-up period. (Turk­derm 2011; 45: 203-5

  12. Perceived sleep quality of psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Niet, G. J. (Gerrit); Tiemens, B. G. (Bea); Lendemeijer, H. H. G. M. (Bert); Hutschemaekers, G. J. M. (Giel)

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims at acquiring knowledge about the quality of sleep of adult and elderly psychiatric patients who receive clinical or outpatient nursing care, and identifying key factors in perceiving a sleep problem. To do so, a sample of 1699 psychiatric patients were asked whether they perceived a

  13. Quantifying psychiatric comorbidity - Lessions from chronic disease epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batstra, L; Bos, EH; Neeleman, J

    2002-01-01

    Background Comorbidity research in psychiatric epidemiology mostly uses measures of association like odds or risk ratios to express how strongly disorders are linked. In contrast, chronic disease epidemiologists increasingly use measures of clustering, like multimorbidity (cluster) coefficients, to

  14. Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with Diabetes Type 2

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    S. Alireza Sajjadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders are important complications of chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus.Materials and method: In this descriptive study, 80 patients with diabetes type 2 referred to diabetes clinic of Zahedan in 2009. They were selected by simple randomized method, screened by General Health Questionnaire and assessed by psychiatric interview, if it was necessary.Results: Totally, 67.5% required an interview and 43.75% were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Major depression were more prevalent (13.5% than adjustment disorders (15%.Conclusion: High prevalence of depression and adjustment disorder in diabetic patients needs psychiatric assessment and treatment as the main part, in the diabetes clinics

  15. Brain tumors in patients primarly treated psychiatrically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović-Ristić Dragana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Psychiatric symptoms are not rare manifestations of brain tumors. Brain tumors presented by symptoms of raised intracranial pressure, focal neurological signs, or convulsions are usually first seen by the neurologist or less frequently by the neurosurgeon in routine diagnostic procedures. On the other hand, when psychiatric symptoms are the first manifestation in “neurologically silent” brain tumors, the patients are sent to the psychiatrist for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms and brain tumors are left misdiagnosed for a long period of time. Case Report. We presented three patients with the diagnosed brain tumor where psychiatrist had been the first specialist to be consulted. In all three cases neurological examination was generally unremarkable with no focal signs or features of raised intracranial pressure. CT scan demonstrated right insular tumor in a female patient with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; right parietal temporal tumor in a patient with delusions and depression and left frontal tumor in a patient with history of alcohol dependency. Conclusion. Psychiatric symptoms/disorders in patients with brain tumors are not specific enough and can have the same clinical presentation as the genuine psychiatric disorder. Therefore, we emphasize the consideration of neuroimaging in patients with abrupt beginning of psychiatric symptoms, in those with a change in mental status, or when headaches suddenly appear or in cases of treatment resistant psychiatric disorders regardless the lack of neurological symptoms.

  16. A Comparative Study Of Psychiatric Morbidity In Dermatological Patients

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    Sharma Neelu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric morbidity in five chronic and disfiguring diseases, namely psoriasis, chronic urticaria, leprosy, vitiligo and lichen simplex chronicus (LSC was assessed and compared using the standardized Hindi (Vernacular languages version of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-H. Thirty new untreated patients of each of the above skin diseases between the age group of 18-60 years were included in the study. The overall prevalence of the psychiatric morbidity was found to be 39%, depression and anxiety were present in 13% and 10.66% of the patients and suicidal ideations and somatisation in 16% and 13% of the patients respectively. Prevalence of interpersonal conflict and suicidal attempt were 10% and 2.6% respectively. On comparative analysis of psychiatric morbidity, significant difference was observed between vitiligo and other disorders (p=0.0028, i.e., chronic urticaria (p=0.0242 and psoriasis and other disorders (p=0.0028, however no significant difference could be elicited between psoriasis and leprosy or leprosy and vitiligo. Comparative analysis of anxiety revealed statistically significant difference between the patients of LSC and vitiligo (p=0.02 or vitiligo and chronic urticaria (p=0.04 but no significant difference was observed for vitiligo and leprosy of psoriasis and leprosy. The prevalence of somatic complaints showed significant difference between the patients of LSC and Leprosy.

  17. Psychiatric disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, Camila; e Silva, Adriana Cardoso de Oliveira; Neto, José Pedro Simões; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2012-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease are associated with poor prognosis and quality of life. The goal of this study is to investigate the association between psychiatric disorders and renal disease in patients undergoing dialysis treatment, compared with other chronic diseases, appreciating the demographic status of these patients. Sixty-nine patients participated in a diagnostic interview and gave socio-demographic data. The population was composed of 55% men aged 19-77 years with an average age of 50 years (95% CI = 47-54 years). The prevalence of psychiatric disorders found in this study (46.6%) was compared with that found in patients with asthma, polycystic ovary syndrome and HIV-positive. Moreover, the prevalence of the four most common psychiatric disorders which were identified among patients on dialysis were also the subject of comparison between them and others. These results demonstrate the relationship between the various psychiatric disorders and are compatible with other research studies.

  18. Psychiatric disorders in bone marrow transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the psychiatric illnesses in patients with hematological/oncological disorders encountered during blood and bone marrow transplantation. All consecutive patients, aged 15 years and above, who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria and underwent blood and bone marrow transplantation, were enrolled in this study. Psychiatric assessment comprised of a semi-structured interview based on Present Status Examination (PSE). The psychiatric diagnosis was made on the basis of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system of classification devised by W.H.O. Eighty patients, who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, were inducted in this study. Thirty (37.5%) cases were found to have psychiatric disorders. Out of the total, 60 (75%) were males and 20 (25%) females. Adjustment disorder was the most frequent diagnosis (n=12), followed by major depression (n=7). Rest of the diagnoses made were generalized anxiety disorder, acute psychotic disorder, delirium and depressive psychosis. High psychiatric morbidity associated with blood and bone marrow transplantation was observed. It indicates the importance of psychiatric intervention during the isolation period of BMT as well as pre-transplant psychiatric assessment and counseling regarding procedure. (author)

  19. Psychiatric diagnoses in patients with burning mouth syndrome and atypical odontalgia referred from psychiatric to dental facilities

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    Miho Takenoshita

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Miho Takenoshita1, Tomoko Sato1, Yuichi Kato1, Ayano Katagiri1, Tatsuya Yoshikawa1, Yusuke Sato2, Eisuke Matsushima3, Yoshiyuki Sasaki4, Akira Toyofuku11Psychosomatic Dentistry, 2Complete Denture Prosthodontics, 3Liaison Psychiatry and Palliative Medicine, 4Center for Education and Research in Oral Health Care, Faculty of Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Burning mouth syndrome (BMS and atypical odontalgia (AO are two conditions involving chronic oral pain in the absence of any organic cause. Psychiatrically they can both be considered as “somatoform disorder”. From the dental point of view, however, the two disorders are quite distinct. BMS is a burning or stinging sensation in the mouth in association with a normal mucosa whereas AO is most frequently associated with a continuous pain in the teeth or in a tooth socket after extraction in the absence of any identifiable cause. Because of the absence of organic causes, BMS and AO are often regarded as psychogenic conditions, although the relationship between oral pain and psychologic factors is still unclear. Some studies have analyzed the psychiatric diagnoses of patients with chronic oral pain who have been referred from dental facilities to psychiatric facilities. No study to date has investigated patients referred from psychiatric facilities to dental facilities.Objective: To analyze the psychiatric diagnoses of chronic oral pain patients, diagnosed with BMS and AO, and referred from psychiatric facilities to dental facilities.Study design: Psychiatric diagnoses and disease conditions of BMS or AO were investigated in 162 patients by reviewing patients’ medical records and referral forms. Psychiatric diagnoses were categorized according to the International Statistical Classification of Disease and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision.Results: The proportion of F4 classification (neurotic, stress

  20. Psychiatric morbidity in dermatology patients: Frequency and results of consultations

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    Seyhan Muammer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dermatological patients quite commonly depict psychiatric morbidity. PURPOSES: To study the psychiatric morbidity among skin patients of our clinic. METHODS: In the present study, the patients who were treated in the Dermatology Clinic of Inonu University Medical Faculty were evaluated retrospectively. The age, gender, marital status, habits, dermatological and systemic diseases, previously used drugs, current therapy and psychiatric diagnosis of each patient were recorded. FINDINGS: Of 636 patients involved in the study, 15.3% had psychopathological problems, which were depression (32.0%, adjustment difficulty (15.5%, anxiety (13.4%, psychosomatic disorders (10.3%, obsessive-compulsive disorder and conversion (5.1%, dysthymic disorder (4.1%, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (2.1%, panic attack (1.0%, premenstrual syndrome, schizophrenia, somatization disorder, insomnia, alcohol dependency, bipolar affective disorder, mental retardation, agoraphobia, social phobia and dementia. The dermatological diseases defined for the patients with psychopathology diagnosis were chronic urticaria (25.8%; psoriasis (15.5%; alopecia areata, totalis and iniversalis (11.3%; acute urticaria, neurodermatitis and Behcet′s disease (5.1%; atopic dermatitis and drug eruptions (4.1%; pemphigus (3.1%; angioedema, contact dermatitis and generalized pruritus (2.1%; folliculitis and the others (1.0%. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric morbidity has an affect on the course of dermatological diseases. When required, psychiatric consultation should be sought by dermatology clinics and patients should be followed with the cooperation of dermatologists and psychiatrists. LIMITATION: The indoor-based study had not included any control group and any domicillary patient.

  1. Sexual Attitude Reassessment for Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincin, Jerry; Wise, Shirley

    1979-01-01

    Sexuality programs are one part of the program at Thresholds, a rehabilitation center for psychiatric patients (17 to 50 years old). A 16 week sexuality group includes seven phases: initial interview; beginning group development (health care, contraception, reproduction, sexuality); masturbation; intercourse; homosexuality; coed group discussion;…

  2. Self-Esteem Deficits Among Psychiatric Patients

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    Muhammad Rizwan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the difference in the level of self-esteem among patients with psychiatric disorders and normal controls. After a detailed literature review, it was hypothesized that there would be a significant difference in the level of self-esteem among patients with psychiatric disorders and normal controls. The sample of the present study consisted of 260 participants, who were further divided into two groups: clinical group (n = 140 and normal controls (n = 120. The age range of the participants in both the samples were 18 to 25 years (with the mean age of 22.14 years for psychiatric patients and 21.18 years for normal controls, and they belonged to middle socioeconomic status. The clinical group consisted of diagnosed psychiatric patients according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR criteria and further divided into four subgroups, including patients of (a schizophrenia (n = 40, (b major depressive disorder (n = 40, (c obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 40, and (d opioid dependence disorder (n = 20. The semi-structured interview form of Institute of Clinical Psychology, University of Karachi, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale were used. Descriptive Statistics and one-way ANOVA were applied to analyze and interpret the data in statistical terminology. Results indicate significant differences among patients with psychiatric disorders and normal controls on the variable of self-esteem (F = 30.513, df = 4, 255, p< .05. The finding has implications for clinical interventions and also suggests avenues for future research.

  3. Anxiety in non-psychiatric patients

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    Maria Polikandrioti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic approach of anxiety in non-psychiatric patients contributes significantly to the effective treatment. At first, is essential to explore the biological causes and afterwards the possibility that anxiety is a manifestation of a psychiatric disorder. Furthermore, when anxiety is diagnosed as patient's response to the disease, it is crucial to explore the psychological mechanisms that the patient mobilizes in order to defend it, the psycho-social problems of the patient, the supportive network, personality and the personal meaning that the patient gives to the disease. The most effective treatment of anxiety is the combination of medication therapy (benzodiazepines, antidepressants with psychological therapies such as cognitive- behavioral psychotherapy that aim to change patterns of thought, behavior and belief.

  4. Oral Health in Psychiatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Gurbuz; Kursat Altinbas; Erhan Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Although oral health is a major determinant of general health and quality of life, it has a low priority in the context of mental illness. Chronic mental illness and its treatment carry inherent risks for significant oral diseases. Both the disease itself and its various pharmacologic management modalities lead to a range of oral complications and side effects, with caries, periodontal disease and xerostomia being encountered most frequently. Older age, female gender, length of hospitalizatio...

  5. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

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    B. A. Nicks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1% requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years, with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140 versus 340 min, CI (304–375; <0.001 when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198 compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue.

  6. What’s in a name? Compliance, adherence and concordance in chronic psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarti, Subho

    2014-01-01

    About half or more of the patients with chronic psychiatric illnesses, either do not take their medications correctly, or completely stop taking them. The problem of poor initial compliance or adherence is often compounded by a continued decline in compliance/adherence over time. The failure to take medicines, adversely affects the outcome of treatment, and places a huge burden of wasted resources on the society. Three terms have been used to describe medication-taking among patients with chr...

  7. [Sexual dysfunction among patients with psychiatric disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, Lorenzo

    2016-03-16

    Scientific literature shows that sexual dysfunction is more common in patients suffering from psychiatric illness as opposed to the general population. It also shows that the prevalence of sexual dysfunction is underestimated by professionals, partly because patients rarely talk spontaneously about their dysfunctions. However, sexual dysfunction has an impact on patients' mental health. Furthermore, some psychotropic medication, antidepressants and antipsychotics in particular, can hinder sexual functioning and induce sexual dysfunction. These harmful effects can, in turn, reduce patients' compliance with their medical treatments. It is therefore important that practitioners take into account their patients' sexual experience. PMID:27149715

  8. Associations between chronic pelvic pain and psychiatric disorders and symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    ANA CAROLINA FRANCO CARVALHO; OMERO BENEDITO POLI NETO; JOSÉ ALEXANDRE DE SOUZA CRIPPA; JAIME EDUARDO CECÍLIO HALLAK; FLÁVIA DE LIMA OSÓRIO

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a complex condition wich is associated with emotional factors, specially depression and anxiety. Objectives To make a systematic review to provide a detailed summary of relevant literature on the association between CPP and different psychiatric disorders/symptoms. Methods A systematic review of articles in the international literature published between 2003 and 2014 was performed in the electronic databases PubMed, PsycINFO, LILACS, and SciELO using th...

  9. Cutaneous factitia in elderly patients: alarm signal for psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiriac A

    2014-03-01

    choose the proper therapy is mandatory for all these cases. Dermatologists and all physicians who take care of old patients must recognize the disorder in order to provide optimum care for this chronic condition. We emphasize therefore the importance of psychiatric evaluation and treatment to avoid the major risk of suicide. Skin lesions must be regarded as an alarm signal in critical cases, especially in senior people. Keywords: pathomimia, elderly, psychiatric disorders

  10. Coping in Chest Pain Patients with and without Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined relations between psychiatric disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) in 77 patients with chest pain, and compared coping profiles of chest pain patients with and without psychiatric disorders and CHD. Psychiatric patients with no medical disease were also studied. Results are discussed in the context of illness behavior and…

  11. GENERAL PRACTITIONERS' ATTITUDE TOWARDS PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS: A SURVEY OF JAIPUR CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ishwar Dayal; Gautam, Shiv; Kamal, Preet

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 40 randomly selected general practitioners was carried out to find out their attitudes towards psychiatric disorders and psychiatric patients by administering a specially designed proforma which recorded sociodemographic characteristics as well as attitudes. Majority of GPs were of the opinion that psychiatric disorders are inherited, can occur in any normal person living under stress, are treatable. They had positive attitude towards psychiatric illness but showed more social dis...

  12. Caring for the elderly female psychiatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Mudhasir; Holroyd, Suzanne

    2010-06-01

    With the growth of the elderly population, and the female elderly population in particular, healthcare providers will see increasing numbers of elderly women with psychiatric disorders. To properly care for this group of patients, better understanding is needed not only of group differences in this patient population but also of the differences in each individual, as they age, given their unique life experiences, cohort effects, medical comorbidity, social situation, and personality traits. Understandably, these characteristics will interact with psychiatric disorders in ways that may increase the challenge to correctly diagnose and treat these patients. In addition, understanding late life changes, the prevalence of various mental disorders and the sometimes unique presentation of mental disorders in this age group is required to better diagnose and treat this population.

  13. Suicide among immigrant psychiatric patients in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasena, R; Beddage, V; Fernando, M L

    1991-11-01

    Ninety-four Canadian-born psychiatric patients who committed suicide were compared with 23 foreign-born patients committing suicide in Canada. East Europeans were over-represented, and significant differences were found in the age distribution, stress, level of education, social isolation, and methods of suicide. Most foreign-born patients had come to Canada for family or economic reasons but were unemployed, with poor social integration. Employment, housing, education, social integration and a support network seem to be important in preventing these deaths. Cultural evaluation of the patient and early intervention is recommended. PMID:1756350

  14. Associations between chronic pelvic pain and psychiatric disorders and symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA CAROLINA FRANCO CARVALHO

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic pelvic pain (CPP is a complex condition wich is associated with emotional factors, specially depression and anxiety. Objectives To make a systematic review to provide a detailed summary of relevant literature on the association between CPP and different psychiatric disorders/symptoms. Methods A systematic review of articles in the international literature published between 2003 and 2014 was performed in the electronic databases PubMed, PsycINFO, LILACS, and SciELO using the terms (chronic pelvic pain AND (psychiatry OR psychiatric OR depression OR anxiety OR posttraumatic stress OR somatoform. The searches returned a total of 529 matches that were filtered according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 18 articles were selected. Results The investigations focused mainly on the assessment of depression and anxiety disorders/symptoms, with rather high rates (17-38.6%. Depression and anxiety symptoms were more prevalent among women with CPP compared to healthy groups. Comparisons between groups with CPP and with specific pathologies that also have pain as a symptom showed that depression indicators are more frequent in CPP. Depressive symptoms tend to be more common in CPP and have no particular association with pain itself, the core feature of CPP. Discussion Other aspects of CPP seem to play a specific role in this association. Anxiety and other psychiatric disorders require further investigation so that their impact on CPP can be better understood.

  15. Suicide Mortality of Suicide Attempt Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Admitted Suicide Attempt Patients, and Admitted Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae W.; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K.; Hong, Jin P.

    2012-01-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients…

  16. Psychiatric side effects of pegylated interferon alfa-2b as compared to conventional interferon alfa-2b in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael R Kraus; Arne Sch(a)fer; Herbert Csef; Michael Scheurlen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess systematically the spectrum and extent of depressive symptoms comparing patient groups receiving peginterferon or conventional interferon.METHODS: Ninety-eight patients with chronic hepatitis C and interferon-based therapy (+ribavirin) were consecutively enrolled in a longitudinal study. Patients were treated with conventional interferon alfa-2b (48/98patients; 5 MIU interferon alfa-2b thrice weekly) or peginterferon alfa-2b (50/98 patients; 80-150 μgpeginterferon alfa-2b) in combination with weight-adapted ribavirin (800-1 200 mg/d). Repeated psychometric testing was performed before, three times during and once after antiviral therapy: Depression was evaluated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), anger/hostility by the Symptom Checklist-90 Items Revised (SCL-90-R).RESULTS: Therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2bproduces comparable scores for depression (ANOVA:P = 0.875) as compared to conventional interferon.Maximums of depression scores were even higher and cases of clinically relevant depression were frequent during therapy with peginterferon. Scores for anger/hostility were comparable for both therapy subgroups.CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the extent and frequency of depressive symptoms in total are not reduced by peginterferon. Monitoring and management of neuropsychiatric toxicity especially depression have to be considered as much as in antiviral therapy with unmodified interferon.

  17. Association of psychiatric co-morbidity and efficacy of treatment in chronic daily headache in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity in patients of chronic daily headache (CDH and compare the efficacy of treatment between various type of headache associated with psychiatric co-morbidity. Materials and Methods: Prospective case control cohort study, 92 consecutive patients of CDH meeting eligibility criteria. The diagnosis of various subtypes of CDH was made according to the IHS criteria. Age, sex, educational, marital and socioeconomic status, matched controls were also selected. Patients were evaluated with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI scale at the time of enrolment and at 3 months. Results: CDH accounted for 28% of all headache patients. The mean age of presentation was 30.2 ± 10.3 years, male: Female ratio of 28:64 and mean duration of 4.56 ± 0.56 years. Chronic migraine (CM accounted for 59 patients, chronic tension type headache (CTTH 22 patients, new daily persistent headache (NDPH 3 patients and miscellaneous 8 patients. Psychiatric co-morbidity was present in 53.3% patients with CDH, and was more common in CM (62.7% as compared to CTTH (36.4%. Single psychiatric co-morbidity was seen in 26 patients, while 23 patients had multiple co-morbidity. Major depressive episode, anxiety disorder, agoraphobia and dysthymia were significant psychiatric co-morbidities. Patients with CM were treated with topiramate or divalproex sodium ER and CTTH were treated with amitriptyline. 55 patients came for follow up at 3 months, improvement in headache was seen in 29 patients. Conclusion: Psychiatric co-morbidity was present in more than 50% patients with CDH and its presence along with a duration of ≥2 years was associated with a poor response to treatment.

  18. Clinically useful predictors for premature mortality among psychiatric patients visiting a psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Buus, Niels; Wernlund, Andreas Glahn;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine changes in the distribution of causes of death and mortality rates among psychiatric patients visiting a psychiatric emergency room (PER), to determine clinically useful predictors for avoiding premature mortality among these patients and to discuss...

  19. Behavioral treatment of violent psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S E; Woolsey, J E; Innocent, A J; Liberman, R P

    1988-12-01

    This article reviewed major accelerative and decelerative behavioral treatments for aggressive and destructive behavior in psychiatric patients. Accelerative procedures supplant antagonistic behavior by teaching adaptive skills, and by strengthening competing responses; they are realized in token economies, social skills training, differential reinforcement of other behavior, and activity programming. Current decelerative procedures reduce violent behavior by decreasing reinforcement accessible to the patient following violent acts; they are exemplified by social extinction, response cost, time out from reinforcement, overcorrection, and contingent restraint. All behavioral interventions are applied within a philosophic framework that emphasizes observable behavior, measurement of treatment effects, and restructure of the social and physical environment to improve patients' response patterns. This approach extends beyond a problem-oriented model and presents proven techniques for developing and maintaining patients' adaptive functioning.

  20. Reactions of psychiatric patients to telepsychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbie Campbell

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Telepsychiatry could offer a viable medical service to remote or isolated social communities if it does not generate adverse reactions such as delusional ideation, particularly in patients in settlements without adequate exposure to mainstream culture and internet. We examined subjective reactions to telepsychiatry of randomly selected 84 psychiatric patients from remote locations in Ontario, Canada. They rated the quality of their teleconferencing sessions via 10 item questionnaire and were asked about advantages and disadvantages of telepsychiatry. The majority of patients indicated that they were able to communicate as if physically present (92.9% and were comfortable with telepsychiatric service (95.2%. They found the sessions as beneficial as direct meetings with their psychiatrist (84.5% and would use this service again (98.8%. There were no instances of telepsychiatry being associated with adverse reactions in patients from remote communities with inadequate exposure to modern mainstream culture and internet.

  1. Reactions of Psychiatric Patients to Telepsychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robbie; O'Gorman, Jennifer; Cernovsky, Zack Z

    2015-09-30

    Telepsychiatry could offer a viable medical service to remote or isolated social communities if it does not generate adverse reactions such as delusional ideation, particularly in patients in settlements without adequate exposure to mainstream culture and internet. We examined subjective reactions to telepsychiatry of randomly selected 84 psychiatric patients from remote locations in Ontario, Canada. They rated the quality of their teleconferencing sessions via 10 item questionnaire and were asked about advantages and disadvantages of telepsychiatry. The majority of patients indicated that they were able to communicate as if physically present (92.9%) and were comfortable with telepsychiatric service (95.2%). They found the sessions as beneficial as direct meetings with their psychiatrist (84.5%) and would use this service again (98.8%). There were no instances of telepsychiatry being associated with adverse reactions in patients from remote communities with inadequate exposure to modern mainstream culture and internet. PMID:26605038

  2. The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soerensen, A L; Nielsen, L P; Poulsen, B K;

    2014-01-01

    The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric PatientsSoerensen AL1,2, Nielsen LP3,4, Poulsen BK3, Lisby M3,5, Mainz J6,7 1Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Faculty of Social Sciences and Faculty of Health Sciences, Aalborg University, Denmark; 2University College of Northern Denmark; 3......-drug interactions involved propranolol, erythromycin, simvastatin and promethazine. After adjusting for age, gender, alcohol/substance abuse, number of prescriptions, number of somatic diagnoses and level of kidney function, only polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) increased the odds for a PIP significantly; OR=4...

  3. Psychiatric aspects of pain in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Sedat

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss the psychiatric aspects of pain in cancer patients from a biopsychosocial approach. Pain in cancer patients is considered as a complex reaction causing severe suffering and involves many psychological aspects. It has many dimensions such as personality, affect, cognition and social relations. The pain experience may also be influenced by some psychological factors such as anxiety, depression and the meaning of pain. Therefore, a successful management of cancer pain requires a multidisciplinary approach. Since cancer pain is generally treated medically, the psychological impact of pain is often underestimated. However, cancer pain is usually related to high levels of psychological distress. Culture, as an important factor affecting cancer pain, will also be discussed during this review. It is crucial to understand cultural diversity in the treatment of cancer patients with pain. Research shows that a minority patients of various ethnicities have less control of their pain because of the miscommunication problem within the medical setting. By paying attention to patients' cultural diversities, problems such as miscommunication causing inadequate control of pain can be eliminated. In order to manage pain in cancer patients, cognitive-behavioral interventions may be integrated with pharmacotherapy. The main goal of these strategies is to provide a sense of control and better coping skills to deal with cancer. Patients' maladaptive thoughts or behaviors may cause physical and emotional stress. Main behavioral strategies include biofeedback, relaxation training, and hypnosis. Cognitive strategies include guided imagery, distraction, thought monitoring and problem solving. By discussing all of these aspects of cancer pain, the multidimensional characteristic of pain and the relation between cancer pain and psychiatric factors will be clarified. PMID:20590361

  4. Experiences of nursing staff on psychiatric care of depressed patients

    OpenAIRE

    Suutarinen, Kreetta-Maija

    2012-01-01

    The thesis researched the views and experiences of nursing staff of psychiatric special care ward on psychiatric care of depressed patients. Because caring is patient/client oriented profession, it is essential to include patients and nursing staff in the development work. This assumption was basis for the thesis. The thesis aimed to add knowledge on the views of the nursing staff and to show how this knowledge can be used in development of psychiatric care. The thesis also pursue...

  5. Psychiatric morbidity in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, V S; Suprakash Chaudhury; Sudarsanan, S.; Kalpana Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric morbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients is being studied all over the world. There is paucity of Indian literature particularly in asymptomatic HIV individuals. Aim: The aim of the following study is to establish the prevalence and the determinants of psychiatric morbidity in asymptomatic HIV patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken to assess psychiatric morbidity as per ICD-10 dacryocystorhinostomy criteria in 100 consec...

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea: management considerations in psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heck T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Taryn Heck,1 Monica Zolezzi21Pharmacy Department, University of Alberta Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 2Clinical Pharmacy and Practice, College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, QatarAbstract: Psychiatric disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA are often comorbid. However, there is limited information on the impact of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms, on how to manage psychiatric pharmacotherapy in patients presenting with OSA, or on the effectiveness and challenges of OSA treatments in patients with comorbid mental illness. As such, the objective of this article is to provide an overview of some epidemiological aspects of OSA and treatment considerations in the management of OSA in individuals with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Predefined keywords were used to search for relevant literature in electronic databases. Data show that OSA is particularly prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. The medical care that patients with these comorbidities require can be challenging, as some of the psychiatric medications used by these patients may exacerbate OSA symptoms. As such, continuous positive airway pressure continues to be the first-line treatment, even in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. However, more controlled studies are required, particularly to determine continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with mental illness, the impact of treating OSA on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of the use of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, psychiatric disorders, comorbidity, psychotropic medications

  7. CLINICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS ATTENDING A PRISON PSYCHIATRIC CLINIC

    OpenAIRE

    R K Chadda; Amarjeet,

    1998-01-01

    Psychiatric morbidity is higher in prison inmates as compared to that in general population but treatment facilities are often inadequate. The present work reports the profile of psychiatric patients seen in a jail hospital over a period of three months. The jail had about 9000 inmates. Psychiatric services consisted of weekly visit by a psychiatrist. Seventy two male inmates were seen during the period of study. Most of them (80%) were undertrials. Diagnosis included schizophrenia, depressio...

  8. Evaluation of Dream Content among Patients with Schizophrenia, their Siblings, Patients with Psychiatric Diagnoses other than Schizophrenia, and Healthy Control

    OpenAIRE

    Leeba Rezaie; Masoud Rezaei; Schwebel, David C.; Golrokh Younesi; Masoud Tahmasian; Habibolah Khazaie; Mehrak Mohamadi; Arezo Ghanbari

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Schizophrenia is a chronic psychotic disorder with unknown etiology that causes cognitive impairment, affecting thinking, behavior, social function, sleep and dream content. This study considered the dream content of patients with schizophrenia, siblings of patients with schizophrenia, patients with psychiatric diagnoses other than schizophrenia, and a group of healthy controls. The aim of this study was to compare the dream content of patients with schizophrenia with dream content...

  9. Importance of Video-EEG Monitoring in the Diagnosis of Epilepsy in a Psychiatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool F. Kirmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic medical condition which is disabling to both patients and caregivers. The differential diagnosis of epilepsy includes psychogenic nonepileptic spells or “pseudoseizures.” Epilepsy is due to abnormal electrical activity in the brain, and pseudoseizure is a form of conversion disorder. The brain waves remain normal in pseudoseizures. The problem arises when a patient with significant psychiatric history presents with seizures. Pseudoseizures become high on the differential diagnosis without extensive work up. This is a case of woman with significant psychiatric issues which resulted in a delay in the diagnosis of epilepsy.

  10. Childeren growing up with chronic pain: Psychiatric comorbidity, quality of life & familial illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knook, L.M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic pain is common in childhood and often co-occurs with psychiatric disorders. It frequently influences daily activities, undermines the child’s confidence in one's health, and affects general well-being. Parents of children with chronic pain often suffer from chronic illness themse

  11. The Association between Psychiatric Disorders and Quality of Life of Patient with Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun Baiyewu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Quality of life (QOL assessment has been employed increasingly to evaluate outcome among patients with chronic medical conditions. Such assessment could be adversely affected by psychiatric disorders, co existing with such a medical condition. Method: A cross sectional study of 251 out-patients with diabetes mellitus was done at a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital using the Composite Diagnostic Interview (CIDI for psychiatric assessment and the World Health Organisation Quality of Life brief version (WHOQOL-BREF to evaluate the QOL. Results: Fifty (20% of the 251 respondents met the ICD-10 criteria for definite psychiatric diagnosis. Depression accounted for 9.6% while twenty-six (10.4% had anxiety disorder. Of the 35 respondents who performed poorly on the overall quality of life, 17(48.57% had psychiatric diagnosis; 9 were depressed and 8 had anxiety disorder. 39 (15.5% scored poor on the physical health domain. 21(53.8% of the 39 respondents with poor score had psychiatric diagnosis: 13 had depression while 8 had anxiety disorder. On domain 1 (physical health, 51 (20.3% scored poor. Twenty-eight (54.9% of the poor scorers had psychiatric diagnosis, 20 were depressed while 8 had anxiety. 51 (20.3% scored poor on psychological domain (domain 2 twenty-eight (54.9% of the poor scorers had psychiatric diagnosis, 20 of which were depressed while 8 had anxiety. 34 (13.5% scored poor on social relations (domain 3. 19 (55.9% of those who scored poor had psychiatric disorder and the diagnosis was depression. Conclusions: Physicians need to increase their surveillance of psychiatric co-morbidity in diabetes mellitus and collaborate with psychiatrists for a more effective liaison to improve the quality of life of patients with diabetes.

  12. Psychiatric Axis I Comorbidities among Patients with Gender Dysphoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Mazaheri Meybodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Cooccurring psychiatric disorders influence the outcome and prognosis of gender dysphoria. The aim of this study is to assess psychiatric comorbidities in a group of patients. Methods. Eighty-three patients requesting sex reassignment surgery (SRS were recruited and assessed through the Persian Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I. Results. Fifty-seven (62.7% patients had at least one psychiatric comorbidity. Major depressive disorder (33.7%, specific phobia (20.5%, and adjustment disorder (15.7% were the three most prevalent disorders. Conclusion. Consistent with most earlier researches, the majority of patients with gender dysphoria had psychiatric Axis I comorbidity.

  13. Noncompliance to medication in psychiatric patients : a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Mibei, Felix

    2013-01-01

    One in four people globally will be affected by mental disorders at some point in their life. Currently approximately 450 million people worldwide suffer from this conditions. The aim of this project is to produce evidence based knowledge for nursing students and practicing nurses in the specialty of mental health about the reasons of noncompliance to medication in psychiatric patients. What are the main reasons for noncompliance to medication in psychiatric patients?. Methods, this...

  14. Psychiatric patients turnaround times in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohlmeier Martin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the turnaround times of psychiatric patients within the Emergency Department (ED from registration to discharge or hospitalization in a University Hospital in 2002. Methods Data from a one-year period of psychiatric admissions to the emergency service at a University Hospital were monitored and analyzed focused on turnaround times within the ED. Information on patients variables such as age, sex, diagnosis, consultations and diagnostic procedures were extracted from the patients' charts. Results From 34.058 patients seen in the ED in 2002, 2632 patients were examined by psychiatrists on duty. Mean turnaround time in the ED was 123 (SD 97 minutes (median 95. Patients to be hospitalized on a psychiatric ward stayed shorter within the ED, patients who later were admitted to another faculty, were treated longer in the ED. Patients with cognitive or substance related disorders stayed longer in the ED than patients with other psychiatric diagnoses. The number of diagnostic procedures and consultations increased the treatment time significantly. Conclusion As the number of patients within the examined ED increases every year, the relevant variables responsible for longer or complicated treatments were assessed in order to appropriately change routine procedures without loss of medical standards. Using this basic data, comparisons with the following years and other hospitals will help to define where the benchmark of turnaround times for psychiatric emergency services might be.

  15. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

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    Korkmaz S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sevda Korkmaz,1 Sevler Yildiz,1 Tuba Korucu,1 Burcu Gundogan,1 Zehra Emine Sunbul,1 Hasan Korkmaz,2 Murad Atmaca1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey Purpose: Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency.Methods: All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic.Findings: Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%, followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%, and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%. Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients.Results: The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population

  16. The Peregrinating Psychiatric Patient in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott A; Pasic, Jagoda

    2016-09-01

    Many emergency department (ED) psychiatric patients present after traveling. Although such travel, or peregrination, has long been associated with factitious disorder, other diagnoses are more common among travelers, including psychotic disorders, personality disorders, and substance abuse. Travelers' intense psychopathology, disrupted social networks, lack of collateral informants, and unawareness of local resources complicate treatment. These patients can consume disproportionate time and resources from emergency providers. We review the literature on the emergency psychiatric treatment of peregrinating patients and use case examples to illustrate common presentations and treatment strategies. Difficulties in studying this population and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:27625725

  17. Depression in patients with chronic hepatitis B: an experience on individual solution- focused therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Arvand, Jinous; Shafiabadi, Abdollah; Falsafinejad, Mohammad Reza; NADERI, Nosratollah

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B, as a chronic disorder that may be associated with several psychiatric disorders, such as depression, and decrease quality of life of affected patients. One of the most important consequences of psychiatric problems is reduced patient compliance with prolonged therapeutic regimens. Psychotherapy, such as solution– focused therapy, may help these patients to resolve psychiatric problems, increase quality of life and completion of therapeutic regimens. Solution-focused therapy is ef...

  18. Low self-esteem and psychiatric patients: Part I – The relationship between low self-esteem and psychiatric diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Silverstone, Peter H.; Salsali, Mahnaz

    2003-01-01

    Background The objective of the current study was to determine the prevalence and the degree of lowered self-esteem across the spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Method The present study was carried out on a consecutive sample of 1,190 individuals attending an open-access psychiatric outpatient clinic. There were 957 psychiatric patients, 182 cases with conditions not attributable to a mental disorder, and 51 control subjects. Patients were diagnosed according to DSM III-R diagnostic criteria...

  19. Nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Nielsen, Lars Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Background : Potential inappropiate prescribing (IP) is associated with higher mortality, morbidity and risk of hospitalization. Potential IP has only been investigated in elderly populations and never in a psychiatric setting or a general population. Registered nurses are the healthprofessionals...... spending most time directly with the patient and very few studies investigate nurses role and potential in improving the appropiateness of patients medicine....

  20. Microtraining of Forensic Psychiatric Patients for Empathic Counseling Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomis, Marsha J.; Baker, Linda L.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed the usefulness of a microtraining package for developing empathic communication skills of peer counselors (N=16) in a therapeutic community of forensic psychiatric patients. Patients were assigned to the skills (empathy training) group, or the attention group, where they viewed counseling films. The skills group gained greater counseling…

  1. Psychiatric disorders and clinical correlates of suicidal patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Tokyo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishimoto Kayo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital with suicidal behavior (SB are considered to be especially at high risk of suicide. However, the number of studies that have addressed this patient population remains insufficient compared to that of studies on suicidal patients in emergency or medical settings. The purpose of this study is to seek features of a sample of newly admitted suicidal psychiatric patients in a metropolitan area of Japan. Method 155 suicidal patients consecutively admitted to a large psychiatric center during a 20-month period, admission styles of whom were mostly involuntary, were assessed using Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV Axis I and II Disorders (SCID-I CV and SCID-II and SB-related psychiatric measures. Associations of the psychiatric diagnoses and SB-related characteristics with gender and age were examined. Results The common DSM-IV axis I diagnoses were affective disorders 62%, anxiety disorders 56% and substance-related disorders 38%. 56% of the subjects were diagnosed as having borderline PD, and 87% of them, at least one type of personality disorder (PD. SB methods used prior to admission were self-cutting 41%, overdosing 32%, self-strangulation 15%, jumping from a height 12% and attempting traffic death 10%, the first two of which were frequent among young females. The median (range of the total number of SBs in the lifetime history was 7 (1-141. Severity of depressive symptomatology, suicidal intent and other symptoms, proportions of the subjects who reported SB-preceding life events and life problems, and childhood and adolescent abuse were comparable to those of the previous studies conducted in medical or emergency service settings. Gender and age-relevant life-problems and life events were identified. Conclusions Features of the studied sample were the high prevalence of affective disorders, anxiety disorders and borderline PD, a variety of SB methods used prior to admission

  2. Effect of nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients - an interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt;

    will contribute with information regarding the effect of pharmacological training of nurses and possibly improve medication safety for psychiatric patients. Results from this study could serve as evidence, when hospital management makes decisions on how to accede the need for medication reviews as part......OBJECTIVES: There is an increasing demand for medication reviews to improve the quality of prescribing for patients with chronic illness such as psychiatric patients. Traditionally, this has been undertaken by physicians. Pharmacists have also proven to be a resource in this field but registered...... nurses are the health professionals spending most time directly with the patient and very few studies investigate nurses’ role and potential in improving the appropriateness of medication. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of educating nurses in general pharmacology...

  3. Effect of nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients - an interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt;

    2013-01-01

    will contribute with information regarding the effect of pharmacological training of nurses and possibly improve medication safety for psychiatric patients. Results from this study could serve as evidence, when hospital management makes decisions on how to accede the need for medication reviews as part......OBJECTIVES: There is an increasing demand for medication reviews to improve the quality of prescribing for patients with chronic illness such as psychiatric patients. Traditionally, this has been undertaken by physicians. Pharmacists have also proven to be a resource in this field but registered...... nurses are the health professionals spending most time directly with the patient and very few studies investigate nurses’ role and potential in improving the appropriateness of medication. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of educating nurses in general pharmacology...

  4. Effects of a Dedicated Regional Psychiatric Emergency Service on Boarding of Psychiatric Patients in Area Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Zeller

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mental health patients boarding for long hours, even days, in United States emergency departments (EDs awaiting transfer for psychiatric services has become a considerable and widespread problem. Past studies have shown average boarding times ranging from 6.8 hours to 34 hours. Most proposed solutions to this issue have focused solely on increasing available inpatient psychiatric hospital beds, rather than considering alternative emergency care designs that could provide prompt access to treatment and might reduce the need for many hospitalizations. One suggested option has been the “regional dedicated emergency psychiatric facility,” which serves to evaluate and treat all mental health patients for a given area, and can accept direct transfers from other EDs. This study sought to assess the effects of a regional dedicated emergency psychiatric facility design known at the “Alameda Model” on boarding times and hospitalization rates for psychiatric patients in area EDs. Methods: Over a 30-day period beginning in January 2013, 5 community hospitals in Alameda County, California, tracked all ED patients on involuntary mental health holds to determine boarding time, defined as the difference between when they were deemed stable for psychiatric disposition and the time they were discharged from the ED for transfer to the regional psychiatric emergency service. Patients were also followed to determine the percentage admitted to inpatient psychiatric units after evaluation and treatment in the psychiatric emergency service.Results: In a total sample of 144 patients, the average boarding time was approximately 1 hour and 48 minutes. Only 24.8% were admitted for inpatient psychiatric hospitalization from the psychiatric emergency service. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that the Alameda Model of transferring patients from general hospital EDs to a regional psychiatric emergency service reduced the length of boarding

  5. Psychiatric Diagnostic Uncertainty: Challenges to Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aultman, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    In this case and commentary, a patient's request to be treated for depression without a stigmatizing diagnostic label of bipolar II disorder challenges a clinician's obligation to provide a clinically and ethically appropriate diagnosis and safe treatment consistent with the patient's family medical history. Sensitively recognizing and responding to patients' concerns and values, even when they might conflict with the delivery of reasonable psychiatric care, is essential when gauging the appropriateness of such therapeutic practices. Furthermore, developing honest and open communication; recognizing that patients, like some psychiatric diagnoses, do not fit into discrete boundaries or cannot be categorized by a single label; and placing the patient at the center of care can all serve to resolve value conflicts, protect patient privacy, and promote accurate diagnostic and treatment practices. PMID:27322991

  6. Psychiatric morbidity in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Chauhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric morbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients is being studied all over the world. There is paucity of Indian literature particularly in asymptomatic HIV individuals. Aim: The aim of the following study is to establish the prevalence and the determinants of psychiatric morbidity in asymptomatic HIV patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken to assess psychiatric morbidity as per ICD-10 dacryocystorhinostomy criteria in 100 consecutive asymptomatic seropositive HIV patients and an equal number of age, sex, education, economic and marital status matched HIV seronegative control. All subjects were assessed with the general health questionnaire (GHQ, mini mental status examination, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS and sensation seeking scale (SSS and the scores were analyzed statistically. Results: Asymptomatic HIV positive patients had significantly higher GHQ caseness and depression but not anxiety on HADS as compared to HIV seronegative controls. On SSS asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects showed significant higher scores in thrill and adventure seeking, experience seeking and boredom susceptibility as compared to controls. HIV seropositive patients had significantly higher incidence of total psychiatric morbidity. Among the individual disorders, alcohol dependence syndrome, sexual dysfunction and adjustment disorder were significantly increased compared with HIV seronegative controls. Conclusion: Psychiatric morbidity is higher in asymptomatic HIV patients when compared to HIV seronegative controls. Among the individual disorders, alcohol dependence syndrome, sexual dysfunction and adjustment disorder were significantly increased compared with HIV seronegative controls. High sensation seeking and substance abuse found in HIV seropositive patients may play a vital role in engaging in high-risk behavior resulting in this dreaded illness.

  7. Mental health related Internet use among psychiatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kalckreuth, Sophie; Trefflich, Friederike; Rummel-Kluge, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Internet is of great importance in today’s health sector, as most Internet users utilize online functions for health related purposes. Concerning the mental health care sector, little data exist about the Internet use of psychiatric patients. It is the scope of this current study to analyze the quantity and pattern of Internet usage among mental health patients. Methods: Patients from all services of the Department of Psychiatry at a university hospital were surveyed by comple...

  8. A fatal encephalopathy in chronic haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, J S; Alfrey, A C; Huddlestone, J; Norenberg, M D; Lewin, E

    1976-04-10

    A distinct neurological syndrome in twelve chronic haemodialysis patients is described. This syndrome is currently the leading cause of death in one Denver dialysis unit. The hallmarks of this syndrome are progressive speech difficulties, mental changes, and a markedly abnormal electroencephalogram which may be present months before the clinical signs appear. Additional clinical features including seizures, myoclonus, asterixis, apraxia, focal neurological signs, and psychiatric symptoms may also be observed. Neuropathological changes are slight and non-specific. The aetiology of this syndrome is unknown but the clinical and pathological features suggest a toxic/metabolic disorder. To date, this disorder has been refractory to several therapeutic measures.

  9. Uses and Limitations of Simulated Patients in Psychiatric Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Adam M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The use of standardized patients (SPs) is becoming prominent as a learning and evaluation tool in both undergraduate and graduate medical education. As increasing attempts are made to extend this tool to psychiatric training and education, it has been suggested that SPs can be useful not only to expose students to the variety of…

  10. Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with Idiopathic Tonic-Clonic Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Sedighi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental disorders severely affect the quality of life of epileptic patients. Due to the lack of adequate research, in the present study we assessed psychiatric disorders in patients with idiopathic tonic-clonic seizure. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-cross-sectional research was conducted on 170 patients using the SCL-90-R questionnaire and the results were analyzed by t-test and χ2 test. Results: The prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients was 38.8%. In order, the highest frequency belonged to obsessive compulsive, depression and interpersonal sensitivity 46.5%. Conclusion: Mental disorders are present in a high percentage of epileptic patients, which shows the need for psychological evaluation.

  11. Monoamine oxidase and agitation in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Uzun, Suzana; Podobnik, Josip; Kozumplik, Oliver; Vlatkovic, Suzana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-08-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia or conduct disorder display a lifelong pattern of antisocial, aggressive and violent behavior and agitation. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme involved in the degradation of various monoamine neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and therefore has a role in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and pathological behaviors. Platelet MAO-B activity has been associated with psychopathy- and aggression-related personality traits, while variants of the MAOA and MAOB genes have been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, including aggressiveness, antisocial problems and violent delinquency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of platelet MAO-B activity, MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism and MAOA uVNTR polymorphism with severe agitation in 363 subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. The results demonstrated significant association of severe agitation and smoking, but not diagnosis or age, with platelet MAO-B activity. Higher platelet MAO-B activity was found in subjects with severe agitation compared to non-agitated subjects. Platelet MAO-B activity was not associated with MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism. These results suggested the association between increased platelet MAO-B activity and severe agitation. No significant association was found between severe agitation and MAOA uVNTR or MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism, revealing that these individual polymorphisms in MAO genes are not related to severe agitation in subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. As our study included 363 homogenous Caucasian male subjects, our data showing this negative genetic association will be a useful addition to future meta-analyses. PMID:26851573

  12. Psychiatric benefits of integrative therapies in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassileth, Barrie R

    2014-02-01

    Integrative oncology uses non-pharmacological adjuncts to mainstream care to manage physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms experienced by cancer survivors. Depression, anxiety, fatigue and pain are among the common, often burdensome symptoms that can occur in clusters, deplete patient morale, interfere with treatment plans, and hamper recovery. Patients already seek various modalities on their own to address a broad range of problems. Legitimate complementary therapies offered at major cancer institutions improve quality of life, speed recovery, and optimize patient support. They also augment the benefits of psychiatric interventions, due to their ability to increase self-awareness and improve physical and psychological conditioning. Further, these integrated therapies provide lifelong tools and develop skills that patients use well after treatment to develop self-care regimens. The active referral of patients to integrative therapies achieves three important objectives: complementary care is received from therapists experienced in working with cancer patients, visits become part of the medical record, allowing treatment teams to guide individuals in maximizing benefit, and patients are diverted from useless or harmful 'alternatives.' We review the reciprocal physical and psychiatric benefits of exercise, mind-body practices, massage, acupuncture, and music therapy for cancer survivors, and suggest how their use can augment mainstream psychiatric interventions. PMID:24716505

  13. Exploring the perceptions of psychiatric patients regarding marijuana use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Scrooby

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There is limited understanding on marijuana use by psychiatric patients, specifically with regard as to why they continue to smoke marijuana despite the negative consequences, such as readmittance to psychiatric hospitals following marijuana-induced psychosis. It is, therefore, important to understand why psychiatric patients continue to use marijuana, despite experiencing its negative effects. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the perceptions of psychiatric patients with regard to marijuana use in Potchefstroom, North West Province, as well as to formulate recommendations for nursing education, nursing research and nursing practice, with the aim of reducing the readmission of psychiatric patients following marijuana-induced psychosis. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was followed in order to give ‘voice’ to the perceptions of psychiatric patients about marijuana use. Purposive sampling was utilised to identify participants who complied with selection criteria. The sample size was determined by data saturation, which was reached after 10 individual interviews with psychiatric patients. Unstructured individual interviews were utilised to gather data after written approval from the Ethics committee of the North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus, North West Provincial Department of Health, the clinical manager of the psychiatric hospital where data were collected, as well as from the psychiatric patients. The co-coder and the researcher analysed the data independently. The findings of this study include perceptions of psychiatric patients on the use of marijuana, the negative effects of marijuana use, marijuana use and mental illness, and quitting marijuana. Recommendations were formulated for nursing education, nursing research as well as for nursing practice.

    Opsomming

    Insig in die gebruik van marijuana deur psigiatriese pasiënte is beperk, spesifiek met

  14. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

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    Margari Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs. Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV, reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30. Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1% or without (47.7% aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0% patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7% at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%, 686 (94.2% and 676 (92.9%. The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%, typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%, atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8% and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%. Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20

  15. Sexually transmitted diseases among psychiatric patients in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Rita Teixeira Dutra; Lorenza Nogueira Campos; Mark Drew Crosland Guimaraes

    2014-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases are still highly prevalent worldwide and represent an important public health problem. Psychiatric patients are at increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases but there are scarce published studies with representative data of this population. We sought to estimate the prevalence and correlates of self-reported sexually transmitted diseases among patients with mental illnesses under care in a national representative sample in Brazil (n = 2145). More than one q...

  16. Crisis homes for adult psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Freiesleben, Michael; Foldager, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Inspired by the Crisis Home programme in Madison, we have adapted and evaluated the programme at the Community Mental Health (CMH) Centre in Tønder, Denmark. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Procedures and schedules from the Crisis Home programme were applied in this open trial. Questionnaire...... data concerning satisfaction with the stay and registration data concerning the admissions and bed days two years before and two years after the first stay were obtained. RESULTS: During four years, 52 different patients had a total of 187 stays in a crisis home. Twenty (38.5%) of the patients were...... attached to the ACT team. The average duration of the stays was 4.0 days. The number of readmissions and bed days after the first stay showed a significant downward tendency for the subgroup of patients with a more severe mental disorder, but not for the whole group. The patients, the crisis homes families...

  17. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne;

    2014-01-01

    , developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups......Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse...... migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry...

  18. Adherence to the Treatment in Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Demirkol

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Although medical treatments and drug industry develop day by day, there have been no changes in the treatment adherence ratios in the past years. To generate possible solutions, treatment adherence should be assessed in all clinical interviews and if patient is non-adherent this issue should be handled seriously. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 555-568

  19. Stress load during childhood affects psychopathology in psychiatric patients

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    Popov Tzvetan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood stress and trauma have been related to adult psychopathology in different psychiatric disorders. The present study aimed at verifying this relationship for stressful experiences during developmental periods by screening stress load across life in adult psychiatric inpatients with different diagnoses compared to healthy subjects. In addition, a relationship between the amount of adverse experiences and the severity of pathology, which has been described as a 'building block' effect in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, was explored for non-traumatic events in psychiatric disorders other than PTSD. Methods 96 patients with diagnoses of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD, schizophrenia, drug addiction, or personality disorders (PD and 31 subjects without psychiatric diagnosis were screened for adverse experiences in childhood (before the age of six years, before onset of puberty, and in adulthood using the Early Trauma Inventory and the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale. Effects of stress load on psychopathology were examined for affective symptoms, PTSD, and severity of illness by regression analyses and comparison of subgroups with high and low stress load. Results High stress load in childhood and before puberty, but not in adulthood, was related to negative affect in all participants. In patients, high stress load was related to depressive and posttraumatic symptoms, severity of disorder, and the diagnoses of MDD and PD. Conclusion Results support the hypothesis of stress-sensitive periods during development, which may interact with genetic and other vulnerability factors in their influence on the progress of psychiatric disorders. A 'dose' effect of stress load on the severity of psychopathology is not restricted to the relationship between traumata and PTSD.

  20. Sexually transmitted diseases among psychiatric patients in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Teixeira Dutra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted diseases are still highly prevalent worldwide and represent an important public health problem. Psychiatric patients are at increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases but there are scarce published studies with representative data of this population. We sought to estimate the prevalence and correlates of self-reported sexually transmitted diseases among patients with mental illnesses under care in a national representative sample in Brazil (n = 2145. More than one quarter of the sample (25.8% reported a lifetime history of sexually transmitted disease. Multivariate analyses showed that patients with a lifetime sexually transmitted disease history were older, had history of homelessness, used more alcohol and illicit drugs, suffered violence, perceived themselves to be at greater risk for HIV and had high risk sexual behavioral: practised unprotected sex, started sexual life earlier, had more than ten sexual partners, exchanged money and/or drugs for sex and had a partner that refused to use condom. Our findings indicate a high prevalence of self-reported sexually transmitted diseases among psychiatric patients in Brazil, and emphasize the need for implementing sexually transmitted diseases prevention programs in psychiatric settings, including screening, treatment, and behavioral modification interventions.

  1. Psychiatric disturbances in five patients with MELAS syndrome

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    Magner, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mitochondrial disorders of energetic metabolism (MD represent a heterogeneous group of diseases manifesting at any age with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms, including psychiatric disorders. Methods: The aim of the study was to characterize psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses in five patients with MELAS syndrome between the ages of 17 and 53 years. Results: Four of MELAS patients them harbored the prevalent mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutation 3243A>G, and one patient had the mtDNA mutation 12706T>C. Three patients had positive family histories for MELAS syndrome. In one patient, depression was diagnosed as the first symptom of MELAS syndrome. Depression also preceded a stroke-like episode in one patient. Four patients had disturbed cognitive functions, confusional states occurred in three patients. One patient manifested psychotic (schizophrenia-like symptoms. Conclusion: Mitochondrial disorders deserve consideration as part of the differential diagnosis, especially if there is suspected involvement of other organ groups or positive family history of MD.

  2. Coping Strategies of Family Members of Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Phyllis M.; Davis, Bertha L.; Pamela V. Hammond; Condon, Esther H.; McGee, Zina T.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory research paper investigated the coping strategies of families of hospitalized psychiatric patients and identified their positive and negative coping strategies. In this paper, the coping strategies of 45 family members were examined using a descriptive, correlational, mixed method research approach. Guided by the Neuman Systems Model and using the Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales and semistructured interviews, this paper found that these family members used m...

  3. The Quality of Prescribing for Psychiatric Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt;

    2014-01-01

    interactions involved propranolol, erythromycin, simvastatin and promethazine. After adjusting for age, gender, alcohol/substance abuse, number of prescriptions, number of somatic diagnoses and level of kidney function, only polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) increased the odds for a PIP significantly; OR=4...... of PIP was assessed using four categories. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify possible predictive factors of PIP. RESULTS: The proportion of patients with one or more PIPs was 123/219(56%). “Interaction between drugs” was the most common category for potentially serious and potentially...... fatal PIPs with 49/123(40%) and 32/45(71%), respectively. Of 32 identified potentially fatal drug-drug interactions, 15/32(47%) involved two or more antipsychotic drugs and 12/32(37%) involved antipsychotic drugs in combination with antidepressants. The remaining 5/32(16%) potentially fatal drug-drug...

  4. Psychiatric evaluation and psychotherapy in the patient's second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquendo, M A

    1996-06-01

    Use of a patient's second language in psychiatric evaluation and treatment has a variety of effects. Patients frequently undergo psychiatric evaluation in their second language, yet competence in a second language varies depending on the phase of illness. Evaluation of bilingual patients should ideally be done in both their languages, preferably by a bilingual clinician or by a monolingual clinician with the help of an interpreter trained in mental health issues. Cultural nuances may be encoded in language in ways that are not readily conveyed in translation, even when the patient uses equivalent words in the second language. The monolingual clinician may clarify these nuances through consultation with a clinician who shares the patient's first language and culture or with an interpreter. In psychotherapy, patients may use a second language as a form of resistance, to avoid intense affect. Therapists may use language switching to overcome this resistance and to decrease emotional intensity, if necessary. Psychotherapy can also be affected by the attitudes toward speaking that are part of the patient's culture. Discussions with bilingual and bicultural consultants can elucidate these effects for the therapist who is unfamiliar with the patient's culture.

  5. [Refusal of food and fluids of a psychiatric patient in order to hasten death: obstacles for patient, family and care-team].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Dekkers, W.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this case-report we present a patient with a psychiatric history of a chronic depressive disorder. After a period of several years of ambivalence, he decided to refuse nutrition and hydration because he--in the words of the Royal Dutch Medical Association--was "suffering from life". There was no

  6. Chronic Stress and Adolescents' Mental Health : Modifying Effects of Basal Cortisol and Parental Psychiatric History. The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandstra, Anna Roos E.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Nederhof, Esther; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Dietrich, Andrea; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Ormel, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Large individual differences in adolescent mental health following chronic psychosocial stress suggest moderating factors. We examined two established moderators, basal cortisol and parental psychiatric history, simultaneously. We hypothesized that individuals with high basal cortisol, assumed to in

  7. On the Moral Acceptability of Physician-Assisted Dying for Non-Autonomous Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelius, Jukka

    2016-05-01

    Several authors have recently suggested that the suffering caused by mental illness could provide moral grounds for physician-assisted dying. Yet they typically require that psychiatric-assisted dying could come to question in the cases of autonomous, or rational, psychiatric patients only. Given that also non-autonomous psychiatric patients can sometimes suffer unbearably, this limitation appears questionable. In this article, I maintain that restricting psychiatric-assisted dying to autonomous, or rational, psychiatric patients would not be compatible with endorsing certain end-of-life practices commonly accepted in current medical ethics and law, practices often referred to as 'passive euthanasia'. PMID:26449985

  8. Belief in demons and exorcism in psychiatric patients in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, S

    1994-09-01

    Belief in demons as the cause of mental health problems is a well-known phenomenon in many cultures of the world. However, there is little literature on this phenomenon in Protestant subcultures of the West. The author conducted a systematic investigation of the prevalence of this attribution in 343 mainly Protestant out-patients of a psychiatric clinic in Switzerland, who described themselves as religious. Of these, 129 (37.6 per cent) believed in the possible causation of their problems through the influence of evil spirits, labelling this as 'occult bondage' or 'possession'. One hundred and four patients (30.3 per cent) sought help through ritual 'prayers for deliverance' and exorcism. Prevalence of such practices was significantly related to diagnosis (p < .01) and to church affiliation (p < .005). Patients in charismatic free churches suffering from anxiety disorders and schizophrenia reported the highest rate of exorcistic rituals (70 per cent), and patients with adjustment disorders from traditional state churches the lowest (14 per cent). The various forms and functions of these healing rituals are described. Although many patients subjectively experienced the rituals as positive, outcome in psychiatric symptomatology was not improved. Negative outcome, such as psychotic decompensation, is associated with the exclusion of medical treatment and coercive forms of exorcism. PMID:7803317

  9. Factors predicting adherence with psychiatric follow-up appointments for patients assessed by the liaison psychiatric team in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Agyapong, Vincent I O

    2010-01-01

    Several factors may predict adherence with psychiatric follow-up appointment for patients seen in the emergency department (ED) by liaison psychiatric teams. Awareness of these factors would allow for interventions targeted at vulnerable groups.

  10. Strength and physiological response to exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Fulcher, K.; White, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To measure strength, aerobic exercise capacity and efficiency, and functional incapacity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) who do not have a current psychiatric disorder.
METHODS—Sixty six patients with CFS without a current psychiatric disorder, 30 healthy but sedentary controls, and 15 patients with a current major depressive disorder were recruited into the study. Exercise capacity and efficiency were assessed by monitoring peak and submaximal o...

  11. The lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bimenyimana

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Caring for good people is difficult enough; to care for people who are either aggressive or violent is even more difficult. This is what psychiatric nurses working in the psychiatric institution in which research was done are exposed to on a daily basis. The aim of the research was to explore and describe the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, and contextual study design was utilised. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and naïve sketches. Tesch’s (Creswell, 2004:256 method of open coding and an independent coder were utilised for data analysis. This study shed some light on the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. The findings show that the level of violence and aggression to which psychiatric nurses are exposed is overwhelming and the consequences are alarming. The contributing factors to this violence and aggression are: the mental status and the conditions in which patients are admitted; the staff shortage; the lack of support among the members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT; and the lack of structured and comprehensive orientation among newly appointed staff members. As a result, psychiatric nurses are emotionally, psychologically, and physically affected. They then respond with the following emotions and behaviour: fear, anger, frustration, despair, hopelessness and helplessness, substance abuse, absenteeism, retaliation and the development of an “I don’t care” attitude.

  12. Do electronic health records affect the patient-psychiatrist relationship? A before & after study of psychiatric outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuyler Mark

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of literature shows that patients accept the use of computers in clinical care. Nonetheless, studies have shown that computers unequivocally change both verbal and non-verbal communication style and increase patients' concerns about the privacy of their records. We found no studies which evaluated the use of Electronic Health Records (EHRs specifically on psychiatric patient satisfaction, nor any that took place exclusively in a psychiatric treatment setting. Due to the special reliance on communication for psychiatric diagnosis and evaluation, and the emphasis on confidentiality of psychiatric records, the results of previous studies may not apply equally to psychiatric patients. Method We examined the association between EHR use and changes to the patient-psychiatrist relationship. A patient satisfaction survey was administered to psychiatric patient volunteers prior to and following implementation of an EHR. All subjects were adult outpatients with chronic mental illness. Results Survey responses were grouped into categories of "Overall," "Technical," "Interpersonal," "Communication & Education,," "Time," "Confidentiality," "Anxiety," and "Computer Use." Multiple, unpaired, two-tailed t-tests comparing pre- and post-implementation groups showed no significant differences (at the 0.05 level to any questionnaire category for all subjects combined or when subjects were stratified by primary diagnosis category. Conclusions While many barriers to the adoption of electronic health records do exist, concerns about disruption to the patient-psychiatrist relationship need not be a prominent focus. Attention to communication style, interpersonal manner, and computer proficiency may help maintain the quality of the patient-psychiatrist relationship following EHR implementation.

  13. Theophylline toxicity leading to suicidal ideation in a patient with no prior psychiatric illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kapoor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Suicidal behavior is a common psychiatric emergency and is associated with psychiatric illness and history of prior suicide attempts. Neuropsychiatric manifestations related to theophylline toxicity are well described in literature. We report a case of theophylline toxicity manifesting as suicidal ideation in a patient with no prior psychiatric illness.

  14. The use of humor in the care of psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysodimitra Galatou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Humor is defined as a state of good spirit, exhibited with a smile or laughter, as a response to external stimuli. It constitutes a special form of human communication as well as a form of social conduct. The word «humor» appears for the first time in Hippocrates' writings. Psychology considers humor as one of the most powerful weapons against depression and disappointment. In psychiatric therapeutics humor serves many purposes, thereby acting as a supplement, not a substitute to treatment received. Purpose: of this article is to highlight the positive effects of humor in humans, health professionals and patient. Material and method: An extensive literature search databases such as Medline, Pub Med, Wikipedia, Cinahl, Medscape, with key words: humor, psychiatric patient, care, humor scales Results: Humor is an interpersonal process which facilitates and promotes expression and exchange of views; however it requires prudence, cautiousness and respect to patients' personality and sensitive issues. Humor is not innate, it is acquired and it can be learning and taught. Conclusion: The correct use of humor in therapeutic practice, contributes to the development of a therapeutic relationship between patient and healthcare professional as well as a sense of trust between them.

  15. Inpatient treatment of the psychiatric patient with alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean-Bayog, M

    1987-05-01

    Patients with both alcoholism and mental illness, or the one masquerading as the other, are very common and often puzzling and discouraging to clinicians. This article reviews several aspects of these problems: epidemiologic studies show that substantial proportions of mentally ill people suffer from alcoholism, and these disorders interlock in complex ways, each exacerbating the other. Many physicians feel uncomfortable working with alcoholic people, mostly because of poor training, and this impinges on difficulties of giving excellent care to these taxing patients. Complexities and resistances to interviewing obstruct evaluation. Interviewing and history taking techniques and the reason for them are discussed. The decision whether a patient needs medical or psychiatric hospitalization, alcoholism rehabilitation, or outpatient psychiatric or alcoholism treatment is reviewed along with the management and sequencing of treatment for primary and secondary alcoholism with concomitant psychosis, mania, depression, panic disorder, and adult attention deficit disorder. Clinical intervention and referral for the patient on a medical or surgical floor who may have alcoholism is discussed. Two special clinical problems, the differential diagnosis of postdetoxification depression and the risks of using alcohol cross-tolerant drugs, are also reviewed. PMID:2884166

  16. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaipisuttikul P

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Papan Thaipisuttikul, Pichai Ittasakul, Punjaporn Waleeprakhon, Pattarabhorn Wisajun, Sudawan Jullagate Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Psychiatric comorbidities are common in major depressive disorder (MDD. They may worsen outcome and cause economic burden. The primary objective was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in MDD. The secondary objectives were to compare the presence of comorbidities between currently active and past MDD, and between patients with and without suicidal risk.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 250 patients with lifetime MDD and age ≥18 years were enrolled. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, Thai version, was used to confirm MDD diagnosis and classify comorbidities. MDD diagnosis was confirmed in 190, and 60 patients were excluded due to diagnosis of bipolar disorder.Results: Of the 190 MDD patients, 25.8% had current MDD and 74.2% had past MDD. Eighty percent were women. The mean age at enrollment was 50 years, and at MDD onset was 41 years. Most patients were married (53.2%, employed (54.8%, and had ≥12 years of education (66.9%. There were 67 patients (35.3% with one or more psychiatric comorbidities. Comorbidities included dysthymia (19.5%, any anxiety disorders (21.1% (panic disorder [6.8%], agoraphobia [5.8%], social phobia [3.7%], obsessive–compulsive disorder [OCD] [4.7%], generalized anxiety disorder [5.3%], and post-traumatic stress disorder [4.2%], alcohol dependence (0.5%, psychotic disorder (1.6%, antisocial personality (1.1%, and eating disorders (0%. Compared with past MDD, the current MDD group had significantly higher OCD (P<0.001, psychotic disorder (P=0.048, past panic disorder (P=0.017, and suicidal risk (P<0.001. Suicidal risk was found in 32.1% of patients. Patients with suicidal risk had more comorbid anxiety disorder of any type (P=0.019 and

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection. PMID:8067276

  18. A STUDY OF CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF PATIENTS WITH PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugasundaram

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skin is an organ that has a primary function of tactile receptivity and reacts to both external and internal emotional stimuli. Dermatological practice certainly embeds a psychosomatic dimension. A relationship between psychological factors and skin diseases has long been hypothesized. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The aim of present study is to evaluate the prevalence of cutaneous manifestations in patients with psychiatric disorder. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty five psychiatric in-patients admitted in the psychiatry ward of a Tertiary Care Hospital were examined for the presence of cutaneous manifestation over a period of 6 months. Appropriate laboratory investigations such as scraping for Acarus, skin biopsy etc. were performed wherever required. The observations were noted. RESULTS The commonest cutaneous manifestations seen in this study were (i Parasitic infestations like scabies (20%, pediculosis capitis (16%, (ii Xerosis (28 %, (iii Prurigo nodularis (4%, (iv Lichen simplex chronicus (4%, (v Venereophobia (4% and (vi Delusion of parasitosis (4%. CONCLUSION A high incidence of parasitic infestations was noted in our study. The healthcare personnel should be sensitized on the significance of such parasitic infestations in institutionalized patients and the importance of early detection and treatment.

  19. [Historicizing nursing and patients at a psychiatric hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, Miriam Süsskind; Pereira, Valdete Preve; Ribas, Dorotéa Löes; Ribeiro, Anesilda Alves de Almeida

    2003-01-01

    This is a historical research whose objective is to historicize the nursing team and the patients at the Hospital Colônia Sant'Ana (HCS), in the period from 1941 to 1960. Five employees that worked at the Hospital in the period of the study were interviewed and other documental sources were used. To analyze the data Foucault's theory was used. HCS was the main pole of psychiatric care in the Santa Catarina. The nursing team was constituted by the nuns, "male nurses" and "watchmen". The institution received indigent, private, and health insurance covered patients, who were diagnosed with many different problems, and some who were more of a social case than anything else. The general conditions of the Hospital were precarious. The studied period made possible visualize that the treatment given to the patients, as well as the work conditions offered to the workers, were distant from the ideal, and that it was part of a national policy, characterized by the creation of state macro psychiatric hospitals.

  20. A psychiatric perspective view of bariatric surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Brandão

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bariatric surgery is the only procedure that has significant results in weight loss and improvements in medical comorbidities in morbid obese patients. Severely obese patients are also associated with a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders and poor quality of life. Objective To evaluate specific areas of psychopathology in individuals undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods A review of the literature was conducted from January 2002 to March 2014 by researching PubMed database using the following query: “morbid AND obesity AND bariatric AND surgery AND (psychiatry OR psychology”. Results Overall improvements in eating behaviors, mood disorders and body image are reported after bariatric surgery, and the mechanism is not enlightened. Risk of suicide and consumption of substances of abuse, especially alcohol, after gastric bypass surgery are problems that clinicians must be aware. Discussion Bariatric patients should be monitored after surgery to identify who did not show the expected benefits postoperatively and the ones who develop psychiatric symptoms after an initial positive response.

  1. Satisfaction of patients hospitalised in psychiatric hospitals: a randomised comparison of two psychiatric-specific and one generic satisfaction questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléopas Agatta

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is interest in measuring the satisfaction of patients discharged from psychiatric hospitals, it might be important to determine whether surveys of psychiatric patients should employ generic or psychiatry-specific instruments. The aim of this study was to compare two psychiatric-specific and one generic questionnaires assessing patients' satisfaction after a hospitalisation in a psychiatric hospital. Methods We randomised adult patients discharged from two Swiss psychiatric university hospitals between April and September 2004, to receive one of three instruments: the Saphora-Psy questionnaire, the Perceptions of Care survey questionnaire or the Picker Institute questionnaire for acute care hospitals. In addition to the comparison of response rates, completion time, mean number of missing items and mean ceiling effect, we targeted our comparison on patients and asked them to answer ten evaluation questions about the questionnaire they had just completed. Results 728 out of 1550 eligible patients (47% participated in the study. Across questionnaires, response rates were similar (Saphora-Psy: 48.5%, Perceptions of Care: 49.9%, Picker: 43.4%; P = 0.08, average completion time was lowest for the Perceptions of Care questionnaire (minutes: Saphora-Psy: 17.7, Perceptions of Care: 13.7, Picker: 17.5; P = 0.005, the Saphora-Psy questionnaire had the largest mean proportion of missing responses (Saphora-Psy: 7.1%, Perceptions of Care: 2.8%, Picker: 4.0%; P P Conclusion Despite differences in the intended target population, content, lay-out and length of questionnaires, none appeared to be obviously better based on our comparison. All three presented advantages and drawbacks and could be used for the satisfaction evaluation of psychiatric inpatients. However, if comparison across medical services or hospitals is desired, using a generic questionnaire might be advantageous.

  2. Impact of psychiatric disorders on the quality of life of brazilian HCV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Batista-Neves

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to determine the impact of psychiatric comorbidities on the health-related quality of life of HCV-infected patients. Assessment of clinical, socio-demographic and quality of life data of the patients followed up at a Hepatology unit was performed by using a standard questionnaire and the SF-36 instrument. Psychiatric diagnoses were confirmed by using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Brazilian version 5.0.0 (MINI Plus. Evaluation using the MINI plus demonstrated that 46 (51% patients did not have any psychiatric diagnosis, while 44 (49% had at least one psychiatric diagnosis. Among patients with a psychiatric comorbidity, 26 (59.1% had a current mental disorder, out of which 22 (84.6% had not been previously diagnosed. Patients with psychiatric disorders had lower scores in all dimensions of the SF-36 when compared to those who had no psychiatric diagnosis. Scores of physical functioning and bodily pain domains were lower for those suffering from a current psychiatric disorder when compared to those who had had a psychiatric disorder in the past. Females had lower scores of bodily pain and mental health dimensions when compared to males. Scores for mental health dimension were also lower for patients with advanced fibrosis. The presence of a psychiatric comorbidity was the variable that was most associated with the different scores in the SF-36, compared to other variables such as age, gender, aminotransferase levels, and degree of fibrosis.

  3. Low self-esteem and psychiatric patients: Part II – The relationship between self-esteem and demographic factors and psychosocial stressors in psychiatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Salsali, Mahnaz; Silverstone, Peter H

    2003-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to identify the effects and relative importance of demographic factors and psychosocial stressors on self-esteem of psychiatric patients. Method The present study was carried out on a consecutive sample of 1,190 individuals attending an open-access psychiatric outpatient clinic. Patients were diagnosed according to DSM III-R diagnostic criteria following detailed assessments. At screening, patients and controls completed two self-esteem questi...

  4. Effects of Auricular Acupressure on Body Weight Parameters in Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Han-Yi Ching; Shang-Liang Wu; Wen-Chi Chen; Ching-Liang Hsieh

    2012-01-01

    Auricular acupressure is widely used in complementary and alternative medicine to reduce body weight, but little is known about the effects of auricular acupressure on body weight parameters in patients with chronic schizophrenia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of auricular acupressure on body weight parameters in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Eighty-six inpatients with schizophrenia were recruited from chronic wards in a psychiatric center. The participants were...

  5. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) survey

    OpenAIRE

    Russo Federico; Righi Roberto; Minervini Lina; Margari Francesco; Casacchia Massimo; Boncompagni Giancarlo; Boccalon Roberto M; Ballerini Andrea; Salteri Andrea; Frediani Sonia; Rossi Andrea; Scatigna Marco

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). The aims of this paper are: (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and...

  6. Impact of psychiatric illness upon asthma patients' health care utilization and illness control. Are all psychiatric comorbidities created equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, Nataliya; Karekla, Maria; Georgiou, Andreas; Feldman, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    The impact of psychiatric illnesses upon asthma patients' functioning is not well understood. This study examined the impact of psychiatric comorbidity upon illness management in asthma patients using empirically-derived psychiatric comorbidity groups. Participants were a clinic sample of Greek-speaking asthma patients (N = 212) assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) Somatoform, Depression, Panic Disorder (PD), Other Anxiety Disorder, Eating Disorder (ED) and Alcohol sub-scales. The associations between sub-scales were examined using multiway frequency analysis. The following groups were derived: Somatoform disorder and/or Any Depressive disorder (n = 63), Somatoform disorder and/or Other Anxiety disorder (n = 51), Somatoform disorder and/or Any ED (n = 60), and Any Anxiety group including PD and/or Other Anxiety disorder (n = 24). Across all groups, psychiatric illness was associated with significantly worse asthma control (p Anxiety group, OR = 4.61, 95% CI [1.90, 11.15], Somatoform and/or Any Depressive disorder, OR = 2.06, 95% CI [1.04, 4.09] and Somatoform and/or Other Anxiety disorder, OR = 2.75, 95% CI [1.35, 5.60] were at higher risk for asthma-related Emergency Room (ER) visits compared to controls. However only Somatoform and/or Any Depressive disorder, OR = 3.67, 95% CI [1.60, 8.72], Somatoform and/or Other Anxiety disorder, OR = 5.50, 95% CI [2.34, 12.74], and Somatoform and/or Any ED, OR = 4.98, 95% CI [2.14, 11.60] group membership were risk factors for asthma-related hospitalizations. Results suggest that while comorbid psychiatric disorders generally negatively impact asthma illness management, different psychiatric comorbidities appear to have disparate effects upon illness management outcomes. PMID:26782700

  7. A study of psychiatric morbidity in patients of peptic ulcer diseases

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    Jagpal Singh Klair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among patients of peptic ulcer disease and to study the patients of peptic ulcer disease with psychiatric morbidity in comparison to patients of peptic ulcer disease without psychiatric morbidity on following variables: sociodemographic variables and attributes/risk factors of peptic ulcer disease. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases of clinically proven acid peptic diseases and 30 cases of the control group were screened in department of General Medicine, outdoor as well as indoor patients. Instruments applied for the purpose of the study were Personal Bio-data Performa (Appendix-I, (SCL- 80 (Appendix-II, Hamilton rating scale for anxiety and depression, (P.S.L.E.; clinical diagnosis of psychiatric disorders was made as per ICD- 10 criteria. Data collected shall be subjected to statistical analysis. Results and Findings: The psychiatric morbidity was significantly (P10 years, compared to 23.80% in patients without psychiatric morbidity. Lastly, 48.27% of patients with psychiatric morbidity had significantly (P<0.01 stronger family history of acid peptic disease compared to 9.52% in patients without psychiatric morbidity. Conclusions: There is a significant relationship between the peptic ulcer disease and the various psychiatric morbidity factors as illustrated from the findings of this study.

  8. Cognitive Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Constraints on HIV Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnell, Gil

    Some mental health experts have suggested that particular subgroups of the chronic mentally ill may be especially vulnerable to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Patients with mood disorders (manic type), schizophrenia, and dual diagnosis of either disorder with substance abuse are considered at high risk for HIV infection, as are…

  9. Conversations with chronic schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R

    1979-02-01

    An account is given of some of the topics discussed during a small informal weekly open group meeting of chronic schizophrenic patients, based on occasional notes compiled over eleven years. The main feature of the patients' condition as displayed was poverty--clinical, social, behavioural, material and financial--and certain features suggested an organic aetiology. Reasons are given for considering that the patients' condition was predominantly caused by schizophrenia rather than by institutionalism.

  10. Influence of Liaison Psychiatric Approach on Quality of Life in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Anton, Sanda; Mrđenović, Slobodan; Gugić, Damir; Tomanović, Katarina

    2008-01-01

    Having breast cancer represents traumatic stress event that can influence development of psychiatric disorders during psychological adjustment. The aim of research was to investigate influence of liaison psychiatric approach on quality of life in patients with breast cancer. Sample consisted of 120 women with breast cancer treated on Department for Oncology in University Hospital Osijek. Patients were in liaison psychiatric treatment for two months. They were estimated on the firs...

  11. Psychiatric disorders prevalence in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

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    Perea-Castro Esther

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizuresare defined as behavior, sensorialperception or cognitive activity alterations, simulating generalized or partial epilepticdisorders, without abnormal neuronal dischargesAims: To determine psychiatric disorders frequency in patients with psychogenicmovement disorders diagnosis.Methods: A studycarriedout in Fundación Centro Colombiano contra la Epilepsia yEnfermedades Neurológicas (FIRE, Cartagena, Colombia. A total of 39 patients werediagnosedwith Psychogenic nonepileptic seizuresfrom 250 video-telemetries performedbetween 2008–2009, to whom a structured interview was applied, known as InternationalNeuro-psichyatricMini Interview (MINI, which identify major psychiatric diagnosis fromaxis I. Moreover, a record with socio-demographic data (e.g. age, gender, marital status,educational level; data related to disorder type, evolution time, previous psychiatricdiagnosis and sexual abuse history. Data was analyzed employing STATA 10.1 software,and proportions for categorical variables were found, as well as mean and median forcontinuous variables.Results: In 85% of patients with psychogenic movement disorders was identified anassociated psychiatric pathology. Major depressive disorder was the most frequentdisease, followed by anxiety disorders and dysthymia. 30% of patients had sexual abusehistory and 61% had physical abuse.Conclusions: Population with observed Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures diagnosisshowed high psychiatric diseases prevalence. Identification and treatment of thoseassociated pathologies contribute to improve evolution of these disorders.RESUMEN:Introducción: las crisis sicógenas se definen como cambios en la conducta, enla sensopercepción o en la actividad cognitiva, simulando trastornos epilépticosgeneralizados o parciales, sin la presencia de descargas neuronales anómalas.Objetivo: determinar los trastornos psiquiátricos más frecuentes que se presentan enpacientes con el

  12. Coping Strategies of Family Members of Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients

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    Phyllis M. Eaton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory research paper investigated the coping strategies of families of hospitalized psychiatric patients and identified their positive and negative coping strategies. In this paper, the coping strategies of 45 family members were examined using a descriptive, correlational, mixed method research approach. Guided by the Neuman Systems Model and using the Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales and semistructured interviews, this paper found that these family members used more emotion-focused coping strategies than problem-focused coping strategies. The common coping strategies used by family members were communicating with immediate family, acceptance of their situation, passive appraisal, avoidance, and spirituality. The family members also utilized resources and support systems, such as their immediate families, mental health care professionals, and their churches.

  13. Fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin Gözübüyükoğulları; Duru Tabanlıoğlu Onan; Nuran Allı

    2014-01-01

    Background and Design: The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of fibromyalgia syndrome in chronic urticaria patients. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out with the participation of 100 chronic urticaria patients and 61 control group patients. Chronic urticaria patients were investigated for the etiology of urticaria and the autologous serum skin test was performed in those patients. Both the chronic urticaria patients and the controls were evaluated for fibromyalgi...

  14. Death and suicide among former child and adolescent psychiatric patients

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    Rydelius Per-Anders

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased mortality rates among previous child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP patients have been found in Scandinavian studies up to the 1980s. The suicide risk in this group has been estimated to be almost five times higher than expected. This article addresses two questions: Do Swedish CAP patients continue to risk premature death and what kind of information related to psychiatric symptoms and/or behavior problems can predict later suicide? Methods Hospital files, Sweden's census databases (including immigration and emigration and administrative databases (including the Swedish Hospital Discharge register and the Persons Convicted of Offences register, and the Cause of Death register were examined to determine the mortality rate in a group of 1,400 former CAP inpatients and outpatients over a period of 12–33 years. Observed and expected numbers of deceased were calculated with the prospective method and the standardized mortality ratio (SMR method. The relative risk or the risk ratio (RR is presented with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Significance level tests were made using two-by-two tables and chi-square tests. The Cox proportional-hazards regression model was used for survival analysis. Results Twenty-four males and 14 females died. Compared with the general population, the standardized mortality ratio in this group of CAP patients was significantly higher in both sexes. Behavioral problems, school problems, and co-morbid alcohol or drug abuse and criminality (including alcohol-related crimes were found to be important predictors. Thirty-two deaths were attributed to suicide, intoxication, drug overdose, or accident; one patient died of an alcohol abuse-related disorder, and five patients died of natural causes. Suicide was the most common cause of death, but only 2 of these 19 cases were initially admitted for attempted suicide. Conclusion We suggest that suicide and death prevention among CAP patients may not be a

  15. Military Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Is Better Pain Management the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeary, Cindy A; McGeary, Donald D; Moreno, Jose; Gatchel, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain, such as low back pain, often appears in the presence of psychiatric comorbidities (e.g., depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)), especially among U.S. military service members serving in the post-9/11 combat era. Although there has been much speculation about how to best address pain/trauma psychiatric symptom comorbidities, there are little available data to guide practice. The present study sought to examine how pre-treatment depression and PTSD influence outcomes in a functional restoration pain management program using secondary analysis of data from the Department of Defense-funded Functional and Orthopedic Rehabilitation Treatment (FORT) trial. Twenty-eight FORT completers were analyzed using a general linear model exploring how well depression and PTSD symptoms predict post-treatment pain (Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain rating), disability (Oswestry Disability Index; Million Visual Analog Scale), and functional capacity (Floor-to-Waist and Waist-to-Eye Level progressive isoinertial lifting evaluation scores) in a sample of active duty military members with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depression or PTSD symptoms. Analysis revealed that pre-treatment depression and PTSD symptoms did not significantly predict rehabilitation outcomes from program completers. Implications of these findings for future research on trauma-related pain comorbidities are discussed. PMID:27417626

  16. Military Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Is Better Pain Management the Answer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy A. McGeary

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic musculoskeletal pain, such as low back pain, often appears in the presence of psychiatric comorbidities (e.g., depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, especially among U.S. military service members serving in the post-9/11 combat era. Although there has been much speculation about how to best address pain/trauma psychiatric symptom comorbidities, there are little available data to guide practice. The present study sought to examine how pre-treatment depression and PTSD influence outcomes in a functional restoration pain management program using secondary analysis of data from the Department of Defense-funded Functional and Orthopedic Rehabilitation Treatment (FORT trial. Twenty-eight FORT completers were analyzed using a general linear model exploring how well depression and PTSD symptoms predict post-treatment pain (Visual Analog Scale (VAS pain rating, disability (Oswestry Disability Index; Million Visual Analog Scale, and functional capacity (Floor-to-Waist and Waist-to-Eye Level progressive isoinertial lifting evaluation scores in a sample of active duty military members with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depression or PTSD symptoms. Analysis revealed that pre-treatment depression and PTSD symptoms did not significantly predict rehabilitation outcomes from program completers. Implications of these findings for future research on trauma-related pain comorbidities are discussed.

  17. Child and adolescent psychiatric patients and later criminality

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    Rydelius Per-Anders

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sweden has an extensive child and adolescent psychiatric (CAP research tradition in which longitudinal methods are used to study juvenile delinquency. Up to the 1980s, results from descriptions and follow-ups of cohorts of CAP patients showed that children's behavioural disturbances or disorders and school problems, together with dysfunctional family situations, were the main reasons for families, children, and youth to seek help from CAP units. Such factors were also related to registered criminality and registered alcohol and drug abuse in former CAP patients as adults. This study investigated the risk for patients treated 1975–1990 to be registered as criminals until the end of 2003. Methods A regional sample of 1,400 former CAP patients, whose treatment occurred between 1975 and 1990, was followed to 2003, using database-record links to the Register of Persons Convicted of Offences at the National Council for Crime Prevention (NCCP. Results Every third CAP patient treated between 1975 and 1990 (every second man and every fifth woman had entered the Register of Persons Convicted of Offences during the observation period, which is a significantly higher rate than the general population. Conclusion Results were compared to published results for CAP patients who were treated between 1953 and 1955 and followed over 20 years. Compared to the group of CAP patients from the 1950s, the results indicate that the risk for boys to enter the register for criminality has doubled and for girls, the risk seems to have increased sevenfold. The reasons for this change are discussed. Although hypothetical and perhaps speculative this higher risk of later criminality may be the result of lack of social control due to (1 rising consumption of alcohol, (2 changes in organisation of child social welfare work, (3 the school system, and (4 CAP methods that were implemented since 1970.

  18. Ethics, patient rights and staff attitudes in Shanghai's psychiatric hospitals

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    Su Liang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to ethical principles in clinical research and practice is becoming topical issue in China, where the prevalence of mental illness is rising, but treatment facilities remain underdeveloped. This paper reports on a study aiming to understand the ethical knowledge and attitudes of Chinese mental health professionals in relation to the process of diagnosis and treatment, informed consent, and privacy protection in clinical trials. Methods A self-administered survey was completed by 1110 medical staff recruited from Shanghai’s 22 psychiatric hospitals. Simple random selection methods were used to identify target individuals from the computerized registry of staff. Results The final sample for analysis consisted 1094 medical staff (including 523 doctors, 542 nurses, 8 pharmacologists and 21 other staff. The majority reported that their medical institutions had not established an Ethics Committee (87.8% and agreed that Ethics Committees should be set up in their institutions (72.9%. Approximately half (52% had not received systematic education in ethics, and almost all (89.1% of the staff thought it was necessary. Nearly all participants (90.0% knew the Shanghai Mental Health Regulations which was the first local regulations relating to mental health in China, but only 11% and 16.6% respectively knew of the Nuremberg Code and the Declaration of Helsinki. About half (51.8% thought that the guardian should make the decision as to whether the patient participated in clinical trials or not. Conclusions The study indicates that most psychiatric hospitals in Shanghai have no Medical Ethics Committee. More than half the medical staff had not received systematic education and training in medical ethics and they have insufficient knowledge of the ethical issues related to clinical practice and trials. Training in ethics is recommended for medical staff during their training and as ongoing professional development.

  19. Psychiatric illness and psychosocial concerns of patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Ginsburg, M L; Quirt, C; Ginsburg, A. D.; Mackillop, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the nature and incidence of psychiatric illness, symptoms of potential psychiatric significance, substance abuse and psychosocial concerns among patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: Kingston Regional Cancer Centre, a tertiary care facility for ambulatory cancer patients. PATIENTS: Seventy-one consecutive English-speaking patients with recently diagnosed lung cancer undergoing radiotherapy or chemotherapy were asked to participate; 52...

  20. Psychiatric consultation for somatizing patients in the family practice setting: a feasibility study.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, C. M.; Wijkel, D.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Collijn, D.H.; Huyse, F.J.; Duyk, R. van

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to assess the feasibility of a psychiatric consultation intervention for somatizing patients in the family practice setting in terms of 1) patient compliance, 2) patient satisfaction, and 3) compliance and satisfaction of general practitioners (GPs). METHOD: In a period of nine months, forty-six patients were selected for psychiatric consultation in six solo family practices in a semi-urban area in the Netherlands. The consultation included an interview...

  1. Psychiatrically impaired patients often exposed to pregnancy risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neinstein, L S; Katz, B

    1985-06-01

    contraception difficult or impossible to use. IUDs also pose problems. 3 factors should be considered when contraceptive services are provided for mentally ill women: those services should be administered by specially trained individuals who can obtain informed consent and can consider specific needs and problems of psychiatrically impaired persons; OCs should be used very cautiously for women with a history of depression; and before prescribing other contraceptive methods, the clinician should consider the ability of the patient to use the method consistently and correctly. PMID:12313658

  2. Psychosocial and medical factors affecting treatment compliance in patients attending psychiatric hospital: a study from Kashmir

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    Sheikh Shoib

    2014-02-01

    Results: Out of 200 respondents studied in the study 41.5 % were males and 58.5% were females. Maximum number of patients (31.5% studied were in the age group below the 30 years. 3.5% of respondents were in the age group above 70 years. Out of total 200 respondents in the study 74 % of the respondents are in compliance with recommended medicine whereas non-compliance was found in the 26% of studied population. Complications (13.46% ascending out by usage of psychiatric medicine can be attributed as one of the major case of treatment non-compliance in psychiatric patients, among the psychiatric patients. Accessibility of psychiatric medicine and Financial constrain was also one of the reasons behind the medicine non-compliance (7.69%. Patients with no insight to psychiatric disease also include a good percentage of (5.76 % of medicine non- compliance. Conclusions: Non-compliance is a dominant factor which causes possibly causes readmission in psychiatric wards. Compliance in psychiatric patients in general could be enhanced and improved by adequate intervention via patient counselling and patient medicinal care and education. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 220-224

  3. Variants of psychiatric disorders in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

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    T A Lisitsyna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze prevalence and structure of psychiatric disorders in pts with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE examining in the Institute of rheumatology of RAMS. Material and methods. 115 pts with SLE with median age 34 [24; 45] years and median disease duration 8 [4; 17] years were included. SLE activity was assessed with SLEDAI. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed by a psychiatrist according to ICD-10 using some psychiatric and psychological scales. Results. Psychiatric disorders were revealed in 76 from 115 (66% pts. Anxiety-depressive spectrum disorders prevailed (83%: depressive episode (40%, adjustment disorders (24%, generalized anxiety disorder (10%, dysthymia (9%. Severe cognitive dysfunction was revealed in 7% of pts. Pts with and without psychiatric disorders did not significantly differ in age, sex, duration and activity of the disease, duration of treatment and cumulative dose of prednisolone and cytotoxic drugs. Conclusion. Psychiatric disorders are frequent in pts with SLE (66%. Anxiety-depressive disorders prevail among them (83%. Relationship between SLE and psychiatric disorders requires further examination.

  4. [Analgesic abuse and psychiatric comorbidity in headache patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radat, F; Irachabal, S; Swendsen, J; Henry, P

    2002-01-01

    Headache patients frequently overuse analgesic medications: 20% of the patients from headache centers is concerned by this problem, which has been estimated to occur in four percent of the community migrainers. Frequent use of various types of headache medication may paradoxically cause an increase in headache attack frequency as well as their chronicisation due to potentially complex mechanisms of sensitization. Patients will enter into a self- perpetuating cycle of daily headaches and use of symptomatic medications which can lead to addiction and to social and occupational impairement. Indeed, many patients will experience pharmacological tolerance and dependence but also by some kind of craving. International Headache Society qualify these patients as abusers referring mostly to the amount of substance ingested. Hence patients are labelled analgesic abusers . However, as many of these analgesic medications contained psychotropic substances (i.e. caffeine, codeine.), these patients may fulfill DSM IV criteria of dependance. Nevertheless, the dependance criteria should be adapted to chronic pain patients. Indeed, if pharmacological dependence and tolerance criteria are easy to apply in such patients, it is not the case for the criteria a great deal of time spent to obtain substances, to use substances or to recover from substances effects . As analgesic medications are legally obtained from medical practitioners, drug seeking behaviours are mostly: obtaining medications from multiple providers, repeating episodes of prescription loss and multiplying requests for early refills. Moreover the detrimental effects of analgesic abuse on psychosocial functioning is likely to be related to pain rather than to medication overuse. Finally the best indicator of addictive behaviors in such patients, is the loss of control over the use of analgesic medication despite the adverse consequences over pain. Comorbidity with addiction to other substances has never been specifically

  5. Emergency anaesthetic management of a severely anaemic, chronic schizophrenic patient with history of neuroleptic malignant syndrome

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    Shrividya Chellam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Administering anaesthesia to a patient with chronic schizophrenia is a challenge due to the increased risk of various perioperative complications. Neuroleptic agents are highly effective drugs used for the treatment of psychiatric disorders, but are rarely associated with neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS. Here, we describe the successful anaesthetic management of a patient of chronic schizophrenia with past history of NMS who presented in emergency with active bleeding per rectum and haemoglobin of 3 gm%.

  6. Pattern of Smoking and Nicotine Dependence in Patients with Psychiatric Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Milani, Hooman Sharifi; Kharaghani, Roghieh; Safa, Mitra; Samadi, Rajab; Farhadi, Mohammad Hassan; Ardakani, Mohammad Reza Khodaee; Hesami, Zahra; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background Smoking prevalence is high among psychiatric patients. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of smoking, related factors and nicotine dependence in patients suffering from psychiatric disorders. Materials and Methods This analytical descriptive study was performed on patients who had been hospitalized for at least 2 days in Razi Hospital during 2010. Data were collected via an interview and the obtained information was recorded in a questionnaire. Fagerstrom test was also use...

  7. Introduction of a Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis Protocol for Older Adult Psychiatric Patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Croxford, Anna; Clare, Adam; McCurdy, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-Acquired venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. In psychiatric patients these risks are increased due to multiple factors including poor mobility, restraint, catatonia, sedation, and conventional antipsychotic use. Diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric patients presenting with signs and symptoms of a VTE can be delayed due to a patient's communication difficulties, non-compliance, or attribution of symptoms to a psychosomatic cause...

  8. Stress load during childhood affects psychopathology in psychiatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Popov Tzvetan; Awiszus Barbara; Borgelt Jens; Rockstroh Brigitte; Weber Katja; Hoffmann Klaus; Schonauer Klaus; Watzl Hans; Pröpster Karl

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Childhood stress and trauma have been related to adult psychopathology in different psychiatric disorders. The present study aimed at verifying this relationship for stressful experiences during developmental periods by screening stress load across life in adult psychiatric inpatients with different diagnoses compared to healthy subjects. In addition, a relationship between the amount of adverse experiences and the severity of pathology, which has been described as a 'buil...

  9. Mortality, Rehospitalisation and Violent Crime in Forensic Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Hospital: Rates and Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seena Fazel

    Full Text Available To determine rates and risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services.We conducted a historical cohort study of all 6,520 psychiatric patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1973 and 2009 in Sweden. We calculated hazard ratios for mortality, rehospitalisation, and violent crime using Cox regression to investigate the effect of different psychiatric diagnoses and two comorbidities (personality or substance use disorder on outcomes.Over mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 30% of patients died (n = 1,949 after discharge with an average age at death of 52 years. Over two-thirds were rehospitalised (n = 4,472, 69%, and 40% violently offended after discharge (n = 2,613 with a mean time to violent crime of 4.2 years. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and outcome varied-substance use disorder as a primary diagnosis was associated with highest risk of mortality and rehospitalisation, and personality disorder was linked with the highest risk of violent offending. Furthermore comorbid substance use disorder typically increased risk of adverse outcomes.Violent offending, premature mortality and rehospitalisation are prevalent in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals. Individualised treatment plans for such patients should take into account primary and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses.

  10. Chronic pain and quality of life in schizophrenic patients

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    Jouce Gabriela de Almeida

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and characteristics of chronic pain in schizophrenic patients and to compare the quality of life in patients with and without chronic pain. METHODS: Crossover design with a probablistic sample of 205 adult schizophrenic outpatients (80% paranoid schizophrenia. Socio-demographic, psychiatric disorder, pain and quality of life (WHOQOL- brief data were collected between June and September 2008. RESULTS: Mean age was 37 years, 65% were men, and the mean time spent in school was 9 years; 87% were single, 65% lived with parents and 25% had a job. Among patients with chronic pain, 70% did not receive treatment for pain. Regarding quality of life, patients with pain had more physical disabilities compared to those without pain (p < .001. There were no differences in other domains. Comparisons between patients with and without pain did not show any differences in how much they felt their mental health problems disabled them. Conclusion: Chronic pain was common in schizophrenic patients (similar to the general population of a similar age and decreased their quality of life. It is necessary to pay more attention to this co-morbidity.

  11. Euthanasia requests, procedures and outcomes for 100 Belgian patients suffering from psychiatric disorders : a retrospective, descriptive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thienpont, Lieve; Verhofstadt, Monica; Van Loon, Tony; Distelmans, Wim; Audenaert, Kurt; De Deyn, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To identify patterns in euthanasia requests and practices relating to psychiatric patients; to generate recommendations for future research. Design: Retrospective analysis of data obtained through medical file review. Setting: Outpatient psychiatric clinical setting in the Dutch-speaking

  12. The relationship between leadership, teamworking, structure, burnout and attitude to patients on acute psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Simpson, A.; Jones, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Conflict (aggression, substance use, absconding, etc.) and containment (coerced medication, manual restraint, etc.) threaten the safety of patients and staff on psychiatric wards. Previous work has suggested that staff variables may be significant in explaining differences between wards

  13. Down the Rabbit Hole: Emergency Department Medical Clearance of Patients with Psychiatric or Behavioral Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Veronica; Siever, Kaylin; Matorin, Anu; Moukaddam, Nidal

    2015-11-01

    Patients presenting with behavior or psychiatric complaints may have an underlying medical disorder causing or worsening their symptoms. Misdiagnosing a medical illness as psychiatric can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. A thorough history and physical examination, including mental status, are important to identify these causes and guide further testing. Laboratory and ancillary testing should be guided by what is indicated based on clinical assessment. Certain patient populations and signs and symptoms have a higher association with organic causes of behavioral complaints. Many medical problems can present with or exacerbate psychiatric symptoms, and a thorough medical assessment is imperative.

  14. Chronic constipation in hemiplegic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of bowel dysfunction in hemiplegic patients, and its relationship with the site of neurological lesion, physical immobilization and pharmacotherapy.METHODS: Ninety consecutive hemiplegic patients and 81 consecutive orthopedic patients were investigated during physical motor rehabilitation in the same period, in the same center and on the same diet. All subjects were interviewed ≥ 3 mo after injury using a questionnaire inquiring about bowel habits before injury and at the time of the interview. Patients' mobility was evaluated by the Adapted Patient Evaluation Conference System. Drugs considered for the analysis were nitrates, angiogenic converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors,calcium antagonists, anticoagulants, antithrombotics,antidepressants, anti-epileptics.RESULTS: Mobility scores were similar in the two groups. De novo constipation (OR = 5.36) was a frequent outcome of the neurological accident.Hemiplegics showed an increased risk of straining at stool (OR: 4.33), reduced call to evacuate (OR: 4.13),sensation of incomplete evacuation (OR: 3.69), use of laxatives (OR: 3.75). Logistic regression model showed that constipation was significantly and independently associated with hemiplegia. A positive association was found between constipation and use of nitrates and antithrombotics in both groups. Constipation was not related to the site of brain injury.CONCLUSION: Chronic constipation is a possible outcome of cerebrovascular accidents occurring in 30% of neurologically stabilized hemiplegic patients.Its onset after a cerebrovascular accident appears to be independent from the injured brain hemisphere,and unrelated to physical inactivity. Pharmacological treatment with nitrates and antithrombotics may represent an independent risk factor for developing chronic constipation.

  15. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITIES IN PATIENTS OF COPD AND BRONCHIAL ASTHMA ATTENDING OPD OF TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ab. Majid

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic pulmonary diseases are a global health problem and the number of patients being treated in primary care settings is increasing. The prevalence of a life-time diagnosis of asthma has increased in all age groups. There has been a dramatic shift in the conceptualization and treatment of asthma and COPD in the last 50 years. Psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety disorders, are very common in patients with asthma and COPD. Anxiety is also common in COPD and is related to some of the same factors described for asthma including the psychological response to the experience of breathlessness as well as side effects of beta-agonists. Since there is paucity of relevant data from Kashmir, this study was designed to find the co morbidity in patients of COPD and Asthma in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Srinagar, Kashmir. METHODS Sixty successive patients presents with history of thirty each of asthma and COPD who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria were taken up for the study and administered the Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D and Hamilton Anxiety rating scale (HAM-A scales for evaluation of depressive disorder and anxiety disorder. Each patient was informed about the purpose of interview; his/her consent was obtained and strict confidentiality was ensured. General description, demographic data and psychiatric history were recorded using semi structured Proforma and HAM-A and HAM-D. RESULTS Out of sixty cases of COPD and Bronchial Asthma, 50% of the patients were in the age group of 66-80 followed by 35% in age group of 81-85 years. This could suggest that COPD and Bronchial Asthma is a problem of old age. There were predominantly more males (65% than females (35% in our study. Representations of gender, religion, family type and marital status have been found to be in accordance with socio-demographic profile of our country. Out of sixty cases of COPD and Bronchial Asthma, 35% of the patients were educated up to

  16. Self-administered acupressure for treating adult psychiatric patients with constipation: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Wai Kit; Chien, Wai Tong; Lee, Wai Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Constipation has a high prevalence rate (>30 %) in psychiatric patients with psychotropic drugs. Common pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for constipation might have longer-term negative and adverse effects that would outweigh their short-term efficacy in symptom reduction. This randomized controlled trial aims to investigate the effect of self-administered acupressure for the management of constipation, in hospitalized psychiatric patients. Methods Seventy-eigh...

  17. Psychosocial and medical factors affecting treatment compliance in patients attending psychiatric hospital: a study from Kashmir

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikh Shoib; Raheel Mushtaq; Mohammad Maqbool Dar; Javid Ahmad Mir; Tabindah Shah; Rameshwar Singh; Javid Ahmad; Syed Kyser

    2014-01-01

    Background: Compliance with medication is decisive for treatment of the psychiatric disorders and is necessary for determining the outcome and prognoses of psychiatric patients. While the causes of poor compliance are multifactorial, the psychiatrist should be aware of such factors and may be able to implement interventions to address those factors. The objective of study was to find out the various medical and social reasons affecting treatment Compliance among patients suffering from psychi...

  18. What do you think of us? Evaluating patient knowledge of and satisfaction with a psychiatric outpatient service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jabbar, F

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with the care they were receiving; examine patients\\' knowledge of the psychiatric services in general; and identify variables associated with satisfaction.

  19. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L. Gabriels

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and/or intellectual disabilities (ID are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children’s hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33% and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days. Available data from a subset of patients (=43 in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes.

  20. Metabolic syndrome in patients with severe mental illness undergoing psychiatric rehabilitation receiving high dose antipsychotic medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapu V Ravindranath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To review evidence of chronic antipsychotic medication and the association with metabolic syndrome in mentally ill patients. This evidence was used to analyse a cohort of patients with severe mental illness and to deduce a correlation between the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and their dose regimens. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four male patients undergoing Psychiatric rehabilitation underwent a review of current medication and assessment of risk factors for metabolic syndrome. Assessment criteria was based upon National Cholesterol Education Programme expert panel on detection, evaluation and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults (Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III criteria, incorporating waist circumference, raised triglycerides, reduced high density lipoprotein, raised blood pressure and fasting blood glucose. PubMed, Nature and Science Direct databases have been used to compile the medical and scientific background on metabolic syndrome and antipsychotic medication and the effect on patients particularly on high dose. Results: Out of 24 patients, 10 patients (41.7% were receiving high dose antipsychotics (HDA and four were on maximum dosage limits of 100%. 8.3% (2/24 patients were receiving only one first generation antipsychotics (FGA, 37.5% (9/24 patients were receiving only one second generation antipsychotic (SGA, 45.8% patients (11/24 were receiving two or more SGA only, and only one patient was receiving two or more FGA. One patient was receiving a combination of FGA and SGA. PRN ("as needed" therapy was not included in this study as their usage was limited. Clozapine was mostly prescribed in these patients (10/24, 41.6%. Four out of the 24 patients refused blood tests therefore were excluded from the following results. In the patients evaluated, 55% (11/20 had confirmed metabolic syndrome. In these patients with metabolic syndrome, 45.4% (5/11 were on HDA and 27.3% (3/11 were on maximum British National

  1. The opinion of patients with mental disorder about tobacco and its prohibition in psychiatric hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Marques de Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the opinion of patients with mental disorder about tobacco and its prohibition during psychiatric hospitalization. Method: An exploratory study with 96 patients smokers with mental disorders hospitalized in a psychiatric ward of a general hospital. The interviews were conducted individually, using an instrument designed for this study. The content from the interviews was recorded, transcribed and submitted to a thematic content analysis. Results: The patients with mental disorder were identified as perceiving smoking during the psychiatric hospitalization as a help to support the difficulties in socialization and in the lack of activities. The permission for smoking is seen as a signal of respect to their needs. The subjects mentioned to not accept the total smoking prohibition. Conclusion: Tobacco helps to face difficulties and conflicts in the psychiatric hospitalization. There is resistance regarding the possibility to totally withdraw the smoking permission during hospitalization.

  2. Psychiatric symptoms are present in most of the patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus F. Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH is characterized by gait disturbance, dementia and/or urinary incontinence associated with dilation of ventricular system with normal opening cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Wide scientifical evidence confirms association between NPH and psychiatric symptoms. We selected 35 patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus from January 2010 to January 2012 in a Brazilian tertiary hospital and performed a formal psychiatric evaluation to identify psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric disorders were present in 71% of these patients, especially anxiety, depression and psychotic syndromes. NPH patients may develop symptoms with frontal dominance, such as personality changes, anxiety, depression, psychotic syndromes, obsessive compulsive disorder, Othello syndrome; shoplifting and mania. Unusual appearances of NPH symptoms may hinder early diagnosis and consequently proper treatment.

  3. Student nurses' learning processes in interaction with psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Linda

    2011-01-01

    . A fuller understanding of how student nurses function and learn during clinical training is vital. This article presents the findings of a qualitative investigation of student nurses’ learning processes during their clinical placement in psychiatric nursing practice. An explorative and qualitative...

  4. Effects of neurofeedback on adult patients with psychiatric disorders in a naturalistic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Seo, Wan-Seok; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Joong-Hyeon; Song, Shin-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Few well-controlled studies have considered neurofeedback treatment in adult psychiatric patients. In this regard, the present study investigates the characteristics and effects of neurofeedback on adult psychiatric patients in a naturalistic setting. A total of 77 adult patients with psychiatric disorders participated in this study. Demographic data and neurofeedback states were retrospectively analyzed, and the effects of neurofeedback were evaluated using clinical global impression (CGI) and subjective self-rating scales. Depressive disorders were the most common psychiatric disorders (19; 24.7 %), followed by anxiety disorders (18; 23.4 %). A total of 69 patients (89.6 %) took medicine, and the average frequency of neurofeedback was 17.39 ± 16.64. Neurofeedback was applied to a total of 39 patients (50.6 %) more than 10 times, and 48 patients (62.3 %) received both β/SMR and α/θ training. The discontinuation rate was 33.8 % (26 patients). There was significant difference between pretreatment and posttreatment CGI scores (anxiety, and inattention (<.001). This is a naturalistic study in a clinical setting, and has several limitations, including the absence of a control group and a heterogenous sample. Despite these limitations, the study demonstrates the potential of neurofeedback as an effective complimentary treatment for adult patients with psychiatric disorders. PMID:25740085

  5. Psychiatric patients' internet use corresponds to the internet use of the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefflich, Friederike; Kalckreuth, Sophie; Mergl, Roland; Rummel-Kluge, Christine

    2015-03-30

    The use of Internet has grown in the past number of years, including the increased application of various therapy programs for psychiatric patients which can be accessed online. Few studies investigating psychiatric patients' Internet use exist. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the number of psychiatric patients that use the Internet in comparison to the general population. Since patients with mental health disorders frequently suffer from a variety of disadvantages in society, it was evaluated whether psychiatric patients were disadvantaged particularly concerning the use and access of the Internet. Three hundred and thirty-seven patients participated in the study and completed a 29-item questionnaire. A response rate of 66% was achieved. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and binary logistic regression analysis were used. Out of the participants, 79.5% were Internet users. This number corresponds to the Internet use of the general population. Young patients in particular were found to use online information, using mostly search engines to seek medical information. The results show that psychiatric patients do not rank below the general population concerning the frequency of Internet use, which is especially important for accessing health related information online or participating in online programs. PMID:25623020

  6. Identifying Patients in the Acute Psychiatric Hospital Who May Benefit From a Palliative Care Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, M Caroline; Warren, Mark; Cha, Stephen S; Stevens, Maria; Blommer, Megan; Kung, Simon; Lapid, Maria I

    2016-04-01

    Identifying patients who will benefit from a palliative care approach is the first critical step in integrating palliative with curative therapy. Criteria are established that identify hospitalized medical patients who are near end of life, yet there are no criteria with respect to hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders. The records of 276 consecutive patients admitted to a dedicated inpatient psychiatric unit were reviewed to identify prognostic criteria predictive of mortality. Mortality predictors were 2 or more admissions in the past year (P = .0114) and older age (P = .0006). Twenty-two percent of patients met National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization noncancer criteria for dementia. Palliative care intervention should be considered when treating inpatients with psychiatric disorders, especially older patients who have a previous hospitalization or history of dementia.

  7. Chronic diseases among older cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckx, L.D.; Akker, M.A. van der; Metsemakers, J.M.; Knottnerus, A.K.; Schellevis, F.G.; Buntinx, F.B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: With the growing number of older cancer patients, the burden of chronic diseases among older cancer patients will become increasingly important. Chronic diseases often interfere with treatment decisions and prognosis for cancer patients. However, little is known about the occurrence of

  8. Study of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with headache using a short structured clinical interview in a rural neurology clinic in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soaham Dilip Desai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders are common in patients attending neurology clinics with headache. Evaluation of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with headache is often missed in the busy neurology clinics. Aims: To assess the prevalence of Axis-I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders in patients with primary headache disorders in a rural-based tertiary neurology clinic in Western India. Settings and Design : A cross-sectional observation survey was conducting assessing all patients with migraine, tension-type headache and chronic daily headache attending the Neurology Clinic of Shree Krishna Hospital, a rural medical teaching hospital in Karamsad, in Gujarat in Western India. Materials and Methods: A total of 101 consecutive consenting adults with headache were interviewed using Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I., a structured diagnostic clinical interview to assess prevalence of Axis-I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics were calculated using SPSS software version 16 and a binomial regression model was used to study the relationship of psychiatric co-morbidity with patient-related factors. Results: 49 out of 101 (48.5% patients with headache suffered from depressive disorders (dysthymia or depression or suicidality, 18 out of 101 patients with headache (17.90% suffered from anxiety related disorders (generalized anxiety disorder or agoraphobia or social phobia or panic disorder. Conclusions: Axis-I psychiatric disorders are a significant comorbidity among patients with headache disorders. M.I.N.I. can be used as a short, less time consuming instrument to assess all patients with headache disorders.

  9. Preventive Psychiatric Admission for Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder: A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekkoek, B.W.; Snoek, R. van der; Oosterwijk, K.; Meijel, B.K.G. van

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE. The purpose of this study was to establish the preliminary effects of preventive psychiatric admission of patients with severe borderline personality disorder (BPD) on the rate of agreement over treatment, patient service use, and patient views on the intervention. DESIGN AND METHODS. A ret

  10. Processes of In-Hospital Psychiatric Care and Subsequent Criminal Behaviour Among Patients With Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Charlotte Gjørup; Olrik Wallenstein Jensen, Signe; Johnsen, Søren Paaske;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: It is unknown whether evidence-based, in-hospital processes of care may influence the risk of criminal behaviour among patients with schizophrenia. Our study aimed to examine the association between guideline recommended in-hospital psychiatric care and criminal behaviour among patients...... with schizophrenia. Methods: Danish patients with schizophrenia (18 years or older) discharged from a psychiatric ward between January 2004 and March 2009 were identified using a national population-based schizophrenia registry (n = 10 757). Data for in-hospital care and patient characteristics were linked with data...... and staff contact with relatives. Conclusions: High-quality, in-hospital psychiatric care was associated with a lower risk of criminal behaviour after discharge among patients with schizophrenia....

  11. High income, employment, postgraduate education, and marriage. A suicidal cocktail among psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Studies dating back over 100 years have shown that the risk of suicide in the general population is associated with low income, unemployment, educational underachievement, and singleness. However, little is known about the association between suicide risk and these factors in psychiatric...... patients. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association between suicide risk, socioeconomic position, and marital status in psychiatric patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: Population-based cohort study of all first-ever psychiatric patients aged 16 to 65 years admitted from 1981 to 1998, with administrative...... longitudinal data on income, labor market affiliation, educational attainment, and marital and cohabitational status (96,369 patients, 256,619 admissions, and 2727 suicides). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Suicide risks after hospital discharge were depicted using Kaplan-Meier product-limit methods. Hazard ratios (HRs...

  12. Factors Associated with Readmission of Patients at a University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Barekatain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Readmission has a major role in the reduction of the quality of life and the increase in the years of lost life. The main objectives of this study were to answer to the following research questions. (a What was the readmission rate? (b What were the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to the Psychiatric Emergency Service at Nour University Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran? (c What were the effective factors on readmission? Method. This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total number of 3935 patients who were admitted to Isfahan University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Isfahan, Iran, from 2004 to 2010. Gender, age, marital status, education, self-report history of previous admission, type of psychiatric disorder, substance misuse, suicide, and the length of the current psychiatric disorder were collected from the registered medical files of patients. The data were analysed using the negative binomial regression model. Results. We found that factors such as psychiatric anxiety disorder, bipolar I, bipolar II, psychotic disorder, depression, and self report history of previous admission were statistically significant in the number of readmissions using the negative binomial model. Conclusion. Readmission to the psychiatric ward is mainly predictable by the type of diagnosis and psychosocial supports.

  13. Factors associated with readmission of patients at a university hospital psychiatric ward in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barekatain, Majid; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Hassannejad, Razeyeh; Hosseini, Reihane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Readmission has a major role in the reduction of the quality of life and the increase in the years of lost life. The main objectives of this study were to answer to the following research questions. (a) What was the readmission rate? (b) What were the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to the Psychiatric Emergency Service at Nour University Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran? (c) What were the effective factors on readmission? Method. This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total number of 3935 patients who were admitted to Isfahan University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Isfahan, Iran, from 2004 to 2010. Gender, age, marital status, education, self-report history of previous admission, type of psychiatric disorder, substance misuse, suicide, and the length of the current psychiatric disorder were collected from the registered medical files of patients. The data were analysed using the negative binomial regression model. Results. We found that factors such as psychiatric anxiety disorder, bipolar I, bipolar II, psychotic disorder, depression, and self report history of previous admission were statistically significant in the number of readmissions using the negative binomial model. Conclusion. Readmission to the psychiatric ward is mainly predictable by the type of diagnosis and psychosocial supports. PMID:24236285

  14. Evaluation of Dream Content Among Patients with Schizophrenia, their Siblings, Patients with Psychiatric Diagnoses Other than Schizophrenia, and Healthy Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeba Rezaie

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Schizophrenia is a chronic psychotic disorder with unknown etiology that causes cognitive impairment, affecting thinking, behavior, social function, sleep and dream content. This study considered the dream content of patients with schizophrenia, siblings of patients with schizophrenia, patients with psychiatric diagnoses other than schizophrenia, and a group of healthy controls. The aim of this study was to compare the dream content of patients with schizophrenia with dream content of individuals with other mental disorders, first degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia, and community controls . Method: Seventy-two patients were selected and placed in 4 groups. The first group consisted of 18 inpatients with schizophrenia whose medications were stable for at least four weeks; the second group consisted of 16 nonpsychotic mentally ill inpatients; the third group consisted of 18 individuals who were siblings of patients with schizophrenia; and the fourth group consisted of 20 healthy individuals in the community with no family history of mental or somatic disorders. The four groups were matched by age and gender. A 14-item dream content questionnaire was administered for all the participants, and the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS was also administered for the two groups of hospitalized patients . Results: Results showed that there were significant differences in dream content among groups included friends acquaintances, females and colorful components. No significant differences were found between the positive and negative subscales of PANSS and any of the dream questionnaire subscales. Conclusion: Our results suggest that there were a few changes in the dream content of the patients with schizophrenia compare to other groups.

  15. Psychiatric morbidity in patients of pulmonary tuberculosis-an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A lot of stigma and misconceptions about pulmonary tuberculosis still persist, in spite of the advances in treatment. Thus, a mere diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis can be a psychological trauma to an individual. The situation has aggravated with the association of tuberculosis with HIV infection. Aim: To study the psychiatric morbidity due to the various psychological stresses faced by a patient of pulmonary tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 100 inpatients admitted to pulmonary ward with diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. The control group consisted of 100 inpatients admitted to pulmonary ward with nontuberculous pulmonary diseases. Psychiatric history and mental status were recorded on a specially designed proforma and diagnosis of any psychiatric illness, if present, arrived at as per International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10. The psychiatric tests applied were beck's depression inventory (BDI and Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS. Results: Of the patients of pulmonary tuberculosis, 24% could be given a diagnostic category, as per ICD-10, as compared to only 8% of the controls (P < 0.005. On BDI, 44% of patients of pulmonary tuberculosis showed depression as compared to 27% of the controls (P < 0.02. On TMAS, 38% of patients of pulmonary tuberculosis showed anxiety as compared to 24% of controls (P < 0.05. A greater incidence of depression (on BDI and anxiety (on TMAS was seen in those with longer duration of illness (P < 0.02 and in those with greater severity of illness (P < 0.02. Conclusion: In view of the high psychiatric morbidity associated with pulmonary tuberculosis, there is enough scope for psychiatric services to be made available to these patients. In addition, personnel involved in the treatment of these patients should be trained for early detection of psychiatric symptoms.

  16. Cognitive impairment in patients with chronic fatigue: a preliminary study.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, E; Cope, H; David, A

    1993-01-01

    Subjective impairment of memory and concentration is a frequent complaint in sufferers from chronic fatigue. To study this, 65 general practice attenders identified as having chronic fatigue were administered a structured psychiatric interview and a brief screening battery of cognitive tests. Subjective cognitive impairment was strongly related to psychiatric disorder, especially depressed mood, but not fatigue, anxiety, or objective performance. Simple tests of attention and concentration sh...

  17. Homicide committed by psychiatric patients: Psychiatrists' liability in Italian law cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Claudio; Rocca, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Interest in psychiatrists' professional liability in Italy has increased in recent years because of the number of medical malpractice claims. Professional liability for failure to prevent violent behaviour by psychiatric patients is particularly debated. This study describes three Italian cases in which health professionals - physicians and nurses - were found guilty of manslaughter for murders committed by psychiatric patients. Examination of the cases focuses on claims of malpractice, patients' characteristics, the circumstances of the homicide and the reasons for the court's judgment. In particular, the predictability of violent behaviour and the concept of causal links are examined in detail. The cases provide an opportunity for a study of comparative jurisprudence. The topics discussed are relevant not only to practicing psychiatrists but also to experts assessing medical liability in cases of criminal acts committed by psychiatric patients. PMID:26130750

  18. Phobias, other psychiatric comorbidities and chronic migraine Fobias, outras comorbidades psiquiátricas e enxaqueca crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Corchs

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Comorbidity of chronic migraine (CM with psychiatric disorders, mostly anxiety and mood disorders, is a well-recognized phenomenon. Phobias are one of the most common anxiety disorders in the general population. Phobias are more common in migraineurs than non-migraineurs. The clinical profile of phobias in CM has never been studied. METHOD: We investigated the psychiatric profile in 56 patients with CM using the SCID I/P interview. RESULTS: Lifetime criteria for at least one mental disorder was found in 87.5% of the sample; 75% met criteria for at least one lifetime anxiety disorder and 60.7% of our sample fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for lifetime phobic avoidant disorders. Mood and anxiety scores were higher in phobic patients than in non-phobic CM controls. Number of phobias correlated with higher levels of anxiety and depression. CONCLUSION: Phobias are common in CM. Its recognition may influence its management. Early treatment may lead to better prognosis.INTRODUÇÃO: As comorbidades psiquiátricas das enxaquecas crônicas são bem conhecidas. As fobias, transtorno ansioso mais comum, são mais prevalentes entre enxaquecosos do que entre não enxaquecosos. O perfil clínico de fobias em uma população enxaquecosa nunca foi estudado. MÉTODO: Estudamos aspectos psiquiátricos de uma população de 56 pacientes com enxaqueca crônica. RESULTADOS: Usando o SCID I/P para o DSM-IV, critérios diagnósticos para ao menos algum transtorno psiquiátrico durante a vida foram preenchidos por 87,5% de nossa amostra, 75% para ao menos um transtorno ansioso e 60,7% para condições fóbicas em algum momento de suas vidas. Os escores de ansiedade e humor foram maiores entre os fóbicos e o número de fobias teve correlação positiva com o grau de ansiedade e depressão. CONCLUSÃO: Fobias são comuns na enxaqueca crônica e seu reconhecimento poderia influenciar seu manejo e melhorar seu prognóstico.

  19. Role of psychiatric disorders and irritable bowel syndrome in asthma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Yilmaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The goals of the study were the following: 1 to determine the frequency of psychiatric disorders and irritable bowel syndrome in patients with asthma and 2 to compare the frequency of these disorders in patients with asthma to their frequency in healthy controls. INTRODUCTION: Patients with asthma have a higher frequency of irritable bowel syndrome and psychiatric disorders. METHODS: We evaluated 101 patients with bronchial asthma and 67 healthy subjects. All subjects completed the brief version of the Bowel Symptoms Questionnaire and a structured clinical interview for DSM-IV axis disorders (SCID-I/CV. RESULTS: There were 37 cases of irritable bowel syndrome in the group of 101 stable asthma patients (36.6% and 12 cases in the group of 67 healthy subjects (17.9% (p = 0.009. Irritable bowel syndrome comorbidity was not related to the severity of asthma (p = 0.15. Regardless of the presence of irritable bowel syndrome, psychiatric disorders in asthma patients (52/97; 53.6% were more common than in the control group (22/63, 34.9% (p = 0.02. Although psychiatric disorders were more common in asthma patients with irritable bowel syndrome (21/35, 60% than in those without irritable bowel syndrome (31/62, 50%, the difference was not significant (p = 0.34. In asthma patients with irritable bowel syndrome and psychiatric disorders, the percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 was lower than it was in those with no comorbidities (p = 0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Both irritable bowel syndrome and psychiatric disorders were more common in asthma patients than in healthy controls. Psychiatric disorders were more common in asthma patients with irritable bowel syndrome than in those without irritable bowel syndrome, although the differences failed to reach statistical significance. In asthma patients with IBS and psychiatric disorders, FEV1s were significantly lower than in other asthma patients. It is important for clinicians to accurately

  20. Is the routine CT head scan justified for psychiatric patients? A prospective study.

    OpenAIRE

    Ananth, J.; Gamal, R; M. Miller; Wohl, M; Vandewater, S

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-four psychiatric patients, assessed for a physical illness that was missed during diagnosis, underwent a CT scan. After investigation, the diagnosis of 14 patients changed from a functional to an organic illness. In nine patients, the CT scan was reported to be abnormal, and yet only two were diagnosed as having an organic syndrome. In seven patients, the CT scan was normal but the patients had an undisputed organic brain syndrome. These findings indicate that the use of CT scans shoul...

  1. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients referred to psychiatric unit in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very few studies from Pakistan have examined the profile of patients seen by psychiatrists in general hospital. The aim of this research is to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients referred to the psychiatric unit of a general hospital over a one year period. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, from January 1st to December 31st 2012. All patients being referred to psychiatry were included in the study over one year period. The information was recorded on a structured questionnaire and analysed the data using SPSS-19.0. Results: Out of the 105 patients referred to the psychiatric unit, 74 (72.3%) were females. A total of 69 (68.5%) patients were married. More than half were uneducated and only number 4 (3%) patients had university qualification. Housewives made up 64.4% of the patient population followed by students (11%). Majority 55 (53%) had less than Rs. 5000/ monthly income. About 30% patients were shifted to psychiatry ward while, nearly one tenth were discharged. In 35% cases the psychiatrist was asked to help in the management, while in 50% cases only opinion was sought. Aggressive and threatening behaviour was source of concern in majority of patients for the primary team while 34% exhibited suicidal behaviour. Depression was most frequent diagnosis in 45 43% patients, followed by conversion disorder 19 (17%) and delirium 16 (14%). Conclusion: The rate of psychiatric referrals is dismal with only one third of the patients being transferred to the psychiatric ward. The major psychiatric diagnosis was depression. Patients with aggressive and threatening behaviour were more frequently referred. (author)

  2. Incidence of violent behavior among patients in Psychiatric Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina C. Iversen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Both psychiatric acute units and psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs focus on acute treatment of behavioral disturbances such as violence and aggressive threats and acts. The aim of the present study is to describe the frequency of violent behavior; such as verbal or physical threats and physical attacks, among patients admitted to psychiatric intensive care unit (PICU. In addition the relationship between the episodes of threats and/or attacks in relation to time of the day, days of the week, and their seasonal variations was explored. Methods: All violent behavior was continuously assessed at the psychiatric emergency department. Data were collected during the period from May 2010 to May 2012. Results: Patients with only one hospitalization were less violent than those who have had two hospitalizations. There was a statistically significant difference in violence among patients without formal secondary education and those who have not formal education. Violent behavior showed two peaks during the day; the first occurring at 1 pm and the second at 8 pm. In regard to seasonality, summer had a higher incidence of violence. The most peaceful seasons of the year were spring and autumn. Conclusions: Violent behavior shows variation in daytime, days of the week and season in acute psychiatric intensive care. Daytime variation shows two peaks of violence at 1 pm and 8 pm, Sundays and Wednesdays being the quietest days regarding violence both in winter and summer. Patient's level of education and hospitalization status partially explain the variation.

  3. The Chauvet 2014 Meeting Report: Psychiatric and Psychosocial Evaluation and Outcomes of Upper Extremity Grafted Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowsey-Gregoire, Sheila G; Kumnig, Martin; Morelon, Emmanuel; Moreno, Elisa; Petruzzo, Palmina; Seulin, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Under the auspices for the International Society on Hand and Composite Tissue Allotransplantation, a section of The Transplantation Society (IHCTAS), a meeting was convened on March 21-22, 2014 in Paris to review the following areas that were deemed significant in the understanding of the psychosocial evaluation and outcomes of upper extremity transplant recipients: required domains of the evaluation, screening instruments, clinical monitoring pretransplant, clinical monitoring posttransplant, patient and team expectations, body image, psychiatric complications, functional goals and quality of life, ethics and media relations. Experts in the fields of psychiatry and psychology, transplantation, social work, ethics, and transplant administration met and reviewed center experiences and literature. The attendees highlighted the importance and the complexity of the psychiatric assessment in this field of transplantation. Moreover, the necessity to develop common instruments and evaluation protocols to predict psychosocial outcomes as well as to understand whether we are transplanting the right patients and how the transplantation is affecting the patients were pointed out. Psychiatric complications in upper extremity transplanted patients have been reported by the majority of teams. Preexisting psychiatric difficulties, the initial trauma of amputation, or adjusting to the transplantation process itself (especially the medical follow-up and rehabilitation process) appeared to be important factors. Monitoring during the whole follow-up was recommended to detect psychiatric issues and to facilitate and ensure long-term adherence. The participants proposed an annual meeting format to build upon the findings of this inaugural meeting to be called the Chauvet Workgroup meeting. PMID:26636738

  4. The patient's perspective on "providing structure" in psychiatric inpatient care: an interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Nugter, A.; Achterberg, T. van

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To gain insight into the patients' experiences on providing structure (PS) as a nursing intervention during psychiatric inpatient care. DESIGN AND METHOD: Interviews were conducted with patients (n = 17) from two inpatient wards within a mental healthcare organization. For data analysis, a

  5. Aggression and Risk of Future Violence in Forensic Psychiatric Patients with and without Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenius, Heidi; Hellstrom, Ake; Belfrage, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Dyslexia does not cause criminal behaviour, but it may worsen aggressive behaviour tendencies. In this study, aggressive behaviour and risk of future violence were compared between forensic psychiatric patients with and without dyslexia. Dyslexia was assessed using the Swedish phonological processing battery "The Pigeon". The patients filled in…

  6. Memory-for-designs drawing styles of psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C B

    1983-07-01

    Studied the relationship between several Memory-For-Designs drawing styles and personality traits using a sample of psychiatric outpatients. Four MFD drawing styles were studied by comparing the MMPI scores of Ss who did or did not draw constricted figures, draw expanded figures, draw along the edges of the paper, or place the figures on the page in a disorganized manner. Contrary to previous work in this area, the present results showed a relationship between certain drawing styles and scores on the MMPI, i.e., certain drawing styles correlate with personality traits. PMID:6874996

  7. The use of electroconvulsive therapy in a cohort of forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Diana; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette; Ockelmann, Hans Henrik;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Denmark, over 2500 people are in psychiatric treatment in forensic mental health services at any one time, most suffering from schizophrenia. Many of them have illnesses that are resistant to medication. There is evidence of the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT......) for schizophrenia, but not explicitly for this complex forensic group. AIMS: The aim of this study was to describe the outcome of using ECT as augmentation therapy in a cohort of forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia who were failing to respond to antipsychotic medication. METHODS: In one university......-based psychiatric clinic, data were extracted from the medical records of all patients treated with ECT during a 6-year period. Fifty-nine of these patients were diagnosed within the schizophrenia spectrum and eight were in specialist forensic hospital services. RESULTS: The mean duration of illness...

  8. The impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks on psychiatric patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Victoria A; Glass, Carol R; Arnkoff, Diane B; Dutton, Mary Ann

    2009-06-01

    Studies of the general population have shown that the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 had a well-documented psychological effect, regardless of whether or not individuals were directly exposed to the events. In light of findings that pre-existing mental illness and prior exposure to trauma are associated with vulnerability to PTSD following a subsequent traumatic event, this article reviews research on the impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks on psychiatric patients. Findings suggest that, in general, psychiatric patients experienced immediate and long-term posttraumatic symptoms at levels greater than normal controls, although there were differential effects by diagnostic group and symptoms as observed did not always match complaints of subjective impairment. Studies sampling inpatients and outpatients, as well as research regarding service utilization, are evaluated. Assessment and treatment implications for clinicians responsible for the care of psychiatric patients following a national trauma are discussed, and recommendations for future research are presented. PMID:19321246

  9. Stereotactic multi-target limbic leucotomy for treating intractable psychiatric disease in 30 patients Three-year follow-up of memory, intelligence, and psychiatric symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Song; Zheng Wang; Qiang Liang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The biochemical hypothesis of dopamine hyperfunction in the brain can explain the pathological mechanisms of schizophrenia. Surgery is performed based on limbic system circuit theory correspondence to above-mentioned hypothesis. Stereotactic surgery for the treatment of mental disorders is related to stereotactic surgery that influences the Papez circuit.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of stereotactic multi-target limbic leucotomy on the improvements in memory, intelligence and psychiatric symptoms in the treatment of intractable psychiatric disease. DESIGN: Self-control case analysis and follow-up of therapeutic effects. SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, First Hospital, Hebei Medical University. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty patients with intractable psychiatric disease, who received stereotactic surgery in the Department of Neurosurgery, First Hospital, Hebei Medical University between July 2002 and August 2005, were included in this study. The patients, 21 males and 9 females, all met the diagnostic criteria of intractable psychiatric disease, determined by the national psychosurgery cooperation team in 1998. Informed consents for surgery and clinical follow-up exams were obtained from patients and/or patients' relatives (guardians). METHODS: In 30 patients with intractable psychiatric disease, limbic leucotomy was performed by stereotactic technique. Multi-target radiofrequency hyperthermia was performed in the intracranial amygdaloid nucleus, anterior limb of internal capsule, callosal gyrus, among other regions. The therapeutic effects of patients were evaluated by Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) before surgery, and 6 months, 1, and 3 years after surgery. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) and Clinical Memory Scale (CMS) were used to assess memory and intelligence before and after surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Memory, intelligence, and psychiatric symptoms of patients before and after operation. RESULTS: Thirty patients were included

  10. Psychiatric morbidity in elderly patients attending OPD of tertiary care centre in western region of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Thapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Aging of population is currently a global phenomenon. At least one in 5 people over the age of 65 years will suffer from a mental disorder by 2030. Study of psychiatric morbidities in this age group is essential to prepare for upcoming challenges. Aims: To find out the prevalence of different psychiatric morbidities in elderly population and to find out if there are any age and gender specific differences. Settings and Design: Retrospective review; Psychiatric outpatient department of Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. Materials and Methods: Data for patients ≥ 65 years of age attending the psychiatric outpatient department of Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal, from 1 st January 2012 to 15 th January 2013 were collected retrospectively in a predesigned proforma. Statistical Analysis Used: Risk of having different psychiatric disorders was estimated using odds ratio. Results: The mean age of 120 patients included in this study was 69.67 (SD = 5.94 years. Depressive disorder (26.7% was the most common diagnosis. There was no statistically significant difference in psychiatric disorders in >75 years compared with ≤75 years except for dementia [odd ratio (OR (≤75 years/>75 years=0.055, 95% confidence interval (CI=0.016; 0.194]. Alcohol dependence syndrome [OR (male/female=7.826, 95% CI = 1.699;36.705] and dementia [OR (male/female=3.394, 95% CI = 1.015;11.350] was more common in males. Conclusions: Depressive disorder was the most common psychiatric morbidity among the elderly patients. The odds suffering from dementia increased with increasing age. The odds of having alcohol related problems and dementia were more in males compared with females.

  11. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Quality of Life in Patients with Dermatologic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayede Ghaninejad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: "n "nThe aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence ofpsychiatric disorders in patients with dermatologic disease and its relationship to the patients' quality of life. "nMethod: This study was cross-sectional. A total of 414 patients with various dermatologic diseases participated in this study. The participants were recruited from an outpatient clinic and inpatient ward of a referral dermatologic hospital using a simple random sampling method. Demographic variables, duration and characteristics of disease and admission status were recorded. Patients were asked to complete two questionnaires: GHQ-28 (General Health Questionnaire ,and DLQI (Dermatologic Life Quality Index. "nResults: The estimated prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in dermatologic patients was %51.3.There was a significant relationship between GHQ score and educational level, marriage statues, type and course of dermatologic disease and admission status (p<0.05. The probability of psychiatric disorders increased among patients with lower educational level, married subjects, patients with relapse of the disease and those having some special skin diseases such as Psoriasis and Pemphigus. However, no significant relationship was observed between the GHQ score and duration of disease and sex. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between quality of life and educational level, marriage status, type of dermatologic disease, course of disease and admission status (p<0.05. Higher quality of life was observed among participants with higher educational level, those who were unmarried, patients with first episode and milder diseases. This study shows a significant relationship between quality of life and mental health (p<0.05. The lower probability of concomitant mental disorder, the higher the quality of life. "nConclusion: Psychiatric disorders are frequent among patients with dermatologic diseases. These disorders have a negative effect on quality

  12. Patient participation in psychiatric services: a literature review and proposal for a research strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenister, D

    1994-04-01

    There is a trend in nursing policy and practice towards patients participating actively in their treatments and the services they use. Nursing theorists often attempt to describe the phenomena of patient participation from a psychological perspective while neglecting sociological issues, such as power, ideology and moral status. This paper commences by examining policy and ethical issues in relation to patient participation. Studies examining immediate patient participation, for example active participation in treatments, and distant patient participation, namely participation in psychiatric service planning, are then reviewed. Various settings of psychiatric services are examined, including the initial interview, primary health care, hospitalization and clinical innovation, in order to uncover common themes. These studies often fail to pay attention to the patient's experience of participation, even when clinically innovative schemes are being described, and also fail to develop hypotheses and theories about participation. The importance of a sociological perspective in future studies is indicated. The author concludes that psychiatric patients want a more active role in treatments and service planning, and that psychiatric clinicians, including nurses, find more active patient participation threatening. Nevertheless, there is evidence of more rewarding alliances being formed between patients and nurses in some settings. The nurse's role in democratizing psychiatric services, thus permitting greater patient participation, while fulfilling statutory obligations is a considerable challenge to nursing practice in the future. This paper concludes by discussing some current limitations of nursing research and the value of some ideas taken from critical theory, in particular reflection, dialogue and praxis, as a practical basis for social action and nursing research. PMID:8021403

  13. An Evaluative Study of the WOW Program on Patients' Satisfaction in Acute Psychiatric Units

    OpenAIRE

    Xie Huiting; Li Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is one of the key evidence of the quality of health-care delivery in nursing. Nursing is a patient-centered activity; although nurse-patient interaction is one of the key tenets of mental health nursing, a structured program to enhance this interaction is lacking. To address the gap, the WOW program was developed in a psychiatric hospital but its effectivenesss had not been evaluated.Objective: This study aims to compare satisfaction levels between patients wh...

  14. Negative and positive childhood experiences across developmental periods in psychiatric patients with different diagnoses – an explorative study

    OpenAIRE

    Schauer Margarete; Neuner Frank; Rockstroh Brigitte; Bichescu Dana; Saleptsi Evangelia; Studer Karl; Hoffmann Klaus; Elbert Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background A high frequency of childhood abuse has often been reported in adult psychiatric patients. The present survey explores the relationship between psychiatric diagnoses and positive and negative life events during childhood and adulthood in psychiatric samples. Methods A total of 192 patients with diagnoses of alcohol-related disorders (n = 45), schizophrenic disorders (n = 52), affective disorders (n = 54), and personality disorders (n = 41) completed a 42-item self-rating s...

  15. Comparison of the prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidities in hepatitis C patients and hepatitis B patients in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser R AlHuthail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Hepatitis C is a major health concern world-wide and is frequently associated with psychiatric co-morbidity. The most common genotype in Saudi Arabia differs from genotypes prevalent elsewhere and thus we aimed to determine if psychiatric disturbances occur in Saudi patients infected with hepatitis C and whether these symptoms extend to those infected with hepatitis B. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from hepatitis C and hepatitis B patients using the general health questionnaire (GHQ-28 and The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 questionnaires. Tinnitus patients served as control subjects. The Chi-square test was used to examine the relationship between categorical variables. Continuous variables were compared using the Student′s t-test or the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test for skewed data, and correlations were evaluated by calculating Spearman′s rho. The odds ratio was used to determine the association between variables and the likelihood of being a psychiatric case. Results: Hepatitis C patients were twice as likely to be labeled as a psychiatric case compared with hepatitis B patients ( P = 0.01. Age and gender were not predictive factors though there was a non-significant tendency toward a higher prevalence of psychiatric cases among females. Hepatitis C patients also scored lower than hepatitis B patients in 3 domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, indicating a greater reduction in quality of life (QoL. Conclusion: We demonstrate an increased incidence of psychiatric symptoms in Saudi Arabian hepatitis C patients compared to hepatitis B patients and controls. This highlights the importance of collaboration between hepatologists and psychiatrists in order to improve the QoL in this patient group.

  16. Variables influencing presenting symptoms of patients with eating disorders at psychiatric outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Chin-Hao; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Hsi-Chung

    2016-04-30

    Eating disorders (EDs) have been underdiagnosed in many clinical settings. This study investigates the influence of clinical characteristics on presenting symptoms of patients with EDs. Psychiatric outpatients, aged 18-45, were enrolled sequentially and received a two-phase survey for EDs in August 2010-January 2013. Their primary reasons for seeking psychiatric help were obtained at their first encounter with outpatient psychiatrists. Patients' clinical and demographic characteristics were compared according to presenting symptoms with or without eating/weight problems. Of 2140 patients, 348 (16.3%) were diagnosed with an ED (22.6% of women and 6.3% of men). The three most common reasons for seeking psychiatric help were eating/weight problems (46.0%), emotional problems (41.3%), and sleep disturbances (19.3%). The multivariate analyses suggest that when patients with EDs presented symptoms that were less related to eating/weight problems, they were significantly more likely to be those having diagnoses other than anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa and less severe degree of binge-eating. Further, patients with EDs who demonstrated more impulsive behaviors and poorer functioning were less likely to report their eating problems when visiting psychiatric clinics. Thus, ED should be assessed routinely in patients with complex psychopathology to facilitate comprehensive treatment. PMID:27086254

  17. Misdiagnosis of Wilson's disease in a patient with psychiatric symptoms

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    Doval Nimisha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic outcome of Wilson's disease significantly depends upon its early recognition. As Wilson's disease is a rare disorder with protean manifestations, its diagnosis and subsequent treatment are often delayed. We elaborate here the case of a young boy who had initially presented with psychiatrc symptoms suggestive of dissociative fugue followed by withdrawn behaviour and was treated by a psychiatrist with minimal response. This was associated with symptoms of tremors, hypersalivation, and slowness of movements. This case highlights the delay in diagnosing Wilson's disease when faced with the case of a young adult with psychiatric manifestations. It is extremely important for physicians, psychiatrists and health professionals at primary care level to recognize and diagnose this treatable disease at an early stage.

  18. Misdiagnosis of Wilson's Disease in a Patient with Psychiatric Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimisha, Doval; Dhruv, Batra; Vikas, Moun; Sneh, Jha K; Rakesh, Shukla

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic outcome of Wilson's disease significantly depends upon its early recognition. As Wilson's disease is a rare disorder with protean manifestations, its diagnosis and subsequent treatment are often delayed. We elaborate here the case of a young boy who had initially presented with psychiatrc symptoms suggestive of dissociative fugue followed by withdrawn behaviour and was treated by a psychiatrist with minimal response. This was associated with symptoms of tremors, hypersalivation, and slowness of movements. This case highlights the delay in diagnosing Wilson's disease when faced with the case of a young adult with psychiatric manifestations. It is extremely important for physicians, psychiatrists and health professionals at primary care level to recognize and diagnose this treatable disease at an early stage.

  19. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is more common in patients with chronic kidney disease and is associated with higher mortality than in the general population. Blood losses in this patient population can be quite severe at times and it is important to differentiate anemia of chronic diseases from anemia due to GI bleeding. We review the literature on common causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGI in chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. We suggest an approach to diagnosis and management of this problem.

  20. A study of skin disorders in patients with primary psychiatric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuruvila Maria

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The skin occupies a powerful position as an organ of communication and plays an important role in socialization throughout life. The interface between dermatology and psychiatry is complex and of clinical importance. AIMS: To document the incidence of cutaneous disorders in patients with primary psychiatric conditions. METHODS: Three hundred patients with a primary psychiatric condition who had cutaneous disease were entered into the study group. The patients were classified appropriately based on the classification of psychocutaneous disorders. The control group included 300 patients presenting with a skin disorder and without any known psychiatric complaint. RESULTS: The majority of the cases in the study group were in the 3rd-5th decade. In this study, the most common primary psychiatric conditions were manic depressive psychosis (53.33%, depression (36.33%, schizophrenia (8.33% and anxiety (2%. Of the study group, 68.66% patients had infective dermatoses and the rest had non-infective dermatoses. A high incidence of pityriasis versicolor and dermatophyte infections was noted in males from the study group. Among non-infective dermatoses, 8% had eczema, and psychogenic skin disorders were seen in 4.67% of the study group. Of these, delusions of parasitosis were the commonest (2% followed by venereophobia (1%. CONCLUSIONS: A statistically significant higher incidence of tinea versicolor and dermatophyte infections was seen in the study group. Delusion of parasitosis was the most common psychogenic skin disorder seen in the study group, followed by venereophobia.

  1. Deliberate ingestion of foreign bodies by institutionalised psychiatric hospital patients and prison inmates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S T

    2012-02-03

    Deliberate and recurrent foreign body ingestion is a common problem among institutionalised patients. We review our experience with 36 cases of deliberate foreign body ingestion by prisoners or psychiatric patients, thirty of whom were institutionalised at the time of ingestion. Symptoms were frequently severe in the prison inmate group but, in contrast, psychiatric patients presented with few, if any, symptoms. A majority of objects pass spontaneously or remain in situ without complication. Twenty-four patients were discharged following initial evaluation and without specific treatment. Eight of these were reviewed electively and discharged within one week. Twelve patients were admitted for observation, seven of whom were discharged within 48 hrs. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed in four patients and an intragastric foreign body identified in two cases. Laparotomy was performed in two cases for unresolving mechanical intestinal obstruction. Management should be conservative when possible, with surgery indicated only for complications.

  2. Predictors of psychopathological outcome during peg-interferon and ribavirin therapy in patients with chronic HCV-correlated hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Prati, Gianmaria; Palazzo, M Carlotta; Rumi, Maria Grazia; Cavallaro, Flaminia; Aghemo, Alessio; Colombo, Massimo; Altamura, A Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Peg-interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) therapy is reported to induce psychiatric symptoms and syndromes in 20% of patients treated for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection. Present study was aimed to quantify the phenomenon and assess the influence of psychiatric counseling over antiviral completion rate and the use of psychometric tools, in terms of prediction of psychopathological outcome. Ninety-six HCV patients were assessed, before antiviral treatment, by means of the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ), Symptom Checklist-90, and Internal State Scale (ISS). Sociodemographic and clinical variables and completion rate were collected. Binary logistic regression was performed to evaluate whether scores were predictive of psychiatric visit, development of psychiatric disorders, and need for treatment. Ninety-five patients (99%) completed antiviral treatment; 27 subjects (29%) needed psychiatric visit: among them, mood disorder was diagnosed in 15 (16%) and were pharmacologically treated. Baseline SDS and MDQ higher scores were found to be predictive of psychiatric visit [odds ratio (OR)=1.258, Pcounseling may be needed in almost 30% of HCV patients on antiviral treatment, with positive influence over the completion rate. Baseline higher scores at psychometric questionnaires-MDQ-in particular, predictors of psychopathological outcome during Peg-IFN and RBV therapy in patients with chronic HCV-correlated hepatitis reflecting individual functioning before starting antiviral therapy and positive history for mood disorders, seem to predict psychiatric visit, onset of mood episodes, and need for psychopharmacological treatment. Further investigation is warranted to confirm results. PMID:23276143

  3. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength measurem

  4. Symptoms of epilepsy and organic brain dysfunctions in patients with acute, brief depression combined with other fluctuating psychiatric symptoms: a controlled study from an acute psychiatric department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linaker Olav M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In psychiatric acute departments some patients present with brief depressive periods accompanied with fluctuating arrays of other psychiatric symptoms like psychosis, panic or mania. For the purpose of the present study we call this condition Acute Unstable Depressive Syndrome (AUDS. The aims of the present study were to compare clinical signs of organic brain dysfunctions and epilepsy in patients with AUDS and Major Depressive Episode (MDE. Methods Out of 1038 consecutive patients admitted to a psychiatric acute ward, 16 patients with AUDS and 16 age- and gender-matched MDE patients were included in the study. Using standardized instruments and methods we recorded clinical data, EEG and MRI. Results A history of epileptic seizures and pathologic EEG activity was more common in the AUDS group than in the MDE group (seizures, n = 6 vs. 0, p = 0.018; pathologic EEG activity, n = 8 vs. 1, p = 0.015. Five patients in the AUDS group were diagnosed as having epilepsy, whereas none of those with MDE had epilepsy (p = 0.043. There were no differences between the groups regarding pathological findings in neurological bedside examination and cerebral MRI investigation. Conclusion Compared to patients admitted with mood symptoms fulfilling DSM 4 criteria of a major depressive disorder, short-lasting atypical depressive symptoms seem to be associated with a high frequency of epileptic and pathologic EEG activity in patients admitted to psychiatric acute departments. Trial registration NCT00201474

  5. Mental health related Internet use among psychiatric patients: a cross-sectional analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kalckreuth, Sophie; Trefflich, Friederike; Rummel-Kluge, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background The Internet is of great importance in today’s health sector, as most Internet users utilize online functions for health related purposes. Concerning the mental health care sector, little data exist about the Internet use of psychiatric patients. It is the scope of this current study to analyze the quantity and pattern of Internet usage among mental health patients. Methods Patients from all services of the Department of Psychiatry at a university hospital were surveyed by completi...

  6. Treatment Compliance in Patients with Comorbid Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Herbeck, Diane M.; Fitek, Diana J.; Svikis, Dace S; Montoya, Ivan D.; Marcus, Steven C.; West, Joyce C.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines clinical and non-clinical factors associated with treatment compliance problems in 342 patients with substance use disorders (SUD) seen in routine psychiatric practice. Weighted Wald-X2 and multivariate logistic regression assessed sociodemographic, clinical, treatment, and health plan characteristics associated with treatment compliance problems. Among patients with SUD, 40.5% were reported to currently have treatment compliance problems. Patients with treatment complianc...

  7. Sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction in chronic hepatitis C patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Cópio Fábregas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD and dissatisfaction with sexual life (DSL in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection (CHC was jointly investigated via a thorough psychopathological analysis, which included dimensions such as fatigue, impulsiveness, psychiatric comorbidity, health-related quality of life (HRQL and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Methods Male and female CHC patients from an outpatient referral center were assessed using the Brief Fatigue Inventory, the Barrat Impulsiveness Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale-Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF. Structured psychiatric interviews were performed according to the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. SD was assessed based on specific items in the BDI (item 21 and the HAM-A (item 12. DSL was assessed based on a specific question in the WHOQOL-BREF (item 21. Multivariate analysis was performed according to an ordinal linear regression model in which SD and DSL were considered as outcome variables. Results SD was reported by 60 (57.1% of the patients according to the results of the BDI and by 54 (51.4% of the patients according to the results of the HAM-A. SD was associated with older age, female gender, viral genotype 2 or 3, interferon-α use, impulsiveness, depressive symptoms, antidepressant and benzodiazepine use, and lower HRQL. DSL was reported by 34 (32.4% of the patients and was associated with depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, antidepressant use, and lower HRQL. Conclusions The prevalence of SD and DSL in CHC patients was high and was associated with factors, such as depressive symptoms and antidepressant use. Screening and managing these conditions represent significant steps toward improving medical assistance and the HRQL of CHC patients.

  8. Trend of psychiatric disorders among out-patients and in-patients of a tertiary care center of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag S. Shah

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Current scenario and trends of psychiatric disorders among this group of patients is in line with epidemiological patterns and reflects a healthy trend of community oriented (out-patient based care. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 439-444

  9. The factor structure of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (Expanded Version) in a sample of forensic psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, J. van; Vuijk, P.J.; Harte, J.M.; Smit, B.L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Scherder, E.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Severe behavioral problems, aggression, unlawful behavior, and uncooperativeness make the forensic psychiatric population both hard to treat and study. To fine-tune treatment and evaluate results, valid measurement is vital. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale-Extended (BPRS-E) is a widely used scale

  10. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Federico

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management. The aims of this paper are: (i to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46% showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%, than in aggression toward other people (20%. A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%, followed by depression (16% and personality disorders (14%, and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge, while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge. Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%. Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self

  11. The Right of Psychiatric Patients to Refuse Medication: Where Should Social Workers Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Kia J.

    1993-01-01

    Addresses differences among competence, commitment, and mental illness; the right to privacy; and the prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment. Reviews professional motivations in relation to both sides of controversy over rights of psychiatric patients to refuse medication. Presents position for social work profession that stands for…

  12. Risk Factors for Overweight and Diabetes mellitus in Residential Psychiatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mookhoek, Evert J.; de Vries, Willem A.; Hovens, Johannes E. J. M.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Loonen, Anton J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of and risk factors for overweight and diabetes mellitus in long-stay psychiatric inpatients. Method: Statistical analysis of data collected from medical, laboratory, and pharmacy files. Results: 80% of the 256 patients were suffering from schizophrenia or ot

  13. Punding in non-demented Parkinson's disease patients: Relationship with psychiatric and addiction spectrum comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettorruso, Mauro; Fasano, Alfonso; De Risio, Luisa; Ricciardi, Lucia; Di Nicola, Marco; Martinotti, Giovanni; Janiri, Luigi; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita

    2016-03-15

    Punding is a stereotyped behavior characterized by an intense fascination with a complex, excessive, non-goal oriented, repetitive activity, associated with dopaminergic replacement therapy (DRT) in patients affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) and with dopamine agonists in several conditions. We studied 25 PD patients with punding behaviors, and compared them to 130 PD controls. The psychiatric evaluation included: the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS); the SCales for Outcomes in PArkinson's disease-Psychiatric Complications (SCOPA-PC); the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Version 11 (BIS-11); the Mood Disorder Questionnaire; the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS). The occurrence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) was diagnosed through a psychiatric interview. Significantly more punding patients (96% vs. 68%; ppathological gambling, hedonistic homeostatic dysregulation) and ICDs were found. In conclusion, presented data confirm that DRT, in a subset of PD patients, is strongly associated with addiction-like behavioral issues. Punding shares similarities with addictive behaviors and is associated to other psychiatric symptoms involving dopamine system alterations. PMID:26944176

  14. Violent women : a multicentre study into gender differences in forensic psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vogel, Vivienne; Stam, Jeantine; Bouman, Yvonne H. A.; Ter Horst, P.R.M.; Lancel, Marike

    2016-01-01

    To gain insight into the relatively small, but increasing group of women in forensic psychiatry, a retrospective multicentre study was started gathering information from the files of 275 female patients of four Dutch forensic psychiatric hospitals on characteristics and violence risk factors. Overal

  15. Psychiatric assessment of patients with 20th-century disease (total allergy syndrome)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D.E.; Raskin, J.

    1985-11-15

    Twentieth-century disease, or total allergy syndrome, is a condition attributed to hypersensitivity to the environment that may sometimes be seen as so serious that the patient is incapable of living in the modern world. Although the popular media frequently carry stories about it, there is little scientific literature. It is diagnosed by clinical ecologists, who maintain, among other theories, that susceptible individuals experience an overload in assaults by artificial materials in the environment. The patients usually have multiple ill defined symptoms for which no organic cause can be found, but they vigorously resist psychiatric referral, as they attribute their symptoms to allergy. A group of 18 patients who were purportedly suffering from 20th-century disease were referred to a university psychiatric consultation liaison service. They virtually all had a long history of visits to physicians, and their symptoms were characteristic of several well known psychiatric disorders. The case histories and management of three of them are presented. Although this group of patients may have been atypical in that they had more severe psychologic symptoms, the experience indicates that a psychiatric diagnosis ought to be considered. The symptoms of 20th-century disease have much in common with other conditions known to physicians for centuries.

  16. Cohabitation patterns among patients with severe psychiatric disorders in the entire Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A F; Olsbjerg, M; Andersen, P K;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assortative mating has been demonstrated in mental disorders but the extent of cohabitation between patients with clinically diagnosed psychiatric disease has been poorly explored. Method We conducted a register-based study of all Danes between 18 and 70 years of age in a 13-year...

  17. Oral health status and treatment needs in institutionalized psychiatric patients : One year descriptive cross sectional study

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    Kumar Manish

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES : Psychiatric patients are one of the special groups requiring attention as they are often neglected. Oral health is an major determinant of general health for psychiatric patients and may have a low priority in the context of mental illness. The present study was conducted to assess the oral health status and treatment needs of institutionalized psychiatric patients of Davangere. METHODS : 220 psychiatric patients admitted in two general hospitals of Davangere during the period of one year were included in the study. The oral health status was evaluated with respect to caries, oral hygiene, and periodontal status. RESULTS : Of the 180 examined with the response rate of 81.8%. 58.3% were males, mean age was 36.7 years, 57.8% had < 1 year of mental illness with a mean of 2.2 years, and 90% were self-sufficient. The multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the mean DMFT (0.92 increased with age, duration of mental illness, and irregularity of oral hygiene habits (P<0.001. Mean OHI-S score was 3.3 and multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the mean OHI-S score increased with age (P<0.001. The multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the CPI score increased with age, duration of mental illness, and degree of helplessness (P<0.001. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSION : The findings of this study demonstrates low caries prevalence, poor oral hygiene, and extensive unmet needs for dental treatment.

  18. The Novaco Anger Scale--Provocation Inventory (1994 Version) in Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsveld, Ruud H. J.; Muris, Peter; Kraaimaat, Floris W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of the Novaco Anger Scale--Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI, 1994 version) in Dutch violent forensic psychiatric patients and secondary vocational students. A confirmatory factor analysis of the subscale structure of the NAS was carried out, reliability was investigated, and relations were calculated between…

  19. The role of personal social networks in risk assessment and management of forensic psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, L.; Spreen, M.; Boegarts, S.; Völker, B.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Social network factors are usually not accounted for in the clinical practice of risk assessment/management.This article introduces a social network analysis as an instrument to systematically chart the relationships and personal networks of forensic psychiatric patients. During the period 2005 to 2

  20. Urea synthesis in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamberg, Ole; Sonne, J; Larsen, S;

    2001-01-01

    Up-regulation of urea synthesis by amino acids and dietary protein intake may be impaired in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) due to the reduced glucagon secretion. Conversely, urea synthesis may be increased as a result of the chronic inflammation. The aims of the study were to determine...... urea synthesis kinetics in CP patients in relation to glucagon secretion (study I) and during an increase in protein intake (study II)....

  1. Assessment of patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansie, E J; Turk, D C

    2013-07-01

    Chronic pain is a public health concern affecting 20-30% of the population of Western countries. Although there have been many scientific advances in the understanding of the neurophysiology of pain, precisely assessing and diagnosing a patient's chronic pain problem is not straightforward or well-defined. How chronic pain is conceptualized influences how pain is evaluated and the factors considered when making a chronic pain diagnosis. There is no one-to-one relationship between the amount or type of organic pathology and pain intensity, but instead, the chronic pain experience is shaped by a myriad of biomedical, psychosocial (e.g. patients' beliefs, expectations, and mood), and behavioural factors (e.g. context, responses by significant others). Assessing each of these three domains through a comprehensive evaluation of the person with chronic pain is essential for treatment decisions and to facilitate optimal outcomes. This evaluation should include a thorough patient history and medical evaluation and a brief screening interview where the patient's behaviour can be observed. Further assessment to address questions identified during the initial evaluation will guide decisions as to what additional assessments, if any, may be appropriate. Standardized self-reported instruments to evaluate the patient's pain intensity, functional abilities, beliefs and expectations, and emotional distress are available, and can be administered by the physician, or a referral for in depth evaluation can be made to assist in treatment planning.

  2. Relation between psychiatric disorder and abnormal illness behaviour in patients undergoing operations for cervical discectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, R.; Creed, F; Hughes, D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To test the hypothesis that depression in patients being considered for cervical disc surgery is associated with severe organic pathology. Secondly, to test whether depression and abnormal illness attitudes recorded preoperatively would predict poorer recovery.
METHODS—Seventy four patients with pain and disability from cervical arthrosis were examined during investigations before potential cervical surgery. The prevalence of psychiatric disorder was assessed using...

  3. Variables Associated with the Use of Coercive Measures on Psychiatric Patients in Spanish Penitentiary Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Girela, E.; LÓPEZ, A; Ortega, L.; De-Juan, J.; Ruiz, F.; Bosch, J. I.; L. F. Barrios; Luna, J. D.; Torres-González, F.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the use of coercive medical measures (forced medication, isolation, and mechanical restraint) in mentally ill inmates within two secure psychiatric hospitals (SPH) and three regular prisons (RP) in Spain. Variables related to adopted coercive measures were analyzed, such as type of measure, causes of indication, opinion of patient inmate, opinion of medical staff, and more frequent morbidity. A total of 209 patients (108 from SPH and 101 from RP) were studied. Isolation (41.35...

  4. Values as determinant of meaning among patients with psychiatric disorders in the perspective of recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Huguelet; Sébastien Guillaume; Sonia Vidal; Sylvia Mohr; Philippe Courtet; Lucile Villain; Chloé Girod; Roland Hasler; Paco Prada; Emilie Olié; Nader Perroud

    2016-01-01

    Recovery is a personal process of growth that involves hope, self-identity, meaning in life and responsibility. Determinants of meaning have not been explored among populations of patients with persistent psychiatric conditions. However, an evidence-based approach aiming at assessing such determinants should provide some insight into the psychotherapeutic aspects of recovery. We tested a model hypothesizing that some symptoms and social parameters of patients are related to values, and second...

  5. Mutation screening of NOS1AP gene in a large sample of psychiatric patients and controls

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    Nygren Gudrun

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene encoding carboxyl-terminal PDZ ligand of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1AP is located on chromosome 1q23.3, a candidate region for schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders (ASD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Previous genetic and functional studies explored the role of NOS1AP in these psychiatric conditions, but only a limited number explored the sequence variability of NOS1AP. Methods We analyzed the coding sequence of NOS1AP in a large population (n = 280, including patients with schizophrenia (n = 72, ASD (n = 81 or OCD (n = 34, and in healthy volunteers controlled for the absence of personal or familial history of psychiatric disorders (n = 93. Results Two non-synonymous variations, V37I and D423N were identified in two families, one with two siblings with OCD and the other with two brothers with ASD. These rare variations apparently segregate with the presence of psychiatric conditions. Conclusions Coding variations of NOS1AP are relatively rare in patients and controls. Nevertheless, we report the first non-synonymous variations within the human NOS1AP gene that warrant further genetic and functional investigations to ascertain their roles in the susceptibility to psychiatric disorders.

  6. The prevalence of psychiatric disease in the significant others of patients with known mood and anxious disease

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    Corea Salvatore

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - Information about the Significant Others (S.O. of 530 patients with mood and anxious spectrum disorders has been tabulated in this multicentre, retrospective, clinical observational study in order to learn the prevalence of the same mood and/or anxious spectrum diseases in the S.O. of the patients. Methods - The 530 outpatients (of age range from 18 to 70 years with mood and anxious spectrum disorders have been treated by the authors, observed for a seven year period (from January 1995 until May 2003. The patients live in 16 different Italian provinces, but are predominantly from Lombardia and Veneto. Mood disease (includes substance abuse was present in 72% of the patients and anxious disease was present in 28% (DSM-IV diagnoses based upon clinical interviews. The S.O. (various heterosexual long-term relationships of each patient was interviewed for this study to establish a DSM-IV diagnosis of any psychiatric disease that might be present. In cases in which the patient had no S.O. or in which information about the S.O. was unavailable, that information was collected. As data was collected, 10 item report was completed for each patient and the respective S.O. Results - Patients had an S.O. with a similar mental disease to their own in 41% of cases; only 16% of the patients chose their S.O. with no mental disease; 18% of the patients did not have any S.O. and in 26% of the cases the health of the S.O. was unknown. Conclusion - In this multicentre, retrospective, clinical observational study, the corresponding Significant Others of 530 patients with mood and anxious spectrum disorders presented with a high percentage of similar disease to the patients. These findings suggest that it may be appropriate to counsel our patients with these diseases to encourage their respective S.O. to undergo a psychiatric evaluation for possible treatable disease: the first objective of an S.O. is preventive care, secondarily the well-being of

  7. Adolescents with personality disorders suffer from severe psychiatric stigma: evidence from a sample of 131 patients

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    Catthoor K

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Kirsten Catthoor,1,3 Dine J Feenstra,2 Joost Hutsebaut,2 Didier Schrijvers,3 Bernard Sabbe3 1Department of Psychiatry, Psychiatrisch Ziekenhuis Stuivenberg, ZNA Antwerpen, Antwerp, Belgium; 2Viersprong Institute for Studies on Personality Disorders, Halsteren, the Netherlands; 3Collaborative Antwerp Psychiatric Research Institute, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium Background: The aim of the study is to assess the severity of psychiatric stigma in a sample of personality disordered adolescents in order to evaluate whether differences in stigma can be found in adolescents with different types and severity of personality disorders (PDs. Not only adults but children and adolescents with mental health problems suffer from psychiatric stigma. In contrast to the abundance of research in adult psychiatric samples, stigma in children and adolescents has hardly been investigated. Personality disordered adolescents with fragile identities and self-esteem might be especially prone to feeling stigmatized, an experience which might further shape their identity throughout this critical developmental phase. Materials and methods: One hundred thirty-one adolescent patients underwent a standard assessment with Axis I and Axis II diagnostic interviews and two stigma instruments, Stigma Consciousness Questionnaire (SCQ and Perceived Devaluation–Discrimination Questionnaire (PDDQ. Independent sample t-tests were used to investigate differences in the mean SCQ and PDDQ total scores for patients with and without a PD. Multiple regression main effect analyses were conducted to explore the impact of the different PDs on level of stigma, as well as comorbid Axis I disorders. Age and sex were also entered in the regression models. Results and conclusions: Adolescents with severe mental health problems experience a burden of stigma. Personality disordered patients experience more stigma than adolescents with other severe psychiatric Axis I disorders. Borderline PD

  8. Detection of Serum Antibodies to Borna Disease Virus in Patients with Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rott, R.; Herzog, S.; Fleischer, B.; Winokur, A.; Amsterdam, J.; Dyson, W.; Koprowski, H.

    1985-05-01

    Borna disease virus causes a rare meningoencephalitis in horses and sheep and has been shown to produce behavioral effects in some species. The possibility that the Borna virus is associated with mental disorders in humans was evaluated by examining serum samples from 979 psychiatric patients and 200 normal volunteers for the presence of Borna virus-specific antibodies. Antibodies were detected by the indirect immunofluorescence focus assay. Antibodies to the virus were demonstrated in 16 of the patients but none of the normal volunteers. The patients with the positive serum samples were characterized by having histories of affective disorders, particularly of a cyclic nature. Further studies are needed to define the possible involvement of Borna virus in human psychiatric disturbances.

  9. Clay and Anxiety Reduction: A One-Group, Pretest/Posttest Design with Patients on a Psychiatric Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimport, Elizabeth R.; Hartzell, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Little research exists on using clay as an anxiety-reducing intervention with patients in psychiatric hospitals. This article reports on a study that used a one-group, pretest/posttest design with 49 adults in a psychiatric facility who created a clay pinch pot. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used as a pre- and posttest measure.…

  10. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation. PMID:27213839

  11. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation.

  12. MALONDIALDEHYDE LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS

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    Madhur

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Periodontitis is a chronic condition leading to the destruction of the periodontium. A case control study was carried out in 30 subjects with chronic periodontitis aged 30 - 65 ye ars (group II and age matched with 30 control subjects (group I. Salivary and serum malondialdehyde, which is a marker of lipid peroxidation, was estimated in the cases and controls. Salivary MDA was elevated (p<0.001 in patients with chronic periodonti tis there was no change in serum MDA levels when compared with normal controls. Increased levels in MDA may be closely associated with periodontal disease and salivary estimation may provide advantage in pathogenesis of the periodontal disease. .

  13. Tear Film Break-Up Time: Comparison between Patients using Psychiatric Drugs and Healthy Individuals

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    Parvin Dibajnia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ocular dryness is a well-recognized adverse side effect of many medications. The purpose of this study was to compare tear film stability between psychiatric patients that use lithium carbonate or carbamazepine and normal cases. Materials and Methods: Tear film break up time test was performed in three groups, 30 patients using lithium carbonate, 30 patients using carbamazepine and 30 normal cases. Values of the TBUTs were compared among groups by the independent t-test. Results: Differences between both of patients and control groups were significant (p<0.0001. Conclusion: The results show that these drugs contribute to decrease of tear film break up time.

  14. An Examination of Perceived Helplessness in Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valine, Warren J.; Phillips, Carolyn

    1984-01-01

    Examined the relationship of helplessness, locus of control, depression, and voluntary participation in therapy. Results confirmed the relationship between helplessness, locus of control, and depression and suggested patients with greater degrees of helplessness were less likely to take an active role in treatment. (JAC)

  15. Cannabis abuse : a phenomenological study of the causative factors as perceived by patients with a history of Cannabis use, admitted at Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital in the North West Province / Boitumelo Susan Patricia Ramphomane

    OpenAIRE

    Ramphomane, Boitumelo Susan Patricia

    2005-01-01

    A phenomenological study was carried out to find out from patients with a history of cannabis use. admitted at Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital, reasons or factors that caused them to use/abuse cannabis. An original sample of 30 male patients between the ages of 16-30 years was selected from chronic (rehabilitation) wards of mentally stable patients awaiting discharge. Out of the 30 subjects, 10 protocols were selected for phenomenological explication. An unstructured type of interview was c...

  16. Treatment needs, diagnoses and use of services for acutely admitted psychiatric patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway

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    Sørgaard Knut W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared demography, diagnoses and clinical needs in acutely admitted psychiatric hospital patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway. Method All acutely admitted psychiatric patients in 1 psychiatric hospital in north-west Russia and 2 in northern Norway were in a three months period assessed with HoNOS and a Norwegian form developed to study acute psychiatric services (MAP. Data from a total of 841 patients were analysed (377 Norwegian, 464 Russian with univariate and multivariate statistics. Results Russian patients were more often males who had paid work. 2/3 were diagnosed with alcohol and organic disorders, and 70% reported problems related to sleep. Depression was widespread, as were problems associated with occupation. Many more Norwegian patients were on various forms of social security and lived in community supported homes. They had a clinical profile of affective disorders, use of drugs, suicidality and problems with activities involved of daily life. Slightly more Norwegian patients were involuntary admitted. Conclusion Acutely admitted psychiatric patients in North West Russia and Northern Norwegian showed different clinical profiles: alcohol, depression and organic disorders characterised Russian patients, affective disorders, suicidality and use of drugs characterised the Norwegians. Whereas Norwegian patients are mainly referred from GPs the Russians come via 1.line psychiatric services (“dispensaries”. Average length of stay for Russian patients was 2.5 times longer than that of the Norwegian.

  17. A dance movement therapy group for depressed adult patients in a psychiatric outpatient clinic: effects of the treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Pylvänäinen, Päivi M.; Muotka, Joona S.; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2015-01-01

    We were interested in investigating the effects of dance movement therapy (DMT) in a psychiatric outpatient clinic with patients diagnosed with depression. DMT aims to engage the patients in physical and verbal exploration of their experiences generated in movement based interaction. The assumption was that DMT, which includes both physical engagement as well as emotional and social exploration, would alleviate the mood and psychiatric symptoms. All adult patients (n = 33) incl...

  18. The role of psychiatric symptoms, alexithymia, and maladaptive defenses in patients with functional dyspepsia

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    Mahbobeh Faramarzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional dyspepsia (FD is a condition commonly seen in gastroenterological practice. The pathophysiology of FD is likely to be multi-factorial and remains incompletely understood. Although evidence for a psychological etiology is growing, few researches have investigated the role of psychological factors in FD disease. The aim of the study was to assess the role of alexithymia, psychiatric symptoms, and defense mechanism in patients with FD. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, 60 consecutive with established FD referred to gastroenterology and 60 healthy people matched regarding demographic variables were selected. The subjects filled out three questionnaires; Symptom Checklist-90-Revised 40-item Defense Style and 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Statistical Analysis: Student′s t-test and multivariate analysis variance model were used to compare the two groups. Results: Significantly higher scores were found in patients with dyspepsia when compared with controls for most psychiatric symptoms (depression P < 0.001, anxiety P < 0.001, obsessive-compulsion P < 0.001, interpersonal sensitivity P < 0.001, psychoticism P < 0.001, hostility P < 0.001, and total score of psychiatric symptoms P < 0.001. Alexithymia symptoms (both (difficulty in identifying feelings and difficulty in describing feelings was higher in FD patients than healthy individuals ( P < 0.001. Also, the use of maladaptive defense mechanisms (both neurotic and immature in FD patients significantly was higher than healthy individuals ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: Psychiatric symptoms, alexithymia, and maladaptive defense play significant role in the emergence of FD symptoms. This study proposes that FD patients should be evaluated and treated by departments of gastroenterology and psychiatry.

  19. Virtual patient simulation in psychiatric care - A pilot study of digital support for collaborate learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnqvist, Charlotta; Karlsson, Karin; Lindell, Lisbeth; Fors, Uno

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatric and mental health nursing is built on a trusted nurse and patient relationship. Therefore communication and clinical reasoning are two important issues. Our experiences as teachers in psychiatric educational programmes are that the students feel anxiety and fear before they start their clinical practices in psychiatry. Therefore there is a need for bridging over the fear. Technology enhanced learning might support such activities so we used Virtual patients (VPs), an interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate 4th term nursing students' opinions on the use of Virtual Patients for assessment in a Mental Health and Ill-health course module. We asked 24 volunteering students to practise with five different VP cases during almost 10 weeks before the exam. The participants were gathered together for participating in a written and an oral evaluation. The students were positive to the use of VPs in psychiatry and were very positive to use VPs in their continued nursing education. It seems that Virtual Patients can be an activity producing pedagogic model promoting students' independent knowledge development, critical thinking, reflection and problem solving ability for nurse students in psychiatric care. PMID:27038085

  20. The effect of psychotherapy in improving physical and psychiatric symptoms in patients with functional dyspepsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbobeh Faramarzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional Dyspepsia (FD is a common symptom of upper gastrointestinal discomfort. Few data are available on the role of psychotherapy in the treatment of dyspeptic syndromes. This study assesses whether brief core conflictual relationship theme (CCRT psychoanalytic psychotherapy improves gastrointestinal and psychiatric symptoms in patients with functional dyspepsia.A randomized, controlled trial was planned in two educational hospitals in city of Babol. Forty-nine patients with FD were randomly assigned to receive standard medication treatment with CCRT psychotherapy (24 participants or standard medication treatment alone (25 participants. The participants completed the Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Symptom Severity Index (PAGI-SYM and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R questionnaires before the trial, after the treatment and at 1 and 12-month follow-ups. The mixed-effects (regression model was used to analyze the data.The results showed that CCRT psychotherapy improved all of the FD symptoms (heartburn/regurgitation, nausea/vomiting, fullness, bloating, upper abdominal pain, and lower abdominal pain and many of the psychiatric symptoms (depression, anxiety, somatization, interpersonal sensitivity and paranoid ideation after the treatment and at 1-month and 12-month follow-ups.Brief CCRT psychoanalytic psychotherapy can serve as an effective intervention for promoting gastrointestinal and psychiatric symptoms in patients with functional dyspepsia.

  1. Values as determinant of meaning among patients with psychiatric disorders in the perspective of recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguelet, Philippe; Guillaume, Sébastien; Vidal, Sonia; Mohr, Sylvia; Courtet, Philippe; Villain, Lucile; Girod, Chloé; Hasler, Roland; Prada, Paco; Olié, Emilie; Perroud, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Recovery is a personal process of growth that involves hope, self-identity, meaning in life and responsibility. Determinants of meaning have not been explored among populations of patients with persistent psychiatric conditions. However, an evidence-based approach aiming at assessing such determinants should provide some insight into the psychotherapeutic aspects of recovery. We tested a model hypothesizing that some symptoms and social parameters of patients are related to values, and secondarily to meaning in life, and in turn that meaning is associated with various parameters, such as depressiveness and self-esteem. We assessed 176 patients with schizophrenia, anorexia, borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder. Overall, our hypotheses proved correct: firstly, characteristics such as depression, hopelessness, self-esteem and the number of relationships influenced values; secondly, the presence and an enactment of values were associated with meaning, and thirdly, meaning was associated with some symptoms and social characteristics. This model was confirmed in the four psychiatric populations under study. These results support the relevance of addressing values and meaning in the recovery-oriented care of patients with persistent psychiatric disorders, in addition to other psychosocial interventions which are more systematically considered in this area. PMID:27272094

  2. Intervention program for modification the nutrition habits of psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Statharou A.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The healthy way of diet of mental patients, as it appears from the international bibliography, occupies the professionals of health for a lot of years. A lot of efforts have become in this sector and mainly in acquire the mental patients the control of natural health and well-being. Each program of intervention that aims in the modification of alimentary habits with the use of cognitive-behavior theories contributes in the improvement of quality of diet, but also in the aid of self-esteem Nevertheless, it should be becomes obvious that this programs, with any their cost it corresponds, can be economically compensated with in the long term profits. Profits that result from the co morbidity and by extension of reduction the use of health services.

  3. Risk of psychiatric and neurological diseases in patients with workplace mobbing experience in Germany: a retrospective database analysis

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    Kostev, Karel

    2014-05-01

    ratios (OR representing the risk of suffering from diseases were higher in affected patients, with the highest value (4.28 for depression and the lowest value for sleep disorders (OR=2.4.Conclusion: Those who will later become the victims of bullying are more prone to suffer from diseases in general, even before this experience of mobbing has occurred, which underlines the importance of supporting (chronically ill patients to protect them against bullying. Sequelae of mobbing include, in particular, diseases from the neurologic-psychiatric spectrum.

  4. The Effects of Group Musical Activity on Psychiatric Patients in India.

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    Katrina Rumball

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Musical activity, particularly as the application of music therapy, has been found to produce numerous benefits within a psychiatric setting. This study has explored a selection of these benefits in psychiatric patients in a hospital in India, examining these effects within a culture not typically studied in this field. Observations of seven sessions of group musical activity was undertaken and questionnaire and interview data collected from both patients and staff. Questionnaire data demonstrated improvements in mood, energy, and attention levels, both during and following the sessions. The quantitative data was integrated with interview responses and is discussed with reference to previous research. Interviews and observation found improvements in the categories of interaction, learning and confidence. Alongside these variables, specific musical factors were considered which strongly indicate that the application of musical activity as a therapy, as distinct from other group effects, contributed to the benefits found.

  5. Psychiatric symptoms in glioma patients: from diagnosis to management

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    Boele FW

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Florien W Boele,1 Alasdair G Rooney,2 Robin Grant,2 Martin Klein1 1Department of Medical Psychology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: Patients with primary intrinsic brain tumors can experience neurological, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms that greatly affect daily life. In this review, we focus on changes in personality and behavior, mood issues, hallucinations, and psychosis, because these are either difficult to recognize, to treat, or are understudied in scientific literature. Neurobehavioral symptoms are common, often multiple, and causation can be multifactorial. Although different symptoms sometimes require a different treatment approach, we advise a comprehensive treatment approach, including pharmacological treatment and/or psychotherapy where appropriate. Further research is needed to obtain a better estimate of the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms in glioma patients, and the extent to which these affect everyday functioning and family life. Keywords: glioma, psychiatry, personality, mood, hallucinations, psychosis

  6. Prevalence of substance use disorders in psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftdahl, Nanna Gilliam; Nordentoft, Merete; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    obtained from several Danish population-based registers. The study population was defined as all individuals with incidents of schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder, other psychoses, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD......). Patients with SUDs were more often men, had fewer years of formal education, more often received disability pension and died due to unnatural causes. CONCLUSIONS: The study was the most comprehensive of its kind so far to estimate the prevalence of SUDs in an unselected population-based cohort...

  7. THE INCIDENCE OF BENDER-GESTALT FIGURE DEVIATIONS IN A GROUP OF MENTALLY RETARDED PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS

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    Habibollah Ghassemzadeh

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bender-Gestalt Test was given to thirty mentally-retarded psychiatric patients. The mean, standard deviation, and standard error were 56.73, 26.25, and 4.80 respectively. Rotation was the most frequent major deviation which occurred in all the designs."nDesign # 7 was the most difficult one to be reproduced in the sample. This design by itself, was subject to 47% of distortion, 79% of omission, and 21% of rotation.

  8. Psychiatric symptomatology and personality in a population of primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Biała

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available introduction and objective. Psychiatric disorders (and their high rates of prevalence in primary care have been widely analyzed, but the problem of underdiagnosis remains unresolved. This becomes increasingly more important in rural health centres in the face of lack of epidemiological data from these centres. The aim of this study is focused on the relationship between general health, psychiatric symptomatology and personality characteristics in the context of an adequate diagnosis. materials and methods. 518 primary care patients in 6 Polish urban clinical centres were studied using (in order of administration: a sociodemographic questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R. results. The investigated sample was representative for urban primary care patients. The findings confirmed a significant association between neuroticism and general health. The strongest relation with current functioning and mental distress of the patients (GHQ general score was observed in case of symptoms of anxiety and insomnia. The symptoms of depression may be the most difficult to identify (psychiatric symptoms assessed using GHQ sub-scales. conclusions. According to the GHQ assumptions and confirmed by the presented study, sub-threshold psychiatric symptomatology affects the functioning of primary care patients and their general health. This correlates with personality factors. Improving adequacy of diagnosis becomes extremely important, as it may often be the only chance for appropriate therapy of mental problems for people living in rural areas due to lower availability of specialistic mental services. Further epidemiological studies concerning rural primary care and prevalence of the spectrum of mental disorders need to be conducted.

  9. Frequency of Psychiatric Disorders in Children of Opioid or Methamphetamine-Dependent Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Parvaresh, Noushin; Mazhari, Shahrzad; Nazari-Noghabi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background Addiction is one of the main problems of human societies, which is more common in developing countries. In addition, it causes to personal and social problems and family problem. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children 5-15 years old of opioid or methamphetamine dependence patients. Methods For this study, three groups including: (1) children of parents addicted to opium, (2) children of parents addicted to methamphetamine, and (3) c...

  10. The role of psychiatric symptoms, alexithymia, and maladaptive defenses in patients with functional dyspepsia

    OpenAIRE

    Mahbobeh Faramarzi; Javad Shokri-Shirvani; Farzan Kheirkhah

    2012-01-01

    Background: Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a condition commonly seen in gastroenterological practice. The pathophysiology of FD is likely to be multi-factorial and remains incompletely understood. Although evidence for a psychological etiology is growing, few researches have investigated the role of psychological factors in FD disease. The aim of the study was to assess the role of alexithymia, psychiatric symptoms, and defense mechanism in patients with FD. Materials and Methods: In a case-con...

  11. A Study of the Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with Methamphetamine-Induced Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Eslami-Shahrbabaki, Mahin; Fekrat, Alireza; Mazhari, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    Background The abuse of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances such as amphetamines and ecstasy has had a growing trend. Tachycardia, increased blood pressure, hallucinations, panic attacks, and psychosis are the negative effects of methamphetamine abuse. The present study aimed to assess psychiatric disorders associated with methamphetamine-induced psychotic disorder. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed from October 2013 to March 2014 on 165 patients hospitalized at Shahid B...

  12. Factors Associated with Readmission of Patients at a University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Barekatain; Mohammad Reza Maracy; Razeyeh Hassannejad; Reihane Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Readmission has a major role in the reduction of the quality of life and the increase in the years of lost life. The main objectives of this study were to answer to the following research questions. (a) What was the readmission rate? (b) What were the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to the Psychiatric Emergency Service at Nour University Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran? (c) What were the effective...

  13. Factors affecting hospital stay in psychiatric patients: the role of active comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Douzenis, Athanassios; Seretis, Dionysios; Nika, Stella; Nikolaidou, Paraskevi; Papadopoulou, Athanassia; Rizos, Emmanouil N; Christodoulou, Christos; Tsopelas, Christos; Mitchell, Dominic; Lykouras, Lefteris

    2012-01-01

    Background Research on length of stay (LOS) of psychiatric inpatients is an under-investigated issue. In this naturalistic study factors which affect LOS of two groups of patients were investigated, focusing on the impact on LOS of medical comorbidity severe enough to require referral. Methods Active medical comorbidity was quantified using referral as the criterion. The study sample consisted of 200 inpatients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia and 228 inpatients suffering from bipolar diso...

  14. Attitudes toward patient expertise in chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, S E; Ternulf Nyhlin, K; Paterson, B L

    2000-08-01

    Although it has become an accepted standard to acknowledge the patient as a full partner in health care decisions, replacing traditional authoritative relationships with those based on an emancipatory model, the experiences of persons living with chronic illness confirm that this paradigm shift is not yet apparent in many health care relationships. In this paper, the authors present a qualitative secondary analysis of combined data sets from their research into chronic illness experience with two quite different chronic diseases - Type I Diabetes (a socially legitimized chronic disease) and Environmental Sensitivities (a disease which is currently treated with considerable scepticism). Comparing the experiences of individuals with diseases that are quite differently socially constructed, it becomes possible to detect common underlying health professional values and attitudes that powerfully influence the experience of living with and negotiating health care for a chronic illness. In the discussion of findings from this study, the authors examine the implications of the spiral of behaviors that fuels mutual alienation in chronic illness care relationships if professionals are unable to value patient expertise.

  15. Cross-cultural adaptation to Brazil of Medication Adherence Rating Scale for psychiatric patients

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    Icaro Carvalho Moreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this research was to make a cross-cultural adaptation of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS for psychiatric patients to the Brazilian context. Methods The procedure consisted of four phases: translation of the original scale, back-translation, review by an Expert Committee and Pre-test study with a patients’ sample. Results The Expert Committee corrected the items’ translation when necessary and modified the scale administration format and its instructions from self-report to face-to-face interview form in order to ensure easy understanding by the target population. During Pre-test, the instructions and most of the items were properly understood by patients, with the exception of three of them which had to be changed in order to ensure better understanding. The Pre-test sample was composed by 30 psychiatric patients, with severe and persistent disorders mainly single (46.7%, female (60.0%, with a mean age of 43.8 years old and an average of five years of education. Conclusion The Brazilian version of MARS scale is now adapted to the Brazilian Portuguese language and culture and is easily understood by the psychiatric target population. It is necessary to do further research to evaluate the scale psychometric qualities of validity and reliability in order to use it in Brazil.

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychiatric Comorbidity in a Patient with Charles Bonnet Syndrome

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    Jasper J. Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A significant proportion of patients with neurological disorders may have comorbid psychiatric symptomology, which may be managed by primary outpatient neurologists. Referral to their psychiatric colleagues is mediated by available consultation-liaison units and according to clinical opinion. Aims of Case Report. We present the case of a patient whose initial referral to epilepsy clinic led to a workup which ultimately diagnosed her with nonepileptic seizures (NES. In the course of her follow-up, she developed intractable headaches, and worsening mood symptoms and eventually exhibited Psychotic Features for which psychiatry became coinvolved in her care. Major Depression with Psychotic Features and Charles Bonnet syndrome were considered as a likely comorbid diagnoses. Her pharmacologic management on venlafaxine and quetiapine eventually caused substantial amelioration of her psychiatric symptomology as longitudinally followed by PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores. Conclusion. Optimal evaluation and management of mental illness in patients with complex neurologic symptomology may require independent evaluation and treatment by psychiatrists when clinically appropriate.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric comorbidity in a patient with charles bonnet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jasper J

    2014-01-01

    Background. A significant proportion of patients with neurological disorders may have comorbid psychiatric symptomology, which may be managed by primary outpatient neurologists. Referral to their psychiatric colleagues is mediated by available consultation-liaison units and according to clinical opinion. Aims of Case Report. We present the case of a patient whose initial referral to epilepsy clinic led to a workup which ultimately diagnosed her with nonepileptic seizures (NES). In the course of her follow-up, she developed intractable headaches, and worsening mood symptoms and eventually exhibited Psychotic Features for which psychiatry became coinvolved in her care. Major Depression with Psychotic Features and Charles Bonnet syndrome were considered as a likely comorbid diagnoses. Her pharmacologic management on venlafaxine and quetiapine eventually caused substantial amelioration of her psychiatric symptomology as longitudinally followed by PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores. Conclusion. Optimal evaluation and management of mental illness in patients with complex neurologic symptomology may require independent evaluation and treatment by psychiatrists when clinically appropriate.

  18. The effects of undertreated chronic medical illnesses in patients with severe mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiolini, Andrea; Goracci, Arianna

    2009-01-01

    Severe mental disorders such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia often co-occur with chronic medical illnesses, especially cardiovascular disease and diabetes. These comorbidities are associated with a more severe course of mental illness, reduced quality of life, and premature mortality. Although the association between mental disorders and physical health complications has long been recognized, medical conditions remain undertreated in clinical psychiatric practice, and the life expectancy for individuals with serious psychiatric disorders is approximately 30% shorter than that of the general US population. Factors that are related to the mental illness (eg, cognitive impairment, reduced ability to function, and a lack of communication skills) as well as factors such as the high cost of medical care may make accessing general health care a difficult task for patients. Even when medical care is received by patients, the quality is often poor, and dangerous illnesses may be undiagnosed and untreated. In addition, harmful side effects of medications used to treat psychiatric disorders, unhealthy habits and lifestyles, and a possible genetic susceptibility to medical conditions increase the likelihood of comorbid physical conditions in patients with severe mental illness. Implementing behavioral interventions into clinical practice may help patients improve their overall health and prevent chronic medical conditions. PMID:19570498

  19. A study on first intake assessments of in-patient referrals to psychiatric rehabilitation services

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    Geetha Desai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric rehabilitation is an important component in mental health services. The rehabilitation needs of patients with mental illness have been highlighted in various studies. The studies on in-patient referrals to rehabilitation services however are sparse. This study describes the clinical and demographic details and the reasons for referrals to rehabilitation services during the in-patients stay. Materials and Methods: A semi-structured pro forma was used for the assessment of in-patients referred for the psychiatric rehabilitation services. The pro forma included socio-demographic details such as background, family resources, illness related details such as symptom status, risk assessment, medication details. The total number of referrals for a period of 5 months was collected and coded. Results: The total number of referrals for a period of 5 months was 216 and there were 197 forms available for the study. The mean age of the sample was 31.48 ± 10.46 years. Vocational rehabilitation was the commonest reason for referral to the in-patient services. Severe mental disorders were the most common diagnosis of patients refereed to the services. Conclusions: Patients with severe mental illness were most often referred to the in-patient services. This indicates that we need include to rehabilitation in the management plan at the earliest. Vocational rehabilitation is the most common reason for referrals and there is a need to develop services to cater to these needs.

  20. EVALUATION OF PSYCHIATRIC DISABILITY AMONG PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA IN RELATION TO MARITAL STATUS: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

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    Rasamsetti Vijaya Kranthi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The marital adjustment is a process in which an individual or a couple modifies, adopts or changes their behaviour pattern and interaction to gain the maximum satisfaction in their relationship. Schizophrenia is a chronic mental illness associated with major disability in several spears of a person’s functioning. Most of the previous studies shows that schizophrenia associated with adverse outcome on marriage. This study conducted to evaluate how disability due to schizophrenia related to marriage in these patients. AIM The study was undertaken to evaluate and correlate psychiatric disability in relation to marital status in patients with schizophrenia. MATERIAL AND METHODS It is a cross-sectional study in a tertiary care psychiatric hospital in 162 patients who was diagnosed of schizophrenia as per ICD - 10 criteria and on regular treatment for the past one year. Sample consists of three groups married, unmarried (never married and single (widow, divorcee and single. IDEAS rating applied on all the subjects to evaluate disability and the result was analysed by t-test and ANOVA using SPSS 13.0 version. RESULTS Out of 162 patients with schizophrenia 81 married, 31 single and 50 unmarried. The mean disability score was (7.78 showing high disability in schizophrenia patients. Married patients group had more cases with mild disability scores and single and unmarried patients group had more cases with moderate-to-severe disability scores (Chi-square = 13.851 and p-value = 0.008. Mean disability score (9.12 was high in unmarried group. The marital status was significantly associated with disability (F-value = 3.622 and pvalue = 0.029. Males reported high disability than females, but gender was not showing significant association with disability. Both male and female married patients had less disability. CONCLUSIONS Schizophrenia patients were showing higher disability and majority (50% eligible for welfare benefits. Unmarried and single

  1. [Psychological and psychiatric problems in cancer patients: relationship to the localization of the disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussas, G I; Papadopoulou, A G; Christodoulaki, A G; Karkanias, A P

    2012-01-01

    Cancer may be localized in a variety of areas in the human body. This localization is associated with significant issues concerning not only therapy and prognosis but also psychological and psychiatric problems that the patient may be confronted with. The psychic impact on the patient is determined to a significant degree by the symbolism the affected organ carries. The symbolic significance of a sick body area triggers emotions and sets in motion self-defence mechanisms. In this way, patients deal with the new psychic reality that cancer creates. Therapeutic choices may include interventions, involving mutilation, which cause disfigurement and major consequences in the body image which result in narcissistic injuries. The phenomenology of anxiety and depressive disorders is connected to the affected body area. The appearance of cancer not only in sexual organs but also in other body areas, may disturb sexual function and therefore lead to sexual disorders. Especially, head and neck are connected with vital functions. This area of the body has had a major impact on psychic reality since early life. Complicated psychic functions have developed in relation to organs of the head and neck. Therefore, localization of cancer in this area leads to individual psychological and psychiatric problems, since eating and breathing are harmed, verbal communication becomes difficult and body image alters. Also, increased incidence of alcohol and nicotine abuse in these patients reflects special aspects of psychic structure and personality. Because of severe somatic symptoms and poor prognosis, lung cancer patients feel hopelessness and helplessness. Patients with gynaecological cancer are confronted with a disease that affects organs like breast and internal female sexual organs associated with femininity, attractiveness and fertility. Dietary habits are often a source of guilt for patients who suffer from cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, stomas, as colostomy

  2. Education for Life: Assessment of the Role of a Recreational Programme in the Rehabilitation of Day Patients in a Psychiatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Robert

    1984-01-01

    With a working definition of rehabilitation, the author assesses the therapeutic recreation program at a psychiatric hospital to determine whether it enabled psychiatric day patients to overcome social disabilities and make a full return to community life. (SK)

  3. Psychiatric diagnoses, medication and risk for disability pension in multiple sclerosis patients; a population-based register study.

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    Philip Brenner

    Full Text Available Psychiatric comorbidity is common among multiple sclerosis (MS patients. The majority of MS patients of working ages are on disability pension. The aims of this study were to chart the prevalences of psychiatric diagnoses and medications among MS patients of working ages, and to investigate their association with the risk for future disability pension.This nationwide, population-based prospective cohort study includes 10,750 MS patients and 5,553,141 non-MS individuals who in 2005 were aged 17-64 years. Psychiatric diagnoses and medications were identified using nationwide registers. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated adjusting for socio-demographics. Furthermore, a survival analysis with five-year follow-up was performed among the 4,571 MS patients not on disability pension in 2005, with psychiatric diagnoses and medication as risk factors, and disability pension as the outcome.Among MS patients, 35% had been prescribed psychiatric medication compared to 10% of non-MS individuals, adjusted OR 3.72 (95% CI 3.57 to 3.88. Ten percent of MS patients had received a psychiatric diagnosis, compared to 5.7% of non-MS individuals, OR 1.82 (95% CI 1.71 to 1.94. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, were the most commonly prescribed drugs (17% among MS patients, while depression (4.8% was the most common psychiatric diagnosis. In the survival analysis, MS patients with any psychiatric diagnosis had a hazard ratio (HR of 1.83 (95% CI 1.53 to 2.18 for disability pension compared to other MS patients. MS patients with any psychiatric drug prescription had a HR for disability pension of 2.09 (95% CI 1.84 to 2.33.Psychiatric diagnoses and medications are common among MS patients and adversely affect risk for disability pension. This highlights the importance of correct diagnosis and management of psychiatric comorbidity, in a clinical as well as in a societal perspective.

  4. A systematic review of music therapy practice and outcomes with acute adult psychiatric in-patients.

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    Catherine Carr

    Full Text Available There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported.A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis.98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions.No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to develop specific music therapy models for this

  5. The revolving door phenomenon revisited: time to readmission in 17’145 [corrected] patients with 37'697 hospitalisations at a German psychiatric hospital.

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    Ulrich Frick

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite the recurring nature of the disease process in many psychiatric patients, individual careers and time to readmission rarely have been analysed by statistical models that incorporate sequence and velocity of recurrent hospitalisations. This study aims at comparing four statistical models specifically designed for recurrent event history analysis and evaluating the potential impact of predictor variables from different sources (patient, treatment process, social environment. METHOD: The so called Andersen-Gil counting process model, two variants of the conditional models of Prentice, Williams, and Peterson (gap time model, conditional probability model, and the so called frailty model were applied to a dataset of 17’145 [corrected] patients observed during a 12 years period starting from 1996 and leading to 37’697 psychiatric hospitalisations Potential prognostic factors stem from a standardized patient documentation form. RESULTS: Estimated regression coefficients over different models were highly similar, but the frailty model best represented the sequentiality of individual treatment careers and differing velocities of disease progression. It also avoided otherwise likely misinterpretations of the impact of gender, partnership, historical time and length of stay. A widespread notion of psychiatric diseases as inevitably chronic and worsening could be rejected. Time in community was found to increase over historical time for all patients. Most important protective factors beyond diagnosis were employment, partnership, and sheltered living situation. Risky conditions were urban living and a concurrent substance use disorder. CONCLUSION: Prognostic factors for course of diseases should be determined only by statistical models capable of adequately incorporating the recurrent nature of psychiatric illnesses.

  6. Malnutrition in patients with chronic renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Abdul Rashid Tony

    2000-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is common in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) and may contribute to a poor clinical outcome. However, the role of nutrition in this regard has not been clearly defined. Malnutrition in patients with CRF may have many causes, including disturbances in protein and energy metabolism, hormonal derangements, as well as low food intake because of anorexia, caused by uremic toxicity, various superimposed illnesses and psychosocial problems. Alth...

  7. Patient concerns regarding chronic hepatitis C infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuk, G Y; Gutkin, A; Wong, S G; Kaita, K D E

    2005-01-01

    Counselling of patients with chronic hepatitis C infections is often limited to discussions regarding how the virus is transmitted and what can be done to decrease the risk of transmission to others. The purpose of the present study was to document the principal concerns of newly diagnosed and follow-up patients with chronic hepatitis C, and thereby enhance counselling strategies and content. Seventy newly diagnosed and 115 follow-up patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were initially asked in an open-ended manner (volunteered concerns) and then to prioritize from a prepared list of seven potential concerns (prioritized concerns), to identify those concerns that were of utmost importance to them. The most common volunteered concerns of newly diagnosed patients in decreasing order were: disease progression (27%), premature death (19%), infecting family members (13%), side-effects of treatment (11%) and miscellaneous others. In decreasing order, prioritized concerns included: infecting family members, development of liver cancer, infecting others, development of cirrhosis, social stigma of having liver disease, need for liver transplant and loss of employment. The principal volunteered and prioritized concerns of follow-up patients were similar to those of newly diagnosed patients. Volunteered and prioritized concerns were relatively consistent across the different genders, age groups, ethnic backgrounds, education level, marital status, employment, modes of viral acquisition and in the case of follow-up patients, duration of follow-up. These results indicate that health care providers who focus counselling efforts exclusively on viral transmission are unlikely to address other important concerns of newly diagnosed and follow-up patients with chronic HCV infection. PMID:15655048

  8. The assessment of dynamic risk among forensic psychiatric patients transitioning to the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Stephanie R; Marshall, Lisa A; Simpson, Alexander I F

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with serious mental illness (SMI; i.e., psychotic or major mood disorders) are vulnerable to experiencing multiple forms of adverse safety events in community settings, including violence perpetration and victimization. This study investigates the predictive validity and clinical utility of modifiable risk factors for violence in a sample of 87 forensic psychiatric patients found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder (NCRMD) transitioning to the community. Using a repeated-measures prospective design, we assessed theoretically based dynamic risk factors (e.g., insight, psychiatric symptoms, negative affect, treatment compliance) before hospital discharge, and at 1 and 6 months postdischarge. Adverse outcomes relevant to this population (e.g., violence, victimization, hospital readmission) were measured at each community follow-up, and at 12 months postdischarge. The base rate of violence (23%) was similar to prior studies of discharged psychiatric patients, but results also highlighted elevated rates of victimization (29%) and hospital readmission (28%) characterizing this sample. Many of the dynamic risk indicators exhibited significant change across time and this change was related to clinically relevant outcomes. Specifically, while controlling for baseline level of risk, fluctuations in dynamic risk factors predicted the likelihood of violence and hospital readmission most consistently (hazard ratios [HR] = 1.35-1.84). Results provide direct support for the utility of dynamic factors in the assessment of violence risk and other adverse community outcomes, and emphasize the importance of incorporating time-sensitive methodologies into predictive models examining dynamic risk. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26914860

  9. Qualitative study on the placement of Huntington disease patients in a psychiatric hospital: perceptions of Maltese nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Josianne; Cassar, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with adult or juvenile Huntington disease can be cared for within psychiatric hospitals. In this paper, nurses' perceptions about the appropriateness of a psychiatric setting for these patients were explored. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 Maltese nurses involved in the care of these individuals. Their responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified from this study: (i) Huntington disease is not a mental illness; (ii) the lack of specialized staff and equipment within a psychiatric setting; and (iii) a need for alternative care options. The findings provide an insight into the perceptions of nurses, as they play a key role in the care and management of individuals with Huntington disease in a psychiatric setting. The findings demonstrated the need to provide alternative residential options in the community, and to improve the care and support provided both within psychiatric hospitals and the community through staff education and the provision of necessary facilities and equipment.

  10. Factors influencing treatment team recommendations to review tribunals for forensic psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Krystle; Martin, Erica

    2016-07-01

    It is the responsibility of forensic psychiatric hospitals to detain and treat patients, gradually reintegrating them into society; decisions to release patients must balance risk to the public with maintaining the least restrictive environment for patients. Little is known about the factors considered when making such decisions and whether these factors have been empirically linked to future risk of violence. The current study explores the factors predictive of forensic treatment teams' recommendations for patients under the care of the Ontario Review Board (ORB). Factors differ depending on level of security; decisions on medium secure units were influenced by the presence of active symptoms and patients' overall violence risk level and decisions made on minimum secure units were influenced by the number of critical incidents that occurred within the recommendation year. Understanding the factors used to make recommendations to the ORB tribunal helps treatment teams to reflect on their own decision-making practices. Furthermore, the results serve to inform us about factors that influence length of stay for forensic psychiatric patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27147124

  11. The medication process in a psychiatric hospital: are errors a potential threat to patient safety?

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    Soerensen AL

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ann Lykkegaard Soerensen,1,2 Marianne Lisby,3 Lars Peter Nielsen,4 Birgitte Klindt Poulsen,4 Jan Mainz5,6 1Faculty of Social Sciences and of Health Sciences, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; 2Department of Nursing, University College of Northern Denmark, Aalborg, Denmark; 3Research Centre of Emergency Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 4Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 5Aalborg Psychiatric University hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 6Department for Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark Purpose: To investigate the frequency, type, and potential severity of errors in several stages of the medication process in an inpatient psychiatric setting. Methods: A cross-sectional study using three methods for detecting errors: (1 direct observation; (2 unannounced control visits in the wards collecting dispensed drugs; and (3 chart reviews. All errors, except errors in discharge summaries, were assessed for potential consequences by two clinical pharmacologists. Setting: Three psychiatric wards with adult patients at Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark, from January 2010–April 2010. The observational unit: The individual handling of medication (prescribing, dispensing, and administering. Results: In total, 189 errors were detected in 1,082 opportunities for error (17% of which 84/998 (8% were assessed as potentially harmful. The frequency of errors was: prescribing, 10/189 (5%; dispensing, 18/189 (10%; administration, 142/189 (75%; and discharge summaries, 19/189 (10%. The most common errors were omission of pro re nata dosing regime in computerized physician order entry, omission of dose, lack of identity control, and omission of drug. Conclusion: Errors throughout the medication process are common in psychiatric wards to an extent which resembles error rates in somatic care. Despite a substantial proportion of errors with potential to harm patients, very

  12. Psychosocial characteristics of oromucosal diseases in psychiatric patients: Observational study from Indian dental college

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    K V Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric diseases like anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders can affect the mental and physical statuses of an individual. Aim: The study was to investigate the different oromucosal diseases (OMD in psychiatric patients and to evaluate the correlation between these OMD to severity of anxiety and depression. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out during a six-month period. Patients reporting to psychiatry department with anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder as diagnosed by an experienced psychiatrist, were subjected to complete oral examination by a skilled oral diagnostician to check for OMD like oral lichen planus (OLP, aphthous stomatitis (AS and burning mouth syndrome (BMS. During the above mentioned time interval, 1320 patients with any of the above mentioned psychiatric diseases were included in this study. Of these, 278 had anxiety, 398 had depression, 295 had schizophrenia and 349 had bipolar disorder. Equal number of individuals reported to the Oral Medicine and Radiology department for routine oral screening with no mucosal diseases were included as control group. Results: In this study, statistically significant increase in the OMD of the psychiatric patients was recorded when compared with the control group. The OMD were significantly higher in patients with anxiety (20.86% followed by patients with depression (9.04%, schizophrenia (7.7%, bipolar disorder (7.4% and control group (5.17%, respectively. Most prevalent OMD in patients with anxiety was AS (12% followed by OLP (5.7%, and BMS (2.87% respectively. Patients with moderate to severe anxiety and depression showed significantly higher prevalence of these OMD compared to the ones with mild anxiety and depression. The AS and OLP were significantly more in the younger age group (18-49 year and BMS was higher in 50-77 year age group in both the study and control groups. Conclusion: A positive association was

  13. Information on antidepressants for psychiatric inpatients: the divide between patient needs and professional practice

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    Desplenter FA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicine information is an integral part of patient care and a patient right. In particular, patients with a mental health diagnosis have a need for information on medicines. Objective: This study aims to describe the current practice on information provision on antidepressants to inpatients in psychiatric hospitals.Methods: A qualitative study was conducted consisting of semi-structured interviews with health care professionals (n=46 and patients (n=17 in 11 Flemish psychiatric hospitals. Two topic guides were designed for conducting the interviews with these respective stakeholders. The issues addressed in the topic guides related to: organization of information provision in the hospital, information on demand of the patient, information provision by health care professionals, information for relatives, evaluation of provided information, interdisciplinary contacts on information provision and satisfaction on current practice of information provision. The interviews were analysed according to the five stages of the framework analysis.Results: Psychiatrists and nurses are the key players to provide information on antidepressants. Their approach depends on patient characteristics and mental state. Information is provided mainly orally. Health care professionals consider non-verbal cues of patients to verify if information has been understood. Health care professionals reported lack of time and lack of interdisciplinary contacts as negative aspects. Patients indicated that health care professionals take too little initiative to provide medicine information. Conclusions: Patients are informed about their antidepressants through various pathways. Although the awareness is present of the importance of the individual approach and efforts are done to tailor information to the individual patient, improvement is still possible. Tailoring communication; assessing patient needs and preferences; matching of health care professional style and

  14. STUDY ON PSYCHIATRIC CO - MORBIDITY IN PSORIASIS

    OpenAIRE

    Shrikant B.; Parth S; Ashish V; Mundhada

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is relatively common , chronic inflammatory and hyper - proliferative skin disease that affects 1.4% to 2.0% of the population. Presence of itching , chronic recurrent course of disease and incomplete cure may contribute to great deal of psychiatric co - morbidity in these patients. the most persuasive indications of a link between stress and psoriasis comes from patients themselves , with studies illustrating that the m...

  15. Factors affecting hospital stay in psychiatric patients: the role of active comorbidity

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    Douzenis Athanassios

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on length of stay (LOS of psychiatric inpatients is an under-investigated issue. In this naturalistic study factors which affect LOS of two groups of patients were investigated, focusing on the impact on LOS of medical comorbidity severe enough to require referral. Methods Active medical comorbidity was quantified using referral as the criterion. The study sample consisted of 200 inpatients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia and 228 inpatients suffering from bipolar disorder (type I or II. Jonckheere and Mann–Whitney tests were used to estimate the influence of referrals on LOS, and regression analyses isolated variables associated with LOS separately for each group. Results Half of the patients needed one or more referrals for a non-psychiatric problem. The most common medical condition of patients with bipolar disorder was arterial hypertension. Inpatients with schizophrenia suffered mostly from an endocrine/metabolic disease - 12% of referrals were for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. A positive linear trend was found between LOS and number of referrals; the effect was greater for schizophrenia patients. The effect of referrals on LOS was verified by regression in both groups. Overall, referred patients showed greater improvement in GAF compared to controls. Conclusions To our knowledge this was the first study to investigate physical comorbidity in psychiatric inpatients using the criterion of referral to medical subspecialties. Comorbidity severe enough to warrant referral is a significant determinant of hospital stay. This insight may prove useful in health care planning. The results show lack of effective community care in the case of schizophrenia and negative symptoms may be the cause of this. Our findings call for more attention to be paid to the general medical needs of inpatients with severe mental health and concurrent severe medical comorbidity.

  16. Psychosocial interventions for patients with chronic disease

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    Deter Hans-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treatment of patients with chronic diseases will be one of the main challenges of medicine in the future. This paper presents an overview of different origins, mechanism, and symptoms necessary for understanding new and different interventions that include a psychosomatic view. In a psychosomatic therapeutic intervention there are very different targets, such as psychological symptoms, personality traits, attitudes toward disease and life, risk behaviour, and social isolation and as biological targets the change of autonomic imbalance and of the effects of the psycho-endocrinological or psycho-immunological stress responses. And there are also different psychosomatic measures that influence the individual biological, psychological and sociological targets. There is a need to give different answer to different questions in the field of psychosomatic and behavioral medicine. Comparative effectiveness research is an important strategy for solving some methodological issues. What is the target of treatment for different diseases: Symptom reduction, healing, or limiting progression to the worst case - the death of patients. We know that, the patient-physician relationship is important for every medical/therapeutic action for patients with chronic diseases. This volume of BioPsychoSocial Medicine will present four different psychosomatic treatment studies from the clinical field in the sense of phase 2 studies: Reports of patients with obesity, anorexia nervosa, chronic somatoform pain and coronary artery disease were presented

  17. [Relationship between the courses of clinical Features of patients with schizophrenia in adolescents and admission to psychiatric clinic].

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    Hattori, Isao; Miyauchi, Toshiro

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve diagnosis of schizophrenia with onset in adolescents at an early stage, we investigated in detail the clinical features of 74 patients with schizophrenia, (23 males) at adolescents psychiatric clinic. Many of the subjects had been suffering from the illness about 14 years old but had not undergone their first psychiatric examination until a few years later. A high percentage (more than 80%) of our subjects presented psychiatric symptoms such as delusional remembrance, delusional moods, delusions of persecution and hypobulia. Additionally, more than 60% of our subjects presented auditory hallucinations. In general, teenage patients with schizophrenia onset show vague symptoms such as anxiety, embarrassment and strange moods rather than obvious hallucinations. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify certain clinical features of this disorder in adolescents: many patients suffer delusional remembrance, delusional moods and delusions of persecution immediately after the onset of the illness. Gradually, problematic behaviors such as anorexia, self injury, offences against their families, voluntary vomiting, etc., develop, but patients do not always receive psychiatric examination at this stage. After socially obvious problems such as school refusal, withdrawal from social activities and lowering of school record develop over a period of time, patients may be urged to undergo psychiatric examination. Our research again underlines the difficulty of achieving diagnosis of schizophrenia at an early stage. The key to early diagnosis appears to be the accurate identification of psychiatric symptoms in the early stages of the illness at school, or at home if possible, before socially problematic behaviors arise.

  18. Comparison between patient characteristics and cranial MR findings in chronic thinner intoxication

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    Uchino, Akira; Kato, Akira; Yoshikai, Tomonori; Kudo, Sho [Department of Radiology, Saga Medical School, Nabeshima (Japan); Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Hiejima, Shigeto; Murakami, Masaru; Endoh, Koichi [Department of Psychiatry, Hizen National Hospital, Saga (Japan); Takashima, Yuki [Department of Neurology, Hizen National Hospital, Saga (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Chronic thinner intoxication is one of the most serious social problems among teenagers and young adults in Japan. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical characteristics of patients with thinner intoxication who had positive MR findings. During the past 4 years, cranial MR imaging of 85 patients (51 males and 34 females) with chronic thinner intoxication was done at a national psychiatric hospital. The MR imaging was performed on a 1.0-T scanner with use of standard pulse sequences including fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). The established characteristic MR findings of chronic thinner intoxication were observed in 8 of the 85 patients: 4 males and 4 females. The female patients tended toward emaciation and were approximately 5 years younger than the male patients. Six of the 8 patients had severe neurological symptoms such as cerebellar ataxia and decreased visual acuity. In contrast, only 3 of 77 (4%) patients with normal MR findings had mild neurological abnormalities such as tremor. If patients with chronic thinner intoxication have significant neurological symptoms, MR imaging should be performed for evaluation of brain abnormalities. Emaciated female patients may be particularly vulnerable to neurological damage caused by thinner intoxication. (orig.)

  19. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Patients from the Addictive Disorders Assistance Units of Galicia: The COPSIAD Study.

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    César Pereiro

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in patients under treatment within the addictive disorders assistance units of Galicia (Spain.A total of 64 healthcare professionals performed clinical diagnosis of mental disorders (on DSM IV-TR criteria in 2300 patients treated throughout March 2010 in 21 addictive disorders assistance units.56.3% of patients with substance abuse/dependency also showed some other mental disorder, 42.2% of patients suffering from at least an Axis I condition and 20.2% from some Axis II condition. Mood and anxiety disorders and borderline and antisocial personality disorders were the most frequent disorders in both axes.A high comorbidity was found between mental and substance use disorders (SUD in patients seen at the addictive disorders assistance units of Galicia.

  20. [Anticoagulation in patients with chronic renal failure].

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    Niksic, L; Saudan, P; Boehlen, F

    2006-03-01

    Anticoagulation may be difficult to implement in patients suffering from chronic renal failure on account of platelet disorders and impaired clearance of some anticoagulant drugs. Although no adjustment of heparin and coumarin dosage is necessary, more frequent testing of coagulation pathways may be required when these drugs are used in patients with renal failure. Long-term use of LMWH should be implemented cautiously with regular testing of anti-factor Xa activity and a half-dose may be advocated in patients with a creatinine clearance heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with regular monitoring of coagulation tests. PMID:16562602

  1. Acinarcellcarcinomaofthepancreasina young patient with chronic pancreatitis

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    Fatima-Zahra Kebir; Ahlem Lahmar; Nafaa Arfa; Saber Manai; Mohamed Ali El Ouaer; Saadia Bouraoui; Carole Gouttalier; Sabah Mezabi-Regaya

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy of the pancreas arising from acinar cells. Unlike ductal adenocarcinoma, this tumor rarely presents with pancreatitis. METHODS: We present a case of ACC associated with chronic calcifying pancreatitis, and a review of the literature focusing on diagnosis and management. RESULTS: A 43-year-old man was proposed for Wirsungo-jejunal derivation for chronic pancreatitis. Histopathological examination of the tissue extracted revealed an ACC. Duodenopancreatectomy was performed. Six months post-operatively, the patient developed hepatic metastasis and was treated with gemcitabine as palliative chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical presentation of ACC of the pancreas is not speciifc and the tumor can be under-diagnosed when associated with chronic pancreatitis. Data regarding course, treatment, and prognosis of this tumor are generally lacking.

  2. Evaluation of factors associated with psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan

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    Minamisawa, Atsumi; Narumoto, Jin; Yokota, Isao; Fukui, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient dropout from treatment can lead to a deterioration in clinical condition, thereby increasing the need for more intensive therapy that incurs substantial social and economic losses. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan. Methods We retrospectively examined the medical charts of new psychiatric patients who were diagnosed with either a mood disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, code: F3) or an anxiety disorder (F4) in the outpatient clinic at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Hospital in Kyoto, Japan, between April 2010 and March 2013. The baseline characteristics of the patients (age, sex, Global Assessment of Functioning score, Clinical Global Impression–Severity of Illness score, education, occupation, marital status, duration of treatment, and prior treatment history), treating psychiatrist experience in years, and sex concordance between the patients and their treating psychiatrists were analyzed using Cox regression models. Results From among 1,626 eligible new patients during the study period, 532 patients were enrolled in the study (F3: n=176; F4: n=356). The dropout rate was 35.7%, which was similar to that of previous studies. Higher educational level, being married, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores were associated with a lower dropout rate. Although psychiatrist experience was not significantly associated with patient dropout in the multivariate analysis, patients treated by less experienced psychiatrists had a higher hazard ratio for dropout (1.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.94–1.85). Conclusion In order to reduce the dropout rate, special focus should be placed on patients with the factors identified in this study, and young psychiatrists should undergo further education to foster adherence.

  3. Psychiatric stigma in treatment seeking adults with personality problems: evidence from a sample of 214 patients.

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    Kirsten eCatthoor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stigmatization is a major hindrance in adult psychiatric patients with Axis-I diagnoses, as shown consistently in most studies. Significantly fewer studies on the emergence of psychiatric stigma in adult patients with personality disorders exist, although the resulting evidence is conclusive. Some authors consider patients with personality disorders at risk for severe stigmatization because of intense difficulties during interpersonal contact, even in a psychotherapeutic relationship. The aim of this study was primarily the assessment of pre-existing stigma in patients referred for intensive treatment for personality disorders. The study enrolled 214 patients admitted to the adult department of a highly specialized mental health care institute offering psychotherapy for patients with severe and complex personality pathology. All patients underwent a standard assessment with self-report questionnaires and a semi-structured interview to measure Axis II personality disorders. The Stigma Consciousness Questionnaire (SCQ and the Perceived Devaluation-Discrimination Questionnaire (DDQ, both validated instruments, were used to measure perceived and actual experiences of stigma. Independent sample t-tests were used to investigate differences in the mean total stigma scores for patients both with and without a personality disorder. One-way ANOVA’s were performed to assess the differences between having a borderline personality disorder, another personality disorder, or no personality disorder diagnosis.Multiple regression main effect analyses were conducted in order to explore the impact of the different personality disorder diagnosis on the level of stigma. The mean scores across all patient groups were consistent with rather low stigma. No differences were found for patients with or without a personality disorder diagnosis. Level of stigma in general was not associated with an accumulating number of personality disorders.

  4. Neuropsychological Impairment and Its Association with Violence Risk in Japanese Forensic Psychiatric Patients: A Case-Control Study

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    Nishinaka, Hirofumi; Nakane, Jun; Nagata, Takako; Imai, Atsushi; Kuroki, Noriomi; Sakikawa, Noriko; Omori, Mayu; Kuroda, Osamu; Hirabayashi, Naotsugu; Igarashi, Yoshito; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background In Japan, the legislation directing treatment of offenders with psychiatric disorders was enacted in 2005. Neuropsychological impairment is highly related to functional outcomes in patients with psychiatric disorders, and several studies have suggested an association between neuropsychological impairment and violent behaviors. However, there have been no studies of neuropsychological impairment in forensic patients covered by the Japanese legislation. This study is designed to examine the neuropsychological characteristics of forensic patients in comparison to healthy controls and to assess the relationship between neuropsychological impairment and violence risk. Methods Seventy-one forensic patients with psychiatric disorders and 54 healthy controls (matched by age, gender, and education) were enrolled. The CogState Battery (CSB) consisting of eight cognitive domains, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to test emotion-based decision making, and psychological measures of violence risk including psychopathy were used. Results Forensic patients exhibited poorer performances on all CSB subtests and the IGT than controls. For each group, partial correlational analyses indicated that poor IGT performance was related to psychopathy, especially antisocial behavior. In forensic patients, the CSB composite score was associated with risk factors for future violent behavior, including stress and noncompliance with remediation attempts. Conclusion Forensic patients with psychiatric disorders exhibit a wide range of neuropsychological impairments, and these findings suggest that neuropsychological impairment may increase the risk of violent behavior. Therefore, the treatment of neuropsychological impairment in forensic patients with psychiatric disorders is necessary to improve functional outcomes as well as to prevent violence. PMID:26824701

  5. Neuropsychological Impairment and Its Association with Violence Risk in Japanese Forensic Psychiatric Patients: A Case-Control Study.

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    Hirofumi Nishinaka

    Full Text Available In Japan, the legislation directing treatment of offenders with psychiatric disorders was enacted in 2005. Neuropsychological impairment is highly related to functional outcomes in patients with psychiatric disorders, and several studies have suggested an association between neuropsychological impairment and violent behaviors. However, there have been no studies of neuropsychological impairment in forensic patients covered by the Japanese legislation. This study is designed to examine the neuropsychological characteristics of forensic patients in comparison to healthy controls and to assess the relationship between neuropsychological impairment and violence risk.Seventy-one forensic patients with psychiatric disorders and 54 healthy controls (matched by age, gender, and education were enrolled. The CogState Battery (CSB consisting of eight cognitive domains, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT to test emotion-based decision making, and psychological measures of violence risk including psychopathy were used.Forensic patients exhibited poorer performances on all CSB subtests and the IGT than controls. For each group, partial correlational analyses indicated that poor IGT performance was related to psychopathy, especially antisocial behavior. In forensic patients, the CSB composite score was associated with risk factors for future violent behavior, including stress and noncompliance with remediation attempts.Forensic patients with psychiatric disorders exhibit a wide range of neuropsychological impairments, and these findings suggest that neuropsychological impairment may increase the risk of violent behavior. Therefore, the treatment of neuropsychological impairment in forensic patients with psychiatric disorders is necessary to improve functional outcomes as well as to prevent violence.

  6. The experience of admission to psychiatric hospital among Chinese adult patients in Hong Kong

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    Lam Linda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paper reports on a study to evaluate the psychometric properties and cultural appropriateness of the Chinese translation of the Admission Experience Survey (AES. Methods The AES was translated into Chinese and back-translated. Content validity was established by focus groups and expert panel review. The Chinese version of the Admission Experience Survey (C-AES was administered to 135 consecutively recruited adult psychiatric patients in the Castle Peak Hospital (Hong Kong SAR, China within 48 hours of admission. Construct validity was assessed by comparing the scores from patients admitted voluntarily versus patients committed involuntarily, and those received physical or chemical restraint versus those who did not. The relationship between admission experience and psychopathology was examined by correlating C-AES scores with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS scores. Results Spearman's item-to-total correlations of the C-AES ranged from 0.50 to 0.74. Three factors from the C-AES were extracted using factor analysis. Item 12 was omitted because of poor internal consistency and factor loading. The factor structure of the Process Exclusion Scale (C-PES corresponded to the English version, while some discrepancies were noted in the Perceived Coercion Scale (C-PCS and the Negative Pressure Scale (C-NPS. All subscales had good internal consistencies. Scores were significantly higher for patients either committed involuntarily or subjected to chemical or physical restrain, independent on severity of psychotic symptoms. Conclusion The Chinese AES is a psychometrically sound instrument assessing the three different aspects of the experience of admission, namely "negative pressure, "process exclusion" and "perceived coercion". The potential of C-AES in exploring subjective experience of psychiatric admission and effects on treatment adherence should be further explored.

  7. Psychiatric morbidity among adult patients in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia

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    Omar Khairani

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening for psychiatric disorders in primary care can improve the detection rate and helps in preventing grave consequences of unrecognised and untreated psychiatric morbidity. This is relevant to the Malaysian setting where mental health care is now also being provided at primary care level. The aim of this paper is to report the prevalence of psychiatric illness in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia using the screening tool Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ. Methods This is a cross-sectional study carried out in a semi-urban primary healthcare centre located south of Kuala Lumpur. Systematic random sampling was carried out and a total of 267 subjects completed the PHQ during the study period. Results The proportion of respondents who had at least one PHQ positive diagnosis was 24.7% and some respondents had more than one diagnosis. Diagnoses included depressive illness (n = 38, 14.4%, somatoform disorder (n = 32, 12.2%, panic and anxiety disorders (n = 17, 6.5%, binge eating disorder (n = 9, 3.4% and alcohol abuse (n = 6, 2.3%. Younger age (18 to 29 years and having a history of stressors in the previous four weeks were found to be significantly associated (p = 0.036 and p = 0.044 respectively with PHQ positive scores. Conclusion These findings are broadly similar to the findings of studies done in other countries and are a useful guide to the probable prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in primary care in other similar settings in Malaysia.

  8. Changes in distress of psychiatric in-patients after the changeover of junior psychiatric trainees as a function of attachment style: A pilot study

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    David Dodwell

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Therapists, including psychiatrists, may act as attachment figures. Rotational training schemes necessitate the regular and frequent ending of therapeutic relationships. The effects on patients are rarely studied. This is a pilot prospective study to evaluate whether relative distress in adult psychiatric in-patients follows change in trainee psychiatrists; whether differences in distress are mediated by patient attachment style; and to provide data for power calculation. Methods: Twenty adult in-patients were assessed using the Mental Health Inventory 5 (MHI-5 scale before and after changeover of psychiatric trainees; attachment style was assessed prior to the changeover. Qualitative data were also collected. Results: The average MHI-5 scores improved with time (p = 0.021. Less improvement correlated with higher score on preoccupied attachment (rho = 0.41, p1-tail <0.05. A non-significantly stronger improvement was seen with secure/dismissing styles compared to preoccupied/fearful styles (p1-tail = 0.08. Based on these results, a study of at least 87 patients is likely to produce a statistically significant result. Most patients were not aware a staff change was due and would like to be informed by their clinical team. Conclusions: Relative distress following junior trainee changeover may have a link with patients' attachment styles.

  9. The influence of music on psychiatric patients' immediate attitude change toward therapists.

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    Kahans, D; Calford, M B

    1982-01-01

    This study was undertaken to establish that in an audience situation, music may facilitate an immediate attitude change toward a therapist by patients. To determine the characteristics of such a change, recorded (popular and classical) and live (cello) music was employed. A semantic differential was used to measure attitude change by psychiatric inpatients and control subjects (medical students and student nurses). Significant attitude change were found when the music presented was the preference of the therapist and when this preference was conveyed to the audience. Patient breakdown into diagnostic categories also showed that patients with affective or alcoholic disorders showed significantly larger attitude change than the controls. Results are discussed in terms of cognitive consistency theories of attitude change, concluding that maximal attitude change toward a therapist occurs under conditions in which the therapist presents new aspects of behavior (in terms of previous exposure) to the patients.

  10. The influence of music on psychiatric patients' immediate attitude change toward therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahans, D; Calford, M B

    1982-01-01

    This study was undertaken to establish that in an audience situation, music may facilitate an immediate attitude change toward a therapist by patients. To determine the characteristics of such a change, recorded (popular and classical) and live (cello) music was employed. A semantic differential was used to measure attitude change by psychiatric inpatients and control subjects (medical students and student nurses). Significant attitude change were found when the music presented was the preference of the therapist and when this preference was conveyed to the audience. Patient breakdown into diagnostic categories also showed that patients with affective or alcoholic disorders showed significantly larger attitude change than the controls. Results are discussed in terms of cognitive consistency theories of attitude change, concluding that maximal attitude change toward a therapist occurs under conditions in which the therapist presents new aspects of behavior (in terms of previous exposure) to the patients. PMID:10256728

  11. Psychiatric morbidity in children with medically unexplained chronic pain: Diagnosis from the pediatrician's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnenberg, Antoinette Y.; De Graeff-Meeder, Elisabeth R.; Van Der Hoeven, Joost; Kimpen, Jan L. L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M.; Van Dijken, Pieter J.; Dijkman-Neerincx, Regina H.M.; Essink, Alphons H.P.M.; Flapper, Boudien C.T.; Fliers, Ellen A.; Ten Haaf, Jeanette K.; Hofkamp, Marchinus; Van Der Meer, Syb B.; Moens, Marijn; Pelleboer, Rolf A.A.; Van Rhijn, Aart; Russel, Ingrid M.B.; Thunnissen, Bernadien T.M.J.; Vlieger, Arine M.; Wennink, Johanna M.B.; Van Wieringen, Hester; Zwart, Pieter

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT. There is very little general evidence to support the clinical management, particularly diagnosis, of medically unexplained chronic pain (UCP) in children. OBJECTIVE. We sought to assess in children with UCP if clinical characteristics held important by general pediatricians help to accurate

  12. Computerized patient information system in a psychiatric unit: five-year experience.

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    Modai, I; Valevski, A

    1993-10-01

    A computerized psychiatric clinical application based on CLICKS program was developed, consisting of a network of 34 personal computers, run by Novell Netware version 3.11. It includes all clinical records and covers most of the administrative needs of the department; it may be used also in the outpatient clinics. Implementation of the system followed the stages of planning, record structuring, record programming, practice and operation. The system is favorably accepted by the patients, has several important advantages over pencil and paper record keeping, and although it is slightly more time-consuming, it improves record quality and departmental efficiency. PMID:8113635

  13. HBV Vaccination in Chronic Renal Failure Patients

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    Mir-davood Omrani

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available HBV infection in chronic renal failure (CRF becomes chronic in 30 to 60% compared with less than 10% in nonuremic patients. Immunological dysfunction in patients on hemodialysis may be related to imbalanced cytokine systems, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-|α| and interleukin (IL 6,1 by retention of renal metabolite in uremia and chronic inflammation and have a poor immunological reaction to T-cell-dependent antigens, like hepatitis B vaccination. Immunocompromised patients who are unresponsive to hepatitis B vaccination seem to be unable to enhance IL-10 synthesis for control of monokine overproduction. Moreover, human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes, which play a major role in the antigen presentation to immunocompetent cells, have also been shown to modulate this immune response. Unfortunately, seroconversion to anti-HBS has been reported to occur in only 40 to 50% of the vaccine, a significantly lower rate than that observed in healthy adults. Various methods including adjutants such as zinc, gamma interferon, thymopentine, GM-CSF and Levamisol for improving immune responses have been advised. Experience with Pres1/s2, third-generation vaccines is limited and they have not been proven more effective than intradermally (ID administered second-generation S antigen vaccines. Both intramuscular (IM and intradermal (ID vaccinations against hepatitis B have variable efficiency in hemodialysis and non-responders should be retreated by ID route.

  14. Variables Associated with the Use of Coercive Measures on Psychiatric Patients in Spanish Penitentiary Centers

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    E. Girela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the use of coercive medical measures (forced medication, isolation, and mechanical restraint in mentally ill inmates within two secure psychiatric hospitals (SPH and three regular prisons (RP in Spain. Variables related to adopted coercive measures were analyzed, such as type of measure, causes of indication, opinion of patient inmate, opinion of medical staff, and more frequent morbidity. A total of 209 patients (108 from SPH and 101 from RP were studied. Isolation (41.35% was the most frequent coercive measure, followed by mechanical restraint (33.17% and forced medication (25.48%. The type of center has some influence; specifically in RP there is less risk of isolation and restraint than in SPH. Not having had any previous imprisonment reduces isolation and restraint risk while increases the risk of forced medication, as well as previous admissions to psychiatric inpatient units does. Finally, the fact of having lived with a partner before imprisonment reduces the risk of forced medication and communication with the family decreases the risk of isolation. Patients subjected to a coercive measure exhibited a pronounced psychopathology and most of them had been subjected to such measures on previous occasions. The mere fact of external assessment of compliance with human rights slows down the incidence of coercive measures.

  15. Relation between stages of change and motivation in the treatment of psychiatric patients1

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    Gavrilov-Jerković Vesna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Main aim of this research was to investigate the relation between psychiatric patients’ motivation for their participation in treatment and a stage of change they were in. Hypothesis on relation quality of examined variables have been defined from the perspective of transtheoretical model created by Prochaska and associates. Decision balance, specific and general self-efficacy and inclination to relapse have been examined as indicators of motivation. One hundred and twenty-nine psychiatric patients with diagnosis of neurosis or personality disorders have been examined in this research. Results have shown that stages of changes are significantly related to inspected motivational variables. Patients in higher stages of readiness express specific motivational profile characterized by the proactive optimism, which means that they rely on their own resources and expect positive outcome of the treatment. Patients in lower stages of readiness express motivational profile characterized by passive resignation receptiveness, by inclination towards demoralization and low trust in their own strength. Results of this research are in conformity with the basic hypothesis of transtheoretical model of change. .

  16. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

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    Di Lorenzo R

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosaria Di Lorenzo,1 Nina Cimino,2 Elena Di Pietro,3 Gabriella Pollutri,4 Vittoria Neviani,5 Paola Ferri2 1Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment, Department of Mental Health, AUSL Modena, Modena, 2School of Nursing, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 3School of Neuro-Psychiatry, 4School of Psychiatry, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 5 “The Medlar”, Villa Igea Hospital, Modena, Italy Background: Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods: This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT, and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18 who had acute hospitalizations (n=140 in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83, from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results: Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient -2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic

  17. When should managed care firms terminate private benefits for chronically mentally ill patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, S N

    1994-01-01

    Corporate America's healthcare cost crisis and the country's budget deficit are forcing limits on the resources used to finance healthcare, including mental healthcare. At the same time, the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act bars discrimination against patients with chronic illnesses, including chronic mental illness. Therefore, corporate benefits managers need guidance on how to ethically and rationally allocate scarce clinical resources to those high-morbidity insureds who utilize disproportionate amounts of these resources. In particular, how should we define the public/private interface: When do patients who repeatedly fail to respond to treatment fall out of the private sector's responsibility? The author, medical director for a leading behavioral healthcare utilization management company, offers the following guidelines recommending reasonable and practical limitations on trials of treatment for seven common categories of difficult psychiatric patients. PMID:10141406

  18. Psychiatric emergencies (part I): psychiatric disorders causing organic symptoms.

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    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Daini, S

    2013-02-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are conditions that mostly destabilize the already frenetic activity of the Emergency Department. Sometimes the emergency is clearly referable to primitive psychiatric illness. Other times, psychiatric and organic symptoms can independently coexist (comorbidity), or develop together in different conditions of substance abuse, including alcohol and prescription drugs. Differentiating between substance induced and pre-existing psychiatric disorder (dual diagnosis) may be difficult, other than controversial issue. Finally, an organic disease can hide behind a psychiatric disorder (pseudopsychiatric emergency). In this review (part I), psychiatric disorders that occur with organic symptoms are discussed. They include: (1) anxiety, conversion and psychosomatic disorders, and (2) simulated diseases. The physiologic mechanisms of the stress reaction, divided into a dual neuro-hormonal response, are reviewed in this section: (1) activation of the sympathetic nervous system and adrenal medulla with catecholamine production (rapid response), and (2) activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with cortisol production (slow response). The concept of the fight-or-flight response, its adaptive significance and the potential evolution in paralyzing response, well showing by Yerkes-Dodson curve, is explained. Abnormal short- and long-term reactions to stress evolving toward well codified cluster of trauma and stressor-related disorders, including acute stress disorder, adjustment disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, are examined. A brief review of major psychiatric disorder and related behaviour abnormalities, vegetative symptoms and cognitive impairment, according to DMS IV-TR classification, are described. Finally, the reactive psychic symptoms and behavioral responses to acute or chronic organic disease, so called "somatopsychic disorders", commonly occurring in elderly and pediatric patients, are presented. The specific conditions of

  19. [Clinical integration in the chronic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero-Alcántara, Luis; Comes-Górriz, Natividad; Borrás-López, Agustina; Rodríguez-Balo, Alberto; Seara-Aguilar, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Castilla-La Mancha Health Service is developing the integration of care levels due to the challenge of an aging population in the region. Aging is associated with chronic diseases and an increasing number of concomitant diseases. This poses a major care challenge care, with more fragile patients and new needs. This also requires a sustainable approach: the concurrence of several chronic diseases affects the cost of care, which is especially acute in times of severe economic crisis. One of the pillars of the strategy for dealing with chronic diseases in our region is care integration, in an effort to adapt the organization to the new needs. The Balanced Scorecard or Integrated Scorecard of the integration process was introduced as it has been designed. The integration of primary and hospital care at an organizational level has already been completed, and the development of integrated care processes has also been performed in order to achieve real integration at care level. To help finance this, a prospective capitation system is gradually being implemented, achieving a convergence of per capita costs in the different health areas integrated. Nurses has a key role in this process, their skills as educators and trainers in self-care, in the role of case managers of patients with particularly complex conditions, and the role of professional liaison to improve the transition between care areas and units. PMID:24468496

  20. Psychiatric Patients Tracking Through a Private Social Network for Relatives: Development and Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Peñalvo, Francisco J; Martín, Manuel Franco; García-Holgado, Alicia; Guzmán, José Miguel Toribio; Antón, Jesús Largo; Sánchez-Gómez, Ma Cruz

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of psychiatric patients requires different health care from that of patients from other medical specialties. In particular, in the case of Department of Psychiatry from the Zamora Hospital (Spain), the period of time which patients require institutionalized care is a tiny part of their treatment. A large part of health care provided to the patient is aimed at his/her rehabilitation and social integration through day-care centres, supervised flats or activities. Conversely, several reports reveal that approximately 50 % of Internet users use the network as a source of health information, which has led to the emergence of virtual communities where patients, relatives or health professionals share their knowledge concerning an illness, health problem or specific health condition. In this context, we have identified that the relatives have a lack of information regarding the daily activities of patients under psychiatric treatment. The social networks or the virtual communities regarding health problems do not provide a private space where relatives can follow the patient's progress, despite being in different places. The goal of the study was to use technologies to develop a private social network for being used by severe mental patients (mainly schizophrenic patients). SocialNet is a pioneer social network in the health sector because it provides a social interaction context restricted to persons authorized by the patient or his/her legal guardian in such a way that they can track his/her daily activity. Each patient has a private area only accessible to authorized persons and their caregivers, where they can share pictures, videos or texts regarding his/her progress. A preliminary study of usability of the system has been made for increasing the usefulness and usability of SocialNet. SocialNet is the first system for promoting personal interactions among formal caregivers, family, close friends and patient, promoting the recovery of schizophrenic

  1. Spiritual Needs of Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. Koenig

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available For many patients confronted with chronic diseases, spirituality/religiosity is an important resource for coping. Patients often report unmet spiritual and existential needs, and spiritual support is also associated with better quality of life. Caring for spiritual, existential and psychosocial needs is not only relevant to patients at the end of their life but also to those suffering from long-term chronic illnesses. Spiritual needs may not always be associated with life satisfaction, but sometimes with anxiety, and can be interpreted as the patients’ longing for spiritual well-being. The needs for peace, health and social support are universal human needs and are of special importance to patients with long lasting courses of disease. The factor, Actively Giving, may be of particular importance because it can be interpreted as patients’ intention to leave the role of a `passive sufferer´ to become an active, self-actualizing, giving individual. One can identify four core dimensions of spiritual needs, i.e., Connection, Peace, Meaning/Purpose, and Transcendence, which can be attributed to underlying psychosocial, emotional, existential, and religious needs. The proposed model can provide a conceptual framework for further research and clinical practice. In fact, health care that addresses patients’ physical, emotional, social, existential and spiritual needs (referring to a bio-psychosocial-spiritual model of health care will contribute to patients’ improvement and recovery. Nevertheless, there are several barriers in the health care system that makes it difficult to adequately address these needs.

  2. Psychiatric morbidity of overseas patients in inner London: A hospital based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parshall Alice M

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of the referral, admission, treatment, and outcome of overseas patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in central London. Ethical, legal and economic implications, and the involvement of consulates in the admission process, are discussed. Method Assessment and review of overseas patients admitted between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 1999. Non-parametric statistical tests were used, and relevant outcomes described. Results 19% of admissions were overseas patients. Mean age was 38 years. 90% were unattached; 84% were white, 71% from European countries. 45% spoke fluent English. Differences in socio-economic status between home country and England were found. 74% were unwell on arrival; 65% travelled to England as tourists. 65% of admissions came via the police. 32% had been ill for more than one year before admission; 68% had psychiatric history. 77% were admitted and 48% discharged under section of the Mental Health Act. 74% had psychotic disorders, all of them with positive symptoms. 55% showed little to moderate improvement in mental state; 10% were on Enhanced Care Programme Approach. Relatives of 48% of patients were contacted. The Hospital repatriated 52% of patients; the Mental Health Team followed up 13% of those discharged. The average length of admission was 43.4 days (range 1–365. Total cost of admissions was GBP350, 600 ($577, 490; average individual cost was GBP11, 116 (range GBP200-81, 000. Conclusions Mentally ill overseas individuals are a vulnerable group that need recognition by health organisations to adapt current practice to better serve their needs. The involvement of consulates needs further evaluation.

  3. Oral health of psychiatric patients: A cross-sectional comparision study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viral R Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental illness is associated with physical health. Oral health affects people physically and psychologically and influences how they grow, enjoy life, look, speak, chew, taste food and socialize. Oral health may have lower priority in the context of mental illness and these diverse and changing client group experiences similar oral and dental problems. Objective: To assess oral health problems in psychiatric patients. Materials and Methods : This cross-sectional study included 133 patients attending the psychiatric outpatient department (OPD as the study group and 133 patients attending the general OPD of the same hospital as the control group. Both groups were examined for oral health status. Results: Mean age of the study group was 40.2 years, 66.17% were males, 66.17% were married and 83.67% belonged to middle or lower class. 39.8% of patients had mental illness for 1-5 years, 88% were self sufficient and 34.6% had healthy oral practices. These results are very much comparable with the control group. Mean decayed missed filled teeth (DMFT score (2.10 and mean oral hygiene index-simplex (OHI-S score (3.6 increased with age. Difference in DMFT score with age was not statistically significant (P>0.5 while it was highly significant for OHI-S score (P<0.0001. Periodontal condition worsened as age increased, suggested by community periodontal index. Only 26.7% of patients had healthy gingiva in the age group 20-50 years while it was zero for 50 years and above. This difference is statistically significant (P<0.001.

  4. Neuropsychological and psychiatric assessments following bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Japanese patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Michitaka; Iga, Jun-Ichi; Ueno, Shu-Ichi; Agawa, Masahito; Tsuda, Toshio; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2014-09-01

    The physical benefits of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are well documented, but the mental benefits are uncertain, particularly in Japanese patients. This study evaluated the clinical and neuropsychological characteristics before and after STN-DBS surgery in Japanese PD patients. PD patients (n=13, age 67.0 ± 7.8 years) were evaluated pre-surgery (baseline) and at 1 and 6 months post-surgery by two trained psychiatrists. The motor symptoms were assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score. The neuropsychological and psychiatric tests performed were the Mini-Mental State Examination, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). The UPDRS motor score (pscore (p=0.004) showed significant improvement at 1 month post-surgery, but a significant decline was observed in the WCST total error (p=0.005) and the semantic VFT score (pscore was maintained, and the scores on the neuropsychological and psychiatric tests had returned to baseline. Although bilateral STN-DBS did not appear to have long-term effects on neuropsychological and psychiatric outcomes, the microlesion effects associated with STN-DBS appear to increase the risk of transient cognitive and psychiatric complications. These complications should be monitored by careful observation of neurological and psychiatric symptoms.

  5. Monitoring Risk Behaviors by Managing Social Support in the Network of a Forensic Psychiatric Patient : A Single-Case Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Haar-Pomp, Lydia; de Beer, Carlijn; van der Lem, Rosalind; Spreen, Marinus; Bogaerts, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This prospective case study examines changes over time in the social support network of a forensic psychiatric patient diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The focus is on the functional and dysfunctional influences of the patient's social support dynamics on his risk beha

  6. Pain, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Cervical Miyofascial Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Dundar

    2014-03-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of depression, pain and disability in patients with chronic cervical miyofascial pain syndrome (MPS and to determine their association with quality of life. Material and Method: Forty patients with Cervical MPS and 40 age and sex-matched healthy controls enrolled in this study. The social and demographic characteristics of the patients and controls were examined. All patients and controls were evaluated with respect to pain (at night, rest and movement and assessed by visual analog scale (VAS. Neck disability index (NDI was used to calculate functional disability. Quality of life was evaluated with the the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36. Also all of the patients and controls underwent Beck depression inventory (BDI. Results: There was no statistical difference between the patients and control cases according to demographical data. The SF-36 scores of the study patients were lower than controls. NDI, BDI and VAS scores were higher in the patients with chronic cervical MPS compared to controls. BDI scores of the patients with chronic cervical MPS  were negatively and closely associated with subparameters of the SF-36 (physical function (r:-0,599, p<0.001, role limitations due to physical functioning (r:-0,558, p<0.001, bodily pain (r:-0.540, p<0.001, general health (r:- 0,708 p<0.001, vitality (r:-0,692, p<0.001, social functioning (r:-0,559, p<0.001, role limitations due to emotional problems (r:-0,537, p<0.001 and mental health (r: -0,787, p<0.001. Discussion: BDI scores are higher in patients with chronic cervical MPS than healthy controls and negatively affect their quality of life. Psychiatric evaluation of the patients with chronic cervical MPS may improve their quality of life and treatments outcome.

  7. Psychiatric diagnoses and psychoactive medication use among nonsurgical critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunsch, Hannah; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Johansen, Martin B;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The relationship between critical illness and psychiatric illness is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To assess psychiatric diagnoses and medication prescriptions before and after critical illness. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Population-based cohort study in Denmark of critically ill patien...

  8. [Telemedicine for patients with chronic intestinal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Sjoukje; Feibig, Doreen; Wanten, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Telemedicine is a valuable extension of the ways in which patients with chronic diseases can be contacted. Patients can easily contact their caregivers within the safe environment of the digital waiting room. Telemedicine especially offers an advantage for those forms of care where the visual aspect is important. Care should be taken with respect to its implementation into the disease management process with careful synchronisation between all involved parties, e.g. patient, caregiver, and organisation. The effectiveness of telemedicine and the savings that can be achieved should be properly established in order to justify the funding of a telemedicine project. Rather than focusing on the possible drawbacks of telemedicine, e.g. safety concerns and the user-friendliness of the system, we should highlight the possibilities that information technology offers. PMID:25515390

  9. Risk of chronic anxiety in implantable defibrillator patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; den Broek, Krista C van; Theuns, Dominic A M J;

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of chronic anxiety in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). In a multi-center, prospective study, we examined 1) the prevalence of chronic anxiety (i.e., patients anxious at implantation and 12 months), and 2) predictors of chronic...... anxiety....

  10. New onset epilepsy following unintentional durotomy in a patient on anti-psychiatric medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We would like to present a rare case report describing a case in which new-onset tonic-clonic seizures occurred following an unintentional durotomy during lumbar discectomy and decompression. Unintentional durotomy is a frequent complication of spinal surgical procedures, with a rate as high as 17%. To our knowledge a case of new onset epilepsy has never been reported in the literature. Although dural tears during surgery and CSF hypovolaemia are thought to be the main contributing factors, one postulates on the effects of anti-psychiatric medication with epileptogenic properties. Amisulpride and Olanzapine can lower seizure threshold and should be used with caution in patients previously diagnosed with epilepsy. However manufacturers do not state that in cases where the seizure threshold is already lowered by CSF hypotension, new onset epilepsy might be commoner. Finally, strong caution and aggressive post-operative monitoring is advised for patients with CSF hypotension in combination with possible epileptogenic medication.

  11. Drug washout issues in studies of cerebral metabolism by positron emission tomography in psychiatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies of brain glucose utilization by positron emission tomography attempt to describe the modifications of the brain activity during psychiatric diseases. A major difficulty in such studies is the necessity to assess patients free of pharmacological treatment, in order to relate the measured changes in glucose utilization to the pathopsychology, and not to a drug effect. In this paper are reviewed the arguments from the literature allowing to estimate the drug washout time for considering the patients as drug-free. The review is focussed on the known effects of the psychotrops on brain glucose utilization. This time is approximately six months for the neuroleptics given orally, one month for antidepressants, and five and a half half-lives for benzodiazepines. Alternative research strategies for avoiding a long drug washout are mentioned, and ethical limitations are considered. (author)

  12. Tardive dyskinesia, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and cytochrome P450c17a gene polymorphism in psychiatric inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, S.A.; Geers, L.M.; Al Hadithy, A.F.Y.; Pechlivanoglou, P.; Semke, A.V.; Vyalova, N.M.; Fedorenko, O.Y.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.; Wilffert, B.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a potentially irreversible antipsychoticinduced movement disorder with a prevalence of about 20-30% in psychiatric patients chronically exposed to antipsychotics. A wellknown theory states that TD is related to oxidative stress induced neurotoxicity. Dehydroepiandrosterone

  13. Efficiency of Physical Exercise Programs on Chronic Psychiatry Patients: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa Lok

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity and exercise have recently been used as an effective method for the treatment of several mental disorders. In this systematic review, the objective is to evaluate the efficiency of the physical activity programs which are applied on the chronic psychiatric patients. The review is made in direction with the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination 2009 guide which is developed by the York University, National Health Care Research Institute. Seven studies are included within the scope of this research. The patients with chronic mental disorders who participate in the physical activity programs experience positive outcomes like that they feel themselves mentally better, they are more compatible with the medical treatment and therapeutic interventions, the programs diminish the anxiety, their perceptions of physical self are strengthened, the social functionality is increased, the duration of morning sleep is decreased and the quality of night sleep is increased. Accordingly, personalized, planned and continuous physical activity programs should be developed for all the psychiatric patients and these programs should be applied on such patients. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(4.000: 354-366

  14. Self-awareness of depression and life events in three groups of patients: Psychotic depression, obsessive–compulsive disorder and chronic medical illness in North India

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Anjali; Bahadur, Indu; Gupta, K.R.; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2006-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common experience across cultures although not all languages have words describing depression. Aim: To identify patients' perception and awareness of depression as an illness. Methods: Sixty psychiatric patients (each with depression or obsessive–compulsive disorder [OCD]) were compared with 30 medical patients with chronic physical illness and assessed on levels of awareness of depression in relation to life events. Results: Life events were more in patients with ...

  15. Personality disorders in heart failure patients requiring psychiatric management: comorbidity detections from a routine depression and anxiety screening protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina

    2014-12-30

    Several international guidelines recommend routine depression screening in cardiac disease populations. No previous study has determined the prevalence and comorbidities of personality disorders in patients presenting for psychiatric treatment after these screening initiatives. In the first stage 404 heart failure (HF) patients were routinely screened and 73 underwent structured interview when either of the following criteria were met: (a) Patient Health Questionnaire ≥10; (b) Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ≥7); (c) Response to one item panic-screener. Or (d) Suicidality. Patients with personality disorders were compared to the positive-screen patients on psychiatric comorbidities. The most common personality disorders were avoidant (8.2%), borderline (6.8%) and obsessive compulsive (4.1%), other personality disorders were prevalent in less than Personality disorder patients had significantly greater risk of major depression (risk ratio (RR) 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-13.3), generalized anxiety disorder (RR 3.2; 95% CI 1.0-10.0), social phobia (RR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-11.5) and alcohol abuse/dependence (RR 3.2; 95% 1.0-9.5). The findings that HF patients with personality disorders presented with complex psychiatric comorbidity suggest that pathways facilitating the integration of psychiatric services into cardiology settings are warranted when routine depression screening is in place.

  16. Dynamic Adaptive Remote Health Monitoring for Patients with Chronic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Myung-kyung

    2012-01-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. More than 70% of deaths among Americans are caused by chronic diseases and more than 133 million Americans have at least one chronic disease. Due to the prevalence of chronic disease-related issues, it is prudent to seek out methodologies that would facilitate the prevention, monitoring, and feedback for patients with chronic diseases.This dissertation describes WANDA (Weight and Activity with Other Vital Si...

  17. Gray Matter Volumes in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le-wei Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a debilitating and complex disorder characterized by profound fatigue with uncertain pathologic mechanism. Neuroimage may be an important key to unveil the central nervous system (CNS mechanism in CFS. Although most of the studies found gray matter (GM volumes reduced in some brain regions in CFS, there are many factors that could affect GM volumes in CFS, including chronic pain, stress, psychiatric disorder, physical activity, and insomnia, which may bias the results. In this paper, through reviewing recent literatures, we discussed these interferential factors, which overlap with the symptoms of CFS.

  18. Heart rate and heart rate variability modification in chronic insomnia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Benedetto; Dittoni, Serena; Colicchio, Salvatore; Testani, Elisa; Losurdo, Anna; Gnoni, Valentina; Di Blasi, Chiara; Brunetti, Riccardo; Contardi, Anna; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic insomnia is highly prevalent in the general population, provoking personal distress and increased risk for psychiatric and medical disorders. Autonomic hyper-arousal could be a pathogenic mechanism of chronic primary insomnia. The aim of this study was to investigate autonomic activity in patients with chronic primary insomnia by means of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Eighty-five consecutive patients affected by chronic primary insomnia were enrolled (38 men and 47 women; mean age: 53.2 ± 13.6). Patients were compared with a control group composed of 55 healthy participants matched for age and gender (23 men and 32 women; mean age: 54.2 ± 13.9). Patients underwent an insomnia study protocol that included subjective sleep evaluation, psychometric measures, and home-based polysomnography with evaluation of HRV in wake before sleep, in all sleep stages, and in wake after final awakening. Patients showed modifications of heart rate and HRV parameters, consistent with increased sympathetic activity, while awake before sleep and during Stage-2 non-REM sleep. No significant differences between insomniacs and controls could be detected during slow-wave sleep, REM sleep, and post-sleep wake. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that autonomic hyper-arousal is a major pathogenic mechanism in primary insomnia, and confirm that this condition is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk.

  19. [Discharge Dynamics and Related Factors of Long-stay Patients in Psychiatric Hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Toshiaki; Shiraishi, Hiromi; Tachimori, Hisateru; Koyama, Asuka; Naganuma, Yoichi; Takeshima, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding challenge in Japan is prolonged psychiatric hospitalization and the associated difficulty of discharge, lost opportunities for patients' social participation, and stagnant reallocation of medical resources. Although the length of stay has been shortened recently on average, its distribution tends to be polarized into high-turnover and long-stay groups. To resolve these problems, we must understand the discharge dynamics of long-stay patients. Three questionnaires were sent to 733 randomly selected psychiatric hospitals (response rate: 24.3%; 178 hospitals, 2,480 patients). One questionnaire was on hospitalized patient numbers for one-year or longer stays as at the end of June 2007, recording each combination of Group (A or B), diagnosis, and hospitalization type. Group A referred to patients continuously hospitalized as at the end of June 2008; Group B referred to those discharged between July 2007 and June 2008. The second questionnaire was on hospital characteristics (founder, bed number, medical function, etc.), and the third questionnaire was on detailed patient characteristics (residential setting post-discharge, etc., for each Group B patient; a maximum of 20 patients per hospital consecutively in order of discharge). Valid data were obtained from 171 hospitals and 2,419 patients, with the latter increasing to 3,543 after weighting. The annual discharge rate (ADR; B/[A+B]) for the entire sample was 16.3%. Regarding the diagnosis, dementia showed the highest ADR (27.8%) and schizophrenia the lowest (13.5%). The ADRs for depression, bipolar disorder, and alcoholism were 23.9, 20.6, and 23.7% respectively. Regarding the hospitalization type, voluntary hospitalization (16.0%) and hospitalization for medical care and protection (16.8%) showed similar ADRs. Regarding the district, ADRs were high in Kinki (19.9%) and Kyushu (18.8%), and low in Kanto (14.1%) and Chugoku/Shikoku (14.2%). Multivariate analyses revealed that discharge within one year was

  20. Psychopathy in women: Prediction of criminality and violence in UK and USA psychiatric patients resident in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Nicola S; Snowden, Robert J

    2016-03-30

    Psychopathy is an important clinical construct often used in the assessment and management of psychiatric patients and offenders. This, in part, is due to the strong association between psychopathy, crime, and particularly violent crime. However, there are few studies of these associations in women. These relationships were examined using information from two large databases. The Partnerships in Care database contains data from a sample of forensic psychiatric patients (154 women and 777 men) in the UK that were discharged from secure psychiatric units. Follow-up was via official conviction data within the next 2 years. The MacArthur study examined violence and aggression in a sample of civil psychiatric patients (367 women and 496 men) in the USA following discharge from an acute psychiatric hospital. Follow-up was via a mixture of self-report, informant report and official records. Psychopathy in both samples was measured via the PCL:SV prior to discharge. Psychopathy was a good predictor of target events for the women in both samples and for all time intervals used. No significant gender differences in the PCL:SV's predictive efficacy were found. The results provide a strong evidence-base for the use of psychopathy in women when considering future community behaviour and reoffending.

  1. The influence of dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia on aggressive behavior of psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Schutter, Marja A M; Kramer, Hein J M Th; Franken, Ernest J F; Lodewijkx, Hein F M; Kleinepier, Tom

    2016-09-30

    Current approaches in Dutch mental health care institutions towards inpatients' aggression have focused predominantly on environmental factors, such as training the staff in aggression management. However, personality traits might be an important factor in patients' aggression - as shown by incidents in the wards. This study explores the influence of dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia on psychiatric patients' aggressive behavior, through self-reports and through involvement in aggressive incidents. Personality traits influencing patients' aggression emphasize the importance of a more direct approach to their aggression. Clinical patients at Dutch mental health care institution Emergis (n=84) filled out questionnaires about their aggressiveness (using Buss and Perry's Aggression Questionnaire Short Form), dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia. Multiple regression analyses indicated that dysfunctional impulsivity positively related to self-reported aggressive behavior. The relationship, however, could not be confirmed for inpatients' aggression as reported by the staff on the wards. Unexpectedly affective alexithymia negatively related to hostility. Gender differences in self-reported aggression were found. Female patients showed higher levels of hostility. Regression analyses indicated that the male gender positively related to physical aggression. Findings emphasize the importance of a new approach in Dutch mental health care, in which patients may engage in aggression-regulation training programs. PMID:27387554

  2. High-quality chronic care delivery improves experiences of chronically ill patients receiving care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Objective. Investigate whether high-quality chronic care delivery improved the experiences of patients. Design. This study had a longitudinal design. Setting and Participants. We surveyed professionals and patients in 17 disease management programs targeting patients wi

  3. Multidimensional assessment of neuro-psychiatric symptoms in patients with low-grade hepatic encephalopathy: A clinical rating scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergei Mechtcheriakov; Ivo W Graziadei; André Kugener; Julia Wiedemann; Chantal Galbavy; Hartmann Hinterhuber; Josef Marksteiner; Wolfgang Vogel

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of a new clinical rating scale for a standardized assessment of cirrhosis-associated neuro-psychiatric symptoms.METHODS: Forty patients with liver cirrhosis (LC, with or without low-grade hepatic encephalopathy) were invest-igated using a clinical neuro-psychiatric rating scale based on a comprehensive list of neurological, psychomotor,cognitive, affective, behavioral symptoms, and symptoms of disturbed bioregulation.RESULTS: The analysis revealed that the majority of cirrhotic patients showed, besides characteristic neurological symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy, various psychomotor,affective and bioregulatory symptoms (disturbed sleep and sexual dysfunction). Patients were impaired in the following subscales: sleep and biorhythm disorder (75.0% of patients), Parkinsonoid symptoms (25.0%), affective symptoms (17.5%), and psychomotor retardation (12.5%).The increase of total neuro-psychiatric clinical score was significantly associated with the degree of hepatic enceph-alopathy.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that a substantial number of patients with LC and low-grade hepatic encephalopathy manifest various clinical neuro-psychiatric symptoms. The use of a rating scale, which explores clinical dimensions of hepatic encephalopathy, would improve the management of patients with LC.

  4. The Psychiatric Patient as a Health Resource Consumer: Costs Associated with Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva-Sevilla, Carmen; Gonzalez-Moral, Maria Luisa; Tolosa-Perez, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical practice protocols should consider both the psychological criteria related to a patient’s satisfaction as a consumer of health services and the economic criteria to allocate resources efficiently. An electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) program was implemented in our hospital to treat psychiatric patients. The main objective of this study was to determine the cost associated with the ECT sessions implemented in our hospital between 2008 and 2014. A secondary objective was to calculate the cost of sessions that were considered ineffective, defined as those sessions in which electrical convulsion did not reach the preset threshold duration, in order to identify possible ways of saving money and improving satisfaction among psychiatric patients receiving ECT. Methods: A descriptive analysis of the direct health costs related to ECT from the perspective of the public health system between 2008 and 2014 was performed using a retrospective chart review. All of the costs are in euros (2011) and were discounted at a rate of 3%. Based on the base case, a sensitivity analysis of the changes of those variables showing the greatest uncertainty was performed. Results: Seventy-six patients received 853 sessions of ECT. The cumulative cost of these sessions was €1409528.63, and 92.9% of this cost corresponded to the hospital stay. A total of €420732.57 (29.8%) was inefficiently spent on 269 ineffective sessions. A sensitivity analysis of the economic data showed stable results to changes in the variables of uncertainty. Conclusion: The efficiency of ECT in the context outlined here could be increased by discerning a way to shorten the associated hospital stay and by reducing the number of ineffective sessions performed. PMID:27303347

  5. [Treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucsi, Orsolya

    2016-06-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in the Western countries. The abnormal B lymphocytes progress into the blood and infiltrate the bone marrow, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. CLL is a disease of the adults and older individuals who often have coexisting conditions. It usually progresses slowly, but in patients who need treatment, CLL eventually returns. For relapsed, refractory patients treatment options are limited. The only curative treatment is bone marrow transplantation. However, the new, alternative therapeutics show superior efficacy in CLL than standard regimens. The aim of this review is to summarize the most important therapeutic aspects of CLL and to give an insight into the novel treatment options. PMID:27275639

  6. Psychiatric Comorbidities in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallweit, Ulf; Werth, Esther; Seiz, Angela; Sefidan, Sandra; Dahmen, Norbert; Manconi, Mauro; Ehlert, Ulrike; Bassetti, Claudio L A

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological sleep disorder with frequent (39%) coexisting psychiatric comorbidities. Patients with any psychiatric comorbidity had fewer periodic leg movements in sleep. Psychiatric disorders should be taken into account in patients with RLS. PMID:27019065

  7. Negative and positive childhood experiences across developmental periods in psychiatric patients with different diagnoses – an explorative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauer Margarete

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high frequency of childhood abuse has often been reported in adult psychiatric patients. The present survey explores the relationship between psychiatric diagnoses and positive and negative life events during childhood and adulthood in psychiatric samples. Methods A total of 192 patients with diagnoses of alcohol-related disorders (n = 45, schizophrenic disorders (n = 52, affective disorders (n = 54, and personality disorders (n = 41 completed a 42-item self-rating scale (Traumatic Antecedents Questionnaire, TAQ. The TAQ assesses personal positive experiences (competence and safety and negative experiences (neglect, separation, secrets, emotional, physical and sexual abuse, trauma witnessing, other traumas, and alcohol and drugs abuse during four developmental periods, beginning from early childhood to adulthood. Patients were recruited from four Psychiatric hospitals in Germany, Switzerland, and Romania; 63 subjects without any history of mental illness served as controls. Results The amount of positive experiences did not differ significantly among groups, except for safety scores that were lower in patients with personality disorders as compared to the other groups. On the other side, negative experiences appeared more frequently in patients than in controls. Emotional neglect and abuse were reported in patients more frequently than physical and sexual abuse, with negative experiences encountered more often in late childhood and adolescence than in early childhood. The patients with alcohol-related and personality disorders reported more negative events than the ones with schizophrenic and affective disorders. Conclusions The present findings add evidence to the relationship between retrospectively reported childhood experiences and psychiatric diagnoses, and emphasize the fact that a emotional neglect and abuse are the most prominent negative experiences, b adolescence is a more 'sensitive' period for negative

  8. SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS AND PSYCHIATRIC COMORBIDITY IN PATIENTS WITH OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekumar Girish Menon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Obsessive-compulsive Disorder (OCD is a distressing anxiety disorder with prevalence of 0.6% in India. About half of the patients have onset in childhood and adolescence with males having earlier onset. Early onset and male cases have severe illness and poor prognosis. Most of them are unmarried and from middle or upper classes. Patients with poor insight and resistance and comorbidity especially psychosis generally had poor prognosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Socio-demographic data of 50 consecutive patients with OCD diagnosed with ICD-10 criteria were collected and assessed on YBOCS and M.I.N.I. RESULTS 46% patients were between the age group of 18-25 yrs., 56% were female, 62% were married, 60% were from rural background, 44% were educated up to secondary school, 62% were from middle income group, 70% had illness of more than 2 yrs. and 42% had depression. CONCLUSION This study showed higher preponderance in females, rural patients, low and middle income group. Most common family history of psychiatric illness was affective disorder and depression was the most common comorbidity

  9. Clinical, laboratory, psychiatric and magnetic resonance findings in patients with Sydenham chorea

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    Faustino, Patricia C.; Terreri, Maria Teresa R.A.; Rocha, Antonio J. da; Zappitelli, Marcelo C.; Lederman, Henrique M.; Hilario, Maria Odete E. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical and laboratory characteristics, psychiatric manifestations and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in children and adolescents with Sydenham chorea (SyC). The imaging examination was repeated 1 year after the acute phase of SyC. There were 19 patients with a mean age of 11.7 years and a predominance of females (79%);68% had generalized chorea and 53% moderate chorea. SyC presented as an isolated manifestation in 74%. No association between SyC and obsessive-compulsive disorder was found. Mental health problems were present in 45% of the patients. MRI analysis revealed persistent alterations in the caudate nucleus in three patients (16%), who presented recurrent episodes of chorea during the study. In one patient, MRI revealed the presence of nodular heteropathy close to the caudate nucleus region. We conclude that attention problems can be associated with acute clinical features of SyC and persistent alterations in the basal nuclei, evidenced by MRI, can be found in some patients who tend to suffer prolonged attacks and a greater number of recurrences. (orig.)

  10. Prolactin and breast cancer: The need to avoid undertreatment of serious psychiatric illnesses in breast cancer patients: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froes Brandao, Denise; Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Goss, Paul E

    2016-01-15

    Hyperprolactinemia, defined as a sustained elevation of prolactin (PRL) levels greater than 530 mIU/L in women and greater than 424 mIU/L in men, has been implicated for a long time in breast cancer etiology and prognosis. Elevated PRL values (approximately 2-3 times higher than the reference values) are a common adverse effect of antipsychotic medications, especially with first-generation drugs, and most antipsychotics carry a standard warning regarding PRL elevations on their US product labels. These associations foster undertreatment of serious psychiatric illnesses in both otherwise healthy patients and cancer patients. This review assesses both the preclinical and clinical evidence that has led to the hypothesis of PRL's role in breast cancer risk or breast cancer progression. It is concluded that taken together, the published data are unconvincing and insufficient to deprive cancer patients in general and breast cancer patients specifically of potentially effective antipsychotic or antidepressant medications for serious psychiatric indications. We thus call on revised medication guidelines to avoid the existing undertreatment of serious psychiatric illnesses among cancer patients based on an unproven contraindication to psychiatric medications. Cancer 2016;122:184-188. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. Prolactin and breast cancer: The need to avoid undertreatment of serious psychiatric illnesses in breast cancer patients: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froes Brandao, Denise; Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Goss, Paul E

    2016-01-15

    Hyperprolactinemia, defined as a sustained elevation of prolactin (PRL) levels greater than 530 mIU/L in women and greater than 424 mIU/L in men, has been implicated for a long time in breast cancer etiology and prognosis. Elevated PRL values (approximately 2-3 times higher than the reference values) are a common adverse effect of antipsychotic medications, especially with first-generation drugs, and most antipsychotics carry a standard warning regarding PRL elevations on their US product labels. These associations foster undertreatment of serious psychiatric illnesses in both otherwise healthy patients and cancer patients. This review assesses both the preclinical and clinical evidence that has led to the hypothesis of PRL's role in breast cancer risk or breast cancer progression. It is concluded that taken together, the published data are unconvincing and insufficient to deprive cancer patients in general and breast cancer patients specifically of potentially effective antipsychotic or antidepressant medications for serious psychiatric indications. We thus call on revised medication guidelines to avoid the existing undertreatment of serious psychiatric illnesses among cancer patients based on an unproven contraindication to psychiatric medications. Cancer 2016;122:184-188. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26457577

  12. [Patients with schizophrenia in forensic-psychiatric hospitals (section 63 German Penal Code) in North Rhine-Westphalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutscher, S; Schiffer, B; Seifert, D

    2009-02-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the development of the number of patients with schizophrenia in detention (section 63 German Penal Code) in North Rhine-Westphalia and the characterization of these patients. Patients with schizophrenia are examined, by using a standardized questionnaire answered by the attending psychiatrist or psychologist (n = 531). During the last 12 years the number of patients with schizophrenia in forensic-psychiatric hospitals has increased three times, whereas the number of patients with other diagnoses heightened only twofold. The patients with schizophrenia showed high rates of psychiatric comorbidities (substance disorders 73.9 %, personality disorders 17.2 %), previous inpatient treatments (78.3 % with a mean of 7.5 stays) and previous convictions (63.4 %). Almost half of these convictions (46.6 %) were violent offences (e. g. assault, homicide). Possible explanations for this development are discussed.

  13. Invasive Aspergillus infections in hospitalized patients with chronic lung disease

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    Wessolossky M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mireya Wessolossky,1 Verna L Welch,2 Ajanta Sen,1 Tara M Babu,1 David R Luke21Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, USABackground: Although invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is more prevalent in immunocompromised patients, critical care clinicians need to be aware of the occurrence of IPA in the nontraditional host, such as a patient with chronic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to describe the IPA patient with chronic lung disease and compare the data with that of immunocompromised patients.Methods: The records of 351 patients with Aspergillus were evaluated in this single-center, retrospective study for evidence and outcomes of IPA. The outcomes of 57 patients with chronic lung disease and 56 immunocompromised patients were compared. Patients with chronic lung disease were defined by one of the following descriptive terms: emphysema, asthma, idiopathic lung disease, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, sarcoid, or pulmonary leukostasis.Results: Baseline demographics were similar between the two groups. Patients with chronic lung disease were primarily defined by emphysema (61% and asthma (18%, and immunocompromised patients primarily had malignancies (27% and bone marrow transplants (14%. A higher proportion of patients with chronic lung disease had a diagnosis of IPA by bronchoalveolar lavage versus the immunocompromised group (P < 0.03. The major risk factors for IPA were found to be steroid use in the chronic lung disease group and neutropenia and prior surgical procedures in the immunocompromised group. Overall, 53% and 69% of chronic lung disease and immunocompromised patients were cured (P = 0.14; 55% of chronic lung patients and 47% of immunocompromised patients survived one month (P = 0.75.Conclusion: Nontraditional patients with IPA, such as those with chronic lung disease, have outcomes and mortality similar to that in the

  14. Psychological and social stressors and psychiatric comorbidity in patients with migraine without aura from headache centers in Italy: a comparison with tension-type headache patients

    OpenAIRE

    Puca, Francomichele; ,

    2000-01-01

    A multicenter study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of psychosocial stressors and psychiatric comorbidity in patients suffering from migraine without aura (MWO) according to the International Headache Society criteria. Two hundred four adult MWO outpatients underwent a structured psychiatric interview (CIDI-c) to determine the presence of anxiety, and mood and somatoform disorders according to DSM-III-R criteria. An ad hoc questionnaire was used to assess psychosocial stress eve...

  15. Prevalence of Cannabis Residues in Psychiatric Patients: A Case Study of Two Mental Health Referral Hospitals in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Epaenetus A. Awuzu; Emmanuel Kaye; Patrick Vudriko

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have reported that abuse of cannabis is a risk factor for psychosis. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of delta 9-tetrahydrocanabinol (Δ9-THC), a major metabolite of cannabis, in psychiatric patients in Uganda, and to assess the diagnostic capacity of two referral mental health hospitals to screen patients for exposure to cannabis in Uganda. Socio-demographic characteristics of the patients were collected through questionnaires and review of medical recor...

  16. Intradialytic Hypoxemia in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Israel; Chan, Lili; Zhang, Hanjie; Deziel, Sheila; Vaughn, Cheryl; Meyring-Wösten, Anna; Kotanko, Peter

    2016-01-01

    When kidney failure occurs, patients are at risk for fluid overload states, which can cause pulmonary edema, pleural effusions, and upper airway obstruction. Kidney disease is also associated with impaired respiratory function, as in central sleep apnea or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Hence, respiratory and renal diseases are frequently coexisting. Hypoxemia is the terminal pathway of a multitude of respiratory pathologies. The measurement of oxygen saturation (SO2) is a basic and commonly used tool in clinical practice. Both arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) can be easily obtained in hemodialysis (HD) patients, SaO2 from an arteriovenous access and ScvO2 from a central catheter. Here, we give a brief overview of the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system, and the different technologies that are currently available to measure oxygen status in dialysis patients. We then focus on literature regarding intradialytic SaO2 and ScvO2. Lastly, we present clinical vignettes of intradialytic drops in SaO2 and ScvO2 in association with different symptoms and clinical scenarios with an emphasis on the pathophysiology of these cases. Given the fact that in the general population hypoxemia is associated with adverse outcomes, including increased mortality, cardiac arrhythmias and cardiovascular events, we posit that intradialytic SO2 may serve as a potential marker to identify HD patients at increased risk for morbidity and mortality. PMID:26765143

  17. Complement defects in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Q Gaunsbaek

    Full Text Available The complement system is an important part of our immune system, and complement defects lead generally to increased susceptibility to infections and autoimmune diseases. We have studied the role of complement activity in relation with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS, and more specifically studied whether complement defects collectively predispose individuals for CRS or affect CRS severity. The participants comprised 87 CRS patients randomly selected from the general population, and a control group of 150 healthy blood donors. The CRS patients were diagnosed according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and nasal Polyps criteria, and severity was evaluated by the Sino-nasal Outcome Test-22. Serum samples were analysed by ELISA for activity of the respective pathways of complement, and subsequently for serum levels of relevant components. We found that the frequency of complement defects was significantly higher among CRS patients than among healthy control subjects. A majority of Mannan-binding lectin deficient CRS patients was observed. The presence of complement defects had no influence on the severity of subjective symptoms. Our studies show that defects in the complement system collectively may play an immunological role related to the development of CRS. However, an association between severity of symptoms and presence of complement defects could not be demonstrated.

  18. Psycho-social Features of Chronic Dialysis Patients in Saudi Arabia: Experience of one Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Homrany, M A; Bilal, A M

    2001-01-01

    The goals of chronic dialysis treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients include restoration of the highest achievable state of personal physical health and preservation as well as restoration and development of the highest level of psychological and social functions. We conducted this study to evaluate factors influencing the process of adaptation such as religious faith, economic status and extended family-tribal system. It was hoped that studying these factors might provide further dimension to our understanding of the psychopathology of ESRD patients, and to help offer new ideas to improve the quality of their lives. A sample comprising 54 patients with ESRD was studied in Abha hemodialysis centre in Southern Saudi Arabia. The socio-demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory data were collected. The psychiatric status of the patients was evaluated using a structured "The Comprehensive Psychiatric Rating Scale" (CPRS) clinical interview. The result indicated that the major co-morbidity (in 60% of these patients) was a depressive illness due to renal failure diagnosable according to DSM-IV criteria. Our study suggests the need for specific anti-depressant treatment in order to ameliorate many distressing symptoms, which may affect the quality of these patients' life. Concomitant social problems of poverty, absence of spouse and illiteracy, dictate a more prompt attitude in initiating support systems and attention to providing leisure activities.

  19. Traumatic events, PTSD, and psychiatric comorbidity in forensic patients – assessed by questionnaires and diagnostic interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbert Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relationships between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, comorbid illness and experiences of traumatic stressors have been reported for large and different groups. The present study investigated this relationship specifically for patients with psychiatric disorders admitted to a forensic ward because of criminal behavior. Methods In sixteen German and fifteen Sudanese forensic patients the prevalence of PTSD and comorbid symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed and related to traumatic experiences, emotional distress, and stressful life events over four developmental periods. Results In the total sample, subjects had experienced an average of five traumatic events, the first one occurring early in childhood, and 39% met criteria of current, 55% of lifetime PTSD, the diagnosis being more likely in patients with a greater number of reported traumatic experiences. Neglect and emotional abuse in childhood were associated with current PTSD diagnosis. As reported for other populations, comorbid symptoms were frequent with 60% of the sample displaying comorbid anxiety symptoms and 64% comorbid depression. PTSD and comorbidity did not differ between cultures. Conclusion Results suggest that forensic patients experience multiple traumatic events, usually beginning early in development, so that the assessment of PTSD and comorbid anxiety and depression is recommended for the clinical evaluation. Further studies have to substantiate, whether traumatic stress during developmental stages interact with other factors leading to routes of forensic psychopathology.

  20. Chronic Rhinosinusitis in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilos, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is highly prevalent in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and accounts for significant morbidity and contribution to CF lung disease. Mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene occur with increased prevalence in patients with CRS without CF, suggesting some contribution to CRS pathophysiology. Nasal polyps (NPs) occur with increased prevalence in patients with CF of all ages and have a more neutrophilic appearance with fewer eosinophils and increased submucosal glandular elements in comparison to NPs from patients without CF. Mainstays of medical treatment include isotonic saline irrigations and topical intranasal glucocorticoids, with some evidence that topical intranasal glucocorticoids reduce NP size. Although inhaled hypertonic saline (7%) has been widely studied as a mucolytic agent for CF lung disease, there are no reports of its use in CF CRS. Mucolytics have also not been studied as a treatment for CRS in CF, and most evidence does not support their use for CF lung disease. Nasally nebulized dornase alfa (recombinant human deoxyribonuclease) following sinus surgery shows promise for treatment. Other unproven therapies include addition of baby shampoo to isotonic saline to potentially thin mucus and help prevent biofilm formation. There are no data to support the use of low-dose oral macrolide antibiotics or the use of prophylactic oral antibiotics for CRS in patients with CF. However, there is some support for the use of topical antibiotics, including colistimethate sodium or tobramycin, administered as a sinus irrigation or antral lavage in patients following sinus surgery when susceptible bacteria are cultured. Key components of CF sinus surgical management include extensive surgery to ensure that the maxillary, frontal, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinuses are all widely opened with smoothing of bony overhangs to prevent mucus retention and bacterial recolonization, postoperative meticulous daily nasal irrigations

  1. Using a Five-Factor Lens to Explore the Relation Between Personality Traits and Violence in Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeem, Jennifer L.; Miller, Joshua D.; Mulvey, Edward; Tiemann, Jenny; Monahan, John

    2005-01-01

    Recent work suggests that predictors of violence are similar for individuals with and without mental illness. Although psychopathy is among the most potent of such predictors, the nature of its relation to violence is unclear. On the basis of a sample of 769 civil psychiatric patients, the authors explore the possibility that measures of…

  2. Eszopiclone Treatment for Insomnia: Effect Size Comparisons in Patients With Primary Insomnia and Insomnia With Medical and Psychiatric Comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Krystal, Andrew D.; McCall, W. Vaughn; Fava, Maurizio; Joffe, Hadine; SOARES, CLAUDIO N.; Huang, Holly; Grinell, Todd; Zummo, Jacqueline; Spalding, William; Marshall, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this post hoc analysis was to compare the treatment effect size of eszopiclone 3 mg for insomnia in patients with a diagnosis of primary insomnia and in several of the psychiatric and medical conditions that are most commonly comorbid with insomnia.

  3. Chronic aseptic meningitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, M E; Mesropian, H; Granillo, R J

    1989-08-01

    Chronic aseptic meningitis is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. It may occur early in the course of the disease and sometimes may be the initial symptom. We report a patient with chronic aseptic meningitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed several ischemic lesions and an appearance which was compatible with chronic inflammation of the ependyma of the lateral ventricles.

  4. The prediction of discharge from in-patient psychiatric rehabilitation: a case-control study

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    Mountain Debbie A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At any time, about 1% of people with severe and enduring mental illness such as schizophrenia require in-patient psychiatric rehabilitation. In-patient rehabilitation enables individuals with the most challenging difficulties to be discharged to successful and stable community living. However, the length of rehabilitation admission that is required is highly variable and the reasons for this are poorly understood. There are very few case-control studies of predictors of outcome following hospitalisation. None have been carried out for in-patient rehabilitation. We aimed to identify the factors that are associated with achieving discharge from in-patient rehabilitation by carrying out a case-control study. Methods We compared two groups: 34 people who were admitted to the Rehabilitation Service at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital and discharged within a six year study period, and 31 people who were admitted in the same period, but not discharged. We compared the groups on demographic, illness, treatment and risk variables that were present at the point of their admission to rehabilitation. We used independent t tests and Pearson Chi-Square tests to compare the two groups. Results We found that serious self harm and suicide attempts, treatment with high dose antipsychotics, antipsychotic polypharmacy and previous care in forensic psychiatric services were all significantly associated with non-discharge. The non-discharged group were admitted significantly later in the six year study period and had already spent significantly longer in hospital. People who were admitted to rehabilitation within the first ten years of developing psychosis were more likely to have achieved discharge. Conclusions People admitted later in the study period required longer rehabilitation admissions and had higher rates of serious self harm and treatment resistant illness. They were also more likely to have had previous contact with forensic services. This

  5. Disclosure of abuse among female patients within general psychiatric care - a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Örmon, K.; Sunnqvist, C.; Bahtsevani, C.; Levander, M. Torstensson

    2016-01-01

    Background Experiences of abuse are common among women in general psychiatric care. Even so, there are to our knowledge no previous national or international studies exploring disclosure in a general psychiatric setting of female patient’s experiences of abuse to staff or to formal and informal networks. This study aimed to explore women’s disclosure of experiencing physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse during their most recent contact with staff at a general psychiatric clinic. The study a...

  6. Functional and psychiatric vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, J P

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral factors have long been recognized as affecting spatial orientation and balance function. Neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic studies conducted worldwide over the last 30 years have substantially advanced our knowledge about the inherently strong connectivity among threat/anxiety, vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems in the brain. Clinical investigations have shed greater light on the nature of functional and psychiatric disorders that manifest or magnify vestibular morbidity. Concepts of these syndromes have changed over 150 years. Even their nomenclature has had different meanings in different eras. This chapter will review functional and psychiatric vestibular disorders. Terminology will follow the International Classification of Diseases, 11th edition, beta draft and the International Classification of Vestibular Disorders. Anxiety plays a central role in behavioral vestibular morbidity. Anxiety, traumatic stress, obsessive, and depressive disorders may be primary causes of episodic and chronic vestibular symptoms or secondary complications of other vestibular disorders. These psychiatric illnesses affect 30-50% of patients who consult neurologists or otologists for vestibular symptoms. Coexisting psychiatric disorders adversely affect treatment for patients with structural vestibular diseases, especially when unrecognized. Persistent postural-perceptual dizziness is the leading cause of long-term vestibular disability. Fortunately, pharmacologic, psychotherapeutic, and rehabilitative treatments of these illnesses have improved in recent years. PMID:27638082

  7. [Cerebral arachnoiditis in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushchin, A N

    1994-01-01

    The examination and treatment of 66 patients with rhinosinusogenic cerebral arachnoiditis (RCA) were performed using otorhinolaryngological and neurological tests with special emphasis on pneumoencephalography to provide objective assessment of the brain layers and ventricles. It is shown that RCA occurs most frequently in subjects suffering from chronic purulent axillary sinusitis or recurrent polysinusitis. RCA manifestations depend on the duration of rhinosinusitis and its recurrence rate. RCA onset is usually not acute and takes place at the time of rhinosinusitis exacerbation. There are also mild frontal headaches, pathological changes in the coats of the anterior cranial fossa. The above abnormalities were most pronounced at the side of rhinosinusitis or most affected sinus. The treatment should be first of all oriented on elimination of maxillary infection in line with pathogenetic treatment of RCA. An individual approach to treatment policy is advocated.

  8. Clinical significance of changes of serum gastrin levels in patients with chronic eczema or chronic urticaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of serum levels of gastrin in patients with chronic eczema or chronic urticaria. Methods: Serum gastrin levels were, 37 patients with chromic urticaria and 43 controls. Results: Serum gastrin levels in patients with chronic exzema (102.95 ± 27.33 ng/L) and patients with chronic urticaria (109.87 ± 33.64 ng/L) were both significantly higher than those in controls (61.72 ± 20.38 ng/L, both P<0.01). Difference between the levels in the two patients groups was not significant. Conclusion: The high gastrin levels in those patients might reflect the presence of helicobacter pylori infections; eradication of which might be helpful for treatment of these chronic dermatologic disorders. (authors)

  9. Psycho-social Features of Chronic Dialysis Patients in Saudi Arabia: Experience of one Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AL-Homrany Mohammed

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The goals of chronic dialysis treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients include restoration of the highest achievable state of personal physical health and preservation as well as restoration and development of the highest level of psychological and social functions. We conducted this study to evaluate factors influencing the process of adaptation such as religious faith, economic status and extended family-tribal system. It was hoped that studying these factors might provide further dimension to our understanding of the psychopathology of ESRD patients, and to help offer new ideas to improve the quality of their lives. A sample comprising 54 patients with ESRD was studied in Abha hemodialysis centre in Southern Saudi Arabia. The socio-demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory data were collected. The psychiatric status of the patients was evaluated using a structured "The Comprehensive Psychiatric Rating Scale" (CPRS clinical interview. The result indicated that the major co-morbidity (in 60% of these patients was a depressive illness due to renal failure diagnosable according to DSM-IV criteria. Our study suggests the need for specific anti-depressant treatment in order to ameliorate many distressing symptoms, which may affect the quality of these patients′ life. Concomitant social problems of poverty, absence of spouse and illiteracy, dictate a more prompt attitude in initiating support systems and attention to providing leisure activities.

  10. Thalamic involvement in the regulation of alpha EEG activity in psychiatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The thalamus is considered to be an important sub-cortical system involved in modulation of cortical activities. A relationship between thalamic activity and surface EEG was recently reported. In this study we evaluated a group of patients with psychiatric disorders who presented with asymmetric perfusion of the thalamus based on brain SPECT HMPAO studies. We predicted that asymmetrical activity of the thalamus would have asymmetrically distributed surface qEEG activity patterns. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three male psychiatric patients (age 54±14) with a primary diagnosis of depression and co-morbid substance abuse (83%) were studied with qEEG and HMPAO brain SPECT. The HMPAO ligand was administered while the EEG activity was being recorded. The SPECT analysis was conducted by means of ROI and SPM. ROI regions were determined based on the Talairach atlas coordinate system. ROI locations were verified by the automated utility, Talairach Demon. QEEG data was analyzed by a standardized protocol involving the NxLink database. Correlations between SPECT findings and qEEG absolute power were calculated. Results: Patients were divided into two groups based on thalamic perfusion patterns. Group 1 (Gr 1) had decreased perfusion to the right thalamus whereas Group 2 (Gr 2) had decreased perfusion to the left thalamus. SPM comparison of the patient groups to normal control subjects indicated significant findings. Comparison of Gr 1 to controls showed increased activity in the left temporal lobe and vermis. Decreased activity was observed in the left and right medial frontal lobes (right Brodmann 9;left Brodmann 6) as well as the left (Brodmann 30) and right (Brodmann 24) cingulate. Gr 2 comparison showed increased activity in the right middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann 10) and left inferior parietal lobe. Decreased activity was found in the left inferior frontal lobe (Brodmann 47). A positive correlation between alpha power and thalamic perfusion was identified in Gr

  11. The validity of self-rating depression scales in patients with chronic widespread pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Omerovic, Emina; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of depression in chronic pain patients by self-rating questionnaires developed and validated for use in normal and/or psychiatric populations is common. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) in a sample...... of females with chronic widespread pain (CWP). METHOD: A total of 263 females diagnosed with CWP and referred for rehabilitation completed the MDI as part of the baseline evaluation. Rasch analysis was applied to this dataset. Rasch measurement models allow detailed analyses of an instrument's rating scale...... and further aspects of validity, including fit of individual scale items to a unidimensional model indicating assessment of a single construct (depression), as a prerequisite for measurement. RESULTS: The Rasch analysis revealed substantial problems with the rating scale properties of the MDI and lack...

  12. Gastric emptying in patients with chronic liver diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizu, Hirotaka; Shiomi, Susumu; Kawamura, Etsushi; Iwata, Yoshinori; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Kawabe, Joji; Ochi, Hironobu [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    There have been a number of reports of gastric emptying in cirrhosis, all with unconfirmed results. Moreover, the mechanism for delayed emptying in cirrhotic patients in unclear. We evaluated gastric emptying in patients with chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis by means of gastric emptying scintigraphy. The subjects were 18 normal controls and 75 patients with chronic viral hepatitis (50 patients had chronic hepatitis and 25 patients had cirrhosis). Tc-99m diethyltriamine pentaacetic acid labeled solid meals were used to evaluate gastric emptying; the half-time (T 1/2) of which was calculated. Digestive symptom scores were determined at the time of gastric emptying tests. Fourteen (28%) of 50 patients with chronic hepatitis and 16 (64%) of 25 patients with cirrhosis had delayed gastric emptying. T 1/2 in patients with cirrhosis was significantly higher than that in normal controls and patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.0001 and 0.0003, respectively). The difference between T 1/2 in patients with chronic hepatitis and that in normal controls was not significant. On regression analysis, two indices, the serum albumin level and platelet count, were found to be significantly related to delayed gastric emptying. Gastric emptying was more delayed in cirrhotic patients than in those with chronic hepatitis and normal controls. Delayed gastric emptying may be related to liver function and portal hypertension. (author)

  13. Electrocardiographic Abnormalities as Potential Contributors to Premature Mortality in Patients With Mental Illness in a Psychiatric Day Treatment Program

    OpenAIRE

    Linzer, Mark; Baker, Karen C.; Poplau, Sara; Coffey, Ellen; Shroff, Gautam; Baum, Inna; Yoder, Patrick; Clifford, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Because patients with mental illness can die prematurely, we sought to determine if undetected cardiovascular disease might be present in a psychiatric day treatment population. Method: We studied 96 patients in a day treatment program seen between February 2011 and August 2012. Data were obtained through an electronic medical record database. Electrocardiographic diagnoses were assigned by 1 investigator (M.L.). Medications were categorized into classes, and problem lists revealed...

  14. Alexithymia and anxiety in female chronic pain patients

    OpenAIRE

    Saatcioglu Omer; Celikel Feryal

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Alexithymia is highly prevalent among chronic pain patients. Pain is a remarkable cause for high levels of chronic anxiety. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alexithymia and to determine anxiety levels among DSM-IV somatoform pain disorder (chronic pain) female patients and to examine the relationship between alexithymia and the self-reporting of pain. Methods Thirty adult females (mean age: 34,63 ± 10,62 years), who applied to the outpatient p...

  15. Physical Activity Recommendations in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Jorine E.; Boezen, H. Marike; Zuidema, Menno J.; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Boezen, Hendrika

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical activity recommendations are hardly studied in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and specifically recommendations that are individualized to a patient's aerobic fitness level are not studied. Objectives: To compare individualized (relative) and nonindiv

  16. Psychiatric disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, G A; Nehall, J E; Simeon, D T

    1996-06-01

    The symptoms of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) may include altered mental function. The present study sought to determine whether the psychiatric disorders are due to the disease itself or to the stress of having a chronic disease. Forty-five SLE patients attending outpatient clinics at the Port-of-Spain General Hospital in Trinidad were compared with two control groups: patients with chronic debilitating diseases similar to SLE in terms of chronicity and treatment (n = 44) and non-diseased individuals (n = 48). The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM III-R was used to identify psychiatric disorders. Both the SLE and the chronic illness groups had more psychiatric illness (44% and 39%, respectively) when compared with the non-diseased controls (2%) (p < 0.001). Major depression was the most common diagnosis among both diseased groups. However, psychotic illnesses (schizophrenic-type psychosis and bipolar disorders) were more prevalent in the SLE group (11.1% vs 0%, p = 0.02). These results indicate that major depression in SLE may be related more to the effects of a chronic illness than to SLE itself. However, the occurrence of psychotic symptoms may be related to SLE disease and needs further study.

  17. Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at increased risk for osteoporosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2012-10-01

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis may be at an increased risk of low bone density because of malabsorption of vitamin D and calcium, poor diet, pain, alcoholism, and smoking. We investigated the rates of osteoporosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis compared to matched controls.

  18. Burnout in Patients with Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementz, Gunilla; Borsbo, Bjorn; Norrbrink, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to assess burnout and its relation to pain, disability, mood and health-related quality of life in a group of patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Forty-five patients with chronic WAD ([greater than or equal to] 3 months) referred to a multidisciplinary rehabilitation centre were included. A questionnaire…

  19. Cognitive function in patients with chronic pain treated with opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; de Mattos Pimenta, C A; Braga, P E;

    2012-01-01

    The paucity of studies regarding cognitive function in patients with chronic pain, and growing evidence regarding the cognitive effects of pain and opioids on cognitive function prompted us to assess cognition via neuropsychological measurement in patients with chronic non-cancer pain treated...... with opioids....

  20. A prospective study of monitoring practices for metabolic disease in antipsychotic-treated community psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkinson Helen MO

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with severe mental illness are at increased risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. A number of recent guidelines and consensus statements recommend stringent monitoring of metabolic function in individuals receiving antipsychotic drugs. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 106 community-treated psychiatric patients from across the diagnostic spectrum from the Northeast of England to investigate changes in metabolic status and monitoring practices for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. We undertook detailed anthropometric and metabolic assessment at baseline and follow-up, and examined clinical notes and hospital laboratory records to ascertain monitoring practices. Results A high prevalence of undiagnosed and untreated metabolic disease was present at baseline assessment. Mean follow-up time was 599.3 (SD ± 235.4 days. Body mass index (p 50% of subjects had neither blood glucose nor lipids monitored during the follow-up period. Conclusion This cohort has a high prevalence of metabolic disease and heightened cardiovascular risk. Despite the publication of a number of recommendations regarding physical health screening in this population, monitoring rates are poor, and physical health worsened during the follow-up period.

  1. Excessive self-focused attention and defensiveness among psychiatric patients: a vicious cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höping, Winfried; de Jong-Meyer, Renate; Abrams, Dominic

    2006-04-01

    The contribution of defensive coping to the phenomenon of excessive self-focused attention was studied in 20 depressed or anxious psychiatric outpatients comprising the negative affect group, 20 patients with psychotic disorders, and a control group of 21 patients of an orthopaedic clinic. Self-focused attention was assessed using the Self-reflectiveness and Internal State Awareness subfactors of the Private Self-consciousness Scale. In accordance with other research on self-focused attention, the negative affect group obtained higher scores on the Self-reflectiveness scale than the control group (t39=2.40, pdefensiveness, Weinberger, Schwartz, and Davidson's approach was employed, using median splits of short forms of the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale and the Marlowe-Crowne scale to differentiate among four groups of subjects. The highest self-reflectiveness was found for those participants who were high in both defensiveness and anxiety. This group scored higher than the nondefensive high anxious group (t30= -2.31, pdefensive efforts to avoid self-focus. PMID:16796082

  2. Prolactin and macroprolactin levels in psychiatric patients receiving atypical antipsychotics: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Bun-Hee; Lee, Kyu Young; Lee, Kye-Seong; Kang, Seung-Gul; Lee, Hwa-Young; Kim, Won

    2016-05-30

    The aims of this study were to clarify whether atypical antipsychotics can elevate serum levels of both macroprolactin and prolactin, and whether the macroprolactin levels differ according to the type of atypical antipsychotic being taken. In total, 245 subjects were enrolled consecutively in 6 hospitals. Serum prolactin and macroprolactin levels were measured at a single time point during maintenance antipsychotic monotherapy. The mean total serum prolactin levels including macroprolactin were 11.91, 20.73, 16.41, 50.83, 12.84, and 59.1ng/mL for patients taking aripiprazole, blonanserin, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, and risperidone, respectively, while those for macroprolactin were 1.71, 3.86, 3.73, 7.28, 2.77, and 8.0ng/mL. The total prolactin and macroprolactin levels were significantly higher among those taking paliperidone and risperidone than among those taking any of the other antipsychotics (phyperprolactinemia and macroprolactinemia in psychiatric patients. PMID:27010188

  3. Improved cognitive, affective and anxiety measures in patients with chronic systemic disorders following structured physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Robson Bonoto; Marins, João Carlos Bouzas; de Sá Junior, Antonio Reis; de Carvalho, Cristiane Junqueira; da Silva Moura, Tiago Augusto; Lade, Carlos Gabriel; Rizvanov, Albert A; Kiyasov, Andrey P; Mukhamedyarov, Marat A; Zefirov, Andrey L; Palotás, András; Lima, Luciana Moreira

    2015-11-01

    Mental illnesses are frequent co-morbid conditions in chronic systemic diseases. High incidences of depression, anxiety and cognitive impairment complicate cardiovascular and metabolic disorders such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Lifestyle changes including regular exercise have been advocated to reduce blood pressure and improve glycaemic control. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the effect of physical training on the most prevalent corollary psychiatric problems in patients with chronic organic ailments. This longitudinal study assessed the mental health of hypertensive (age: 57 ± 8 years) and/or diabetic (age: 53 ± 8 years) patients using mini-mental state examination, Beck's depression inventory, Beck's anxiety inventory and self-reporting questionnaire-20 before and after a 3-month supervised resistance and aerobic exercise programme comprising structured physical activity three times a week. Clinically relevant improvement was observed in the Beck's depression inventory and Beck's anxiety inventory scores following the 12-week training (61%, p = 0.001, and 53%, p = 0.02, respectively). Even though statistically not significant (p = 0.398), the cognitive performance of this relatively young patient population also benefited from the programme. These results demonstrate positive effects of active lifestyle on non-psychotic mental disorders in patients with chronic systemic diseases, recommending exercise as an alternative treatment option. PMID:26410835

  4. Psychiatric comorbidity of chronic daily headache: focus on traumatic experiences in childhood, post-traumatic stress disorder and suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Kai Dih; Yang, Chin-Yi

    2014-04-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual (DSM-5) reclassified some mental disorders recently. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is in a new section termed "trauma- and stressor-related disorder". Community-based studies have shown that PTSD is associated with a notably high suicidal risk. In addition to previous findings of comorbidity between chronic daily headache (CDH) and both depressive disorders and anxiety disorders, recent data suggest that frequency of childhood maltreatment, PTSD, and suicidality are also increased in CDH. CDH patients with migraine aura are especially at risk of suicidal ideation. Research suggests that migraine attack, aura, frequency, and chronicity may all be related to serotonergic dysfunction. Vulnerability to PTSD and suicidality are also linked to brain serotonin function, including polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR). In the present review, we focus on recent advances in knowledge of traumatic experiences in childhood, PTSD, and suicidality in relation to migraine and CDH. We hypothesize that vulnerability to PTSD is associated with migraine attack, migraine aura, and CDH. We further postulate that these associations may explain some of the elevated suicidal risks among patients with migraine, migraine aura, and/or CDH. Field studies are required to support these hypotheses.

  5. The high prevalence of obsessive-compulsive disorder in patients with chronic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mehraban

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a common disorder with a high prevalence of psychiatric disorder that imposes a worse prognosis on both conditions. Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD is estimated to be the fourth most prevalent life time psychiatric disorder, but yet has gained less attention in chronic pain comorbidity researches.Ninety three heterogeneous chronic pain patients who attended a pain clinic in Tehran (Iran in an outpatient setting during three months were included in this study. Diagnosis was made by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID.The mean age of the patients was 46.37 (SD 15.005 years; of the patients, 66.7% were female and 33.3% were male. The mean duration of pain was 34.43 (SD 51.422 months. The mean pain severity on numerical pain scale was 5.82 (SD 1.950 from 10. The mean pain site number was 3.68 (SD 3.401 from the maximum of 27 places. Furthermore, 61.3% of the participants were diagnosed with lifetime OCD, 25.8% with subclinical OCD and 61.5 % with major depressive disorder (MDD. OCD diagnosis was not correlated with MDD or pain intensity. Female gender was associated with OCD (OD; 4.182, 95% CL (1.655-10.568. Pain intensity was correlated with MDD (P < 0.05.The high prevalence of OCD was comorbidity, independent of MDD and most pain characteristics. The high prevalence of OCD may be explained by the high rate of undiagnosed cause of pain as well as cultural and local factors. Using screening tests is suggested for tackling under diagnosis and under treatment of OCD and MDD.

  6. Review article: hepatitis vaccination in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, G; Keeffe, E B

    2004-04-01

    Evidence regarding the outcomes of viral super-infection in patients with chronic liver disease and practical strategies for hepatitis A and B vaccination of these individuals are reviewed. Patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B have a more severe clinical course and a higher death rate compared with otherwise healthy individuals with hepatitis A, and these differences are most pronounced in older patients and those with histological evidence of chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, rather than in asymptomatic hepatitis B carriers. Patients with acute hepatitis A super-infection and chronic hepatitis C have an increased risk of fulminant hepatitis and death. In addition, patients with other chronic liver diseases also appear to be at increased risk for more severe disease with superimposed hepatitis A. Patients with chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus co-infection have more severe laboratory abnormalities, more severe histological disease, a greater frequency of cirrhosis and complications of cirrhosis, and a higher incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Vaccines for both hepatitis A and B are safe and effective if used early in the course of chronic liver disease. Hepatitis A and B vaccination should be part of the routine management of patients with chronic liver disease, preferably as early as possible in the natural course of their disease.

  7. Addiction to opioids in chronic pain patients: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-01-01

    Opioids have proven very useful for treatment of acute pain and cancer pain, and in the developed countries opioids are increasingly used for treatment of chronic non-malignant pain patients as well. This literature review aims at giving an overview of definitions, mechanisms, diagnostic criteria......, incidence and prevalence of addiction in opioid treated pain patients, screening tools for assessing opioid addiction in chronic pain patients and recommendations regarding addiction problems in national and international guidelines for opioid treatment in cancer patients and chronic non-malignant pain...... patients. The review indicates that the prevalence of addiction varied from 0% up to 50% in chronic non-malignant pain patients, and from 0% to 7.7% in cancer patients depending of the subpopulation studied and the criteria used. The risk of addiction has to be considered when initiating long-term opioid...

  8. Primary Psychiatric Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Mercan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of these dermatological diseases is entirely psychiatric origin. These patients show overconcern to their skin or self inflicted dermatoses unconsciously instead of facing with their real problems. In this group, delusions, dermatitis artefacta, trichotillomania, body dysmorphic disorder can be seen. They use denial as defence mechanism to their real psychiatric problems and prefer to apply dermatology instead of psychiatry. Dermatologist should be very careful before asking psychiatric consultation. Denial mechanism help patients to overcome agressive impulses like suicide or prevent further psychiatric damage like psychosis. Dermatologist should see these patients with short and frequent intervals with a good empathic approach. This will help to progress a powerful patient doctor relationship which will lead to a psychiatric evaluation.

  9. Influence of chronic kidney disease on the outcome of patients with chronic total occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qing-Bin; Chen, Li-Ming; Min LI; Cui, Yu-Qi; Zhao, Chuan-Yan; Cui, Lian-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) predicted a poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease. There is a paucity of data on outcomes after revascularization in patients with chronic total occlusion (CTO) and CKD. This study aims to investigate the impact of CKD on the revascularization of CTO. Methods: This study enrolled 1,092 CTO patients received treatments in our hospital between February 2009 and January 2014. Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) and al...

  10. Transvascular lipoprotein transport in patients with chronic renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Krogsgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo;

    2004-01-01

    , determines the degree of atherosclerosis among patients with chronic renal disease. METHODS: We used an in vivo method for measurement of transvascular transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in 21 patients with chronic renal disease and in 42 healthy control patients. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL...... was reinjected intravenously, and the 1-hour fractional escape rate was taken as index of transvascular transport. RESULTS: Transvascular LDL transport tended to be lower in patients with chronic renal disease than in healthy control patients [3.3 (95% CI 2.4-4.2) vs. 4.2 (3.7-4.2)%/hour; NS]. However...... with chronic renal disease, and healthy control patients [5.0 (3.2-7.8) vs. 3.0 (2.2-3.8) vs. 4.2 (3.6-4.8) %/hour; P

  11. Gender differences in the clinical characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in patients with antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Leo; Siever, Larry J; Goodman, Marianne; McNamara, Margaret; Hazlett, Erin A; Koenigsberg, Harold W; New, Antonia S

    2015-10-30

    Gender is an important variable in the study of mental health because of the actual and perceived differences between men and women. Relatively little is known how males and females differ in their manifestations of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). Demographic and clinical features of 323 participants with ASPD were assessed and recorded. Women had fewer episodes of antisocial behavior involving or not involving police, higher scores on the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and on Emotional Abuse and Sexual Abuse subscales of the CTQ compared to men. CTQ scores positively correlated with the number of episodes of antisocial behavior involving police in men but not in women. The percentage of patients with comorbid borderline and histrionic personality disorders was higher and the percentage of participants with cocaine use disorder was lower among women compared to men. Comorbid alcohol use disorder was frequent in both groups, while a higher percentage of women had comorbid mood disorders compared to men. Logistic regression analysis demonstrates that CTQ scores, histrionic personality disorder, and antisocial behavior involving the police drive the difference between the groups. Our findings indicate that treatment of individuals with ASPD should focus on the management of comorbid psychiatric disorders.

  12. Gender differences in the clinical characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in patients with antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Leo; Siever, Larry J; Goodman, Marianne; McNamara, Margaret; Hazlett, Erin A; Koenigsberg, Harold W; New, Antonia S

    2015-10-30

    Gender is an important variable in the study of mental health because of the actual and perceived differences between men and women. Relatively little is known how males and females differ in their manifestations of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). Demographic and clinical features of 323 participants with ASPD were assessed and recorded. Women had fewer episodes of antisocial behavior involving or not involving police, higher scores on the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and on Emotional Abuse and Sexual Abuse subscales of the CTQ compared to men. CTQ scores positively correlated with the number of episodes of antisocial behavior involving police in men but not in women. The percentage of patients with comorbid borderline and histrionic personality disorders was higher and the percentage of participants with cocaine use disorder was lower among women compared to men. Comorbid alcohol use disorder was frequent in both groups, while a higher percentage of women had comorbid mood disorders compared to men. Logistic regression analysis demonstrates that CTQ scores, histrionic personality disorder, and antisocial behavior involving the police drive the difference between the groups. Our findings indicate that treatment of individuals with ASPD should focus on the management of comorbid psychiatric disorders. PMID:26296756

  13. A comparative study of psychiatric comorbidity, quality of life and disability in patients with migraine and tension type headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Chandra Bera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare psychiatric co-morbidity, quality of life and disability between patients of migraine and tension type headache and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Study subjects included 40 consecutive adult patients each with migraine and tension type of headache (TTH of either gender fulfilling International Headache Society-II criteria and suffering for 2 years They were recruited from a headache clinic in a tertiary care teaching hospital and were assessed on Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF Hindi version and the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6. Age and sex matched 40 healthy controls were assessed on MINI and WHOQOL-BREF. The three groups were compared for statistical significance on various scales. Results: Depression emerged as the most prevalent psychiatric disorder in both the headache groups. There was significant impairment in quality of life on all domains along with functional disability in subjects with both types of headache. Conclusion: Psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression is common in patients with migraines and tension type headache. Quality of life and functional ability are significantly impaired in these patients. The clinician should remain aware of consequences of prolonged headache, and should provide timely intervention.

  14. [The physician-patient relationship in chronic disease management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginies, P

    2008-07-01

    The relationship between patients and clinicians is a key element in the management of chronic diseases. With the objective of a more efficient communication, the clinician should know his own personality but also the patient personality. The organisation of the consultation, of the waiting room and of the secretary has to facilitate this relationship. The amelioration of this relationship is usefulness only for the clinician in particularly complicated cases but also for the patients suffering from chronic diseases.

  15. Analysis of postictal psychiatric disorders in patients with epilepsy:3 cases report%癫痫患者的发作后精神障碍(附3例报告)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔韬; 吕瑞娟; 孙振荣; 邵晓秋

    2012-01-01

    Objective To discuss the clinical features of postictal psychiatric disorders in epilepsy patients. Methods Ninety-eight patients receiving presurgical evaluation from 2007 to 2009 were reviewed. The significant psychiatric disorders were reported in three epilepsy patients while they received video EEC montoring for presurgical evaluation. All the clinical data were retrospectively analyzed including semiology, EEC, MRI and the treatment. Results All the patients suffered from postictal psychiatric disorders after a cluster of epileptic seizures. There was a lucid interval between seizures and psychiatric symptoms in all patients. The psychiatric disorders were characterized by auditory and visual hallucinations, mania, depression and aggression. Conclusion Postictal psychiatric disorders are common psychiatric complication of chronic epilepsy. Recognition of this disorder is critical to initiate treatment and avoid severe accidental injury.%目的 探讨癫痫患者的发作后精神障碍的临床特点.方法 回顾分析我中心2009~2010年进行术前评估的患者共98例,其中3例在进行视频脑电监测时出现明显的精神障碍,包括发作症状学、脑电图、MRI和治疗等相关资料都进行了回顾分析.结果 所有患者都是在成簇的癫痫发作后出现精神障碍,在发作和精神症状之间都有一个相对正常的时期,精神障碍主要以幻听、幻视、躁狂、抑郁和攻击行为为特征.结论 发作后精神障碍是慢性癫痫常见的并发症,早期识别对治疗和防止严重的意外伤害都是至关重要的.

  16. Osteoporosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Schwarz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence.......The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence....

  17. Medication Adherence, Work Performance and Self-Esteem among Psychiatric Patients Attending Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services at Bangalore, India

    OpenAIRE

    Sailaxmi Gandhi; Rajitha Pavalur; Sivakumar Thanapal; Nirmala B Parathasarathy; Geetha Desai; Poornima Bhola; Mariamma Philip; Chaturvedi, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Work benefits mental health in innumerable ways. Vocational rehabilitation can enhance self-esteem. Medication adherence can improve work performance and thereby the individuals′ self-esteem. Aim: To test the hypothesis that there would be a significant correlation between medication adherence, work performance and self-esteem. Setting and Design: A quantitative, descriptive correlational research design was adopted to invite patients attending psychiatric rehabilitation services to ...

  18. Treatment-seeking patients with binge-eating disorder in the Swedish national registers: clinical course and psychiatric comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, Elisabeth; Jangmo, Andreas; Thornton, Laura M.; Norring, Claes; von Hausswolff-Juhlin, Yvonne; Herman, Barry K.; Pawaskar, Manjiri; Larsson, Henrik; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background We linked extensive longitudinal data from the Swedish national eating disorders quality registers and patient registers to explore clinical characteristics at diagnosis, diagnostic flux, psychiatric comorbidity, and suicide attempts in 850 individuals diagnosed with binge-eating disorder (BED). Method Cases were all individuals who met criteria for BED in the quality registers (N = 850). We identified 10 controls for each identified case from the Multi-Generation Register matched ...

  19. Longitudinal Relationships of Religion with Posttreatment Depression Severity in Older Psychiatric Patients: Evidence of Direct and Indirect Effects

    OpenAIRE

    R. David Hayward; Owen, Amy D.; Harold G. Koenig; Steffens, David C.; Payne, Martha E.

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric patients (age 59+) were assessed before study treatment for major depressive disorder, and again after 3 months. Measures taken before study treatment included facets of religiousness (subjective religiosity, private prayer, worship attendance, and religious media use), social support, and perceived stress. Clinician-rated depression severity was assessed both before and after treatment using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Structural equation modeling was u...

  20. Adverse incidents, patient flow and nursing workforce variables on acute psychiatric wards: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bowers, L.; Allan, T; Simpson, A.; Nijman, H.; Warren, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adverse incidents (violence, self-harm and absconding) can cause significant harm to patients and staff, are difficult to predict, and are driving an increase in security measures and defensive practice. Aims: To explore the relationship between adverse incidents on acute psychiatric wards, admissions and nursing workforce variables. Methods: A retrospective analysis of officially collected data covering a period of 30 months on 14 acute wards at three hospitals. This data...

  1. Influence of music therapy on coping skills and anger management in forensic psychiatric patients: An exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Hakvoort, Laurien; Bogaerts, S.; Thaut, Michael H.; Spreen, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    The effect of music therapy on anger management and coping skills is an innovative subject in the field of forensic psychiatry. This study explores the following research question: Can music therapy treatment contribute to positive changes in coping skills, anger management, and dysfunctional behavior of forensic psychiatric patients? To investigate this question, first a literature review is offered on music therapy and anger management in forensic psychiatry. Then, an explorative study is p...

  2. Ovarian carcinoma in two patients with chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehlika Isildak; Gulay Sain Guven; Murat Kekilli; Yavuz Beyazit; Mustafa Erman

    2005-01-01

    Ascites is a common and debilitating complication of cirrhosis. However, patients with chronic liver disease are not spared from other causes of ascites and physicians should be careful not to miss an underlying malignancy.Ovarian cancer is an insidious disease, which is difficult to diagnose and it ranks first in mortality among all gynecological cancers. Here, we present two cases of patients with chronic liver disease that developed ascites not simply because of cirrhosis but as a manifestation of ovarian cancer. We would like to emphasize that the causes of ascites, other than the liver itself, should not be overlooked in patients with chronic liver disease.

  3. Assessing and Managing Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatle, Martin D; Foster, Simmie; Pinkett, Aaron; Lesneski, Matthew; Qu, David; Dhingra, Lara

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is associated with symptoms that may impair a patient's quality of life, including emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. There is a high prevalence of concomitant pain and sleep disturbance. Studies support the hypothesis that sleep and pain have a bidirectional and reciprocal relationship. Clinicians who manage patients with chronic pain often focus on interventions that relieve pain, and assessing and treating sleep disturbance are secondary or not addressed. This article reviews the literature on pain and co-occurring sleep disturbance, describes the assessment of sleep disturbance, and outlines nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment strategies to improve sleep in patients with chronic pain. PMID:27208716

  4. Assessing and Managing Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatle, Martin D; Foster, Simmie; Pinkett, Aaron; Lesneski, Matthew; Qu, David; Dhingra, Lara

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is associated with symptoms that may impair a patient's quality of life, including emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. There is a high prevalence of concomitant pain and sleep disturbance. Studies support the hypothesis that sleep and pain have a bidirectional and reciprocal relationship. Clinicians who manage patients with chronic pain often focus on interventions that relieve pain, and assessing and treating sleep disturbance are secondary or not addressed. This article reviews the literature on pain and co-occurring sleep disturbance, describes the assessment of sleep disturbance, and outlines nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment strategies to improve sleep in patients with chronic pain.

  5. [A new method for treating patients with chronic prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭko, M I

    1995-01-01

    A new preparation is reported for treatment of chronic inflammation of the prostate, which substantially lowers rates of patients' complaints and depresses the secretion leucocyte reaction. Prostatilen was shown to be capable of normalization of immunity status of the chronic prostatitis patients thus lowering the microbial index of the cultured prostate secretion microorganisms. The following new nonantibacterial strategy of treatment of chronic prostatitis patients is proposed: prostatilen given as a single agent or in combination with immunomodulators and physiotherapeutic methods. Antibacterial therapy is to be instituted on a short-term basis only during the period of exacerbation of the inflammatory process.

  6. The new asylums in the community: severely ill psychiatric patients living in psychiatric supported housing facilities. A Danish register-based study of prognostic factors, use of psychiatric services, and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Pedersen, Marianne G; Pedersen, Carsten B;

    2012-01-01

    never experienced a psychiatric admission. RESULTS: We identified schizophrenia as the strongest diagnostic predictor of becoming a resident in a supported psychiatric housing facility, followed by organic mental disorders, substance abuse, and affective disorder. In addition, the higher the number of...... predictors of becoming a resident in a psychiatric housing facility, use of psychiatric services around the time of entrance to a supported psychiatric housing facility, and mortality rates for residents in a psychiatric housing facility compared to non-residents and to persons in the general population who...... been diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizophrenia-like disorders, and organic mental disorders, and a large proportion had substance abuse and a high use of bed days. Moving into such a facility reduced the number of bed days....

  7. Mitochondrial DNA deletions in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Arzu; Tasdemir, Sener; Sahin, Ibrahim; Bozoglu, Ceyda; Erdem, Haktan Bagis; Yoruk, Ozgur; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the 4977 and 7400 bp deletions of mitochondrial DNA in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media and to indicate the possible association of mitochondrial DNA deletions with chronic suppurative otitis media. Thirty-six patients with chronic suppurative otitis media were randomly selected to assess the mitochondrial DNA deletions. Tympanomastoidectomy was applied for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media, and the curettage materials including middle ear tissues were collected. The 4977 and 7400 bp deletion regions and two control regions of mitochondrial DNA were assessed by using the four pair primers. DNA was extracted from middle ear tissues and peripheral blood samples of the patients, and then polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were performed. PCR products were separated in 2 % agarose gel. Seventeen of 36 patients had the heterozygote 4977 bp deletion in the middle ear tissue but not in peripheral blood. There wasn't any patient who had the 7400 bp deletion in mtDNA of their middle ear tissue or peripheral blood tissue. The patients with the 4977 bp deletion had a longer duration of chronic suppurative otitis media and a higher level of hearing loss than the others (p media and the reactive oxygen species can cause the mitochondrial DNA deletions and this may be a predisposing factor to sensorineural hearing loss in chronic suppurative otitis media. An antioxidant drug as a scavenger agent may be used in long-term chronic suppurative otitis media.

  8. Analysis of electrocardiogram in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazović Biljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is the fourth leading cause of mortality worldwide. It is defined as a persistent airflow limitation usually progressive and not fully reversible to treatment. The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severity of disease is confirmed by spirometry. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease produces electrical changes in the heart which shows characteristic electrocardiogram pattern. The aim of this study was to observe and evaluate diagnostic values of electrocardiogram changes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with no other comorbidity. Material and Methods. We analyzed 110 electrocardiogram findings in clinically stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the forced expiratory volume in the first second, ratio of forces expiratory volume in the first second to the fixed vital capacity, chest radiographs and electrocardiogram changes such as p wave height, QRS axis and voltage, right bundle branch block, left bundle branch block, right ventricular hypertrophy, T wave inversion in leads V1-V3, S1S2S3 syndrome, transition zone in praecordial lead and QT interval. Results. We found electrocardiogram changes in 64% patients, while 36% had normal electrocardiogram. The most frequent electrocardiogram changes observed were transition zone (76.36% low QRS (50% and p pulmonale (14.54%. Left axis deviation was observed in 27.27% patients. Conclusion. Diagnostic values of electrocardiogram in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease suggest that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients should be screened electrocardiographically in addition to other clinical investigations.

  9. Broader Indications for Psychiatric Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A liaison approach to psychiatric consultation increases the patient population who can benefit from psychiatric assessment during hospitalization for medical or surgical conditions. It also broadens the scope of the psychiatric investigation of the individual patient. The meaning of the illness to the patient, and the patient's present methods of adapting to his or her illness are important considerations. Unconscious concerns, which interfere with the patient's compliance to medical treatme...

  10. STUDY ON PSYCHIATRIC CO - MORBIDITY IN PSORIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is relatively common , chronic inflammatory and hyper - proliferative skin disease that affects 1.4% to 2.0% of the population. Presence of itching , chronic recurrent course of disease and incomplete cure may contribute to great deal of psychiatric co - morbidity in these patients. the most persuasive indications of a link between stress and psoriasis comes from patients themselves , with studies illustrating that the majority of patients believe that stress or psychological distress is a factor in the manifestations of their condition . Depression and anxiety are the most common disorders that are associated with psoriasis , but the proportion of patient also having other psychiatric co - morbid diseases which include social phobia , generalize anxiety disorder , panic disorder , psychotic diso rder , etc. Moreover , symptoms of psoriasis , especially pruritus , are related to depression. OBJECTIVES : To evaluate different psychiatric illnesses their prevalence and severity in psoriasis patients. METHODOLOGY : This was cross - sectional observational stu dy comprised of 70 consecutive patients of psoriasis attending the out - patient department of Dermatology. All the patients were subjected to detailed examinations including the elicitation of dermatological and psychiatric profile after getting written con sent for study . Data was collected using self - developed , pre tested , semi structured Pro format by interview method. RESULTS : The profile of psychiatric diagnoses obtained in the present study depressive disorder 31.4% {18.57% depression , 12.85% Depression with anxiety symptoms} , anxiety disorder 25.7% (7.14% GAD , 8.17% panic disorder , 5.71% social phobia , 4.28 specific phobia. Severity of major depressive disorder was determined with HAM - D score 53.8% had mild depression , 30.7% moderate depression and 15. 5% severe depression. Similarly when HAM - A scale was used to determined severity of generalized

  11. Risk-factor differences for nonsuicidal self-injury and suicide attempts in Mexican psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresán A

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ana Fresán,1 Beatriz Camarena,2 Thelma Beatriz González-Castro,3 Carlos Alfonso Tovilla-Zárate,4 Isela E Juárez-Rojop,5 Lilia López-Narváez,5 Alicia E González-Ramón,4 Yazmín Hernández-Díaz3 1Subdirección de Investigaciones Clínicas, Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatría Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz, México City, 2Departamento de Genética Psiquiátrica, Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatría Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz, México City, 3División Académica Multidisciplinaria de Jalpa de Méndez, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Jalpa de Méndez, 4División Académica Multidisciplinaria de Comalcalco, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Comalcalco, 5Hospital General de Yajalón, Secretaría de Salud, Yajalón, Chiapas, México Background: The present study compared sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities with substance use, and impulsivity features in three groups of psychiatric patients – suicide attempters, nonsuicidal self-injury, and nonsuicidal without self-injury – to determine the predictive factors for nonsuicidal self-injury or suicide behavior.Patients and methods: Demographic features and self-reported substance use were assessed in 384 Mexican psychiatric patients. Impulsivity features were evaluated using the Plutchik Impulsivity Scale. Comparison analyses between groups were performed and a logistic regression model used to determine the factors associated with nonsuicidal with self-injury behavior and suicidal behavior.Results: Different predictive factors were observed for nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behavior. Females were more likely to present nonsuicidal self-injury behaviors (odds ratio [OR] 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.18–0.93; P=0.03. For suicide attempters, the factors associated were younger age (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.85–0.93; P<0.001, less than 6 years of schooling (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.06–0.6; P=0.004, and higher impulsivity traits, such as self-control (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.03

  12. [Psychiatric rehabilitation from the viewpoint of a large psychiatric facility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, R

    1990-06-01

    The paper makes the reader familiar with the results of activities of the central rehabilitation department in the Psychiatric Sanatorium in Kromĕríz. It postulates views regarding the technique of work with patients and pays special attention to the rehabilitation of patients with schizophrenic psychosis. In these patients the results of rehabilitation care at different rating levels were evaluated. In the field of ergotherapy the schizophrenic patients were evaluated by the therapists and instructors of occupational therapy on entry of and departure from the workshop or class, using the Engelsman--Hájek scale. Based on the results the hypothesis was confirmed of a lower working performance of patients with schizophrenic psychosis, as compared with other diagnostic groups. In the field of remedial exercise and special forms of psychiatric rehabilitation, such as educational and recreational activities, patients with schizophrenic psychosis were evaluated by a doctor and psychologist of the rehabilitation department of the psychiatric sanatorium for after--treatment of psychoses. The patients were evaluated by Wing's scale for chronic schizophrenia and by means of the Scale for Evaluation of Working Performance and Behaviour. According to the results of both scales no significant differences were found between the experimental groups where different forms of rehabilitation were accentuated, as compared with the control group engaged only in occupational therapy. Both scales revealed in both experimental groups highly significant improvement as regards resocialization within a very short period during which the patients were subjected to intense rehabilitation. Based on these results the author recommends further rehabilitation provisions. PMID:2225189

  13. Bile acid malabsorption in patients with chronic diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, S; Nørby Rasmussen, S; Lysgård Madsen, Jan;

    2003-01-01

    Bile acid malabsorption (BAM), a cause of chronic diarrhoea, can be diagnosed by the SeHCAT test. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of SeHCAT testing by assessing the extent of BAM and describing the clinical characteristics in a group of patients with chronic diarrhoea...

  14. Ribavirin for Chronic Hepatitis Prevention among Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Tavitian, Suzanne; Peron, Jean-Marie; Huguet, Françoise; Kamar, Nassim; Abravanel, Florence; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Oberic, Lucie; Faguer, Stanislas; Alric, Laurent; Roussel, Murielle; Gaudin, Clément; Ysebaert, Loïc; Huynh, Anne; Recher, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Findings among a cohort of 26 patients who had hematologic malignancies and hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection support that HEV can induce chronic hepatitis. However, a 3-month course of ribavirin can induce a rapid viral clearance, reducing the risk for chronic hepatitis and enabling continuation of cytotoxic treatments for underlying malignancies.

  15. Insulin Radioimmunoassay for Clinical Research in Psychiatric, Pancreatic, Cirrhotic and Irradiated Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modified Hales-Randle method for insulin radioimmunoassay is described. An insulin response curve was established in normal cases after glucose loading. Pathological changes were then investigated in patients and animals before and after therapeutic, operative and radiological procedures. Four representative groups of this material will be illustrated. (1) Psychotic patients (acute and chronic schizophrenics, neurotics and depressives) were examined with the aim of learning about the variable effects produced by insulin shock-therapy, as well as for biochemical diagnosis purposes in psychotics. Highest insulin response curves were found in chronic schizophrenics with improvement after insulin therapy. Schizophrenics without improvement presented different curves. Lowest insulin values were found in acute schizophrenia. Depressives and anxiety neurotics showed insulin tolerance curves similar to those of non-psychotic patients. (2) Pancreatic patients. Special attention was paid to pancreatic carcinoma (insulinoma excepted). In most cases of pancreatic carcinoma a very low and flat insulin tolerance curve was found. The above findings may be of a diagnostic importance in this condition, which is clinically hardly recognized. (3) Liver cirrhotic patients. A special group of shunt operated patients was investigated. The study was performed on eight liver cirrhotics before and after porto-caval or reno-splenal shunt operation. The plasma insulin level was examined in the vena cava, renal and cubital blood. The influence of tolbutamide was analysed. The normally occurring retention of insulin by normal hepatic tissue was found to be considerably disturbed. Other interesting changes were observed. (4) The plasma insulin level in the radiologically exposed. Experimental and clinical studies were performed, with insulin doses before and after radiation. Whole body X-ray exposure (300 rads) to rats resulted in a rapid lowering of insulin or its disappearance. Recovery was

  16. Effect of a Multi-Dimensional and Inter-Sectoral Intervention on the Adherence of Psychiatric Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Pauly

    Full Text Available In psychiatry, hospital stays and transitions to the ambulatory sector are susceptible to major changes in drug therapy that lead to complex medication regimens and common non-adherence among psychiatric patients. A multi-dimensional and inter-sectoral intervention is hypothesized to improve the adherence of psychiatric patients to their pharmacotherapy.269 patients from a German university hospital were included in a prospective, open, clinical trial with consecutive control and intervention groups. Control patients (09/2012-03/2013 received usual care, whereas intervention patients (05/2013-12/2013 underwent a program to enhance adherence during their stay and up to three months after discharge. The program consisted of therapy simplification and individualized patient education (multi-dimensional component during the stay and at discharge, as well as subsequent phone calls after discharge (inter-sectoral component. Adherence was measured by the "Medication Adherence Report Scale" (MARS and the "Drug Attitude Inventory" (DAI.The improvement in the MARS score between admission and three months after discharge was 1.33 points (95% CI: 0.73-1.93 higher in the intervention group compared to controls. In addition, the DAI score improved 1.93 points (95% CI: 1.15-2.72 more for intervention patients.These two findings indicate significantly higher medication adherence following the investigated multi-dimensional and inter-sectoral program.German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00006358.

  17. Chronic urticaria. Clinical and pathogenetic studies in 141 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeglas, Hendrik Maarten George

    1975-01-01

    This study describes a combined clinical, laboratory and experimental approach of the problems of 141 patients with chronic urticaria, collected over a three-year period in a Dermatology department. ... Zie: Summary

  18. SRSF2 mutation in patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨向绸

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate SRSF2 mutations in patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia(CMML)and the clinical characteristics of patients with SRSF2mutants.Methods In this study,the frequency of SRSF2mutation in a cohort of 20 patients with CMML was detected by polymerase chain reaction(PCR)followed by direct

  19. Differences in maladaptive schemas between patients suffering from chronic and acute posttraumatic stress disorder and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadian A

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alireza Ahmadian,1,2 Jafar Mirzaee,1 Maryam Omidbeygi,1 Edith Holsboer-Trachsler,3 Serge Brand3,41Department of Psychology, Kharazmi University, 2Sadr Psychiatric Hospital, Janbazan Medical and Engineering Research Center (JMERC, Tehran, Iran; 3Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, Center for Affective, Stress and Sleep Disorders, 4Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, Sport Science Section, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background: War, as a stressor event, has a variety of acute and chronic negative consequences, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. In this context, early maladaptive schema-based problems in PTSD have recently become an important research area. The aim of this study was to assess early maladaptive schemas in patients with acute and chronic PTSD.Method: Using available sampling methods and diagnostic criteria, 30 patients with chronic PTSD, 30 patients with acute PTSD, and 30 normal military personnel who were matched in terms of age and wartime experience were selected and assessed with the Young Schema Questionnaire-Long Form, Beck Depression Inventory second version (BDI-II, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, and the Impact of Events Scale (IES.Results: Both acute and chronic PTSD patients, when compared with normal military personnel, had higher scores for all early maladaptive schemas. Additionally, veterans suffering from chronic PTSD, as compared with veterans suffering from acute PTSD and veterans without PTSD, reported more impaired schemas related, for instance, to Self-Control, Social Isolation, and Vulnerability to Harm and Illness.Discussion: The results of the present study have significant preventative, diagnostic, clinical, research, and educational implications with respect to PTSD. Keywords: veterans, PTSD, depression, anxiety 

  20. Ovarian carcinoma in two patients with chronic liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Isildak, Mehlika; Guven, Gulay Sain; Kekilli, Murat; Beyazit, Yavuz; Erman, Mustafa

    2005-01-01

    Ascites is a common and debilitating complication of cirrhosis. However, patients with chronic liver disease are not spared from other causes of ascites and physicians should be careful not to miss an underlying malignancy. Ovarian cancer is an insidious disease, which is difficult to diagnose and it ranks first in mortality among all gynecological cancers. Here, we present two cases of patients with chronic liver disease that developed ascites not simply because of cirrhosis but as a manifes...

  1. Phenotypes selected during chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Wang, Hengzhuang;

    2012-01-01

    During chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods of time under the challenging selective pressure imposed by the immune system and antibiotic treatment as a result of its biofilm mode of growth and adaptive evolution mediated...... the importance of biofilm prevention strategies by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy before phenotypic diversification during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis....

  2. Cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Julian Wright; Alastair Hutchison

    2009-01-01

    Julian Wright, Alastair HutchisonManchester Institute of Nephrology and Transplantation, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UKAbstract: Patients with chronic kidney disease have a high burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease do not progress to end stage renal failure, but do have a significantly higher incidence of all cardiovascular co-morbidities. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors only partially account for this ...

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders and cardiovascular diseases are major co-morbidities in both. Co-existence of both disorders (overlap syndrome) occurs in 1% of adults and overlap patients have worse nocturnal hypoxemia and hypercapnia than COPD and OSA patients alone. The present review discusses recent data concerning the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the overlap syndrome.

  4. Impaired vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzner, Fabian; Scholze, Alexandra; Wittstock, Antje;

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics.......Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics....

  5. Disability and borderline personality disorder in chronic pain patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sansone, Randy A.; J David Sinclair; Wiederman, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Few studies have examined the relationship between disability and borderline personality symptomatology, and, among those that have, findings have been inconsistent. In the present study, the relationship between medical disability and borderline personality symptomatology was examined in a sample of chronic pain patients.METHODS: In a consecutive insured sample of male and female chronic pain patients (n=117), who were being initially evaluated by an outpatient pain...

  6. Quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Carolina Cruz; Carolina Andrade; Milton Urrutia; Sergio Draibe; Luiz Antônio Nogueira-Martins; Ricardo de Castro Cintra Sesso

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To compare the dimensions of quality of life in the stages of chronic kidney disease and the influence of sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data. INTRODUCTION: The information available on the quality of life of patients on conservative treatment and the relationship between the quality of life and glomerular filtration rate is limited. METHODS: 155 patients in stages 1-5 of chronic kidney disease and 36 in hemodialysis were studied. Quality of life was rated by the Medical Outco...

  7. Health Related Quality of Life of Chronic Liver Patients: A Dutch Population-Based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. van der Plas (Simone)

    2004-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Chronic illnesses form a spectrum of diseases. Some chronic illnesses are poorly understood and unpredictable, some are understood and manageable, some are progressively disabling and some are life threatening. Nevertheless, for all chronic patients chronic illnesses ha

  8. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System—A Study Including Immigrants, Refugees and Ethnic Danes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasja Koitzsch Jensen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes. Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. Conclusions: The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups.

  9. Quality of life in chronic disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalliopi Megari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades there was an increasing predominance of chronic disorders, with a large number of people living with chronic diseases that can adversely affect their quality of life. The aim of the present paper is to study quality of life and especially Health-related quality of life (HRQoL in chronic diseases. HRQOL is a multidimensional construct that consists of at least three broad domains − physical, psychological, and social functioning − that are affected by one’s disease and/or treatment. HRQoL is usually measured in chronic conditions and is frequently impaired to a great extent. In addition, factors that are associated with good and poor HRQoL, as well as HRQoL assessment will be discussed. The estimation of the relative impact of chronic diseases on HRQoL is necessary in order to better plan and distribute health care resources aiming at a better HRQoL.[«All the people perceive the concept of living good or being well, that is the same as being happy». (Aristotle. 384-322 BC. Ethica Nichomachea

  10. The effect of songwriting on knowledge of coping skills and working alliance in psychiatric patients: a randomized clinical effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a songwriting intervention on psychiatric patients' knowledge of coping skills and working alliance. Participants were randomly assigned to scripted and manualized experimental (n=48) or control (n=41) conditions. The experimental condition was a group psychoeducational music therapy songwriting session concerning coping skills while the control condition was a group psychoeducational session concerning coping skills. Both conditions were single-session therapy with patients on an acute adult psychiatric unit. Results indicated no significant between group differences in measures of knowledge of coping skills, consumer working alliance, or perception of enjoyment (p>.05), although the experimental condition tended to have slightly higher mean scores than the control group for these measures. There was a significant between group difference in measures of therapist working alliance (pgroup higher than the control group. Although the music therapy group had a higher mean rate of previous psychiatric hospitalizations, their perception of enjoyment scores were still higher than those of the control condition, a finding incongruent in the literature. Furthermore, despite the increased number of previous hospitalizations, the music therapy condition had higher attendance rates than the control condition, thus possibly providing incentives for funding. It seems that group songwriting about coping skills can be as effective a psychosocial intervention as traditional talk-based psychoeducation to teach psychiatric inpatients how to proactively manage their illness. Additionally, music therapy can be as effective as talk-based psychoeducation in establishing working alliance. Implications for clinical practice, limitations, and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:21866716

  11. Acute and chronic effects of cannabinoids on human brain: gene-environment interactions related to psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Batalla Cases, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut Clínic de Neurociències / Hospital Clínic 1) Introduction Cannabis use has been associated to mental health problems and worsened outcome of established psychiatric disorders. Disturbances of the endocannabinoid system may be responsible for long-lasting effects, such as neuropsychological deficits and morphological brain alterations. As not all the exposed individuals are equally affected, proneness to cannabis induced impairment may rely on key factors su...

  12. Early Sleep Psychiatric Intervention for Acute Insomnia: Implications from a Case of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Yuichiro; Nishimura, Go; Endo, Takuro

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is a common problem among patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and patients suffering from acute insomnia with psychiatric comorbidity are more likely to develop chronic insomnia without appropriate intervention. Here we report a case of obsessive-compulsive disorder with acute insomnia, successfully treated with early sleep psychiatric non-pharmacological intervention. The augmentation of medication runs a risk of exacerbating daytime impairment. Clinicians usually pre...

  13. Classification and identification of opioid addiction in chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Guldstrand, Sally Kendall;

    2010-01-01

    Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction, to investi......Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction...

  14. Stereoselective pharmacokinetics of methadone in chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, K; Blemmer, T; Angelo, H R;

    1996-01-01

    Ten patients with chronic pain were randomized to an open, balanced, crossover study. Each patients received two different preparations of racemic methadone, i.e., tablets and intravenous infusion. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the R- and S-enantiomers of the racemate are reported. The analge......Ten patients with chronic pain were randomized to an open, balanced, crossover study. Each patients received two different preparations of racemic methadone, i.e., tablets and intravenous infusion. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the R- and S-enantiomers of the racemate are reported...

  15. Patient-Staff Interactions and Mental Health in Chronic Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Richard D.; Perry, Erica; Brown, Stephanie; Swartz, June; Vinokur, Amiram

    2008-01-01

    Chronic dialysis imposes ongoing stress on patients and staff and engenders recurring contact and long-term relationships. Thus, chronic dialysis units are opportune settings in which to investigate the impact of patients' relationships with staff on patient well-being. The authors designed the present study to examine the degree to which…

  16. Chronic coinfections in patients diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantos, Paul M.; Wormser, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The controversial diagnosis of chronic Lyme disease is often given to patients with prolonged, medically unexplained physical symptoms. Many such patients are also treated for chronic co-infections with Babesia, Anaplasma, or Bartonella in the absence of typical presentations, objective clinical findings, or laboratory confirmation of active infection. We have undertaken a systematic review of the literature to evaluate several aspects of this practice. Methods Five systematic literature searches were performed using Boolean operators and the PubMed search engine. Results The literature searches did not demonstrate convincing evidence of 1) chronic anaplasmosis infection, 2) treatment responsive symptomatic chronic babesiosis in immunocompetent persons in the absence of fever, laboratory abnormalities and detectable parasitemia, 3) either geographically widespread or treatment responsive symptomatic chronic infection with Babesia duncani in the absence of fever, laboratory abnormalities and detectable parasitemia, 4) tick-borne transmission of Bartonella species, or 5) simultaneous Lyme disease and Bartonella infection. Conclusions The medical literature does not support the diagnosis of chronic, atypical tick-borne coinfections in patients with chronic, nonspecific illnesses. PMID:24929022

  17. Patients suffering benign chronic pain becoming acute: ER approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Nervetti

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to prescribing errors, to wrong therapeutic choice, to inadequate patient education, to errors in patients adherence to therapy, to social problems, to well known comorbidity between chronic pain and depression, a high number of patients, affected by chronic pain becoming acute, is in charge of the Emergency Department. But the Emergency Department is often the wrong place where to take care of such a complex condition. We present the results of a study conducted in our Emergency Department with the contribute of the Mental Health Department, concerning the evaluation of the diagnostic and therapeutic iter, the evolution of the symptoms, the customer satisfaction and the depression comorbidity, among the patients afferent to the Emergency Department because of a chronic non malignant pain becoming acute. The results of the study suggest the necessity of a more specific diagnostic and therapeutic approach to these patients, in both Emergency Hospital Department and outpatients settings.

  18. Major drivers influencing adherence and quality of life during antiviral triple therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suceveanu Andra I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims. Triple therapy with Peg-IFNs, Ribavirin and protease inhibitors raise the treatment success for hepatitis C up to 83%, but also bring together with the significantly higher rates of sustained virologic response (SVR more side effects, interfering with patient’s quality of life (QoL and work productivity. We aimed to analyze the factors influencing the adherence and the QoL during triple therapy using Peg-IFNs, Ribavirin and protease inhibitors in 50 patients diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C with first line therapy failure. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to analyze determinants of retreatment initiation and treatment compliance, according to patient features. Results: We identified as major drivers of retreatment initiation the younger age, the female gender, the urban provenience, the high income, and the psychiatric and alcohol or drugs abuse history. The adherence and the QoL during retreatment therapy were similar, despite the regimen used, and obvious lower in patients with history of previous abandon, drugs and alcohol abuse or hematologic/ psychiatric decompensation. A lower capacity to work and a temporary withdrawal from job necessary to continue the therapy were seen similar in patients taking Boceprevir/Telaprevir. Abandon of therapy without a known reason was more frequent in males, with alcohol and drugs intake history, from rural region, with low income, and with psychiatric disturbances in personal history. Conclusion. Physicians should focus to develop medical strategies or drugs to increase the adherence and to provide a better QoL for patients with chronic hepatitis C making antiviral therapy.

  19. Evaluation of role of Candida in patients with chronic paronychia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Bahunuthula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic paronychia, earlier considered to be an infection due to Candida, is currently being considered as a dermatitis of the nail fold. Irritant, allergic and protein contact dermatitis are the suggested major pathogenic mechanisms. Hypersensitivity to Candida is more likely to be the etiology, rather than the infection itself. Aims: To assess the clinico-etiological profiles of patients with chronic paronychia and to determine the role of contact sensitization and hypersensitivity to Candida. Methods: All consecutive patients of chronic paronychia attending the dermatology outpatient department (OPD were assessed for risk factors, number of nails affected, clinical presentation and presence of fungus, patch tested for contact allergy and prick tested for hypersensitivity to Candida allergen. Results: A total of 80 patients of chronic paronychia were recruited into our study. There was female preponderance (66 patients, 82.5%, with the most common group affected being housewives (47 patients, 58.8%. Frequent washing of hands (64 patients, 80% was the most common risk factor. Fungal culture was positive in 56.1% (41 patients, the predominant species cultured was Candida albicans (15 patients, 36.5%. Patch testing with Indian standard series was positive in 27.1% patients (19 out of 70 patients tested, with nickel being the most common allergen. Prick test with Candida allergen was positive in 47.6% patients (31 out of 65 patients tested. Limitations: Prick test and patch test provide indirect evidence of hypersensitivity, with inherent limitations. Conclusion: Our study shows that chronic paronychia is probably a form of hand dermatitis associated with prolonged wet work, and that there is a higher incidence of contact sensitization and Candida hypersensitivity in these patients.

  20. 240 Mold Sensitization in Chronic Rhinosinusitis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Radoslaw; Czecior, Eugeniusz

    2012-01-01

    Background It is estimated that about 10% of the population have IgE antibodies to common inhalant molds. Exposure to fungal allergens could be linked to the presence and persistence of asthma, rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. Mold sensitization is a risk factor for development and deterioration of upper airway allergy, especially chronic rhinosinusitis. We addressed the incidence of mold allergy measured as specific IgE to molds and skin prick tests in chronic sinusitis patients. We assessed prevalence of allergic reactions to mould among surgery treated chronic sinusitis patients. Methods A group of 28 chronic sinusitis patients after surgery were included into the study. Routine medical examination, skin prick tests with common inhaled allergens and extended mold panel (Alternaria alternate, Cladosporium herbarium, Aspergilus fumigatus, Candida albicans, Mucor mucedo, Botrytis cinerea, Rhisopus nigricans, Penicilliumi notatum, Fusarum moniliforme Pullularia pullulans (Allergopharma, Germany), tIgE, asIgE measurement were performed (Phadia, Sweden). All investigated patients were consulted by laryngologist and mycological examination was performed. Results We found that sensitization to at least one allergen was present in 43.8(14/32) of sinusitis patients. The most prevalent was sensitization to house dust mite Dermatophagoides pt., found in 21.8 % (7/32) patients. Positive results of skin prick tests with Candida albicans we observed in 18.8% (6/32), with Alternaria alternate in 15,6% (5/32), Cladosporium herbarium in 6,3% (2/32), Aspergilus fumigatus in 3,13 % (1/32). None of investigated patients presented sensitization to other mold allergens. Microbiological methods demonstrated fungal infection only in 2 patients. Conclusions Almost half of chronic sinusitis patients presented sensitization to at least one allergen. Fungal allergy is relatively rare in chronic sinusitis patients.

  1. Psychological interactions in chronic disease education – Nursing interventions in chronically patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Gourni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the diseases that the modern person faces in developed countries are chronic. These illnesses in their majority are not cured finally, but constitute situations that we try to control. The use of pharmaceutical medicines and the changes in the life of an individual allow henceforth in the chronically patients to live for along time duration an almost "physiologic" life, even if the chronic disease continues accompanying them. It is already known in all the interdisciplinary health care team that the chronically suffering patients present an enormous variety and differentiation of behaviours and experience abundance biological, psychological and social problems.This ascertainment led the researchers to develop a wide spectrum of theoretical approaches and clinical applications, with basic protractor of their efforts the maintenance of life’s quality as much patients who bear from chronic diseases as their familial environment.Aim of the present literature review was to investigate all the factors that interact in the psychology of an individual at the event of chronic disease, to report all the ways of adaptation in the new situation, and to assign all the nursing interventions that contribute positively in the acceptance of chronic illness.The education of patients with chronic diseases constitutes the corner stone of right therapeutic confrontation. The acceptance by the patient of changes that is required in his way of life is easier provided that when he has completely comprehended the nature of his illness, the gravity of his situation and role that plays the right collaboration with the health care providers.

  2. Aggressive Behavior in the Adolescent Psychiatric Patient: A Clinical-Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recklitis, Christopher J.; Noam, Gil G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the relationship between ego development and psychological defenses to aggressive behavior in a group of psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Method: Subjects were 245 adolescents ages 12-16, who were assessed for aggressive behaviors, assaultive incidents, ego development and defenses. Results: Aggressive…

  3. Association of family background with adolescent smoking and regular use of illicit substances among underage psychiatric in-patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether adolescent's family type was associated with regular smoking or the use of illicit substances (cannabis or hard drugs) among underage adolescent psychiatric in-patients. The sample consisted of 471 adolescents aged 12-17 years admitted to psychiatric hospital between April 2001 and March 2006 at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. The information on family factors and substance use was based on the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime interview and the European modification of the Addiction Severity Index questionnaire. Compared to adolescent boys from two-parent families, those from child welfare placement were more likely to regularly use both cannabis (odds ratio [OR]=4.4; 95%confidence interval [CI]=1.4-13.7; P=.012) and hard drugs (OR=8.4; 95% CI=1.7-42.1; P=.01).Among girls, no association was found between family type and the use of illicit substances. Two-parent or foster family units may protect adolescents from involvement with illicit substances. In clinical adolescent psychiatric practice more attention should be paid to family interventions and parental support. PMID:19062350

  4. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    OpenAIRE

    van Doorn, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment is shown to be effective in a selected group of patients with a chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The proportion of patients that improve after IVIg treatment varies between studies. Because 40% of a group of IVIg treated CIDP patients needed intermittent IVIg infusions to maintain their improved clinical condition, it is expected that IVIg is effective, at least in this subgroup of patients. However, the proportion of patien...

  5. Enhanced emotional reactions in chronic head trauma patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Fordyce, D J; Roueche, J R; Prigatano, G P

    1983-01-01

    The emotional characteristics of head injury patients referred for neuropsychological testing were examined as a function of the time since injury. Patients referred more than 6 months from injury were more emotionally distressed on the MMPI and Katz Adjustment Scale (relatives form) compared to those tested 6 months or earlier. The more chronic head trauma patients were more anxious and depressed, more confused in their thinking, and more socially withdrawn compared to the acute patient grou...

  6. Varenicline precipitating psychosis in a patient with no previous psychiatric history: a case report of a Spanish patient who was later diagnosed with paranoid personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcen, Fernando Espi; Martinez, Fernando Luis Espi; Moya, Amparo Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Varenicline is gaining popularity for the treatment of nicotine dependence. General treatment guidelines recommend monitoring for behavioral changes in patients with a mental illness. There are very few cases reported on patients developing psychiatric symptoms with no previous history. We are reporting the case of a Spanish patient who had developed a first-psychotic episode after he was started on varenicline. He was ultimately diagnosed with a paranoid personality disorder. Therefore, prior to starting a patient on varenicline, the clinician must identify possible paranoid and other cluster A personality traits. It is essential to monitor for new onset of psychotic symptoms during the treatment with this drug.

  7. Chronic diseases and life events accounted for 2-18 % population attributable risks for adult hearing loss: UK Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ivy

    2016-01-01

    Links between chronic diseases and hearing loss in adults have emerged. However, previous investigations were not complete, and the role of life events was unclear. Therefore, it was aimed to examine the relationships of common chronic diseases and life events and adult hearing loss in a country-wide and population-based study. Data were retrieved from UK Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, 2007, being cross-sectional, including demographics, self-reported prior health conditions and hearing loss (ever and in the last 12 months), and several major life events. Analyses included Chi square test, t test, logistic regression model, and population attributable risk estimation. People who had prior health conditions including cancer, migraine, dementia, depression, cataracts, chronic bronchitis, allergy, bowel problem, bladder problem, arthritis, muscle problem or skin problem tended to report hearing loss than their counterparts. People who have experienced major life events including post-traumatic stress disorder, serious illness of close relatives, death of family, serious problems with friends, major financial crisis, valuables stolen, being bullied, violence at home, sexual abuse or running away from home were also more likely to experience ever hearing loss problem or that in the last 12 months. 2.0-13.1 % adult hearing loss could be delayed or prevented by managing chronic diseases while 4.1-18.1 % might be delayed or prevented by minimizing the negative effects of life events. Chronic diseases and life events were associated with hearing loss in adults. Better managing lifestyle to minimize detrimental impacts in future health and nursing programs would be suggested.

  8. 流浪精神病患者与普通精神病患者智力比较分析%A Comparative Analysis on Intellectual Characteristics between Homeless Psychiatric Patients and General Psychiatric Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张露莹; 侯吉星; 戴尊孝; 张海宇

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To explore the intelligence of homeless psychiatric patients, and provide scientific evidence for assistance and treatment of social departments.Methods 371 cases who were all homeless psychiatric patients diagnosed by DSM-IV and 353 general cases were given intellectual test by WAIS-RC.All results were analyzed by SPSS 18.0, and t-test was carried out.Results The average IQ of the homeless psychiatric patients was 64.19 + 15.19, and the average IQ of the general psychiatric patients was 80.50 ±13.30.Both of their verbal IQ was significantly higher than performance IQ (P(DSM-Ⅳ)诊断标准的371例流浪精神病患者和353例一般住院精神病患者进行韦氏成人智力表(WAIS-RC)测定;并对测定结果使用SPSS 18.0软件进行统计分析,对结果采用成组设计的t检验进行分析.结果 流浪精神病患者的平均智商为64.19±15.19,一般住院精神病患者的平均智商为80.50±13.30.两组言语智商均显著高于操作智商(P<0.01),且流浪组智商显著低于一般住院组智商(P<0.01).结论 流浪精神病患者的精神发育迟滞患病率显著高于一般住院精神病患者,相关部门应重视流浪精神病患者这一特殊群体的智力发展,以提高其生活质量,减少其对家庭、社会造成的负担.

  9. Glucose intolerance in Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Kung Chen; Shinn-Jang Hwang; Shih-Tzer Tsai; Jiing-Chyuan Luo; Shou-Dong Lee; Full-Young Chang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and the risk factors of glucose intolerance in Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis C and to evaluate the relationship between interferon (IFN)treatment and glucose intolerance in these patients.METHODS: Prospective cross-sectional study was done to evaluate the prevalence of glucose intolerance in Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection from the outpatient clinic of Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Chronic hepatitis C was defined as persistent presence of anti-HCV and persistent elevation of liver transaminase for at least 1.5 folds for at least 6 months. Moreover, patients were further categorized into normal fasting glucose and glucose intolerance (diabetes mellitus (DM) and impaired fasting glucose) according to the diagnostic criteria of American Diabetic Association. RESULTS: Totally, 359 Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis C were enrolled (212 males and 147 females, mean age=58.1±13.0 years). One hundred and twenty-three patients (34.3 %) had various forms of IFN treatment. One hundred and twenty-five patients (34.6 %)had glucose intolerance, including 99 patients (27.6 %) with DM and 26 patients (7.0 %) with impaired fasting glucose.Tn comparison with those with normal fasting glucose levels,patients with chronic hepatitis C with glucose intolerance were significantly older, had a significantly higher body mass index, and they were more likely to suffer from obesity, to have family history of diabetes and to have had previous IFN treatment. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression revealed significantly that age ≥ 57 years, obesity,previous history of IFN treatment and the presence of family history of diabetes were independent risk factors associated with the presence of glucose intolerance in chronic hepatitis C patients.CONCLUSION: In conclusion, 34.6 % of Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis C had glucose intolerance. Chronic hepatitis C patients who

  10. Importance of Social Relationships in Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    The literature lacks reports on the role of the social relationships domain (SRD) of quality of life (QoL) in shaping care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases in primary care. In this study we examined a group of 582 patients with chronic respiratory diseases and chronic non-respiratory diseases recruited from 199 primary care centers. In the patients with chronic respiratory diseases, higher SRD correlated with more frequent patient visits due to medical issue, fewer district nurse interventions over the past 12 months, less frequent hospitalizations over the past 3 years, and fewer chronic diseases. In these patients, a high SRD was most effectively created by high QoL in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, and the satisfaction with QoL. Programs for preventing a decline in SRD should include patients with low scores in the Psychological, Environmental, and Physical domains, those who show no improvement in mental or somatic well-being in the past 12 months, those with a low level of positive mental attitudes, unhealthy eating habits, and with low levels of met needs. Such programs should include older widows and widowers without permanent relationships, with only primary education, living far from a primary care center, and those whose visits were not due to a medical issue.

  11. Chronic patient care at North West Province clinics

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    Claire van Deventer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic illnesses are a significant burden to the health services in South Africa. There is a specific national health plan whereby chronically ill patients who are acceptably controlled should be managed at clinic level. The perception has emerged that the management of primary care has not been optimal in the Southern District of the North West Province. This provided the motivation to initiate this research, namely consideration of chronic patient care at clinics in the North West Province of South Africa.Method: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out at four randomly selected clinics covering four sub-districts in the Southern District (North West Province. This was done using charts and registers at the clinics. Inclusion criteria were patients older than 18, and presenting with the following chronic illnesses: asthma/chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD, hypertension, diabetes and epilepsy. The major focus areas were the regular assessment of the patients, the level of control of the illness and the use of the Essential Drugs List and Standard Treatment Guidelines (EDL/STG.Results: In the cases of all the chronic illnesses it was found that regular assessments were poorly done, with asthma (peak flow measurements being the most poorly done. Control was generally less than 50% for all the illnesses, although the EDL was followed fairly well by the personnel at the clinics.Conclusion: In the light of the burden of chronic illness the results give cause for great concern about the quality of care for chronically ill patients, and reasons were sought for some of the poor results. A subsequent decision was taken to carry out comprehensive quality improvement projects on each of the illnesses over the following five years.

  12. Patient-Centered Medical Home in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Ortiz G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Ortiz1, Len Fromer21Pediatric Pulmonary Services, El Paso, TX; 2Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive and debilitating but preventable and treatable disease characterized by cough, phlegm, dyspnea, and fixed or incompletely reversible airway obstruction. Most patients with COPD rely on primary care practices for COPD management. Unfortunately, only about 55% of US outpatients with COPD receive all guideline-recommended care. Proactive and consistent primary care for COPD, as for many other chronic diseases, can reduce hospitalizations. Optimal chronic disease management requires focusing on maintenance rather than merely acute rescue. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH, which implements the chronic care model, is a promising framework for primary care transformation. This review presents core PCMH concepts and proposes multidisciplinary team-based PCMH care strategies for COPD.Keywords: Patient-Centered Medical Home, chronic care model, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, patient education, physician assistants, nurse practitioners

  13. A patient with Graves’ disease showing only psychiatric symptoms and negativity for both TSH receptor autoantibody and thyroid stimulating antibody

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    Hamasaki Hidetaka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH and thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb negative Graves’s disease (GD is extremely rare. Here we present such a patient. Case presentation The patient was a 76-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having schizophrenia forty years ago. She did not show characteristic symptoms for hyperthyroidism, such as swelling of thyroid, exophthalmos, tachycardia and tremor, however, she showed only psychomotor agitation. Serum free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine levels were elevated and TSH level was suppressed, suggesting the existence of hyperthyroidism. However, both the first generation TSH receptor autoantibody (TRAb1 and the thyroid stimulating autoantibody (TSAb were negative. Slightly increased blood flow and swelling was detected by thyroid echography. Thyroid scintigraphy demonstrated diffuse and remarkably elevated uptake of 123I uptake. Finally, we diagnosed her as having GD. She was treated by using methimazole, and hyperthyroidism and her psychiatric symptoms were promptly ameliorated. Discussion We experienced a patient with GD who did not show characteristic symptoms except for psychiatric symptoms, and also showed negativity for both TRAb1 and TSAb. Thyroid autoantibody-negative GD is extremely rare. Thyroid scintigraphy was useful to diagnose such a patient.

  14. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Bojana Kisic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure.

  15. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  16. Research on stage of chronic kidney disease in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 45 ml·min-1·1.73 m-2for the stage assessment in the elderly patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) .Methods From June 2009 to December 2011,2258 patients were recruited and divided

  17. Herbal medicine use among Turkish patients with chronic diseases

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    Munevver Tulunay

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: In this study herbal medicine use was found to be higher among patients who had been diagnosed with chronic diseases. Therefore physicians should be aware of herbal medicine usage of their patients and inform them about the effectivity and side effects of herbal medicines. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 217-220

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, K K; Kjaergaard, J; Akkan, D;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important differential diagnosis in patients with heart failure (HF). The primary aims were to determine the prevalence of COPD and to test the accuracy of self-reported COPD in patients admitted with HF. Secondary aims were to study a...

  19. Therapy chronic trichomoniasis at patients with associated urogenital chlamydial infection

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    A. L. Poznyak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Present material of problem question therapy chronic trichomoniasis. Study clinical and bacteriological effectiveness basic etiotropic preparation and their combination, used in treatment patients trichomoniasis. Found that the combined application antiprotozoal drugs have a more pronounced effect on kills T. vaginalis and shortens the rehabilitation of the patient.

  20. The Effect of Attending Good Psychiatric Management (GPM) Workshops on Attitudes Toward Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuroghlian, Alex S; Palmer, Brian A; Choi-Kain, Lois W; Borba, Christina P C; Links, Paul S; Gunderson, John G

    2016-08-01

    The effect that attending a 1-day workshop on Good Psychiatric Management (GPM) had on attitudes about borderline personality disorder (BPD) was assessed among 297 clinicians. Change was recorded by comparing before and after scores on a 9-item survey previously developed to assess the effects of workshops on Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem Solving (STEPPS). Participants reported decreased inclination to avoid borderline patients, dislike of borderline patients, and belief that BPD's prognosis is hopeless, as well as increased feeling of competence, belief that borderline patients have low self-esteem, feeling of being able to make a positive difference, and belief that effective psychotherapies exist. Less clinical experience was related to an increased feeling of competence and belief that borderline patients have low self-esteem. These findings were compared to those from the STEPPS workshop. This assessment demonstrates GPM's potential for training clinicians to meet population-wide needs related to borderline personality disorder. PMID:26111249

  1. The prescribing pattern of a new antipsychotic: A descriptive study of aripiprazole for psychiatric in-patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, M.; Manniche, C.; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2008-01-01

    (range 0-8) psychoactive drugs parallel with aripiprazole. This study demonstrates reality in psychopharmacology and quote aripiprazole as example. In day-to-day practice, aripiprazole is used as part of highly individualized regimens comprising polypharmacy and excessive dosing. Although theoretically......In June 2004, aripiprazole was marketed as a second-generation antipsychotic with an entire new mechanism of action. The objective of this descriptive study is to examine the day-to-day prescriptions of aripiprazole to an unselected population of psychiatric in-patients. From 1 February to 1 May...... 2006, present and former in-patients treated with aripiprazole were identified. Prescriptions of aripiprazole and psychoactive comedication were collected retrospectively from the patient records. Seventy-one patients, mainly schizophrenic, received aripiprazole 2.5 to 55 mg/day for median 350 days...

  2. Ask me what is inmy heart of hearts! The core question of care in relation to parents who are patients in a psychiatric care context

    OpenAIRE

    Blegen, Nina Elisabeth; Eriksson, Katie; Bondas, Terese

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to understand the experience of being cared for in psychiatric care as a patient and as a parent. Parenthood represents the natural form of human caring, a human directedness regardless of gender. The study has its starting point in this image, as it applies to mothers who receive care as provided in a psychiatric care context. The theoretical perspective is the theory of caritative caring, and the methodological approach is the philosophical hermeneutics outlined by Gadamer. The s...

  3. A psychiatric and psychodynamic investigation of LCO (Prurico Nodularis Hyde) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtola, J

    1991-01-01

    Prurico Nodularis Hyde (LCO) is a rare dermatitis yielding with difficulty to treatment and often tends to be chronic. Its clinical manifestations are hard itching, verrucose nodes in areas of the skin only reached by the hands. The aetiology is unknown. It has been surmised that psychic factors are involved in the onset and the clinical course of the disease. Five psychotherapies were carried out during a five-year interview period with a group of 32 women and 9 men. Everyone interviewed described childhood environments and early developmental years as harsh and emotionally restricted. Nearly all had recollections of painful experiences of loneliness and longing for warm contact with another human being. Life-cycles bore the mark of practical activities and the majority had chosen a manual trade. The most significant common feature this study brought to light is the extraordinary propensity of these patients to suffer from psychic trauma. A distinct correlation exists between the outbreak of the disease and the preceding loss of a human relationship, detrimental to self-esteem. The concept "body image" was used in resolving the psychosomatic problems of LCO-patients. It appeared that the emotionally deprived and barren past and the choice of manual labor have tended to deprive the patients of all psychic means. This is evidenced by the inability to endure psychic stress. Psychic to them means physical and they attempt to solve problems with the aid of archaic bodily meaning schemata. Their regression has activated in them an inadequately worked-out separation from mother.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2048377

  4. Psychoterapia indywidualna wyniszczonej pacjentki z jadłowstrętem psychicznym w warunkach stacjonarnego oddziału psychiatrycznego — opis przypadku [Individual psychotherapy of cachectic patient with anorexia nervosa in conditions of in-patient psychiatric unit — case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ślosarczyk, Mariusz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the process of individual psychotherapy of cachectic patient with chronic anorexia nervosa. The therapy was conducted in conditions of the in-patient psychiatric ward for adolescents as a part of treatment during the twenty-four-hour hospitalisation. Understanding of the patient psychopathology as well as phenomena appearing in the time of the psychotherapy process were described in the psychodynamic paradigm. Basic difficulties met by the therapist of chronic patients with eating disorders are mentioned. Particular attention is paid to the situation when the psychotherapy takes place within the in-patient unit and thereupon as integral part of hospitalization has to be only a short episode in the broader plan of long-term treatment.

  5. Anxiety and depression among patients with Bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diffuse parenchymatous lung diseases

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    Taghreed S. Farag*, Manal R. Hafez*, Taghreed Elshafie**and Omaima I. Abo-Elkheir

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychosocial stressors, such as death of a spouse or divorce are closely related to relapses and aggravations of respiratory disease pointing to a link between psychological factors and chronic pulmonary disease. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD cannot cope adequately with everyday needs. This inadequacy may lead to heightened anxiety and depression, which in turn may worsen the everyday inadequacy. It has been reported that this is probably a factor that leads bronchial asthma (BA and COPD patients to frequent hospital admissions, lower treatment adherence and even intensive care unit hospitalizations.Study objectives: to assess anxiety and depressive symptoms among a sample of Egyptian patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, bronchial asthma (BA, and diffuse parenchymatous lung diseases (DPLD.Subjects & methods: A cross-sectional study conducted over a one year period on a sample of 258 Egyptian patients with chronic breathing disorders who attending the outpatient chest clinic at Al-Zahraa University Hospital. All patients diagnosed as having COPD, BA or DPLD were enrolled into the study. Anxiety and depression were assessed by using the Hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI.Results: Psychiatric disorders were most prevalent among DPLD cases (80.0%, followed by COPD patients (74.0%, while BA group showed the least reported cases (38.8% with psychiatric disorders, with a statistically significant difference among the studied groups (P-value < 0.05.Depression was prevalent among 60.1% (155/258 of the studied cases, of them 23.2% had severe depression, followed by 38.7 % had moderate depression and 38.1% had mild depression. DPLD cases had the highest proportion of severe depression (31.8, COPD cases had the highest proportion of moderate depression (52.4 and BA group had the highest proportion of mild depression (68.4%, with a statistically

  6. Affect School for chronic benign pain patients showed improved alexithymia assessments with TAS-20

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    Thulesius Hans O

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alexithymia is a disturbance associated with psychosomatic disorders, pain syndromes, and a variety of psychiatric disorders. The Affect School (AS based on Tomkins Affect Theory is a therapy focusing on innate affects and their physiological expressions, feelings, emotions and scripts. In this pilot study we tried the AS-intervention method in patients with chronic benign pain. Methods The AS-intervention, with 8 weekly group sessions and 10 individual sessions, was offered to 59 patients with chronic non-malignant pain at a pain rehabilitation clinic in Sweden 2004-2005. Pre and post intervention assessments were done with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20, the Visual Analogue Scale for pain assessment (VAS-pain, the European Quality of Life health barometer (EQoL and the Stress and Crisis Inventory-93 (SCI-93. After the group sessions we used Bergdahl's Questionnaire for assessing changes in interpersonal relations, general well-being and evaluation of AS. Results The AS intervention was completed by 54 out of 59 (92% patients. Significant reductions in total TAS-20 post-test scores (p = 0.0006 as well as TAS-20 DIF and DDF factors (Difficulties Identifying Feelings, and Difficulties Describing Feelings were seen (p = 0.0001, and p = 0.0008 while the EOT factor (Externally Oriented Thinking did not change. Improvements of HAD-depression scores (p = 0.04, EQoL (p = 0.02 and self-assessed changes in relations to others (p Conclusions This pilot study involving 59 patients with chronic benign pain indicates that the alexithymia DIF and DDF, as well as depression, social relations and quality of life may be improved by the Affect School therapeutic intervention.

  7. MEMBRANOUS INTESTINAL DIGESTION CHARACTERISTICS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PANCREATITIS

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    О.А. Stгокоva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of enzymes activity of membranous intestinal digestion has been carried out. The condition of ultrastructure of mucous membrane of a small bowel in patients with chronic pancreatitis taking into account duration of disease is presented. It is shown, that signs of lesion of a small bowel in case of chronic pancreatitis are caused by disturbances in the first stage of membranous intestinal digestion, observed at early stages of disease and begin to progress with the disease duration.

  8. Resource-oriented music therapy for psychiatric patients with low therapy motivation: Protocol for a randomised controlled trial [NCT00137189

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    Aarre Trond

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has shown positive effects of music therapy for people with schizophrenia and other mental disorders. In clinical practice, music therapy is often offered to psychiatric patients with low therapy motivation, but little research exists about this population. The aim of this study is to examine whether resource-oriented music therapy helps psychiatric patients with low therapy motivation to improve negative symptoms and other health-related outcomes. An additional aim of the study is to examine the mechanisms of change through music therapy. Methods 144 adults with a non-organic mental disorder (ICD-10: F1 to F6 who have low therapy motivation and a willingness to work with music will be randomly assigned to an experimental or a control condition. All participants will receive standard care, and the experimental group will in addition be offered biweekly sessions of music therapy over a period of three months. Outcomes will be measured by a blind assessor before and 1, 3, and 9 months after randomisation. Discussion The findings to be expected from this study will fill an important gap in the knowledge of treatment effects for a patient group that does not easily benefit from treatment. The study's close link to clinical practice, as well as its size and comprehensiveness, will make its results well generalisable to clinical practice.

  9. Physical restraint for psychiatric patients and its associations with clinical characteristics and the National Mental Health Law in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Feng-Rong; Sha, Sha; Zhang, Qing-E; Ungvari, Gabor S; Ng, Chee H; Chiu, Helen F K; Wu, Ping-Ping; Jin, Xin; Zhou, Jian-Song; Tang, Yi-Lang; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-07-30

    Physical restraint (PR) for patients is an ongoing controversial topic in psychiatry. This study examined the percentage of PR and its associations with clinical characteristics and the implementation of the National Mental Health Law (NMHL) in China. The study consecutively assessed a sample of 1364 psychiatric inpatients. Socio-demographic and clinical data including use of PR were collected from the medical records using a form designed for this study and confirmed via interview. Psychopathology and insight were measured using standardized instruments. The percentage of PR was 27.2% in the whole sample with 30.7% and 22.4% occurring respectively before and after the NMHL implementation (p=0.001). In multiple logistic regression analysis PR was positively associated with unemployment, lower income, aggression in the past month, being admitted before the NMHL implementation and poorer insight. The percentage of PR in Chinese psychiatric patients is associated with various clinical factors and appeared to decrease after the implementation of the NMHL. Focused and individualized care for patients who are unemployed, have low income, recent aggression and poor insight would be necessary at early stages of admission. PMID:27179180

  10. Neurodegenerative properties of chronic pain: cognitive decline in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijtje L A Jongsma

    Full Text Available Chronic pain has been associated with impaired cognitive function. We examined cognitive performance in patients with severe chronic pancreatitis pain. We explored the following factors for their contribution to observed cognitive deficits: pain duration, comorbidity (depression, sleep disturbance, use of opioids, and premorbid alcohol abuse. The cognitive profiles of 16 patients with severe pain due to chronic pancreatitis were determined using an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Data from three cognitive domains (psychomotor performance, memory, executive functions were compared to data from healthy controls matched for age, gender and education. Multivariate multilevel analysis of the data showed decreased test scores in patients with chronic pancreatitis pain in different cognitive domains. Psychomotor performance and executive functions showed the most prominent decline. Interestingly, pain duration appeared to be the strongest predictor for observed cognitive decline. Depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, opioid use and history of alcohol abuse provided additional explanations for the observed cognitive decline in some of the tests, but to a lesser extent than pain duration. The negative effect of pain duration on cognitive performance is compatible with the theory of neurodegenerative properties of chronic pain. Therefore, early and effective therapeutic interventions might reduce or prevent decline in cognitive performance, thereby improving outcomes and quality of life in these patients.

  11. Complement defects in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Lange, Bibi; Kjeldsen, Anette D;

    2012-01-01

    whether complement defects collectively predispose individuals for CRS or affect CRS severity. The participants comprised 87 CRS patients randomly selected from the general population, and a control group of 150 healthy blood donors. The CRS patients were diagnosed according to the European Position Paper...... was significantly higher among CRS patients than among healthy control subjects. A majority of Mannan-binding lectin deficient CRS patients was observed. The presence of complement defects had no influence on the severity of subjective symptoms. Our studies show that defects in the complement system collectively...

  12. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management.

  13. Online Patient Education for Chronic Disease Management: Consumer Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Probst, Yasmine

    2016-04-01

    Patient education plays an important role in chronic disease management. The aim of this study is to identify patients' preferences in regard to the design features of effective online patient education (OPE) and the benefits. A review of the existing literature was conducted in order to identify the benefits of OPE and its essential design features. These design features were empirically tested by conducting survey with patients and caregivers. Reliability analysis, construct validity and regression analysis were performed for data analysis. The results identified patient-tailored information, interactivity, content credibility, clear presentation of content, use of multimedia and interpretability as the essential design features of online patient education websites for chronic disease management. PMID:26846749

  14. Management of insomnia in patients with chronic pain conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Frederic; Stagno, Daniele

    2004-01-01

    The management of insomnia in patients experiencing chronic pain requires careful evaluation, good diagnostic skills, familiarity with cognitive-behavioural interventions and a sound knowledge of pharmacological treatments. Sleep disorders are characterised by a circular interrelationship with chronic pain such that pain leads to sleep disorders and sleep disorders increase the perception of pain. Sleep disorders in individuals with chronic pain remain under-reported, under-diagnosed and under-treated, which may lead--together with the individual's emotional, cognitive and behavioural maladaptive responses--to the frequent development of chronic sleep disorders. The moderately positive relationship between pain severity and sleep complaints, and the specificity of pain-related arousal and mediating variables such as depression, illustrate that insomnia in relation to chronic pain is multifaceted and poorly understood. This may explain the limited success of the available treatments. This article discusses the evaluation of patients with chronic pain and insomnia and the available pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to manage the sleep disorder. Non-pharmacological interventions should not be considered as single interventions, but in association with one another. Some non-pharmacological interventions especially the cognitive and behavioural approaches, can be easily implemented in general practice (e.g. stimulus control, sleep restriction, imagery training and progressive muscle relaxation). Hypnotics are routinely prescribed in the medically ill, regardless of their adverse effects; however, their long-term efficacy is not supported by robust evidence. Antidepressants provide an interesting alternative to hypnotics, since they can improve pain perception as well as sleep disorders in selected patients. Sedative antipsychotics can be considered for sleep disturbances in those patients exhibiting psychotic features, or for those with

  15. Hepatic encephalopathy in patients with acute decompensation of cirrhosis and acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Montagnese, Sara; Jalan, Rajiv

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy in a hospitalized cirrhotic patient is associated with a high mortality rate and its presence adds further to the mortality of patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The exact pathophysiological mechanisms of HE in this group of patients are unclear but hyperammonemia, systemic inflammation (including sepsis, bacterial translocation, and insulin resistance) and oxidative stress, modulated by glutaminase gene alteration, remain as key factors. Moreover, alcohol misuse, hyponatremia, renal insufficiency, and microbiota are actively explored. HE diagnosis requires exclusion of other causes of neurological, metabolic and psychiatric dysfunction. Hospitalization in the ICU should be considered in every patient with overt HE, but particularly if this is associated with ACLF. Precipitating factors should be identified and treated as required. Evidence-based specific management options are limited to bowel cleansing and non-absorbable antibiotics. Ammonia lowering drugs, such as glycerol phenylbutyrate and ornithine phenylacetate show promise but are still in clinical trials. Albumin dialysis may be useful in refractory cases. Antibiotics, prebiotics, and treatment of diabetes reduce systemic inflammation. Where possible and not contraindicated, large portal-systemic shunts may be embolized but liver transplantation is the most definitive step in the management of HE in this setting. HE in patients with ACLF appears to be clinically and pathophysiologically distinct from that of acute decompensation and requires further studies and characterization.

  16. Peripheral blood lymphocytes DNA in patients with chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasiliy I Reshetnyak; Tatyana I Sharafanova; Ludmila U Ilchenko; Elena V Golovanova; Gennadiy G Poroshenko

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND Viral replication in blood cells with nucleuses may lead to the damage of lymphocytes genetic apparatus and the beginning of immunopathological reactions.AIM Of this investigation is to reveal the damage to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL)DNA in the patients with chronic liver diseases.MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen-ninepatients with chronic liver diseases (37 patients with chronic viral hepatitis, 2 patients with liver cirrhosis of mixed etiology (alcohol + virus G),30 women with primary biliary cirrhosis-PBC)were examined. The condition of DNA structure of PBL-was measured by the fluorescenceanalysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) technique with modification. Changes of fluorescence (in %) reflected the DNA distractions degree (thepresence of DNA single-stranded breaks and alkalinelabile sights).RESULTS AND CONCLUSION . The quantity of DNA single-stranded breaks and alkalinelabile sightsin DNA in all patients with chronic viral hepatitis .didnt differ from the control group,excluding the patients with chronic hepatitis (CH) C + G. Patients with HGV and TTV monoinfection had demonstrated the increase of the DNA single-stranded breaks PBL quantity.This fact may be connected with hypothesisabout the viruses replication in white blood cells discussed in the literature. Tendency to increase quantity of DNA PBL damages in the patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) accordingly to the alkaline phosphatase activity increase was revealed. Significant decrease of the DNA single-stranded breaks and alkalinelabile sights in the PBC patients that were treated with prednison was demonstrated. Probably, the tendency to increase the quantity of DNA singlestranded breaks and alkalinelabile sights in lymphocytes of the PBC patients was depended on the surplus of the blood bile acid content.

  17. Anxiety and depression in patients suffering from chronic low backache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency of anxiety and depression in patients with chronic low backache and to document other co-morbidities among these patients presenting at rheumatology clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Islamabad. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences from July 2012 to April 2013. Methodology: A total of 170 chronic low backache patients were administered urdu translated Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scales. Scoring was done on Likert-type scale of 1-4 (based on these replies: a little of the time, some of the time, good part of the time, most of the time) with overall assessment by cumulative score ranging from 20 to 80, where 20-44 was normal range, 45-59 mildly depressed/anxious, 60-69 moderately depressed / anxious and 70 and above severely depressed / anxious. Results: Out of 170 patients, 157 patients above 18 years of age with male to female ratio 2:3 completed the study. Among study sample 72.2% had mild depression, 21.6% had mild anxiety, 32% had mixed mild anxiety and depression, 0.8% had severe depression, 1.6% had severe anxiety while 2.4% suffered from severe mixed symptoms. Overall, 125 (79.6%) patients were suffering from mild to severe form of depression and anxiety both alone or mixed. Obesity was present in 34 (21.66%) of patients with chronic backache and out of these 29 (85.3%) had psychological co-morbidity. Conclusion: Two thirds of the chronic backache patients reporting at rheumatology clinic of a tertiary care hospital were suffering from mild to severe degree of depression and anxiety. This worrying situation calls for thorough systematic evaluation of all chronic backache patient arriving at rheumatology clinic for mood disorders and psychological ailment. (author)

  18. Aureobasidium pullulans infection in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Rodrigues de Oliveira; Helio Moraes-Souza; Andre Luiz Maltos; Keila Cristina dos Santos; Rodrigo Juliano Molina; Cristina Hueb Barata

    2013-01-01

    Saprophytic fungi are being increasingly recognized as etiologic agents of mycoses in immunosuppressed patients. We report a case of subcutaneous infiltration by Aureobasidium pullulans, likely due to traumatic inoculation, in a neutropenic patient during chemotherapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The patient was treated with amphotericin B deoxycholate but was subsequently switched to itraconazole, which improved the lesion. This case highlights the importance of considering unusual fung...

  19. Electrocardiographic Screening for Prolonged QT Interval to Reduce Sudden Cardiac Death in Psychiatric Patients: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Poncet

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is a leading cause of mortality in psychiatric patients. Long QT (LQT is common in this population and predisposes to Torsades-de-Pointes (TdP and subsequent mortality.To estimate the cost-effectiveness of electrocardiographic screening to detect LQT in psychiatric inpatients.We built a decision analytic model based on a decision tree to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and utility of LQT screening from a health care perspective. LQT proportion parameters were derived from an in-hospital cross-sectional study. We performed experts' elicitation to estimate the risk of TdP, given extent of QT prolongation. A TdP reduction of 65% after LQT detection was based on positive drug dechallenge rate and through adequate treatment and electrolyte adjustments. The base-case model uncertainty was assessed with one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Finally, the TdP related mortality and TdP avoidance parameters were varied in a two-way sensitivity analysis to assess their effect on the Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER.Costs, Quality Ajusted Life Year (QALY, ICER, and probability of cost effectiveness thresholds ($ 10,000, $25,000, and $50,000 per QALY.In the base-case scenario, the numbers of patients needed to screen were 1128 and 2817 to avoid one TdP and one death, respectively. The ICER of systematic ECG screening was $8644 (95%CI, 3144-82 498 per QALY. The probability of cost-effectiveness was 96% at a willingness-to-pay of $50,000 for one QALY. In sensitivity analyses, results were sensitive to the case-fatality of TdP episodes and to the TdP reduction following the diagnosis of LQT.In psychiatric hospitals, performing systematic ECG screening at admission help reduce the number of sudden cardiac deaths in a cost-effective fashion.

  20. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  1. Pre-morbid IQ in mental disorders: a Danish draft-board study of 7486 psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urfer-Parnas, A; Lykke Mortensen, E; Sæbye, D;

    2010-01-01

    obtained significantly lower pre-morbid IQ than controls (3-7 IQ points), AD had the highest IQ and PD the lowest. In each diagnostic category, decreasing IQ was associated with an increasing risk of becoming a patient [odds ratios (ORs) 0.5-2.5 over the full IQ spectrum]. IQ distributions was nearly......BACKGROUND: Longitudinal studies indicate that future schizophrenia patients exhibit lower IQ than healthy controls. Recent studies suggest that future patients with other mental illnesses obtain lower pre-morbid IQ. The aims of this study were to compare pre-morbid IQ among five diagnostic...... categories and normal controls, to examine the distribution of pre-morbid IQ, and to investigate the relationship between pre-morbid IQ and risk of mental illness.MethodA total of 7486 individuals hospitalized with psychiatric disease and 20 531 controls. IQ was measured at the draft board and hospital...

  2. Revascularization options in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrith, Guha; Elayda, MacArthur A; Wilson, James M

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients who have chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease and are undergoing hemodialysis. Chronic kidney disease is a recognized risk factor for premature atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, most major randomized clinical trials that form the basis for evidence-based use of revascularization procedures exclude patients who have renal insufficiency. Retrospective, observational studies suggest that patients with end-stage renal disease and severe coronary occlusive disease have a lower risk of death if they undergo coronary revascularization rather than medical therapy alone. Due to a lack of prospective studies, however, the relative merits of percutaneous versus surgical revascularization are merely a matter of opinion. Several small, retrospective studies have shown that coronary artery bypass grafting is associated with higher procedural death but better long-term survival than is percutaneous coronary intervention. This difference appears to result from poor long-term results of percutaneous coronary intervention in patients who have chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease.Because randomized trials comparing percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting have included patients undergoing balloon angioplasty and placement of bare-metal stents, their conclusions are suspect in the era of drug-eluting stents. In this review, we discuss different revascularization options for patients with chronic kidney disease, the outcomes of revascularization procedures, and the risk factors for adverse outcomes.

  3. Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania López Rodríguez

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease is related with multiple risk factors. Those patients with human immunodeficiency virus have higher risk of presenting this disease and it is usually more serious in these cases. Objective: To describe the prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV. Methods: Descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study including patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province. The occurrence of the disease was determined after the Periodontics Cuban Standards, and oral hygiene was assessed through the simplified oral hygiene index. Other variables were measured, such as smoking habits, T CD4+ lymphocyte counting and virus load. The independent association of each risk factor with the disease was determined through a logistic regression model. Results: The 56, 5 % of the 154 patients presented Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease; 60 (39.0% gingivitis and 27 (17,5% periodontitis. Gingivitis was associated with poor oral hygiene (OR: 3,71 and periodontitis with smoking habit (OR: 5,20. The severe forms of periodontitis occurred mainly in patients with lymphocyte counting lower than 500 cells/mm3 . Conclusions: The prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province is linked to known risk factors such as smoking habits and oral hygiene.

  4. A study of reasons of non-compliance of psychiatric treatment and patients' attitudes towards illness and treatment in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Dafeeah, Elnour E; Salem, Mohamad O

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the extent of psychiatric patients' compliance and non-compliance with treatment and examine the factors that affect compliance. Patients were recruited who were between 16 and 60 years of age and who were hospitalized with a psychiatric disorder and treated in the outpatient clinics of the psychiatry department. A total of 689 patients were approached and 564 patients agreed to participate in the study, a response rate of 81.8%. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire that asked about socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender, nationality, level of education, occupation, marital status, and life style habits); medication(s) prescribed and the participant's response; the degree of social supervision (rated subjectively by the patient as "poor," "good," or "very good"); data also were obtained from clinical records. Data analyses explored significant associations between compliance and non-compliance and a group of relevant variables. Of the 564 patients studied, 328 (58.2%) were compliant with treatment and 236 (41.8%) were non-compliant. There was no significant difference between compliance and non-compliance in terms of gender (p = 0.471). Patients between 21-30 years of age were significantly more compliant with drug treatment than not. Non-compliance was more common among patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (28.4%), followed by depression (14.4%), and bipolar affective disorder (12.7%) (p = 0.001). Only 25% of compliant patients and 26.3% of non-compliant patients used non-psychotropic medication. Social supervision (40%) was very poor in non-compliant patients whereas 49.4% of compliant patients had very good family support. Notable reasons for non-compliance were irregular attendance to clinic (55.5%), ignorance about side effects of medication (61%), free medicine (45.8%), and a lack of education about medication (58.1%). This study revealed that non-compliance rates among psychiatry patients

  5. Awareness and perceptions of electroconvulsive therapy among psychiatric patients: a cross-sectional survey from teaching hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Maria

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is shown to be effective in many psychiatric illnesses, but its distorted projection by the Pakistani media and its unregulated use by many physicians across the country have adversely affected its acceptability. Given this situation we aimed to assess the awareness and perceptions regarding ECT as a treatment modality among the psychiatric patients. Methods This was a questionnaire based cross-sectional study carried out at 2 tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. Results We interviewed 190 patients of which 140 were aware of ECT. The study showed that the level of education had a significant impact on the awareness of ECT (p = 0.009. The most common source of awareness was electronic and print media (38%, followed by relatives (24% and doctors (23%. Physical injuries (42% and neurological (12% and cognitive disturbances (11% were the commonly feared side effects. The most popular belief about ECT was that it was a treatment of last resort (56%. Thirty-nine percent thought that ECT could lead to severe mental and physical illness and 37% considered it inhumane. Patients' willingness to receive ECT was dependant on whether or not they were convinced of its safety (p = 0.001 and efficacy (p = 0.0001. Conclusion We identified a serious lack of dissemination of information regarding ECT by the psychiatrists and the mental health care providers. This may be the result of an inadequate postgraduate training in Pakistan or just a lack of concern about the mentally ill patients. The media seemed to be the major source of information for our patients. We also saw the prevalence of a variety of myths regarding ECT in our society, which we feel may be responsible for the patients' adverse attitudes. Given the widespread applicability of ECT there is a dire need to dispel these misconceptions and improve its acceptability.

  6. Skin and brain: itch and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavale, Stefano; Bove, Domenico; Bove, Rocco M; LA Montagna, Maddalena

    2016-10-01

    Skin diseases (atopic eczema, psoriasis, idiopathic urticaria), systemic diseases (chronic hepatic or renal failure, morbus Hodgkin, diabetes mellitus) and psychiatric disorders (obsessive compulsive disorders, depression, delusions of parasitosis) can occur with itching. The aim of this review is to clarify the link between pruritus and psychiatric morbidity and emphasize the importance of a psychiatric consultation for patients with a chronic itching, without a skin disease. In the last years, there is a growing awareness regarding psychogenic itch, although these types of itch are significantly less studied in comparison to other types of pruritus. Psychogenic pruritus is usually a diagnosis of exclusion. There are not controlled studies about treatment of psychogenic itch, but the same drugs prescribed for neuropathic pain, depression, and anxiety are used. There is a strong association between pruritus and psyche; so, it is important that the dermatologist evaluates psychosomatic dimension. According to the analysis of scientific literature and our clinical experience, pruritus seems to be a rather common phenomenon in patients suffering from depression. Future works should explain the basis of psychopathology of chronic itching thanks to studies of selected groups of patients with a particular type of chronic itching, highlighting the clinical features to establish appropriate and individual targeted care, based on the several types of pruritus. Some questions still unanswered could be clarified in this way. It is really important to decrease the symptoms "itching", because the quality of life of the patient will be improved, but the goal is to identify the underlying mechanisms of itch and establish a targeted therapy, depending on the biological changes and the underlying disease. PMID:25854671

  7. [Deep brain stimulation in a patient with ocd and the intensive pre- and post-operative psychiatric/psychotherapeutic follow-up. A case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corveleyn, P; Nuttin, B; Gabriëls, L

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical intervention carried out in meticulously selected patients with a therapy-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We describe the pre- and post-operative psychiatric care given to a 51-year-old woman before, during and after treatment with deep brain stimulation. The psychiatric follow-up included an intensive search for the optimal stimulation parameters, and considerable attention was given to psycho-education, psychotherapy and counselling. The procedure resulted in a marked improvement in the patient's OCD and made it easier for the patient to re-construct a meaningful life. PMID:23512633

  8. A STUDY OF PSYCHIATRIC FACTORS IN PATIENTS PRESENTED WITH ATTEMPTED SUICIDE IN A STATE CAPITAL MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL IN CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is one of the commonest psychiatric emergencies. According to WHO report, 1999 suicide was one of the top three leading causes of death among people aged 15-34 years in all countries. In recent years, attempted suicide has become the focus of research as it has been found to be the predictor of suicide. Psychiatric factors are one of the important determinants in attempted suicide. OBEJCTIVES The aim of the present study was to analyse the psychiatric factors in attempted suicide. METHODS The present study was conducted in the Department of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry, Gandhi Medical College and associated Hamidia Hospital Bhopal. Study based on the patients admitted in Medicine/Psychiatry ward or attending Out Patients Department with history of suicidal attempts, during the period December 2006 to November 2007. RESULTS Psychiatric disorders were present in 74.25%, while no psychiatric disorder was present in rest of 25.75%. CONCLUSION Major depressive disorder accounting for 34.69% cases, was the most common concurrent psychiatric illness among the study group.

  9. Anagrelide treatment in 52 patients with chronic myeloproliferative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, E; Jensen, B A; Hansen, P B;

    2004-01-01

    In this retrospective multi-centre study, we report our experience with anagrelide in the treatment of thrombocytosis in patients with chronic myeloproliferative diseases. Our study included 52 patients (age 20-78 years). The initial anagrelide dose was, in general, 0.5 mg once daily and mean...... anaemia (50%). Two patients experienced erectile dysfunction which has been described only once previously in association with anagrelide treatment. One patient progressed to acute leukaemia. However, this patient had been pre-treated with two potentially leukaemogenic drugs and had only been in short...... of the drug....

  10. Alexithymia and Early Maladaptive Schemas in chronic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saariaho, Anita S; Saariaho, Tom H; Mattila, Aino K; Karukivi, Max; Joukamaa, Matti I

    2015-08-01

    Psychological factors have an impact on subjective pain experience. The aim of this study was to explore the occurrence of alexithymia and Early Maladaptive Schemas in a sample of 271 first visit chronic pain patients of six pain clinics. The patients completed the study questionnaire consisting of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20, the Finnish version of the Young Schema Questionnaire short form-extended, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, and pain variables. Alexithymic patients scored higher on Early Maladaptive Schemas and had more pain intensity, pain disability and depression than nonalexithymic patients. Both alexithymia and depression correlated significantly with most Early Maladaptive Schemas. The co-occurrence of alexithymia, Early Maladaptive Schemas and depression seems to worsen the pain experience. Screening of alexithymia, depression and Early Maladaptive Schemas may help to plan psychological treatment interventions for chronic pain patients. PMID:26040835

  11. Addiction to opioids in chronic pain patients: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-01-01

    Opioids have proven very useful for treatment of acute pain and cancer pain, and in the developed countries opioids are increasingly used for treatment of chronic non-malignant pain patients as well. This literature review aims at giving an overview of definitions, mechanisms, diagnostic criteria...... patients. The review indicates that the prevalence of addiction varied from 0% up to 50% in chronic non-malignant pain patients, and from 0% to 7.7% in cancer patients depending of the subpopulation studied and the criteria used. The risk of addiction has to be considered when initiating long-term opioid...... are concerned with the fact that pain may be under treated because of fear of addiction, and the guidelines in management of non-malignant pain patients include warnings of addiction. According to the literature, it seems appropriate and necessary to be aware of the problems associated with addiction during...

  12. Psychosocial work environment, stress factors and individual characteristics among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Tuvesson; Mona, Eklund

    2014-01-20

    The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics--Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience--are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff's perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  13. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  14. Computerized spectral analyses of EEG in chronic schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was aimed at clarifying the EEG difference between chronic schizophrenic patients and normal controls by using the EEG method of spectral analyses. Twelve comparatively homogenous chronic schizophrenic patients and the 10 healthy controls were subjected to EEG investigations. 1) The EEG of schizophrenic patients had a slowing tendency of the frequency in the frontal pole, anterior temporal and central regions of the scalp compared with control subjects. 2) There was a decrease of mutual relation among the five electrodes' peak frequency in the schizophrenic patients. 3) The EEG of schizophrenic patients had more fast waves of β1 and β2 band than that of control subjects. 4) A slowing tendency of the frequency in the first half regions of the scalp was not found in 3 chronic schizophrenic patients which showed defective functions in the frontal area by positron emission tomography. 5) When mental arithmetic was given, the schizophrenic patients showed an increase of fast wave in the central, posterior temporal and occipital regions of the scalp. 6) When they opened their eyes, attenuation in the α band was not so marked in the schizophrenic patients. (author)

  15. Skin changes in patients with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olarenwaju Falodun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of patients with renal failure remains a major problem in poor-resource nations. Cutaneous manifestations in this group of patients are varied and remain helpful in differentiating acute from chronic renal failure (CRF. We studied the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders in patients with CRF at The University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, during the period between May 2006 and February 2007. Relevant information was collected with the aid of a questionnaire. The patients were then examined for skin disorders. One hundred and twenty patients who met the inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. The mean age of the CRF patients was 43.12 ± 15.38 years, while that of the control subjects was 43.13 ± 15.38 years. Seventy-six of the 120 patients (63.3% were on chronic hemodialysis while 44 (36.5% were on conservative management. A total of 107 patients (89.1% had at least one skin problem. The skin disorders seen include xerosis in 72 (60%, pruritus in 32 (26.7%, hyper-pigmentation, icthyosis and pityriasis versicolor in nine patients each (7.5%, either singly or in combination. Pallor of the skin was seen in three of the patients (2.5%, while uremic frost was seen in one (0.8%. Nail changes were seen in 48 patients (40%. We conclude that xerosis, pruritus, pigmentary and nail changes were the most common skin disorders in patients with CRF in our environment.

  16. Lung lobar volume in patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured lung lobar volume by using helical computed tomography (HCT) in 23 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), 7 patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia associated with collagen vascular disease (CVD-IP), and 5 healthy volunteers HCT scanning was done at the maximal inspiratory level and the resting end-expiratory level. To measure lung lobar volume, we traced the lobar margin on HCT images with a digitizer and calculated the lobar volume with a personal computer. The lower lobar volume and several factors influencing it in chronic interstitial pneumonia were studied. At the maximal inspiratory level, the lower lobar volume as a percent of the whole lung volume was 46.8±4.13% (mean ± SD) in the volunteers, 39.5±6.19% in the patients with IIP, and 27.7±7. 86% in the patients with CVD-IP. The lower lobar volumes in the patients were significantly lower than in the volunteers. Patients with IIP in whom autoantibody tests were positive had lower lobar volumes that were very low and were similar to those of patients with CVD-IP. These data suggest that collagen vascular disease may develop in patients with interstitial pneumonia. The patients with IIP who had emphysematous changes on the CT scans had smaller decreases in total lung capacity and lower ratios of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity than did those who had no emphysematous changes, those two groups did not differ in the ratio of lower lobar volume to whole lung volume. This suggests that emphysematous change is not factor influencing lower lobar volume in patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia. We conclude that chronic interstitial pneumonia together with very low values for lower lobar volume may be a pulmonary manifestation of collagen vascular disease. (author)

  17. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halperin JJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available John J HalperinDepartment of Neurosciences, Overlook Medical Center, Summit, NJ, USAAbstract: Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%–15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. Keywords: Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, chronic, diagnosis, treatment, chronic

  18. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%-15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease.

  19. Quality of Life in Chronic Hepatitis B and C Patients

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    Abitin Heidarzadeh

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Chronic hepatitis B and C are prevalent diseases, especially in developing countries. In many of the patients they cause limitations in physical and mental functions and finally cause reduction in their life quality. We wanted to assess the quality of life in these patients.Methods: This research was done on 74 chronic hepatitis B and C patients of Rasht which their diseases were confirmed by serologic and histologic methods and their hepatic enzymes including AST & ALT was two times more than normal range for at least 6 months. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey performed in October 2003 till Jully 2004 in Gastrointestinal & Liver Diseases Research Center of Rasht (north city of Iran, Razi hospital. The questionnaires consisted of 29 questions that were given to the patients and they were let free to complete it. Results: The individuals under survey consisted of 15 (20.27% chronic hepatitis B patients and 59 (79.72% chronic hepatitis C patients. 54 (72.79% ones were male and 20 (27.02% were female. Total adjusted score (up to 100 points of life quality was 54.4 ± 22.5. No meaningful difference was seen between two sexes based on total score of life quality. Also, in different fields of life quality no significant difference was seen between two genders, except the systemic signs that the average of adjusted score of females (43 ± 28 was less than males (63 ± 27 that means meaningful statistical difference (P < 0.007.Conclusions: Generally, it seems that chronic hepatitis B and C have untoward life qualities which could result from concern of decrease of social support or fear of society or decrease in patronage of the family or friends and it is mandate to be concerned when furnishing services to these patients.

  20. Assessing the prevalence of autoimmune, endocrine, gynecologic, and psychiatric comorbidities in an ethnically diverse cohort of female fibromyalgia patients: does the time from hysterectomy provide a clue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Larry Brooks,1 Joseph Hadi,2 Kyle T Amber,1 Michelle Weiner,3 Christopher L La Riche,4 Tamar Ference1 1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, 2Anesco Interventional Pain Institute, Margate, 3Miami Pain and Diagnostics, Miami, 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health, Florida International University Wertheim College of Medicine, University Park, FL, USABackground: This retrospective chart review investigated differences in the prevalence of medical comorbidity between women with fibromyalgia (FM (n=219 and a control group women with chronic pain (CP without FM (n=116. The specific aims were to compare the prevalence of autoimmune, psychiatric, endocrine, gynecologic pathology, the relationship between timing of gynecologic surgery, and pain onset. We additionally sought to compare the number of comorbidities in an ethnically diverse cohort.Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of patients seen in FM or CP clinics at an academic medical center in 2009–2010.Results: Logistic regression modeling found that gynecologic, endocrine, and autoimmune diagnoses were independently associated with a diagnosis of FM. Detailed analyses showed that thyroid disease (P<0.01 and gynecologic surgery (P<0.05 were significantly more common in FM. Women with FM were more likely to have multiple autoimmune, endocrine, gynecologic, or psychiatric pathologies. A relationship was observed between the timing of gynecologic surgery and pain onset in FM, with more surgeries observed in the years just prior to pain onset or in the year after pain onset. A similar pattern was not found in the control group.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that autoimmune, endocrine, and gynecologic pathologies occur more commonly in women with FM than in those with CP, which is consistent with findings in less ethnically diverse samples. Moreover, a relationship was found between timing of pain onset and gynecologic

  1. Remote patient monitoring in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Mishkin, Aaron; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kalra, Ankur; Frishman, William H

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) poses a significant economic burden on our health-care resources with very high readmission rates. Remote monitoring has a substantial potential to improve the management and outcome of patients with HF. Readmission for decompensated HF is often preceded by a stage of subclinical hemodynamic decompensation, where therapeutic interventions would prevent subsequent clinical decompensation and hospitalization. Various methods of remote patient monitoring include structured telephone support, advanced telemonitoring technologies, remote monitoring of patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators, and implantable hemodynamic monitors. Current data examining the efficacy of remote monitoring technologies in improving outcomes have shown inconsistent results. Various medicolegal and financial issues need to be addressed before widespread implementation of this exciting technology can take place. PMID:23018667

  2. Influence of sleep-wake and circadian rhythm disturbances in psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Boivin, DB

    2000-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the temporal alignment between the sleep-wake cycle and the circadian pacemaker affects self-assessment of mood in healthy subjects. Despite the differences in affective state between healthy subjects and patients with psychiatric disorders, these results have implications for analyzing diurnal variation of mood in unipolar and bipolar affective disorders and sleep disturbances in other major psychiatric conditions such as chronic schizophrenia. In a good proportion...

  3. Reasons for psychiatric consultation referrals in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia : a comparison with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kat, Martin G; Zuidema, Sytse U; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Kalisvaart, Kees J; van Gool, Willem A; Eikelenboom, Piet; de Jonghe, Jos F M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study psychiatric consultation referrals of nursing home patients with dementia and to compare referral reasons with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. METHODS: This is part of a cross-sectional study of 787 patients residing in 14 nursing homes in the Netherlan

  4. Effect of nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients - an interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt;

    2013-01-01

    and conducting systematic medication reviews using computer based screening. The effect is evaluated in a controlled interventional study. METHODS: An interventional study including 2 acute psychiatric wards. In one ward nurses’ will receive pharmacological training and the other ward will function as a control...... of the interratervariability between the two professions. RESULTS: The hypothesis is that nurse-led medication reviews will reduce potential inappropriate prescribing and that training will increase nurses’ ability to identify and report potential inappropriate prescribing. It is assumed that this intervention, in addition...

  5. Chronic diarrhoea in HIV patients: Prevalence of coccidian parasites

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    Gupta S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in HIV patients with or without diarrhoea and to see an association between diarrhoea and the coccidian parasites in our setting. Stool samples from 113 HIV patients, 34 chronic diarrhoea and 79 without any history of diarrhoea were collected and examined for enteric parasites by microscopy. One hundred and thirteen control samples from HIV negative patients complaining of prolonged diarrhoea were also collected and analysed. Prevalence of coccidian parasites in HIV and non-HIV patients; with and without diarrhoea was compared using chi-square tests. Enteric parasites were detected in 55.8% HIV patients with diarrhoea compared to 16.4% in patients without diarrhoea ( P < 0.001. Isospora belli was found in 41.1% (14/34 of chronic diarrhoea and 6.3% (5/79 in non-diarrhoeal cases ( P < 0.001. Cryptosporidium was detected in 20.6% (7/34 of chronic diarrhoea and 2.5% (2/79 in non-diarrhoeal cases ( P < 0.01. Cyclospora cayetanensis associated diarrhoea was detected in only one case of chronic diarrhoea (2.9%. CD4+ T-cell count was lower (180 cells/μl0 in diarrhoeal HIV patients as compared to non-diarrhoeal patients. Coccidian parasites were seen at a mean CD4+ T-cell count of 186.3 cells/μL. This study concluded that Isospora belli was the predominant parasite followed by Cryptosporidium spp. and both were strongly associated with diarrhoea among HIV patients.

  6. Large cerebral perfusion defects observed in brain perfusion SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young; Kim, Hahn Young; Roh, Hong Gee; Han, Seol Heui [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a memory disorder characterized by an episode of antegrade amnesia and bewilderment which persists for several hours. We analyzed brain perfusion SPECT findings and clinical outcome of patients who suffered from TGA. From September 2005 to August 2007, 12 patients underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT for neuroimaging of TGA. All patients also underwent MRI and MRA including DWI (MRI). Among them, 10 patients who could be chased more than 6 months were included in this study. Their average age was 60.74.0 yrs (M: F = 2: 8) and the average duration of amnesia was 4.42.2 hrs (1 hr {approx} 7 hrs). Duration from episode of amnesia to SPECT was 4.32.4 days (1{approx}9 days). Precipitating factors could be identified in 6 patients: emotional stress 3, hair dyeing 1, taking a nap 1 and angioplasty 1. SPECT and MRI was visually assessed, No cerebral perfusion defect was observed on SPECT in 3 patients and their clinical outcome was all good. Among 7 patients who had cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT, 3 patients had good clinical outcome, while others did not: one had hypercholesterolemia, another had depression, and 2 patients with cerebral perfusion defects at both temporoparetal cortex was later diagnosed as early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MRI was negative in 6 patients and 3 of them had excellent clinical outcome while other 3 were diagnosed as hypercholesterolemia, early AD and MCI. Among 4 patients with positive MRI, 3 showed good clinical outcome and their MRI showed lesions at medial temporal cortex and/or vertebral artery. One patient with microcalcification at left putamen was diagnosed to have depression. Large cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients which usually shows negative MRI.

  7. Large cerebral perfusion defects observed in brain perfusion SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a memory disorder characterized by an episode of antegrade amnesia and bewilderment which persists for several hours. We analyzed brain perfusion SPECT findings and clinical outcome of patients who suffered from TGA. From September 2005 to August 2007, 12 patients underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT for neuroimaging of TGA. All patients also underwent MRI and MRA including DWI (MRI). Among them, 10 patients who could be chased more than 6 months were included in this study. Their average age was 60.74.0 yrs (M: F = 2: 8) and the average duration of amnesia was 4.42.2 hrs (1 hr ∼ 7 hrs). Duration from episode of amnesia to SPECT was 4.32.4 days (1∼9 days). Precipitating factors could be identified in 6 patients: emotional stress 3, hair dyeing 1, taking a nap 1 and angioplasty 1. SPECT and MRI was visually assessed, No cerebral perfusion defect was observed on SPECT in 3 patients and their clinical outcome was all good. Among 7 patients who had cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT, 3 patients had good clinical outcome, while others did not: one had hypercholesterolemia, another had depression, and 2 patients with cerebral perfusion defects at both temporoparetal cortex was later diagnosed as early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MRI was negative in 6 patients and 3 of them had excellent clinical outcome while other 3 were diagnosed as hypercholesterolemia, early AD and MCI. Among 4 patients with positive MRI, 3 showed good clinical outcome and their MRI showed lesions at medial temporal cortex and/or vertebral artery. One patient with microcalcification at left putamen was diagnosed to have depression. Large cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients which usually shows negative MRI

  8. Classification and identification of opioid addiction in chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Guldstrand, Sally Kendall;

    2010-01-01

    Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction, to investi......Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction......, to investigate whether PC were applicable and to compare these criteria with the ICD-10 criteria. The study was cross-sectional and included 253 patients with chronic pain at a tertiary pain centre. Patients were screened for addiction by a physician and a nurse. The addiction prevalence was 14.4% according...... treated pain patients and seems to be more sensitive and specific than ICD-10 criteria....

  9. Questionnaire survey of chronic cough in asthmatic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏为利; 邱忠民; 吕寒静; 杨忠民; 洪光朝; 王岚; 刘兴元; 郑桂芬

    2004-01-01

    @@ Wheezing is a common symptom of asthma and a main reason for most patients to seek medical care. Although wheezing has long been considered the essential symptom of asthma, clinical observations have shown that chronic cough is also an important symptom of asthma, even the sole presenting manifestation in cough variant asthma.1 As a special form of asthma, cough variant asthma probably represents the milder end of the spectrum of asthma or the forerunner of asthma, and may develop into typical asthma when the state of the illness progresses.2 Therefore, there may be a natural course from chronic cough to wheezing in the pathogenesis of asthma. However, there is currently no data to show how many patients with asthma present chronic cough before the first onset of wheezing. To investigate this question, we performed this questionnaire survey.

  10. A Questionnaire-based Study of the Views of Schizophrenia Patients and Psychiatric Healthcare Professionals in Japan about the Side Effects of Clozapine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ippei; Hanya, Manako; Uno, Junji; Amano, Yuhei; Fukai, Keiko; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is well documented that clozapine treatment causes agranulocytosis, but it can also induce drowsiness, constipation, and hypersalivation; however, these symptoms are usually less severe. It has been reported that clozapine-treated patients with schizophrenia and psychiatric healthcare professionals consider different side effects to be important. The aim of this study was to assess current practice related to the side effects of clozapine in clozapine-treated patients with schizophrenia and psychiatric healthcare professionals in Japan. Methods Data were collected from January 2014 to August 2015 in Okehazama Hospital, Kakamigahara Hospital, and Numazu Chuo Hospital. Clozapine-treated patients with schizophrenia and psychiatric healthcare professionals (psychiatrists and pharmacists) were enrolled in this study. Results Of the 106 patients and 120 psychiatric healthcare professionals screened, 100 patients and 104 healthcare professionals were included in this study. We asked the patients what side effects caused them trouble and we asked psychiatric healthcare professionals what side effects caused them concern. The patients and psychiatrists held similarly positive views regarding the efficacy of clozapine. The healthcare professionals were concerned about agranulocytosis (92.4%), blood routines (61.3%). On the other hand, the patients experienced hypersalivation (76.0%), sleepiness (51.0%). A positive correlation (R=0.696) was found between patient satisfaction and DAI-10 score. Conclusion Patients experienced more problems than healthcare professionals expected. However, usage experience of clozapine healthcare professionals tended to have similar results to patients. It is necessary that all healthcare professionals fully understand the efficacy and potential side effects of clozapine. This is very important for promoting clozapine treatment in Japan. PMID:27489383

  11. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    2004536 Association study of clinical presentation in first-episode schizophrenia and possible candidate genes in chromosome 22. MA Xiaohong (马小红), et al. Dept Psychiatr, West China Hosp, Sichuan U-niv, Chengdu 610041. Chin J Psychiatr 2004;37(3): 145-148.

  12. Patient Factors Associated with Extended Length of Stay in the Psychiatric Inpatient Units of a Large Urban County Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jason E; Shumway, Martha; Leary, Mark; Mangurian, Christina V

    2016-08-01

    This case-control study identified patient-specific factors associated with the longest psychiatric inpatient lengths of stay (LOS) at a large urban county hospital. Subjects with LOS ≥ 60 days comprised the extended LOS (ELOS) case cohort. An equally-sized control cohort consisted of a random sample of inpatients with LOS ≤ 30 days. Chi square tests and t tests were conducted to determine differences between groups. Factors associated with ELOS included older age, cognitive impairment, higher number of medical conditions requiring medication, and violence during hospital stay. Initiatives focused on community placement of patients with these characteristics may reduce prolonged LOS at safety-net hospitals. PMID:26883829

  13. Alexithymia and anxiety in female chronic pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saatcioglu Omer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Alexithymia is highly prevalent among chronic pain patients. Pain is a remarkable cause for high levels of chronic anxiety. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alexithymia and to determine anxiety levels among DSM-IV somatoform pain disorder (chronic pain female patients and to examine the relationship between alexithymia and the self-reporting of pain. Methods Thirty adult females (mean age: 34,63 ± 10,62 years, who applied to the outpatient psychiatry clinic at a public hospital with the diagnosis of chronic pain disorder (DSM-IV, were included in the study. Thirty seven healthy females (mean age: 34,46 ± 7,43 years, who matched for sociodemographic features with the patient group, consisted the control group. A sociodemographic data form, 26-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-26, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were administered to each subject and information was obtained on several aspects of the patients' pain, including intensity (measured by VAS, and duration. Results Chronic pain patients were found significantly more alexithymic than controls. There was a positive correlation between TAS-26 scores and the duration of pain. The alexithymic and nonalexithymic group did not differ in their perception of pain. Neither positive correlation nor significant difference was found between alexithymia and trait anxiety in pain patients. Discussion Alexithymia may be important in addressing the diversity of subjective factors involved in pain. The conceptualization of alexithymia as a personality trait as well as a secondary state reaction is underlined by our data.

  14. Structure and process factors that influence patients' perception of inpatient psychiatric nursing care at Mathari Hospital, Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoro, M C A; Othieno, C J; Musandu, J; Karani, A

    2008-04-01

    To explore structure and process factors which influence patients' perception of quality inpatient psychiatric nursing care at Mathari hospital. This was a cross-sectional study of 236 inpatients selected by stratified random sampling. Competence to give consent was determined by a minimum score of 24 on Mini Mental State Examination. Patients were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Differences in proportions of variables were determined by calculating confidence interval and summary chi-squared statistics. P-values of < or =0.05 were considered significant. Majority of patients (87%) were aged 20-49 years with 43% having stayed in the ward for over a month. Structure factors related to patients' perception of care included physical environment, being happy with the way the ward looked was significantly related to satisfaction with care (chi(2) = 5.506, P = 0002). Process factors significantly related to patients' satisfaction with care included nurses providing patients with information on prescribed medicines (chi(2) = 10.50, P = 00012). Satisfaction with care was positively related to ability to recommend someone for admission in the same ward (chi(2) = 20.2, P = 00001). Structure and process factors identified as influencing patients' perception of care were physical environment and nurses' qualities that fit within the characteristics of Peplau's Interpersonal Relations Theory. PMID:18307654

  15. Characteristics of patients frequently subjected to pharmacological and mechanical restraint--a register study in three Norwegian acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Mjøsund, Nina Helen; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2014-01-30

    This retrospective study from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards showed that of all the pharmacologically and mechanically restrained patients (n=373) 34 (9.1%) had been frequently restrained (6 or more times). These patients accounted for 39.2% of all restraint episodes during the two-year study period. Adjusted binary logistic regression analyses showed that the odds for being frequently restrained were 91% lower among patients above 50 years compared to those aged 18-29 years; a threefold increase (OR=3.1) for those admitted 3 times or more compared to patients with only one stay; and, finally, a threefold increase (OR=3.1) if the length of stay was 16 days or more compared to those admitted for 0-4 days. Among frequently restrained patients, males (n=15) had significantly longer stays than women (n=19), and 8 of the females had a diagnosis of personality disorder, compared to none among males. Our study showed that being frequently restrained was associated with long inpatient stay, many admissions and young age. Teasing out patient characteristics associated with the risk of being frequently restraint may contribute to reduce use of restraint by developing alternative interventions for these patients.

  16. Oral Tori in Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Hsu

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of oral tori has long been debated and is thought to be the product of both genetic and environmental factors, including occlusal forces. Another proposed mechanism for oral tori is the combination of biomechanical forces, particularly in the oral cavity, combined with cortical bone loss and trabecular expansion, as one might see in the early stages of primary hyperparathyroidism. This study investigated the epidemiology of torus palatinus (TP and torus mandibularis (TM in peritoneal dialysis patients, and analyzed the influences of hyperparathyroidism on the formation of oral tori.In total, 134 peritoneal dialysis patients were recruited between July 1 and December 31, 2015 for dental examinations for this study. Patients were categorized into two subgroups based on the presence or absence of oral tori. Demographic, hematological, biochemical, and dialysis-related data were obtained for analysis.The prevalence of oral tori in our sample group was high at 42.5% (57 of 134, and most patients with oral tori were female (61.4%. The most common location of tori was TP (80.7%, followed by TP and TM (14.0%, then TM (5.3%. All 54 TP cases were at the midline, and most were <2 cm (59.3%, flat (53.7%, and located in the premolar region (40.7%. Of the 11 TM cases, all were bilateral and symmetric, mostly <2 cm (81.9%, lobular (45.4%, and located at premolar region (63.6%. Interestingly, patients with oral tori had slightly lower serum levels of intact parathyroid hormones than those without oral tori, but the difference was not statistically significant (317.3±292.0 versus 430.1±492.6 pg/mL, P = 0.126. In addition, patients with oral tori did not differ from patients without tori in inflammatory variables such as serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (6.6±8.2 versus 10.3±20.2 mg/L, P = 0.147 or nutritional variables such as serum albumin levels (3.79±0.38 versus 3.77±0.45 g/dL, P = 0.790. Furthermore, there were no

  17. [Anesthetic Management of Three Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Naoko; Wakimoto, Mayuko; Inamori, Noriko; Nishimura, Shinya; Mori, Takahiko

    2015-08-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a chronically progressing or relapsing disease caused by immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy. We report the anesthetic management of three CIDP patients who underwent elective orthopedic surgeries. Owing to the risk of neuraxial anesthetics triggering demyelination, general anesthesia was selected to avoid epidural or spinal anesthesia or other neuraxial blockade. It was also judged prudent to avoid prolonged perioperative immobilization, which might compress vulnerable peripheral nerves. For Patient 1, general anesthesia was induced with propofol, remifentanil, and sevoflurane, and was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. For Patients 2 and 3, general anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. For tracheal intubation, under careful monitoring with peripheral nerve stimulators, minimal doses of rocuronium (0.6-0.7 mg x kg(-1)) were administered. When sugammadex was administered to reverse the effect of rocuronium, all patients rapidly regained muscular strength. Postoperative courses were satisfactory without sequelae.

  18. Diagnostic stability among chronic patients with functional psychoses: an epidemiological and clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsen Klaus D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnostic stability and illness course of chronic non-organic psychoses are complex phenomena and only few risk factors or predictors are known that can be used reliably. This study investigates the diagnostic stability during the entire course of illness in patients with non-organic psychoses and attempts to identify non-psychopathological risk factors or predictors. Method 100 patients with functional psychosis were initially characterised using the Operational Criteria Checklist for Psychotic Illness and Affective Illness (OPCRIT, medical records and health registers. To study the stability of diagnoses (i.e. shifts per time, we used registry data to define four measures of diagnostic variation that were subsequently examined in relation to four possible measures of time (i.e. observation periods or hospitalisation events. Afterwards, we identified putative co-variables and predictors of the best measures of diagnostic stability. Results All four measures of diagnostic variation are very strongly associated with numbers-of-hospitalisations and less so with duration-of-illness, duration-of-hospitalisation and with year-of-first-admission. The four measures of diagnostic variation corrected for numbers-of-hospitalisations were therefore used to study the diagnostic stability. Conventional predictors of illness course – e.g. age-of-onset and premorbid-functioning – are not significantly associated with stability. Only somatic-comorbidity is significantly associated with two measures of stability, while family-history-of-psychiatric-illness and global-assessment-of-functioning (GAF scale score show a trend. However, the traditional variables age-of-first-admission, civil-status, first-diagnosis-being-schizophrenia and somatic-comorbidity are able to explain two-fifth of the variation in numbers-of-hospitalisations. Conclusion Diagnostic stability is closely linked with the contact between patient and the healthcare system

  19. Use of cotinine urinalysis to verify self-reported tobacco use among male psychiatric out-patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatan Pal Singh Balhara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There is a complex and significant correlation between respiratory disorders and psychiatric conditions. Reliability of self-reported tobacco use has been questioned in recent times. Aims: The current study aims at assessment of accuracy of self-reported tobacco use (both smoked and smokeless among psychiatric out-patients. Settings and Design: We recruited 131 consecutive subjects from the out-patient psychiatry department of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Male patients meeting the study criteria were approached for participation in the study. They were asked about their recent tobacco use history. Those reporting recent use were assessed for severity of dependence using Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND-smoking and FTND-smokeless scales. Quantitative urine cotinine analysis was performed using the Enzyme Linked Immunesorbant Assay (ELISA method. Based on this method, a (50 ng/ml cut off score for urinary cotinine level for tobacco use was set. Statistical Analysis Used: Concordance between the self-report of tobacco use and urinary cotinine level was assessed using the Cohen′s kappa. Additionally, Pearson′s correlation coefficient was used to examine the correlation between the FTND-smoking and FTND-smokeless scales and the urinary cotinine levels. Results: The values of Cohen′s kappa suggest no significant concordance between the self-reported recent tobacco use and urinary cotinine levels for both smoking and smokeless tobacco forms. The discordance was present irrespective of a higher (550 ng/ml or a lower (50 ng/ml cut off score for a urinary cotinine level. Pearson′s correlation coefficient failed to reveal any significant direct correlation between the FTND scores and urinary cotinine levels. Conclusions: It is recommended to use biological markers such as urinary cotinine levels to corroborates the information provided by the patients.

  20. Ibrutinib-induced lymphocytosis in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herman, S E M; Niemann, C U; Farooqui, M;

    2014-01-01

    Ibrutinib and other targeted inhibitors of B-cell receptor signaling achieve impressive clinical results for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). A treatment-induced rise in absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) has emerged as a class effect of kinase inhibitors in CLL and warrants further...