WorldWideScience

Sample records for chronic progressive radiation

  1. Two children with chronic progressive radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Hideaki; Takai, Kenji; Hosoi, Gaku; Okamura, Takayuki; Osugi, Yuko; Ishihara, Shigehiko; Hara, Junichi; Tawa, Akio; Okada, Shintaro

    1995-01-01

    We report two patients who developed chronic progressive radiation myelopathy (CPRM). Patient 1 was a 16-year-old boy with group IV rhabdomyosarcoma of cervical soft tissue. He underwent partial excision of the tumor and received systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and 44 Gy of local radiotherapy (C4 through Th3). These therapies were followed by high-dose chemotherapy including thio-TEPA and busulfan with autologous bone marrow rescue. One year after the completion of the therapies, he developed CPRM. Patient 2 was a 15-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia on the 3rd complete remission. She received 18 Gy of irradiation to whole brain during the 1st remission and another 18 Gy to whole brain and 9 Gy to spinal cord after her 1st CNS relapse. After successful reinduction therapy for the 2nd relapse in CNS and bone marrow, she underwent an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The preconditioning regimen consisted of 12 Gy total body irradiation, thio-TEPA and cyclophosphamide. Seven months after BMT, she developed CPRM at C0-C1 level, which was included in the area of whole-brain irradiation. In both patients, MR images showed a swelling of the cervical cord and ring-like images by gadolinium enhancement. Their neurological disability transiently responded to the administration of corticosteroid, but they developed progressive quadriplegia. Although it is reported that a dose of 45-50 Gy may be safe, these cases suggest that administration of high-dose chemotherapy combined with intrathecal chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the cord might increase the rink of developing CPRM. (author)

  2. Two children with chronic progressive radiation myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Hideaki; Takai, Kenji; Hosoi, Gaku; Okamura, Takayuki; Osugi, Yuko; Ishihara, Shigehiko; Hara, Junichi; Tawa, Akio; Okada, Shintaro [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    We report two patients who developed chronic progressive radiation myelopathy (CPRM). Patient 1 was a 16-year-old boy with group IV rhabdomyosarcoma of cervical soft tissue. He underwent partial excision of the tumor and received systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy and 44 Gy of local radiotherapy (C4 through Th3). These therapies were followed by high-dose chemotherapy including thio-TEPA and busulfan with autologous bone marrow rescue. One year after the completion of the therapies, he developed CPRM. Patient 2 was a 15-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia on the 3rd complete remission. She received 18 Gy of irradiation to whole brain during the 1st remission and another 18 Gy to whole brain and 9 Gy to spinal cord after her 1st CNS relapse. After successful reinduction therapy for the 2nd relapse in CNS and bone marrow, she underwent an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The preconditioning regimen consisted of 12 Gy total body irradiation, thio-TEPA and cyclophosphamide. Seven months after BMT, she developed CPRM at C0-C1 level, which was included in the area of whole-brain irradiation. In both patients, MR images showed a swelling of the cervical cord and ring-like images by gadolinium enhancement. Their neurological disability transiently responded to the administration of corticosteroid, but they developed progressive quadriplegia. Although it is reported that a dose of 45-50 Gy may be safe, these cases suggest that administration of high-dose chemotherapy combined with intrathecal chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the cord might increase the rink of developing CPRM. (author).

  3. Clinical utility of MR imaging in chronic progressive radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melki, P.S.; Halimi, P.; Wibault, P.; Doyon, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper defines the diagnostic and prognostic value of MR imaging in chronic progressive radiation myelopathy 9CPRM). In this series, MR imaging showed excellent sensitivity (199%) for the demonstration of radiation-induced lesions of the spinal cord. Fifty percent of the cases showed spinal cord hypertrophy (pseudotumoral, 33%; cystic, 17%) occurring within 8 months of the clinical onset of myelopathy. The remaining 50% showed spinal cord atrophy, which occurred more than 8 months following the onset of myelopathy. These medullary lesions were located at least partially in the radiation field but extended beyond its boundaries in 73% of the cases. MR imaging helped to establish disease prognosis: spinal cord hypertrophy was usually associated with neurologic deterioration and fatal outcome within a mean of 11.5 months; in spinal atrophy, neurologic deficit was often static and survival rates were better

  4. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffoli, A.; Micheletti, E.; Capra, R.; Mattioli, F.; Marciano', N.

    1991-01-01

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  5. A case of chronic progressive radiation myelopathy with a CT myelogram simulating intramedullary tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Kamo, Hisaki; Yamao, Satoshi; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Kameyama, Masakuni

    1985-01-01

    A 58-year-old man underwent a right middle lobectomy in June, 1975, for poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung. Postoperative irradiation was given to the hilus (6100 rads), and to the right supraclavicular area (6000 rads). In 1980, 60 months after completion of irradiation, the patient noticed weakness of his legs particularly on the left side. In 1982, he noticed the girdle sensation in the upper thoracic region, and paresthesia in the lateral side of the right thigh. In Dec 1983, micturition disturbance appeared, and gait disturbance progressed, he was admitted to the Kyoto University Hospital. Neurological examination revealed an incomplete left Brown-Sequard syndrome with diminution of pain and thermal sensation on the right lower limb, and weakness and spasticity particularly on the left lower limb. Conventional myelogram with CT myelogram showed spinal cord swelling from T-2 through T-5. No extramedullary lesion was found. Laminectomy was performed through T-1 to T-6. When the dura was opened, the cord was swollen and necrotic with a cyst formation. Microscopic examination of the thickened part of the cord showed necrosis and gliosis. The lesion was correspond to the cord segments exposed to the radiation, and a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy was made. Several cases of radiation myelopathy with definite swelling of the cord at myelography were reported, but myelography in these cases was performed at most within 11 months after the onset. In this case, myelography was performed three years after the onset, and revealed difinite swelling of the cord due to a cyst formation. (author)

  6. Case of chronic progressive radiation myelopathy with a CT myelogram simulating intramedullary tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Kamo, Hisaki; Yamao, Satoshi; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Kameyama, Masakuni

    1985-05-01

    A 58-year-old man underwent a right middle lobectomy in June, 1975, for poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung. Postoperative irradiation was given to the hilus (6100 rads), and to the right supraclavicular area (6000 rads). In 1980, 60 months after completion of irradiation, the patient noticed weakness of his legs particularly on the left side. In 1982, he noticed the girdle sensation in the upper thoracic region, and paresthesia in the lateral side of the right thigh. In Dec 1983, micturition disturbance appeared, and gait disturbance progressed, he was admitted to the Kyoto University Hospital. Neurological examination revealed an incomplete left Brown-Sequard syndrome with diminution of pain and thermal sensation on the right lower limb, and weakness and spasticity particularly on the left lower limb. Conventional myelogram with CT myelogram showed spinal cord swelling from T-2 through T-5. No extramedullary lesion was found. Laminectomy was performed through T-1 to T-6. When the dura was opened, the cord was swollen and necrotic with a cyst formation. Microscopic examination of the thickened part of the cord showed necrosis and gliosis. The lesion was correspond to the cord segments exposed to the radiation, and a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy was made. Several cases of radiation myelopathy with definite swelling of the cord at myelography were reported, but myelography in these cases was performed at most within 11 months after the onset. In this case, myelography was performed three years after the onset, and revealed difinite swelling of the cord due to a cyst formation. (author).

  7. Ionizing radiation in tumor promotion and progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.

    1990-08-01

    Chronic exposure to beta radiation has been tested as a tumor promoting or progressing agent. The dorsal skins of groups of 25 female SENCAR mice were chemically initiated with a single exposure to DMBA, and chronic exposure to strontium-90/yttrium-90 beta radiation was tested as a stage 1, stage 2 or complete skin tumor promoter. Exposure of initiated mice to 0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks produced no papillomas, indicating no action as a complete promoter. Another similar group of animals was chemically promoted through stage 1 (with TPA) followed by 0.5 gray of beta radiation twice a week for 13 weeks. Again no papillomas developed indicating no action of chronic radiation as a stage 2 tumor promoter. The same radiation exposure protocol in another DMBA initiated group receiving both stage 1 and 2 chemical promotion resulted in a decrease in papilloma frequency, compared to the control group receiving no beta irradiation, indicating a tumor preventing effect of radiation at stage 2 promotion, probably by killing initiated cells. Chronic beta radiation was tested three different ways as a stage 1 tumor promoter. When compared to the appropriate control, beta radiation given after initiation as a stage 1 promoter (0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks), after initiation and along with a known stage 1 chemical promoter (1.0 gray twice a week for 2 weeks), or prior to initiation as a stage 1 promoter (0.5 gray twice a week for 4 weeks), each time showed a weak (∼ 15% stimulation) but statistically significant (p<0.01) ability to act as a stage 1 promoter. When tested as a tumor progressing agent delivered to pre-existing papillomas, beta radiation (0.5 gray twice a week for 13 weeks) increased carcinoma frequency from 0.52 to 0.68 carcinoma/animal, but this increase was not statistically significant at the 95% confidence level. We conclude that in the addition to the known initiating, progressing and complete carcinogenic action of acute exposures to ionizing

  8. Progress in radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Koji; Zingu, Kenichi; Matsuura, Keiichi; Aramaki, Ryoji; Yoshinaga, Haruma

    1980-01-01

    Possible mechanism of differences in radiosensitivity of malignant tumors in vivo was reviewed. The magnitude of repair of potentially lethal damage after X- or gamma-ray was relatively large for melanoma, osteosarcoma and glioblastoma multiform cultured in vitro. The proportion of hypoxic cells in malignant melanoma was relatively high and the Dq value of the dose response curves was relatively large, implying that these two factors also play important role for making malignant melanoma radioresistant. Recurrent tumor cells in vitro has relatively high amount of non-protein SH, which can protect cells from radiation. Except for these limited data, no experimental results has been reported which can explain the radiobiological mechanism of each radioresistant tumor. It was stressed that assessment of the radiobiological mechanism of the relatively radioresistant malignant tumors in vivo and new treatment protocol based on this assessment will improve the local control rate of malignant tumors in vivo as well as doing best in treating relatively radiosensitive tumors. (author)

  9. Progression of chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, R M; Lazarus, J M

    1989-11-01

    Rates of progression of renal failure were calculated for a group of 277 patients who had five or more clinic visits. The goals of therapy in the absence of ongoing immunological processes were control of blood pressure to diastolic pressures less than 85 mm Hg and serum phosphate less than 1.60 mmol/L (5 mg/dL). The mean rate of progression expressed as the slope of the reciprocal creatinine versus time was -0.0054 +/- 0.0009 dL/mg/mo (mean +/- SEM), and the median was -0.00315 dL/mg/mo. Approximately 25% of these patients had rates of progression less than -0.001 dL/mg/mo. The rate of progression was inversely correlated with the creatinine concentration at entry (P less than 0.004) and with the frequency of clinic visits (P less than 0.01). The "renal survival" time from a creatinine of 880 mumol/L (10 mg/dL) to dialysis was 10.0 +/- 1.2 months (mean +/- SEM). These data provide rates of progression for a group of patients without specific dietary intervention but with vigorous control of blood pressure and phosphorus.

  10. Progression from acute to chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Becker, Ulrik; Matzen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality.......1%) during follow-up; 48.2% developed from alcoholic AP, 47.0% from idiopathic AP, and 4.8% from other causes. The mortality rate for patients with progressive AP was 2.7 times higher than in patients with nonprogressive acute pancreatitis, and 5.3 to 6.5 times higher than in the background population....... In Cox regression analyses corrected for age, only smoking was of significance for the progression from AP to CP. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis can progress to CP, not only from alcoholic but also from nonalcoholic AP. Smoking was the strongest risk factor associated with progression. The mortality...

  11. Chronic progressive lymphoedema in draught horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Keyser, K; Janssens, S; Buys, N

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this review was to summarise and evaluate the current state of knowledge about chronic progressive lymphoedema in draught horses. Clinical signs of this multifactorial disorder are mainly restricted to the lower limbs, comprising progressively deteriorating skin, swelling and deformation. Although typical lesions were first reported at the beginning of the 20th century, chronic progressive lymphoedema was recognised as a specific syndrome only in 2003, and since then research has driven forward. Despite the high prevalence in some breeds and the serious economic impact, the pathogenesis is not fully understood, and the available treatment options remain symptomatic and noncurative. There is a need to improve diagnostic techniques and to develop selection tools. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  12. Allopurinol Against Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Sima; Almasi, Afshin; Manouchehri, M; Omrani, Hamid Reza; Zandkarimi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in approximately 50% of patients with kidney failure due to decreased uric acid excretion, and it has been recently known as an independent factor in the progression of renal insufficiency. Allopurinol inhibits the production of uric acid. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of allopurinol on chronic kidney disease progression. In a clinical trial, patients with stages 3 and 4 of chronic kidney disease were divided into two groups to receive allopurinol, 100 mg, daily and placebo for 12 months. Patients' kidney function and serum uric acid levels were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months after initial administration. Subgroups of patients with severe and mild glomerular filtration rate (GFR) impairment (GFR, 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively), were compared between the groups. Serum uric acid levels decreased significantly during after 12 months of allopurinol administration (P = .004). In patients with severe GFR impairment, serum creatinine levels did not decrease significantly and there was no significant increase in GFR, but in those with mild GFR impairment, serum creatinine levels decreased and GFR increase significantly (P kidney disease progression and could be administered with other effective medications for controlling the kidney disease.

  13. Radiation protection programme progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The progress report of the radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out in 1988 under contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. Results of more than 350 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: Radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; Behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; Nonstochastic effects of ionizing radiation; Radiation carcinogenesis; Genetic effects of ionizing radiation; Evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure a safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  14. Enalapril dosage in progressive chronic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elung-Jensen, Thomas; Heisterberg, Jens; Sonne, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In chronic renal failure, clearance of enalapril is reduced. Hence, a renoprotective effect may be achieved with lower doses than conventionally used. Since marked inter-patient variation in concentrations of enalaprilat has been shown in patients with renal failure despite equivalent...... dosage of enalapril, a direct comparison of the effect of high versus low plasma concentrations of enalaprilat on the progression of renal failure was undertaken. METHODS: Forty patients with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 17 (6-35) ml/min/1.73 m2 were studied in an open-label, randomised...... intervals by the plasma clearance of 51Cr-EDTA, and the individual rates of progression of renal failure were calculated as the slope of GFR versus time plot. RESULTS: In the high-concentration group, the median enalaprilat trough concentration was 92.9 ng/ml (21.8-371.0 ng/ml) and in the low...

  15. Progress in Medical Radiation Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    In-depth reviews of the advances and concepts in the application of radiation to medicine are presented in six comprehensive review articles which help to bridge the communications gap between the international research community and the medical physicists and physicians whose responsibility it is to put these advances into clinical use. Topics include techniques used both for the diagnosis of disease, such as computerized tomography, digital radiography, ultrasonography, computerized nuclear medicine scanning, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, and for its treatment, such as the radiotherapeutic utilization of high-LET radiations, and the widespread application of computers to perform dosimetry calculations from 3-D treatment planning and imaging. Each chapter has extensive references and the collection is indexed

  16. Radiative Cooling: Principles, Progress, and Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Muntasir

    2016-01-01

    The recent progress on radiative cooling reveals its potential for applications in highly efficient passive cooling. This approach utilizes the maximized emission of infrared thermal radiation through the atmospheric window for releasing heat and minimized absorption of incoming atmospheric radiation. These simultaneous processes can lead to a device temperature substantially below the ambient temperature. Although the application of radiative cooling for nighttime cooling was demonstrated a few decades ago, significant cooling under direct sunlight has been achieved only recently, indicating its potential as a practical passive cooler during the day. In this article, the basic principles of radiative cooling and its performance characteristics for nonradiative contributions, solar radiation, and atmospheric conditions are discussed. The recent advancements over the traditional approaches and their material and structural characteristics are outlined. The key characteristics of the thermal radiators and solar reflectors of the current state‐of‐the‐art radiative coolers are evaluated and their benchmarks are remarked for the peak cooling ability. The scopes for further improvements on radiative cooling efficiency for optimized device characteristics are also theoretically estimated. PMID:27812478

  17. Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages 4 and 5. ... Conclusion: Low serum bicarbonate level and high urinary protein excretion at baseline are independent predictors of progression in stage 4 and 5 CKD. Keywords: Chronic kidney disease; End stage renal disease; Glomerular filtration rate; ...

  18. A review of progress towards radiative divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Roman

    1997-07-01

    A solution of the problem of the power and particle exhaust from the next step tokamaks, will require new techniques which redistribute the power entering the SOL onto much larger surface area than conventional divertor design permits, while maintaining good impurity retention in divertor volume and allowing for efficient helium pumping. Progress made in developing such techniques is discussed. Status of the modelling studies of dynamic gas target divertor and impurity seeded radiating divertors is presented. Recent results of experiments on radiative and gas target divertors are reviewed

  19. The radiological features of chronic radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelson, R.M.; Nolan, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The radiological findings, using a single-contrast barium infusion technique, are described in a series of 13 patients with chronic radiation enteritis. The signs include evidence of submucosal thickening, single or multiple stenoses, adhesions and sinus or fistula formation. A combination of these signs characterises the condition. This technique is particularly suited to the investigation of radiation enteritis because of its ability to distend maximally the small intestine. A cause, stenosis and/or adhesions, was demonstrated in the eight of the 13 patients presenting with intermittent small-intestinal obstruction. Three patients had diarrhoea as their predominant complaint and a fistula was demonstrated in two. (author)

  20. Lipidomic Signature of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farsad Afshinnia

    2016-11-01

    Discussion: We conclude that a distinct panel of lipids may improve prediction of progression of chronic kidney disease beyond estimated glomerular filtration rate and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio when added to the base model.

  1. Brain viscoelasticity alteration in chronic-progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar-Josche Streitberger

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Viscoelastic properties indicate structural alterations in biological tissues at multiple scales with high sensitivity. Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE is a novel technique that directly visualizes and quantitatively measures biomechanical tissue properties in vivo. MRE recently revealed that early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS is associated with a global decrease of the cerebral mechanical integrity. This study addresses MRE and MR volumetry in chronic-progressive disease courses of MS. METHODS: We determined viscoelastic parameters of the brain parenchyma in 23 MS patients with primary or secondary chronic progressive disease course in comparison to 38 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals by multifrequency MRE, and correlated the results with clinical data, T2 lesion load and brain volume. Two viscoelastic parameters, the shear elasticity μ and the powerlaw exponent α, were deduced according to the springpot model and compared to literature values of relapsing-remitting MS. RESULTS: In chronic-progressive MS patients, μ and α were reduced by 20.5% and 6.1%, respectively, compared to healthy controls. MR volumetry yielded a weaker correlation: Total brain volume loss in MS patients was in the range of 7.5% and 1.7% considering the brain parenchymal fraction. All findings were significant (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic-progressive MS disease courses show a pronounced reduction of the cerebral shear elasticity compared to early relapsing-remitting disease. The powerlaw exponent α decreased only in the chronic-progressive stage of MS, suggesting an alteration in the geometry of the cerebral mechanical network due to chronic neuroinflammation.

  2. Exercise training and the progression of chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eidemak, I; Haaber, A B; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1997-01-01

    The possible beneficial effect of regular exercise training on the progression of chronic renal failure was studied in a prospective randomized controlled study. Thirty patients with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 25 ml/(min.1.73 m2) (range 10-43) were randomized to physical training...... the rate of progression judged by the slope of GFR versus time plot was equal in the two groups. Hence, the beneficial effect of exercise training, earlier observed in rat studies, could not be reproduced in our patients. Physical exercise had no untoward effect on progression of renal disease....

  3. Chronic radiation enteritis: A community hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenner, M.N.; Sheehan, P.; Nanavati, P.J.; Ross, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the operative management of patients with chronic radiation enteropathy. Thirty-eight affected patients from 1974 to 1986 were reviewed. Patients with recurrent cancer responsible for symptoms were excluded. Seventy-one percent of patients presented with bowel obstruction. Twenty-one patients were treated with bowel resection, while 17 were treated with a bypass procedure or diverting ostomy alone. Overall morbidity was 45%, and postoperative mortality was 16%. Patients in the bypass group were significantly older than those in the resection group (70.3 vs. 55.5 years, P = .024), suggesting that age may have been a determinant of the procedure performed. In our study there was no difference in outcome based on preexisting vascular disease, tumor site, type of procedure performed, or radiation dose. We conclude that resection is the procedure of choice in cases of chronic radiation enteritis requiring surgery except in cases with dense adhesions when enteroenterostomal bypass is a viable alternative

  4. Central Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie L. Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, diabetes, and proteinuria are well-recognized risk factors for progressive kidney function loss. However, despite excellent antihypertensive and antidiabetic drug therapies, which also often lower urinary protein excretion, there remains a significant reservoir of patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high risk for progression to end-stage kidney disease. This has led to the search for less traditional cardiovascular risk factors that will help stratify patients at risk for more rapid kidney disease progression. Among these are noninvasive estimates of vascular structure and function. Arterial stiffness, manifested by the pulse wave velocity in the aorta, has been established in a number of studies as a significant risk factor for kidney disease progression and cardiovascular endpoints. Much less well studied in chronic kidney disease are measures of central arterial pressures. In this paper we cover the physiology behind the generation of the central pulse wave contour and the studies available using these approaches and conclude with some speculations on the rationale for why measurements of central pressure may be informative for the study of chronic kidney disease progression.

  5. [Various pathways leading to the progression of chronic liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Somogyi, Anikó; Blázovics, Anna; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2016-02-21

    As the result of various effects (viruses, metabolic diseases, nutritional factors, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) abnormal liver function, liver steatosis and connective tissue remodeling may develop. Progression of this process is complex including various pathways and a number of factors. The authors summarize the factors involved in the progression of chronic liver disease. They describe the role of cells and the produced inflammatory mediators and cytokines, as well as the relationship between the disease and the intestinal flora. They emphasize the role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in disease progression. Insulin resistance and micro-elements (iron, copper) in relation to liver damage are also discussed, and genetic and epigenetic aspects underlying disease progression are summarized. Discovery of novel treatment options, assessment of the effectiveness of treatment, as well as the success and proper timing of liver transplantation may depend on a better understanding of the process of disease progression.

  6. Radiation transport: Progress report, July 1, 1987-September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.; Nagy, A.

    1988-05-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group S-6 for the fourth quarter of FY 87 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Deterministic Radiation Transport, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics. 23 refs., 9 figs

  7. Studies of radiation and chemical toxicity. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Annual report for the Studies of Radiation and Chemical Toxicity Program at the University of Rochester is presented. Progress is reported on four projects: Neurobehavorial Toxicity of Organometallic Fuel Additives, Mechanisms of Permanent and Delayed Pathologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Solid State Radiation Chemistry of the DNA Backbone, and Pulmonary Biochemistry

  8. The treatment progress of radiation dermatitis from external exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Wangyang; Liu Yulong

    2009-01-01

    Radiation dermatitis is often seen and is often a complication of radiation therapy of tumors. It is characterized by poor healing, stubborn relapse, and carcinogenesis.. The treatment include drug, physical therapy and surgery. This article describes the treatment progress of radiation dermatitis from external exposure. (authors)

  9. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  10. Studies on chronic effect on radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, T.K.; Kang, T.U.; Yun, Y.S.; Chung, I.Y.; Koh, J. W.; Kim, J.W.; Ryu, Y.W.

    1983-01-01

    This experiment was carried out to evaluate the chronic harzard of Co-60 low dose irradiation on ICR mice. There is now considerable evidence from human studies that age, both at exposure to radiation and at observation for risk, can be a major determinant of radiation induced cancer risk. For this reason, ICR mice at different ages as specified below were exposed to 60 m rads/week, 500 m rads/biweek of whole body Co-60 radiation at a dose rate of 3.6 rads/min. ICR mice were irradiated during pregnant period and each period from the 1st week to the 3rd week to the 52nd week, from the 6th week to the 52nd week and from the 22nd week to the 52nd week after the birth. All the experimental mice were autopsied immediately after sacrificed at the 52nd week. And all of their major organs were examined grossly and weighed. After fixation histo-pathological preparations were made for microscopical study. Blood cells-W.B.C., R.B.C., Hb-from eye's vein were counted by hemocytometer and hemometer. (Author)

  11. Research progress in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Guoying

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral therapy is the most important treatment for chronic hepatitis C. This paper reviews the progress in antiviral treatment over recent years, including the combination therapy with polyethylene glycol-Interferon (PEG-IFN and ribavirin (RBV, specific target therapy, and gene therapy. The paper believes that the anti-hepatitis C virus treatment needs more effective drug combination therapies, shorter courses, less side effect, higher drug resistance threshold, etc.

  12. Research progress on space radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjian; Dang Bingrong; Wang Zhuanzi; Wei Wei; Jing Xigang; Wang Biqian; Zhang Bintuan

    2010-01-01

    Space radiation, particularly induced by the high-energy charged particles, may cause serious injury on living organisms. So it is one critical restriction factor in Manned Spaceflight. Studies have shown that the biological effects of charged particles were associated with their quality, the dose and the different biological end points. In addition, the microgravity conditions may affect the biological effects of space radiation. In this paper we give a review on the biological damage effects of space radiation and the combined biological effects of the space radiation coupled with the microgravity from the results of space flight and ground simulation experiments. (authors)

  13. Prediction of fibrosis progression in chronic viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Lai-Hung Wong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of liver fibrosis progression has a key role in the management of chronic viral hepatitis, as it will be translated into the future risk of cirrhosis and its various complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. Both hepatitis B and C viruses mainly lead to fibrogenesis induced by chronic inflammation and a continuous wound healing response. At the same time direct and indirect profibrogenic responses are also elicited by the viral infection. There are a handful of well-established risk factors for fibrosis progression including older age, male gender, alcohol use, high viral load and co-infection with other viruses. Metabolic syndrome is an evolving risk factor of fibrosis progression. The new notion of regression of advanced fibrosis or even cirrhosis is now strongly supported various clinical studies. Even liver biopsy retains its important role in the assessment of fibrosis progression, various non-invasive assessments have been adopted widely because of their non-invasiveness, which facilitates serial applications in large cohorts of subjects. Transient elastography is one of the most validated tools which has both diagnostic and prognostic role. As there is no single perfect test for liver fibrosis assessment, algorithms combining the most validated noninvasive methods should be considered as initial screening tools.

  14. Progress in radiation processing of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad; Ahmed, Shamshad

    2005-07-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from ether radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation of noxious fumes and by products of peroxide degradation. Both the irradiation sources have their merits and limitations. Increased utilization of electron beams for modification and enhancement of polymer materials has been in particular witnessed over the past 40 years. The paper highlights several recent cases of EB utilization to improve key properties of selected plastic products. In paper is provided a survey of radiation processing methods of industrial interest, encompassing technologies which are already commercially well established, through developments in the active R&D stage which show pronounced promise for future commercial use. Radiation cross-linking technologies discussed include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, development of radiation crosslinked SiC fiber, polymer recycling, development of gamma compatible pp, hydrogels etc. Over the years, remarkable advancement has been achieved in radiation processing of natural polymers. Role of radiation in improving the processing of temperature of PCL for use as biodegradable polymer, in accelerated breakdown of cellulose into viscose and enhancement in yields of chitin/chitosan from sea-food waste, is described.

  15. Progress in radiation processing of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad; Ahmed, Shamshad

    2005-01-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from ether radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation of noxious fumes and by products of peroxide degradation. Both the irradiation sources have their merits and limitations. Increased utilization of electron beams for modification and enhancement of polymer materials has been in particular witnessed over the past 40 years. The paper highlights several recent cases of EB utilization to improve key properties of selected plastic products. In paper is provided a survey of radiation processing methods of industrial interest, encompassing technologies which are already commercially well established, through developments in the active R and D stage which show pronounced promise for future commercial use. Radiation cross-linking technologies discussed include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, development of radiation crosslinked SiC fiber, polymer recycling, development of gamma compatible pp, hydrogels etc. Over the years, remarkable advancement has been achieved in radiation processing of natural polymers. Role of radiation in improving the processing of temperature of PCL for use as biodegradable polymer, in accelerated breakdown of cellulose into viscose and enhancement in yields of chitin/chitosan from sea-food waste, is described

  16. Progress in radiation processing of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Industrial Applications and Chemistry Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Wagramer Street 5, Vienna 1400 (Austria) and Department of Process and Chemical Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)]. E-mail: a-g.chmielewski@iaea.org; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad [International Atomic Energy Agency, Industrial Applications and Chemistry Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Wagramer Street 5, Vienna 1400 (Austria); Ahmed, Shamshad [Applied Chemistry Laboratories, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Box Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2005-07-01

    Modification in polymeric structure of plastic material can be brought either by conventional chemical means or by exposure to ionization radiation from ether radioactive sources or highly accelerated electrons. The prominent drawbacks of chemical cross-linking typically involve the generation of noxious fumes and by products of peroxide degradation. Both the irradiation sources have their merits and limitations. Increased utilization of electron beams for modification and enhancement of polymer materials has been in particular witnessed over the past 40 years. The paper highlights several recent cases of EB utilization to improve key properties of selected plastic products. In paper is provided a survey of radiation processing methods of industrial interest, encompassing technologies which are already commercially well established, through developments in the active R and D stage which show pronounced promise for future commercial use. Radiation cross-linking technologies discussed include: application in cable and wire, application in rubber tyres, radiation vulcanization of rubber latex, development of radiation crosslinked SiC fiber, polymer recycling, development of gamma compatible pp, hydrogels etc. Over the years, remarkable advancement has been achieved in radiation processing of natural polymers. Role of radiation in improving the processing of temperature of PCL for use as biodegradable polymer, in accelerated breakdown of cellulose into viscose and enhancement in yields of chitin/chitosan from sea-food waste, is described.

  17. Year of progress for radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesrobian, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    New developments in ultraviolet and electron beam curing of inks and coatings are reviewed. Current installations of radiation systems are noted. An assessment is presented on raw and intermediate materials availability. Current outlook on such problems as toxicity (FDA and OSHA), residual volatiles, materials cost, adhesion and flow-out of coatings is discussed. The future potential for radiation curing systems is contrasted with that of other systems, in view of EPA requirements

  18. Radiation transport. Progress report, April 1-December 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.

    1984-10-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport by the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group X-6 for the last nine months of CY 83 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Fission Reactor Neutronics, Deterministic Transport Methods, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics

  19. The progress of molecular biology in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Kang

    1989-01-01

    The recent progress in application of molecular biology techniques in the study of radiation biology is reviewed. The three sections are as follows: (1) the study of DNA damage on molecular level, (2) the molecular mechanism of radiation cell genetics, including chromosome abberation and cell mutation, (3) the study on DNA repair gene with DNA mediated gene transfer techniques

  20. Progresses in studies on radiation treatment of environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Min; Shen Zhongqun; Yang Ruiyuan; Ma Hongjuan; Zhao Jun; Wang Wenfeng

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives a review on recent progresses in E-beam purification of flue gases, radiation degra- dation of volatile organic compounds, and radiation treatment of sewerage and industrial wastewater. And research activities in this area at Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics are given in particular details. (authors)

  1. Progress and prospects in labour radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhomenko, G.M.; Tarasenko, N.Yu.

    1987-01-01

    Stages of the development of radiation hygiene as a branch of hygienic science from 1940-1950 till now are being analyzed. The results and major research trends are presented. During the period under consideration the sanitary legislation was developed and important activity on setting up safety standards for ionizing raiation carried out

  2. Progress in identification of radiation embrittlement mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    This report outlines recent advances in the isolation and understanding of mechanisms behind known composition influences on he radiation embrittlement sensitivity of reactor pressure vessel steels at 288 deg. C. The advances are largely the product of joint investigations by Materials Engineering Associates (MEA) and other laboratories in the U.S. and overseas under cooperative and subcontract arrangements. Specific objectives were: confirmation of the suspect Cu mechanism, identification of the process for the Cu:Ni synergism, and isolation of the P mechanism in radiation sensitivity development. The investigations proceeded with MEA-supplied steels and iron alloys from 4-way split laboratory melts; research tools included Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Field Ion Microscopy (FIM), Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS), Positron Annihilation (PA) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Experimental results show that P and Cu enhance the radiation elevation of yield strength and that the associated mechanisms are a radiation-induced precipitation of P or Cu-rich clusters which impede dislocation motion. With high Cu alloys, a Cu phosphide is formed in preference to P precipitates and the P contribution is greatly reduced. Effects of postirradiation annealing and reirradiation are also reported. (author)

  3. Progress report: 1996 Radiation Safety Systems Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagwat, A.M.; Sharma, D.N.; Abani, M.C.; Mehta, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    The activities of Radiation Safety Systems Division include (i) development of specialised monitoring systems and radiation safety information network, (ii) radiation hazards control at the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the radioisotope programmes at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and for the accelerators programme at BARC and Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore. The systems on which development and upgradation work was carried out during the year included aerial gamma spectrometer, automated environment monitor using railway network, radioisotope package monitor and air monitors for tritium and alpha active aerosols. Other R and D efforts at the division included assessment of risk for radiation exposures and evaluation of ICRP 60 recommendations in the Indian context, shielding evaluation and dosimetry for the new upcoming accelerator facilities and solid state nuclear track detector techniques for neutron measurements. The expertise of the divisional members was provided for 36 safety committees of BARC and Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Twenty three publications were brought out during the year 1996. (author)

  4. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.D.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Hernandez, E.; Lavenhar, M.; Vidaver, R.; Dowling, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI; 1980 cGy) or sham irradiation was given to 40 patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) in a prospective, randomised, double-blind study. During mean follow-up of 21 months, MS patients treated with TLI has less functional decline than sham-irradiated MS patients (p<0.01). A significant relation was noted between absolute blood lymphocyte counts in the first year after TLI and subsequent course, patients with higher lymphocyte counts generally having a worse prognosis (p<0.01). TLI was well tolerated and associated with only mild short-term, and to date, long-term side-effects. (author)

  5. Progress in medical radiation physics. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    This book is the first of a series that will provide in-depth reviews of new developments in medical radiation physics. This volume is directed toward application scientists who are involved with research in this field. Six chapters review current topics in medical radiation physics. The first chapter reviews neutron dosimetry for biomedical applications. The second chapter briefly surveys current tissue inhomogeneity corrections in proton-beam treatment planning. Chapter three deals with anthropomorphic phantom materials. It includes a useful table of recommended tissue substitutes and information on manufacturing. The fourth chapter reviews applications of computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy treatment planning. Chapter five is a short introduction to positron imaging. The last chapter describes optical methods for radiograph storage

  6. Progress in high-dose radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettinger, K.V.; Nam, J.W.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Chadwick, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a deluge of new high-dose dosimetry techniques and expanded applications of methods developed earlier. Many of the principal systems are calibrated by means of calorimetry, although production of heat is not always the final radiation effect of interest. Reference systems also include a number of chemical dose meters: ferrous sulphate, ferrous-cupric sulphate, and ceric sulphate acidic aqueous solutions. Requirements for stable and reliable transfer dose meters have led to further developments of several important high-dose systems: amino acids and saccharides analysed by ESR or lyoluminescence, thermoluminescent materials, radiochromic dyes and plastics, ceric-cerous solutions analysed by potentiometry, and ethanol-chlorobenzene solutions analysed by high-frequency oscillometry. A number of other prospective dose meters are also treated in this review. In addition, an IAEA programme of high-dose standardization and intercomparison for industrial radiation processing is described. (author)

  7. Chronic effects of ionizing radiation on animals and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozd, Yi.P.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous experimental radiobiological studies and medical observations were conducted after the Chernobyl disaster based on the published results; patterns and characteristics influence of the fission products of nuclear materials on the body of mammals, including humans were analyzed. Chronic exposure to low doses leads to the changes in the hemopoietic system was founded and increases the risk of myeloproliferative diseases. The consequence of radiation-related immunodeficiency is the autoimmune disease and chronic fatigue syndrome. Radiation damage leads to endocrine system disruption of the body and of polipatologycal states. High radiosensitivity of the central nervous system was founded. Genotoxic chronic radiation exposure threatens the stability of the genome

  8. Research progress of therapeutic vaccines for treating chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianqiang; Bao, Mengru; Ge, Jun; Ren, Sulin; Zhou, Tong; Qi, Fengchun; Pu, Xiuying; Dou, Jia

    2017-05-04

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a member of Hepadnavirus family, which leads to chronic infection in around 5% of patients with a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma. 1 Despite the availability of prophylactic vaccines against hepatitis B for over 3 decades, there are still more than 2 billion people have been infected and 240 million of them were chronic. Antiviral therapies currently used in the treatment of CHB (chronic hepatitis B) infection include peg-interferon, standard α-interferon and nucleos/tide analogs (NAs), but none of them can provide sustained control of viral replication. As an alternative strategy, therapeutic vaccines for CHB patients have been widely studied and showed some promising efficacies in dozens of preclinical and clinical trials. In this article, we review current research progress in several types of therapeutic vaccines for CHB treatment, including protein-based vaccines, DNA-based vaccines, live vector-based vaccines, peptide-based vaccines and cell-based therapies. These researches may provide some clues for developing new treatments in CHB infection.

  9. Progress in radiation immune thermionic integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, D.K.; McCormick, J.B.

    1985-08-01

    This report describes the results of a program directed at evaluating the thermionic integrated circuit (TIC) technology for applicability to military systems. Previous programs under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, have developed an initial TIC technology base and demonstrated operation in high-temperature and high-radiation environments. The program described in this report has two parts: (1) a technical portion in which experiments and analyses were conducted to refine perceptions of near-term as well as ultimate performance levels of the TIC technology and (2) an applications portion in which the technical conclusions were to be evaluated against potential military applications. This report draws several conclusions that strongly suggest that (1) useful radiation-hard/high-temperature operable integrated circuits can be developed using the TIC technology; (2) because of their ability to survive and operate in hostile environments, a variety of potential military applications have been projected for this technology; and (3) based on the above two conclusions, an aggressive TIC development program should be initiated to provide the designers of future systems with integrated circuits and devices with the unique features of the TICs

  10. Progress in radiation immune thermionic integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, D.K.; McCormick, J.B. (comps.)

    1985-08-01

    This report describes the results of a program directed at evaluating the thermionic integrated circuit (TIC) technology for applicability to military systems. Previous programs under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, have developed an initial TIC technology base and demonstrated operation in high-temperature and high-radiation environments. The program described in this report has two parts: (1) a technical portion in which experiments and analyses were conducted to refine perceptions of near-term as well as ultimate performance levels of the TIC technology and (2) an applications portion in which the technical conclusions were to be evaluated against potential military applications. This report draws several conclusions that strongly suggest that (1) useful radiation-hard/high-temperature operable integrated circuits can be developed using the TIC technology; (2) because of their ability to survive and operate in hostile environments, a variety of potential military applications have been projected for this technology; and (3) based on the above two conclusions, an aggressive TIC development program should be initiated to provide the designers of future systems with integrated circuits and devices with the unique features of the TICs.

  11. Chemical and radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    Gamma radiation, as a quantitative perturbation reference, has been related to oxygen toxicity as the unavoidable background risk due to living in an oxygen atmosphere. The basic mechanisms shared by gamma irradiation and oxygen toxicity have been studied. The response to these two perturbations has been characterized at the molecular level through DNA chemistry and monoclonal antibodies, and by cellular biological responses. The investigation of cellular responses is being extended to the molecular level through a study of alteration of gene arrangement and gene expression. Concentration has been on the study of the involvement of the evolutionally conserved repetitive DNA sequences shared by hamster and man. Such sequences were found and some have been isolated in plasmids. Two cellular systems were chosen for investigation, the embryonic/adult mesenchymal system and the hematopoietic tissues system. Concentration has been on the isolation, properties, and response to perturbation of the progenitor cells and the stem cell populations

  12. Recent progress with the Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Froidevaux, D

    Start-up of end-cap assembly in Russia On July 2nd at PNPI (first photo) and on August 1st at JINR Dubna (second photo), the first straws were inserted into the first 4-plane end-cap wheels, each containing 3072 straws. The straws were glued, the radiator stacks were installed and the PNPI wheel was tested for gas leaks. An initial large leak rate was observed and fixed by increasing somewhat the amount of glue around each straw end-piece and improving the leak-tightness of the testing equipment itself. PNPI will assemble a total of 48 4-plane wheels of type A using two assembly lines. JINR Dubna will assemble a total of 32 4-plane wheels of type B using a single assembly line. The next steps are the gluing of the so-called active webs (printed circuit boards connecting high voltage and signal lines from straw/wire to HV supply and front-end boards), followed by wiring, and will take place in November. PNPI and JINR Dubna should start mass production in February-March next year. Barrel module produc...

  13. Radiological features of progressive tumoral calcinosis in chronic renal failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodnett, P

    2012-02-03

    We present the case of a young adult patient with chronic renal failure who developed painful subcutaneous nodules after failed renal transplant and recommencing dialysis. These nodules were juxta-articular in location and initially located over both shoulders. Radiological evaluation suggested tumoral calcinosis. The patient was placed on a strict dialysis and dietary regimen but was suboptimally compliant with same. The patient developed progressive disease with an increase in size and number of juxta-articular calcified soft-tissue masses. However, 6 months following a second renal transplant clinical and radiological follow up demonstrated marked resolution both in symptomatology and radiographic findings. We present the plain radiographic, CT and MRI findings which demonstrate the typical radiological features of tumoral calcinosis. We correlate these findings with clinical course and histological findings following surgical excision of one of these masses.

  14. Smart garments in chronic disease management: progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Ajit

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents the progress made developments in the area of Smart Garments for chronic disease management over last 10 years. A large number of health monitoring smart garments and wearable sensors have been manufactured to monitor patient's physiological parameters such as electrocardiogram, blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate, oxygen saturation, while patient is not in hospital. In last few years with the advancement in smartphones and cloud computing it is now possible to send the measure physiological data to any desired location. However there are many challenges in the development of smart garment systems. The two major challenges are development of new lightweight power sources and there is a need for global standardization and a road map for development of smart garments. In this paper we will discuss current state-of-theart smart garments and wearable sensor systems. Also discussed will be the new emerging trends in smart garment research and development.

  15. Genetic parameters for chronic progressive lymphedema in Belgian Draught Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyser, K; Janssens, S; Peeters, L M; Foqué, N; Gasthuys, F; Oosterlinck, M; Buys, N

    2014-12-01

    Genetic parameters for chronic progressive lymphedema (CPL)-associated traits in Belgian Draught Horses were estimated, using a multitrait animal model. Clinical scores of CPL in the four limbs/horse (CPLclin ), skinfold thickness and hair samples (hair diameter) were studied. Due to CPLclin uncertainty in younger horses (progressive CPL character), a restricted data set (D_3+) was formed, excluding records from horses under 3 years from the complete data set (D_full). Age, gender, coat colour and limb hair pigmentation were included as fixed, permanent environment and date of recording as random effects. Higher CPLclin certainty (D_3+) increased heritability coefficients of, and genetic correlations between traits, with CPLclin heritabilities (SE) for the respective data sets: 0.11 (0.06) and 0.26 (0.05). A large proportion of the CPLclin variance was attributed to the permanent environmental effect in D_full, but less in D_3+. Date of recording explained a proportion of variance from 0.09 ± 0.03 to 0.61 ± 0.08. Additive genetic correlations between CPLclin and both skinfold thickness and hair diameter showed the latter two traits cannot be used as a direct diagnostic aid for CPL. Due to the relatively low heritability of CPLclin , selection should focus on estimated breeding values (from repeated clinical examinations) to reduce CPL occurrence in the Belgian Draught Horse. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Lymphoscintigraphy of draught horses with chronic progressive lymphoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cock, H E V; Affolter, V K; Wisner, E R; Larson, R F; Ferraro, G L

    2006-03-01

    Early diagnosis of chronic progressive lymphoedema (CPL) may result in more effective interventions and provide a basis for further investigation of whether early diagnosis could be used as a means of eliminating potential genetic influences by cessation of breeding from affected individuals. Lymphoscintigraphy may be useful in draught horses to differentiate early lesions of CPL from other conditions in the pastern region. Forelimbs of 2 normal and 5 CPL-affected draught horses were evaluated with lymphoscintigraphy. Lymphoscintigraphy showed clearly the presence of interstitial fluid stasis and delayed lymphatic drainage in the affected extremities of diseased animals in contrast to normal animals of these breeds. The rate of decreased clearance of a particulate radiopharmaceutical from the tissues was related positively to the severity of clinical signs. Our findings support the hypothesis that lymph stasis is probably responsible for the progressive swelling and concurrent skin lesions observed in association with CPL in draught horses. Lymphoscintigraphy should also prove useful in diagnosis of CPL in draught horses, even in the mild stages of the disease; such early diagnosis may result in more effective intervention.

  17. Fear of progression in chronic diseases: psychometric properties of the Fear of Progression Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschbach, Peter; Berg, Petra; Dankert, Andrea; Duran, Gabriele; Engst-Hastreiter, Ursula; Waadt, Sabine; Keller, Monika; Ukat, Robert; Henrich, Gerhard

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was the development and psychometric testing of a new psychological questionnaire to measure the fear of progression (FoP) in chronically ill patients (cancer, diabetes mellitus and rheumatic diseases). The Fear of Progression Questionnaire (FoP-Q) was developed in four phases: (1) generation of items (65 interviews); (2) reduction of items--the initial version of the questionnaire (87 items) was presented to 411 patients, to construct subscales and test the reliability; (3) testing the convergent and discriminative validity of the reduced test version (43 items) within a new sample (n=439); (4) translation--German to English. The scale comprised five factors (Cronbach's alpha >.70): affective reactions (13 items), partnership/family (7), occupation (7), loss of autonomy (7) and coping with anxiety (9). The test-retest reliability coefficients varied between .77 and .94. There was only a medium relationship to traditional anxiety scales. This is an indication of the independence of the FoP. Significant relationships between the FoP-Q and the patient's illness behaviour indicate discriminative validity. The FoP-Q is a new and unique questionnaire developed for the chronically ill. A major problem and source of stress for this patient group has been measuring both specifically and economically the FoP of an illness. The FoP-Q was designed to resolve this problem, fulfill this need and reduce this stress.

  18. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 29 papers in this progress report which deal with radiobiological physics, the biological effects of ionizing radiations, and the modification of these effects by chemical and pharmacological agents

  19. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1984-November 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, H.H.

    1985-07-01

    This is the annual progress report for the Radiological Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Columbia University. The report consists of 17 individual reports plus an overall summary. Reports survey research results in neutron dosimetry, microdosimetry of electron beams and x-radiation, development of theoretical models for biological radiation effects and induction of oncogenic transformations. Individual abstracts were also prepared for each paper

  20. Forecasting of Radiation Belts: Results From the PROGRESS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balikhin, M. A.; Arber, T. D.; Ganushkina, N. Y.; Walker, S. N.

    2017-12-01

    Forecasting of Radiation Belts: Results from the PROGRESS Project. The overall goal of the PROGRESS project, funded in frame of EU Horizon2020 programme, is to combine first principles based models with the systems science methodologies to achieve reliable forecasts of the geo-space particle radiation environment.The PROGRESS incorporates three themes : The propagation of the solar wind to L1, Forecast of geomagnetic indices, and forecast of fluxes of energetic electrons within the magnetosphere. One of the important aspects of the PROGRESS project is the development of statistical wave models for magnetospheric waves that affect the dynamics of energetic electrons such as lower band chorus, hiss and equatorial noise. The error reduction ratio (ERR) concept has been used to optimise the set of solar wind and geomagnetic parameters for organisation of statistical wave models for these emissions. The resulting sets of parameters and statistical wave models will be presented and discussed. However the ERR analysis also indicates that the combination of solar wind and geomagnetic parameters accounts for only part of the variance of the emissions under investigation (lower band chorus, hiss and equatorial noise). In addition, advances in the forecast of fluxes of energetic electrons, exploiting empirical models and the first principles IMPTAM model achieved by the PROGRESS project is presented.

  1. Chronic effects of ionizing radiation on animals and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Drozd

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous experimental radiobiological studies and medical observations were conducted after the Chernobyl disaster based on the published results; patterns and characteristics influence of the fission products of nuclear materials on the body of mammals, including humans were analyzed. Chronic exposure to low doses leads to the changes in the hemopoietic system was founded and increases the risk of myeloproliferative diseases. The con-sequence of radiation-related immunodeficiency is the autoimmune disease and chronic fatigue syndrome. Radi-ation damage leads to endocrine system disruption of the body and of polipatologycal states. High radiosensitivi-ty of the central nervous system was founded. Genotoxic chronic radiation exposure threatens the stability of the genome.

  2. Bicarbonate therapy for prevention of chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoniewski, Igor; Wesson, Donald E

    2014-03-01

    Kidney injury in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is likely multifactorial, but recent data support that a component is mediated by mechanisms used by the kidney to increase acidification in response to an acid challenge to systemic acid-base status. If so, systemic alkalization might attenuate this acid-induced component of kidney injury. An acid challenge to systemic acid-base status increases nephron acidification through increased production of endothelin, aldosterone, and angiotensin II, each of which can contribute to kidney inflammation and fibrosis that characterizes CKD. Systemic alkalization that ameliorates an acid challenge might attenuate the contributions of angiotensin II, endothelin, and aldosterone to kidney injury. Some small clinical studies support the efficacy of alkalization in attenuating kidney injury and slowing glomerular filtration rate decline in CKD. This review focuses on the potential that orally administered NaHCO₃ prevents CKD progression and additionally addresses its mechanism of action, side effects, possible complications, dosage, interaction, galenic form description, and contraindications. Current National Kidney Foundation guidelines recommend oral alkali, including NaHCO₃(-), in CKD patients with serum HCO₃(-) <22 mmol/l. Although oral alkali can be provided by other medications and by base-inducing dietary constituents, oral NaHCO₃ will be the focus of this review because of its relative safety and apparent efficacy, and its comparatively low cost.

  3. Long-term follow-up observation of patients with chronic radiation sickness due to external irradiation treated with thymopeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shenyong; Sun Wenji; Zhang Aizhen; Ye Anfang

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To provide the clinical data and prognosis judgement, the authors observed the results and progression of 11 cases of chronic radiation sickness due to external irradiation treated with thymopeptide. Methods: The clinical symptoms, hematopoiesis, T lymphocyte percentage and chromosome aberration rate were used as the judgement indexes for recovery from the chronic radiation sickness. Results: Thymopeptide treatment greatly improved the neurasthenic syndrome and increased the T lymphocyte percentage (P 0.05), and improvement of neurasthenic syndrome occurred 3.5 years after they left radiation work or diminished the exposure level. 5 to 8 years after, bone marrow hematopoiesis also restored to the normal level. However, the chromosome aberration rate restored to the normal level 10 years after. Conclusion: According to the judgement criteria, the chronic radiation sickness due to external radiation exposure can recover and thymopeptide is a helpful and simple means to treat it

  4. Progress in reassessment of atomic bomb radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Studies for reassessment of A-bomb radiation dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are underway in both Japan and the US. The progress made in various reassessment studies has been reported at several US-Japan joint workshops. The medical follow-up studies by the RERF provide data on dose-related parameters such as the location of the survivors and their shielding by surrounding structures at the times of the bombings. To make accurate estimates of the radiation dose for individual survivors in the two cities, they need reliable information concerning (a) the hypocenters and burst heights of the bombs, (b) the energy yields of the bombs and the source terms for the initial radiations from the bombs, (c) the atmospheric radiation transport to determine the initial radiation fields at the location of the survivors, (d) the attenuation factors for shielding afforded by structures and terrain, and (e) the shielding of specific organs by overlying tissues of the body. A computer code combining the above elements has been installed at the RERF and used in a preliminary reassessment of radiation doses to survivors who were indoors, shielded by houses at the times of the bombings. These results will be presented and discussed. The discussions will be focused, however, on specific areas where binational agreement has been reached and on specific areas where additional work is needed before the reassessment can be considered final

  5. Chronic neuroendocrinological sequelae of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklar, C.A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Constine, L.S. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1995-03-30

    A variety of neuroendocrine disturbances are observed following treatment with external radiation therapy when the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) is included in the treatment field. Radiation-induced abnormalities are generally dose dependent and may develop many years after irradiation. Growth hormone deficiency and premature sexual development can occur following doses as low as 18 Gy fractionated radiation and are the most common neuroendocrine problems noted in children. Deficiency of gonadotropins, thyroid stimulating hormone, and adrenocorticotropin are seen primarily in individuals treated with > 40 Gy HPA irradiation. Hyperprolactinemia can be seen following high-dose radiotherapy (>40 Gy), especially among young women. Most neuroendocrine disturbances that develop as a result of HPA irradiation are treatable; patients at risk require long-term endocrine follow-up. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Research progress in airborne surveys of terrestrial gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burson, Z.G.

    1974-01-01

    Progress during the last few years in airborne surveys of terrestrial gamma radiation, i.e. in the measuring, recording, and interpreting of gamma ray signals in NaI(Tl) crystals, is discussed. Non-terrestrial background contributions have been accurately characterized. The feasibility of determining the water equivalent of snow cover by aerial survey techniques has been demonstrated. Repeat surveys over areas surrounding reactor sites can now be used to detect average differences of less than 1.0 μR/hr in terrestrial gamma radiation levels. New data acquisition and recording systems allow isotope concentrations and total inventories to be measured in spatial resolutions of a few hundred feet. Aerial survey data have been combined with population distribution data to obtain population exposure values from natural terrestrial gamma radiation around reactor sites

  7. Case of basal cell epithelioma occurring on chronic radiation dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kase, Kayoko; Matsuoka, Yoshitaka; Urushibata, Osamu; Nishiwaki, Soichi (Toho Univ. Ohashi Hosp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-05-01

    A 52-year-old woman had been treated with radiation therapy for lymphoid tuberculosis on the right side of the neck 40 years before. Chronic radiation dermatitis occurred on that site. Blackish small mass has appeared 2 years before on the central part of the dermatitis. Histological examination revealed thinning of the epidermis, swelling of the dermal collagen fibers, and follicular clusters composed of basaloid cells from the epidermis to the upper layer of the dermis. (Namekawa, K).

  8. Technological progress in radiation therapy for brain tumors

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vernimmen, Frederik Jozef

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a good therapeutic ratio the radiation dose to the tumor should be as high as possible with the lowest possible dose to the surrounding normal tissue. This is especially the case for brain tumors. Technological ad- vancements in diagnostic imaging, dose calculations, and radiation delivery systems, combined with a better un- derstanding of the pathophysiology of brain tumors have led to improvements in the therapeutic results. The widely used technology of delivering 3-D conformal therapy with photon beams (gamma rays) produced by Li-near Accelerators has progressed into the use of Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Particle beams have been used for several decades for radiotherapy because of their favorable depth dose characteristics. The introduction of clinically dedicated proton beam therapy facilities has improved the access for cancer patients to this treatment. Proton therapy is of particular interest for pediatric malignancies. These technical improvements are further enhanced by the evolution in tumor physiology imaging which allows for improved delineation of the tumor. This in turn opens the potential to adjust the radiation dose to maximize the radiobiological effects. The advances in both imaging and radiation therapy delivery will be discussed.

  9. Streptococcus bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadeja, L.; Kantarjian, H.; Bolivar, R.

    1983-01-01

    We describe the first patient with simultaneous S bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis. This case underlines the value of a thorough gastrointestinal evaluation of all patients with S bovis infection, and the need for a neurologic investigation even with minor neurologic manifestations

  10. Acute and chronic radiation syndrome in domestic animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuessel, M.

    1974-11-01

    The paper reports on the incidence and the clinical picture of the radiation syndrome in domestic animals, especially in pigs which are often used in animal experiments. The following parameters which influence the radiation reaction are discussed: type of irradiation (whole-body, partial-body and local irradiation), mean lethal radiation dose, radiation quality and RBE, age and individual radiosensitivity. The auther then describes the various symptoms of the radiation syndrome and the lesions which lead to death (death due to intestinal lesions, death following changes in the central nervous system). The next few chapters treat the symptoms manifested after chronic and internal irradiation. The paper closes with some remarks on the usability of irradiated animals for human consumption. (MG/AK) [de

  11. Chronic low dose radiation exposure and oxidative stress in radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.S.; Bhatt, M.B.; Kulkarni, MM.; Rajan, R.; Singh, B.B.; Venkataraman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. In this study free radical stress due to low dose chronic radiation exposures of radiation workers was examined as a possible atherogenic risk factor. Data on lipid profiles, lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione content in blood indicated an absence of correlation with radiation doses up to 125 mSv. (author). 13 refs., 1 fig

  12. Diagnosis of 20 cases with chronic radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongshou; Shen, Zhezhong; Wen Zhigen; Xie, Xiaoping; Ni, Jinxian

    1984-01-01

    Twenty cases with chronic radiation syndrome were diagnosed in our department during 1957-1980. All except one were radiologists, and eight of them had worked in radiological departments for over 20 years. Owing to the use of out-dated x-ray machines as well as radium sources without adequate protection, all these cases were apparently overexposed to radiation. They presented following signs and symptoms of chronic radiation syndrome: excitability, palpitation, fatigue, general weakness, loss of weight, oversweating accompanied by tendency of lowered metabolism, peripheral blood cell changes, and chromosome aberrations. The diagnosis of this syndrome was based on definitive professional and over-exposure history, clinical picture and abnormal laboratory findings. (author)

  13. Illness progression in chronic fatigue syndrome: a shifting immune baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Lindsey; Broderick, Gordon; Taylor, Renee; Fernandes, Henrique; Harvey, Jeanna; Barnes, Zachary; Smylie, AnneLiese; Collado, Fanny; Balbin, Elizabeth G; Katz, Ben Z; Klimas, Nancy G; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2016-03-10

    Validation of biomarkers for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) across data sets has proven disappointing. As immune signature may be affected by many factors, our objective was to explore the shift in discriminatory cytokines across ME/CFS subjects separated by duration of illness. Cytokine expression collected at rest across multiple studies for female ME/CFS subjects (i) 18 years or younger, ill for 2 years or less (n = 18), (ii) 18-50 years of age, ill for 7 years (n = 22), and (iii) age 50 years or older (n = 28), ill for 11 years on average. Control subjects were matched for age and body mass index (BMI). Data describing the levels of 16 cytokines using a chemiluminescent assay was used to support the identification of separate linear classification models for each subgroup. In order to isolate the effects of duration of illness alone, cytokines that changed significantly with age in the healthy control subjects were excluded a priori. Optimal selection of cytokines in each group resulted in subsets of IL-1α, 6, 8, 15 and TNFα. Common to any 2 of 3 groups were IL-1α, 6 and 8. Setting these 3 markers as a triple screen and adjusting their contribution according to illness duration sub-groups produced ME/CFS classification accuracies of 75-88 %. The contribution of IL-1α, higher in recently ill adolescent ME/CFS subjects was progressively less important with duration. While high levels of IL-8 screened positive for ME/CFS in the recently afflicted, the opposite was true for subjects ill for more than 2 years. Similarly, while low levels of IL-6 suggested early ME/CFS, the reverse was true in subjects over 18 years of age ill for more than 2 years. These preliminary results suggest that IL-1α, 6 and 8 adjusted for illness duration may serve as robust biomarkers, independent of age, in screening for ME/CFS.

  14. Progressive pituitary hormone deficiency following radiation therapy in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, Rafaela A.; Vaisman, Mario

    2004-01-01

    Hypopituitarism can be caused by radiation therapy, even when it is not directly applied on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and can lead to anterior pituitary deficiency mainly due to hypothalamic damage. The progressive loss of the anterior pituitary hormones usually occurs in the following order: growth hormone, gonadotropin hormones, adrenocorticotropic hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Although there are several different tests available to confirm anterior pituitary deficiency, this paper will focus on the gold standard tests for patients submitted to radiation therapy. We emphasize that the decline of anterior pituitary function is time- and dose-dependent with some variability among the different axes. Therefore, awareness of the need of a joint management by endocrinologists and oncologists is essential to improve treatment and quality of life of the patients. (author)

  15. Progress on clustered DNA damage in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Li'na; Zhang Hong; Di Cuixia; Zhang Qiuning; Wang Xiaohu

    2012-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage which caused by high LET heavy ion radiation can lead to mutation, tumorigenesis and apoptosis. Promoting apoptosis of cancer cells is always the basis of cancer treatment. Clustered DNA damage has been the hot topic in radiobiology. The detect method is diversity, but there is not a detail and complete protocol to analyze clustered DNA damage. In order to provide reference for clustered DNA damage in the radiotherapy study, the clustered DNA damage characteristics, the latest progresses on clustered DNA damage and the detecting methods are reviewed and discussed in detail in this paper. (authors)

  16. Skin cancer in patients with chronic radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.M.; Hanke, C.W.; Zollinger, T.W.; Montebello, J.F.; Hornback, N.B.; Norins, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The cases of 76 patients with chronic radiation dermatitis resulting from low-dose ionizing radiation for benign disease were reviewed retrospectively for risk factors leading to the development of neoplasia. The patients were studied with respect to original hair color, eye color, sun reactive skin type, benign disease treated, area treated, age at treatment, and age at development of first skin cancer. Analysis of data showed 37% of patients had sun-reactive skin type I, 27% had type II, and 36% had type III. Types IV through VI were not represented. There appeared to be an overrepresentation of types I and II. Increased melanin pigmentation may therefore be either directly or indirectly protective against the development of skin cancers in patients who have received low-dose superficial ionizing radiation for benign disease. The sun-reactive skin type of patients with chronic radiation dermatitis may be used as a predictor of skin cancer risk when the total dose of ionizing radiation is not known

  17. Progress in the clinical treatment of chronic dacryocystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Lei Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic dacryocystitis is often seen in middle-aged and old women, especially in menopause. The opening of the obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct is the key to the treatment of chronic dacryocystitis. At present, surgical treatment is the main type of operation. The commonly used methods include the transnasal canthus skin dacryocystorhinostomy and the endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy. With the development of technology, the application of laser technology and new lacrimal duct silicon rubber tube makes the clinical treatment of chronic dacryocystitis more perfect. Lacrimal endoscope technology can obtain more intuitive image of lacrimal duct data, to determine the nature, location and degree of obstruction of lacrimal passage and treatment plan is particularly important, is a major breakthrough in the field of diagnosis and treatment of lacrimal duct obstruction, diagnosis and treatment method is currently the most advanced in the field.

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Locally Progressive and Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer after Prior Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Sutera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionPancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive malignancy that has consistently demonstrated poor outcomes despite aggressive treatments. Despite multimodal treatment, local disease progression and local recurrence are common. Management of recurrent or progressive pancreatic carcinomas proves a further challenge. In patients previously treated with radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is a promising modality capable of delivering high dose to the tumor while limiting dose to critical structures. We aimed to determine the feasibility and tolerability of SBRT for recurrent or local pancreatic cancer in patients previously treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT.Materials and methodsPatients treated with EBRT who developed recurrent or local pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with SBRT reirradiation at our institution, from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed. Our primary endpoints included overall survival (OS, local control, regional control, and late grade 3+ radiation toxicity. Endpoints were analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method. The association of these survival endpoints with risk factors was studied with univariate Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsWe identified 38 patients with recurrent/progressive pancreatic cancer treated with SBRT following prior radiation therapy. Prior radiation was delivered to a median dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. SBRT was delivered to a median dose of 24.5 Gy in 1–3 fractions. Surgical resection was performed on 55.3% of all patients. Within a median follow-up of 24.4 months (inter-quartile range, 14.9–32.7 months, the median OS from diagnosis for the entire cohort was 26.6 months (95% CI: 20.3–29.8 with 2-year OS of 53.0%. Median survival from SBRT was 9.7 months (95% CI, 5.5–13.8. The 2-year freedom from local progression and regional progression was 58 and 82%, respectively. For the entire cohort, 18.4 and 10.5% experienced late grade 2

  19. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists on proteinuria and progression of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Currie, Gemma; Taylor, Alison H M; Fujita, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension and proteinuria are critically involved in the progression of chronic kidney disease. Despite treatment with renin angiotensin system inhibition, kidney function declines in many patients. Aldosterone excess is a risk factor for progression of kidney disease. Hyperkalaemi...... pressure and urinary protein/albumin excretion with a quantifiable risk of hyperkalaemia above predefined study upper limit....

  20. Association between Smoking and the Progression of Computed Tomography Findings in Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ho Gak; Lee, Dong Wook; Han, Jimin; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Seo, Chang Jin; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Jung, Jin Tae; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-05-23

    Smoking and alcohol intake are two wellknown risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. However, there are few studies examining the association between smoking and changes in computed tomography (CT) findings in chronic pancreatitis. The authors evaluated associations between smoking, drinking and the progression of calcification on CT in chronic pancreatitis. In this retrospective study, 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis who had undergone initial and follow-up CT between January 2002 and September 2010 were included. Progression of calcification among CT findings was compared according to the amount of alcohol intake and smoking. The median duration of followup was 51.6 months (range, 17.1 to 112.7 months). At initial CT findings, there was pancreatic calcification in 35 patients (59.3%). In the follow-up CT, progression of calcification was observed in 37 patients (62.7%). Progression of calcification was more common in smokers according to the multivariate analysis (odds ratio [OR], 9.987; p=0.006). The amount of smoking was a significant predictor for progression of calcification in the multivariate analysis (OR, 6.051 in less than 1 pack per day smokers; OR, 36.562 in more than 1 pack per day smokers; p=0.008). Continued smoking accelerates pancreatic calcification, and the amount of smoking is associated with the progression of calcification in chronic pancreatitis.

  1. Progress in the development of a tracking transition radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, J.S.; Beatty, J.; Shank, J.T.; Wilson, R.J.; Polychronakos, V.A.; Radeka, V.; Stephani, D.; Beker, H.; Bock, R.K.; Botlo, M.; Fabjan, C.W.; Pfennig, J.; Price, M.J.; Willis, W.J.; Akesson, T.; Chernyatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B.; Nevsky, P.; Potekhin, M.; Romanjuk, A.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Gavrilenko, I.; Maiburov, S.; Muravjev, S.; Shmeleva, A.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the TRD/Tracker is to provide charged particle tracking in the r-z plane and to provide particle identification capabilities that are independent of and complementary to calorimetric methods. The tracking goals include observation of the charged particle multiplicity and topology, reconstruction of the primary vertex or vertices, and assignment of charged particles to the correct vertex. Particle identification goals include the independent validation of electron candidates selected by calorimetric signatures, the rejection of false electron candidates that rise from accidental overlaps of low momentum charged particles with photon-induced electromagnetic showers in the calorimeter, and the identification of electrons arising from Dalitz decays or from photon conversions. The authors report on progress towards the development of an integrated transition radiation detector and charged particle tracker. Mechanical design and simulation of a detector has been pursued; a prototype device with 240 channels has been constructed and tested. Innovative construction techniques have been developed

  2. Recent Progress of the Synchrotron Radiation Calculation Code SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Kitamura, H.

    2007-01-01

    SPECTRA is a computer software to calculate optical properties of synchrotron radiation (SR) emitted by electrons passing through magnetic devices such as bending magnets, wigglers and undulators. It has been used to design various devices in the SR beamline, such as high heat-load components in the front-end section and optical elements in the optics hutch. In addition, the electron beam quality can be estimated by comparison between the measured and calculated properties of SR. Since the first announcement, numerous improvements have been made to SPECTRA to achieve less computation time with higher numerical accuracy. In addition, a number of functions have been added to follow the user's demand. In this paper, recent progress of SPECTRA is presented and details of the new functions are explained together with several examples

  3. Stage-to-stage progression of chronic kidney disease in renal transplantation with chronic allograft dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalkhali H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Although the short-term results of kidney transplantation have improved greatly during the past decades, the long-term results have not improved according. Graft loss due to chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD is a major concern in renal transplant recipients (RTRs. There is little data about disease progression in this patient population. In this paper, we investigated history of kidney function as the pattern, waiting time and rate of pass from intermediate stages in RTR with CAD."n"nMethods: In a single-center retrospective study, 214 RTRs with CAD investigated at the Urmia University Hospital urmia, Iran from 1997 to 2005. Kidney function at each visit assessed with GFR. We apply NKF and K/DOQI classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD staging system to determine pattern of disease progression per stage in this group of patients. "n"nResults: The pure death-censored graft loss was 26% with mean waiting time 81.7 months. 100% of RTRs passed from stage I to II in mean waiting time 26.3 months. The probability of prognostic factors transition from stage II to III was 88.9% with mean waiting time 25.5 months, transition from III to IV was 55.7% with mean waiting time of 24.9 months and transition for

  4. Influence of low doses chronic contamination on the progression of atheromatous pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le-Gallic, Clelia

    2015-01-01

    -inflammatory profile cytokines expression (CRP, TNF-α, MCP-1 et IFN-γ), and MMPs expression, and increase in GPx activity compared to the control group. All together, these results suggest that chronic internal exposure to low dose ionizing radiation with 137 Cs do not potentiate atherosclerosis progression. Such exposure induces an adaptive response along the experimental process, with an amelioration of atheromatous plaque phenotype, acting on the balance of pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines, pro/anti oxidant system. (author)

  5. Low level chronic irradiation of salmon. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershberger, W.K.; Donaldson, L.R.; Bonham, K.; Brannon, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    A question of primary importance in the use of nuclear energy is what effect the effluent from a reactor will have on the aquatic life in the water used for cooling. Of particular concern in the Pacific Northwest are the effects of chronic irradiation on salmon that use the rivers for spawning and nursery area. The present program was designed in the early days of the atomic era to address this concern, and to provide some insight into the long-term consequences of exposure of fish to chronic, low levels of irradiation. The experimental techniques are described and data are summarized on irradiation effects on the entire life cycle of the chinook salmon. Also, long-term effects transmitted to future generations were assessed in F 1 offspring of irradiated parents

  6. Progress in radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, Keizo

    2000-01-01

    Vulcanization dose defined as the radiation dose at which cross-linked natural rubber in latex has the maximum tensile strength can be reduced by adding carbon tetrachloride as a reaction accelerator. The radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex was selected as one of regional projects of IAEA in 1989 and a pilot plant was built in Jakarta. The products from it were evaluated during 1983-1985, followed by IAEA decision to support the continued R and D study at Takasaki, JAERI. Various factors to improve the properties of the products have been studied. Several advantages of the process over conventional method, such as absence of N-nitrosoamines, low cytotoxicity, decomposability in the environment, transparency and softness, were confirmed. The technology has been transferred toward commercial application in Thailand, and pilot plants being set up in Indonesia, India, Malaysia and Thailand. Moreover, the process was found to be effective in reducing protein remaining in natural rubber latex products and the initial investment and irradiation cost was found to be greatly reduced by employing low energy electron accelerator. This paper reviews such progress. (S. Ohno)

  7. Exploiting Novel Radiation-Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Exploiting Novel Radiation -Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report Distribution...assess the effects of ionizing radiation on at least three classes of electromagnetic materials. The proposed approach for radiation detection was...that was desired to be monitored remotely. Microwave or low millimeter wave electromagnetic radiation would be used to interrogate the device

  8. Applications of acoustic radiation force impulse quantification in chronic kidney disease: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang [Dept. of Ultrasound, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-08-15

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an emerging technique with great promise in the field of elastography. Previous studies have validated ARFI quantification as a method of estimating fibrosis in chronic liver disease. Similarly, fibrosis is the principal process underlying the progression of chronic kidney disease, which is the major cause of renal failure. However, the quantification of tissue stiffness using ARFI imaging is more complex in the kidney than in the liver. Moreover, not all previous studies are comparable because they employed different procedures. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted, both in animal models and in clinical patients, in order to better understand the histopathological mechanisms associated with renal elasticity and to further improve this imaging method by developing a standardized guidelines for its implementation.

  9. Applications of acoustic radiation force impulse quantification in chronic kidney disease: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an emerging technique with great promise in the field of elastography. Previous studies have validated ARFI quantification as a method of estimating fibrosis in chronic liver disease. Similarly, fibrosis is the principal process underlying the progression of chronic kidney disease, which is the major cause of renal failure. However, the quantification of tissue stiffness using ARFI imaging is more complex in the kidney than in the liver. Moreover, not all previous studies are comparable because they employed different procedures. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted, both in animal models and in clinical patients, in order to better understand the histopathological mechanisms associated with renal elasticity and to further improve this imaging method by developing a standardized guidelines for its implementation

  10. Radiation-associated chronic myelogenous leukaemia in younger people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimaoka, K.; Sokal, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) is known to be induced by exposure to ionizing radiation, as is acute leukaemia. However, CML has been recorded only rarely as a complication of radiation exposure early in life. During the period from 1973 to 1976, 75 patients with CML were admitted to Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI). In addition, 64 patients admitted to RPMI previously were also available for study in 1973. Among 79 patients who were born after 1925, information regarding radiation exposure was obtained in 89%; 49 were interviewed and 21 responded to a mailed questionnaire. Consultation with parents was achieved in 52 of the 70 responding cases (74%). Replies were obtained from 15 of the 18 patients below the age of 25, and were confirmed by parents or siblings in all instances. Replies to the mailed questionnaire were obtained from 45 age- and sex-matched controls. In addition to two patients already known to have radiation exposure for treatment of malignant neoplasms, these inquiries yielded a total of nine patients with histories of radiation exposure for benign conditions. Three had therapeutic irradiation, two for thymic enlargement and one for eczema. Three had exposure in utero by pelvimetry. Two had diagnostic exposure during the perinatal period and one had occupational exposure as a nurse. Four of these patients were below the age of 25. All nine patients had the Ph' chromosome. The course of CML in these patients was not different from that of other patients with Ph' chromosome-positive CML without a history of radiation exposure. A history of radiation exposure was elicited in one-fourth of the younger patients (<25) in this study, compared with one of 45 age- and sex-matched controls without leukaemia (p<0.02)

  11. The role of chronic prostatic inflammation in the pathogenesis and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandaglia, Giorgio; Briganti, Alberto; Gontero, Paolo; Mondaini, Nicola; Novara, Giacomo; Salonia, Andrea; Sciarra, Alessandro; Montorsi, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Several different stimuli may induce chronic prostatic inflammation, which in turn would lead to tissue damage and continuous wound healing, thus contributing to prostatic enlargement. Patients with chronic inflammation and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have been shown to have larger prostate volumes, more severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and a higher probability of acute urinary retention than their counterparts without inflammation. Chronic inflammation could be a predictor of poor response to BPH medical treatment. Thus, the ability to identify patients with chronic inflammation would be crucial to prevent BPH progression and develop target therapies. Although the histological examination of prostatic tissue remains the only available method to diagnose chronic inflammation, different parameters, such as prostatic calcifications, prostate volume, LUTS severity, storage and prostatitis-like symptoms, poor response to medical therapies and urinary biomarkers, have been shown to be correlated with chronic inflammation. The identification of patients with BPH and chronic inflammation might be crucial in order to develop target therapies to prevent BPH progression. In this context, clinical, imaging and laboratory parameters might be used alone or in combination to identify patients that harbour chronic prostatic inflammation. © 2013 BJU International.

  12. Effects of chronic radiation exposure on the reproduction of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifrine, M.; Kawakami, T.G.; Rasmussen, C.

    1984-01-01

    During studies on radiation leukemogenesis 7 dogs were exposed to 4.4 R/day starting at 150 days of age. Three of these dogs were females. To determine whether the exposure to chronic irradiation affected their reproductive capacity the three bitches were bred. Two of the bitches did not conceive, and one of these died shortly thereafter from myeloproliferative disease (MPD) which could have been a factor. The third bitch whelped 7 pups, one of which died shortly after birth, and the other 6 are healthy 2 months after birth. 1 table

  13. Cytogenetic studies in workers with chronic occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grynszpan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of chromosomal aberration detection on peripheral lymphocytes blood samples from monazite industry workers was used to study the cytogenetic effect of low chronic radiation doses. Cells from 51 workers and 21 controls were analysed. Cytogenetic data from individuals from different working areas were statistically compared among themselves and with the control group. The possible correlations between chromosomal aberration frequencies and cumulative external dose and working time were investigated. The influence of smoking was also tested. The link to the wives spontaneous abortions was analysed. Our results indicate possible biological effects on this sample of workers. (author)

  14. [Manneristic catatonia. A psychotropic drug refractory chronic progressive course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöber, G; Jungkunz, G; Franzek, E; Beckmann, H

    1996-07-01

    Manneristic catatonia, one form of Leonhard's systematic schizophrenias, is illustrated in nine case notes. The essential syndrome of this rare disorder (described by Leonhard in the preneuroleptic era) consisted in mannerisms and progressive stiffness of psychomotor activity. Mannerisms often developed from obsessive and compulsive ideas; whereas distress disappeared, repetitive behavior developed into a stereotype. Complex movements (e.g. not to shake hands; mutism) became mannerisms. With disease progression stiffness of facial expression and gestures and an impairment of voluntary motor activity became increasingly prominent. There were no signs of (neuroleptic-induced) parkinsonism. Manneristic catatonia affects preponderantly men and exhibits an early age of onset (median: 23 years). In none of the cases a family history of psychiatric illness was noted. Severe obstetric and birth complications as well as the high prevalence of supratentorial and cerebellar CT/MR abnormalities in this patient group point to deviations of prenatal brain maturation. The median yearly dose of neuroleptics was 83.1 g chlorpromazin equivalents. The characteristic psychopathology was not essentially influenced by modern psychopharmacological treatment neither in the beginning nor in the long run irrespective of the time of onset of the disease. Continuous high-dose neuroleptic treatment is not efficacious in this distinct group of systematic schizophrenias. Behavioural training in a rehabilitation unit is the treatment of choice from the early beginning.

  15. Progress report: nuclear safety and radiation protection in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    For the French Nuclear Safety Authority (Asn), the year 2006 was marked by two important nuclear laws being passed, one of which brought about a major change in its status. The year was a relatively satisfactory one with regard to nuclear safety, although the picture was more contrasted concerning radiation protection: in this area, more particularly in the medical field, the overall impression of good progress is offset by the declaration of a number of radiotherapy accidents. Given the benefits expected from radiotherapy treatment by the patient suffering from cancer, the conditions in which this activity is carried out are a subject of major concern for Asn, in the light of the serious risks linked to patient over-exposure. ( some important points as follows: the law on transparency and security in the nuclear field, the law on sustainable management of radioactive materials and waste, Asn: an independent administrative authority, EPR reactor project safety, I.R.R.S.: an international audit of Asn in 2006, harmonization of nuclear safety, cancer radiotherapy, improved information of the public after the T.S.N. law, taking account of organisational and human factors). (N.C.)

  16. Prion protein polymorphisms affect chronic wasting disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad J Johnson

    Full Text Available Analysis of the PRNP gene in cervids naturally infected with chronic wasting disease (CWD suggested that PRNP polymorphisms affect the susceptibility of deer to infection. To test this effect, we orally inoculated 12 white-tailed deer with CWD agent. Three different PRNP alleles, wild-type (wt; glutamine at amino acid 95 and glycine at 96, Q95H (glutamine to histidine at amino acid position 95 and G96S (glycine to serine at position 96 were represented in the study cohort with 5 wt/wt, 3 wt/G96S, and 1 each wt/Q95H and Q95H/G96S. Two animals were lost to follow-up due to intercurrent disease. The inoculum was prepared from Wisconsin hunter-harvested homozygous wt/wt animals. All infected deer presented with clinical signs of CWD; the orally infected wt/wt had an average survival period of 693 days post inoculation (dpi and G96S/wt deer had an average survival period of 956 dpi. The Q95H/wt and Q95H/G96S deer succumbed to CWD at 1,508 and 1,596 dpi respectively. These data show that polymorphisms in the PRNP gene affect CWD incubation period. Deer heterozygous for the PRNP alleles had extended incubation periods with the Q95H allele having the greatest effect.

  17. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists on proteinuria and progression of chronic kidney disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Currie, G. (Gemma); Taylor, A.H.M. (Alison H. M.); Fujita, T. (Toshiro); Ohtsu, H. (Hiroshi); Lindhardt, M. (Morten); K. Rossing; Boesby, L. (Lene); Edwards, N.C. (Nicola C.); Ferro, C.J. (Charles J.); J. Townend (Jonathan); A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton); Saklayen, M.G. (Mohammad G.); Oveisi, S. (Sonia); Jardine, A.G. (Alan G.); C. Delles (Christian); Preiss, D.J. (David J.); Mark, P.B. (Patrick B.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hypertension and proteinuria are critically involved in the progression of chronic kidney disease. Despite treatment with renin angiotensin system inhibition, kidney function declines in many patients. Aldosterone excess is a risk factor for progression of kidney disease.

  18. Periodontal Pocket Depth, Hyperglycemia, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jia-Feng; Yeh, Jih-Chen; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Liou, Jian-Chiun; Hsiung, Jing-Ru; Tung, Tao-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    No large epidemiological study has been conducted to investigate the interaction and joint effects of periodontal pocket depth and hyperglycemia on progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with periodontal diseases. Periodontal pocket depth was utilized for the grading severity of periodontal disease in 2831 patients from January 2002 to June 2013. Progression of chronic kidney disease was defined as progression of color intensity in glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria grid of updated Kidney Disease-Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) in various models were presented across different levels of periodontal pocket depth and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in forest plots and 3-dimensional histograms. During 7621 person-years of follow-up, periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C levels were robustly associated with incremental risks for progression of chronic kidney disease (aHR 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-4.6 for periodontal pocket depth >4.5 mm, and 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.4 for HbA1C >6.5%, respectively). The interaction between periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C on progression of chronic kidney disease was strong (P periodontal pocket depth (>4.5 mm) and higher HbA1C (>6.5%) had the greatest risk (aHR 4.2; 95% CI, 1.7-6.8) compared with the lowest aHR group (periodontal pocket depth ≤3.8 mm and HbA1C ≤6%). Our study identified combined periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C as a valuable predictor of progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with periodontal diseases. While considering the interaction between periodontal diseases and hyperglycemia, periodontal survey and optimizing glycemic control are warranted to minimize the risk of worsening renal function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The radiation response of cells recovering after chronic hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, T.T.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the influence of hypoxic pretreatment on the radiation response of A431 human squamous carcinoma cells. Reaeration for 10 min after chronic hypoxia (greater than 2 h) was found to enhance the radiosensitivity of A431 cells, and the maximal effect was seen for those cells reaerated after 12 h of hypoxia. The radiosensitivity enhancement for reaerated cells after 12 h of hypoxia was maximized by 5 min after the return to aerobic conditions and reached the control level by 12 h of reaeration. This enhanced radiosensitive state was characterized by a reduced shoulder region and increased slope of the radiation dose-response curve for cells in both the exponential and plateau phases of growth. There was a slight increase in the number of G1 and decrease in the number of S and G2 + M cells for both exponential- and plateau-phase cultures following 12 h hypoxic treatment. Although growth inhibition induced by 12 h of hypoxia was seen for cells in the exponential phase, there was no cell number change in the plateau-phase culture after hypoxia. Plating efficiency (PE) of cells in both growth phases was reduced by 30% after hypoxia. Furthermore, in the exponential-phase culture, the extent of reduction in PE after hypoxia was similar among cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Although S-phase cells in exponentially growing cultures were relatively more resistant to radiation than G1 and G2 + M cells, the cell age-response pattern was the same whether the cells had been aerobic or hypoxic before reaeration and irradiation. Furthermore, the enhancement ratio associated with reaeration after 12 h of hypoxia for these three subpopulations of cells was 1.3. Our results indicate that the increase in radiosensitivity due to reaeration after chronic hypoxia is unlikely to be related to the changes of cell cycle stage and growth phase during hypoxic treatment

  20. Endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in patients with progressive chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenning, Guido; Dankers, Patricia Y. W.; Drouven, Johannes W.; Waanders, Femke; Franssen, Casper F. M.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Popa, Eliane R.

    Krenning G, Dankers PY, Drouven JW, Waanders F, Franssen CF, van Luyn MJ, Harmsen MC, Popa ER. Endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in patients with progressive chronic kidney disease. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 296: F1314-F1322, 2009. First published April 1, 2009; doi:

  1. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  2. Disease impact in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia: more than meets the eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.W.; Fermont, J.; Delnooz, C.C.S.; Kalkman, J.S.; Bleijenberg, G.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2011-01-01

    We determined the extent of disease impact in 28 patients with genetically confirmed chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and compared the outcomes to those of matched myotonic dystrophy type I patients. CPEO patients reported a high frequency of severe fatigue (67.9%), pain (96.2%),

  3. Radiation curing technology progress and its industrial applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukachi, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Optics, electronics and display industries are now the driving forces for the Japanese radiation curing technology. The purpose of this paper is to overview the newly developed radiation curing technology in Japan, in particular, its industrial applications, and to present the market figures in radiation curing applications, which were surveyed by RadTech Japan in 2002 afresh. (author)

  4. JAK2V617F mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia predicts early disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahore, Z.A.A.; Shamsi, T.S.; Taj, M.; Farzana, T.; Ansari, S.H.; Nadeem, M.; Ahmad, M.; Naz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of JAK2V617F mutation along with BCR-ABL translocation or Philadelphia chromosome in chronic myeloid leukemia with early disease progression to advanced stages (accelerated phase or blast crisis) and poor outcome. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: National Institute of Blood Diseases and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Karachi, from February 2008 to August 2009. Methodology: All the newly diagnosed cases of BCR-ABL or Philadelphia positive CML were tested for JAK2V617F mutation by Nested PCR. Demographic data, spleen size, hemoglobin levels, white blood cell and platelet counts were recorded. Independent sample t-test was used for age, haemoglobin level and spleen size. Fisher's exact test was applied to compare disease progression in JAK2V617F mutation positive and negative cases. Results: Out of 45 newly diagnosed cases of CML, 40 were in chronic phase, 01 in accelerated phase and 04 in blast crisis. JAK2V617F mutation was detected in 12 (26.7%) patients; 09 (22.5%) in chronic phase, none in accelerated phase and 03 (75%) in blast crisis. During a mean follow-up of 8 months, 03 patients in chronic phase transformed in blast crisis and 02 into accelerated phase. Overall 08 out of 11 (73%) JAK2V617F positive patients either had advanced disease or showed disease progression. Only 2 of 20 (10%) available patients, negative for the mutation, showed disease progression by transforming into blast crisis (p < 0.001). No statistically significant difference was seen in the age, spleen size, haemoglobin levels, white blood cells and platelets counts in JAK2V617F positive patients. Conclusion: JAK2V617F mutation was detected in 26.7% cases of chronic myeloid leukemia. A significant proportion of them showed early disease progression. (author)

  5. Progression from acute to chronic pancreatitis: prognostic factors, mortality, and natural course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Becker, Ulrik; Matzen, Peter; Andersen, Jens Rikardt; Holst, Claus; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality of progressive AP. During 1977 to 1982, patients admitted to hospitals in Copenhagen with a diagnosis of AP or CP were included in a prospective cohort and followed up by the Danish registries in 2008. The subcohort analyses comprised 352 AP patients. Progressive AP was found in 85 patients (24.1%) during follow-up; 48.2% developed from alcoholic AP, 47.0% from idiopathic AP, and 4.8% from other causes. The mortality rate for patients with progressive AP was 2.7 times higher than in patients with nonprogressive acute pancreatitis, and 5.3 to 6.5 times higher than in the background population. In Cox regression analyses corrected for age, only smoking was of significance for the progression from AP to CP. Acute pancreatitis can progress to CP, not only from alcoholic but also from nonalcoholic AP. Smoking was the strongest risk factor associated with progression. The mortality rate for these patients was 5 to 6 times the mortality rate in the population.

  6. Effects in Plant Populations Resulting from Chronic Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, Stanislav A.; Volkova, Polina Yu.; Vasiliyev, Denis V.; Dikareva, Nina S.; Oudalova, Alla A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249032, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    environment activates genetic mechanisms, changing a population's resistance to exposure. However, there are ecological situations in which enhanced resistance has not evolved or has not persisted. Consequently, there are good theoretical and practical reasons for more attention being paid to the mechanisms by which populations becomes more radioresistant and to those situations where radio-adaptation appears not to be taking place. Since radio-adaptation plays an important role in response of populations on radiation exposure, this process needs to be incorporated into management programmes. To this very day, the effects of chronic exposure on living organisms and populations remain poorly explored, and represent a much needed field of research. In spite of the long history of the research, we are still far from complete understanding underlying processes in exposed populations. Neglecting field-collected data in favour of simplified short-term experiments that tend to overestimate adverse effects will obviously have detrimental effect for understanding, predicting, and mitigating consequences of the radiation impact on the environment. Much more is to be elucidated in our understanding before we will be able to give an objective and comprehensive assessment of the biological consequences of chronic, low-level radiation exposures to natural plant and animal populations. (authors)

  7. Classification system for acute and chronic radiation treatment sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegenschmiedt, M.H.; Sauer, R.

    1993-01-01

    A classification system in German language is proposed for scoring of acute and chronic treatment sequelae after radiotherapy. It includes all important organs and organ systems. The proposed grading corresponds to the four-scale-system of the WHO and UICC. The system is also compatible to the RTOG and EORTC acute and late radiation morbidity scoring criteria. This facilitates the data transfer for retrospective and prospective analysis of monomodal and multimodal radiotherapy treatment regimes. We recommend to use this scoring system in all German speaking countries for multicentric prospective studies. It is possible, that organ-specific sophistications of the toxicity grading will be developed in the future. These additions should conform with (inter)national standards and apply the same four-scale grading of this classification system. (orig.) [de

  8. Radiation Protection Services Division: progress report for 1992-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massand, O.P.; Murthy, B.K.S.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Radiation Protection Services Division during 1993, for implementation of radiation safety in all institutions in India using radiation sources in medical, industrial and research applications. It gives information about personnel monitoring using photographic film and TLD badges, neutron monitoring badges, advisory and licensing services, regulation, transport of radioactive materials and periodic protection survey. About 33 publications by the staff of the Division are also listed. (author). 4 tabs

  9. Progress of radiation chemistry engineering in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breger, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review of works in the field of radiation chemistry engineering (RCE) in the recent 20 years is given. Main results of development of theoretic, engineering and economic bases for creating plants for realization of RCE processes using radionuclide (long- and short-living) γ radiation sources and electron accelerators, are considered. The current state in this field meets the requirements placed in connection with forthcoming wide introduction of radiation technology to the soviet industry

  10. Recent status and progress of radiation processing in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yun Jong; Lee, Byoung Hun; Im, Don Sun; Kim, Jae Ho; Nho, Young Chang

    2008-01-01

    Radiation technology is currently used in a number of industrial processes such as sterilization, cross linking of polymer, food irradiation, rubber vulcanization in the tire manufacturing, contaminated medical waste, etc. Gamma ray and electron beam are the key examples of well-established economical applications of radiation processes. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent technological trends and activities for radiation processes in order for the industrial end users to better understand, and obtain useful information about the technology. It is clear that the radiation processing technology has potential for a variety of the industrial applications

  11. Radiation protection programme progress report 1985-89. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The final report of the 1985-89 radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out during the whole contractual period under all contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. More than 700 scientists collaborated on this programme. Results of more than 440 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation; radiation carcinogenesis; genetic effects of ionizing radiation; evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  12. Radiation protection programme progress report 1985-89. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The final report of the 1985-89 radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out during the whole contractual period under all contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. More than 700 scientists collaborated on this programme. Results of more than 440 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation; radiation carcinogenesis; genetic effects of ionizing radiation; evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  13. Recent status and progress of radiation processing in the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Jong; Lee, Byoung Hun; Im, Don Sun; Kim, Jae Ho; Nho, Young Chang [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup(Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    Radiation technology is currently used in a number of industrial processes such as sterilization, cross linking of polymer, food irradiation, rubber vulcanization in the tire manufacturing, contaminated medical waste, etc. Gamma ray and electron beam are the key examples of well-established economical applications of radiation processes. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent technological trends and activities for radiation processes in order for the industrial end users to better understand, and obtain useful information about the technology. It is clear that the radiation processing technology has potential for a variety of the industrial applications.

  14. Radiation protection programme progress report 1985-89. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The final report of the 1985-89 radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out during the whole contractual period under all contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. More than 700 scientists collaborated on this programme. Results of more than 440 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation; radiation carcinogenesis; genetic effects of ionizing radiation; evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  15. Interferon-gamma in progression to chronic demyelination and neurological deficit following acute EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renno, T; Taupin, V; Bourbonnière, L

    1998-01-01

    The cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) is implicated in the induction of acute CNS inflammation, but it is less clear what role if any IFNgamma plays in progression to chronic demyelination and neurological deficit. To address this issue, we have expressed IFNgamma in myelinating oligodendrocytes....... In contrast to control mice, which remit from EAE with resolution of glial reactivity and leukocytic infiltration, transgenics showed chronic neurological deficits. While activated microglia/macrophages persisted in demyelinating lesions for over 100 days, CD4(+) T lymphocytes were no longer present in CNS...

  16. Potential mechanisms of disease progression and management of advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Cortés, Jorge E.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Despite vast improvements in treatment of Philadelphia chromosome–positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP), advanced stages of CML, accelerated phase or blast crisis, remain notoriously difficult to treat. Treatments that are highly effective against CML-CP produce disappointing results against advanced disease. Therefore, a primary goal of therapy should be to maintain patients in CP for as long as possible, by (1) striving for deep, early molecular response to treatment; (2) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors that lower risk of disease progression; and (3) more closely observing patients who demonstrate cytogenetic risk factors at diagnosis or during treatment. PMID:24050507

  17. Urinary endotrophin predicts disease progression in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Daniel Guldager Kring; Fenton, Anthony; Jesky, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is the central pathogenic process in progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Collagen type VI (COL VI) is upregulated in renal fibrosis. Endotrophin is released from COL VI and promotes pleiotropic pro-fibrotic effects. Kidney disease severity varies considerably and accurate...... information regarding CKD progression may improve clinical decisions. We tested the hypothesis that urinary endotrophin derived during COL VI deposition in fibrotic human kidneys is a marker for progression of CKD in the Renal Impairment in Secondary Care (RIISC) cohort, a prospective observational study...... of 499 CKD patients. Endotrophin localised to areas of increased COL VI deposition in fibrotic kidneys but was not present in histologically normal kidneys. The third and fourth quartiles of urinary endotrophin:creatinine ratio (ECR) were independently associated with one-year disease progression after...

  18. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report: third new contract year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1980-01-01

    Research progress for 1979-1980 is reported. Projects discussed include the process of radiation-induced repair, Weigle-reactivation, induced radioresistance, the induction of the recA gene product, uv mutagenesis, and the induction of lambda

  19. Radiation physics and biology: Progress report for period December 1, 1986-November 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, J.S.

    1987-04-01

    This annual report describes progress made on 14 individual research projects. These projects fall naturally into theoretical biophysics, experimental microdosimetry and radiation biology. Each project has been separately abstracted for the Energy Data Base

  20. Progress in radiation application to industry and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu

    2006-01-01

    Utilization of radiation in Japan has been actively promoted by various agencies including the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI (presently Japan Atomic Energy Agency: JAEA). The JAEA-Takasaki was established in April 1963 for the purpose of promoting research and development (R and D) activities with gamma rays and electron beams. The JAEA-Takasaki's activities were addressed principally to industry and agriculture. In Japan, purpose of utilization of radiation is aiming at increasing welfare and quality of life of our peoples. (author)

  1. Uraemia progression in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5 is not constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya; Mortensen, Leif Spange

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive disease leading to loss of glomerular filtration rate (ΔGFR, measured in ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year). ΔGFR is usually assumed to be constant, but the hyperfiltration theory suggests that it accelerates in severe uraemia. A retrospective analysis of estimated...... GFR (eGFR) calculated from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation was performed to evaluate whether ΔGFR is constant or accelerating....

  2. Does significant renal ablation truly and invariably lead to hyperfiltration and progressive chronic kidney disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew; Sam, Ramin

    2017-06-01

    It is generally believed that significant renal ablation leads to hyperfiltration and eventually progressively worsening chronic kidney disease. The data behind this belief have not been scrutinized intensively. More importantly, the above belief leads many physicians to manage patients differently than they otherwise would manage. Here, we examine the data behind whether hyperfiltration occurs when patients lose kidney mass (by excision or by disease) and whether the hyperfiltration is uniformly injurious.

  3. Progranulin Is a Novel Independent Predictor of Disease Progression and Overall Survival in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    G?bel, Maria; Eisele, Lewin; M?llmann, Michael; H?ttmann, Andreas; Johansson, Patricia; Scholtysik, Ren?; Bergmann, Manuela; Busch, Raymonde; D?hner, Hartmut; Hallek, Michael; Seiler, Till; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; D?hrsen, Ulrich; D?rig, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Progranulin (Pgrn) is a 88 kDa secreted protein with pleiotropic functions including regulation of cell cycle progression, cell motility, wound repair and tumorigenesis. Using microarray based gene expression profiling we have recently demonstrated that the gene for Pgrn, granulin (GRN), is significantly higher expressed in aggressive CD38(+)ZAP-70(+) as compared to indolent CD38(-)ZAP-70(-) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cases. Here, we measured Pgrn plasma concentrations by enzyme-linke...

  4. Earth as a radio source: terrestrial kilometric radiation. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurnett, D.A.

    1974-02-01

    Radio wave experiments on the IMP-6 and 8 satellites have shown that the earth emits very intense electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range from about 50 kHz to 500 kHz. A peak intensity the total power emitted in this frequency range is about 1 billion watts. The earth is, therefore, a very intense planetary radio source, with a total power output comparable to the decametric radio emission from Jupiter. This radio emission from the earth is referred to as terrestrial kilometric radiation. Terrestrial kilometric radiation appears to originate from low altitudes (less than 3.0 Re) in the auroral region. Possible mechanisms which can explain the generation and propagation of the terrestrial kilometric radiation are discussed. (U.S.)

  5. Effect of enalapril on the progression of chronic renal failure. A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Strandgaard, S; Leyssac, P P

    1992-01-01

    In order to study the influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on the progression of chronic nephropathy, 70 patients with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 15 (range, 6 to 54) mL/min/1.73 m2 were randomized in an open study to basic treatment with enalapril or conve......In order to study the influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on the progression of chronic nephropathy, 70 patients with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 15 (range, 6 to 54) mL/min/1.73 m2 were randomized in an open study to basic treatment with enalapril...... or conventional antihypertensive treatment. The patients were followed for at least 2 years or until they needed dialysis. The groups were comparable with respect to age and sex distribution, etiology of renal diseases, initial levels of renal function and arterial blood pressure (BP), and protein intake.......18 to -7.11) mL/min/1.73 m2/month and in the control group it was -0.31 (+0.01 to -1.97) mL/min/1.73 m2/month (P less than .05). There was no significant difference in blood pressure or plasma lipid levels between the groups. Thus, the progression of moderate to severe chronic nephropathy was slower...

  6. [50 years of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-04-01

    The German Journal of Gastroenterology celebrates its fifties anniversary in 2013. Over half a century original studies, reviews and guidelines covering the topics of acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer have assumed a prominent role on its pages. Already in the first edition of the Journal Haemmerli and Hefti have summarized the Zurich experience with chronic pancreatitis and provided a detailed state-of-the-art review for the year 1963. 50 years later the current guidelines of the German Society of Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS) have been published in the same Journal and allow to summarize the scientific progress over this period. Back then chronic pancreatitis was regarded as a rare disorder (tenfold less common than e. g. acute pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer). This misconception had little to do with actual prevalence but with highly insensitive diagnostic tests, particularly in the area of diagnostic imaging. While pathogenetic factors for chronic pancreatitis, including a possible genetic disposition, were largely known in 1963, our understanding of their cellular mechanisms has very much improved. The greatest progress in diagnostic options was achieved by the introduction of novel imaging techniques such as ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound, ERCP, CT and MRCP. In terms of therapy the notion that a blockage of pancreatitic secretion is an effective pharmacological option has been abandoned and endoscopic intervention and surgical treatment have been newly developed as alternatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Radiation doses and possible radiation effects of low-level, chronic radiation in vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, W.A.; Franks, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of radiation doses in soil and vegetation in Pu-contaminated areas at the Nevada Test Site with the objective of investigating low-level, low-energy gamma radiation (with some beta radiation) effects at the cytological or morphological level in native shrubs. In this preliminary investigation, the exposure doses to shrubs at the approximate height of stem apical meristems were estimated from 35 to 140 R for a ten-year period. The gamma exposure dose estimated for the same period was 20.7 percent +- 6.4 percent of that recorded by the dosimeters used in several kinds of field instrument surveys. Hence, a survey instrument reading made at about 25 cm in the tops of shrubs should indicate about 1 / 5 the dosimeter-measured exposures. No cytology has yet been undertaken because of the drought since last winter. (auth)

  8. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements semiannual technical progress report, March 1989--August 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ney, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    This semiannual technical progress report is for the period 1 March 1989 through 31 August 1989. This National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) program is designed to provide recommendations for radiation protection based on scientific principles. During this period several reports were published covering the topics of occupational radiation exposure, medical exposure, radon control, dosimetry, and radiation protection standards. Accomplishments of various committees are also reported; including the committees on dental x-ray protection, radiation safety in uranium mining and milling, ALARA, instrumentation, records maintenance, occupational exposures of medical personnel, emergency planning, and others. (SM)

  9. Late health effects of chronic radiation exposure of bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmoshenko, Ilia V.; Malinovsky, Georgy P.; Konshina, Lidia G.; Zhukovsky, Michael V. [Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS, 620219, 20, Sophy Kovalevskoy St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Tuzankina, Irina A. [Institute of Immunology and Physiology UB RAS, 620049, 106, Pervomayskaya St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    infectious etiology, which are unexpected due to low doses absorbed in those organs and tissues. To analyze the unexpected results recent findings on strong attributability of stomach, liver and cervix cancers to bacterial and viral infections was taken into account. According to IARC, stomach cancer relative risk associated with helicobacter pillory is 5.6, liver cancer relative risks associated with HBV and HCV are 23 and 17 respectively, cervix cancer relative risk associated with HPV is >100. At the same time association of lung cancer, colon cancer and some other common malignancies with infections is either not established or of low significance. To explain observed effects we suggested that excess mortality due to cancer and non-cancer diseases of infectious etiology is associated with radiation exposure of bone marrow due to Sr-90. Irradiation of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells damages hematopoiesis and suppresses the immune response. Secondary immune deficiency induced by chronic radiation increases susceptibility to the bacterial and viral infections. Such late effect of radiation exposure can be considered within the concept of deterministic tissue reactions. (Under support of UB RAS project 12-P-2-1033). (authors)

  10. Radiation carcinogenesis. Comprehensive three-year progress report, 1 May 1972--15 March 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.; Gates, O.

    1976-03-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the pathological effects of various doses of x radiation on rats and mice, with emphasis on radioinduced carcinogenesis in parabiont rats with one of the pair exposed to 1000 R of whole body x radiation and the other shielded. Results are included from studies on alterations in metabolic parameters and life span induced by irradiation

  11. Elevation of telomerase activity in chronic radiation ulcer of human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoying; Zhao Po; Wang Dewen; Yang Zhixiang

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the levels of telomerase activity in chronic radiation ulcers of human skin and the possible relationship between the enzyme and cancer transformation. Method: Using nonisotopic telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP), detections were performed in 20 cases of chronic radiation ulcers of human skin, 5 cases of normal skin tissues and 5 cases of carcinoma. Results: The positive rates for telomerase activity were 30.0%(6/20), 0(0/5) and 100%(5/5) in chronic radiation ulcers of human skin, normal skin and carcinoma, respectively. The telomerase activity in radiation ulcer was weaker than in carcinoma. Conclusion: The telomerase activity assay might be used as a marker for predicting the prognosis and the effect of treatment in chronic radiation ulcer of human skin

  12. ROLE OF THE RENAL MICROCIRCULATION IN PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC KIDNEY INJURY IN OBESITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chade, Alejandro R.; Hall, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is largely responsible for the growing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, cardiovascular, and renal disease. Current strategies to prevent and treat obesity and its consequences have been insufficient to reverse the ongoing trends. Lifestyle modification or pharmacological therapies often produce modest weight loss which is not sustained and recurrence of obesity is frequently observed, leading to progression of target organ damage in many obese subjects. Therefore, research efforts have focused not only on the factors that regulate energy balance, but also on understanding mechanisms of target organ injury in obesity. Summary and Key message Microvascular disease plays a pivotal role in progressive kidney injury from different etiologies such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, which are all important consequences of chronic obesity. The microvascular networks are anatomical units that are closely adapted to specific functions of nutrition and removal of waste in every organ. Damage of the small vessels in several tissues and organs has been reported in obesity and may increase cardio-renal risk. However, the mechanisms by which obesity and its attendant cardiovascular and metabolic consequences interact to cause renal microvascular injury and chronic kidney disease are still unclear, although substantial progress has been made in recent years. This review addresses potential mechanisms and consequences of obesity-induced renal microvascular injury as well as current treatments that may provide protection of the renal microcirculation and slow progressive kidney injury in obesity. PMID:27771702

  13. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypotheses regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alteration in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  14. Problems and progress in radiation physics of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinetskij, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of the current status of radiation physics of semiconductors comprises the analysis of some new problems and poses the statement of concern. The essential difference between the probability of interstitial-vacancy pair occurrence W(T) in elastic collisions and the generally accepted step distribution with a typical ''threshold'' energy Tsub(d) is indicated. The role of diffusion and reaction evolution of primary defects leading to specific properties of the cluster formation process is shown. Special features of defect formation in spatially inhomogeneous semiconductors, in particular for elastic stresses present, are described. Among most important advances in the radiation physics of semiconductors there are the discovery of non-activation motion of the ''extra'' atom in silicon, the observation of a low activation energy value for the vacancy diffusion, the understanding of subthreshold mechanism of defect formation and radiation-induced diffusion, the effects of laser annealing of defects and oriented crystallization

  15. The influence of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition on renal tubular function in progressive chronic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1996-01-01

    The influence of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on renal tubular function in progressive chronic nephropathy was investigated in 69 patients by the lithium clearance (C(Li)) method. Studies were done repeatedly for up to 2 years during a controlled trial on the effect of enalapril...... on progression of renal failure. The pattern of proteinuria was followed over the first 9 months. At baseline, the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 5 to 68 mL/min. Absolute proximal tubular reabsorption rate of fluid (APR), estimated as the difference between GFR and C(Li), was 1 to 54 mL/min. Calculated...... in either treatment regimen was associated with a long-term slower progression of renal failure. Over 9 months, the 24-hour fractional clearance of albumin decreased in the ACE inhibitor group (P

  16. Analysis of reproductive function in persons exposed to chronic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossenko, M.M.; Ostroumova, E.V.; Vyushkova, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the reproductive function in individuals exposed to radiation in the riverside villages on the Techa in the Southern Urals. The exposure of the population, numbering 28000, occurred in 1950-1956 as a result of discharges into the river of radioactive wastes from the Mayak facility for processing weapon plutonium. The residents were exposed to chronic radiation, both external and internal. The range of exposure doses to gonads was sufficiently wide: 20-1270 mSv. However, the distribution of doses among the exposed individuals was ununiform, and the proportion of people whose dose was below 120 mGy accounted for 74%. The following characteristics of exposed women were analyzed: menstrual function, outcomes of pregnancy, birth rates, health status for newborns. The analysis of the menstrual function in exposed women showed that in persons exposed in childhood, menarche was registered at the age of 14.3 years, on the average (based on literature sources, menarche is attained at the age of 13 for unexposed population). The mean age at menopause was 47.9 years for exposed women (the respective mean value for Russia is 50.8 years). Pregnancy outcomes were analyzed in 9000 exposed women. The rate of medical and criminal abortions was estimated as 79 per 100 labors. The rate of spontaneous abortions for exposed women was slightly higher, 3.11%, than for controls, 2.30%; these difference, however, were statistically insignificant. The total loss of fetus or neonate (unfavorable outcomes of pregnancy: spontaneous abortions, stillbirths, early neonatal death) was estimated to be 4.58% at zero dose. Exposure to gonads at the dose 1 Sv, estimated using the above-indicated method, yielded 3% of additional unfavorable outcomes of pregnancy. It was shown, based on the analysis of birth rates for the Techa Cohort that they had not undergone any essential changes over the first 25 years of exposure compared to the respective coefficients for

  17. Analysis of reproductive function in persons exposed to chronic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossenko, M.M.; Ostroumova, E.V.; Vyushkova, O.V. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the reproductive function in individuals exposed to radiation in the riverside villages on the Techa in the Southern Urals. The exposure of the population, numbering 28000, occurred in 1950-1956 as a result of discharges into the river of radioactive wastes from the Mayak facility for processing weapon plutonium. The residents were exposed to chronic radiation, both external and internal. The range of exposure doses to gonads was sufficiently wide: 20-1270 mSv. However, the distribution of doses among the exposed individuals was ununiform, and the proportion of people whose dose was below 120 mGy accounted for 74%. The following characteristics of exposed women were analyzed: menstrual function, outcomes of pregnancy, birth rates, health status for newborns. The analysis of the menstrual function in exposed women showed that in persons exposed in childhood, menarche was registered at the age of 14.3 years, on the average (based on literature sources, menarche is attained at the age of 13 for unexposed population). The mean age at menopause was 47.9 years for exposed women (the respective mean value for Russia is 50.8 years). Pregnancy outcomes were analyzed in 9000 exposed women. The rate of medical and criminal abortions was estimated as 79 per 100 labors. The rate of spontaneous abortions for exposed women was slightly higher, 3.11%, than for controls, 2.30%; these difference, however, were statistically insignificant. The total loss of fetus or neonate (unfavorable outcomes of pregnancy: spontaneous abortions, stillbirths, early neonatal death) was estimated to be 4.58% at zero dose. Exposure to gonads at the dose 1 Sv, estimated using the above-indicated method, yielded 3% of additional unfavorable outcomes of pregnancy. It was shown, based on the analysis of birth rates for the Techa Cohort that they had not undergone any essential changes over the first 25 years of exposure compared to the respective coefficients for

  18. Endoscopic diode laser therapy for chronic radiation proctitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Lino; Marini, Lucia; Rizzato, Roberto; Picardi, Edgardo; Merigliano, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of endoscopic diode laser therapy in patients presenting rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). A retrospective analysis of CRP patients who underwent diode laser therapy in a single institution between 2010 and 2016 was carried out. The patients were treated by non-contact fibers without sedation in an outpatient setting. Fourteen patients (median age 77, range 73-87 years) diagnosed with CRP who had undergone high-dose radiotherapy for prostatic cancer and who presented with rectal bleeding were included. Six required blood transfusions. Antiplatelet (three patients) and anticoagulant (two patients) therapy was not suspended during the treatments. The patients underwent a median of two sessions; overall, a mean of 1684 J of laser energy per session was used. Bleeding was resolved in 10/14 (71%) patients, and other two patients showed improvement (93%). Only one patient, who did not complete the treatment, required blood transfusions after laser therapy; no complications were noted during or after the procedures. Study findings demonstrated that endoscopic non-contact diode laser treatment is safe and effective in CRP patients, even in those receiving antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant therapy.

  19. Progress report on the neutral beam radiation hardening study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Condit, R.H.; Hoenig, C.L.; Wilcox, T.P.; Erickson, J.

    1978-01-01

    A neutral beam injector as presently conceived directly views the plasma it is sustaining. In turn the injector is exposed to the primary fusion neutrons plus secondary neutrons and gammas streaming back up the neutral beam duct. The intent of this work is to examine representative beam lines to see how performance and lifetimes could be affected by this radiation environment and to determine how unacceptable effects could be alleviated. Potential radiation induced problems addressed in this report have been limited to: (1) overheating of cryopanels and insulators, (2) gamma flux induced electrical conductivity increase of insulators, and (3) neutron and gamma fluence induced damage to insulator materials

  20. Creatinine measurements often yielded false estimates of progression in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, M.; Drew, H.H.; LaFrance, N.D.

    1988-01-01

    In 9 of 22 observation periods (lasting an average of 15 months) in 17 patients with moderate to severe chronic renal failure (GFR 4 to 23 ml/min), rates of progression as estimated from the linear regression on time of 24-hour creatinine clearance (b1) differed significantly from rates of progression as estimated from the regression on time of urinary clearance of 99mTc-DTPA (b2), during all or part of the period of observation. b1 exceeded b2 in four cases and was less than b2 in the other five. Thus there were gradual changes in the fractional tubular secretion of creatinine in individual patients, in both directions. Owing to these changes, measurements of creatinine clearance gave erroneous impressions of the rate or existence of progression during all or a portion of the period of observation in nearly half of these patients. In the 22 studies as a group, using the entire periods of observation, b1 indicated significantly more rapid progression (by 0.18 +/- 0.06 ml/min/month, P less than 0.01) than did b2, and had a significantly greater variance. Measurements of progression based on the rate of change of reciprocal plasma creatinine (multiplied by an average rate of urinary creatinine excretion in each study) were equally misleading, even though less variable. We conclude that sequential creatinine measurements are often misleading as measures of progression and should, when feasible, be replaced by urinary clearance of isotopes in following patients with chronic renal failure

  1. Attenuation of radiological consequences from CDA's by radiation. Progress report, October 1, 1976--September 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.H.

    1977-01-01

    This technical progress report summarizes the research work accomplished during the first six months of the investigation on the significance of radiation heat transfer in attenuating the radiological consequences from LMFBR core disruptive accidents. Considerable progress has been made in modeling and computing the effects of radiative cooling on a rising HCDA bubble buoyant through a sodium pool. Our results reveal that most of the fuel vapor within the bubble can be effectively condensed out by radiating cooling. The finding has a profound implication as it could lead to a substantial reduction in subsequent aerosal releases

  2. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1990-01-01

    In this progress report all of the abstracts - except two - are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) radionuclide metrology (5) applications of nuclear methods and (6) nuclear information processing. (botek)

  3. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmaier, B [comp.

    1991-12-31

    In this progress report all of the abstracts - except two - are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) radionuclide metrology (5) applications of nuclear methods and (6) nuclear information processing. (botek).

  4. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1991-01-01

    In this progress report all of the abstracts are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) applications of nuclear methods and (5) environmental investigations. (botek)

  5. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmaier, B [comp.

    1992-12-31

    In this progress report all of the abstracts are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) applications of nuclear methods and (5) environmental investigations. (botek).

  6. Present status and expected progress in radiation processing dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, A.; Miller, A.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the present status of radiation processing dosimetry including the methods used most widely in gamma- and electron processing as well as the new methods under development or introduction. The recent trends with respect to calibrationof routine dosimetry systems as well...

  7. α2-adrenergic blockade mimics the enhancing effect of chronic stress on breast cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamkin, Donald M.; Sung, Ha Yeon; Yang, Gyu Sik; David, John M.; Ma, Jeffrey C.Y.; Cole, Steve W.; Sloan, Erica K.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies in preclinical mouse models of breast cancer have shown that chronic restraint stress can enhance disease progression by increasing catecholamine levels and subsequent signaling of β-adrenergic receptors. Catecholamines also signal α-adrenergic receptors, and greater α-adrenergic signaling has been shown to promote breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. However, antagonism of α-adrenergic receptors can result in elevated catecholamine levels, which may increase β-adrenergic signaling, because pre-synaptic α2-adrenergic receptors mediate an autoinhibition of sympathetic transmission. Given these findings, we examined the effect of α-adrenergic blockade on breast cancer progression under non-stress and stress conditions (chronic restraint) in an orthotopic mouse model with MDA-MB-231HM cells. Chronic restraint increased primary tumor growth and metastasis to distant tissues as expected, and non-selective α-adrenergic blockade by phentolamine significantly inhibited those effects. However, under non-stress conditions, phentolamine increased primary tumor size and distant metastasis. Sympatho-neural gene expression for catecholamine biosynthesis enzymes was elevated by phentolamine under non-stress conditions, and the non-selective β-blocker propranolol inhibited the effect of phentolamine on breast cancer progression. Selective α2-adrenergic blockade by efaroxan also increased primary tumor size and distant metastasis under non-stress conditions, but selective α1-adrenergic blockade by prazosin did not. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that α2-adrenergic signaling can act through an autoreceptor mechanism to inhibit sympathetic catecholamine release and, thus, modulate established effects of β-adrenergic signaling on tumor progression-relevant biology. PMID:25462899

  8. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates chronic kidney disease progression after ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Garcia Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Despite a significant improvement in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD, its incidence and prevalence has been increasing over the years. Progressive renal fibrosis is present in CKD and involves the participation of several cytokines, including Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Besides cardiovascular diseases and infections, several studies show that Vitamin D status has been considered as a non-traditional risk factor for the progression of CKD. Given the importance of vitamin D in the maintenance of essential physiological functions, we studied the events involved in the chronic kidney disease progression in rats submitted to ischemia/reperfusion injury under vitamin D deficiency (VDD.Rats were randomized into four groups: Control; VDD; ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI; and VDD+IRI. At the 62 day after sham or IRI surgery, we measured inulin clearance, biochemical variables and hemodynamic parameters. In kidney tissue, we performed immunoblotting to quantify expression of Klotho, TGF-β, and vitamin D receptor (VDR; gene expression to evaluate renin, angiotensinogen, and angiotensin-converting enzyme; and immunohistochemical staining for ED1 (macrophages, type IV collagen, fibronectin, vimentin, and α-smooth mucle actin. Histomorphometric studies were performed to evaluate fractional interstitial area.IRI animals presented renal hypertrophy, increased levels of mean blood pressure and plasma PTH. Furthermore, expansion of the interstitial area, increased infiltration of ED1 cells, increased expression of collagen IV, fibronectin, vimentin and α-actin, and reduced expression of Klotho protein were observed. VDD deficiency contributed to increased levels of plasma PTH as well as for important chronic tubulointerstitial changes (fibrosis, inflammatory infiltration, tubular dilation and atrophy, increased expression of TGF-β1 and decreased expression of VDR and Klotho protein observed in VDD+IRI animals.Through inflammatory

  9. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Rouhani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED, renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine (Cr, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P=0.01. Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression.

  10. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on regulation of gene expression included research projects on turnover of ribosomal RNA, ribonuclease-resistant oligonucleotides, and reutilization of oligonucleotides. Studies on radiation effects on RNA included research projects on radioinduced strand breaks in RNA and radioinduced alterations in RNA nucleotides. Effects of vasopression on radiosensitivity were studied. Studies on amino acid-nucleic acid interactions included research projects on synthesis and spectroscopic analysis of nucleotide-amino acid covalently bonded model compound and intermolecular interactions between tryptophan and dinucleoside phosphates

  11. Reduction of the dose of ionizing radiation: progressions in TC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlacchio, A.; Costanzo, E.; Chegai, F.; Simonetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of the dose of ionizing radiation in CT, it is a very important matter that can be reach avoiding unnecessary examinations, using un appropriate report KV / mAs reducing the rotation time, determining the field of study, using a high pitch using equipment that provide systems with dose reduction, through proper education of the staff that interacts with machinery and using radioprotective compounds.

  12. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1974-01-01

    Work during the past year has been focused on three areas related to the cellular effects of radiation. Radiation effects on RNA and the regulation of gene expression and amino acid-nucleic acid interactions were studied. Studies on the radiation response of RNA in growing and confluent cells were continued. We have derived radiation survival curves and demonstrated repair of potentially lethal damage in 3T3 cells. Studies of giant cell formation and turnover of ribosomal RNA in irradiated cells has demonstrated differences in growing and confluent cells. We have sought evidence consistent with our hypothesis for regulation of eukaryotic gene expression with segments of RNA reutilized to prime new RNA synthesis. Data derived from the turnover of ribosomal RNA and the methylation pattern of ribosomal RNA during turnover are consistent with the possibility that a segment of 18s ribosomal RNA is being conserved during new RNA synthesis. We were unable to show reutilization of the 5' trinucleotide of 18s and 28s ribosomal RNA but did find a ribonuclease resistant oligonucleotide in 18s RNA which appeared to be reutilized. In studies of amino acid nucleic-acid interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy we have been able to successfully synthesize an amidate and begin an examination of the intramolecular interactions. We have also studied intermolecular interactions betweentryptophan and nucleoside monophosphates and found upfield shifts which provide evidence for preferential stacking of the 6-membered ring of tryptophan with adenine and evidence for specific geometry of interactions of tryptophan with cytosine. (U.S.)

  13. Retrospective analysis of factors affecting the progression of Chronic Renal Failure in Adult Polycystic Kidney Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.R.; Tashkandi, Muhammed A.; Nahrir, S.; Maulana, A.

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the commonest congenital cystic renal disease. Factors such as hypertension, urinary tract infection, hematuria and proteinuria may effect the progression to chronic renal failure in ADPKD patients. Therapeutic interventions, such as the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or diet modification, may impact the natural progression of the disease. We aim in this study to review a registry of ADPKD patients in order to compare the slow and fast progressors and identify possible predictors of progression and interventions that slow the progression of this disease. Sheffield Kidney Institute (SKI), one of the largest kidney institutes in Northern Europe, has registered a large number of ADPKD patients since 1981. SKI's computer network contains a wide range of information on these patients. We selected 94 adult polycystic patients from the SKI for retrospective analysis of factors affecting progression to chronic renal failure. Patients who doubled their s. creatinine in 3 6 months were considered fast progressors (FP), while those who doubled their s. creatinine in > 36 months were regarded as slow progressors (SP). There 70 patients in the FP group and 24 patients in the SP group. A third group of 137 patients consisted of non-progressors (NP) who ha d stable s. creatinine levels during the same period. We found that the incidence of hypertension, UTI, macroscopic and microscopic hematuria, and overt proteinuria in the FP group was higher than in SP and NP groups. Modification of some factors, such as hypertension and UTI, may decrease the rate of the deterioration of renal function. (author)

  14. PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE RELAXATION INCREASE PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW RATE ON CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintin Sukartini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Limited progressive air flow in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD can caused by small airway disease (bronchiolitis obstructive and loss of elasticity of the lung (emphysema. Further it can be decreasing the quality of life in COPD patients because dyspnea and uncomfortable in activity. Progressive muscle relaxation (PMR is one of the relaxation technique that can repair pulmonary ventilation by decreasing chronic constriction of the respiratory muscles. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on raised peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR. Method: A pre-experimental one group pre-post test design was used in this study. Population was all of the COPD patients at Pulmonary Specialist Polyclinic Dr Mohamad Soewandhie Surabaya. There were 8 respondents taken by using purposive sampling. PEFR was counted by using peak flow meter every six day. Data were analyzed by using Paired t-Test with significance level  p≤0.05. Result: The result showed that PMR had significance level on increasing of PEFR (p=0.012. Discussion: It can be concluded that PMR has an effect on raise PEFR. Further studies are recommended to measure the effect of PMR on respiratory rate (RR, heart rate (HR subjective dyspnoe symptoms, forced expiration volume on the first minute (FEV1 and mid maximum flow rate (MMFR in COPD patients.

  15. Radiation biophysicl study of biological molecules. Progress report, February 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: direct action target investigation of molecular weights of enzymes exposed to fast electrons; direct action gamma radiation dosimetry with T 1 bacteriophage; uv radiation sensitivity of T 1 bacteriophage on various host strains of E. coli; temperature dependence of uv radiation direct action on dry T 1 bacteriophage; investigation of light and temperature effects during incubation of T 1 bacteriophage exposed to fast electrons; test of superoxide anion as a radiation intermediate in cellular radiobiology; uv action spectra related to error-prone repair; uv-reactivation experiments with T 1 and lambda bacteriophages; and split-dose uv mutagenesis in E. coli

  16. Some progress on radiation chemistry of substances of biological interests and biological applications of radiation technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jilan; Fang Xingwang

    1995-01-01

    Studies in China on the detection method of irradiated food, mechanism of DNA damage induced by peroxidation, radiolysis of natural products and herbs are reviewed on the update open literature, and some progress on applications of radiation technology is summarized. (author)

  17. Two cases of basal cell carcinoma arising from chronic radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakamori, Takeshi; Takenaka, Hideya; Ueda, Eiichiro; Katoh, Norito; Kishimoto, Saburo

    2003-01-01

    A 48-year-old female and a 51-year-old male with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) arising from chronic radiation dermatitis are reviewed. They are treated with radiotherapy for hemangioma on their right cheek in their childhood. Review in the literature showed high incidence of the histological diagnosis of malignant skin tumors arising from chronic radiation dermatitis are follows: squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), BCC, sarcoma, and Bowen's disease. (author)

  18. Occupational therapy for patients with chronic diseases: CVA, rheumatoid arthritis and progressive diseases of the central nervous system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.J.; Dekker, J.; Lankhorst, G.; Zee, J. van der

    1997-01-01

    A substantial proportion of the patients treated by occupational therapists have a chronic disease. The aim of this study was to describe the outlines of occupational therapy treatment for three specific groups of chronic diseases: progressive neurological diseases, cerebrovascular accident and

  19. Structured approach to design of diagnostic test evaluation studies for chronic progressive infections in animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils; Gardner, Ian Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic test evaluations (DTEs) for chronic infections are challenging because a protracted incubation period has to be considered in the design of the DTE, and the adverse effects of infection may be widespread and progressive over an animal's entire life. Frequently, the specific purpose......) than originally intended. The objective of this paper is to outline a structured approach to the design and conduct of a DTE for diagnostic tests used for chronic infections in animals, and intended for different purposes. We describe the process from reflections about test purpose and the underlying...... of the test is not formally considered when a test is evaluated. Therefore, the result is often a DTE where test sensitivity and specificity estimates are biased, either because of problems with establishing the true infection status or because the test detects another aspect of the infection (and analyte...

  20. Progress in basic principles of limitation in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzaev, P.V.; Tarasov, S.I.; Troitskaya, M.N.; Ermolaeva, A.P.

    1977-01-01

    For purposes of limitation of harmful factors, e.g. radiation, it is proposed to divide all countless numbers of biological effects into three groups: 1) social important effects (ultimate and effects); 2) intermediate effects (different diseases etc.), which are connected with and controlled by the first group; 3) pure biological effects, importance of which is not known. To determine the first group effects there are identified four indices describing all significant sides of human life: time of life, life-time integral of mental and physical capacity for work, aesthetical satisfaction from organism itself, reproduction of descendants. They reflect the main social and individual interests related to functioning of organism. On the base of weighing these indices it is suggested the united general index of health in form of time of a full life. The united index can be used for different principles of limitation (based on threshold, acceptable risk, maximum benefit). To realize the principle of maximum public benefit as ideal principle in the future limitation all benefit and detriment from utilization of harmful sources must be expressed in the united index of health (instead of money), which is the greatest value of individual and society. Authors suggest to standartize ionizing radiation on the general methodological approaches that were acceptable to non-ionizing factors too

  1. Urine liver fatty acid binding protein and chronic kidney disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khatir, Dinah S; Bendtsen, Mette D; Birn, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    , regarding progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In a prospective study design a cohort of 74 stage 3-4 CKD patients (age 61 ± 13 years) were included. Glomerular filtration ratio (GFR, 51Cr-EDTA-clearance), 24-hour ambulatory BP, 24-hour urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UAC) and urinary L......Excretion of the tubular protein liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is a potential novel biomarker of renal dysfunction. We examined whether urine L-FABP excretion adds prognostic information to the well-established risk markers, blood pressure (BP), albumin excretion and baseline GFR...

  2. Current and future disease progression of the chronic HCV population in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesak, Martin; Francis, Kevin; Gedeon, Alex; Gillis, John; Hvidsten, Kyle; Kidder, Phyllis; Li, Hong; Martyn, Derek; Orne, Leslie; Smith, Amanda; Kwong, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to advanced liver disease (AdvLD), including cirrhosis, decompensated cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The aim of this study was to determine recent historical rates of HCV patient progression to AdvLD and to project AdvLD prevalence through 2015. We first determined total 2008 US chronic HCV prevalence from the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Surveys. Next, we examined disease progression and associated non-pharmacological costs of diagnosed chronic HCV-infected patients between 2007-2009 in the IMS LifeLink and CMS Medicare claims databases. A projection model was developed to estimate AdvLD population growth through 2015 in patients diagnosed and undiagnosed as of 2008, using the 2007-2009 progression rates to generate a "worst case" projection of the HCV-related AdvLD population (i.e., scenario where HCV treatment is the same in the forecasted period as it was before 2009). We found that the total diagnosed chronic HCV population grew from 983,000 to 1.19 million in 2007-2009, with patients born from 1945-1964 accounting for 75.0% of all patients, 83.7% of AdvLD patients, and 79.2% of costs in 2009, indicating that HCV is primarily a disease of the "baby boomer" population. Non-pharmacological costs grew from $7.22 billion to $8.63 billion, with the majority of growth derived from the 60,000 new patients that developed AdvLD in 2007-2009, 91.5% of whom were born between 1945 and 1964. The projection model estimated the total AdvLD population would grow from 195,000 in 2008 to 601,000 in 2015, with 73.5% of new AdvLD cases from patients undiagnosed as of 2008. AdvLD prevalence in patients diagnosed as of 2008 was projected to grow 6.5% annually to 303,000 patients in 2015. These findings suggest that strategies to diagnose and treat HCV-infected patients are urgently needed to increase the likelihood that progression is interrupted, particularly for patients born from 1945-1964.

  3. The mode of progression of subperiosteal resorption in the hyperparathyroidism of chronic renal future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meema, H.E.; Oreopoulos, D.G.; Toronto Univ., Ontario

    1983-01-01

    Subperiosteal resorption in finger phalanges is usually thought to be the result of osteoclastic bone resorption on the periosteal surface of bone, progressive centripetally with creation of the serrated appearances and ''lace-like'' patterns in periosteal cortical bone. Our longitudinal microradioscopic observations in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism of chronic renal failure have revealed evidence of another pathogenetic mechanism: by the enlargement of intracortical juxtaperiosteal resorption spaces, the remaining thin layer of bone is broken down from inside the bone, i.e., a centrifugal rather then centripetal process. (orig.)

  4. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  5. Occult hepatitis B virus infection is not associated with disease progression of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junhyeon; Lee, Sang Soo; Choi, Yun Suk; Jeon, Yejoo; Chung, Jung Wha; Baeg, Joo Yeong; Si, Won Keun; Jang, Eun Sun; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang

    2016-11-14

    To clarify the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) and the association between OBI and liver disease progression, defined as development of liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), worsening of Child-Pugh class, or mortality in cases of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This prospective cohort study enrolled 174 patients with chronic HCV infection (chronic hepatitis, n = 83; cirrhosis, n = 47; HCC, n = 44), and evaluated disease progression during a mean follow-up of 38.7 mo. OBI was defined as HBV DNA positivity in 2 or more different viral genomic regions by nested polymerase chain reaction using 4 sets of primers in the S, C, P and X open reading frame of the HBV genome. The overall OBI prevalence in chronic HCV patients at enrollment was 18.4%, with 16.9%, 25.5% and 13.6% in the chronic hepatitis C, liver cirrhosis and HCC groups, respectively ( P = 0.845). During follow-up, 52 patients showed disease progression, which was independently associated with aspartate aminotransferase > 40 IU/L, Child-Pugh score and sustained virologic response (SVR), but not with OBI positivity. In 136 patients who were not in the SVR state during the study period, OBI positivity was associated with neither disease progression, nor HCC development. The prevalence of OBI in chronic HCV patients was 18.4%, and OBI was not associated with disease progression in South Koreans.

  6. Basic aspects of radiation action on microorganisms. Progress report, April 1, 1974--March 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, E.C.

    1975-04-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: effects of blocking DNA synthesis by hydroxyurea on induction of lambda phage; dose response curves for uv and ionizing radiation with radiosensitive and radioresistant strains of phage; effects of oxygen, rifampin, and hydrogen peroxide on induction of radioresistance; radioinduced degradation of DNA; and induction of repair system of mutagenesis with uv and ionizing radiation. (U.S.)

  7. Effect of chronic alcohol ingestion on the progression of periodontitis induced in Fisher-344 rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éder Ricardo Biasoli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Understand the effect of chronic alcohol on the progression of periodontitis induced in Fischer-344 rats.Methods: For the study, 22 Fischer-344 rats, two months old were used, divided into groups: alcohol (n=8, ligature (n=7 and control (n=7. On the first day, the animals in the alcohol group were exposed to ingestion of a water solution containing 20% alcohol (size/size, up to day 90. After thirty days from the beginning of the experiment, the animals in the alcohol group and the ligature group were submitted to the placement of a silk thread around the right maxillary second molar. Nothing was performed on the left side, serving as control. All the groups were submitted to euthanasia 60 days after ligature placement. To assess the destruction of periodontitis, a radiographic exam was used to measure the destruction of bone height. Results: The results of the study showed that on the side in which periodontitis was induced, the group that ingested alcohol suffered an increase in destruction, with statistical differences when compared with the ligature and control groups and increased bone destruction in the ligature group when compared to control. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the study, it was concluded that chronic alcohol consumption by Fischer-344 rats led to greater progression of induced periodontitis.

  8. Basal cell carcinoma arising on the skin with chronic radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukiko; Ogusa, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Shinya

    1986-01-01

    In a 86-year-old woman, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) arose on the skin with chronic radiation dermatitis. She, at the age of 46, received irradiation to the abdomen for cancer of the uterine cervix. Radiation source and dose were unknown. A verrucous eruption appeared on the irradiated field of the right abdomen, and gradually expanded. Histological examination showed that proliferation of tumor cells with adenoid and cystose structure extended to the epidermis. Electron microscopic study showed both clear and dark tumor cells, although dark cells were few in number. A review of the literature showed that BCC arising on the skin with chronic radiation dermatitis is uncommon in Japan. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Chronic ionizing radiation exposure as a tumor promoter in mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Trivedi, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have tested a chronic exposure to 90 Y beta-radiation as a tumor promoter in mouse skin previously exposed to a chemical tumor initiator. Three different tests of radiation as a stage I tumor promoter, in skin subsequently given chemical stage II promotion, all indicated that the beta-radiation acted as a weak stage I skin tumor promoter. It showed no action as either a stage II or complete tumor promoter. (author)

  10. [Retrospective analysis of influence of differential protein intake on renal prognosis for progressive chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wendi; Yin, Daoxin; Cui, Wenying; Liu, Wenhu

    2014-01-28

    To explore retrospectively the influence of differential protein intake on renal prognosis for progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 159 chronic kidney disease patients at stages 2, 3 and 4 were enrolled and a questionnaire survey was conducted from January 2009 to July 2012. They were followed monthly and their clinical data collected, including primary disease, blood pressure, body mass index and adverse events. Laboratory tests were performed every 3 months, including biochemical parameters, protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), diet reviews and daily protein intake (DPI). A simplified MDRD formula was employed to evaluate the level of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). According to the level of DPI, they were divided into 3 groups of very low protein diet (VLPD): DPI ≤ 0.6 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), low-protein diet (LPD): DPI >0.6-protein diet (NPD): DPI ≥ 0.8 · g · kg(-1) · d(-1). Among them, 4 cases (2.50%) progressed to uremia stage and received renal replacement therapy, 2(1.25%) experienced rapid decline in renal function, 9(5.66%) were hospitalized from cardio-cerebral diseases and the 2-year kidney survival rate was 97.5%. At the end of study, among 9 patients of PEM, 2 subjects had a serum level of albumin under 32 g/L and another 7 with a BMI 0.05). Within a certain range, differential protein intake may not significantly affect the prognosis of kidney for progressive CKD patients.

  11. Progress in research on ionizing radiation-induced microRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zheng; Tie Yi; Sun Zhixian; Zheng Xiaofei

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small single-stranded noncoding RNAs consisting of 21-23 nucleotides that play important gene-regulatory roles in eukaryotes by pairing to the mRNAs of protein-coding genes to direct their posttranscriptional repression. A growing body of evidence indicates that alterations in miRNA expression may occur following exposure to several oxidative stress including ionizing radiation. So miRNAs may serve as potential new targets for co-therapies aiming to improve the effects of radiation disease therapy in cancer patients. The progress in research on ionizing radiation-induced miRNAs is reviewed in this paper. (authors)

  12. PREDICTIVE FACTORS FOR THE PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY IN PATIENTS WITHOUT LEFT VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana de Araújo SILVA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of predictors for the progression of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC is essential to ensure adequate patient management. This study looked into a non-concurrent cohort of 165 CCC patients between 1985 and 2010 for independent predictors for CCC progression. The outcomes were worsening of the CCC scores and the onset of left ventricular dysfunction assessed by means of echo-Doppler cardiography. Patients were analyzed for social, demographic, epidemiologic, clinical and workup-related variables. A descriptive analysis was conducted, followed by survival curves based on univariate (Kaplan-Meier and Cox’s univariate model and multivariate (Cox regression model analysis. Patients were followed from two to 20 years (mean: 8.2. Their mean age was 44.8 years (20-77. Comparing both iterations of the study, in the second there was a statistically significant increase in the PR interval and in the QRS duration, despite a reduction in heart rates (Wilcoxon < 0.01. The predictors for CCC progression in the final regression model were male gender (HR = 2.81, Holter monitoring showing pauses equal to or greater than two seconds (HR = 3.02 increased cardiothoracic ratio (HR = 7.87 and time of use of digitalis (HR = 1.41. Patients with multiple predictive factors require stricter follow-up and treatment.

  13. Metabolomics insights into activated redox signaling and lipid metabolism dysfunction in chronic kidney disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Early detection is critical in prevention and treatment of kidney disease. However currently clinical laboratory and histopathological tests do not provide region-specific and accurate biomarkers for early detection of kidney disease. The present study was conducted to identify sensitive biomarkers for early detection and progression of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy in aristolochic acid I-induced rats at weeks 4, 8 and 12. Biomarkers were validated using aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN rats at week 24, adenine-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD rats and CKD patients. Compared with control rats, AAN rats showed anemia, increased serum urea and creatinine, progressive renal interstitial fibrosis, activation of nuclear factor-kappa B, and up-regulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-fibrotic proteins at weeks 8 and 12. However, no significant difference was found at week 4. Metabolomics identified 12-ketodeoxycholic acid, taurochenodesoxycholic acid, LPC(15:0 and docosahexaenoic acid as biomarkers for early detection of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy. With prolonging aristolochic acid I exposure, LPE(20:2, cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and LPC(17:0 were identified as biomarkers for progression from early to advanced AAN and lysoPE(22:5, indoxyl sulfate, uric acid and creatinine as biomarkers of advanced AAN. These biomarkers were reversed by treatment of irbesartan and ergone in AAN rats at week 24 and adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, these biomarkers were also reversed by irbesartan treatment in CKD patients.

  14. SCC, Bowen's disease and BCC arising on chronic radiation dermatitis due to radiation therapy for tinea pedis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Eri; Aoki, Mikako; Ikemura, Akiko; Igarashi, Tsukasa; Suzuki, Kayano; Kawana, Seiji

    2000-01-01

    We reported a case who developed three different types of skin cancers: SCC, BCC, and Bowen's disease, on the chronic radiation dermatitis. He had been treated for his tinea pedis et palmaris with radiotherapy in 1940's. It is very ratre that three different types of skin cancers arise in the same patient. This is a second case reported in Japan. (author)

  15. Progress in research on combination treatment of cancer with radiation therapy and immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hao; Jia Rui; Yan Jinqi; Yu Jiyun

    2007-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important local treatment for tumors, and immunotherapy is a systematic treatment. Combination of RT with immunotherapy may bring about an obvious synergistic anti-tumor effort. Here the research progress in this aspect is reviewed. (authors)

  16. The progress and issues of national nuclear and radiation safety supervision and MIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Kefei; Sun Guochen; Jiang Guang; Li Jingxi; Zhang Lin

    2009-01-01

    The article briefly describes the pre-planning construction of 'National Nuclear and Radiation Safety Supervision and Management Information System', Including the overall frame of the system and the main issues found in the work which affect and confine the progress of the program. Some recommendations are put forward. (authors)

  17. Progress in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and application in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhidong; Chen Xiaohua

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is the key separation technique in proteomics research, which is designed by protein character: molecular weight and PI. Some progress has been made in disease mechanism detection, tumor indicator research and drug development. This technique also has some potential application in radiation research

  18. Clinical experience in 89 consecutive cases of chronic radiation enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Cheng Chen

    2011-02-01

    Conclusions: We confirmed that as compared with recently developed innovative techniques, early primitive radiotherapy techniques were associated with more severe radiotherapy complications that required surgery. Smoking may enhance patients’ vulnerability to severe radiation injury. Surgery for radiation-induced intestinal obstruction, intestinal fistula and perforation is warranted because QOL, serum albumin level and body mass index were similar between the surgical and nonsurgical groups.

  19. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  20. Progress in radiation protection techniques for workers in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, J.; Zettwoog, P.; Rouyer, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The increasingly stringent safety requirements of workers and the general public in the face of occupational and in particular nuclear risks call for continual improvements in radiation protection techniques. The Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN), especially the Technical Protection Services belonging to the Protection Department, and also the various radiation protection services of the French Atomic Energy Commission's nuclear centres and Electricite de France (EDF) are carrying out substantial research and development programmes on the subject. For this reason, IPSN organized a specialists' meeting to take stock of the efforts being made and to try to identify what steps seem most promising or should have priority at the national level. The authors summarize the presentations and discussions on three topics: (1) Progress in the analysis of the mechanism of exposure of workers; (2) Progress achieved from the radiation protection standpoint in the field of facility design and instrumentation; and (3) Application of the optimization principle

  1. Distinction between glioma progression and post-radiation change by combined physiologic MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsusue, Eiji [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Fink, James R.; Maravilla, Kenneth R. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Rockhill, Jason K. [University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori University, Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging (DSC), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) techniques provide specific physiologic information that may distinguish malignant glioma progression from post-radiation change, yet no single technique is completely reliable. We propose a simple, multiparametric scoring system to improve diagnostic accuracy beyond that of each technique alone. Fifteen subjects with lesions suspicious for glioma progression following radiation therapy who had also undergone 3-tesla DWI, DSC, and MRS studies of the lesion were retrospectively reviewed. Minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) ratio, maximum regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) ratio, and maximum MRS choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetyl-aspartate (Cho/NAA) metabolic peak-height ratios were quantified within each lesion. Each parameter (ADC ratio, rCBV ratio, and combined Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios) was scored as either glioma progression (one point) or radiation change (zero point) based upon thresholds derived from our own data. For each lesion, the combined parameters yielded a multiparametric score (0 to 3) for prediction of tumor progression or post-radiation change. Optimum thresholds for ADC ratio (1.30), rCBV ratio (2.10), and either combined Cho/Cr (1.29) and Cho/NAA (1.06) yielded diagnostic accuracies of 86.7%, 86.7%, and 84.6%, respectively (p < 0.05). A combined multiparametric score threshold of 2 improved diagnostic accuracy to 93.3% (p < 0.05). In this small series combining 3-T DWI, DSC, and MRS diagnostic results using a simple, multiparametric scoring system has potential to improve overall diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing glioma progression from post-radiation change beyond that of each technique alone. (orig.)

  2. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report for October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, H.H.; Hall, E.J.

    1980-07-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 31 of the 32 papers presented in this progress report. The other paper is represented by an abstract only and deals with field shaping and recalibration of x-ray facilities

  3. Longitudinal study of spatially heterogeneous emphysema progression in current smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Tanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoke is the main risk factor for emphysema, which is a key pathology in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Low attenuation areas (LAA in computed tomography (CT images reflect emphysema, and the cumulative size distribution of LAA clusters follows a power law characterized by the exponent D. This property of LAA clusters can be explained by model simulation, where mechanical force breaks alveolar walls causing local heterogeneous lung tissue destruction. However, a longitudinal CT study has not investigated whether continuous smoking causes the spatially heterogeneous progression of emphysema. METHODS: We measured annual changes in ratios of LAA (LAA%, D and numbers of LAA clusters (LAN in CT images acquired at intervals of ≥ 3 years from 22 current and 31 former smokers with COPD to assess emphysema progression. We constructed model simulations using CT images to morphologically interpret changes in current smokers. RESULTS: D was decreased in current and former smokers, whereas LAA% and LAN were increased only in current smokers. The annual changes in LAA%, D, and LAN were greater in current, than in former smokers (1.03 vs. 0.37%, p=0.008; -0.045 vs. -0.01, p=0.004; 13.9 vs. 1.1, p=0.007, respectively. When LAA% increased in model simulations, the coalescence of neighboring LAA clusters decreased D, but the combination of changes in D and LAN in current smokers could not be explained by the homogeneous emphysema progression model despite cluster coalescence. Conversely, a model in which LAAs heterogeneously increased and LAA clusters merged somewhat in relatively advanced emphysematous regions could reflect actual changes. CONCLUSIONS: Susceptibility to parenchymal destruction induced by continuous smoking is not uniform over the lung, but might be higher in local regions of relatively advanced emphysema. These could result in the spatially heterogeneous progression of emphysema in current smokers.

  4. Pediatric malignancies and radiation therapy: What are the chronic treatment sequelae?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constine, Louis S.; Shelton, Dabney

    1997-01-01

    Most pediatric malignancies have proved to be vulnerable targets to cytotoxic therapy. The bleak outlook that historically accompanied these diseases has changed into an optimism for cure; 65% of affected children now survive. These gains are a direct consequence of the development of effective chemotherapeutic agents, radiotherapeutic and surgical techniques, and strategies to maximize their complementary actions in obtaining both local and systemic tumor control. In concert with the advances in tumor eradication has come an increased flexibility for devising approaches which reduce associated morbidities, including second malignancies. Children are particularly vulnerable for developing debilitating normal tissue effects, and are particularly complicated because in children a mosaic of different tissues are developing at different rates and in different temporal sequences. Understanding these biologic principles in the setting of progress in radiotherapeutic technique is critical to accomplishing the goal of appropriate and safe treatment delivery. Second malignancies result from the collision of cytotoxic therapy and the genetic constitution of the child. Since death is a frequent outcome, their importance is heightened. The objective of this course is to provide an understanding of organ-specific chronic effects of cancer therapy, and to offer a systematic guide to their evaluation and management. Since one of every 1000 young adults is now a childhood cancer survivor, the late sequelae of therapy, including second malignancies, become increasingly relevant for the radiation oncologist to appreciate, manage, and consider when formulating therapy

  5. Pediatric malignancies and radiation therapy: what are the chronic treatment sequelae?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, Dabney; Constine, Louis S.

    1995-01-01

    Most pediatric malignancies have proved to be vulnerable targets to cytotoxic therapy. The bleak outlook that historically accompanied these diseases has changed into an optimism for cure; 65% of affected children now survive. These gains are a direct consequence of the development of effective chemotherapeutic agents, radiotherapeutic and surgical techniques, and strategies to maximize their complementary actions in obtaining both local and systemic tumor control. In concert with the advances in tumor eradication has come an increased flexibility for devising approaches which reduce associated morbidities, including second malignancies. Children are particularly vulnerable for developing debilitating normal tissue effects, and are particularly complicated because in children a mosaic of different tissues are developing at different rates and in different temporal sequences. Understanding these biologic principles in the setting of progress in radiotherapeutic technique is critical to accomplishing the goal of appropriate and safe treatment delivery. Second malignancies result from the collision of cytotoxic therapy and the genetic constitution of the child. Since death is a frequent outcome, their importance is heightened. The objective of this course is to provide an understanding of organ-specific chronic effects of cancer therapy, and to offer a systematic guide to their evaluation and management. Since one of every 1000 young adults is now a childhood cancer survivor, the late sequelae of therapy, including second malignancies, become increasingly relevant for the radiation oncologist to appreciate, manage, and consider when formulating therapy

  6. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described

  7. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  8. Progression of autosomal dominant kidney disease: measurement of the stage transitions of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Blanchette

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a progressive genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous kidney cysts that result in kidney failure. Little is known regarding the key patient characteristics and utilization of healthcare resources for ADPKD patients along the continuum of disease progression. This observational study was designed to describe the characteristics of ADPKD patients and compare them with those of patients with other chronic kidney diseases. Methods: This retrospective cohort study involved patients with a claim for ADPKD or PKD unspecified from 1/1/2000–2/28/2013 and ≥6 months of previous continuous enrollment (baseline within a large database of administrative claims in the USA. A random sample of chronic kidney disease (CKD patients served as comparators. For a subset of ADPKD patients who had only a diagnosis code of unspecified PKD, abstraction of medical records was undertaken to estimate the proportion of patients who had medical chart-confirmed ADPKD. In patients with linked electronic laboratory data, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated via serum creatinine values to determine CKD stage at baseline and during follow-up. Proportions of patients transitioning to another stage and the mean age at transition were calculated. Results: ADPKD patients were, in general, younger and had fewer physician visits, but had more specific comorbidities at observation start compared with CKD patients. ADPKD patients had a longer time in the milder stages and longer duration before recorded transition to a more severe stage compared with CKD patients. Patients with ADPKD at risk of rapid progression had a shorter time-to-end-stage renal disease than patients with CKD and ADPKD patients not at risk, but stage duration was similar between ADPKD patients at risk and those not at risk. Conclusions: These results suggest that distribution of patients by age at transition

  9. Chronic irradiation and brain development. Progress report, February 15, 1976--February 15, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamenhof, S.

    1977-01-01

    Tritiated water ( 3 HOH) ingested by the female rats in the dose as low as 3 μCi/ml drinking water (69 μCi/day) produced highly significant decreases in body weight, cerebral weight, cerebral DNA (cell number), and cerebral protein, of the offspring at birth. These effects of such a low dose on fetal brain development were not demonstrated before. Administration of 3 HOH before mating (and during pregnancy) seemed to be necessary for this damage; a disturbance of ovarian maturation is implicated. Chronic administration of 3 HOH until birth of F 2 generation did not result in more damage in F 2 than in F 1 ; high mortality and a selection of individuals less suceptible to radiation may be implicated

  10. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoto, Masafumi, E-mail: mkanoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki, E-mail: thosoya@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Toyoguchi, Yuuki, E-mail: c-elegans_0201g@mail.goo.ne.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Oda, Atsuko, E-mail: a.oda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis.

  11. HBV genome analysis in the progression of HBV related chronic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruksana Raihan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although HBV is a non-cytopathic virus, alteration of viral genome may also alter host immunity and may play a part in the pathogenesis LC and HCC. During the last decade, various studies have shown that mutations in the HBV genome may play a role in HCC pathogenesis. Here, we have analyzed HBV genome from patients with asymptomatic HBV carrier [ASC], chronic hepatitis B (CHB, cirrhosis of liver (LC, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC of Bangladeshi origin. A total of 225 patients tested positive for HBV with different stages of chronic HBV infection were enrolled in this study. The extent of liver damages were assayed by estimating serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, serum bilirubin and finally by abdominal ultrasonography and/or fine needle aspiration cytology. Wherever required, cancer marker like alpha fetoprotein (AFP was assessed. HBV genotype was evaluated by immunoassays and sequenced. A total of 25 patients were ASC, 135 were CHB and 65 were LC and HCC. Among ASC patients, 5, 7 and 13 belonged to HBV genotype A, C, and D, respectively. On the other hand, HBV genotype C was most prevalent in CHB patients (about 42%, followed by HBV genotype D (36%. About 69% patients with LC and HCC also had genotype C. Full genomic analysis of sera of patients with progressive liver damages (LC and HCC revealed mutations at HBeAg promoter regions in more than 80% patients. However, mutations in this region were mostly unseen in ASC and patients with less progressive liver diseases. HBV genotype was found quite different in Bangladeshi HBV patients which seem a mixture of Indian and Asia-Pacific region. This study also reveals that HBeAg promoter region mutation may have role in development of HBV related LC and HCC.

  12. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanoto, Masafumi; Hosoya, Takaaki; Toyoguchi, Yuuki; Oda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis

  13. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the lymphocytes of rats chronically exposed to radiation and chemical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of lymphocytes in peripheral blood, thymus and spleen of rats chronically exposed to combined external γ-radiation trichlorfon pesticide effect have been studied. It is shown that chronical combined trichlorfon and γ irradiation effect is accompanied by suppression of lymphopoiesis already at the early stages of the experience. The observed effects are formed depending on both daily and cumulative doses of the effect. The development of the combined effect is based on the summation of effects of chronical effect of ionizing radiation and pesticide. The revealed changes in lymphocytes population exposed to radiation and chemical factors can lead to substantial decrease of natural immunity thereby decreasing to various diseases

  14. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ``biological fingerprint`` of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  15. Effect of Rebamipide on the Premalignant Progression of Chronic Gastritis: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xue; Jiang, Kui; Wang, Bangmao; Zhou, Lu; Chen, Xin; Li, Shu

    2015-10-01

    Chronic gastritis frequently progresses into precancerous intestinal metaplasia and intraepithelial neoplasia lesions. Rebamipide is a free radical scavenger and we assessed its efficacy on clinical symptoms, gastric mucosal lesions, pathologic grade, and immunohistochemistry in chronic gastritis patients. 178 eligible patients were randomized into treatment and control groups. Both groups followed an optimized lifestyle for 26 weeks, but the treatment group was additionally medicated with rebamipide 0.1 g three times per day. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed in all patients to evaluate the severity of gastritis by the Modified Lanza Scoring (MLS) and histological changes were evaluated by the Updated Sydney System Score (USSS). Gastric mucosa immunohistochemistry in the treatment group was performed using the intestinal metaplasia markers caudal type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) and trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) detection. There were significant outcome differences between the treatment and control groups regarding the clinical symptom scores (2.62 ± 1.86 vs. 1.55 ± 1.61, P = 0.0001), gastric mucosal lesion scores (0.57 ± 1.05 vs. 0.16 ± 0.90, P = 0.002), and inflammation (P gastritis patients and decreased the expression rates of CDX2 and TFF3 in gastric cells.

  16. [Living with a chronic progressive form of multiple sclerosis--a balance act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellige, Barbara

    2002-12-01

    There are only a few studies in the German speaking countries available which address the subject of the experience of chronically ill people during the course of their illness. Therefore it was the intent of this present study to find answers for central nurse science issues: How do people who suffer from a chronically progressive course of multiple sclerosis experience the downward trajectory? Which strategies do they develop in order to integrate the disease into their lives? In what ways does the scientific paradigm of medicine influence the perceptions of the illness and the life with it? After an analysis of the national and international state of nursing research follows a description of the methodology of the Grounded Theory and the individual examination steps of the study. The second part examines some essentials of the study. The results show that the trajectory is characterized by four phases. At first the ill person concentrates on the social discussion of the pathogenesis and the medical paradigma. But with physical experiences, exchange with other affected people and acquired information, those concerned develop a very case-specific knowledge. Often disillusioned by the medication strategies, based on the experience that their subjectivity and their individuality are not taken into account, they increasingly disapprove the deficit-oriented perspective of the professionals. They develop distinctly self-caring potentialities. To identify and support this self-care potentialities should be the very core of nursing.

  17. Direct Effects Of Chronic Gamma Radiation On Musa Acuminata Var. Berangan, A Local Malaysia Banana Cultivar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maimum Tahir; Azhar Mohamad; Rozeita Laboh; Umikalsum Mohd Bahari

    2014-01-01

    Musa acuminata var. Berangan, is a popular variety of our local banana known as Pisang Berangan. The variety is a triploid banana, use mainly for dessert and has a great value for commodity fruit crops. However, production of PisangBerangan has been threatened by diseases such as Fusarium wilt, black sigatoka, Fusarium wilt, burrowing nematodes and viral diseases like Banana streak virus, Banana bunch top virus and Banana bract mosaic virus. The scenario becoming worst as Musa has a narrow genetic background for breeding and/or selection program. The banana breeding program of edible bananas is hampered by high sterility, and very limited amounts of seeds. Mutation induction via chronic gamma radiation is an alternative ways in creating more variants for selections towards a better quality and disease tolerance. A total number of 75 samples at nursery stage (1 month) were exposed to chronic gamma radiation in Gamma Greenhouse at Malaysian Nuclear Agency for 28 weeks. The samples were accordingly arranged with distance ranging from 1 m to 15 m from gamma source (Cesium-137). Plant height and new buds were used as measurement parameters in evaluating the direct effects of the chronic gamma radiation. Results showed effective dose of chronic gamma radiation in Pisang Berangan was 20 Gy. Number of new emerging sucker was ranging from 1-3 pieces with the highest at ring-4 and ring-5. Plant height was observed ranging from 22.1 to 110.5 cm. Effects of chronic radiation were observed after 3-4 months in the GGH. The samples revealed as striking leaves, short inter node and new emergence of suckers. The objective of this work is to get a dose response for chronic gamma radiation in Pisang Berangan. As for selection of potential mutant variants, new emerging suckers were tissue cultured in segregating chimeras and to get required numbers of samples for further field evaluation. (author)

  18. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the effects of x irradiation at the cellular level that lead ultimately to either malignant transformation or cell death. Experimental results consistent with the primer hypothesis for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes are reported. It was found that oligonucleotides can be inserted en bloc into newly synthesized RNA. Studies on amino acid-nucleic acid interactions were continued by successfully synthesizing an amidate and beginning NMR studies on the interactions between its nucleic acid and amino acid moieties. In studies on radiation induced giant cells in 3T3 cells growing in culture, it was demonstrated that conditions which potentiate potential lethal damage repair and those which prevent radiation induced giant cell formation exist. In an examination of the in vitro effects of vasopressin, no direct effect was found of vasopressin on radiation sensitivity and significant effects of radiation on lysosomal enzyme activity in cultured cells were found

  19. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the effects of x irradiation at the cellular level that lead ultimately to either malignant transformation or cell death. Experimental results consistent with the primer hypothesis for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes are reported. It was found that oligonucleotides can be inserted en bloc into newly synthesized RNA. Studies on amino acid-nucleic acid interactions were continued by successfully synthesizing an amidate and beginning NMR studies on the interactions between its nucleic acid and amino acid moieties. In studies on radiation induced giant cells in 3T3 cells growing in culture, it was demonstrated that conditions which potentiate potential lethal damage repair and those which prevent radiation induced giant cell formation exist. In an examination of the in vitro effects of vasopressin, no direct effect was found of vasopressin on radiation sensitivity and significant effects of radiation on lysosomal enzyme activity in cultured cells were found.

  20. Recent progress of the RD50 Collaboration – Development of radiation tolerant tracking detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Moll, M

    2014-01-01

    The CERN RD50 Collaboration "Radiation hard semiconductor devices for high luminosity col- liders" is undertaking a massive R&D; programme across High Energy Physics (HEP) Experi- ments boundaries to develop silicon sensors with increased radiation tolerance. Highest priority is to provide concepts and prototypes of high performance silicon sensors for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) Experiments at CERN and other future HEP Experiments op- erating in severe radiation environments. This paper gives an overview of the RD50 collaboration activities and describes some examples of recent developments. Emphasis is put on the charac- terization of microscopic radiation induced defects and their impact on the sensor performance, the evaluation and parametrization of electric fields inside irradiated sensors, progress in device modeling using TCAD tools, the use of p-type silicon as strip and pixel sensor material and finally the first steps towards the exploitation of impact ionization ( charge...

  1. Expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase in radiation-induced chronic human skin ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Po; Li Zhijun; Lu Yali; Zhong Mei; Gu Qingyang; Wang Dewen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of the catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TRT) and the possible relationship between the TRT and cancer transformation or poor healing in radiation-induced chronic ulcer of human skin. Methods: Rabbit antibody against human TRT and SP immunohistochemical method were used to detect TRT expression in 24 cases of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embed human skin chronic ulcer tissues induced by radiation, 5 cases of normal skin, 2 of burned skin, and 8 of carcinoma. Results: The positive rate for TRT was 58.3%(14/24) in chronic radiation ulcers, of which the strongly positive rate was 41.7%(10/24) and the weakly positive 16.7%(4/24), 0% in normal (0/5) and burned skin (0/2), and 100% in carcinoma (8/8). The strongly positive expression of TRT was observed almost always in the cytoplasm and nucleus of squamous epithelial cells of proliferative epidermis but the negative and partly weakly positive expression in the smooth muscles, endothelia of small blood vessels and capillaries, and fibroblasts. Chronic inflammtory cells, plasmacytes and lymphocytes also showed weakly positive for TRT. Conclusion: TRT expression could be involved in the malignant transformation of chronic radiation ulcer into squamous carcinoma, and in the poor healing caused by sclerosis of small blood vessels and lack of granulation tissue consisting of capillaries and fibroblasts

  2. Serum bilirubin: a simple routine surrogate marker of the progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolchandani, K; Priyadarssini, M; Rajappa, M; Parameswaran, S; Revathy, G

    2016-10-01

    Studies suggest that Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a global burden health associated with significant comorbid conditions. Few biochemical parameters have gained significance in predicting the disease progression. The present work aimed to study the association of the simple biochemical parameter of serum bilirubin level with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and to assess their association with the co-morbid conditions in CKD. We recruited 188 patients with CKD who attended a Nephrology out-patient department. eGFR values were calculated based on the serum creatinine levels using CKD-EPI formula. Various biochemical parameters including glucose, creatinine, uric acid, total and direct bilirubin were assayed in all study subjects. Study subjects were categorized into subgroups based on their eGFR values and their diabetic status and the parameters were compared among the different subgroups. We observed a significantly decreased serum bilirubin levels (p bilirubin levels (r = 0.92). We also observed a significant positive correlation between the eGFR levels and the direct bilirubin levels (r = 0.76). On multivariate linear regression analysis, we found that total and direct bilirubin independently predict eGFR, after adjusting for potential confounders (p bilirubin may help in predicting the early progression of CKD and more so in diabetic CKD.

  3. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy in Athletes: Progressive Tauopathy following Repetitive Head Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Cantu, Robert C.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Hedley-Whyte, E. Tessa; Gavett, Brandon E.; Budson, Andrew E.; Santini, Veronica E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Stern, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1920s, it has been known that the repetitive brain trauma associated with boxing may produce a progressive neurological deterioration, originally termed “dementia pugilistica” and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We review the 47 cases of neuropathologically verified CTE recorded in the literature and document the detailed findings of CTE in 3 professional athletes: one football player and 2 boxers. Clinically, CTE is associated with memory disturbances, behavioral and personality changes, Parkinsonism, and speech and gait abnormalities. Neuropathologically, CTE is characterized by atrophy of the cerebral hemispheres, medial temporal lobe, thalamus, mammillary bodies, and brainstem, with ventricular dilatation and a fenestrated cavum septum pellucidum. Microscopically, there are extensive tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles, and spindle-shaped and threadlike neurites throughout the brain. The neurofibrillary degeneration of CTE is distinguished from other tauopathies by preferential involvement of the superficial cortical layers, irregular, patchy distribution in the frontal and temporal cortices, propensity for sulcal depths, prominent perivascular, periventricular and subpial distribution, and marked accumulation of tau-immunoreactive astrocytes. Deposition of beta amyloid, most commonly as diffuse plaques, occurs in fewer than half the cases. CTE is a neuropathologically distinct, slowly progressive tauopathy with a clear environmental etiology. PMID:19535999

  4. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C; Bakker, Olaf J; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Bollen, Thomas L; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J; Brink, Menno A; Schaapherder, Alexander F; Dejong, Cornelis H; Spanier, B W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H; Besselink, Marc G; Gooszen, Hein G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Boermeester, Marja A

    2016-05-01

    episode of acute pancreatitis leads to recurrent pancreatitis in 17% of patients, and almost 8% of patients progress to CP within 5 years. Progression was associated independently with alcoholic etiology, smoking, and a history of pancreatic necrosis. Smoking is the predominant risk factor for recurrent disease, whereas the combination of alcohol abuse and smoking produces the highest cumulative risk for chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of chronic radiation injury over the shoulder with a latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelson, B.C.; Masson, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    We report our experiences in treating chronic radiation injury about the shoulder, a complication of radiation after mastectomy. Left untreated, these can result in chronic infection and/or amputation. The coverage of a large shoulder area presents certain unique problems, which severely limit the usefulness of traditional procedures. We have found that the remarkable size and versatility of the latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap enables one to use it with relative simplicity and safety. A further great advantage is that it brings new permanent blood supply into this ischemic area, thus favoring rapid healing and durable coverage

  6. Effectiveness of the hydrotherapy in children with chronic encephalopathy no progressive of the childhood: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques, Karoline de Carvalho; Drumond, Nayana Rocha; Andrade, Silmara Aparecida Figueiredo; Chaves Júnior, Israel Penaforte; Toffol, Walesca Carla de

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Now Cerebral Palsy is considered like Chronic Encephalopathy no Progressive of the Childhood and defined as any disorder characterized by alteration in the structure and function of the body, activity and participation due to a lesion no progressive of the brain in development. Several techniques physiotherapy exist for individuals rehabilitation with that pathology, however, no technique stands out as more effective in the literature. The use of the approach hydrotherapy become...

  7. Embryonic Stem Cells-loaded Gelatin Microcryogels Slow Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiao-Dong; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Cong-Mei; Wang, Shu-Qiang; Hong, Quan; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei; Wu, Di

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a public health problem. New interventions to slow or prevent disease progression are urgently needed. In this setting, cell therapies associated with regenerative effects are attracting increasing interest. We evaluated the effect of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) on the progression of CKD. Methods: Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy. We used pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded gelatin microcryogels (GMs) on the 5/6 nephrectomized kidney. The viability of ESCs within the GMs was detected using in vitro two-photon fluorescence confocal imaging. Rats were sacrificed after 12 weeks. Renal injury was evaluated using serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, 24 h protein, renal pathology, and tubular injury score results. Structural damage was evaluated by periodic acid-Schiff and Masson trichrome staining. Results: In vitro, ESCs could be automatically loaded into the GMs. Uniform cell distribution, good cell attachment, and viability were achieved from day 1 to 7 in vitro. After 12 weeks, in the pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded GMs on 5/6 nephrectomized rats group, the plasma urea nitrogen levels were 26% lower than in the right nephrectomy group, glomerulosclerosis index was 62% lower and tubular injury index was 40% lower than in the 5/6 nephrectomized rats group without GMs. Conclusions: In a rat model of established CKD, we demonstrated that the pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded GMs on the 5/6 nephrectomized kidney have a long-lasting therapeutic rescue function, as shown by the decreased progression of CKD and reduced glomerular injury. PMID:26879011

  8. Antibodies to elastin peptides in sera of Belgian Draught horses with chronic progressive lymphoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brantegem, L; de Cock, H E V; Affolter, V K; Duchateau, L; Hoogewijs, M K; Govaere, J; Ferraro, G L; Ducatelle, R

    2007-09-01

    Chronic progressive lymphoedema (CPL) is a recently recognised disease of the lymphatic system characterised by lesions in the skin of the lower legs in several draught horse breeds, including the Belgian Draught hourse. Clinical signs slowly progress and result in severe disfigurement of the limbs. Ideally, supportive treatment should be started early in the disease process. However early diagnosis and monitoring progression of CPL is still a challenge. Elastin changes, characterised by morphological alterations as well as increased desmosine levels, in the skin of the distal limbs of horses affected with CPL are probably associated with a marked release of elastin degradation products, which elicit production of circulating anti-elastin antibodies (AEAbs) in the serum. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of serum AEAbs may document elastin breakdown. An ELISA technique was used to evaluate levels of AEAbs in sera of 97 affected Belgian Draught horses that were clinically healthy except for possible skin lesions, associated with CPL in their distal limbs. The horses were divided into 5 groups according to the severity of these skin lesions: normal horses (Group 1, n = 36), horses with mild lesions (Group 2, n = 43), horses with moderate lesions (Group 3, n = 8), horses with severe lesions (Group 4, n = 10) and, as a control, healthy Warmblood horses, unaffected by the disease (Group 5, n = 83). Horses with clinical signs of CPL had significantly higher AEAb levels compared to clinically normal Belgian Draught horses and to healthy Warmblood horses. These levels correlated with severity of lesions. CPL in draught horses is associated with an increase of serum AEAbs. Evaluation of serum levels of AEAbs by ELISA might be a useful diagnostic aid for CPL. Pathological degradation of elastic fibres, resulting in deficient support of the distal lymphatics, is proposed as a contributing factor for CPL in Belgian Draught horses.

  9. Estimation of doses to patients with chronic radiation sickness from external occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Delin; Dai Guangfu

    1991-01-01

    The doses to patients with chronic radiation sickness who had engaged in diagnostic radiology have been estimated according to the radiation work load, type and capacity of X-ray equipment, protection conditions, data of nationwide survey on doses to X-ray workers in China, or the data of dose monitoring in working places. Based on the activities of radium sources, time taken up in performing radium therapy, distance to radium sources and radiation work load, the doses to patients who had engaged in radium therapy have been estimated. The results of estimated average doses for 29 cases of chronic radiation sickness are given. Their average red marrow dose, trunk dose and effective dose equivalent are 1.3 Gy, 1.2 Gy and 1.6 Sv, respectively

  10. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology: Progress report, December 1, 1987-November 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.; Delegianis, M.J.

    1988-07-01

    Research at the Radiological Research Laboratory is a blend of physics, chemistry, and biology, involving research at the basic level with the admixture of a small proportion of pragmatic or applied research in support of radiation protection and/or radiation therapy. At the current level of funding, approximately one quarter of the research of the Laboratory could be regarded as in support of radiotherapy, with the remainder addressing more basic issues. The new initiatives have been in two directions. First, there has been an increased emphasis on research in radiation chemistry, inasmuch as this subject which involves the study of free radicals and fast radiation chemistry processes starts to bridge the gap between physics and biology, between the initial deposition of radiant energy and its final expression in terms of biological consequences. Second, the emphasis in the biological research has moved towards studies at the molecular level, with the appointment of new members of staff with expertise in this area. Individual chapters were processed separately for the data base

  11. Effect of chronic forced swimming stress on whole brain radiation induced cognitive dysfunction and related mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuan; Sun Rui; Zhu Yaqun; Zhang Liyuan; Ji Jianfeng; Li Kun; Tian Ye

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore whether chronic forced swimming stress could improve whole brain radiation induced cognitive dysfunction and possible mechanism. Methods: Thirty-nine one month old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into sham control group(C), swimming group(C-S), radiation group(R), and radiation plus swimming group(R-S). Radiation groups were given a single dose of 20 Gy on whole-brain. Rats in the swimming groups were trained with swimming of 15 min/d, 5 d/w. Rat behavior was performed 3 months after radiation in an order of free activity in an open field and the Morris water maze test including the place navigation and spatial probe tests. Then, the protein expressions of BDNF, P-ERK, T-ERK, P-CREB and T-CREB in the rat hippocampus tissue were assayed by Western blot. Results: On the day 2, in the place navigation test of Morris water maze, the latency of swimming group was significantly shorter than that of sham group, the latency of sham group was significantly shorter than that of radiation group, and the latency of radiation swimming group was significantly shorter than that of radiation group(P 0.05). Western blot assay showed that the expressions of BDNF and its downstream signals including P-ERK and P-CREB were markedly reduced by radiation (P < 0.05), but this reduction was attenuated by the chronic forced swimming stress. Conclusion: The chronic forced swimming stress could improve whole brain radiation induced cognitive dysfunction by up-regulating the expressions of BDNF and its downstream signal molecules of P-ERK and P-CREB in hippocampus. (authors)

  12. Progress in coating and radiation curing of metal and plastic objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayenknecht, H.

    1983-01-01

    The manyfold problems with one or multi-layered coatings on metal and plastic surfaces as adhesion and coat compound are the reasons for a rather slow progress of industrial applications of both radiation curing technologies (UV and EBC). Important reasons for this seemed to result from the fact that the manyfold offers of radiation sources were not optimum adapted to the chemistry of the coating materials. It was pointed out that tensions due to film contraction during polymerization process are the main reasons for insufficient adhesion. This presentation is an attempt to clarify both points of view

  13. A case of basal cell epithelioma occurring on chronic radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kase, Kayoko; Matsuoka, Yoshitaka; Urushibata, Osamu; Nishiwaki, Soichi

    1989-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman had been treated with radiation therapy for lymphoid tuberculosis on the right side of the neck 40 years before. Chronic radiation dermatitis occurred on that site. Blackish small mass has appeared 2 years before on the central part of the dermatitis. Histological examination revealed thinning of the epidermis, swelling of the dermal collagen fibers, and follicular clusters composed of basaloid cells from the epidermis to the upper layer of the dermis. (Namekawa, K)

  14. Progressive shoulder-neck exercise on cervical muscle functions in middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Hsien; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Tsou, Chih-Min; Huang, Yi-Ching

    2018-02-01

    Although neck pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder, there is no consensus on suitable exercise methods for middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. Therefore, this study investigated the effectiveness of a 6-week shoulder-neck exercise intervention program on cervical muscle function improvement in patients aged 45 years or older with chronic neck pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of progressive shoulder-neck exercise on cervical muscle functions of middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. A randomized controlled single-blind trial. Rehabilitation department of a hospital. A total of 72 subjects aged ≥45 years with chronic neck pain were randomly allocated to either an experimental group (N.=36; age 57.3±8.74 years) or a control group (N.=36; age 58.15±8.17 years). The control group received only traditional physiotherapy, whereas the experimental group participated in a 6-week shoulder-neck exercise program consisting of cranio-cervical flexion and progressive resistance exercises in addition to receiving traditional physiotherapy. The muscle functions of subjects in both groups were tested before the experiment and also after the intervention program. The pretest and posttest measured the cranio-cervical flexion test (CCFT) and the superficial cervical muscle strength. After the intervention, the experimental group had a 56.48 point improvement in the performance index of the CCFT (Pcervical muscle functions. This study confirmed that the 6-week progressive shoulder-neck exercise program can effectively improve cervical muscle function in middle-aged and senior patients with chronic neck pain. Progressive shoulder-neck exercise might provide positive effect on deep and superficial neck muscle strength in patients with chronic neck pain. Therefore, this study may serve as a reference for the clinical rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain.

  15. Effect of chronic radiation on rape genotype formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Hannich, K.; Cerny, J.; Vyvadilova, M.

    1975-01-01

    The F 1 generation of hybrid plants of the Canadian erucic acid-free rape cross-bred with some European winter rape varieties with a high content of erucic acid were chronically irradiated in a gamma-field with doses ranging from 5978 to 329 R er vegetation. In segregating F 2 generations, the irradiation significantly increased the proportion of winter genotypes; a matroclinous influence on the developmental characteristics of plants occurred in irradiated segregating F 2 hybrid populations. As against spring rape, winter rape varieties used as the maternal form during hybridization caused a statistically significant increase in the frequency of winter genotypes. The segregation of half-winter forms in irradiated segregating hybrid populations of the F 2 generation proved the incomplete dominance of the spring habit of oil rape. Chronic irradiation significantly increased erucic-free (0 - 10% of erucic acid) and low-erucic (10 - 20% of erucic acid) genotype frequencies in segregating F 2 generations. Chronic irradiation of the hybrid plants of erucic-free spring rapes and erucic winter rapes with doses ranging from 5978 to 329 R per vegetation, together with the temperature screening of winter forms and with the determination of the fatty acid content, may be considered as an effective method of creating non-erucic and low-erucic winter forms of oil rape. (author)

  16. Modeling of chronic radiation-induced cystitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette M.M. Zwaans, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: We developed an RC model that mimics the human pathology and functional changes. Furthermore, radiation exposure attenuates the urothelial integrity long-term, allowing for potential continuous irritability of the bladder wall from exposure to urine. Future studies will focus on the underlying molecular changes associated with this condition and investigate novel treatment strategies.

  17. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1985-November 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.

    1986-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Radiological Research Laboratory of the Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University. The bulk of the research of the Laboratory involves basic and fundamental aims, not confined to radiotherapy. Research carried out in the Laboratory covers the determination of microdosimetry quantities, computer simulation of particle tracks, determination of oncogenic transformation, and the transfection of DNA into cells. The Hallmark of the Laboratory is the interaction between physics and biology

  18. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report, October 1, 1982-November 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    A wide range of research is carried out at the Radiological Research Laboratory, from computer simulation of particle tracks to the determination of oncogenic transformation in mammalian cells. Mechanistic studies remain the central mission in an attempt to understand the biological action of ionizing radiations. Collaborative research is carried out on the use of radiosensitizers on chemosensitizers on the effect of hormones on oncogenic transformation and on cataractogenesis

  19. Progress report: nuclear safety and radiation protection in France in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Asn (Nuclear safety authority) considers that 2005 was a satisfactory year in terms of nuclear safety and radiation protection. However, further progress can and must be made. 2005 was a year of great progress for the Asn as it consolidated its organisation and working methods, in accordance with the 2005-2007 strategic plan it set for itself. The Asn continued progress in the field of radiation protection has given rise to various new regulations to improve the legislative and regulatory framework in this area. 2005 was marked by significant progress in the process of harmonizing national nuclear safety policies Against a backdrop of the preparation of a bill on management of radioactive materials and waste, to be presented to Parliament in March 2006, 2005 was a year of important milestones. The Asn control activities encompass the following seven areas: development of general regulations for nuclear safety and radiation protection; management of individual authorization requests and receipt of declarations; inspection of nuclear activities; organisation of radiological surveillance of individuals and of the environment; preparation for management of emergency situations and implementation if necessary; contribution to public information on nuclear safety and radiation protection; determination of the French position within international community. Main topics in 2005: government bill on transparency and security in the nuclear field; the challenges and ambitions of the Asn; controlling exposure to radon; EPR Reactor Project Safety; working towards a law on radioactive waste in 2006; I.R.R.T.: an international audit of Asn in 2006; harmonization of nuclear safety in Europe; Chernobyl: what has been achieved over the past 20 years; informing the Public; internal authorizations. (N.C.)

  20. Radiation biophysical study of biological molecules. Progress report, July 1, 1976--August 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: x-ray induction of uv mutagenesis enhancement in lambda-phage; action spectrum for uv mutagenesis in Escherichia coli; survival of E. coli colonies after uv damage; repair of radiation damage to lambda-phage by the W-reactivation system; experiments on the Weigle-reactivation of irradiated lambda-phage; and studies on the wavelength dependence of uv mutagenesis

  1. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia disease progression is accelerated by APRIL-TACI interaction in the TCL1 transgenic mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lascano, Valeria; Guadagnoli, Marco; Schot, Jan G.; Luijks, Dieuwertje M.; Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Cameron, Katherine; Hahne, Michael; Pals, Steven; Slinger, Erik; Kipps, Thomas J.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Eldering, Eric; Medema, Jan Paul; Kater, Arnon P.

    2013-01-01

    Although in vitro studies pointed to the tumor necrosis factor family member APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) in mediating survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells, clear evidence for a role in leukemogenesis and progression in CLL is lacking. APRIL significantly prolonged in

  2. Chronic progressive polyarthritis and other symptoms of collagen vascular disease induced by graft-vs-host reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pals, S. T.; Radaszkiewicz, T.; Roozendaal, L.; Gleichmann, E.

    1985-01-01

    The induction of a GVHR in (BALB/c X A)F1 mice by i.v. injection of 80 to 120 X 10(6) BALB/c spleen cells leads to the development of chronic progressive polyarthritis, which shares several of the articular and extra-articular manifestations of human rheumatoid arthritis. The development of these

  3. Influence on cell proliferation of background radiation or exposure to very low, chronic gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Conter, A.; Croute, F.; Caratero, C.; Gaubin, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations carried out on the protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus lividus, which were shielded against background radiation or exposed to very low doses of gamma radiation, demonstrated that radiation can stimulate the proliferation of these two single-cell organisms. Radiation hormesis depends on internal factors (age of starting cells) and external factors (lighting conditions). The stimulatory effect occurred only in a limited range of doses and disappeared for dose rates higher than 50 mGy/y

  4. Radiation cleanup of vacuum systems (radiation-induced outgassing). Progress report, September 15, 1976--September 14, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, J.N.

    1977-06-01

    A stainless steel-304 vacuum system has been designed and constructed to study radiation-induced outgassing when this material is exposed to cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The system is pumped with an ion pump and sorption roughing pump. No foreign materials have been introduced except for copper seals at the flanges. An analytical model has been developed which predicts the outgassing from SS-304 to be 8.27 x 10 -12 torr-liters/(cm 2 )(sec) per megarad/hr. Extrapolation of existing data for aluminum suggests a lower value of 1.0 x 10 -12 torr-liters/(cm 2 )(sec) per megarad/hr. Experiments to determine the value are currently in progress

  5. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia in mild to moderate progressive chronic renal failure and its association with aerobic work capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eidemak, I; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Kanstrup, I L

    1995-01-01

    Tissue sensitivity to insulin and aerobic work capacity was measured in patients with mild to moderate progressive chronic renal failure. Twenty-nine non-diabetic patients with a glomerular filtration rate of 25 ml.min-1.1.73 m-2 (11-43) (median, range) and 15 sex, age, and body mass index matched.......02) (M/I ratio 1.77 +/- 0.71 vs 2.57 +/- 0.70 (mg/(kgBW.min) per pmol/l.100, p aerobic work capacity was significantly lower in the patients than in the control subjects (24 +/- 8 vs 32 +/- 11 ml O2/(kg body weight.min), p .../I ratio in both groups. In conclusion, not only patients with end-stage chronic renal failure but also those with mild to moderate progressive chronic renal failure are insulin resistant and hyperinsulinaemic. The tissue sensitivity to insulin is correlated to the maximal aerobic work capacity suggesting...

  6. Rapid Progression of Metastatic Pulmonary Calcification and Alveolar Hemorrhage in a Patient with Chronic Renal Failure and Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Eun Joo; Kim, Dong Hun; Yoon, Seong Ho; Suk, Eun Ha

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification (MPC) is common in patients with chronic renal failure. The authors experienced a patient with chronic renal failure and primary hyperparathyroidism by parathyroid adenoma accompanied with rapid progressions of MPC and alveolar hemorrhage. Recent chest radiographs, compared with previous chest radiographs, showed rapid accumulation of calcification in both upper lungs. Following up on the high-resolution CT scan after five years demonstrates more increased nodules in size and ground glass opacity. The patient was diagnosed with MPC and alveolar hemorrhage by transbronchial lung biopsy. We assumed rapid progression of MPC and alveolar hemorrhage in underlying chronic renal failures could be a primary hyperparathyroidism which may be caused by parathyroid adenoma detected incidentally. Therefore parathyroid adenoma was treated with ethanol injections. Herein, we have reported on CT findings of MPC with alveolar hemorrhage and reviewed our case along with other articles.

  7. Progression of chronic pulmonary tuberculosis in mice intravenously infected with ethambutol resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ethambutol (EMB is an important first line drug, however little information on its molecular mechanism of resistance and pathogenicity of resistant isolates is available. Present work was designed to study virulence of the EMB resistant M. tuberculosis strains and the host responses in-vivo on infection of EMB resistant M. tuberculosis using Balb/c mouse model of infection. Methods: Three groups of Balb/c mice (female, age 4-6 wk; 21 mice in each group were infected intravenously with 106 CFU of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and two EMB resistant clinical isolates. Age and sex matched control animals were mock inoculated with Middlebrook 7H9 broth alone. At 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 days post-infection three animals from each group were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and lung tissue was collected for further analysis. Results: Infection with EMB resistant M. tuberculosis led to progressive and chronic disease with significantly high bacillary load (p=0.02. Massive infiltration and exacerbated lung pathology with increased expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α was observed in lungs of mice infected with EMB resistant strains. The present study suggests that infection with EMB resistant M. tuberculosis leads to chronic infection with subsequent loss of lung function, bacterial persistence with elevated expression of TNF-α resulting in increased lung pathology. Conclusion: These findings highlight that EMB resistant M. tuberculosis regulates host immune response differentially and its pathogenicity is different from drug sensitive strains of M. tuberculosis.

  8. Retarding chronic kidney disease (CKD progression: a practical nutritional approach for non-dialysis CKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bellizzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on a patient with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD in whom several nutritional issues are briefly discussed from a practical point of view. The article is accompanied by an editorial published in this Journal in relation to the 2nd International Conference of the European Renal Nutrition working group at ERA-EDTA—“Retarding CKD progression: readily available through comprehensive nutritional management?”—and focuses on several practical topics associated with the nutritional approach for the conservative treatment of non-dialysis CKD. The article is divided into 3 sections—basic nutritional assessment, nutritional targets, and nutritional follow-up in non-dialysis CKD—linked to 3 consecutive steps of the clinical follow-up of the patient and the related nutritional concerns and intervention. First visit: Baseline nutritional assessment and basic nutritional considerations in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD • What nutritional assessment/monitoring for protein-energy wasting (PEW should be employed? • Is a body mass index (BMI of 21 kg/m2 adequate? • What phosphate target should be pursued? • What are the nutritional habits in patients with incident CKD? • What protein needs and amount of dietary protein should be pursued? • Does the quality of protein matter? • What amount of dietary salt should be employed? How should this be obtained? • How should normal serum phosphate be achieved? • What diet should be recommended? Is a vegetarian diet an option? Second visit: Major nutritional targets in non-dialysis CKD • Consequences of unintentional weight loss • What is the role of the renal dietitian in helping the patient adhere to a renal diet? Intermediate visits: Nutritional follow-up in non-dialysis CKD • What treatment for calcium/parathyroid hormone (PTH will affect CKD progression? Final visits: • Would a dietary recall/intensive dietary education improve adherence with

  9. Progressive tumefactive fibroinflammatory lesion of the infratemporal fossa treated by radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian O’Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumefactive fibroinflammatory lesion (TFIL is a rare benign tumor in the head and neck region. We present a case of a 40-year-old female with a benign but progressive lesion of the infratemporal fossa, which was diagnosed as TFIL. Patient responded briefly to a course of steroid treatment but eventually showed progression and was unresponsive to further steroids. She was then treated with external beam radiation to a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. After radiation a slow, gradual decrease in tumor size was noted over the course of years and she is free of disease after more than 11 years of follow-up. The major longterm side effect this patient developed was an expected unilateral radiation-induced retinopathy, due to the close proximity of the lesion to the orbit. The dilemma of treatment of benign disease with radiation with potential long-term complications is discussed and a review of the literature on TFIL is presented.

  10. Independent and combined effect of bilirubin and smoking on the progression of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jiancheng Wang,1,* Binyan Wang,1,2,* Min Liang,1 Guobao Wang,1 Jianping Li,3 Yan Zhang,3 Yong Huo,3 Yimin Cui,4 Xiping Xu,1,5 Xianhui Qin1 1National Clinical Research Center for Kidney Disease, State Key Laboratory for Organ Failure Research, Renal Division, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 2Institute for Biomedicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 3Department of Cardiology, 4Department of Pharmacy, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, 5Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, Key Laboratory of Functional Dairy, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Whether serum bilirubin and cigarette smoking affect the risk of renal function decline remains inconclusive. We aimed to test the independent and combined effects of bilirubin and cigarette smoking on the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD in hypertensive adults. Methods: The study population consisted of 12,633 patients in the renal sub-study of the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial. The primary outcome was progression of CKD, defined as a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of ≥30% and to a level of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 if baseline eGFR was ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2, or a decrease in eGFR of ≥50% if baseline eGFR was <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, or end-stage renal disease. The secondary outcomes included 1 rapid decline in renal function and 2 annual rate of eGFR decline. Results: The median follow-up duration was 4.4 years. Cigarette smoking had no significant effect on the progression of CKD (odds ratio [OR]: 1.11, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.78–1.57. However, a significantly lower risk of the primary event (OR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.55–0.95 was found in participants in tertile 3 compared to those in tertiles 1–2 for total bilirubin (TBiL levels. More importantly, there was an interaction

  11. Features of progression of chronic hepatitis C in children with different variants of polymorphism of the gene IL-28B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berezenko V.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the features of the progression of chronic hepatitis C in children with different variants of polymorphism of the gene IL-28B. Materials and methods. The study involved 57 children aged 3–18 years with CHC. All patients were involved in clinical, laboratory and instrumental examination. The stage of fibrosis was assessed morphologicallyon a scale METAVIR, by the calculation method — Fibro Test, on APRI index, and by the concentration of hyaluronic acid (HA, transforming growth factor TGF- β1 in serum usingIFA. The SNP genotypes of rs8099917 and rs12979860 lociin IL-28B were determinedby the method of the polymer chain reaction (PCR. A statistical analysis of the data was conducted. Resume. Most of the patients were children with chronic hepatitis C who had genotype CT at rs12979860 locus of the gene IL-28B (54% and the TT geno-type at rs8099917 locus (60%. It was found that fibrogenesis in the liver of patients with chronic hepatitis C depends on the polymorphism of the gene IL-28B. Unfavorable genotypevariants for the development of liver fibrosis are: TT (rs12979860, CT (rs12979860 and TG/GG (rs8099917. Variants CC (rs12979860 and TT (rs8099917 have a beneficial effect on the course of chronic hepatitis C, including patients with a lower stage of fibrosis. To determine the risk of progression of chronic hepatitis C it may be sufficient to determine the polymorphism of rs12979860locusin the gene IL-28B. Conclusions.The polymorphism variants CC (rs12979860 and TT (rs8099917of the gene IL-28Bare more favorable (lower severity of fibrosis in the progression of chronic hepatitis C in children. Variant TT (rs12979860 in the polymorphism of the gene IL-28B is associated with the progression of hepatitis — faster development of liver fibrosis.

  12. Chronic radiation exposure as an ecological factor: Hypermethylation and genetic differentiation in irradiated Scots pine populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkova, P.Yu.; Geras'kin, S.A.; Horemans, N.; Makarenko, E.S.; Saenen, E.; Duarte, G.T.; Nauts, R.; Bondarenko, V.S.; Jacobs, G.; Voorspoels, S.; Kudin, M.

    2018-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic changes were investigated in chronically irradiated Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) populations from territories that were heavily contaminated by radionuclides as result of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. In comparison to the reference site, the genetic diversity revealed by electrophoretic mobility of AFLPs was found to be significantly higher at the radioactively contaminated areas. In addition, the genome of pine trees was significantly hypermethylated at 4 of the 7 affected sites. - Highlights: • Chronic radiation exposure changes the genetic structure of plant populations. • Genomes of irradiated pines are hypermethylated. • The level of hypermethylation does not depend on annual dose. - These results indicate that even relatively low levels of chronic radiation exposure can influence on the genetic characteristics and the methylation status of natural pine populations and that it should be considered as an important ecological factor reflecting the anthropogenic impact on ecosystems.

  13. The associations of Bmi-1 with progression of glomerular chronic kidney disease
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Bai, Ming; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Ma, Feng; Liu, Limin; Liu, Ting; Liu, Minna; Wang, Hanmin; Sun, Shiren

    2018-02-01

    Our previous studies indicated that Bmi-1 plays an important role in hypoxia-induced tubular epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the development of kidney fibrosis in cellular and animal models. However, circulating Bmi-1 levels in human chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their relation to progression remains unknown. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of a prospective cohort study. The blood samples and clinical data of 230 patients with glomerular CKD and 67 healthy adults were prospectively collected between January 2010 and June 2012. Serum Bmi-1 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CKD patients had significantly higher serum Bmi-1 concentrations than the healthy controls (496.4 (363.1 - 675.4) pg/mL compared with 257.3 (235.4 - 303.8) pg/mL, p Bmi-1 level inversely correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (r = -0.346, p Bmi-1 levels and serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, cystatin C concentration, and the severity of tubulointerstitial fibrosis (r = 0.248, p Bmi-1 level was associated with a shorter duration of renal survival. Cox multivariate analyses further demonstrated that serum Bmi-1 concentration was an independent prognostic factor for CKD patients (HR = 6.48, p Bmi-1 levels were associated with adverse kidney disease outcome, suggesting that Bmi-1 is a novel biomarker for glomerular CKD progression. More data from larger longitudinal studies are required to validate our findings.
.

  14. Venetoclax for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who progressed during or after idelalisib therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutre, Steven; Choi, Michael; Furman, Richard R; Eradat, Herbert; Heffner, Leonard; Jones, Jeffrey A; Chyla, Brenda; Zhou, Lang; Agarwal, Suresh; Waskiewicz, Tina; Verdugo, Maria; Humerickhouse, Rod A; Potluri, Jalaja; Wierda, William G; Davids, Matthew S

    2018-04-12

    B-cell receptor pathway inhibitors (BCRis) have transformed treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL); however, the efficacy of therapies for patients whose disease is refractory to/relapses after (R/R) BCRis is unknown. Venetoclax is a selective, orally bioavailable BCL-2 inhibitor with activity in patients with CLL, including those who are heavily pretreated or have 17p deletion. This phase 2 study prospectively evaluated venetoclax in patients with R/R CLL after ibrutinib or idelalisib; here we report on patients who received idelalisib as the last BCRi before enrollment. Venetoclax was initiated at 20 mg daily, followed by intrapatient ramp-up to 400 mg daily. Primary objectives included efficacy (objective response rate [ORR]) and safety of venetoclax. The study enrolled 36 patients who previously received idelalisib (ORR, 67% [24/36]); 2 patients achieved complete remission, and 1 had complete remission with incomplete bone marrow recovery. Median progression-free survival (PFS) has not yet been reached; estimated 12-month PFS was 79%. The most common adverse events (AEs; all grades) were neutropenia (56%), diarrhea (42%), upper respiratory tract infection (39%), thrombocytopenia (36%), nausea (31%), fatigue (28%), cough (22%), rash (22%), and anemia (22%). Grade 3 or 4 AEs were primarily hematologic (neutropenia [50%], thrombocytopenia [25%], and anemia [17%]). No patients experienced tumor lysis syndrome. Venetoclax demonstrated promising clinical activity and favorable tolerability in patients with CLL whose disease progressed during or after idelalisib therapy. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02141282. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. Skin autofluorescence is associated with the progression of chronic kidney disease: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Nakayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Makoto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kimio; Tani, Yoshihiro; Kusano, Yuki; Suzuki, Hodaka; Hayashi, Yoshimitsu; Asahi, Koichi; Sato, Keiji; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end product (AGE) accumulation is thought to be a measure of cumulative metabolic stress that has been reported to independently predict cardiovascular disease in diabetes and renal failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between AGE accumulation, measured as skin autofluorescence, and the progression of renal disease in pre-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Skin autofluorescence was measured noninvasively with an autofluorescence reader at baseline in 449 pre-dialysis patients with CKD. The primary end point was defined as a doubling of serum creatinine and/or need for dialysis. Thirty-three patients were lost to follow-up. Forty six patients reached the primary end point during the follow-up period (Median 39 months). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significantly higher risk of development of the primary end points in patients with skin autofluorescence levels above the optimal cut-off level of 2.31 arbitrary units, derived by receiver operator curve analysis. Cox regression analysis revealed that skin autofluorescence was an independent predictor of the primary end point, even after adjustment for age, gender, smoking history, diabetes, estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria (adjusted hazard ratio 2.58, P = 0.004). Tissue accumulation of AGEs, measured as skin autofluorescence, is a strong and independent predictor of progression of CKD. Skin autofluorescence may be useful for risk stratification in this group of patients; further studies should clarify whether AGE accumulation could be one of the therapeutic targets to improve the prognosis of CKD.

  16. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression from various tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yu Jin; Kim, Mi Sook; Jang, Won Il; Seo, Young Seok; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Paik, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression from various primary tumors. Between 2002 and 2013, 72 patients with liver oligo-recurrence (oligo-metastasis with a controlled primary tumor) and oligo-progression (contradictory progression of a few sites of disease despite an overall tumor burden response to therapy) underwent SBRT. Of these, 9 and 8 patients with uncontrollable distant metastases and patients immediate loss to follow-up, respectively, were excluded. The total planning target volume was used to select the SBRT dose (median, 48 Gy; range, 30 to 60 Gy, 3–4 fractions). Toxicity was evaluated using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. We evaluated 55 patients (77 lesions) treated with SBRT for liver metastases. All patients had controlled primary lesions, and 28 patients had stable lesions at another site (oligo-progression). The most common primary site was the colon (36 patients), followed by the stomach (6 patients) and other sites (13 patients). The 2-year local control and progression-free survival rates were 68% and 22%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 56% and 20%, respectively. The most common adverse events were grade 1–2 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting; no grade ≥3 toxicities were observed. Univariate analysis revealed that oligo-progression associated with poor survival. SBRT for liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression appears safe, with similar local control rates. For liver oligo-progression, criteria are needed to select patients in whom improved overall survival can be expected through SBRT.

  17. Residual insufficiency of hematopoiesis after acute or chronic exposure to gamma radiation or neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangenheim, K.H. v.; Peterson, H.P.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recovery of the stem cell quality is possible after acute exposure to 500 rad γ radiation up to a period of 6 months. Beyond this data, a significant residual damage remains. The same applies to quantitative stem cell recovery. Chronic γ exposure leads to less radiation damage than acute exposure. After a total accumulation of 500 rad, the proliferation factors after chronic exposure were, on an average 20% higher than after acute radiation exposure. 6 MeV neutron exposure reduced the stem cell quality and stem cell count much more efficiently than γ exposure. The relative biological effect of neutrons is at least 2.5 times as high as the γ effect, both for the stem cell count and the stem cell quality. (orig.) [de

  18. Effect of low-protein diet supplemented with keto acids on progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneata, Liliana; Mircescu, Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    Hypoproteic diets are most often discussed for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who do not receive dialysis. A very low-protein diet supplemented with ketoanalogues of essential amino acids (keto-diet) proved effective in ameliorating metabolic disturbances of advanced CKD and delaying the initiation of dialysis without deleterious effects on nutritional status. Several recent studies report that the keto-diet could also slow down the rate of decline in renal function, with better outcomes after the initiation of dialysis. Results of a single-center randomized controlled trial addressing the rate of CKD progression revealed a 57% slower decline in renal function with the keto-diet compared with a conventional low-protein diet (LPD). The keto-diet allowed the safe management of selected patients with stage 4-5 CKD, delaying dialysis for almost 1 year, with a major impact on patient quality of life and health expenditures. Therefore, the keto-diet could be a link in the integrated care model. Careful selection of patients, nutritional monitoring, and dietary counseling are required. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-09-08

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process.

  20. Imaging of human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated chronic progressive myeloneuropathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcindor, F.; Valderrama, R.; Canavaggio, M.; Lee, H.; Katz, A.; Montesinos, C.; Madrid, R.E.; Merino, R.R.; Pipia, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    We studied magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head and cervical spine and CT of the head in 46 patients (14 men, 32 women) with chronic progressive myeloneuropathy. The findings were correlated with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) serology, race, country of origin, and age. We found a female predominance of 2:1. Most patients were aged between 30 and 50 years, and most were Caribbean immigrants and black. There were 9 men and 17 women with blood antibody titers to HTLV-I and 7 mem and 15 women with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) titers. All patients with virus or antibodies in blood or CSF were Caribbean immigrants or black. T2-weighted cranial MRI showed scattered areas of high signal intensity in the cerebral white matter, usually in the periventricular and subcortical areas, but not in the posterior cranial fossa. Cranial CT revealed periventricular low density areas, ventricular enlargement, and atrophy MRI of the cervical spine showed atrophy of the cord. Myelography was normal in all 15 patients examined. No imaging differences were observed between the HTLV-I-positive and -negative patients. These findings, although consistent with demyelination, are not specific. (orig.)

  1. Imaging of human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated chronic progressive myeloneuropathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcindor, F. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Valderrama, R. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Canavaggio, M. (Abbott Labs., North Chicago, IL (United States)); Lee, H. (Abbott Labs., North Chicago, IL (United States)); Katz, A. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Montesinos, C. (Beth Israel Medical Center, Dept. of Neurology and Clinical Electrophysiology, New York, NY (United States)); Madrid, R.E. (New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, Inst. for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, NY (United States)); Merino, R.R. (Beth Israel Medical Center, Dept. of Neurology and Clinical Electrophysiology, New York, NY (United States)); Pipia, P.A. (Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of New York, Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States))

    1992-12-01

    We studied magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head and cervical spine and CT of the head in 46 patients (14 men, 32 women) with chronic progressive myeloneuropathy. The findings were correlated with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) serology, race, country of origin, and age. We found a female predominance of 2:1. Most patients were aged between 30 and 50 years, and most were Caribbean immigrants and black. There were 9 men and 17 women with blood antibody titers to HTLV-I and 7 mem and 15 women with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) titers. All patients with virus or antibodies in blood or CSF were Caribbean immigrants or black. T2-weighted cranial MRI showed scattered areas of high signal intensity in the cerebral white matter, usually in the periventricular and subcortical areas, but not in the posterior cranial fossa. Cranial CT revealed periventricular low density areas, ventricular enlargement, and atrophy MRI of the cervical spine showed atrophy of the cord. Myelography was normal in all 15 patients examined. No imaging differences were observed between the HTLV-I-positive and -negative patients. These findings, although consistent with demyelination, are not specific. (orig.)

  2. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia: II. A qualitative and quantitative electronmicroscopy study of skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Dias-Tosta

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available This study quantifies the maior electron microscopic changes in limb muscle biopsies from 31 out of 34 patients with the syndrome of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Patients were divided into three clinical groups - A 10 sporadic cases with muscle weakness only; B 9 familial cases with muscle weakness only; C 15 cases with muscle weakness and one or more of the following features: pigmentary retinopathy, cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal signs and peripheral neuropathy. Electron microscopic mitochondrial abnormalities were found in all groups (8 patients from group A, 3 from group B, 14 from group C. Quantitative measurements of certain muscle fibre constituents, using a point-counting technique, revealed decreased myofibril volume-fractions and increased volume-fractions of mitochondria, glycogen and lipid in some biopsies from each group. Mitochondrial volume-fractions correlated positively with lipid content, the proportion of type 1 fibres, and the percentage of fibres with increased oxidative enzyme activity. The three groups defined clinically showed no significant differences in terms of the relative proportions of these measured constituents.

  3. Unresolved Subclinical Hypothyroidism is Independently Associated with Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Oh; Lee, Ihn Suk; Choi, Yoo A; Lee, Sang Ju; Chang, Yoon Kyung; Yoon, Hye Eun; Jang, Yi Sun; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Hye Soo; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Suk Young; Hwang, Hyeon Seok

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often have subclinical hypothyroidism. However, few reports have investigated changes in the status of subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients and its clinical significance in CKD progression. Methods: We included 168 patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD stages 2-4. The normalization of subclinical hypothyroidism during follow-up was assessed, and the association between transitions in subclinical hypothyroid status and the rate of decline of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was investigated. Results: At baseline, 127 patients were euthyroid and 41 (24.4%) patients were diagnosed with subclinical hypothyroidism. Of these 41 patients, 21 (51.2%) spontaneously resolved to euthyroid during follow-up. The rate of eGFR decline of patients with resolved subclinical hypothyroidism was similar to that of euthyroid patients. The patients with unresolved subclinical hypothyroidism showed a steeper renal function decline than patients with euthyroidism or resolved subclinical hypothyroidism (all p hypothyroidism than in those who were euthyroid (p = 0.006). In multivariate linear regression for rate of eGFR decrease, unresolved subclinical hypothyroidism (β = -5.77, p = 0.001), baseline renal function (β = -0.12, p hypothyroidism did not resolve to euthyroidism, and this lack of resolution was independently associated with rapid renal function decline. PMID:24396286

  4. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of dermal elastin of draught horses with chronic progressive lymphoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, H E V; Van Brantegem, L; Affolter, V K; Oosterlinck, M; Ferraro, G L; Ducatelle, R

    2009-01-01

    Chronic progressive lymphoedema (CPL) in horses, a disease of certain draught breeds, is associated with altered elastin metabolism. The characteristic lesions are seen in the skin of the lower (distal) limbs. This study was based on horses of susceptible breeds, with and without CPL, and on horses of a non-susceptible breed. Skin samples were obtained for examination from the neck (considered a non-affected region) and from the distal limb. The skin lesions were characterized histologically and the dermal elastic fibres were evaluated morphologically and quantitatively. In all horses the mean elastin concentrations were highest in the superficial dermis, gradually decreasing in the mid-dermis and deep dermis. As compared with horses of a non-susceptible breed, affected horses had increased amounts of dermal elastin in both the distal limb and neck, while non-affected horses of a susceptible breed had decreased amounts. The findings support an earlier hypothesis that CPL of horses is a generalized disease. Reduced efficiency of the elastic network in supporting the dermal lymphatics may explain the development of CPL.

  5. Retrospective results of radiation therapy of the Eustachian tube in chronic otitis media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.; Reinke, C.; Kimmig, B.; Frese, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Background: The treatment results of symptomatic radiation therapy of the Eustachian tube in chronic otitis media had to be evaluated retrospectively. Patients and Methods: Between 1980 and 1997, 66 patients were referred for therapy. The median age was 58 years. In the clinical presentation, all the patients had a hearing impairment, 35 patients complained of pain, 21 had otorrhea. In their history, 20 patients indicated chronic recurrent infections. The complaints lasted for 4.7 years in the median, primary conservative (adstringentia, antibiotics) and surgical treatment (paracentesis, tympanic tubule, tympanoplastic) did not lead to lasting cure. In 40 of 66 patients, finally radiation therapy was done of both Eustachian tubes. With opposed fields and cobalt-60 photons a total dose of 6 Gy at single doses of 1 Gy, three times a week, was applied. Under the causes for exclusion of radiation therapy were non-acceptance of the patients (nine), prior radiation therapies (six) or spontaneous improvement after initial presentation in our department. The treatment results were evaluated by interviews of the patients and regular otorhinolaryngological examinations. Results: There were no side effects noticed. 28 of 40 (70%) patients reported a significant improvement that could be verified by objective otorhinolaryngological examinations. In the group of 26 nonirradiated patients, 22 could be interviewed indicating in 16 cases (72%) that the complaints were unchanged and chronic otitis media was lasting. In a subgroup analysis concerning the duration of otitis media radiation therapy proved more effective in an acute and subacute stadium of disease of up to 5 years duration, while the patients resistant to radiation therapy were entirely in a chronic stage of disease exceeding 5 years duration. (orig.) [de

  6. Possible cause for altered spatial cognition of prepubescent rats exposed to chronic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sareesh Naduvil; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Karun, Kalesh M; Nayak, Satheesha B; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2015-10-01

    The effects of chronic and repeated radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFEMR) exposure on spatial cognition and hippocampal architecture were investigated in prepubescent rats. Four weeks old male Wistar rats were exposed to RF-EMR (900 MHz; SAR-1.15 W/kg with peak power density of 146.60 μW/cm(2)) for 1 h/day, for 28 days. Followed by this, spatial cognition was evaluated by Morris water maze test. To evaluate the hippocampal morphology; H&E staining, cresyl violet staining, and Golgi-Cox staining were performed on hippocampal sections. CA3 pyramidal neuron morphology and surviving neuron count (in CA3 region) were studied using H&E and cresyl violet stained sections. Dendritic arborization pattern of CA3 pyramidal neuron was investigated by concentric circle method. Progressive learning abilities were found to be decreased in RF-EMR exposed rats. Memory retention test performed 24 h after the last training revealed minor spatial memory deficit in RF-EMR exposed group. However, RF-EMR exposed rats exhibited poor spatial memory retention when tested 48 h after the final trial. Hirano bodies and Granulovacuolar bodies were absent in the CA3 pyramidal neurons of different groups studied. Nevertheless, RF-EMR exposure affected the viable cell count in dorsal hippocampal CA3 region. RF-EMR exposure influenced dendritic arborization pattern of both apical and basal dendritic trees in RF-EMR exposed rats. Structural changes found in the hippocampus of RF-EMR exposed rats could be one of the possible reasons for altered cognition.

  7. Effects of chronic gamma radiation on the lichen Parmelia sulcata Tayl. in the Enterprise Radiation Forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbisch, F.H.

    1977-01-01

    Within the Enterprise Radiation Forest, the foliose lichen Parmelia sulcata Tayl. exhibited radiation damage. Only those lichens which received in excess of 100 krad manifested damage. The damage was evidenced as a lifting and subsequent breaking of lobes, a coalescing of fungal hyphae, a formation of a brown pigment by the coalescing hyphae, a distortion of the chloroplastid of the algal component, and eventual death of the lichen. The radiation also affected thallus growth by slowing it and rhizinae branching by increasing the number of branches. Damage was not manifested until the late spring (June) of the year following radiation. Apparently P. sulcata is able to maintain itself until conditions are favorable for growth, after receiving a large dose of gamma radiation. Under favorable growth conditions, the lichen cannot carry out its normal growth functions and deteriorates. Although environmental changes did occur within the forest, evidence obtained indicates that gamma radiation was the principal factor affecting the lichens

  8. Chronic Subdural Hematoma development in Accelerated phase of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia presenting with seizure and rapid progression course with fatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheja Amol

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH in leukemia is rare, and most reported cases occurred in relation with acute myeloid leukaemia; however, occurrence is extremely rare in accelerated phase of chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML. Seizure as presentation of SDH development in CML cases is not reported in literature. Authors report an elderly male, who was diagnosed as CML, accelerated phase of developing SDH. Initially presented to local physician with seizure; urgent CT scan head was advised, but ignored and sensorium rapidly worsened over next day and reported to our emergency department in deeply comatose state, where imaging revealed chronic subdural hematoma with hypoxic brain injury with fatal outcome. Seizure, progressive worsening of headache, vomiting and papilloedema are harbinger of intracranial space occupying lesion and requires CT head in emergency medical department for exclusion, who are receiving treatment of haematological malignancy

  9. Relationship between kidney burden and radiation dose from chronic ingestion of U: Implications for radiation standards for the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Metabolic models for U in adults recommended by Wrenn et al. (1985) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1979a) were used to study the relationship between kidney burden and radiation dose from chronic ingestion of soluble 238U or natural U and whether current radiation standards for the public provide adequate protection against chemical toxicity from U in the kidney. We assumed that the threshold concentration for chemical toxicity is 1 microgram of U g-1 of kidney and that a safety factor of 10 should be applied in limiting kidney burdens for maximally exposed individuals in the general public. We found that a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 1 mSv (0.1 rem) for chronic exposures of the public from all sources, as recommended by the ICRP (1985) and the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP 1987), corresponds to concentrations of U in the kidney from chronic ingestion that exceed the assumed threshold for chemical toxicity of 1 microgram g-1 only for 238U using the metabolic model of the ICRP (1979a). However, using either metabolic model (ICRP 1979a; Wrenn et al. 1985), the predicted concentrations of U in the kidney exceeded the limit of 0.1 microgram g-1, based on the assumed safety factor for protection of the public, for both 238U and natural U. From these results, we concluded that chemical toxicity should be considered in developing health protection standards for the public for ingestion of soluble 238U or natural U. Environmental radiation standards for certain practices established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (EPA 1987a, 1987b, 1987c, 1987d; NRC 1988a) are consistent with a limit on annual effective dose equivalent of 0.25 mSv (25 mrem) per practice. If the metabolic model of Wrenn et al. 27 references

  10. Modeling of radiation doses from chronic aqueous releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    A general model and corresponding computer code were developed to calculate personnel dose estimates from chronic releases via aqueous pathways. Potential internal dose pathways are consumption of water, fish, crustacean, and mollusk. Dose prediction from consumption of fish, crustacean, or mollusk is based on the calculated radionuclide content of the water and applicable bioaccumulation factor. 70-year dose commitments are calculated for whole body, bone, lower large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract, and six internal organs. In addition, the code identifies the largest dose contributor and the dose percentages for each organ-radionuclide combination in the source term. The 1974 radionuclide release data from the Savannah River Plant were used to evaluate the dose models. The dose predicted from the model was compared to the dose calculated from radiometric analysis of water and fish samples. The whole body dose from water consumption was 0.45 mrem calculated from monitoring data and 0.61 mrem predicted from the model. Tritium contributed 99 percent of this dose. The whole body dose from fish consumption was 0.20 mrem calculated from monitoring data and 0.14 mrem from the model. Cesium-134,137 was the principal contributor to the 70-year whole body dose from fish consumption

  11. Toxic agent and radiation control: progress toward objectives for the nation for the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rall, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    In 1980, the Department of Health and Human Services set national prevention objectives for 1990 in 15 health priority areas, 1 of which is the control of toxic agents and radiation. Ten objectives related to this area are priorities for the national control effort. Progress is reviewed on those priorities within the responsibilities of the Public Health Service. Six key program elements, or types of support activities, are deemed essential to preventing, identifying, and controlling toxic agent and radiation threats. Significant progress has been made toward achieving objectives for which all key program elements have been successfully implemented to provide the requisite know-how, manpower, and tools. Important advances have been made in reducing the blood lead levels of the population, reducing unnecessary exposure to medical X-rays, evaluating the toxicities of chemicals in toxic waste dumps, and improving the scientific and technical information base and its availability for prevention and control efforts. The most important priority for the forseeable future will be to expand our knowledge of potential health risks posed by toxic agents and radiation. Expanded surveillance systems and data bases are essential to determining the extent of the problems in terms of human health effects and for measuring the impact of prevention programs. Emphasis on the activities embodied in the key elements will encourage the expansion of the knowledge base and its effective application to prevention and control problems

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging may simulate progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia after fludarabine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalita J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old male with chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL after 6 months of fludarabine therapy was admitted with status epilepticus and developed left hemiplegia. His magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple T2 hyperintense lesions in the right frontal and left parieto-occipital lesion, simulating progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML. Cerebrospinal fluid Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR for JC virus was negative. We suggest the possible role of fludarabine in producing PML-like lesions in patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL.

  13. Analysis of chronic radiation exposure at small doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestinina, L.Y.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the late effects of radiation exposure among residents of settlements located on the territory of the East-Urals Radiation Trace (EURT) in the Southern Urals. In 1957 an explosion occurred at the depot of radioactive waste in the Southern Urals. An area of 23000 km 2 was contaminated, with contamination density of over 0.1 Ci/m 2 for 90 Sr. There were 217 populated ares on that territory with total population about 270000. The residents of 22 villages with contamination density of over 4 Ci/km 2 for 90 Sr were evacuated. The times of evacuation differed from 7 to 670 days since the accident, depending on the level of contamination. In 1988-1993 an individualized registry was created at the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM) which included information on the residents of 22 evacuated villages and a proportion of unevacuated residents of the EURT area. Currently, the registry contains data on 30000 residents. Of that number 17000 persons were born before, and 12000 after the accident (including about 9000 offspring of exposed residents evacuated from the EURT, and about 3000 persons who were born after the accident and have been living permanently in the EURT area). Over the 35-year period since the accident the residents have received mean effective doses ranging from 23 to 530 mSv. The mean effective doses received by permanent residents range from 5 to 60 mSv. The cohort of people exposed on the EURT territory was identified based on the information contained in the registry. If a person happened to be in the EURT area at the time of the accident, he/she was considered to be eligible for inclusion in the cohort. Over the 35-year period (from 1957 through 1992) 29.5% of 17872 residents died, and 35% of the original cohort were lost to follow-up for different reasons. To enable an analysis a control group was established which included residents of villages located outside, but close enough, to the EURT area

  14. Reaction of fresh water zooplankton community to chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipov, D.; Pryakhin, E. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine - URCRM (Russian Federation); Ivanov, I. [FSUE Mayak PA (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The characteristic features of ecological community as a whole and cenosis of zooplankton organisms as part of it determine the intensity of the processes of self-purification of water and the formation of a particular body of water. Identifying features of the structure and composition of the zooplankton community of aquatic ecosystems exposed to different levels of radiation exposure, it is necessary to identify patterns of changes in zooplankton and hydro-biocenosis as a whole. Industrial reservoirs, the storage of liquid low-level radioactive waste 'Mayak' for decades, have high radiation load. A large range of levels of radioactive contamination (total volume beta-activity in water varies from 2.2x10{sup 3} to 2.3x10{sup 7} Bq/l, total volume alpha-activity - from 2.6x10{sup -1} to 3.1x10{sup 3} Bq/l) provides a unique opportunity to study ecosystems in a number of reservoirs with increasing impact of radiation factor. We studied five reservoirs that were used as the storage of low-and intermediate-level liquid radioactive waste pond and one comparison water body. In parallel with zooplankton sampling water samples were collected for hydro-chemical analysis. 41 indicators were analysed in order to assess the water chemistry. To determine the content of radionuclides in the various components of the ecosystem samples were collected from water, bottom sediments and plankton. Sampling of zooplankton for the quantitative analysis was performed using the method of weighted average auto bathometer. Apshteyn's plankton net of the surface horizon was used for qualitative analysis of the species composition of zooplankton. Software package ERICA Assessment Tool 2012 was used for the calculation of the absorbed dose rate. Species diversity and biomass of zooplankton, the share of rotifers in the number of species, abundance and biomass decrease with the increase of the absorbed dose rate and salinity. The number of species in a sample decreases with the

  15. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report, November 1, 1977--October 31, 1978. [Uv and x radiation, bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: coordinate induction of mutagenesis, radioresistance, and inhibition of post-radiation DNA degradation; radioinduced filamentation; action spectrum for induction of K12 lambda phage; effects of uv radiation on cells in the frozen state; dependence of mutagenesis on wavelength of uv; and w-reactivation of x-irradiated phage lambda. (HLW)

  16. HIV-1 subtype C envelope characteristics associated with divergent rates of chronic disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goulder Philip JR

    2010-11-01

    is an important correlate of disease progression in chronic HIV-1 subtype C infection.

  17. The Chronic Kidney Disease Model: A General Purpose Model of Disease Progression and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Uptal D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is the focus of recent national policy efforts; however, decision makers must account for multiple therapeutic options, comorbidities and complications. The objective of the Chronic Kidney Disease model is to provide guidance to decision makers. We describe this model and give an example of how it can inform clinical and policy decisions. Methods Monte Carlo simulation of CKD natural history and treatment. Health states include myocardial infarction, stroke with and without disability, congestive heart failure, CKD stages 1-5, bone disease, dialysis, transplant and death. Each cycle is 1 month. Projections account for race, age, gender, diabetes, proteinuria, hypertension, cardiac disease, and CKD stage. Treatment strategies include hypertension control, diabetes control, use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, nephrology specialty care, CKD screening, and a combination of these. The model architecture is flexible permitting updates as new data become available. The primary outcome is quality adjusted life years (QALYs. Secondary outcomes include health state events and CKD progression rate. Results The model was validated for GFR change/year -3.0 ± 1.9 vs. -1.7 ± 3.4 (in the AASK trial, and annual myocardial infarction and mortality rates 3.6 ± 0.9% and 1.6 ± 0.5% vs. 4.4% and 1.6% in the Go study. To illustrate the model's utility we estimated lifetime impact of a hypothetical treatment for primary prevention of vascular disease. As vascular risk declined, QALY improved but risk of dialysis increased. At baseline, 20% and 60% reduction: QALYs = 17.6, 18.2, and 19.0 and dialysis = 7.7%, 8.1%, and 10.4%, respectively. Conclusions The CKD Model is a valid, general purpose model intended as a resource to inform clinical and policy decisions improving CKD care. Its value as a tool is illustrated in our example which projects a relationship between

  18. Sucralfate or placebo following argon plasma coagulation for chronic radiation proctitis: a randomized double blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruscielewska-Kiliszek, M R; Regula, J; Polkowski, M; Rupinski, M; Kraszewska, E; Pachlewski, J; Czaczkowska-Kurek, E; Butruk, E

    2013-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctitis is a long-term complication of radiation therapy for pelvic malignancy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of two treatment regimens, sucralfate or placebo, following argon plasma coagulation (APC) for chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis. A single-centre, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was performed on patients with haemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis after irradiation for prostate, uterine, cervical, rectal or vaginal cancer. All patients received APC, and were then randomized to oral sucralfate (6 g twice a day) or placebo treatment for 4 weeks. APC was repeated every 8 weeks if necessary after the first session. Patients were graded clinically and endoscopically according to the Chutkan and Gilinski scales before and at 8 and 16 weeks after initial APC treatment (1.5-2 l/min, 25-40 W) and after 52 weeks (clinical only). Of 122 patients, 117 completed the entire protocol, with 57/60 in the sucralfate group and 60/62 in the placebo group. At baseline there were no significant differences between the sucralfate and placebo groups. At 1 year, a significant improvement in the clinical scale in both groups occurred compared with baseline. After 16 weeks, the median overall clinical severity scores fell from 4 to 2 points and the median bleeding score from 2 to 0 in both groups. APC is safe and effective for the management of chronic radiation proctitis. Additional sucralfate treatment did not influence the clinical or endoscopic outcome. © 2012 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2012 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Total radiation dosage from X-ray examinations in rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic skeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldursson, H.; Gustafsson, M.

    1977-01-01

    Young patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic diseases of the skeleton are increasingly being operated on with replacement of major joints. The great number of associated X-ray examinations performed on these patients has caused some anxiety amongst orthopaedic surgeons. Two patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have been studied. An attempt was made to calculate the total radiation dose to bone marrow and gonads. For lack of recommendations for the maximum permissible radiation dose to patients, the dose calculated has been compared with the maximum permissible dose of radiation workers, and with the dose limit for non-occupational irradiation of individuals. The yearly absorbed dose in these two patients is much lower than the maximum permissible dose of radiation workers and only slightly higher than the dose limit for non-occupational exposure of individuals. (author)

  20. Progressive rise in red cell distribution width is associated with disease progression in ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauthen, Clay A; Tong, Wilson; Jain, Anil; Tang, W H Wilson

    2012-02-01

    Single red cell distribution width (RDW) assessment is a consistent prognostic marker of poor outcomes in heart failure as well as in other patient cohorts. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of sequential RDW assessment in ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure. We reviewed 6,159 consecutive ambulatory patients with chronic heart failure between 2001-2006 and examined changes in RDW values from baseline to 1-year follow-up. Clinical, demographic, laboratory, and ICD-9 coding data were extracted from electronic health records, and all-cause mortality was followed over a mean follow-up of 4.4 ± 2.4 years. In this study cohort, median baseline RDW was 14.9%. RDW >16% at baseline (18.5% of cohort) was associated with a higher mortality rates than RDW ≤16%. For each +1% increment of baseline RDW, the risk ratio for all-cause mortality was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15-1.19; P < .0001). At 12-month follow-up (n = 1,601), a large majority of subjects (68% in first tertile, 56% in second tertile of baseline RDW) showed rising RDW and correspondingly higher risk for all-cause mortality (risk ratio for +1% increase in changes in RDW was 1.08 (95% CI 1.03-1.13; P = .001). This effect was independent of anemia status or other baseline cardiac or renal indices, and particularly strong in those with lower baseline RDW. In our ambulatory cohort of patients with chronic heart failure, baseline and serial increases in RDW were associated with poor long-term outcomes independently from standard cardiac, hematologic, and renal indices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased frequency of CD8+ and CD4+ regulatory T cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: association with disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Yousefi, Mehdi; Memarian, Ali; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2013-02-01

    Little is known regarding the immunobiology of regulatory T (Treg) cells in hematopoietic malignancies, particularly in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In the present study, we showed that the frequencies of CD8(+) and CD4(+) Treg cells were significantly increased in progressive as compared with indolent CLL patients and normal subjects. Enriched CD4(+) Treg cells induced a similar level of inhibition in polyclonally activated B cells and effector T cells from CLL patients and normal subjects. Our results suggest that the increase in circulating Treg cells may result in downregulation of tumor-specific immune response, leading to tumor expansion and disease progression.

  2. Urinary uromodulin excretion predicts progression of chronic kidney disease resulting from IgA nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uromodulin, or Tamm-Horsfall protein, is the most abundant urinary protein in healthy individuals. Recent studies have suggested that uromodulin may play a role in chronic kidney diseases. We examined an IgA nephropathy cohort to determine whether uromodulin plays a role in the progression of IgA nephropathy. METHODS: A total of 344 IgA nephropathy patients were involved in this study. Morphological changes were evaluated with the Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA measured the urinary uromodulin level on the renal biopsy day. Follow up was done regularly on 185 patients. Time-average blood pressure, time-average proteinuria, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and eGFR decline rate were caculated. Association between the urinary uromodulin level and the eGFR decline rate was analyzed with SPSS 13.0. RESULTS: We found that lower baseline urinary uromodulin levels (P = 0.03 and higher time-average proteinuria (P = 0.04 were risk factors for rapid eGFR decline in a follow-up subgroup of the IgA nephropathy cohort. Urinary uromodulin level was correlated with tubulointerstitial lesions (P = 0.016. Patients that had more tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis on the surface had lower urinary uromodulin levels (P = 0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary uromodulin level is associated with interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy and contributes to eGFR decline in IgA nephropathy.

  3. Laboratory database population surveillance to improve detection of progressive chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David M; Chatha, Kamaljit; Rayner, Hugh C

    2013-09-01

    Some patients with chronic kidney disease are still referred late for specialist care despite the evidence that earlier detection and intervention can halt or delay progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). To develop a population surveillance system using existing laboratory data to enable early detection of patients at high risk of ESKD by reviewing cumulative graphs of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). A database was developed, updated daily with data from the laboratory computer. Cumulative eGFR graphs containing up to five years of data are reviewed by clinical scientists for all primary care patients or out-patients with a low eGFR for their age. For those with a declining trend, a report containing the eGFR graph is sent to the requesting doctor. A retrospective audit was performed using historical data to assess the predictive value of the graphs. In nine months, we reported 370,000 eGFR results, reviewing 12,000 eGFR graphs. On average 60 graphs per week were flagged as 'high' or 'intermediate' risk. Patients with graphs flagged as high risk had a significantly higher mortality after 3.5 years and a significantly greater chance of requiring renal replacement therapy after 4.5 years of follow-up. Five patients (7%) with graphs flagged as high risk had a sustained >25% fall in eGFR without evidence of secondary care referral. Feedback about the service from requesting clinicians was 73% positive. We have developed a system for laboratory staff to review cumulative eGFR graphs for a large population and identify patients at highest risk of developing ESKD. Further research is needed to measure the impact of this service on patient outcomes. © 2013 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  4. Progranulin is a novel independent predictor of disease progression and overall survival in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Göbel

    Full Text Available Progranulin (Pgrn is a 88 kDa secreted protein with pleiotropic functions including regulation of cell cycle progression, cell motility, wound repair and tumorigenesis. Using microarray based gene expression profiling we have recently demonstrated that the gene for Pgrn, granulin (GRN, is significantly higher expressed in aggressive CD38(+ZAP-70(+ as compared to indolent CD38(-ZAP-70(- chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL cases. Here, we measured Pgrn plasma concentrations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in the Essen CLL cohort of 131 patients and examined Pgrn for association with established prognostic markers and clinical outcome. We found that high Pgrn plasma levels were strongly associated with adverse risk factors including unmutated IGHV status, expression of CD38 and ZAP-70, poor risk cytogenetics (11q-, 17p- as detected by flourescence in situ hybridization (FISH and high Binet stage. Pgrn as well as the aforementioned risk factors were prognostic for time to first treatment and overall survival in this series. Importantly, these results could be confirmed in the independent multicentric CLL1 cohort of untreated Binet stage A patients (n = 163. Here, multivariate analysis of time to first treatment revealed that high risk Pgrn (HR = 2.06, 95%-CI = 1.13-3.76, p = 0.018, unmutated IGHV status (HR = 5.63, 95%-CI = 3.05-10.38, p<0.001, high risk as defined by the study protocol (HR = 2.06, 95%-CI = 1.09-3.89, p = 0.026 but not poor risk cytogenetics were independent prognostic markers. In summary our results suggest that Pgrn is a novel, robust and independent prognostic marker in CLL that can be easily measured by ELISA.

  5. Progranulin is a novel independent predictor of disease progression and overall survival in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Maria; Eisele, Lewin; Möllmann, Michael; Hüttmann, Andreas; Johansson, Patricia; Scholtysik, René; Bergmann, Manuela; Busch, Raymonde; Döhner, Hartmut; Hallek, Michael; Seiler, Till; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Dührsen, Ulrich; Dürig, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Progranulin (Pgrn) is a 88 kDa secreted protein with pleiotropic functions including regulation of cell cycle progression, cell motility, wound repair and tumorigenesis. Using microarray based gene expression profiling we have recently demonstrated that the gene for Pgrn, granulin (GRN), is significantly higher expressed in aggressive CD38(+)ZAP-70(+) as compared to indolent CD38(-)ZAP-70(-) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cases. Here, we measured Pgrn plasma concentrations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the Essen CLL cohort of 131 patients and examined Pgrn for association with established prognostic markers and clinical outcome. We found that high Pgrn plasma levels were strongly associated with adverse risk factors including unmutated IGHV status, expression of CD38 and ZAP-70, poor risk cytogenetics (11q-, 17p-) as detected by flourescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and high Binet stage. Pgrn as well as the aforementioned risk factors were prognostic for time to first treatment and overall survival in this series. Importantly, these results could be confirmed in the independent multicentric CLL1 cohort of untreated Binet stage A patients (n = 163). Here, multivariate analysis of time to first treatment revealed that high risk Pgrn (HR = 2.06, 95%-CI = 1.13-3.76, p = 0.018), unmutated IGHV status (HR = 5.63, 95%-CI = 3.05-10.38, p<0.001), high risk as defined by the study protocol (HR = 2.06, 95%-CI = 1.09-3.89, p = 0.026) but not poor risk cytogenetics were independent prognostic markers. In summary our results suggest that Pgrn is a novel, robust and independent prognostic marker in CLL that can be easily measured by ELISA.

  6. Outcome of Ptosis Surgery in Patients with Chronic Progressive External Ophthalmoplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeyda Uğurlu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the clinical features and the outcome of ptosis surgery in patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO. Materials and Methods: The demographic features, surgical approaches, anatomic and functional outcomes, and complications were reviewed in patients with CPEO who had undergone ptosis surgery by a single surgeon between the years 2005 and 2013. The patients were asked to evaluate their postoperative result as either worse, no change, good, or very good. Results: Seven men and 5 women with an average age of 50±14.08 years (range: 28-72 were included in the study. Ragged red fibers (RRF were identified in 5 out of 9 patients’ levator and orbicularis muscle biopsy specimens. Average levator function was 5.4±2.6 mm (range: 2-9. Frontalis suspension surgery with silicone rod was performed in 8 patients; two of those 8 patients had lower lid elevation with hard palate graft prior to ptosis surgery. The remaining 4 patients had levator resection. Postoperative margin reflex distance -1 was between +1 and +3 in all patients. One patient had punctate keratopathy following surgery, which responded rapidly to intensive use of lubricants. Head position was improved in all patients; postoperative result was rated ‘very good’. Conclusion: Eyelid elevation must be tailored to result in sufficient interpalpebral area so as to allow for normal visual function and avoid exposure keratopathy. Lower eyelid elevation with hard palate graft may help to achieve this goal by displacing the interpalpebral area superiorly without introducing additional risk for corneal exposure. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 379-83

  7. The role of interstitial changes in the progression of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Sulikowska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Interstitium – the renal tubulointerstitial compartment – is located between the renal tubule basement membrane and microcirculation vessels. Interstitial fibroblasts produce the extracellular matrix and constitute the structure’s cellular skeleton, regulating spatial relationships between its components (microenvironment.The tubular epithelium and endothelium cooperate within an integrated microenvironment. Structural or functional impairment of the extracellular matrix, microcirculation vessels or tubular epithelium results in disturbances of tubulointerstitial compartment components.In the course of glomerular kidney diseases, the intrarenal RAA system becomes activated and inflammatory mediators are released. Interstitial inflammation and microcirculatory disorders develop, inducing adverse consequences, manifested mainly through the process of hypoxia and inflammation.Inflammation-induced increase in interleukin-1 (TNF-α expression leads to increased concentrations of VEGF, ICAM-1, angiotensin II, IL-6 and IL-8. Cytokines activate fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells. Fibrosis is also triggered by HIF-1alpha pathway activation, resulting in vascular growth and fibroblast proliferation. This reaction likewise occurs through activation of NF-ĸβ, EPO, GLUT-1, IGF-1 and INOS.Interstitial fibrosis is one of the factors determining the clinical course of kidney diseases. Apart from inducing fibrosis, microcirculatory disorders lead to the progression of hypoxia.Angiogenesis is a part of the repair process accompanying fibrosis. Its determinant is the normal function and structure of endothelial cells manifested by their ability to migrate and proliferate in response to, inter alia, angiopoietins, VEGF and nitric oxide synthase.Administering a three-drug RAAS-inhibiting therapy to patients with chronic glomerulopathies improves tubular function, measured by the decrease in excretion of NAG and propeptide of type III

  8. [Salt intake and the progression of renal failure in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaha, Mayuko; Ohashi, Yasushi; Sakai, Ken; Aikawa, Atsushi; Mizuiri, Sonoo

    2010-01-01

    Salt intake not only elevates the levels of blood pressure, glomerular capillary pressure and proteinuria, but also increases oxidative stress within the renal cortex in animal models. We examined the effect of salt intake on the rate of renal function decline, urinary protein and oxidative stress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical data including systolic blood pressure (SBP)and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), serum creatinine, uric acid, total cholesterol, triglyceride, urinary protein, salt intake, protein intake of non-diabetic CKD 53 patients were observed for one year. At the end of the observation period, we measured 8-hydroxydeoxy guanosine (8-OHdG) in spot urine. We calculated the slope of reciprocal serum creatinine as the rate of renal function decline (delta1/Cr). We then investigated the relationship between those clinical factors and delta1/Cr, and urinary 8-OHdG, and also selected clinical factors that significantly influence delta1/Cr and urinary 8-OHdG by stepwise multiple regression analysis. In addition, we investigated the gender difference in urinary 8-OHdG. Annual mean SBP and DBP of all patients were 121.5 +/- 9.3 mmHg and 72.5+/- 6.2 mmHg, respectively. delta1/Cr was negatively correlated with salt intake, urinary protein and urinary protein was a significant predictor of delta1/Cr in a multiple regression analysis. Salt intake was positively correlated with protein intake and urinary protein. Urinary 8-OHdG of all patients was positively correlated with urinary protein and it was a significant predictor. Urinary 8-OHdG of male patients was positively correlated with salt intake and was a significant predictor; in female patients, it was positively correlated with urinary protein and total cholesterol and these two factors were significant predictors. Salt intake increases urinary protein and promotes the progression of renal failure in CKD patients.

  9. Chronic myeloid leukemia and its induction by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubek, S.; Lukasova, E.; Kozubek, M.; Bartova, E.; Skalnikova, M.; Kroha, V.

    1998-01-01

    Physical distance can play an important role in the process leading to the translocations that are responsible for oncogenic transformation of cells. Thus, e.g., one of the reasons of a high incidence of ABL/BCR fusion may be the physical closeness of ABL and BCR genes in cells. The average distance of ABL-BCR genes in interphase lymphocytes is only 24% of the nuclear radius; after stimulation, this distance increases to 35%. The mean value for randomly distributed genes in a sphere is 43%. This means that the mutual distance of the critical genes is largely smaller than the random distance. The distance between chromosomes 9 and 22 in prometaphase plates (rosettes) of human fibroblasts was also investigated. In many prometaphase rosettes, each copy of chromosome 9 was located near a copy of chromosome 22 and the pairs were located on opposite sides of the plate. Thus both in the interphase and in mitosis, the distance between ABL and BCR genes, located in chromosomes 9 and 22, is substantially shorter than the random value. This contributes to the observed incidence of leukemia. The positions of ABL and BCR genes in irradiated and stimulated lymphocytes are shifted to the centre of the nucleus. They are closer to each other, and also the distances between heterologous ABL and BCR genes are shorter. In 15% of the cell nuclei irradiated with gamma rays (5 Gy), the volume in which the genes appear is 6 times smaller than in control nuclei. Hence, the probability of interaction between ABL and CBR genes increases 6 2 x 0.15 = 5.4 times. Thus, radiation increases substantially the probability of induction of leukemia not only through DNA damage but also due to changes in the chromatin structure in irradiated cells, which concentrates the critical genes in a relatively small volume

  10. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1980-09-01

    In this project several mechanisms are proposed for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA, and a series of experiments detailed utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. Under current investigation are irradiated systems of DNA constituents which may shed light on indirect effects. In addition, studies of radiation effects on lipids have been undertaken which will shed light on the only other proposed site for cell kill, the membrane. Studies completed during the past year are: (1) π cations produced in DNA bases by attack of oxidizing radicals; (2) INDO studies of radicals produced in peptides and carboxylic acid model compounds; (3) electron reactions with carboxylic acids, ketones and aldehydes; and (4) γ-irradiation of esters and triglycerides. Progress has been made this year in a study of radicals generated in model compounds for the sugar-phosphate backbone

  11. Radiation and biophysical studies on cells and viruses. Progress report, February 29, 1974--March 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, A.

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: sedimentation analysis of chromosome components from interphase and mitotic chromosomes; electron microscopy of mitotic chromosomes; radiosensitive site analysis using short range particle beams; studies on nucleoproteins and DNA; RBE and OER for double strand breaks and single strand breaks of DNA irradiated with 241 Am alpha particles; use of 241 Am alpha particle track-ends to study the location of radiosensitive sites; gamma irradiation of nucleoprotein model systems; assembly of new equipment for the analysis of DNA size distributions; cell rejoining of DNA breaks induced by various radiations; studies on cell transformation induced by gamma radiation; localization of cellular sites for DNA breakage using labeled specific antibodies; and semiconductor properties of melanins related to preferential killing of melanoma cells. (U.S.)

  12. The role of cell progression in potentiation of radiation lethality by hyperthermia and by chemical means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, B.; Lange, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    Aerobic stationary dense cultures of HeLa cells show very little potentiation of radiation lethality when irradiated cells are incubated with procaine HCl for two hours at 37 0 C, but if cells are diluted in fresh medium after irradiation and incubated for two hours with procaine, a high degree of radiopotentiation is obtained. This effect is not cell density dependent, since the addition of heavily irradiated cells to achieve comparable densities did not diminish lethality in the diluted culture. Procaine radiopotentiation at 37 0 C could be prevented by simultaneous administration with procaine of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Since cycloheximide inhibits cell cycle progression (with block points in G1 and G2) progression is strongly implicated in the phenomenon of radiopotentiation. Cell progression may be also involved in hyperthermic radiopotentiation: adding cycloheximide during heating of irradiated cells at 41 0 C for two hours increased survival. This effect of cycloheximide is even more pronounced in cells also treated with procaine during heating, thus diminishing the interaction of heat and procaine in radiopotentiation. Data pertaining to cell progression in synchronous cultures of HeLa cells under various treatment conditions are presented and discussed

  13. Malignant transformation of oral lichen planus by a chronic inflammatory process. Use of topical corticosteroids to prevent this progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Rey, Eva Maria; Suarez-Alen, Fatima; Peñamaria-Mallon, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Jose; Blanco-Carrion, Andres

    2014-11-01

    Oral lichen planus is a potentially malignant disorder with a capacity, although low, for malignant transformation. Of all the factors related to the process of malignant transformation, it is believed that the chronic inflammatory process plays a key role in the development of oral cancer. This inflammatory process is capable of providing a microenvironment based on different inflammatory cells and molecules that affect cellular growth, proliferation and differentiation. The objectives of our study are: to review the available evidence about the possible relationship between the chronic inflammatory process present in oral lichen planus and its malignant transformation, to discuss the potential therapeutic implications derived from this relationship and to study the role that topical corticosteroids play in the control of oral lichen planus inflammation and its possible progression to malignant transformation. The maintenance of a minimum dose of topical corticosteroids could prevent the inflammatory progression of oral lichen planus to oral cancer.

  14. Chronic radiation effects on dental hard tissue (''radiation carries''). Classification and therapeutic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groetz, K.A.; Brahm, R.; Al-Nawas, B.; Wagner, W.; Riesenbeck, D.; Willich, N.; Seegenschmiedt, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: Since the first description of rapid destruction of dental hard tissues following head and neck radiotherapy 80 years ago, 'radiation caries' is an established clinical finding. The internationally accepted clinical evaluation score RTOG/EORTC however is lacking a classification of this frequent radiogenic alteration. Material and Methods: Medical records, data and images of radiation effects on the teeth of more than 1,500 patients, who underwent periradiotherapeutic care, were analyzed. Macroscopic alterations regarding the grade of late lesions of tooth crowns were used for a classification into 4 grades according to the RTOG/EORTC guidelines. Results: No early radiation effects were found by macroscopic inspection. In the first 90 days following radiotherapy 1/3 of the patients complained of reversible hypersensitivity, which may be related to a temporary hyperemia of the pulp. It was possible to classify radiation caries as a late radiation effect on a graded scale as known from RTOG/EORTC for other organ systems. This is a prerequisite for the integration of radiation caries into the international nomenclature of the RTOG/EORTC classification. Conclusions: The documentation of early radiation effects on dental hard tissues seems to be neglectable. On the other hand the documentation of late radiation effects has a high clinical impact. The identification of an initial lesion at the high-risk areas of the neck and incisal part of the tooth can lead to a successful therapy as a major prerequisite for orofacial rehabilitation. An internationally standardized documentation is a basis for the evaluation of the side effects of radiooncotic therapy as well as the effectiveness of protective and supportive procedures. (orig.) [de

  15. Comparison of the cytological effects produced by ionizing radiations of different LET. Progress report, March 1974--April 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, E.F. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: RBE of neutrons and x radiation for effects on rat lens epithelium; effects of x radiation on tumor cell transplants in mice; effects of fast neutrons on ascites tumors; the sparing effect of dose fractionation in the wounded rat lens; and DNA synthesis in wounded rat lens at various times after irradiation. (U.S.)

  16. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report, November 1, 1977--October 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: coordinate induction of mutagenesis, radioresistance, and inhibition of post-radiation DNA degradation; radioinduced filamentation; action spectrum for induction of K12 lambda phage; effects of uv radiation on cells in the frozen state; dependence of mutagenesis on wavelength of uv; and w-reactivation of x-irradiated phage lambda

  17. A research program on radiative, chemical, and dynamical feedback progresses influencing the carbon dioxide and trace gases climate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This report summarizes the up-to-date progress. The program includes two tasks: atmospheric radiation and climatic effects and their objective is to link quantitatively the radiation forcing changes and the climate responses caused by increasing greenhouse gases. Here, the objective and approach are described. We investigate the combined atmospheric radiation characteristics of the greenhouse gases (H 2 O, CO 2 , CH 4 , N 2 O, CFCs, and O 3 ), aerosols and clouds. Since the climatic effect of increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases is initiated by perturabtion to the longwave thermal radiation, it is critical to understand better the radiation characteristics of the greenhouse gases and their relationship to radiatively-important aerosols and clouds; the latter reflect solar radiation (a cooling of the surface) and provide a greenhouse effect (a warming to the surface). Therefore, aerosol and cloud particles are an integral part of the radiation field in the atmosphere. 9 refs

  18. Salivary pathogen and serum antibody to assess the progression of chronic periodontitis: a 24-mo prospective multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozumi, T; Nakagawa, T; Nomura, Y; Sugaya, T; Kawanami, M; Suzuki, F; Takahashi, K; Abe, Y; Sato, S; Makino-Oi, A; Saito, A; Takano, S; Minabe, M; Nakayama, Y; Ogata, Y; Kobayashi, H; Izumi, Y; Sugano, N; Ito, K; Sekino, S; Numabe, Y; Fukaya, C; Yoshinari, N; Fukuda, M; Noguchi, T; Kono, T; Umeda, M; Fujise, O; Nishimura, F; Yoshimura, A; Hara, Y; Nakamura, T; Noguchi, K; Kakuta, E; Hanada, N; Takashiba, S; Yoshie, H

    2016-12-01

    A diagnosis of periodontitis progression is presently limited to clinical parameters such as attachment loss and radiographic imaging. The aim of this multicenter study was to monitor disease progression in patients with chronic periodontitis during a 24-mo follow-up program and to evaluate the amount of bacteria in saliva and corresponding IgG titers in serum for determining the diagnostic usefulness of each in indicating disease progression and stability. A total of 163 patients with chronic periodontitis who received trimonthly follow-up care were observed for 24 mo. The clinical parameters and salivary content of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were assessed using the modified Invader PLUS assay, and the corresponding serum IgG titers were measured using ELISA. The changes through 24 mo were analyzed using cut-off values calculated for each factor. One-way ANOVA or Fisher's exact test was used to perform between-group comparison for the data collected. Diagnostic values were calculated using Fisher's exact test. Of the 124 individuals who completed the 24-mo monitoring phase, 62 exhibited periodontitis progression, whereas 62 demonstrated stable disease. Seven patients withdrew because of acute periodontal abscess. The ratio of P. gingivalis to total bacteria and the combination of P. gingivalis counts and IgG titers against P. gingivalis were significantly related to the progression of periodontitis. The combination of P. gingivalis ratio and P. gingivalis IgG titers was significantly associated with the progression of periodontitis (p = 0.001, sensitivity = 0.339, specificity = 0.790). It is suggested that the combination of P. gingivalis ratio in saliva and serum IgG titers against P. gingivalis may be associated with the progression of periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Progression of recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis: A short-term follow up study from a southern Indian centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, M Ganesh; Pai, C Ganesh; Kamath, Asha

    2016-11-01

    Little data exist on the progression of recurrent acute (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) from regions from where the entity of tropical chronic pancreatitis was originally described. The study aimed to follow up patients with RAP and CP seen at a southern Indian centre for progression of disease over time. Prospectively enrolled patients with RAP and CP were followed up, and the alcoholic and idiopathic subgroups were assessed for progression of structural and functional changes in the organ. One hundred and forty patients (RAP = 44; 31.4 %, CP = 96; 68.5 %) were followed up over a median 12.2 (interquartile range 12.0-16.8) months. The cause was alcohol in 31 (22.1 %) and not evident in 109 (77.8 %). The disease progressed from RAP to CP in 7 (15.9 %), 6 (16.2 %) out of 37 in the idiopathic and 1 (14.2 %; p = 1.00) out of 7 in the alcoholic subgroups. Three (42.8 %) and 1 (14.2 %) developed steatorrhea and diabetes mellitus (DM), respectively, and 2 (4.5 %) developed calcification. Established CP progressed in 19 (19.7 %), 1 (1.0 %), 5 (5.2 %), 2 (2.0 %) and 11 (11.4 %) newly developed DM, steatorrhea, calcification and duct dilation during follow up. Among the idiopathic and alcoholic CP, disease progression was seen in 15 (20.8 %) out of 72 and 4 (16.6 %) out of 24 respectively. Idiopathic RAP and CP progressed during the short-term follow up. This is similar to other etiological forms of pancreatitis, as described from elsewhere in the world.

  20. Microbial cells can cooperate to resist high-level chronic ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Shuryak, Igor; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Tkavc, Rok; Grichenko, Olga; Klimenkova, Polina; Volpe, Robert P.; Daly, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding chronic ionizing radiation (CIR) effects is of utmost importance to protecting human health and the environment. Diverse bacteria and fungi inhabiting extremely radioactive waste and disaster sites (e.g. Hanford, Chernobyl, Fukushima) represent new targets of CIR research. We show that many microorganisms can grow under intense gamma-CIR dose rates of 13–126 Gy/h, with fungi identified as a particularly CIR-resistant group of eukaryotes: among 145 phylogenetically diverse strain...

  1. The role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system genes in the progression of chronic kidney disease: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Tanika N; Raj, Dominic; Rahman, Mahboob; Kretzler, Matthias; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Ricardo, Ana C; Rosas, Sylvia E; Tao, Kaixiang; Xie, Dawei; Hamm, Lotuce Lee; He, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    We conducted single-marker, gene- and pathway-based analyses to examine the association between renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) variants and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression among Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study participants. A total of 1523 white and 1490 black subjects were genotyped for 490 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 12 RAAS genes as part of the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array. CKD progression phenotypes included decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over time and the occurrence of a renal disease event, defined as incident end-stage renal disease or halving of eGFR from baseline. Mixed-effects models were used to examine SNP associations with eGFR decline, while Cox proportional hazards models tested SNP associations with renal events. Gene- and pathway-based analyses were conducted using the truncated product method. All analyses were stratified by race, and a Bonferroni correction was applied to adjust for multiple testing. Among white and black participants, eGFR declined an average of 1.2 and 2.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/year, respectively, while renal events occurred in a respective 11.5 and 24.9% of participants. We identified strong gene- and pathway-based associations with CKD progression. The AGT and RENBP genes were consistently associated with risk of renal events in separate analyses of white and black participants (both P renal events in both groups (both P < 1.00 × 10(-6)). No single-marker associations with CKD progression were observed. The current study provides strong evidence for a role of the RAAS in CKD progression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera: I. clinical features, hematology, histology, and immunopathology in long-term chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical features, pathology, and immunopathology of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developing in the long-term rat radiation chimera are described. At 6 to 12 months post-transplant, the previously stable ACI/LEW chimeras developed patchy to diffuse severe hair loss and thickened skin folds, and had microscopic features resembling scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis. Skin histology showed dermal inflammation and acanthosis with atrophy of the appendages, with progression to dermal sclerosis. The liver revealed chronic hepatitis with bile duct injury and proliferation and periportal piecemeal necrosis. The tongue had considerable submucosal inflammation, muscular necrosis, and atrophy and arteritis. The serous salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and bronchi had lymphocytic inflammation and injury to duct, acinar, and mucosal columnar epithelium. The thymus had lymphocyte depletion of the medulla with prominent epithelium. The spleen and lymph nodes had poorly developed germinal centers but increased numbers of plasma cells. IgM was observed along the basement membrane and around the basal cells of the skin and tongue and along the basement membrane of the bile ducts. IgM was present also in the arteries of the tongue. Immunoglobulins eluted from the skin, cross-reacted with the bile duct epithelium and usually with both ACI and Lewis skin. Increased titers of speckled antinuclear antibodies were present in the serum of rats with chronic (GVHD). Chronic GVHD in the long-term rat radiation chimera is very similar to human chronic GVHD and is a potentially excellent model for autoimmune disorders including scleroderma, Sjorgren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis

  3. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera: I. clinical features, hematology, histology, and immunopathology in long-term chimeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1982-04-01

    The clinical features, pathology, and immunopathology of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developing in the long-term rat radiation chimera are described. At 6 to 12 months post-transplant, the previously stable ACI/LEW chimeras developed patchy to diffuse severe hair loss and thickened skin folds, and had microscopic features resembling scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis. Skin histology showed dermal inflammation and acanthosis with atrophy of the appendages, with progression to dermal sclerosis. The liver revealed chronic hepatitis with bile duct injury and proliferation and periportal piecemeal necrosis. The tongue had considerable submucosal inflammation, muscular necrosis, and atrophy and arteritis. The serous salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and bronchi had lymphocytic inflammation and injury to duct, acinar, and mucosal columnar epithelium. The thymus had lymphocyte depletion of the medulla with prominent epithelium. The spleen and lymph nodes had poorly developed germinal centers but increased numbers of plasma cells. IgM was observed along the basement membrane and around the basal cells of the skin and tongue and along the basement membrane of the bile ducts. IgM was present also in the arteries of the tongue. Immunoglobulins eluted from the skin, cross-reacted with the bile duct epithelium and usually with both ACI and Lewis skin. Increased titers of speckled antinuclear antibodies were present in the serum of rats with chronic (GVHD). Chronic GVHD in the long-term rat radiation chimera is very similar to human chronic GVHD and is a potentially excellent model for autoimmune disorders including scleroderma, Sjorgren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis.

  4. A model of hemo-immunopoietic system adaptation to chronic low and intermediate radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibkova, D.Z.; Andreeva, O.G.; Efimova, N.V.; Akleev, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper radiobiological conformities to natural laws of mice's hemoimmunopoiesis systems (lines CBA and C 57 Bl/6) were investigated upon chronic internal with lowering power doses of β- irradiation 90 Sr and external γ-irradiation with constant power. It was shown that determinative effects of long chronic irradiation become apparent upon development of chronic radioactive effect for experimental animals were observed upon γ-irradiation with power 6 cGy/day and more or under internal with lowering power dose of β-irradiation 90 Sr introduced in concentration above 1.1 c Bq/g, that is correlated with appreciations of other author's made before, concerning 'critical' level of power doses for hemopoietic system. It was shown that reduction of medium length of animals' life correlates with dis-balance into a system and between systems' links of immuno- and hemopoiesis. Physiological balance of those systems was supplied genetically by determinative systems of sanogenesis, responded for forming adaptive processes in organism. Characteristics of positive and negative inter and outward systems' links, induced by additional radiation exposure and noticeably modified constitutive regulative mechanisms being before were made more exact. A model for adaptation of hemoimmunopoiesis system to chronic radiation exposure in a rate of low and intermediate power doses was modeled. A possibility of full or part regeneration of hemopoiesis depending on power dose and kind of irradiation was experimentally substantiated. (author)

  5. High serum bicarbonate level within the normal range prevents the progression of chronic kidney disease in elderly chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanda Eiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic acidosis leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD progression. The guidelines recommend a lower limit of serum bicarbonate level, but no upper limit. For serum bicarbonate level to be clinically useful as a therapeutic target marker, it is necessary to investigate the target serum bicarbonate level within the normal range to prevent CKD progression. Methods One hundred and thirteen elderly CKD patients, whose serum bicarbonate level was controlled within the normal range, were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study in Ibaraki, Japan. Outcome was defined as a decrease of 25% or more in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR or starting dialysis. We used Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for patients’ characteristics to examine the association between serum bicarbonate level and the outcome. Results Female patients were 36.3%: average age (SD, 70.4 (6.6 years; eGFR, 25.7 (13.6 ml/min/1.73 m2; serum bicarbonate level, 27.4 (3.2 mEq/l. Patients with the lowest quartile of serum bicarbonate levels [23.4 (1.8 mEq/l] showed a high risk of CKD progression compared with patients with high serum bicarbonate levels [28.8 (2.3 mEq/l]: adjusted hazard ratio (HR, 3.511 (95% CI, 1.342-9.186. A 1 mEq/l increase in serum bicarbonate level was associated with a low risk of CKD progression: adjusted HR, 0.791 [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.684-0.914]. Conclusions In elderly CKD patients, our findings suggest that serum bicarbonate level is independently associated with CKD progression, and that a high serum bicarbonate level is associated with a low risk of CKD progression. A high target serum bicarbonate level within the normal range may be effective for preventing CKD progression.

  6. Acoustic backscattering and radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane progressive waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a formal analytical theory using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates, to calculate the acoustic backscattering form function as well as the radiation force-per-length on an infinitely long elliptical (non-circular) cylinder in plane progressive waves. The major (or minor) semi-axis of the ellipse coincides with the direction of the incident waves. The scattering coefficients for the rigid elliptical cylinder are determined by imposing the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface and solving a resulting system of linear equations by matrix inversion. The present method, which utilizes standard cylindrical (Bessel and Hankel) wave functions, presents an advantage over the solution for the scattering that is ordinarily expressed in a basis of elliptical Mathieu functions (which are generally non-orthogonal). Furthermore, an integral equation showing the direct connection of the radiation force function with the square of the scattering form function in the far-field from the scatterer (applicable for plane waves only), is noted and discussed. An important application of this integral equation is the adequate evaluation of the radiation force function from a bistatic measurement (i.e., in the polar plane) of the far-field scattering from any 2D object of arbitrary shape. Numerical predictions are evaluated for the acoustic backscattering form function and the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density, and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb, without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation, acousto-fluidics and particle dynamics applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of a Disposable Sterile Radiation Shield on Operator Radiation Exposure During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention of Chronic Total Occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorrock, Deborah; Christopoulos, Georgios; Wosik, Jedrek; Kotsia, Anna; Rangan, Bavana; Abdullah, Shuaib; Cipher, Daisha; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2015-07-01

    Daily radiation exposure over many years can adversely impact the health of medical professionals. Operator radiation exposure was recorded for 124 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) performed at our institution between August 2011 and May 2013: 69 were chronic total occlusion (CTO)-PCIs and 55 were non-CTO PCIs. A disposable radiation protection sterile drape (Radpad; Worldwide Innovations & Technologies, Inc) was used in all CTO-PCI cases vs none of the non-CTO PCI cases. Operator radiation exposure was compared between CTO and non-CTO PCIs. Mean age was 64.6 ± 6.2 years and 99.2% of the patients were men. Compared with non-CTO PCI, patients undergoing CTO-PCI were more likely to have congestive heart failure, to be current smokers, and to have longer lesions, and less likely to have prior PCI and a saphenous vein graft target lesion. CTO-PCI cases had longer procedural time (median: 123 minutes [IQR, 85-192 minutes] vs 27 minutes [IQR, 20-44 minutes]; P<.001), fluoroscopy time (35 minutes [IQR, 19-54 minutes] vs 8 minutes [IQR, 5-16 minutes]; P<.001), number of stents placed (2.4 ± 1.5 vs 1.7 ± 0.9; P<.001), and patient air kerma radiation exposure (3.92 Gray [IQR, 2.48-5.86 Gray] vs 1.22 Gray [IQR, 0.74-1.90 Gray]; P<.001), as well as dose area product (267 Gray•cm² [IQR, 163-4.25 Gray•cm²] vs 84 Gray•cm² [IQR, 48-138 Gray•cm²]; P<.001). In spite of higher patient radiation exposure, operator radiation exposure was similar between the two groups (20 μSv [IQR, 9.5-31 μSv] vs 15 μSv [IQR, 7-23 μSv]; P=.07). Operator radiation exposure during CTO-PCI can be reduced to levels similar to less complicated cases with the use of a disposable sterile radiation protection shield.

  8. Predictors of estimated glomerular filtration rate progression, stabilization or improvement after chronic renal impairment in HIV-positive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryom, Lene; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this analysis were to investigate predictors of progression, stabilization or improvement in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after development of chronic renal impairment (CRI) in HIV-positive individuals. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. METHODS......: The Data Collection on Adverse events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study participants progressing to CRI defined as confirmed, at least 3 months apart, and eGFR 70 ml/min per 1.73 m or less were included in the analysis. The median of all eGFRs measured 24-36 months post-CRI was compared with the median e......GFR defining CRI, and changes were grouped into improvement (>+10 ml/min per 1.73 m), stabilization (-10 to +10 ml/min per 1.73 m) and progression (

  9. A microsimulation model for the development and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.; Boessen, R.; Fishwick, D.; Klein Entink, R.H.; Meijster, T.; Pronk, A.; Van Duuren-Stuurman, B.; Warren, N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that is thought to affect over one million people in Great Britain. The main factor contributing to the development of COPD is tobacco smoke. This paper presents a microsimulation model for the development of COPD, incorporating

  10. A microsimulation model for the development and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.; Boessen, R.; Fishwick, D.; Klein Entink, R.; Meijster, T.; Pronk, A.; Duuren-Stuurman, B. van; Warren, N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that is thought to affect over one million people in Great Britain. The main factor contributing to the development of COPD is tobacco smoke. This paper presents a microsimulation model for the development of COPD, incorporating

  11. Chronic kidney disease progression: a retrospective analysis of 3-year adherence to a low protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetto, Felipe; Leal, Viviane de Oliveira; Bastos, Leonardo Soares; Fouque, Denis; Mafra, Denise

    2017-11-01

    The potential benefits and dangers of dietary protein restriction in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are still controversial. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of low protein diet (LPD) on the renal function in nondialysis CKD patients. A retrospective study was conducted from 321 nondialysis CKD patient's medical files (65.1 ± 12.7 yrs, 58.2% men). These patients received individualized dietary protein prescription (0.6-0.8 g protein/kg/day). Protein intake was evaluated by food diary and 24 h-food recall. Adherence to the LPD was considered when patients intake from 90 to 110% of the prescribed amount of protein. The patients were divided into 4 groups: (G1) adherent diabetes mellitus (DM) patients (n = 83); (G2) non-adherent DM patients (n = 106); (G3) adherent non-DM patients (n = 75); (G4) non-adherent non-DM patients (n = 57). Renal function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Both groups of patients (DM and non-DM) that adhered to the LPD showed significant improvement in eGFR (G1: 38.7 ± 13.2 mL/min to 51.1 ± 17.0 mL/min (p patients, no differences in albumin and BMI were observed at the end of follow up. In non-adherent patients, eGFR significantly decreased in DM group (G2: 44.2 ± 18.5 mL/min to 38.2 ± 15.8 mL/min (p = 0.003)). According to multivariate analysis, annual changes in eGFR were not independent associated with age, gender, BMI, lipid profile, bicarbonate or smoking status. In summary, adherence to low protein diet could be able to improve serum creatinine and eGFR, well-known markers of renal function. However, prospective studies are needed to control confounders which affect renal function and CKD progression.

  12. Less contribution of mast cells to the progression of renal fibrosis in Rat kidneys with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Asuka; Tachi, Masahiro; Ejima, Yutaka; Endo, Yasuhiro; Toyama, Hiroaki; Saito, Kazutomo; Abe, Nozomu; Yamauchi, Masanori; Miura, Chieko; Kazama, Itsuro

    2017-02-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is histopathologically characterized by tubulointerstitial fibrosis in addition to glomerulosclerosis. Although mast cells are known to infiltrate into the kidneys with chronic inflammation, we know little about their contribution to the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis associated with CRF. The aim of this study was to reveal the involvement of mast cells in the progression of renal fibrosis in CRF. Using a rat model with CRF resulting from 5/6 nephrectomy, we examined the histopathological features of the kidneys and the infiltration of mast cells into the renal interstitium. By treating the rats with a potent mast cell stabilizer, tranilast, we also examined the involvement of mast cells in the progression of renal fibrosis associated with CRF. The CRF rat kidneys were characterized by the wide staining of collagen III and increased number of myofibroblasts, indicating the progression of renal fibrosis. Compared to T-lymphocytes or macrophages, the number of tryptase-positive mast cells was much smaller within the fibrotic kidneys and they did not proliferate in situ. The mRNA expression of mast cell-derived fibroblast-activating factors was not increased in the renal cortex isolated from CRF rat kidneys. Treatment with tranilast did not suppress the progression of renal fibrosis, nor did it ameliorate the progression of glomerulosclerosis and the interstitial proliferation of inflammatory leukocytes. This study demonstrated for the first time that mast cells are neither increased nor activated in the fibrotic kidneys of CRF rats. Compared to T-lymphocytes or macrophages that proliferate in situ within the fibrotic kidneys, mast cells were less likely to contribute to the progression of renal fibrosis associated with CRF. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  13. Progressive behavioral changes in rats after exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation in utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, S.; Kimler, B.F.; Mullenix, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on the developing brain may be not only prolonged but progressive. Fetuses were exposed to 0.75 Gy of ionizing radiation on gestational day 15 through whole body exposure of the pregnant rat. Three behavioral tests (gait analysis, continuous corridor activity and photographic analysis of sequences of behavioral acts) were performed at 1 and 3 months, postnatally. Body weight and thickness of the cerebral cortex of irradiated rats were 10-15 percent below controls throughout the period of study. Behavior in all tests was more affected at 3 months than at 1 month of age. Gait of control rats, as measured by the angle of advanced of hind feet, widened about 20 percent for males and 40 percent for females from 1 to 3 months, as expected, while, in irradiated rats, the angle widened only about 10 percent. Continuous corridor activity increased less than 10 percent in controls and about 35 percent in irradiated rats over the same period. In photographic analysis of behavior, controls increased their time spent standing by about 50 percent in males and 20 percent in females from 1 to 3 months of age. Irradiated males increased time standing only about 10 percent and irradiated females decreased about 30 percent over the same period. The data obtained in these experiments support other evidence that some behavioral alterations from perinatal exposure to radiation become more marked with maturation

  14. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    'The broad objective of the project is to understand the molecular basis for the response of cells to radiations and chemicals, with the pragmatic goal of being able to identify human subpopulations that are exceptionally sensitive to DNA damaging agents. The project focuses on HRAD9, a human orthologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene rad9. S. pombe rad9::ura4+ mutant cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV and many chemicals, such as the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. They also lack the ability to delay cycling transiently in S phase or in G2 following a block in DNA replication or after incurring DNA damage, respectively -i.e., they lack checkpoint controls. The attempt by mutant cells to progress through mitosis in the absence of fully intact DNA accounts at least in part for their sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cells bearing rad9::ura4+ also aberrantly regulate UVDE, an enzyme that participates in a secondary DNA excision repair pathway. The key role played by S. pombe rad9 in promoting resistance to chemicals and radiations suggests that the evolutionarily conserved human cognate also has important functions in mammals. The first set of aims in this proposal centers on characterizing the structure and expression of HRAD9, to assess structure/function relationships and potentially link protein activity to a specific tissue. The next set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer.'

  15. Fractionation schedule affects transforming growth factor β expression in chronic radiation enteropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Richter, Konrad K.; Sung, C.-C.; Langberg, Carl W.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The risk of intestinal obstruction from fibrotic strictures is a major dose limiting factor in abdominal radiation therapy. We have shown that chronic intestinal radiation injury (radiation enteropathy) is associated with sustained over-expression of the fibrogenic cytokine, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). This study used quantitative computerized image analysis to examine the relationship between TGF-β expression and specific histopathologic alterations as a function of fractionation schedule. Materials and Methods: Localized fractionated small bowel irradiation was performed in a rat model developed in our laboratory: 49 male rats were orchiectomized and a loop of small bowel was sutured to the inside of the scrotum. After 3 weeks recovery, the intestine within the artificial 'scrotal hernia' was sham-irradiated (Controls) or exposed to a total dose of 50.4 Gy orthovoltage radiation, given either as 18 daily fractions of 2.8 Gy (Group I) or as 9 daily fractions of 5.6 Gy (Group II). Groups of animals were euthanized at 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury). Specimens were prepared for immunohistochemistry and histopathology. Extracellular TGF-β was detected with a polyclonal antibody, and protein expression was quantified by computerized image analysis. Twenty separate 40X fields per specimen were digitized, and the average number of stained pixels relative to total pixels was determined. Histopathologic injury was assessed in H+E sections with a previously validated Radiation Injury Score (RIS). Results: Irradiated animals had significantly higher levels of extracellular TGF-β immunoreactivity at both 2 weeks and 26 weeks (p<0.01). TGF-β expression correlated with RIS at both time points (p<0.001). Group II had significantly greater RIS and TGF-β expression than group I (p<0.01). TGF-β expression at 2 weeks correlated with epithelial atypia, mucosal ulceration, and subserosal thickening (p<0.01). At 26 weeks, TGF

  16. Timely Referral to Outpatient Nephrology Care Slows Progression and Reduces Treatment Costs of Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Lonnemann

    2017-03-01

    Discussion: Timely referral to outpatient nephrology care is associated with slowed disease progression, less hospital admissions, reduced total treatment costs, and improved survival in patients with CKD.

  17. Radiation promotes colorectal cancer initiation and progression by inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Bozeman, R G; Kaisani, A; Kim, W; Zhang, L; Richardson, J A; Wright, W E; Shay, J W

    2016-06-30

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common as protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared with conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole-body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIRs), which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence-associated gene (P19Arf), are markedly increased. Following these changes, loss of Casein kinase Iα and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared with X-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid-ethyl amide (CDDO-EA), reduces proton irradiation-associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA.

  18. Progression of Renal Impairment and Chronic Kidney Disease in Chronic Heart Failure: An Analysis From GISSI-HF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Kevin; Masson, Serge; Lucci, Donata; Gorini, Marco; Urso, Renato; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Tarantini, Luigi; Tognoni, Gianni; Voors, Adriaan; Latini, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Data on the natural change in renal function in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed over 36 months in 6934 patients included in the GISSI-HF study. Associations from baseline, changes in renal function, and occurrence of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization were assessed. Mean age was 67 years, mainly men (78%), and mean eGFR was 68 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 . Change in eGFR in the 1st year was -1.5 ± 16 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 , and over 36 months it was -3.7 ± 18 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 . Over the latter period, only 25% deteriorated ≥1 Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiatives (KDOQI) class of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Fifteen percent of patients had >15 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 decrease in eGFR in the 1st 12 months. Lower eGFR was associated with outcome: hazard ratio (HR) 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.10 (P 15 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 in the 1st year showed the highest risk of events (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.36; P renal function over time in patients with chronic HF was modest. Only 25% deteriorated ≥1 KDOQI class of CKD after 3 years. Any decrease in eGFR over time was associated with strongly increased event rates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a Conceptual Model of Disease Progression for Use in Economic Modeling of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabberer, Maggie; Gonzalez-McQuire, Sebastian; Muellerova, Hana; Briggs, Andrew H; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Chambers, Mike; Lomas, David A

    2017-05-01

    To develop and validate a new conceptual model (CM) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) for use in disease progression and economic modeling. The CM identifies and describes qualitative associations between disease attributes, progression and outcomes. A literature review was performed to identify any published CMs or literature reporting the impact and association of COPD disease attributes with outcomes. After critical analysis of the literature, a Steering Group of experts from the disciplines of health economics, epidemiology and clinical medicine was convened to develop a draft CM, which was refined using a Delphi process. The refined CM was validated by testing for associations between attributes using data from the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE). Disease progression attributes included in the final CM were history and occurrence of exacerbations, lung function, exercise capacity, signs and symptoms (cough, sputum, dyspnea), cardiovascular disease comorbidities, 'other' comorbidities (including depression), body composition (body mass index), fibrinogen as a biomarker, smoking and demographic characteristics (age, gender). Mortality and health-related quality of life were determined to be the most relevant final outcome measures for this model, intended to be the foundation of an economic model of COPD. The CM is being used as the foundation for developing a new COPD model of disease progression and to provide a framework for the analysis of patient-level data. The CM is available as a reference for the implementation of further disease progression and economic models.

  20. [Research progress of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors on healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yunyi; Liang, Yujie; Ran, Xingwu

    2018-05-01

    To review the effect of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on the wound healing and its mechanisms in chronic diabetic foot ulcers. The latest literature concerning DPP-4 inhibitors for chronic diabetic foot ulcers was extensively reviewed, as well as the potential benefit and mechanism of DPP-4 inhibitors on wound healing of diabetic foot ulcers was analyzed thoroughly. DPP-4 inhibitors can accelerated the ulcer healing. The mechanisms probably include inhibiting the expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and restoring the balance of the wound MMP and the tissue inhibitors of MMP; promoting recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells and augmenting angiogenesis; optimizing extracellular matrix construction and the immune response to persistent hypoxia in chronic diabetes wounds, and so on. At present, clinical researches show that DPP-4 inhibitors may be considered as an adjuvant treatment for chronic diabetic foot ulcers. DPP-4 inhibitors show promise in the local wound healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers. However, more strictly designed, adequately powered, long-term follow-up, and high-quality randomized control trials are needed to further verify their efficacy and safety for chronic diabetic foot ulcers.

  1. Effects of progressive backward body weight suppoted treadmill training on gait ability in chronic stroke patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hun; Lee, Kyoung Bo; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Fong, Shirley S M; Lee, Suk Min

    2017-10-23

    A stroke patient with hemiplegic gait is generally described as being slow and asymmetric. Body weight-supported treadmill training and backward gait training are recent additions to therapeutic gait trainings that may help improve gait in stroke patient with hemiplegic gait. Therefore, we examined the effect of progressive backward body weight-supported treadmill training on gait in chronic stroke patients with hemiplegic gait. Thirty subjects were divided to the experimental and control groups. The experimental group consisted of 15 patients and underwent progressive backward body weight-supported treadmill training. The control group consisted of 15 patients and underwent general treadmill gait training five times per week, for a total of four weeks. The OptoGait was used to analyze gait kinematics, and the dynamic gait index (DGI) and results of the 6-minute walk test were used as the clinical evaluation indicators. A follow-up test was carried out four weeks later to examine persistence of exercise effects. The experimental group showed statistically significant results in all dependent variables week four compared to the control group. However, until the eighth week, only the dependent variables, of affected step length (ASL), stride length (SL), and DGI differed significantly between the two groups. This study verified that progressive bodyweight-supported treadmill training had a positive influence on the temporospatial characteristics of gait and clinical gait evaluation index in chronic stroke patients.

  2. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of "ten stacks" of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

  3. Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb3Sn coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb 3 Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of “ten stacks” of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy

  4. Responses of a grassland arthropod community to chronic beta and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styron, C.E.; Dodson, G.J.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Miller, F.L. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A long-term project was initiated in 1968 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assess effects of mixed beta and gamma radiation from simulated fallout on a grassland ecosystem. Beta and gamma radiation dose rates in microhabitats of the experimentally contaminated enclosure were measured with LiF thermoluminescent microdosimeters. Extensive statistical analyses of data on numbers of individuals collected for each of 76 arthropod and 2 molluscan taxa have identified no lasting significant changes in similarity or species diversity of experimental versus control communities as the result of the long-term irradiation at low dose rates. Natural fluctuations in community dynamics obscured any possible radiation effects. Thus, the apparent threshold for mixed beta and gamma radiation inducing changes in community structure must be above the exposure rate range of 2.3 to 13 rad/day delivered during the 5 yr of observation. Establishing such a threshold is of importance in assessing the impact of communities subjected to chronic, low level environmental exposure to ionizing radiation

  5. Ways of pharmacological prophylaxis of stochastic and deterministic effects of chronical radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillova, E.N.; Muksinova, K.N.; Revina, V.; Smirnov, D.; Sokolnikov, M.; Lukyanova, T.

    1996-01-01

    The prophylactics of late effects of exposure is the actual medico-social problem, because now there are large groups of persons who were exposed during occupational contact and living on territories contaminated by radionuclides. Most probable consequences of external and internal chronic influence of radiation may be the increase of malignant tumour frequency, the development of secondary myelo- and immuno-depressions, the earlier forming of sclerous and destructive processes, and the acceleration of senescence. The role of damages in immune system was not yet understood in pathogenesis of the late effects of radiation, but there are evidences that the decreasing of the immunologic supervision in period of forming the consequences of radiation influence enables to realize the cancerogenic effect of radiation. The purposes of this investigation are to decrease the frequency or to prevent the development of radiation consequences dangerous for health and life by using the method of modification of radiogenic damages in hemopoietic and immune systems by applying the pharmacological preparations with immunomodulating effects. The investigation tasks include: the study of modifying influence of pharmacological substances with different mechanisms of effect: myelopid (immunomodulating, and regulatory), β-carotin, Calendula officinalis (immunomodulating, and antioxidant), lipamid (detoxicating); the separate or complex applications of these substances; and the development of the optimum medico-prophylactic schemes. The advantages of these indicated preparations in comparison with the known (T-activin, thymogen, cytokines, etc.) are the absence of contraindications and the possibility to use per os. (author)

  6. Gastrointestinal function in chronic radiation enteritis -effects of loperamide-N-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, E.K.; Horowitz, M.; Russo, A.; Muecke, T.; Chatterton, B.E.; Robb, T.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of loperamide-N-oxide, a new peripheral opiate agonist precursor, on gastrointestinal function were evaluated in 18 patients with diarrhoea caused by radiation enteritis. Each patient was given loperamide-N-oxide and placebo for 14 days, separated by a washout period of 14 days. Gastrointestinal symptoms; absorption of bile acid, vitamin B12, lactose, and fat; gastric emptying; small intestinal and whole gut transit; and intestinal permeability were measured during placebo and loperamide-N-oxide phases. Data were compared with those obtained in 18 normal subjects. In the patient, in addition to an increased frequency of bowel actions there was reduced bile acid absorption, higher prevalence of lactose malabsorption associated with a reduced dietary intake of dairy products and faster small intestinal and whole gut transit when compared with the normal subjects. There was no significant difference in gastric emptying between the two groups. Treatment with loperamide-N-oxide was associated with a reduced frequency of bowel actions, slower small intestinal and total gut transit, more rapid gastric emptying improved absorption of bile acid and increased permeability to 51 Cr EDTA. These observations indicate that: (1) diarrhoea caused by chronic radiation enteritis is associated with more rapid intestinal transit and a high prevalence of bile acid and lactose malabsorption, and (2) loperamide-N-oxide slows small intestinal transit, increases bile acid absorption, and is effective in the treatment of diarrhoea associated with chronic radiation enteritis. (Author)

  7. Locoregional Tumor Progression After Radiation Therapy Influences Overall Survival in Pediatric Patients With Neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; McGregor, Lisa; Krasin, Matthew J.; Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There is renewed attention to primary site irradiation and local control for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). We conducted a retrospective review to identify factors that might predict for locoregional tumor control and its impact on overall survival. Methods and Materials: Between July 2000 through August 2006, a total of 44 pediatric patients with NB received radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent using computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning. The median age was 3.4 years and the median cumulative dose was 23.4 Gy. Overall survival and locoregional tumor control were measured from the start of RT to the date of death or event as determined by CT/magnetic resonance imaging/meta-iodobenzylguanidine. The influence of age at irradiation, gender, race, cumulative radiation dose, International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage, treatment protocol and resection status was determined with respect to locoregional tumor control. Results: With a median follow-up of 34 months ± 21 months, locoregional tumor progression was observed in 11 (25%) and was evenly divided between primary site and adjacent nodal/visceral site failure. The influence of locoregional control reached borderline statistical significance (p = 0.06). Age (p = 0.5), dose (p = 0.6), resection status (p = 0.7), and International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage (p = 0.08) did not influence overall survival. Conclusions: Overall survival in high-risk neuroblastoma is influenced by locoregional tumor control. Despite CT-based planning, progression in adjacent nodal/visceral sites appears to be common; this requires further investigation regarding target volume definitions, dose, and the effects of systemic therapy.

  8. [Influence of cryoglobulinemic syndrome and insulin resistance on the progression of liver cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratiuk, L O; Bezrodna, O V; Kuliesh, O V

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of analysis of the frequency of detection of cryoglobulinemic syndrome (CGS) and insulin resistance (IR) in patients with HCV-associated liver cirrhosis (LC) depending on its stage. There were also evaluated clinical and laboratory features of the disease. The study involved 72 patients with chronic hepatitis C who were divided into 3 main groups according to the presence of LC. The I group included 32 patients with chronic hepatitis C without LC. The II group consisted of 19 patients with compensated HCV-associated LC and III group included 21 patients with decompensated LC. It was shown that terminal stages of the LC (class B-C by Child-Pugh) are characterized by more frequent presence of IR and CGS with more severe clinical picture, which may be caused not only by the influence of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), but also by the progression of LC.

  9. A pilot study of healing touch and progressive relaxation for chronic neuropathic pain in persons with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Diane Wind; Rintala, Diana H; Duan, Zhigang; Tan, Gabriel

    2006-12-01

    This pilot study assessed the role of Healing Touch (HT), an energy-based therapy, in modulating chronic neuropathic pain and the associated psychological distress from post spinal cord injury. Twelve veterans were assigned to either HT or guided progressive relaxation for six weekly home visits. The instruments selected showed sensitivity, although there was a large variation among the groups. There was a significant difference in the composite of interference on the Brief Pain Inventory (t = -2.71, p = .035). The mean score of the fatigue subscale of the Profile of Moods decreased (ns) in the HT group and in the subscale of confusion yet remained stable in the control group. The Diener Satisfaction With Life Scale showed increased well-being in the HT group and no change in the control group. Participants reported various experiences with HT sessions indicating that it may have benefit in the complex response to chronic pain.

  10. Changes in lymphocytes size under chronic exposure of the organism to factors of radiation and chemical origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    Results of the analysis of changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes size under chronic exposure to external gamma radiation and pesticide chlorofoz in combination and separately are presented. It has been found out that under exposure of animals to radiation or the pesticide it is small and big lymphocytes respectively which most significantly suffer quantitatively. Under the joint radiational-chemical exposure of the organism the number of both types of cells is reduced simultaneously

  11. Effect of low and chronic radiation exposure to human population: Kollam study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Anu; Kumar, Vinay

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the cellular and biological processes with low-level chronic radiation provides a rational basis for limits of exposure for occupational workers and general public. There are several high level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) of the world where human population is continuously exposed to natural radiation higher than the global average of 2.4 mGy/y. These areas provide unique opportunities to conduct studies which can provide better understanding of radiation effects and underlying mechanisms. The ∼55 km long monazite bearing belt of Kerala on the south-west coast of India is one such area. Over the last few decades, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has conducted extensive research on the human population residing in these areas to understand effects of low dose at the organismal, cellular and molecular levels. More recently, high resolution quantitative proteomic analysis of PBMCs using iTRAQ based LC-MS/MS identified differential expression of 1570 proteins in HLNRA individuals relative to individuals from the adjoining Normal Level Natural Radiation Areas (NLNRA). Almost 215 biological processes were distinctly altered in HLNRA samples, which included several pro-survival stress activated protein kinases and DNA repair networks. Many of the changes seen at the proteomics level were confirmed at the gene level using microarray expression data. This suggests an enhanced level of basal repair mechanisms in HLNRA individuals. The scientific program at BARC thus, focuses on fundamental scientific understanding of the mechanisms cells use to sense, repair and adapt to low dose radiation. Implications of these cellular processes for low dose radiation risk estimation will be discussed. (author)

  12. Ascending central canal dilation and progressive ependymal disruption in a contusion model of rodent chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keirstead Hans S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI can lead to an insidious decline in motor and sensory function in individuals even years after the initial injury and is accompanied by a slow and progressive cytoarchitectural destruction. At present, no pathological mechanisms satisfactorily explain the ongoing degeneration. Methods Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized laminectomized at T10 and received spinal cord contusion injuries with a force of 250 kilodynes using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Animals were randomly distributed into 5 groups and killed 1 (n = 4, 28 (n = 4, 120 (n = 4, 450 (n = 5, or 540 (n = 5 days after injury. Morphometric and immunohistochemical studies were then performed on 1 mm block sections, 6 mm cranial and 6 mm caudal to the lesion epicenter. The SPSS 11.5 t test was used to determine differences between quantitative measures. Results Here, we document the first report of an ascending central canal dilation and progressive ependymal disruption cranial to the epicenter of injury in a contusion model of chronic SCI, which was characterized by extensive dural fibrosis and intraparenchymal cystic cavitation. Expansion of the central canal lumen beyond a critical diameter corresponded with ependymal cell ciliary loss, an empirically predictable thinning of the ependymal region, and a decrease in cell proliferation in the ependymal region. Large, aneurysmal dilations of the central canal were accompanied by disruptions in the ependymal layer, periependymal edema and gliosis, and destruction of the adjacent neuropil. Conclusion Cells of the ependymal region play an important role in CSF homeostasis, cellular signaling and wound repair in the spinal cord. The possible effects of this ascending pathology on ependymal function are discussed. Our studies suggest central canal dilation and ependymal region disruption as steps in the pathogenesis of chronic SCI, identify central canal dilation as a marker of

  13. Influence of a radiation to an immunity of the women with chronic unspecific vaginitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazhina, M.V.; Mikhal'tsevich, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    Some parameters of immunity at the sick by chronic unspecific vaginitis in conditions of cesium 137 incorporation to body are investigated. 72 women sickening during 5 years are surveyed. At all the sick was detected a suppression of the cell immunity, which is more expressed at patients with the cesium 137 contents in blood in dozes (4-30)*10 -8 Ci/l. It was displayed in a decrease of quantity of common and T-lymphocytes. Decrease of the contents of M and G immunoglobulins on 16% and 23% accordingly is found out. It is supposed there is a correlation between a clinical current character of chronic inflammatory process of female genitals and irradiation by cesium 137. It is explained by increase of resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics in result of long time effect of low doses radiation. 6 refs., 1 tab

  14. Progressive glomerulosclerosis and renal failure following perinatal gamma radiation in the beagle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaenke, R.S.; Phemister, R.D.; Norrdin, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The renal effects of whole body irradiation in the perinatal period were studied in the dog. Ninety-three dogs received a single sublethal exposure in the range of 270 to 435 R in either late gestation (55 days postcoitus) or early postnatal life (2 days postpartum) and were sacrificed at 70 days, 2, or 4 years of age. Early renal lesions in 70-day-old irradiated dogs were characterized by arrested glomerular maturation and degeneration resulting in reduced functional renal mass. Mature glomeruli exhibited mesangial proliferation. At 2 and 4 years of age, surviving irradiated dogs exhibited sever renal disease associated with progressive glomerular damage which was characterized by mesangial proliferation and compression of capillary lumina, epithelial degeneration and focal capsular adhesions, and ultimately obliterative glomerulosclerosis. Twenty-one of the 93 irradiated dogs died in renal failure before 4 years of age with advanced glomerulosclerosis. The phatogenesis of this progressive renal lesion may be related to the interaction of three specific factors. These include (1) the effect of direct radiation damage to mature kidney components; (2) the loss of outer cortical nephrons resulting in increased work load of the surviving nephrons; and (3) the effect of compensatory hypertrophy related to the loss of renal parenchyma as the rapid growth rates associated with kidney maturation

  15. Effect of hyperthermia and radiation on the cell cycle progression of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Nobuo

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hyperthermia and irradiation on cytokinetics was studied using exponentially growing HeLa cells. To determine the effect of heat and/or radiation on the cell cycle progression, the changes in the DNA distribution of the cell population after time intervals after treatment were studied. The cellular DNA content of the cell population was measured by flow cytometry. The results obtained were as follows: 1. Compared with the control, the cellular DNA content distribution of HeLa cells treated with 43 0 C for 20 min and 60 min showed cell accumulation in S and G 2 M phases 8 hours after treatment. 2. Hyperthermic treatment at 45 0 C for 20 min caused cells to accumulate in S phase in the first 4 hours and G 2 M phase after 8 to 14.5 hours, whereas heat treatment at 45 0 C for 60 min caused cells to accumulate in G 2 M phase after 24 hours. 3. Irradiation of exponentially growing cells induced a block in the progress from G 2 M to G 1 phase. 4. Dose survival curves of HeLa cells with and without postirradiation thermal treatment (43 0 C, 60 min) showed significant enhancement of radiosensitivity by hyperthermia. 5. The sequential treatment, i.e. 5 Gy irradiation followed immediately by heat treatment at 43 0 C for 60 min, caused more cells to accumulate in G 2 M phase after 24 and 48 hours, as compared with 5 Gy irradiation alone. (author)

  16. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1979-07-01

    Several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA are proposed, and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms are detailed. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on the direct affect of radiation on DNA. We are currently investigating systems of DNA constituents and peptides which may shed light on indirect effects. Studies which have been completed during the past year include: (1) studies of γ-irradiated N-acetyl amino acids and peptide solutions at 77 0 K; and (2) studies of barriers to hindered rotation in peptide radicals. Studies in which progress has been made in this past year include: (1) π cations produced in DNA bases by hydroxyl radical attack; and (2) studies of spin transfer in γ-Irradiated nucleoside-peptide solutions. These studies have shown that: (1) frozen aqueous solutions provide a suitable matrix for γ irradiation studies; (2) γ-irradiated peptides in frozen aqueous solutions follow chemistry expected from previous studies; and (3) π cations of DNA base can be produced by hydroxyl radical attack

  17. The effectiveness of electromagnetic terahertz radiation use in the treatment of patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelenova A.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim: to increase the efficiency of treatment of patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP using electromagnetic radiation at terahertz frequencies of molecular spectrum of radiation and absorption of nitric oxide 150,176-150,664 GHz. Material and methods. The study involved 50 patients with RPP, which according to the method of therapy were divided into 2 groups: group 1 included patients receiving conventional therapy, group 2 consisted of patients who, along with traditional therapy received EHF-therapy device "Orbit" YAKUL.941526.001. The control group consisted of 20 healthy subjects with intact periodontium. For the non-invasive study of tissue blood flow in the periodontal tissue Doppler ultrasound was used MiniMax-Doppler-Phono. The study of the microvasculature of periodontitis has been conducted. To determine the reactivity of microvascular periodontal tissue reflex functional tests on the indirect effect of the cold were performed. Results. Reductions achieved values of periodontal indices, especially important index PMA, a significant increase in the linear blood flow indices, decreased pulse pressure gradient and the index followed appropriate reduction to their cold test. Conclusion. The proposed complex therapy can accelerate the relief of inflammation in the periodontal tissues of the complex, to improve the elastic properties of blood vessels, reduce their tone and restore microcirculation in periodontal tissues.

  18. Tumor progression: analysis of the instability of the metastatic phenotype, sensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The major complications for tumor therapy are 1) tumor spread (metastasis); 2) the mixed nature of tumors (heterogeneity); and 3) the capacity of tumors to evolve (progress). To study these tumor characteristics, the rat 13762NF mammary adenocarcinoma was cloned and studied for metastatic properties and sensitivities to therapy (chemotherapy, radiation and hyperthermia). The cell clones were heterogeneous and no correlation between metastatic potential and therapeutic sensitivities was observed. Further, these phenotypes were unstable during pasage in vitro; yet, the changes were clone dependent and reproducible using different cryoprotected cell stocks. To understand the phenotypic instability, subclones were isolated from low and high passage cell clones. The results demonstrated that 1) tumor cells are heterogeneous for multiple phenotypes; 2) tumor cells are unstable for multiple phenotypes; 3) the magnitude, direction and time of occurrence of phenotypic drift is clone dependent; 4) the sensitivity of cell clones to ionizing radiation (γ or heat) and chemotherapy agents is independent of their metastatic potential; 5) shifts in metastatic potential and sensitivity to therapy may occur simultaneously but are not linked; and 6) tumor cells independently diverge to form several subpopulations with unique phenotypic profiles

  19. Models of hemapoietic changes on the basis of systematically collected case histories of radiation accident victims as well as pathophysiologically evaluated patients after chronic radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.

    2004-01-01

    The research project ''Models of Hematopoietic Changes on the Basis of Systematically Collected Case Histories of Radiation Accident Victims as well as Pathophysiologically Evaluated Patients after Chronic Radiation Exposure'' required the investigation of four major research problem areas. First of all, biomathematical models were improved or newly developed allowing the simulation of the radiation induced response patterns of granulocytes, lymphocytes and blood platelets. The compartment model approach allowed the establishment of the correlation of such blood cell changes to the extent of damage at the level of hemopoietic stem cells distributed throughout the skeleton. The utilization of neural-network techniques resulted in a ''synergetic'' model that enables the medical doctor - using blood cell changes within the first 5-6 days after exposure - to predict the further course of illness and to allow a rational approach to clinical management. Secondly, available information on the clinical consequences of radiation exposure on more than 800 accident victims enabled the team to develop an entirely new concept to recognize and treat such persons. For this approach the biomathematical models were used to identify ''response categories'' (rather than dosimetrically defined ''exposure categories'') with an organ specific grading code of the severity of radiation-induced damage. This grading allowed the semi-quantitative damage assessment of the hemopoiesis, the neurovascular system, the gastrointestinal as well as the cutaneous system. It forms the basis for a ''weighted'' prognosis and for the logistics of radiation accident medical management. In the third project domain, models were developed to understand pathophysiological mechanisms of biological consequences of chronic radiation in human beings (former USSR) as well as in a preclinical dog study (USA). From a large group of patients with the diagnosis of ''Chronic Radiation Sickness'' more than 80 were

  20. Early and late radiation response of human skin following chronic exposure of the hands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenz, U.; Arndt, D.; Thormann, T.

    1979-01-01

    Clinical examinations on 45 radiation workers with chronical low-level exposures to their hands revealed that accumulated doses in the range of 15 to 30 Sv (1500 to 3000 rem) may already produce macroscopically unconspicuous early alterations of the vessel system within the corium as well as epidermal hyperplasia. Therefore, the annual permissible dose equivalent of 0.75 Sv (75 rem) recommended by ICRP for the skin of the extremities appears unjustifiably high and should be reduced to 0.30 Sv (30 rem), the limit valid for the remaining areas of skin. (author)

  1. Progress of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in chronic renal failure patients with vertebral bone change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Cailiang; Dong Guoli; Zeng Nanlin

    2013-01-01

    Bone changes caused by kidney diseases affect the quality of life in the patients with chronic renal failure. How to improve evaluation of the bone change, and consequently start early intervention and treatment is an important topic. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been successfully used in the evaluations of central nervous system, breast and prostate, etc. Evaluation of bone changes with MRS is under studied. This article reviewed the MRS in evaluation of vertebral body bone changes in patients with chronic renal failure. (authors)

  2. Progress in z-pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T W L; Nash, T J; Olson, R E; Bliss, D E; Lemke, R W; Olson, C L; Ruiz, C L; Mock, R C; Bailey, J E; Chandler, G A; Cuneo, M E; Leeper, R J; Matzen, M K; Mehlhorn, T A; Slutz, S A; Stygar, W A; Peterson, D L; Chrien, R E; Watt, R G; Roderick, N F; Cooper, G W; Apruzese, J P; Sarkisov, G S; Chittenden, J P; Haines, M G

    2004-01-01

    Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions

  3. Effects of combined exposure of F344 rats to radiation and chronically inhaled cigarette smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, G.L.; Nikula, K.J.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear workers may be exposed to radiation in various forms, such as low-LET {gamma}-irradiation or {alpha}-irradiation from inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} particles. These workers may then have increased risk for lung cancer compared to the general population. Of additional concern is the possibility that interactions between radiation and other carcinogens may increase the risk of cancer induction, compared to the risks from either type of agent alone. An important and common lung carcinogen is cigarette smoke. The purpose of this project is to better determine the combined effects of chronically inhaled cigarette smoke and either inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} or external, thoracic X-irradiation on the induction of lung cancer in rats. Histologic and dosimetric evaluations of rats in the CS + {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} study continue, and the study of CS + X rays is beginning.

  4. Effects of combined exposure of F344 rats to radiation and chronically inhaled cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, G.L.; Nikula, K.J.; Barr, E.B.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear workers may be exposed to radiation in various forms, such as low-LET γ-irradiation or α-irradiation from inhaled 239 PuO 2 particles. These workers may then have increased risk for lung cancer compared to the general population. Of additional concern is the possibility that interactions between radiation and other carcinogens may increase the risk of cancer induction, compared to the risks from either type of agent alone. An important and common lung carcinogen is cigarette smoke. The purpose of this project is to better determine the combined effects of chronically inhaled cigarette smoke and either inhaled 239 PuO 2 or external, thoracic X-irradiation on the induction of lung cancer in rats. Histologic and dosimetric evaluations of rats in the CS + 239 PuO 2 study continue, and the study of CS + X rays is beginning

  5. The health status of grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation. Communication 2. Morphofunctional parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushkina, N.P.; Musatkova, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigation of the parameters of physical development and specific features in the development of psychomotor habits and peripheral blood parameters in children aged 0 to 7 grandchildren of exposed individuals. A dynamic follow-up of physical and psychomotor development, as well as regular check-ups of peripheral blood were carried out in 877 grandchildren of test subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation before conception. Multifactorial analysis did not show a correlation between the deviations in the physical development of children in the studied cohort and exposure of their grandparents and/or parents. Factors other than radiation (poor health status of mother, gestosis) did influence the studied parameters. The mean levels of hemoglobin, red cells, platelets, and leukocytes in the test group were virtually the same as in controls and coincided with published data [ru

  6. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Oscar; Martínez-Climent, José Angel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis.

  7. Podoplanin Expression Is Correlated With the Progression of Chronic Discoid Lupus Erythematosus to Lip Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Ma, Liwei; Zhou, Zengtong; Jian, Xinchun; Liu, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Chronic lip discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a potentially malignant disorder that can develop into lip squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Podoplanin is a specific marker for lymphatic endothelial cells and plays a role in cancer progression. The objective of this study was to determine the immunoexpression of podoplanin in samples of patients with DLE and its correlation with the risk of progression to LSCC. In a retrospective study, podoplanin expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in samples from 52 patients with DLE, including 44 patients with untransformed DLE and 8 patients with malignant transformed DLE. Ten samples of normal oral mucosa and 10 samples of LSCC were used as normal and cancer controls, respectively. The results showed that podoplanin expression was observed in 12 of 44 (27.3%) patients with untransformed DLE and in 7 of 8 (87.5%) patients with transformed DLE (P = .002). Podoplanin was not expressed in normal oral mucosa, but it was overexpressed in all of the 10 patients with LSCC. Regression analysis revealed that podoplanin expression was significantly associated with an 18.67-fold increase in the risk of malignant progression (95% confidence interval = 2.07-168.10; P = .009). In summary, podoplanin expression is significantly associated with malignant transformation of DLE into LSCC. Thus, podoplanin expression may identify a subgroup with a high risk of malignant progression of DLE. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch

  9. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  10. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, U.A.; Issa, Y.; Hagenaars, J.C.; Bakker, O.J.; Goor, H. van; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Bollen, T.L.; Ramshorst, B. van; Witteman, B.J.; Brink, M.A.; Schaapherder, A.F.; Dejong, C.H.; Spanier, B.W.; Heisterkamp, J.; Harst, E. van der; Eijck, C.H. van; Besselink, M.G.; Gooszen, H.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Boermeester, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  11. Functional role of CCL5/RANTES for HCC progression during chronic liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohs, Antje; Kuttkat, Nadine; Reissing, Johanna; Zimmermann, Henning Wolfgang; Sonntag, Roland; Proudfoot, Amanda; Youssef, Sameh A.; de Bruin, Alain; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Trautwein, Christian

    Background & Aims: During liver inflammation, triggering fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis immune cells play a pivotal role. In the present study we investigated the role of CCL5 in human and in murine models of chronic liver inflammation leading to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. Methods:

  12. High doses of biotin in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedel, Frédéric; Papeix, Caroline; Bellanger, Agnès; Touitou, Valérie; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Galanaud, Damien; Gout, Olivier; Lyon-Caen, Olivier; Tourbah, Ayman

    2015-03-01

    No drug has been found to have any impact on progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Biotin is a vitamin acting as a coenzyme for carboxylases involved in key steps of energy metabolism and fatty acids synthesis. Among others, biotin activates acetylCoA carboxylase, a potentially rate-limiting enzyme in myelin synthesis. The aim of this pilot study is to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of high doses of biotin in patients suffering from progressive MS. Uncontrolled, non-blinded proof of concept study 23 consecutive patients with primary and secondary progressive MS originated from three different French MS reference centers were treated with high doses of biotin (100-300mg/day) from 2 to 36 months (mean=9.2 months). Judgement criteria varied according to clinical presentations and included quantitative and qualitative measures. In four patients with prominent visual impairment related to optic nerve injury, visual acuity improved significantly. Visual evoked potentials in two patients exhibited progressive reappearance of P100 waves, with normalization of latencies in one case. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) in one case showed a progressive normalization of the Choline/Creatine ratio. One patient with left homonymous hemianopia kept on improving from 2 to 16 months following treatment׳s onset. Sixteen patients out of 18 (89%) with prominent spinal cord involvement were considered as improved as confirmed by blinded review of videotaped clinical examination in 9 cases. In all cases improvement was delayed from 2 to 8 months following treatment׳s onset. These preliminary data suggest that high doses of biotin might have an impact on disability and progression in progressive MS. Two double-blind placebo-controlled trials are on going. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Time of Progression to Osteopenia/Osteoporosis in Chronically HIV-Infected Patients: Screening DXA Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negredo, Eugenia; Bonjoch, Anna; Gómez-Mateu, Moisés; Estany, Carla; Puig, Jordi; Perez-Alvarez, Nuria; Rosales, Joaquin; di Gregorio, Silvana; del Rio, Luis; Gómez, Guadalupe; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2012-01-01

    Background Algorithms for bone mineral density (BMD) management in HIV-infected patients are lacking. Our objective was to assess how often a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan should be performed by assessing time of progression to osteopenia/osteoporosis. Methods All DXA scans performed between 2000 and 2009 from HIV-infected patients with at least two DXA were included. Time to an event (osteopenia and osteoporosis) was assessed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Strata (tertiles) were defined using baseline minimum T scores. Differences between strata in time to an event were compared with the log-rank test. Results Of 391 patients (1,639 DXAs), 49.6% had osteopenia and 21.7% osteoporosis at their first DXA scan. Of the 112 (28.6%) with normal BMD, 35.7% progressed to osteopenia; median progression time was 6.7 years. These patients were stratified: “low-risk" (baseline minimum T score >−0.2 SD), “middle-risk" (between −0.2 and −0.6 SD), and “high-risk" (from −0.6 to −1 SD); median progression time to osteopenia was 8.7, >7.2, and 1.7 years, respectively (ppatients with osteopenia, 23.7% progressed to osteoporosis; median progression time was >8.5 years. Progression time was >8.2 years in “low-risk" tertile (T score between −1.1 and −1.6 SD), >8.5 years in “middle-risk" (between −1.6 and −2), and 3.2 years in “high-risk" (from −2 to −2.4) (ppatients with bone demineralization could reduce fracture–related morbidity/mortality. PMID:23056229

  14. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertz, Ruediger S., E-mail: ruediger.goertz@uk-erlangen.de; Schuderer, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna@schuderer-floss.de; Strobel, Deike, E-mail: deike.strobel@uk-erlangen.de; Pfeifer, Lukas, E-mail: Lukas.Pfeifer@uk-erlangen.de; Neurath, Markus F., E-mail: Markus.Neurath@uk-erlangen.de; Wildner, Dane, E-mail: Dane.Wildner@uk-erlangen.de

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  15. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertz, Ruediger S.; Schuderer, Johanna; Strobel, Deike; Pfeifer, Lukas; Neurath, Markus F.; Wildner, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  16. The use of free musculocutaneous flaps to cover chronic radiation ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujiguchi, Kounosuke; Tajima, Sadao; Tanaka, Yoshio; Hira, Michiya; Imai, Keisuke; Fukae, Eiichi; Omiya, Yuka.

    1992-01-01

    Three patients with chronic radiation ulcer treated with free musculocutaneous flap transfer are described. The first patient was a 66-year-old woman who developed sacral ulcer 7 years after radiation combined with surgery for uterine cancer. After debridement of this ulcer, interpositional vein grafts 30 cm in length was used to reconstruct an 'extended' latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. The second patient was a 62-year-old woman. She developed ulcer on her chest 15 years after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer. Radiation damage extended to the myocardium and pulmonary parenchyma. After careful debridement, reconstruction was performed by using the free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. The last patient was a 72-year-old woman. Ulcer of the right axilla developed 19 years after postoperative irradiation for breast cancer. Reconstruction was performed by using a free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. In these patients in whom radiation-damaged tissue was not completely excised, favorable results could be attained by using the transfer of the free musculocutaneous flaps. (N.K.)

  17. Alteration of cytokine profiles in mice exposed to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Suk Chul [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung-Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yu Mi [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwanghee [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Jin, Young-Woo [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong Soon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 612-030 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Sun, E-mail: hskimdvm@khnp.co.kr [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-09

    While a high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms, a low-dose of radiation has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of animal models. To understand the basis for the effect of low-dose radiation in vivo, we examined the cellular and immunological changes evoked in mice exposed to low-dose radiation at very low (0.7 mGy/h) and low (3.95 mGy/h) dose rate for the total dose of 0.2 and 2 Gy, respectively. Mice exposed to low-dose radiation, either at very low- or low-dose rate, demonstrated normal range of body weight and complete blood counts. Likewise, the number and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte populations, CD4{sup +} T, CD8{sup +} T, B, or NK cells, stayed unchanged following irradiation. Nonetheless, the sera from these mice exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, leptin, MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-1{alpha}, thrombopoietin, and VEGF along with slight reduction of IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-{gamma}. This pattern of cytokine release suggests the stimulation of innate immunity facilitating myeloid differentiation and activation while suppressing pro-inflammatory responses and promoting differentiation of naive T cells into T-helper 2, not T-helper 1, types. Collectively, our data highlight the subtle changes of cytokine milieu by chronic low-dose {gamma}-radiation, which may be associated with the functional benefits observed in various experimental models.

  18. Wii Fit balance training or progressive balance training in patients with chronic stroke: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatar, Gozde Iyigun; Yildirim, Sibel Aksu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Wii Fit balance training (WBT) and progressive balance training (PBT) approaches on balance functions, balance confidence, and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] A total of 30 patients were randomized into the WBT (n=15) and PBT (n=15) groups. [Methods] All of the subjects received exercise training based on a neurodevelopemental approach in addition to either Wii Fit or progressive balance training for total of 1 hour a day, 3 days per week for 4 weeks. Primary measurements were static balance function measured with a Wii Balance Board and dynamic balance function assessed with the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go test, Dynamic Gait Index, and Functional Reach Test. Secondary measures were balance confidence assessed with the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale and activities of daily living evaluated with the Frenchay Activity Index. [Results] There was not remarkable difference between the two treatments in dynamic balance functions, balance confidence, and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Although both of the approaches were found to be effective in improving the balance functions, balance confidence, and activities of daily living, neither of them were more preferable than the other for the treatment of balance in patients with chronic stroke. PMID:25995576

  19. Wii Fit balance training or progressive balance training in patients with chronic stroke: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatar, Gozde Iyigun; Yildirim, Sibel Aksu

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Wii Fit balance training (WBT) and progressive balance training (PBT) approaches on balance functions, balance confidence, and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] A total of 30 patients were randomized into the WBT (n=15) and PBT (n=15) groups. [Methods] All of the subjects received exercise training based on a neurodevelopemental approach in addition to either Wii Fit or progressive balance training for total of 1 hour a day, 3 days per week for 4 weeks. Primary measurements were static balance function measured with a Wii Balance Board and dynamic balance function assessed with the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go test, Dynamic Gait Index, and Functional Reach Test. Secondary measures were balance confidence assessed with the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale and activities of daily living evaluated with the Frenchay Activity Index. [Results] There was not remarkable difference between the two treatments in dynamic balance functions, balance confidence, and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Although both of the approaches were found to be effective in improving the balance functions, balance confidence, and activities of daily living, neither of them were more preferable than the other for the treatment of balance in patients with chronic stroke.

  20. Population sensitivities of animals to chronic ionizing radiation-model predictions from mice to elephant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazykina, Tatiana G

    2018-02-01

    Model predictions of population response to chronic ionizing radiation (endpoint 'morbidity') were made for 11 species of warm-blooded animals, differing in body mass and lifespan - from mice to elephant. Predictions were made also for 3 bird species (duck, pigeon, and house sparrow). Calculations were based on analytical solutions of the mathematical model, simulating a population response to low-LET ionizing radiation in an ecosystem with a limiting resource (Sazykina, Kryshev, 2016). Model parameters for different species were taken from biological and radioecological databases; allometric relationships were employed for estimating some parameter values. As a threshold of decreased health status in exposed populations ('health threshold'), a 10% reduction in self-repairing capacity of organisms was suggested, associated with a decline in ability to sustain environmental stresses. Results of the modeling demonstrate a general increase of population vulnerability to ionizing radiation in animal species of larger size and longevity. Populations of small widespread species (mice, house sparrow; body mass 20-50 g), which are characterized by intensive metabolism and short lifespan, have calculated 'health thresholds' at dose rates about 6.5-7.5 mGy day -1 . Widespread animals with body mass 200-500 g (rat, common pigeon) - demonstrate 'health threshold' values at 4-5 mGy day -1 . For populations of animals with body mass 2-5 kg (rabbit, fox, raccoon), the indicators of 10% health decrease are in the range 2-3.4 mGy day -1 . For animals with body mass 40-100 kg (wolf, sheep, wild boar), thresholds are within 0.5-0.8 mGy day -1 ; for herbivorous animals with body mass 200-300 kg (deer, horse) - 0.5-0.6 mGy day -1 . The lowest health threshold was estimated for elephant (body mass around 5000 kg) - 0.1 mGy day -1 . According to the model results, the differences in population sensitivities of warm-blooded animal species to ionizing radiation are generally

  1. Quantitative modeling of responses to chronic ionizing radiation exposure using targeted and non-targeted effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shuryak

    Full Text Available The biological effects of chronic ionizing radiation exposure can be difficult to study, but important to understand in order to protect the health of occupationally-exposed persons and victims of radiological accidents or malicious events. They include targeted effects (TE caused by ionizations within/close to nuclear DNA, and non-targeted effects (NTE caused by damage to other cell structures and/or activation of stress-signaling pathways in distant cells. Data on radiation damage in animal populations exposed over multiple generations to wide ranges of dose rates after the Chernobyl nuclear-power-plant accident are very useful for enhancing our understanding of these processes. We used a mechanistically-motivated mathematical model which includes TE and NTE to analyze a large published data set on chromosomal aberrations in pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis embryos collected over 16 years from water bodies contaminated by Chernobyl fallout, and from control locations. The fraction of embryo cells with aberrations increased dramatically (>10-fold and non-linearly over a dose rate range of 0.03-420 μGy/h (0.00026-3.7 Gy/year. NTE were very important for describing the non-linearity of this radiation response: the TE-only model (without NTE performed dramatically worse than the TE+NTE model. NTE were predicted to reach ½ of maximal intensity at 2.5 μGy/h (0.022 Gy/year and to contribute >90% to the radiation response slope at dose rates <11 μGy/h (0.1 Gy/year. Internally-incorporated 90Sr was possibly more effective per unit dose than other radionuclides. The radiation response shape for chromosomal aberrations in snail embryos was consistent with data for a different endpoint: the fraction of young amoebocytes in adult snail haemolymph. Therefore, radiation may affect different snail life stages by similar mechanisms. The importance of NTE in our model-based analysis suggests that the search for modulators of NTE-related signaling pathways

  2. Central blood circulation in children at chronic combined low dose radiation and chemical action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arinchin, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    The state of central blood circulation and its hormonal regulation were studied in 1465 children living permanently under chronic low dose radiation and chemical action. Basic group consisted of 1093 children (579 boys and 514 girls) . 372 children (115 boys and 227 girls permanently living on 'clean' areas) were investigated in control group. Average age was 10,8 years old in basic group and 10,4 years old in the control group. Such parameters as arterial pressure, level of lead in blood and urine, adrenaline, noradrenaline and dophamine content in urine, thyroxine, iodothyronine, prostaglandins and cyclic AMP content in the blood serum has been controlled. Hypotensive states were determined to prevail in children living permanently under chronic low dose radiation and chemical action. The main pathogenic mechanism of this defeat is consider to be a reduction of the sympathoadrenal system activity combined with a decreasing of the thyroid system activity and of cyclic AMP level as well as predominance of prostaglandin depressive activity

  3. Reassessment of radiation therapy for the management of lung cancer in patients with chronic pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Weinstein, H.

    1983-01-01

    Surgery has remained the mainstay of definitive treatment for lung cancer. Radiation therapy has been advocated when the location of the lung cancer precludes resection or the severity or the cardiopulmonary impairment indicates that the patient cannot withstand the proposed resection. Extended field irradiation has been shown to improve tumor control and survival. However, in patients with chronic pulmonary disease, extended field irradiation may exacerbate pulmonary insufficiency and compromise survival. Between 1975 and 1980, 29 patients with lung cancer and chronic pulmonary disease were treated by involved field irradiation (IFR). This was compared to the experience of 41 patients who had been treated prior to 1975 by extended field irradiation (EFR). The frequency of subjective response and tumor control were comparable in each group. One patient treated by IFR developed a marginal recurrence. Radiation pneumonitis was observed in 7/41 (17%) EFR patients versus 2/29 (7%) IFR. Treatment related death occurred in 2/41 (5%) EFR versus 1/29 (3.3%) IFR. One year disease free survival was 8/41 (19%) EFR versus 12/29 (41%) IFR. Two of 14 (14%) IFR patients at risk five years are alive without evidence of disease

  4. Impaired Subset Progression and Polyfunctionality of T Cells in Mice Exposed to Methamphetamine during Chronic LCMV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Uma; Hill, Beth L; Cenna, Jonathan M; Gofman, Larisa; Fernandes, Nicole C; Haldar, Bijayesh; Potula, Raghava

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely used psychostimulant that severely impacts the host's innate and adaptive immune systems and has profound immunological implications. T cells play a critical role in orchestrating immune responses. We have shown recently how chronic exposure to METH affects T cell activation using a murine model of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection. Using the TriCOM (trinary state combinations) feature of GemStone™ to study the polyfunctionality of T cells, we have analyzed how METH affected the cytokine production pattern over the course of chronic LCMV infection. Furthermore, we have studied in detail the effects of METH on splenic T cell functions, such as cytokine production and degranulation, and how they regulate each other. We used the Probability State Modeling (PSM) program to visualize the differentiation of effector/memory T cell subsets during LCMV infection and analyze the effects of METH on T cell subset progression. We recently demonstrated that METH increased PD-1 expression on T cells during viral infection. In this study, we further analyzed the impact of PD-1 expression on T cell functional markers as well as its expression in the effector/memory subsets. Overall, our study indicates that analyzing polyfunctionality of T cells can provide additional insight into T cell effector functions. Analysis of T cell heterogeneity is important to highlight changes in the evolution of memory/effector functions during chronic viral infections. Our study also highlights the impact of METH on PD-1 expression and its consequences on T cell responses.

  5. Studies in chemical dynamics and radiation chemistry. Technical progress report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppermann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Research progress in the following areas is reported: low energy electron scattering; photoelectron spectrometry; elementary reactions by photolysis at variable wavelengths; collisions in crossed molecular beams; and, diffusion kinetics in the radiation chemistry of water. Publications related to the work are included. (JGB)

  6. Physico-chemical studies of radiation effects in cells. Progress report, February 15, 1982-February 14, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in studies investigating the chemical mechanisms involved in radiation-induced cellular damage is reported. Three organisms currently being tested are Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus subtilis, and Escherichia coli, silver and mercury have been used as radiosensitizers, and their interaction with DNA studied

  7. IL-35, a hallmark of immune-regulation in cancer progression, chronic infections and inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymouri, Manouchehr; Pirro, Matteo; Fallarino, Francesca; Gargaro, Marco; Sahebkar, Amirhosein

    2018-03-25

    Cytokine members of the IL-12 family have attracted enormous attention in the last few years, with IL-35 being the one of the most attractive-suppressive cytokine. IL-35 is an important mediator of regulatory T cell function. Regulatory T cells play key roles in restoring immune homeostasis after facing challenges such as infection by specific pathogens. Moreover, a crucial role for regulatory T cell populations has been demonstrated in several physiological processes, including establishment of fetal-maternal tolerance, maintenance of self-tolerance and prevention of autoimmune diseases. However, a deleterious involvement of immune regulatory T cells has been documented in specific inhibition of immune responses against tumor cells, promotion of chronic infections and establishment of chronic inflammatory disorders. In this review, we attempt to shed light on the concept of immune-homoeostasis on the aforementioned issues, taking IL-35 as the hallmark of regulatory responses. The dilemma between immune-mediated cancer treatment and inflammation is discussed. Histopathological indications of chronic vs. acute infections are elaborated. Moreover, the evidence that IL-35 requires additional immune-regulatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β, to induce effective and maximal anti-inflammatory effects suggest that immune-regulation requires multi-factorial analysis of many immune playmakers rather than a specific immune target. © 2018 UICC.

  8. Expression of blood serum proteins and lymphocyte differentiation clusters after chronic occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybkina, Valentina L.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Adamova, Galina V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Bannikova, Maria V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Scherthan, Harry; Meineke, Viktor; Doerr, Harald [University of Ulm, Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology, Munich (Germany); Zurochka, Alexander V. [Immunology Institute, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    This study aimed to assess effects of chronic occupational exposure on immune status in Mayak workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). The study cohort consists of 77 workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays at total dose from 0.5 to 3.0 Gy (14 individuals) and workers with combined exposure (external gamma-rays at total dose range 0.7-5.1 Gy and internal alpha-radiation from incorporated plutonium with a body burden of 0.3-16.4 kBq). The control group consists of 43 age- and sex-matched individuals who never were exposed to IR, never involved in any cleanup operations following radiation accidents and never resided at contaminated areas. Enzyme-linked immunoassay and flow cytometry were used to determine the relative concentration of lymphocytes and proteins. The concentrations of T-lymphocytes, interleukin-8 and immunoglobulins G were decreased in external gamma-exposed workers relative to control. Relative concentrations of NKT-lymphocytes, concentrations of transforming growth factor-β, interferon gamma, immunoglobulins A, immunoglobulins M and matrix proteinase-9 were higher in this group as compared with control. Relative concentrations of T-lymphocytes and concentration of interleukin-8 were decreased, while both the relative and absolute concentration of natural killers, concentration of immunoglobulins A and M and matrix proteinase-9 were increased in workers with combined exposure as compared to control. An inverse linear relation was revealed between absolute concentration of T-lymphocytes, relative and absolute concentration of T-helpers cells, concentration of interferon gamma and total absorbed dose from external gamma-rays in exposed workers. For workers with incorporated plutonium, there was an inverse linear relation of absolute concentration of T-helpers as well as direct linear relation of relative concentration of NKT-lymphocytes to total absorbed red bone marrow dose from internal alpha-radiation. In all, chronic

  9. Expression of blood serum proteins and lymphocyte differentiation clusters after chronic occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybkina, Valentina L.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Adamova, Galina V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Bannikova, Maria V.; Scherthan, Harry; Meineke, Viktor; Doerr, Harald; Zurochka, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess effects of chronic occupational exposure on immune status in Mayak workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). The study cohort consists of 77 workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays at total dose from 0.5 to 3.0 Gy (14 individuals) and workers with combined exposure (external gamma-rays at total dose range 0.7-5.1 Gy and internal alpha-radiation from incorporated plutonium with a body burden of 0.3-16.4 kBq). The control group consists of 43 age- and sex-matched individuals who never were exposed to IR, never involved in any cleanup operations following radiation accidents and never resided at contaminated areas. Enzyme-linked immunoassay and flow cytometry were used to determine the relative concentration of lymphocytes and proteins. The concentrations of T-lymphocytes, interleukin-8 and immunoglobulins G were decreased in external gamma-exposed workers relative to control. Relative concentrations of NKT-lymphocytes, concentrations of transforming growth factor-β, interferon gamma, immunoglobulins A, immunoglobulins M and matrix proteinase-9 were higher in this group as compared with control. Relative concentrations of T-lymphocytes and concentration of interleukin-8 were decreased, while both the relative and absolute concentration of natural killers, concentration of immunoglobulins A and M and matrix proteinase-9 were increased in workers with combined exposure as compared to control. An inverse linear relation was revealed between absolute concentration of T-lymphocytes, relative and absolute concentration of T-helpers cells, concentration of interferon gamma and total absorbed dose from external gamma-rays in exposed workers. For workers with incorporated plutonium, there was an inverse linear relation of absolute concentration of T-helpers as well as direct linear relation of relative concentration of NKT-lymphocytes to total absorbed red bone marrow dose from internal alpha-radiation. In all, chronic

  10. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation is a major mediator of CKD progression and is partly driven by altered gut microbiome and intestinal barrier disruption, events which are caused by: urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; disruption of epithelial barrier by urea-derived ammoni...

  11. A resistant starch fiber diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation is a constant feature and a major mediator of CKD progression. It is, in part, driven by altered gut microbiome and disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier, events which are primarily caused by: 1- urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; 2-...

  12. Chronic Family Economic Hardship, Family Processes and Progression of Mental and Physical Health Symptoms in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Kyoung; Wickrama, K. A. S.; Simons, Leslie Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Research has documented the relationship between family stressors such as family economic hardship and marital conflict and adolescents' mental health symptoms, especially depressive symptoms. Few studies, however, have examined the processes whereby supportive parenting lessens this effect and the progression of mental health and physical health…

  13. Effectiveness of the hydrotherapy in children with chronic encephalopathy no progressive of the childhood: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline de Carvalho Jacques

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Now Cerebral Palsy is considered like Chronic Encephalopathy no Progressive of the Childhood and defined as any disorder characterized by alteration in the structure and function of the body, activity and participation due to a lesion no progressive of the brain in development. Several techniques physiotherapy exist for individuals rehabilitation with that pathology, however, no technique stands out as more effective in the literature. The use of the approach hydrotherapy becomes viable in several aspects structural, functional and social in the rehabilitation process. OBJETIVE: It is done necessary to evaluate, through the selection and discerning analysis of article, the evidences of the effectiveness of the hydrotherapy in children and/or adolescents with Chronic Encephalopathy no Progressive of the childhood with inferior age to 17 years. METHODS: Research was accomplished at the Virtual Library in Health in the bases of bibliographical data of LILACS, MEDLINE, SciELO, Cochrane Library and search active in national and international newspapers. RESULTS: The databases located only two article of systematic review on the approached theme. Through these, it was possible to locate for search activates six scientific articles. These were analyzed in agreement with the inclusion criteria, and finally, only three articles composed the study, where the same ones were appraised as for the methodological quality. No article of the type randomized controlled trial was found, just an quasy- randomized one. CONCLUSION: It had limited evidence of the effects hydrotherapy in that population. Like this being, future studies of the type randomized controlled trial are made necessary for the clinical conduct and for scientific community.

  14. Time of progression to osteopenia/osteoporosis in chronically HIV-infected patients: screening DXA scan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Negredo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Algorithms for bone mineral density (BMD management in HIV-infected patients are lacking. Our objective was to assess how often a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA scan should be performed by assessing time of progression to osteopenia/osteoporosis. METHODS: All DXA scans performed between 2000 and 2009 from HIV-infected patients with at least two DXA were included. Time to an event (osteopenia and osteoporosis was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Strata (tertiles were defined using baseline minimum T scores. Differences between strata in time to an event were compared with the log-rank test. RESULTS: Of 391 patients (1,639 DXAs, 49.6% had osteopenia and 21.7% osteoporosis at their first DXA scan. Of the 112 (28.6% with normal BMD, 35.7% progressed to osteopenia; median progression time was 6.7 years. These patients were stratified: "low-risk" (baseline minimum T score >-0.2 SD, "middle-risk" (between -0.2 and -0.6 SD, and "high-risk" (from -0.6 to -1 SD; median progression time to osteopenia was 8.7, >7.2, and 1.7 years, respectively (p8.5 years. Progression time was >8.2 years in "low-risk" tertile (T score between -1.1 and -1.6 SD, >8.5 years in "middle-risk" (between -1.6 and -2, and 3.2 years in "high-risk" (from -2 to -2.4 (p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Our results may help to define the BMD testing interval. The lowest T score tertiles would suggest recommending a subsequent DXA in 1-2 years; in the highest tertiles, ≥6 years. Early intervention in patients with bone demineralization could reduce fracture-related morbidity/mortality.

  15. Uremic Solutes in Chronic Kidney Disease and Their Role in Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan A J G van den Brand

    Full Text Available To date, over 150 possible uremic solutes have been listed, but their role in the progression of CKD is largely unknown. Here, the association between a selected panel of uremic solutes and progression in CKD patients was investigated.Patients from the MASTERPLAN study, a randomized controlled trial in CKD patients with a creatinine clearance between 20 and 70 ml/min per 1.73m2, were selected based on their rate of eGFR decline during the first five years of follow-up. They were categorized as rapid (decline >5 ml/min per year or slow progressors. Concentrations of eleven uremic solutes were obtained at baseline and after one year of follow-up. Logistic regression was used to compare the odds for rapid to slow progression by uremic solute concentrations at baseline. Variability in uremic solute levels was assessed using scatter plots, and limits of variability were calculated.In total, 40 rapidly and 40 slowly progressing patients were included. Uremic solutes were elevated in all patients compared to reference values for healthy persons. The serum levels of uremic solutes were not associated with rapid progression. Moreover, we observed substantial variability in solute levels over time.Elevated concentrations of uremic solutes measured in this study did not explain differences in rate of eGFR decline in CKD patients, possibly due to lack of power as a result of the small sample size, substantial between patient variability, and variability in solute concentrations over time. The etiology of intra-individual variation in uremic solute levels remains to be elucidated.

  16. Uremic Solutes in Chronic Kidney Disease and Their Role in Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brand, Jan A J G; Mutsaers, Henricus A M; van Zuilen, Arjan D; Blankestijn, Peter J; van den Broek, Petra H; Russel, Frans G M; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2016-01-01

    To date, over 150 possible uremic solutes have been listed, but their role in the progression of CKD is largely unknown. Here, the association between a selected panel of uremic solutes and progression in CKD patients was investigated. Patients from the MASTERPLAN study, a randomized controlled trial in CKD patients with a creatinine clearance between 20 and 70 ml/min per 1.73m2, were selected based on their rate of eGFR decline during the first five years of follow-up. They were categorized as rapid (decline >5 ml/min per year) or slow progressors. Concentrations of eleven uremic solutes were obtained at baseline and after one year of follow-up. Logistic regression was used to compare the odds for rapid to slow progression by uremic solute concentrations at baseline. Variability in uremic solute levels was assessed using scatter plots, and limits of variability were calculated. In total, 40 rapidly and 40 slowly progressing patients were included. Uremic solutes were elevated in all patients compared to reference values for healthy persons. The serum levels of uremic solutes were not associated with rapid progression. Moreover, we observed substantial variability in solute levels over time. Elevated concentrations of uremic solutes measured in this study did not explain differences in rate of eGFR decline in CKD patients, possibly due to lack of power as a result of the small sample size, substantial between patient variability, and variability in solute concentrations over time. The etiology of intra-individual variation in uremic solute levels remains to be elucidated.

  17. Regulatory T-cell and T-helper 17 balance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia progression and autoimmune cytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Deepesh P; Varma, Subhash; Varma, Neelam; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Bose, Parveen; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    The reasons for progression and autoimmune cytopenias (AIC) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are not entirely clear, with previous studies suggesting a role for regulatory T-cells (Treg). In this study we prospectively studied Treg (CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127low), interleukin-10 (IL-10) producing Treg and T-helper 17 (Th17) (CD3+CD4+IL-17+) cells in 40 treatment-naive patients with CLL. The percentage of Th17 and not Treg cells was significantly higher in the AIC cohort than in those without AIC (pcells are responsible for AIC of CLL. Analysis of lymph-node aspirates showed that the percentage of Treg and IL-10 expression in Treg and not Th17 was significantly higher than in peripheral blood (pcells play a major role in the microenvironment where disease progression occurs. This shows the importance of maintaining the Treg:Th17 equilibrium, for imbalance leads to CLL progression or AIC.

  18. Toll like receptor7 polymorphisms in relation to disease susceptibility and progression in Chinese patients with chronic HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junping; Zhang, Tong; Cao, Lina; Li, Aixin; Zheng, Kai; Zhang, Nan; Su, Bin; Chen, Zhiyun; Chen, Ning; Wu, Hao; He, Qiushui

    2017-09-29

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate and adaptive immunity, protecting the host from viral pathogens. We studied the effect of TLR7 polymorphisms on disease susceptibility and progression of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection in Chinese adults. Blood samples were taken from 612 patients with confirmed CHB, hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver cirrhosis (LC) or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 293 controls. TLR7 polymorphisms (rs179010-C > T, rs2074109-T > C, and rs179009-A > G) were analyzed by PCR-based sequencing. A significantly higher frequency of TLR7 rs179010 C allele was found in male CHB patients than in controls (74.8% vs 59.5%, P = 0.002). The frequency of rs179009 G allele was markedly increased with disease progression when male patients with CHB, LC and HCC were compared (P = 0.012). The haplotype CTA was significantly associated with an increased susceptibility to CHB among male patients (P = 0.000). Frequency of the haplotype CTG was higher in male patients with HCC than CHB (P = 0.005). No such differences in these allele frequencies were found between female patients and controls. Our results indicated that TLR7 polymorphisms play an important role in disease susceptibility and the progression of CHB infections in Chinese adults, and may partly explain the high incidence of HBV related diseases in Chinese men.

  19. Role of p53 status in radiation sensitivity and cell cycle progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zellars, Richard C.; Loney, Tania; Schott, Ann F.; Davis, Mary A.; Maybaum, Jonathan; Clarke, Michael F.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Although p53 function plays a major role in G1 arrest after radiation, the influence of p53 status on progress through other phases of the cell cycle and on radiation sensitivity of human tumors is less clear. We investigated these issues using cells with a conditional expression system for wild type p53. Methods: A temperature sensitive murine wild type p53 plasmid was used (Ginsberg D, et al: Mol. Cell.Biol . 11:582, 1991). At the permissive temperature (32 deg. C), this plasmid produces a protein which assumes a conformation that exhibits wild type p53 function. However, when cells are cultured at 38 deg. C, this protein assumes an inactive conformation. HT29 human colon cancer cells (which are p53 mutant) were transduced with this plasmid (designated PEP A and PEP G cells) or a control vector (designated CCH1 cells) using electroporation and Geneticin selection. The presence of murine p53 transcript in the PEP cells was confirmed by Northern analysis. Results: Cells were cultured under 3 conditions: 1) 38 deg. C at all times; 2) 32 deg. C for 24 hours prior to irradiation and 3) 32 deg. C for 24 hours after irradiation. We found that culturing under permissive temperatures produced a small decrease in surviving fraction in the PEP clones (0.61 ± 0.10 and 0.64 ± 0.07, for PEP A and G, respectively) but not the CCH1 controls (1.14 ± 0.15). PEP cells tended to be more radiosensitive than CCH1 cells (even under non-permissive conditions) and demonstrated a trend towards increased radiosensitivity under both Conditions 2 and 3. In addition, flow cytometry revealed that a 24 hour exposure to permissive conditions increased the fraction of cells in G1 slightly and in G2/M substantially. S phase was almost absent. Conclusion: Restoration of p53 function in HT29 human colon cancer cells using this temperature sensitive system produced increased cytotoxicity and radiation sensitivity as well as cell cycle redistribution. It will be important to assess the

  20. Treatment and long-term outcome of chronic radiation esophagitis after radiation therapy for head and neck tumors: A report of 13 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvain, C.; Barrioz, T.; Besson, I.; Babin, P.; Fontanel, J.P.; Daban, A.; Matuchansky, C.; Beauchant, M. (CHU J Bernard, Poitiers (France))

    1993-05-01

    The natural history of chronic radiation esophagitis occurring in previously normal esophagus is still unknown. The authors describe here the long-term outcome of chronic esophagitis arising after neck irradiation for oropharynx and larynx carcinomas in 13 consecutive adult patients. The first clinical signs of radiation esophagitis were dysphagia or impossibility of oral intake, which appeared within 26 months (range 2--120 months) after the end of radiation for pyriform fossae carcinoma (N = 5), tonsil carcinoma (N = 2), larynx carcinoma (N = 2), pharynx carcinoma (N = 2), base of the tongue (N = 1), and thyroid carcinomas (N = 1). During upper endoscopy, an esophageal stenosis was found in 11 cases and was associated with ulceration in three cases. An isolated esophageal ulceration was present in only two cases. Chronic radiation esophagitis diagnosis was confirmed by histology and surgery in seven cases. In the last six cases, diagnosis was supported by the absence of first cancer relapses within a median follow-up of two years (16 months to nine years) and by endoscopic findings. Seven patients received parenteral or enteral nutrition. Ten patients were treated by peroral dilatations. These treatments allowed nearly normal oral diet in 11/13 patients. Only one patient was lost of follow-up after 20 months. Four patients died from chronic radiation esophagitis. One of these patients died from massive hemorrhage after peroral dilatation. Four patients died of a second carcinoma with no first cancer recurrence. Four patients were alive after six months to nine years of follow-up. Moderate dysphagia was still present, allowing nearly normal oral feeding. In conclusion, chronic radiation esophagitis is a severe disease with an underestimated frequency. In this study, peroral dilatations appeared to be necessary and were not associated with an increased morbidity. 21 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    In this project we have proposed a mechanism for radiation damage to DNA and detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. In this past year several investigations have been completed or are nearing completion. These investigations are an ESR study of the N 1 -substituted thymine π-cation radicals; studies of electron reactions with amino acid anhydrides; and ESR and pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer in dinucleoside phosphate anions. Studies which we have made significant progress on in this past year are positive ion radicals of the dinucleoside phosphates, and reactions of the π-cations of thymine derivatives. In the first study the spin density distribution in the cation radicals of thymidine and thymidine-5 1 -monophosphate have been elucidated. Couplings are found to the ribose group in these radicals. It is believed that these results will aid the identification of cation radicals in DNA. In study 2, the results indicate that these cyclic anhydrides can undergo reductive deamination. In study 3, the results show the order of electron affinities of the DNA bases to be thymine approximately equal to cytosine greater than adenine approximately equal to guanine

  2. Chronic Progressive Neurodegeneration in a transgenic mouse model of Prion disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fainstein

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases present pathologically with progressive structural destruction of neurons and accumulation of mis-folded proteins specific for each condition leading to brain atrophy and functional disability. Many animal models exert deposition of pathogenic protein without accompanying neurodegeneration pattern. The lack of a comprehensive model hinders the efforts to develop treatment. We performed longitudinal quantification of cellular, neuronal and synaptic density, as well as of neurogenesis in brains of mice, mimicking for genetic Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease as compared to age matched wild type mice. Mice exhibited a neurodegenerative process indicated by progressive reduction in cortical neurons and synapses, starting at age of 4-6 months, in accordance with neurologic disability. This was accompanied by significant decrease in subventricular/subependymal zone neurogenesis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis was detected in mice, a neurodegenerative process of CA1 and CA3 regions associated with impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function was observed. In conclusion, mice exhibit pathological neurodegeneration concomitant with progressive neurological disease, indicating these mice can serve as a model for neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Chronic Progressive Neurodegeneration in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Prion Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainstein, Nina; Dori, Dvir; Frid, Kati; Fritz, Alexa T; Shapiro, Ilona; Gabizon, Ruth; Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases present pathologically with progressive structural destruction of neurons and accumulation of mis-folded proteins specific for each condition leading to brain atrophy and functional disability. Many animal models exert deposition of pathogenic proteins without an accompanying neurodegeneration pattern. The lack of a comprehensive model hinders efforts to develop treatment. We performed longitudinal quantification of cellular, neuronal and synaptic density, as well as of neurogenesis in brains of mice mimicking for genetic Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease as compared to age-matched wild-type mice. Mice exhibited a neurodegenerative process of progressive reduction in cortical neurons and synapses starting at age of 4-6 months, in accord with neurologic disability. This was accompanied by significant decrease in subventricular/subependymal zone neurogenesis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis was detected in mice, a neurodegenerative process of CA1 and CA3 regions associated with impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function was observed. In conclusion, mice exhibit pathological neurodegeneration concomitant with neurological disease progression, indicating these mice can serve as a model for neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosratola D Vaziri

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a major mediator of CKD progression and is partly driven by altered gut microbiome and intestinal barrier disruption, events which are caused by: urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; disruption of epithelial barrier by urea-derived ammonia leading to endotoxemia and bacterial translocation; and restriction of potassium-rich fruits and vegetables which are common sources of fermentable fiber. Restriction of these foods leads to depletion of bacteria that convert indigestible carbohydrates to short chain fatty acids which are important nutrients for colonocytes and regulatory T lymphocytes. We hypothesized that a high resistant starch diet attenuates CKD progression. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a chow containing 0.7% adenine for 2 weeks to induce CKD. Rats were then fed diets supplemented with amylopectin (low-fiber control or high fermentable fiber (amylose maize resistant starch, HAM-RS2 for 3 weeks. CKD rats consuming low fiber diet exhibited reduced creatinine clearance, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, tubular damage, activation of NFkB, upregulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-fibrotic molecules; impaired Nrf2 activity, down-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and disruption of colonic epithelial tight junction. The high resistant starch diet significantly attenuated these abnormalities. Thus high resistant starch diet retards CKD progression and attenuates oxidative stress and inflammation in rats. Future studies are needed to explore the impact of HAM-RS2 in CKD patients.

  5. Pivotal roles of Kupffer cells in the progression and regression of DDC-induced chronic cholangiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemail, Leila; Miyao, Masashi; Kotani, Hirokazu; Kawai, Chihiro; Minami, Hirozo; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2018-04-23

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are key players in maintaining tissue homeostasis and are involved in various liver diseases. However, the roles of KCs in the pathogenesis of cholangiopathy are largely unknown. We aimed to investigate the precise roles of KCs in both the progression and regression phases of the 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC)-induced cholangiopathy model. In the early phase of DDC-induced cholangiopathy, the number of KCs significantly increased over time. Moreover, KCs were associated with abnormal phenotypic changes in other liver cells, such as hepatocytes, biliary epithelial cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and hepatic stellate cells. In contrast, KC depletion by clodronate administration suppressed the progression of the disease, and maintained the phenotypes of other cells. In the regression phase, the numbers of KCs significantly decreased, and the cells redifferentiated to their quiescent state. In contrast, KC depletion delayed the recovery of cells by maintaining other liver cells in an active state. These findings suggest that KCs play detrimental roles in the progression phase; however, they are beneficial in the regression phase by mediating interactions between other liver cells. Our data provide new insights into the roles of KCs in the pathogenesis of cholangiopathy.

  6. [Reports from Scientific Review Committees on Recommendations for Radiation Protection]. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A brief annual report is presented for work on recommendations dealing with management of radionuclides produced in nuclear power generation, radiation associated with medical examinations, radiation received by radiation employees, experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations, internal emitter standards, radionuclides in the environment, biological effects of magnetic fields, and radiation exposure and potentially related injury

  7. Analysis of the value of post-radiation prostate biopsy in predicting subsequent disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benda, R.; Shamsa, F.; Meetze, K.; Bolton, S.; Littrup, P.; Grignon, D.; Washington, T.; Forman, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the value of Transrectal ultrasound(TRUS), Color flow doppler(CFD) and Prostate specific antigen(PSA) in identifying residual disease in the prostate status post external beam radiation therapy and to determine the value of this pathologic information in predicting subsequent disease progression. Materials and Methods: As part of four prospective protocols, 146 patients had scheduled TRUS guided prostate biopsies 6-25 months status post radiation therapy. The stage distribution was: 13% T1, 51% T2, and 36% T3/T4. Fifty six percent had neo-adjuvant hormones. Conformal photon or mixed neutron/photon irradiation was given to a median 2 Gy/fraction equivalent dose of 77 Gy(range 74 to 84 Gy). Following treatment, patients were assessed by digital rectal exam (DRE), PSA and TRUS guided biopsies at 6, 12 and/or 18 months. The ultrasound and CFD results were scored as normal, suspicious or abnormal. Sextant biopsies were obtained as well as ultrasound guided biopsies from any abnormal ultrasound or doppler area. The biopsies, all read by one pathologist (DG), were graded as negative, marked, moderate, minimal therapeutic effect or positive. The median followup post radiation therapy was 33.6 months and post biopsy was 25.3 months. Comparisons were done by Kappa index with corresponding 95% CI, chi square and Fisher's exact tests. Results: Twenty-eight patients had biopsies at both six and 12-18 months. Overall 35% of patients had all negative cores, 30% had at least one core showing a marked therapeutic effect, and 35% had at least one core showing moderate or minimal therapeutic effect or were positive. Although CFD correlated with a positive biopsy in 9% and a suspicious doppler identified cancer in 15% of cases, an abnormal TRUS identified cancer in 29.5% biopsies ((49(166))). However, a serum PSA >1.5ng/ml at the time of biopsy predicted 61% of positive biopsies ((23(38))). A negative biopsy was associated with low stage (≤T2c, p=0.001), low pre

  8. Reinforcing the protection against ionizing radiation in medical uses through following the progress in modern medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Junzheng; Li Junli

    2008-01-01

    The medical application of ionizing radiation has the longest history, the most extensive uses and the strongest effect among the multiple applications of ionizing radiation technology. With the development of diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, for instances, the radiology, the interventional radiology, the nuclear medicine, and the radiation oncology; the infrastructures and teambuilding of medical physics in China has been becoming more and more important and urgent. Fortunately, people in relevant fields have already recognized this situation and made lots of progresses in the recent years, for example, the 221 st Xiangshan Science Conference took 'The Development of Medical Physics' as its main topic in 2004; in recent years, a series of regulations and national standards regarding to the quality assurance and radiological protection of medical exposure and the teambuilding of the relevant departments in hospital have been successively issued; the subject of Medical Physics was opened as both undergraduate and graduated courses in more and more universities (Tsinghua University, Peking University etc); the Committee on Medical Physics was enrolled as a new member of the Chinese Physical Society. Modern medical physics should include 4 parts, medical imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, radiation oncology physics, and health physics. Protection against ionizing radiation needs to fully cover the development of medical physics, which includes the protection against ianizing radiation in medical uses. This article emphasizes the improvement of the ionizing radiation protection in medical uses, for marking of 30th anniversary of the Journal of Radiation Protection. (authors)

  9. Predictors of high healthcare resource utilization and liver disease progression among patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMori, Joyce; Tandon, Neeta; Laliberté, François; Germain, Guillaume; Pilon, Dominic; Lefebvre, Patrick; Prabhakar, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Since hepatitis C virus therapy is typically prioritized for patients with more advanced disease, predicting which patients will progress could help direct scarce resources to those likely to benefit most. This study aims to identify demographics and clinical characteristics associated with high healthcare resource utilization (HRU) and liver disease progression among CHC patients. Using health insurance claims (January 2001-March 2013), adult patients with ≥2 CHC claims (ICD-9-CM: 070.44 or 070.54), and ≥6 months of continuous insurance coverage before and ≥36 months after the first CHC diagnosis were included. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus were excluded. Generalized estimating equations were used to identify the demographic and clinical characteristics of being in the 20% of patients with the highest HRU. Factors predicting liver disease progression were also identified. In the study population (n = 4898), liver disease severity and both CHC- and non-CHC-related comorbidities and conditions were strong predictors of high healthcare costs, with odds ratios (ORs; 95% confidence interval [CI]) for ≥2 CHC-related and ≥2 non-CHC-related comorbidities/conditions of 2.78 (2.48-3.12) and 2.19 (1.76-2.72), respectively. CHC- and non-CHC-related comorbidities and conditions were also strong predictors of liver disease progression with ORs (95% CI) for ≥2 CHC-related and ≥2 non-CHC-related comorbidities and conditions of 2.18 (1.83-2.60) and 1.50 (1.14-1.97), respectively. Potential inaccuracies in claims data, information or classification bias, and findings based on a privately insured population. This study suggests that CHC patients with high healthcare resource utilization have a high level of comorbidity at baseline and also that non-CHC comorbidities and conditions are strong predictors of high HRU. Non-cirrhotic CHC patients with one or more comorbidities are at high risk of progressing to cirrhosis or end-stage liver disease.

  10. Research progress and application prospect of radiation-resistant prokaryotic microbe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Zhu Jing; Zhang Zhidong; Tang Qiyong; Chen Ming

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-resistant microbe is becoming the research hotspot because of its special life phenomenon and physiological mechanism. Radiation-resistant bacteria are one kind of the most studied radiation-resistant microbe. This article summarized some aspects of the research on radiation-resistant bacteria, including the radiation resistant bacteria resources, and discussed its potential application prospects in the environmental engineering, biotechnology, human health, military and space et al. (authors)

  11. Progression from Chronic Atrophic Gastritis to Gastric Cancer; Tangle, Toggle, Tackle with Korea Red Ginseng

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jae; Chung, Jun Won; Lee, So Jung; Choi, Ki Seok; Kim, Ju Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2010-01-01

    Key molecular players that link inflammation to carcinogenesis are prostaglandins, cytokines, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), chemokines, angiogenic growth factors, and free radicals, all of which lead to increased mutations and altered functions of important enzymes and proteins, for example, activation of oncogenic products and/or inhibition of tumor suppressor proteins, in inflamed tissues, thus contributing to multi-stage carcinogenesis process. Interpreted reversely, the identification of the molecular mechanisms by which chronic inflammation increases cancer risk or optimal intervention of targeted drugs or agents during the inflammation-associated carcinogenic process could be a necessary basis for developing new strategy of cancer prevention at many sites. In this review, we discuss the possibilities for cancer prevention by controlling inflammation process in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated inflamed stomach with Korea red ginseng. Korea red ginseng is a good example of a natural herb that has ubiquitous properties that are conductive to stop inflammatory carcinogenesis that is un wanted outcome of H. pylori infection, rendering rejuvenation of chronic atrophic gastritis. PMID:20490314

  12. Autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells are effective for chronic intractable radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, S.; Yoshimoto, H.; Ohtsuru, A.; Hirano, A.; Yamashita, S.

    2012-01-01

    Effective therapy for chronic radiation injuries, such as ulcers, is prone to infection. Stiffness is expected since the therapeutic radiation often involves wider and deeper tissues and often requires extensive debridement and reconstruction, which are not sometimes appropriate for elderly and compromised hosts. Autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) are highly yielding, forming relatively elderly aged consecutive 10 cases, 63.6±14.9 y (52-89 y), with mean radiation dose of 75.0±35.4 Gy (50-120 Gy) were included with at least 10-month follow-up. Minimal debridement and ADRC injection in the wound bed and margin along with the injection of mixture of fat and ADRCs in the periphery were tested for efficacy and regenerated tissue quality by clinically as well as imaging by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Uncultured ADRCs of 1.6±1.3 x 10 7 cells were obtained. All cases healed uneventfully after 6.6±3.2 weeks (2-10 weeks) post-operatively. The done site morbidity was negligible and without major complications, such as paralysis or massive haematoma. The regenerated tissue quality was significantly superior to the pre-operative one and the mixture of fat and ADRCs connected to the intact tissue was very soft and pliable. Mean follow-up at 1.9±0.8 y (0.9-2.9 y) revealed no recurrence or new ulceration after treatment. Thus, the ADRCs treatment for decades-long radiation injuries is effective, safe and improves the quality of wounds. (authors)

  13. Autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells are effective for chronic intractable radiation injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akita, S; Yoshimoto, H [Div. of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Dept. of Developmental and Reconstructive Medicine, Nagasaki Univ., Graduate School of Biomedical and Sciences, Nagasaki (Japan); Ohtsuru, A [Takashi Nagai Memorial International Hibakusha Medical Center, Nagasaki Univ. Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan); Hirano, A [Div. of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Dept. of Developmental and Reconstructive Medicine, Nagasaki Univ., Graduate School of Biomedical and Sciences, Nagasaki (Japan); Yamashita, S [Takashi Nagai Memorial International Hibakusha Medical Center, Nagasaki Univ. Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan); Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Atomic Bomb Disease Inst., Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Effective therapy for chronic radiation injuries, such as ulcers, is prone to infection. Stiffness is expected since the therapeutic radiation often involves wider and deeper tissues and often requires extensive debridement and reconstruction, which are not sometimes appropriate for elderly and compromised hosts. Autologous adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) are highly yielding, forming relatively elderly aged consecutive 10 cases, 63.6{+-}14.9 y (52-89 y), with mean radiation dose of 75.0{+-}35.4 Gy (50-120 Gy) were included with at least 10-month follow-up. Minimal debridement and ADRC injection in the wound bed and margin along with the injection of mixture of fat and ADRCs in the periphery were tested for efficacy and regenerated tissue quality by clinically as well as imaging by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Uncultured ADRCs of 1.6{+-}1.3 x 10{sup 7} cells were obtained. All cases healed uneventfully after 6.6{+-}3.2 weeks (2-10 weeks) post-operatively. The done site morbidity was negligible and without major complications, such as paralysis or massive haematoma. The regenerated tissue quality was significantly superior to the pre-operative one and the mixture of fat and ADRCs connected to the intact tissue was very soft and pliable. Mean follow-up at 1.9{+-}0.8 y (0.9-2.9 y) revealed no recurrence or new ulceration after treatment. Thus, the ADRCs treatment for decades-long radiation injuries is effective, safe and improves the quality of wounds. (authors)

  14. Chronic restraint-induced stress has little modifying effect on radiation hematopoietic toxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Katsube, Takanori; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Vares, Guillaume; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Liu Qiang; Morita, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    Both radiation and stresses cause detrimental effects on humans. Besides possible health effects resulting directly from radiation exposure, the nuclear plant accident is a cause of social psychological stresses. A recent study showed that chronic restraint-induced stresses (CRIS) attenuated Trp53 functions and increased carcinogenesis susceptibility of Trp53-heterozygous mice to total-body X-irradiation (TBXI), having a big impact on the academic world and a sensational effect on the public, especially the residents living in radioactively contaminated areas. It is important to investigate the possible modification effects from CRIS on radiation-induced health consequences in Trp53 wild-type (Trp53wt) animals. Prior to a carcinogenesis study, effects of TBXI on the hematopoietic system under CRIS were investigated in terms of hematological abnormality in the peripheral blood and residual damage in the bone marrow erythrocytes using a mouse restraint model. Five-week-old male Trp53wt C57BL/6J mice were restrained 6 h per day for 28 consecutive days, and TBXI (4 Gy) was given on the 8th day. Results showed that CRIS alone induced a marked decrease in the red blood cell (RBC) and the white blood cell (WBC) count, while TBXI caused significantly lower counts of RBCs, WBCs and blood platelets, and a lower concentration of hemoglobin regardless of CRIS. CRIS alone did not show any significant effect on erythrocyte proliferation and on induction of micronucleated erythrocytes, whereas TBXI markedly inhibited erythrocyte proliferation and induced a significant increase in the incidences of micronucleated erythrocytes, regardless of CRIS. These findings suggest that CRIS does not have a significant impact on radiation-induced detrimental effects on the hematopoietic system in Trp53wt mice. (author)

  15. A case of chronic effusive-constrictive pericarditis with slight myocardial involvement caused by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horimoto, Masashi; Funayama, Naoki; Takenaka, Takashi; Igarashi, Takeki; Sekiguchi, Morie.

    1985-01-01

    A 25-year-old female was admitted with shortness of breath and abdominal swelling. Six years before the admission, she had received resection of 7th to 9th left ribs and subsequent radiation of 5,000 rads to the thorax for the treatment of rib osteoblastoma. One year after the radiation, marked pericardial effusion associated with acute pericarditis was observed and was improved by digitalization and diuretic therapy. Since two years after the radiation, she had felt easy fatigability, swelling of face and foot, and transient faintness on more than 10 meters running. On admission, chest X-ray photograph showed increased pulmonary vascularity without cardiac enlargement. Electrocardiogram indicated systolic right ventricular strain, mitral P, and nonspecific S-T segment depression in left precordial leads. Two-dimensional echocardiography presented pericardial effusion with posterior pericardial thickening, while M-mode echocardiography showed diastolic posterior movement of interventricular septum and diastolic flattening of left ventricular posterior wall. Cardiac catheterization revealed marked elevation of mean right atrial pressure, pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure, right and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, accompanied with their equalization. In addition, pressure waves of right and left ventricle showed diastolic dip and plateau. Phono-cardiogram and apexcardiogram presented pericardial knock sound and systolic retraction, respectively. Cardiac angiography showed diastolic restriction of left ventricle without any stenosis of coronary artery. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed thickening of anterior and left lateral pericardium with expansion of inferior vena cava, and abdominal CT revealed ascites with slight enlargements of liver and spleen. From above obtained data, chronic effusive-constrictive pericarditis, which was attributed to radiation, was strongly suggested. (J.P.N.)

  16. Research progress in combination therapy with pegylated interferon and nucleos(tide analogues in treatment of chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Yiqi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Current antiviral treatment strategy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB includes pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN and nucleos(tide analogues (NAs. Whether combination therapy with PEG-IFN and NAs improve therapeutic efficacy has become the key question regarding the antiviral therapy for CHB. This article reviews the recent progress in combination therapy for the management of CHB. The results indicate that the efficacy of simultaneous combination of PEG-IFN and NAs is not superior to that of PEG-IFN monotherapy in terms of HBeAg seroconversion and response after drug withdrawal. Sequential combination or switching therapy in PEG-IFN- or NAs-treated patients, as well as combination with immune cell therapy, is a promising treatment strategy.

  17. Lipid disorders in patients with renal failure: Role in cardiovascular events and progression of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Visconti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of lipid disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD is usually characterized by high triglycerides and reduced high dense lipoprotein (HDL, associated with normal or slightly reduced low dense lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol. This dyslipidemia is associated with an increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Keys for the cardiovascular risk reduction in these patients are lowering the number and modifying the composition of the cholesterol-carrying atherogenic lipoprotein particles. Statins have an important role in primary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality in non-hemodialyzed CKD patients. The benefits in terms of progression of renal failure are contradictory. Patient education regarding dietary regimen should be part of the CKD clinical management.

  18. Progression of Tubulointerstitial Fibrosis and the Chronic Kidney Disease Phenotype – Role of Risk Factors and Epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D. Hewitson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the kidney has capacity to repair after mild injury, ongoing or severe damage results in scarring (fibrosis and an associated progressive loss of kidney function. However, despite its universal significance, evidence highlights a population based heterogeneity in the trajectory of chronic kidney disease (CKD in these patients. To explain the heterogeneity of the CKD phenotype requires an understanding of the relevant risk factors for fibrosis. These factors include both the extrinsic nature of injury, and intrinsic factors such as age, gender, genetics, and perpetual activation of fibroblasts through priming. In many cases an additional level of regulation is provided by epigenetic mechanisms which integrate the various pro-fibrotic and anti-fibrotic triggers in fibrogenesis. In this review we therefore examine the various molecular and structural changes of fibrosis, and how they are influenced by extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Our aim is to provide a unifying hypothesis to help explain the transition from acute to CKD.

  19. A case of chronic progressive Lyme encephalitis as a manifestation of late Lyme neuroborreliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Verma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year-old female living in Europe presented with gait ataxia, dizziness, and bilateral hearing loss. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed non-specific white matter changes. The patient’s condition gradually deteriorated over two years without diagnosis. The patient continued to decline cognitively and neurologically with worsening ataxia and upper motor neuron signs. Repeat MRI showed worsening white matter changes. Lumbar puncture, not previously done, showed positive Lyme testing. Treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone resulted in marked neurological improvement. Four years after symptom, the patient has short-term memory deficits and chronic fatigue, but is otherwise neurologically, cognitively, and functionally intact. Follow up MRI findings remain largely unchanged. Because cases of intraparenchymal or encephalopathic neuroborreliosis in America are lacking, so are treatment options. We present a rare case and discuss our experience with antibiotic treatment. This case lends evidence to define optimal treatment of this disease, imperative for hastening neurological recovery.

  20. Noncultured Autologous Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Therapy for Chronic Radiation Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Sadanori; Akino, Kozo; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2010-01-01

    Increasing concern on chronic radiation injuries should be treated properly for life-saving improvement of wound management and quality of life. Recently, regenerative surgical modalities should be attempted with the use of noncultured autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) with temporal artificial dermis impregnated and sprayed with local angiogenic factor such as basic fibroblast growth factor, and secondary reconstruction can be a candidate for demarcation and saving the donor morbidity. Autologous adipose-derived stem cells, together with angiogenic and mitogenic factor of basic fibroblast growth factor and an artificial dermis, were applied over the excised irradiated skin defect and tested for Patients who were uneventfully healed with minimal donor-site morbidity, which lasts more than 1.5 years. PMID:21151652

  1. Noncultured Autologous Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Therapy for Chronic Radiation Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanori Akita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing concern on chronic radiation injuries should be treated properly for life-saving improvement of wound management and quality of life. Recently, regenerative surgical modalities should be attempted with the use of noncultured autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs with temporal artificial dermis impregnated and sprayed with local angiogenic factor such as basic fibroblast growth factor, and secondary reconstruction can be a candidate for demarcation and saving the donor morbidity. Autologous adipose-derived stem cells, together with angiogenic and mitogenic factor of basic fibroblast growth factor and an artificial dermis, were applied over the excised irradiated skin defect and tested for Patients who were uneventfully healed with minimal donor-site morbidity, which lasts more than 1.5 years.

  2. Immune homeostasis disturbances in different generations of rats at chronic exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mel'nikov, O.F.; Sambur, M.B.; Timchenko, S.V.; Rozenfel'd, L.G.; Yindik, V.M.; Zayats, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study immune homeostasis disturbance in six generations of rats which were kept under the conditions of chronic exposure to small doses of low-intensity radiation resembling those after the accident at Chernobyl Atomic Power Station. The controls included the animals from Kiev vivarium. Leukopenia and lymphopenia of different stage, decrease of the absolute number of immunocompetent cell having Fc receptor to lg G, inhibition of their functional activity, increase of mastocytelike lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, stable suppression of natural cytotoxic cells activity has been found out in the rats of the experimental groups examined at the age 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. The revealed disturbances of cell immunity indices and nonspecific resistance factors depended on the age of the animals and their generation to greater extend in the young rats of F 1 -F 2 generation

  3. Health status of grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation. Communication 4. Congenital developmental defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushkina, N.P.; Musatkova, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence and structure of cogenital developmental defects in the grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic external gamma-irradiation. For 830 children only grandfather was exposed, for 259 only grandmother, and for 468 grandfather and grandmother. The mean equivalent doses for gonads by the moment of conception of future parents of the cohort examined ranged from 17.3 to 145.3 sSv. The incidence and structure of congenital developmental defects in 1557 grandchildren of occupationally exposed subjects differed from that in controls. Multifactorial analysis failed to establish the effect of grandparents' and parents' exposure on the development of diseases in the progeny. Factors other than radiation proved to be significant. 13 refs.; 1 tab

  4. Endothelial dysfunction in rectal cancer patients chronically exposed to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Pak, Laura; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Manambayeva, Zukhra; Tokanova, Sholpan; Madiyeva, Madina [Semey State Medical University, Semey (Kazakhstan); Inoue, Ken [Kochi University, Health Service Center, Kochi (Japan); Kawano, Noriyuki; Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Takeichi, Nobuo [Takeichi Clinic, Hiroshima (Japan); Noso, Yoshihiro [Shimane University, Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane (Japan); Khozhayev, Arman; Molgazhdarov, Maulen [The Kazakh National Medical University of S.D.Asfendiyarov, Department of Oncology, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Olzhaev, Sayakhat [Almaty Regional Oncologic Hospital, Department of Oncology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2017-08-15

    We sought to identify the features of endothelial function in rectal cancer patients who were exposed to chronic ionizing radiation from a nuclear test site in Kazakhstan. We examined 146 individuals, 76 of whom were rectal cancer patients. The existence of a complex of disturbances of the endothelium and hemostasis systems in patients vs non-patients was revealed. Endothelial dysfunction was expressed as an increase of nitric oxide (NO) production along with decreases in vasodilatation function, and increased levels of von Willebrand factor in blood, along with an increase in the number of circulating endotheliocytes. Significant correlations between indicators of endothelial function and vascular-platelet hemostasis were observed. These changes and their interrelations were expressed more strongly in the patients who lived in the contaminated area around the nuclear test site. Such patients could have an increased risk of thrombosis and other complications after the treatment of a malignant neoplasm. (orig.)

  5. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  6. Resveratrol Improved the Progression of Chronic Prostatitis via the Downregulation of c-kit/SCF by Activating Sirt1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Zeng, Huizhi; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Jiashu; Zeng, Xiaona; Gong, Fengtao; Duan, Xingping; Liu, Qi; Yang, Bo

    2017-07-19

    The regulation mechanism of inflammation inducing prostate carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated the role of the c-kit/SCF pathway, which has been associated with the control of prostate carcinogenesis, in chronic prostatitis (CP) rats and evaluated the anti-prostatitis effect of resveratrol. We performed hemolysin and eosin staining to evaluate the histopathological changes in prostates. Multiple approaches evaluated the expression levels of c-kit, stem cell factor (SCF), Sirt1, and carcinogenesis-associated proteins. The CP group exhibited severe diffuse chronic inflammation. Meanwhile, the prostate cells appeared atypia; the activity of c-kit/SCF was upregulated, and carcinogenesis-associated proteins are dysregulated significantly in CP rats. Resveratrol treatment significantly improved these factors by Sirt1 activation. In summary, CP could further cause prostate carcinogenesis, which may be associated with activated c-kit/SCF signaling. Resveratrol treatment could improve the progression of CP via the downregulation of c-kit/SCF by activating Sirt1.

  7. Melanin is Effective Radioprotector against Chronic Irradiation and Low Radiation Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosse, I.; Plotnikova, S.; Kostrova, L.; Molophei, V.; Dubovic, B.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Earlier we found pigment melanin ability to reduce significantly genetic consequences of acute irradiation in animals (drosophila, mice) and cultured human cells and to decrease strongly 'genetic load' accumulated in irradiated populations. The influence of melanin isolated from human hair on genetic effects of chronic irradiation in mice has been investigated. Melanin suspension or distilled water were injected every day into stomach of animals during 1-3 Gy g-irradiation with dose rate 0.007Gy/h. Levels of reciprocal translocations in germ cells were analysed cytologically. Melanin influence on genetic effect of chronic irradiation was shown to be even more effective than that of acute one. Radioadaptive response was used in order to study melanin influence on low radiation dose effect. We have demonstrated adaptive response in mice germ cells and bone marrow cells frequency of chromosomal aberrations in these cells after 0.2+1.5 Gy was about half as much as 1.7 Gy effect. Melanin injection 2 hours before the conditioning dose of 0.2 Gy resulted in the same mutation level as before 1.7 Gy adaptive response was not found. If melanin was applied between the first and second doses, both adaptive reaction and protection led to 4-fold decrease in aberration level. Thus melanin is able to remove completely low radiation dose effect. Complete toxicological tests have been conducted. The pigment melanin is not toxic and does not possess a mutagenic, teratogenic or carcinogenic activity. Melanin could be used in medicine for people protection against genetic consequences of long-term irradiation at low doses. (author)

  8. Colostomy is a simple and effective procedure for severe chronic radiation proctitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zi-Xu; Ma, Teng-Hui; Wang, Huai-Ming; Zhong, Qing-Hua; Yu, Xi-Hu; Qin, Qi-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Lei

    2016-06-28

    To assess the efficacy and safety of diverting colostomy in treating severe hemorrhagic chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). Patients with severe hemorrhagic CRP who were admitted from 2008 to 2014 were enrolled into this study. All CRP patients were diagnosed by a combination of pelvic radiation history, clinical rectal bleeding, and endoscopic findings. Inclusion criteria were CRP patients with refractory bleeding with moderate to severe anemia with a hemoglobin level colostomy, while the control group included patients who received conservative treatment. The remission of bleeding was defined as complete cessation or only occasional bleeding that needed no further treatment. The primary outcome was bleeding remission at 6 mo after treatment. Quality of life before treatment and at follow-up was evaluated according to EORTC QLQ C30. Severe CRP complications were recorded during follow-up. Forty-seven consecutive patients were enrolled, including 22 in the colostomy group and 27 in the conservative treatment group. When compared to conservative treatment, colostomy obtained a higher rate of bleeding remission (94% vs 12%), especially in control of transfusion-dependent bleeding (100% vs 0%), and offered a better control of refractory perianal pain (100% vs 0%), and a lower score of bleeding (P colostomy achieved better remission of both moderate bleeding (100% vs 21.5%, P = 0.002) and severe bleeding (100% vs 0%, P colostomy, which included global health, function, and symptoms, but it was not improved in the control group. Pathological evaluation after colostomy found diffused chronic inflammation cells, and massive fibrosis collagen depositions under the rectal wall, which revealed potential fibrosis formation. Diverting colostomy is a simple, effective and safe procedure for severe hemorrhagic CRP. Colostomy can improve quality of life and reduce serious complications secondary to radiotherapy.

  9. Effect of low dose radiation on expression of p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longzhen; Ding Xin; Li Xiangyang; Cen Jiannong; Shen Hongjie; Chen Zixing

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose radiation on the expression on p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Methods: Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) which expressed CD34 +, CD38 - and CD123 + were isolated from bone marrow cells obtained from twenty patients newly-diagnosedas chronic myeloid leukemia with EasySep TM magnet beads. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) which expressed CD34 + and CD38 - were isolated from human cord blood cells obtained from twenty full-term deliveries with EasySep TM magnet beads as control. HSCs vs LSCs samples were further divided into three dose groups, including 0, 12.5 and 50 cGy, respectively. RT-PCR and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods were used to detect mRNA expression of p16 gene in HSCs and LSCs after irradiation. Cells were harvested at different time for detection of cell cycle and apoptosis by flow cytometer. Results: p16 mRNA level in CML-LSCs was increased slightly at 12.5 cGy, and significantly increased at 50 cGy (Z=-3.39, P 0 /G 1 stagewas increased 48 h after 12.5 cGy irradiation, and 72 h post-irradiation with 50 cGy. The apoptosis rate of CML-LSCs was gradually raised after LDR, especially at 72 h post-irradiation of 50 cGy [(17.75±11.760% vs (6.13±4.71)%, Z=-2.37, P<0.01]. Conclusions: p16 gene transcription could be up-regulated by low dose radiation, which might provide a theoretical evidence for CML therapy and LDR in leukemic clinical application. (authors)

  10. Study of the radiation effects on nucleic acids and related compounds. Progress report, August 15, 1976--November 14, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.

    1977-08-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on nucleic acids and components were studied in vitro. Our approach involves four levels of operation and progress is being made at each stage. First, procedures were established to separate and purify three reactive radiation products from thymidine. Second, improved methods of synthesizing trans-glycols of pyrimidines were developed, and a new method for the stereospecific synthesis of cis-glycol of pyrimidines was realized. Thirdly, the Ames Salmonella test was used to determine the mutagenicity of the radiation products and the reactive ones from thymine and thymidine were found to be highly mutagenic. Therefore, all radiation products should be considered potential human health hazards and should be screened when they can be purified and synthesized. In the fourth stage, the reaction of each nucleic-acid base with Cu ++ and cis-5,6-dihydro-6-hydroperoxy-5-hydroxythymine (6-TOOH) was studied in order to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of radiation mutagenesis. The presence of Cu ++ was shown to be necessary for the effective mutagenic activity of 6-TOOH in the H. influenzae transformation assay. These findings provide fundamental information about the possible health hazards of ionizing radiation and will be useful in designing methods to protect against and repair radiation damage, which may be mutagenic and carcinogenic

  11. Comparing clinical attachment level and pocket depth for predicting periodontal disease progression in healthy sites of patients with chronic periodontitis using multi-state Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdala, Ibrahimu; Olsen, Ingar; Haffajee, Anne D; Socransky, Sigmund S; Thoresen, Magne; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben

    2014-09-01

    To understand degeneration of healthy sites and identify factors associated with disease progression in patients with chronic periodontitis. Data on healthy sites from 163 American and Swedish subjects were analysed using two-three-state (health, gingivitis, chronic periodontitis) Markov models based on bleeding on probing (BOP), and either clinical attachment level (CAL) + BOP or pocket depth (PD) + BOP. In 2 years, 10% (CAL + BOP) and 3% (PD + BOP) of healthy sites developed chronic periodontitis. On average, healthy sites remained healthy for 32 months before transiting in both models. Most transitions (87-97%) from health were to the gingivitis state. The expected duration of the gingivitis lesion was 4-5 months and sites recovered with a high probability (96-98%). Disease severity as measured by number of sites with CAL/PD > 4 mm at baseline and smoking, were associated with fast progression from health to chronic periodontitis within 6 months as were gingival redness in the PD + BOP model only. With age, the rate of disease progression to gingivitis decreased. Transition probabilities for gingivitis and chronic periodontitis were higher with CAL + BOP than with PD + BOP. Smoking and disease severity were significant predictors for fast progression. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Periodontology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Comparing clinical attachment level and pocket depth for predicting periodontal disease progression in healthy sites of patients with chronic periodontitis using multi-state Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdala, Ibrahimu; Olsen, Ingar; Haffajee, Anne D; Socransky, Sigmund S; Thoresen, Magne; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben

    2014-01-01

    Aim To understand degeneration of healthy sites and identify factors associated with disease progression in patients with chronic periodontitis. Material and Methods Data on healthy sites from 163 American and Swedish subjects were analysed using two-three-state (health, gingivitis, chronic periodontitis) Markov models based on bleeding on probing (BOP), and either clinical attachment level (CAL) + BOP or pocket depth (PD) + BOP. Results In 2 years, 10% (CAL + BOP) and 3% (PD + BOP) of healthy sites developed chronic periodontitis. On average, healthy sites remained healthy for 32 months before transiting in both models. Most transitions (87–97%) from health were to the gingivitis state. The expected duration of the gingivitis lesion was 4–5 months and sites recovered with a high probability (96–98%). Disease severity as measured by number of sites with CAL/PD > 4 mm at baseline and smoking, were associated with fast progression from health to chronic periodontitis within 6 months as were gingival redness in the PD + BOP model only. With age, the rate of disease progression to gingivitis decreased. Conclusion Transition probabilities for gingivitis and chronic periodontitis were higher with CAL + BOP than with PD + BOP. Smoking and disease severity were significant predictors for fast progression. PMID:24888705

  13. Realization of radiation-chemical processes in national economy-important stage of scientific and technical progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breger, A.Kh.

    1975-01-01

    Realization of energy resourses of the atomic power engineering will greatly contribute to the scientific and technological progress. The dominat role play the radiochemical methods of properties modification applied for the well-known materials and for the production of materials with modern operating characteristics necessary for their application in different branches of industry and agriculture. Radiation modeling of products from polyolefine, wood-plastic and concrete-polymer materials are considered as well as the processes in ''thin'' units of agitating systems. The future developments and present state of the art of radiation sources are presented

  14. Chronic radiation-induced leukemogenesis: alterations of hematopoietic progenitor repair functions during preclinical phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Kaspar, L.V.; Grdina, D.J.; Frazier, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic exposure to low daily doses of whole-body gamma irradiation elicits a high incidence of myeloid leukemia (ML) and related myeloproliferative diseases (MPD) in beagles. Previously, the authors identified and partially characterized a four-phase sequence of evolving MPD as a consequence of chronic radiation exposure. With a focus on preclinical alterations in granulocyte/monocyte-committed stem cells, they have identified two critical events in the process: (i) an early event, involving the coupling of acquired radioresistance of the stem cell with renewed proliferative capacity; and (ii) a late event, involving acquired autocrine functions and associated change in stem cell clonality. In terms of the early event, repair-associated parameters are currently being examined on the cellular level by both split-dose and low dose-rate-type assays with survival enhancement used as the measured end point. On the molecular level, these parameters are examined by microfluorometric alkaline elution assays with DNA damage and repair used as end points

  15. NRC TLD [thermoluminescent dosimeter] Direct Radiation Monitoring Network: Progress report, January-March 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facility sites throughout the country for the first quarter of 1988

  16. NRC TLD direct radiation monitoring network: Progress report, April--June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1988-09-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facility sites throughout the country for the second quarter of 1988

  17. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report for October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, H.H.; Hall, E.J.

    1980-07-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 31 of the 32 papers presented in this progress report. The other paper is represented by an abstract only and deals with field shaping and recalibration of x-ray facilities.

  18. Comparing fixed-amount and progressive-amount DRO Schedules for tic suppression in youth with chronic tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriotti, Matthew R; Turkel, Jennifer E; Johnson, Rachel A; Espil, Flint M; Woods, Douglas W

    2017-01-01

    Chronic tic disorders (CTDs) involve motor and/or vocal tics that often cause substantial distress and impairment. Differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) schedules of reinforcement produce robust, but incomplete, reductions in tic frequency in youth with CTDs; however, a more robust reduction may be needed to affect durable clinical change. Standard, fixed-amount DRO schedules have not commonly yielded such reductions, so we evaluated a novel, progressive-amount DRO schedule, based on its ability to facilitate sustained abstinence from functionally similar behaviors. Five youth with CTDs were exposed to periods of baseline, fixed-amount DRO (DRO-F), and progressive-amount DRO (DRO-P). Both DRO schedules produced decreases in tic rate and increases in intertic interval duration, but no systematic differences were seen between the two schedules on any dimension of tic occurrence. The DRO-F schedule was generally preferred to the DRO-P schedule. Possible procedural improvements and other future directions are discussed. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  19. Do frequent moderate exacerbations contribute to progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients who are ex-smokers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreyse J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jorge Dreyse,1 Orlando Díaz,1 Paula Repetto,2 Arturo Morales,1 Fernando Saldías,1 Carmen Lisboa11Department of Pulmonary Diseases, School of Medicine, 2School of Psychology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, ChileBackground: In addition to smoking, acute exacerbations are considered to be a contributing factor to progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, these findings come from studies including active smokers, while results in ex-smokers are scarce and contradictory. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if frequent acute moderate exacerbations are associated with an accelerated decline in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and impairment of functional and clinical outcomes in ex-smoking COPD patients.Methods: A cohort of 100 ex-smoking patients recruited for a 2-year follow-up study was evaluated at inclusion and at 6-monthly scheduled visits while in a stable condition. Evaluation included anthropometry, spirometry, inspiratory capacity, peripheral capillary oxygen saturation, severity of dyspnea, a 6-minute walking test, BODE (Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea, Exercise performance index, and quality of life (St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire and Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire. Severity of exacerbation was graded as moderate or severe according to health care utilization. Patients were classified as infrequent exacerbators if they had no or one acute exacerbation/year and frequent exacerbators if they had two or more acute exacerbations/year. Random effects modeling, within hierarchical linear modeling, was used for analysis.Results: During follow-up, 419 (96% moderate acute exacerbations were registered. At baseline, frequent exacerbators had more severe disease than infrequent exacerbators according to their FEV1 and BODE index, and also showed greater impairment in inspiratory capacity, forced vital capacity, peripheral capillary oxygen saturation

  20. Resveratrol improves prostate fibrosis during progression of urinary dysfunction in chronic prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Zeng, Hui-Zhi; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Shu; Duan, Xingping; Zeng, Xiao-Na; Gong, Feng-Tao; Liu, Qi; Yang, Bo

    2017-09-01

    We investigated whether prostate fibrosis was associated with urinary dysfunction in chronic prostatitis (CP) and whether resveratrol improved urinary dysfunction and the underlying molecular mechanism. Rat model of CP was established via subcutaneous injections of DPT vaccine and subsequently treated with resveratrol. Bladder pressure and volume tests investigated the effect of resveratrol on urinary dysfunction in CP rats. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining examined the expression level of C-kit/SCF and TGF-β/Wnt/β-catenin. Compared to the control group, the maximum capacity of the bladder, residual urine volume and maximum voiding pressure, the activity of C-kit/SCF and TGF-β/Wnt/β-catenin pathways were increased significantly in the CP group. Resveratrol treatment significantly improved these factors. CP induced significantly prostate fibrosis, which exhibits a close relationship with urinary dysfunction. Resveratrol improved fibrosis, which may be associated with the suppression of C-kit/SCF and TGF-β/Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Obesity: a chronic relapsing progressive disease process. A position statement of the World Obesity Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, G A; Kim, K K; Wilding, J P H

    2017-07-01

    This paper considers the argument for obesity as a chronic relapsing disease process. Obesity is viewed from an epidemiological model, with an agent affecting the host and producing disease. Food is the primary agent, particularly foods that are high in energy density such as fat, or in sugar-sweetened beverages. An abundance of food, low physical activity and several other environmental factors interact with the genetic susceptibility of the host to produce positive energy balance. The majority of this excess energy is stored as fat in enlarged, and often more numerous fat cells, but some lipid may infiltrate other organs such as the liver (ectopic fat). The enlarged fat cells and ectopic fat produce and secrete a variety of metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory products that produce damage in organs such as the arteries, heart, liver, muscle and pancreas. The magnitude of the obesity and its adverse effects in individuals may relate to the virulence or toxicity of the environment and its interaction with the host. Thus, obesity fits the epidemiological model of a disease process except that the toxic or pathological agent is food rather than a microbe. Reversing obesity will prevent most of its detrimental effects. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  2. Response of shortgrass Plains vegetation to chronic and seasonally administered gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraley, Jr., Leslie [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1971-08-01

    In order to determine the effect of radiation on the structure of native shortgrass plains vegetation, an 8750 Ci 137Cs source was installed on the Central Plains Experimental Range near Nunn, Colorado; The experimental area was divided into 6 treatment sectors, a control, 2 sectors for chronic exposure (irradiation initiated April 1969 and continuing as of August 1971), and one each for spring, summer and late fall seasonal semi-acute (30 day), exposures which were administered during April, July and December, 1969, respectively. Community structure was measured by coefficient of community and diversity index. Yield was determined by clipping plots in September 1970 and visual estimates in September 1969 and 1970 for the grass-sedge component of the vegetation. Individual species sensitivity was determined by density data recorded in April, June and September of 1969 and 1970 and by a phenological index recorded at weekly intervals during the 1969 and 1970 growing seasons. The response of the vegetation was similar whether determined by coefficient of community or diversity with diversity being a more sensitive measure of effects. In the chronically exposed sectors, the exposure rate which resulted in a 50 per cent reduction in these 2 parameters (CC50 or D50) was still decreasing the second growing season and was approximately 18 R/hr for the CC50 as of June 1970 and 10 R/hr for the D50 as of September 1970. For the seasonally exposed sectors, the late fall period (December, 1969) was the most sensitive, summer (July, 1969) the least sensitive and spring (April, 1969) intermediate with CC50 and D50 values of 195 and 90, 240 and 222, and 120 and 74 R/hr for the spring, summer and late fall exposed sectors, respectively. Yield and density data indicated a rapid revegetation of the spring and summer exposed sectors during 1970 as a result of an influx of invader species such as Salsola kali tenuifolia, Chenopodium leptophyllum and Lepidium densiflorum and the

  3. Modelling the propagation of effects of chronic exposure to ionising radiation from individuals to populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo, F. [Laboratory of Environmental Modelling, DEI/SECRE/LME, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache, Building 159, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, DEI/SECRE/LRE, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache Building 186, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)], E-mail: frederic.alonzo@irsn.fr; Hertel-Aas, T. [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 1432 Aas (Norway); Gilek, M. [School of Life Sciences, Soedertoern University College, 14189 Huddinge (Sweden); Gilbin, R. [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, DEI/SECRE/LRE, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache Building 186, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Oughton, D.H. [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, 1432 Aas (Norway); Garnier-Laplace, J. [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, DEI/SECRE/LRE, Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Cadarache Building 186, BP3, 13115 St-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2008-09-15

    This study evaluated the potential effect of ionising radiation on population growth using simple population models and parameter values derived from chronic exposure experiments in two invertebrate species with contrasting life-history strategies. In the earthworm Eisenia fetida, models predicted increasing delay in population growth with increasing gamma dose rate (up to 0.6 generation times at 11 mGy h{sup -1}). Population extinction was predicted at 43 mGy h{sup -1}. In the microcrustacean Daphnia magna, models predicted increasing delay in population growth with increasing alpha dose rate (up to 0.8 generation times at 15.0 mGy h{sup -1}), only after two successive generations were exposed. The study examined population effects of changes in different individual endpoints (including survival, number of offspring produced and time to first reproduction). Models showed that the two species did not respond equally to equivalent levels of change, the fast growing daphnids being more susceptible to reduction in fecundity or delay in reproduction than the slow growing earthworms. This suggested that susceptibility of a population to ionising radiation cannot be considered independent of the species' life history.

  4. Changes of medullary hemopoiesis produced by chronic exposure to tritium oxide and external γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murzina, L.D.; Muksinova, K.N.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study of a chronic effect of tritium oxide ( 3 HOH) and external γ-radiation by 137 Cs on medullary hemopoiesis was conducted in experiments on Wistar rats. 3 HOH was administered for 3mos., 37x10 4 Bk per lg per of body mass daily (the absorbed dose 10.8 Gy), external irradiation was given in correlated values of dose rates and integral doses. Bone marrow depopulation was 1.9 times as deeper in rats exposed to 3 HOH as compared to that in irradiated rats. This difference is caused by early and stable inhibition of erythropoiesis with the administration of the radionuclide. The integral index showing the injuring effect of tritium on erythropoiesis was 4 times as high as compared to that of external γ-irradiation by 137 Cs. The time course of value of the proliferative pool of bone marrow granulocytes with the exposure to 2 types of radiation was monotypic. Differences in maturing and functioning granulocytic pools were marked in early time of the experiment

  5. Risk factors for CKD progression in Japanese patients: findings from the Chronic Kidney Disease Japan Cohort (CKD-JAC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaguma, Daijo; Imai, Enyu; Takeuchi, Ayano; Ohashi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Kosaku; Akizawa, Tadao; Matsuo, Seiichi; Makino, Hirofumi; Hishida, Akira

    2017-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) eventually progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, risk factors associated with CKD progression have not been well characterized in Japanese patients with CKD who are less affected with coronary disease than Westerners. A large-scale, multicenter, prospective, cohort study was conducted in patients with CKD and under nephrology care, who met the eligibility criteria [Japanese; age 20-75 years; and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): 10-59 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ]. The primary endpoint was a composite of time to a 50 % decline in eGFR from baseline or time to the initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT). The secondary endpoints were the rate of decline in eGFR from baseline, time to a 50 % decline in eGFR from baseline, time to the initiation of RRT, and time to doubling of serum creatinine (Cre) concentration. 2966 patients (female, 38.9 %; age, 60. 3 ± 11.6 years) were enrolled. The incidence of the primary endpoint increased significantly (P < 0.0001) in concert with CKD stage at baseline. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards models revealed that elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) [hazard ratio (HR) 1.203, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.099-1.318)] and increased albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR ≥ 1000 mg/g Cre; HR: 4.523; 95 % CI 3.098-6.604) at baseline were significantly associated (P < 0.0001, respectively) with the primary endpoint. Elevated SBP and increased UACR were risk factors that were significantly associated with CKD progression to ESRD in Japanese patients under nephrology care. UMIN clinical trial registry number: UMIN000020038.

  6. Second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors prevent disease progression in high-risk (high CIP2A) chronic myeloid leukaemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C M; Harris, R J; Holcroft, A K; Scott, L J; Carmell, N; McDonald, E; Polydoros, F; Clark, R E

    2015-07-01

    High cancerous inhibitor of PP2A (CIP2A) protein levels at diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) are predictive of disease progression in imatinib-treated patients. It is not known whether this is true in patients treated with second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (2G TKI) from diagnosis, and whether 2G TKIs modulate the CIP2A pathway. Here, we show that patients with high diagnostic CIP2A levels who receive a 2G TKI do not progress, unlike those treated with imatinib (P=<0.0001). 2G TKIs induce more potent suppression of CIP2A and c-Myc than imatinib. The transcription factor E2F1 is elevated in high CIP2A patients and following 1 month of in vivo treatment 2G TKIs suppress E2F1 and reduce CIP2A; these effects are not seen with imatinib. Silencing of CIP2A, c-Myc or E2F1 in K562 cells or CML CD34+ cells reactivates PP2A leading to BCR-ABL suppression. CIP2A increases proliferation and this is only reduced by 2G TKIs. Patients with high CIP2A levels should be offered 2G TKI treatment in preference to imatinib. 2G TKIs disrupt the CIP2A/c-Myc/E2F1 positive feedback loop, leading to lower disease progression risk. The data supports the view that CIP2A inhibits PP2Ac, stabilising E2F1, creating a CIP2A/c-Myc/E2F1 positive feedback loop, which imatinib cannot overcome.

  7. Risk prediction for chronic kidney disease progression using heterogeneous electronic health record data and time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotte, Adler; Ranganath, Rajesh; Hirsch, Jamie S; Blei, David; Elhadad, Noémie

    2015-07-01

    As adoption of electronic health records continues to increase, there is an opportunity to incorporate clinical documentation as well as laboratory values and demographics into risk prediction modeling. The authors develop a risk prediction model for chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression from stage III to stage IV that includes longitudinal data and features drawn from clinical documentation. The study cohort consisted of 2908 primary-care clinic patients who had at least three visits prior to January 1, 2013 and developed CKD stage III during their documented history. Development and validation cohorts were randomly selected from this cohort and the study datasets included longitudinal inpatient and outpatient data from these populations. Time series analysis (Kalman filter) and survival analysis (Cox proportional hazards) were combined to produce a range of risk models. These models were evaluated using concordance, a discriminatory statistic. A risk model incorporating longitudinal data on clinical documentation and laboratory test results (concordance 0.849) predicts progression from state III CKD to stage IV CKD more accurately when compared to a similar model without laboratory test results (concordance 0.733, P<.001), a model that only considers the most recent laboratory test results (concordance 0.819, P < .031) and a model based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (concordance 0.779, P < .001). A risk prediction model that takes longitudinal laboratory test results and clinical documentation into consideration can predict CKD progression from stage III to stage IV more accurately than three models that do not take all of these variables into consideration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  8. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Volume 5, No. 2. Progress report, April-June 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, J.; Kramaric, M.; Cohen, L.

    1985-09-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network provides continuous measurement of the ambient radiation levels around licensed NRC facilities, primarily power reactors. The Network is intended to measure radiation levels during routine facility operations and to establish background radiation levels used to assess the radiological impact of an unusual condition, such as an accident. This report presents the radiation levels measured around all facilities in the Network for the second quarter of 1985. A complete listing of the site facilities monitored is included

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: getting it right. Does optimal management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease alter disease progression and improve survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard E

    2014-03-01

    We live in a world where people live longer lives. The standardized mortality rate for many diseases is decreasing. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not following this trend. Over the last 10 years, interventions for COPD have been developed, but have any changed the prognosis or trajectory of this modern epidemic? We review the most recent and classical literature in order to answer this question. Recent analyses of data have clarified which interventions are effective in COPD and which are not. New studies have defined what is achievable with the current therapies. Only two interventions have been demonstrated to improve survival: smoking cessation and long-term oxygen therapy. Other treatments do reduce exacerbations, improve lung function and improve the patient's quality of life, but do not affect physiological disease progression or mortality. There is much work to do, not only to improve the treatments we have for this disease, but also to diagnose it early, intervene at the right time, reduce the treatment side-effects and most importantly understand the pathophysiology better. Moreover, we are duty bound to look at each patient and review what we are trying to achieve for each one through appropriate phenotyping as well as sometimes taking a more palliative approach.

  10. The effects of chronic radiation on reproductive success of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, F.L.; Anderson, S.L.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of lifetime exposure to chronic irradiation on reproductive success were assessed for laboratory populations of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata. Lifetime exposure was initiated upon the spawning of the P 1 female and was terminated upon spawning of the F 1 female. Groups of experimental worms received either no radiation (controls) or 0.19, 2.1, or 17 mGy/h. The total dose received by the worms was either background or approximately 0.55, 6.5, or 54 Gy, respectively. The broods from the F 1 mated pairs were sacrificed before hatching occurred, and information was obtained on brood size, on the number of normal and abnormal embryos, and on the number of embryos that were living, dying, and dead. The mean number of embryos in the broods from the F 1 females exposed to lifetime radiation of 0.19 and 2.1 mGy/h was not significantly different from the mean number of embryos from control females; however, the mean number of embryos was different from those F 1 females exposed to 17 mGy/h. There was a significant reduction in the number of live embryos in the broods from the F 1 mated pairs that were exposed to the lowest dose rate given, 0.19 mGy/h, as well as those exposed to 2.1 and 17 mGy/h. Also, increased percentages of abnormal embryos were determined in the broods of all the radiation-exposed groups. 39 refs., 10 figs., 15 tabs

  11. Haematuria as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease progression in glomerular diseases: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Juan Antonio; Yuste, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Sevillano, Ángel M; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro-Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Praga, Manuel; Egido, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    Haematuria has long been considered to be a benign condition associated with glomerular diseases. However, new evidences suggest that haematuria has a pathogenic role in promoting kidney disease progression. An increased risk for end-stage renal disease has been reported in adolescents and young adults with persistent microscopic haematuria. A persistent impairment of renal function has been also reported following macroscopic haematuria-associated acute kidney injury in immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Haematuria-induced renal damage has been related to oxidant, cytotoxic and inflammatory effects induced by haemoglobin or haem released from red blood cells. The pathophysiological origin of haematuria may be due to a more fragile and easily ruptured glomerular filtration barrier, as reported in several glomerular diseases. In this review we describe a number of the key issues associated with the epidemiology and pathogenesis of haematuria-associated diseases, provide an update of recent knowledge on the role of haematuria on renal function outcome and discuss specific therapeutic approaches in this setting. KEY SUMMARY POINTS: 1. Glomerular haematuria is a common observation in a number of renal diseases that may lead to persistent renal injury. 2. Haematuria in children differs from that in adults in specific aspects, particularly in the frequency of glomerular diseases and renal disease outcome. 3. Regular follow-up of renal function in children with isolated microhaematuria may be recommended.

  12. Characterization of a siberian virus isolated from a patient with progressive chronic tick-borne encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsun, T S; Frolova, T V; Zhankov, A I; Armesto, M; Turner, S L; Frolova, M P; Pogodina, V V; Lashkevich, V A; Gould, E A

    2003-01-01

    A strain of Tick-borne encephalitis virus designated Zausaev (Za) was isolated in Siberia from a patient who died of a progressive (2-year) form of tick-borne encephalitis 10 years after being bitten by a tick. The complete genomic sequence of this virus was determined, and an attempt was made to correlate the sequence with the biological characteristics of the virus. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this virus belongs to the Siberian subtype of Tick-borne encephalitis virus. Comparison of Za virus with two related viruses, a Far Eastern isolate, Sofjin, and a Siberian isolate, Vasilchenko, revealed differences among the three viruses in pathogenicity for Syrian hamsters, cytopathogenicity for PS cells, plaque morphology, and the electrophoretic profiles of virus-specific nonstructural proteins. Comparative amino acid alignments revealed 10 individual amino acid substitutions in the Za virus polyprotein sequence that were different from those of other tick-borne flaviviruses. Notably, the dimeric form of the Za virus NS1 protein migrated in polyacrylamide gels as a heterogeneous group of molecules with a significantly higher electrophoretic mobility than those of the Sofjin and Vasilchenko viruses. Two amino acid substitutions, T(277)-->V and E(279)-->G, within the NS1 dimerization domain are probably responsible for the altered oligomerization of Za virus NS1. These studies suggest that the patient from whom Za virus was isolated died due to increased pathogenicity of the latent virus following spontaneous mutagenesis.

  13. Securing safe and informative thoracic CT examinations—Progress of radiation dose reduction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Takeshi, E-mail: tkubo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Seo, Joon Beom [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Yamashiro, Tsuneo [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishinara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Kalender, Willi A. [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Henkestr. 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Lee, Chang Hyun [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 28 Yeongeon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lynch, David A. [Department of Radiology, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson St, A330 Denver, Colorado 80206 (United States); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hatabu, Hiroto, E-mail: hhatabu@partners.org [Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Various techniques have led to substantial radiation dose reduction of chest CT. • Automatic modulation of tube current has been shown to reduce radiation dose. • Iterative reconstruction makes significant radiation dose reduction possible. • Processing time is a limitation for full iterative reconstruction, currently. • Validation of diagnostic accuracy is desirable for routine use of low dose protocols. - Abstract: The increase in the radiation exposure from CT examinations prompted the investigation on the various dose-reduction techniques. Significant dose reduction has been achieved and the level of radiation exposure of thoracic CT is expected to reach the level equivalent to several chest X-ray examinations. With more scanners with advanced dose reduction capability deployed, knowledge on the radiation dose reduction methods has become essential to clinical practice as well as academic research. This article reviews the history of dose reduction techniques, ongoing changes brought by newer technologies and areas of further investigation.

  14. Radiation chemistry of hydrocarbon and alkyl halide systems. Progress report, August 30, 1979-July 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanrahan, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    This progress report covers experiments on pulse radiolysis of methyl iodide, radiation induced reactions in H 2 -CO mixtures and photochemistry and mass spectrometry of CF 3 I-CH 3 I systems. In the pulse radiolysis of alkyl iodide, it was possible to follow rate processes involving atomic iodine in the 2 P/sub 1/2/ excited state and 2 P/sub 3/2/ ground state resulting from irradiation of these compounds. The excited state proved easy to follow, since it can be observed in a strong transition at 206.2 nm. Observation of atomic iodine in the 2 P/sub 3/2/ ground state proved difficult, since it must be observed at 178.3 nm, well into the vacuum ultraviolet. Several design improvements in the pulse radiolysis apparatus were made to achieve a reliable measurement of the I*/I production ratio. The physical arrangement of the apparatus which was adopted is illustrated. A remaining problem which stands in the way of measuring I*/I ratios is the lack of information on extinction coefficients of 2 P/sub 1/2/ and 2 P/sub 3/2/ atomic iodine at 206 and 178 nm. It is expected that indirect calculations and/or computer modelling will be employed. In the H 2 -CO system, investigation of the effect of total pressure in the homogeneous gas phase was made, concentrating on the 3:1 H 2 -CO mixtures. Measurements were made as a function of pressure in the range of 250 to 3300 torr for saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbon in the C 1 to C 6 range. Two trends were exhibited; yields of all products dropped markedly as system pressure was increased; and yields in the nickel vessels were generally in excess of yields in the stainless vessels. Photolysis of CF 3 I-CH 3 I gas phase showed a substantial yield of the product CH 2 I 2 . High pressure mass spectrometry of CF 3 -CH 3 I mixtures revealed (CH 3 ICH 3 ) + , I 2 + , CF 3 I 2 + , (CF 3 I) 2 + , and unique species such as CF 3 ICH 3 and CF 2 ICH 2 +

  15. Progress in R and D radiation processing of natural polymers in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dela Rosa, A.; Abad, L.; Relleve, L.; Aranilla, C.; Cabalfin, E.; Bisnar, C.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation technology has emerged as an environment-friendly, commercially viable technology with broad applications that can essentially contribute to achieve the goal of sustainable development. Natural polymers are good raw materials since they are biodegradable, readily available in large quantity and at low cost. Radiation processing of natural polymers is a potential area to widen the prospect of industrial scale application of radiation technology in the Philippines. (author)

  16. Value of HBsAg level in dynamic monitoring of disease progression in patients with chronic HBV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAO Teng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical value of HBsAg level in dynamic monitoring of disease progression in patients with chronic HBV infection. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 1107 patients with different clinical stages of chronic HBV infection who had not received antiviral therapy at the time of hospitalization in The Second Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University from May 2011 to December 2015, and according to the disease status, they were divided into HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB group, HBeAg-negative CHB group, compensated liver cirrhosis group (LC-C group, decompensated liver cirrhosis group (LC-D group, and primary liver cancer (PLC group. These groups were compared in terms of HBsAg expression and the association between HBsAg and clinical features. An analysis of variance was used for comparison of continuous data between multiple groups, and the least significant difference t-test was used for further comparison between any two groups; the t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between two groups. The chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between these groups. Pearson correlation analysis was also performed. ResultsThere was a significant difference in serum HBsAg level between the HBeAg-positive CHB group, HBeAg-negative CHB group, LC-C group, LC-D group, and PLC group (F=100.45, P<0.001. The HBeAg-positive CHB group had significantly higher levels of HBsAg and HBV DNA than the HBeAg-negative CHB group (t= 16.67 an 16.22, both P<0.001. There were significant differences in HBsAg and HBV DNA levels between the HBeAg-positive CHB group, LC-C group, LC-D group, and PLC group (F= 42.92 and 27.38, both P<0.001, as well as between the HBeAg-negative CHB group, LC-C group, LC-D group, and PLC group (F=6.04 and 4.10, both P<0.05. HBV DNA level was significantly different across patients with different HBsAg levels (<1000 IU/ml, 1000-20 000 IU

  17. Epicutaneous immunization with type II collagen inhibits both onset and progression of chronic collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Strid

    Full Text Available Epicutaneous immunization is a potential non-invasive technique for antigen-specific immune-modulation. Topical application of protein antigens to barrier-disrupted skin induces potent antigen-specific immunity with a strong Th2-bias. In this study, we investigate whether the autoimmune inflammatory response of chronic collagen-induced arthritis (CCIA in DBA/1-TCR-beta Tg mice can be modified by epicutaneous immunization. We show that epicutaneous immunization with type II collagen (CII inhibited development and progression of CCIA and, importantly, also ameliorated ongoing disease as indicated by clinical scores of disease severity, paw swelling and joints histology. Treated mice show reduced CII-driven T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production, as well as significantly lower levels of CII-specific IgG2a serum antibodies. In contrast, CII-driven IL-4 production and IgE antibody levels were increased consistent with skewing of the CII response from Th1 to Th2 in treated mice. IL-4 production in treated mice was inversely correlated with disease severity. Moreover, T cells from treated mice inhibited proliferation and IFN-gamma production by T cells from CCIA mice, suggesting induction of regulatory T cells that actively inhibit effector responses in arthritic mice. The levels of CD4(+CD25(+ T cells were however not increased following epicutaneous CII treatment. Together, these results suggest that epicutaneous immunization may be used as an immune-modulating procedure to actively re-programme pathogenic Th1 responses, and could have potential as a novel specific and simple treatment for chronic autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Risk factors associated with prognosis of progressive stages of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YE Peiyan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo identify the risk factors associated with progression of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF occurring in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection (CHB. MethodsThe clinical, demographic, treatment and outcome data of 180 ACLF patients with concomitant CHB managed in our hospital between June 2009 and September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical data, taken at baseline, included markers of inflammation/infection (white blood cell (WBC count, coagulation (prothrombin time (PT and prothrombin activity (PTA, and liver function (alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, total bilirubin (TBil, direct bilirubin (DBil, choninesterase (CHE, albumin (Alb, globulin (Glb, total cholesterol (TC, and ammonia. In-hospital treatments included supplementation with traditional Chinese medicine-based therapies, such as Tuihuang decoction and detoxification enema. The primary outcome was survival during hospitalization. The patients were grouped for analysis according to ACLF stage (early, n=93; mid, n=61; late, n=26 and the risk factors associated with each stage were identified by using univariate (log-rank test and multivariate (Cox’s test regression analyses. The association of risk factors with patient survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier curve analysis. ResultsThe three ACLF groups showed significantly different amounts of leukocytes, with the late ACLF group showing the highest WBC. The late ACLF group also showed significantly lower Glb and TC. There was a trend in reduced cumulative survival rate and shorter time to death that significantly corresponded to progressive stages of ACLF (early ACLF>mid ACLF>late ACLF; all P<0.001. One-hundred-and-twenty-six (70.0% of the patients died during their hospitalization, and multivariate regression analysis of this entire patient population identified absence of colonic enema, presence of hepatic encephalopathy, presence of hepatorenal syndrome, PTA

  19. Pathophysiological effects of radiation on atherosclerosis development and progression, and the incidence of cardiovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basavaraju, Sekhara Rao; Easterly, Clay E.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation therapy while important in the management of several diseases, is implicated in the causation of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular complications. Cancer and atherosclerosis go through the same stages of initiation, promotion, and complication, beginning with a mutation in a single cell. Clinical observations before the 1960s lead to the belief that the heart is relatively resistant to the doses of radiation used in radiotherapy. Subsequently, it was discovered that the heart is sensitive to radiation and many cardiac structures may be damaged by radiation exposure. A significantly higher risk of death due to ischemic heart disease has been reported for patients treated with radiation for Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer. Certain cytokines and growth factors, such as TGF-β1 and IL-1 β, may stimulate radiation-induced endothelial proliferation, fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition, and fibrosis leading to advanced lesions of atherosclerosis. The treatment for radiation-induced ischemic heart disease includes conventional pharmacological therapy, balloon angioplasty, and bypass surgery. Endovascular irradiation has been shown to be effective in reducing restenosis-like response to balloon-catheter injury in animal models. Caution must be exercised when radiation therapy is combined with doxorubicin because there appears to be a synergistic toxic effect on the myocardium. Damage to endothelial cells is a central event in the pathogenesis of damage to the coronary arteries. Certain growth factors that interfere with the apoptotic pathway may provide new therapeutic strategies for reducing the risk of radiation-induced damage to the heart. Exposure to low level occupational or environmental radiation appears to pose no undue risk of atherosclerosis development or cardiovascular mortality. But, other radiation-induced processes such as the bystander effects, abscopal effects, hormesis, and individual variations in radiosensitivity may be

  20. New-onset vitiligo and progression of pre-existing vitiligo during treatment with biological agents in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méry-Bossard, L; Bagny, K; Chaby, G; Khemis, A; Maccari, F; Marotte, H; Perrot, J L; Reguiai, Z; Sigal, M L; Avenel-Audran, M; Boyé, T; Grasland, A; Gillard, J; Jullien, D; Toussirot, E

    2017-01-01

    The development of vitiligo during treatment with biological agents is an unusual event and only a few isolated cases have been reported. To describe the clinical characteristics and evolution of patients developing new-onset vitiligo following initiation of a biological agent for chronic inflammatory disease; and also to report the clinical course of pre-existing vitiligo under biological therapy. This nationwide multicentre, retrospective study, carried out between July 2013 and January 2015, describes the characteristics of a large series of 18 patients (psoriasis N = 8, inflammatory rheumatic diseases N = 8, ulcerative colitis N = 1, uveitis N = 1) who developed new-onset vitiligo while receiving a biological agent. TNFα inhibitors were the most common biological agent involved (13/18) while anti-IL-12/23 and anti-IL-17 agents or abatacept were less common (4/18 and 1/18 respectively). Mean duration of biological agent exposure before vitiligo onset was 13.9 ± 16.5 months. Outcome was favourable for most patients (15/17) while maintaining the biological agent. Data were also collected for 18 patients (psoriasis N = 5, inflammatory rheumatic diseases N = 10, inflammatory bowel diseases N = 2, SAPHO N = 1) who had pre-existing vitiligo when treatment with a biological agent started (TNFα inhibitors N = 15, ustekinumab N = 1, rituximab N = 1, tocilizumab N = 1). Vitiligo progressed in seven patients and was stable or improved in eight cases. Vitiligo may thus emerge and/or progress during treatment with various biological agents, mainly TNFα inhibitors and could be a new paradoxical skin reaction. De novo vitiligo displays a favourable outcome when maintaining the biological agent, whereas the prognosis seems worse in cases of pre-existing vitiligo. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  1. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, January-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 55 NRC-licensed facility sites throughout the country for the first half of 1981. The program objectives, scope, and methodology are given. The TLD system, dosimeter location, data processing scheme, and quality assurance program are outlined

  2. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October-December 1985. Volume 5, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, J.; Rabatin, K.; Cohen, L.

    1986-05-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1985. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  3. NRC TLD [thermoluminescent dosimeter] Direct Radiation Monitoring Network: Progress report, October--December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; NcNamara, N.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1988. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 4 tabs

  4. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

  5. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Study on intraoperative radiotherapy applying hyperthermia together with radiation sensitizers for progressive local carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M; Takahashi, M; Ono, K; Hiraoka, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1980-08-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer, colonic cancer, pancreatic cancer, cancer of the biliary tract, prostatic carcinoma, cerebral tumor, tumor of soft tissues, and osteosarcoma and its clinical results were described. Basic and clinical studies on effects of both hyperthermia and radiation sensitizers to elevate radiation sensitivity were also described, because effects of intraoperative radiotherapy were raised by applying hyperthermia and hypoxic cell sensitizers.

  7. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  8. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Radiation damage in natural and synthetic halite. Progress report January 1992 - February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.

    1993-12-01

    This report complements the information presented in the report of December 1992 regarding the research performed at the ECN on radiation damage in salt. It consists of two parts. The first part regards the amount of stored energy which can be developed by gamma-irradiation on different types of halite and considers both the effect of low dose rates in developing radiation damage, and the possible saturation level of radiation damage in natural halite. The second part presents a model to simulate radiation damage development which incorporates some extensions in the Jain-Lidiard model. Due to malfunction of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering installation, neither the previously reported results nor the newly obtained can be trusted and therefore are not reported here. These results regard the shape, size and size distribution of radiation damage defects. (orig.)

  10. Low-dose radiation effects on the evolution of chronic dystrophical processes in cornea and clouding of crystalline lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajdaj, Yu.V.; Gajdaj, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    Low-dose radiation effects on the course of chronic dystrophical processes in cornea and the dynamics of crystalline lens clouding of involution age genesis are investigated in the patients participated in Chernobyl accident response. Examples of the concrete pathological cases are considered. It was stated that the above dose effects led to exacerbation of the chronic slack dystrophical processes in cornea and intensification of the development of cornea primary dystrophy. In a number of cases the intensification of development of crystalline lens clouding takes place resulted in the cataract for 2-3 years

  11. Hepcidin-25 in diabetic chronic kidney disease is predictive for mortality and progression to end stage renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wagner

    Full Text Available Anemia is common and is associated with impaired clinical outcomes in diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD. It may be explained by reduced erythropoietin (EPO synthesis, but recent data suggest that EPO-resistance and diminished iron availability due to inflammation contribute significantly. In this cohort study, we evaluated the impact of hepcidin-25--the key hormone of iron-metabolism--on clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with CKD along with endogenous EPO levels.249 diabetic patients with CKD of any stage, excluding end-stage renal disease (ESRD, were enrolled (2003-2005, if they were not on EPO-stimulating agent and iron therapy. Hepcidin-25 levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The association of hepcidin-25 at baseline with clinical variables was investigated using linear regression models. All-cause mortality and a composite endpoint of CKD progression (ESRD or doubling of serum creatinine were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards models.Patients (age 67 yrs, 53% male, GFR 51 ml/min, hemoglobin 131 g/L, EPO 13.5 U/L, hepcidin-25 62.0 ng/ml were followed for a median time of 4.2 yrs. Forty-nine patients died (19.7% and forty (16.1% patients reached the composite endpoint. Elevated hepcidin levels were independently associated with higher ferritin-levels, lower EPO-levels and impaired kidney function (all p<0.05. Hepcidin was related to mortality, along with its interaction with EPO, older age, greater proteinuria and elevated CRP (all p<0.05. Hepcidin was also predictive for progression of CKD, aside from baseline GFR, proteinuria, low albumin- and hemoglobin-levels and a history of CVD (all p<0.05.We found hepcidin-25 to be associated with EPO and impaired kidney function in diabetic CKD. Elevated hepcidin-25 and EPO-levels were independent predictors of mortality, while hepcidin-25 was also predictive for progression of CKD. Both hepcidin-25 and EPO may represent important prognostic factors of clinical outcome and have the

  12. Interaction between PNPLA3 I148M variant and age at infection in determining fibrosis progression in chronic hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella De Nicola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The PNPLA3 I148M sequence variant favors hepatic lipid accumulation and confers susceptibility to hepatic fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect size of homozygosity for the PNPLA3 I148M variant (148M/M on the fibrosis progression rate (FPR and the interaction with age at infection in chronic hepatitis C (CHC. METHODS: FPR was estimated in a prospective cohort of 247 CHC patients without alcohol intake and diabetes, with careful estimation of age at infection and determination of fibrosis stage by Ishak score. RESULTS: Older age at infection was the strongest determinant of FPR (p<0.0001. PNPLA3 148M/M was associated with faster FPR in individuals infected at older age (above the median, 21 years; -0.64±0.2, n = 8 vs. -0.95±0.3, n = 166 log10 FPR respectively; p = 0.001; confirmed for lower age thresholds, p<0.05, but not in those infected at younger age (p = ns. The negative impact of PNPLA3 148M/M on fibrosis progression was more marked in subjects at risk of altered hepatic lipid metabolism (those with grade 2-3 steatosis, genotype 3, and overweight; p<0.05. At multivariate analysis, PNPLA3 148M/M was associated with FPR (incremental effect 0.08±0.03 log10 fibrosis unit per year; p = 0.022, independently of several confounders, and there was a significant interaction between 148M/M and older age at infection (p = 0.025. The association between 148M/M and FPR remained significant even after adjustment for steatosis severity (p = 0.032. CONCLUSIONS: We observed an interaction between homozygosity for the PNPLA3 I148M variant and age at infection in determining fibrosis progression in CHC patients.

  13. Feasibility of a novel approach for fast, economical determination of radiation damage in nuclear reactor cores. Progress report, [November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    Progress has been made in several areas in the second year of grant activity. This includes radiation induced segregation (modeling and experiment), deformation of the irradiated microstructure and stress corrosion cracking of irradiated microstructures

  14. Evidence for chronic inflammation as a component of the interstitial lung disease associated with progressive systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, G.A.; Bitterman, P.B.; Rennard, S.I.; Ferrans, V.J.; Crystal, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) is a generalized disorder characterized by fibrosis of many organs including the lung parenchyma. Unlike most other interstitial disorders, traditional concepts of the interstitial lung disease associated with PSS have held it to be a ''pure'' fibrotic disorder without a significant inflammatory component. To directly evaluate whether an active alveolitis is associated with this disorder, patients with chronic interstitial lung disease and PSS were studied by open lung biopsy, gallium-67 scanning, and bronchoalveolar lavage. Histologic evaluation of the biopsies demonstrated that the interstitial fibrosis of PSS is clearly associated with the presence of macrophages, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, both in the interstitium and on the alveolar epithelial surface. Gallium-67 scans were positive in 77% of the patients, showing diffuse, primarily lower zone uptake, suggestive of active inflammation. Consistent with the histologic findings, bronchoalveolar lavage studies demonstrated a mild increase in the proportions of neutrophils and eosinophils with occasional increased numbers of lymphocytes. Importantly, alveolar macrophages from patients with PSS showed increased release of fibronectin and alveolar-macrophage-derived growth factor, mediators that together stimulate lung fibroblasts to proliferate, thus suggesting at least one mechanism modulating the lung fibrosis of these patients

  15. Regulatory T-cells in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: their role in disease progression and autoimmune cytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Deepesh P; Varma, Subhash; Varma, Neelam; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Bose, Parveen; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2013-05-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) have been shown to be important for the balance of autoimmunity and oncogenesis. Tregs have a protective role in autoimmune diseases and conversely promote oncogenesis. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is unique in being at the cross-roads of oncogenesis and autoimmunity. We studied Tregs, defined as CD4+CD25(high)CD127(low)FOXP3+, in 32 treatment-naive patients with CLL. Our study shows that patients with CLL had a higher absolute Treg count than the control group (p < 0.001). A progressive increase of Tregs was noted in advanced stages of the disease (p < 0.001). The increase in absolute Treg count is more significant than the increase in percentage Tregs. The absolute Treg count appears to be more important in disease pathogenesis. The absolute Treg count was significantly higher in those patients having autoimmune cytopenias. There was an inverse correlation between lymphocyte doubling time and absolute Treg count (p = 0.03). The absolute Treg count may be used as a prognostic marker in CLL.

  16. Sex and gender differences in chronic kidney disease: progression to end-stage renal disease and haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Gabriela; Hecking, Manfred; Port, Friedrich K; Exner, Isabella; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Sex and gender differences are of fundamental importance in most diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Men and women with CKD differ with regard to the underlying pathophysiology of the disease and its complications, present different symptoms and signs, respond differently to therapy and tolerate/cope with the disease differently. Yet an approach using gender in the prevention and treatment of CKD, implementation of clinical practice guidelines and in research has been largely neglected. The present review highlights some sex- and gender-specific evidence in the field of CKD, starting with a critical appraisal of the lack of inclusion of women in randomized clinical trials in nephrology, and thereafter revisits sex/gender differences in kidney pathophysiology, kidney disease progression, outcomes and management of haemodialysis care. In each case we critically consider whether apparent discrepancies are likely to be explained by biological or psycho-socioeconomic factors. In some cases (a few), these findings have resulted in the discovery of disease pathways and/or therapeutic opportunities for improvement. In most cases, they have been reported as merely anecdotal findings. The aim of the present review is to expose some of the stimulating hypotheses arising from these observations as a preamble for stricter approaches using gender for the prevention and treatment of CKD and its complications. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. Th2 Regulation of Viral Myocarditis in Mice: Different Roles for TLR3 versus TRIF in Progression to Chronic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Abston

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections are able to induce autoimmune inflammation in the heart. Here, we investigated the role of virus-activated Toll-like receptor (TLR3 and its adaptor TRIF on the development of autoimmune coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 myocarditis in mice. Although TLR3- or TRIF-deficient mice developed similarly worse acute CVB3 myocarditis and viral replication compared to control mice, disease was significantly worse in TRIF compared to TLR3-deficient mice. Interestingly, TLR3-deficient mice developed an interleukin (IL-4-dominant T helper (Th2 response during acute CVB3 myocarditis with elevated markers of alternative activation, while TRIF-deficient mice elevated the Th2-associated cytokine IL-33. Treatment of TLR3-deficient mice with recombinant IL-33 improved heart function indicating that elevated IL-33 in the context of a classic Th2-driven response protects against autoimmune heart disease. We show for the first time that TLR3 versus TRIF deficiency results in different Th2 responses that uniquely influence the progression to chronic myocarditis.

  18. Impact of acute kidney injury on long-term mortality and progression to chronic kidney disease among critically ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najlaa G. Al-Otaibi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the 2-year outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI following admission to pediatric critical care units (PICU. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted between January 2012 and December 2013. We followed 131 children admitted to PICU, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with a diagnosis of AKI, based on pRIFLE (pediatric risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage renal disease, for 2 years. During the study period, 46 children died and 38 of survivors completed the follow-up. Factors affecting long-term progression to chronic kidney disease were also evaluated. Results: The 2-year mortality was more than 40%. The main determinant of the 2-year mortality was the pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM score, which increased the risk of mortality by 6% per each one score (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06: 95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.11. By the end of the 2 years, 33% of survivors had reduction in the glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria, and 73% were hypertensive. Patients with more severe renal impairment at admission, based on the pRIFLE criteria, had higher mortality rate. This association, however, was not independent since it was influenced by baseline disease severity (PRISM score. Conclusion: Large proportion of patients admitted to PICU with AKI either died during the first 2 months of follow-up or developed long-term complications. The severity of AKI, however, was not an independent risk factor for mortality.

  19. Chronic stress enhances progression of periodontitis via α1-adrenergic signaling: a potential target for periodontal disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan

    2014-10-17

    This study assessed the roles of chronic stress (CS) in the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system and explored the underlying mechanisms of periodontitis. Using an animal model of periodontitis and CS, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the protein levels of the α1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) and β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) were assessed. Furthermore, human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPDLFs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mimic the process of inflammation. The proliferation of the HPDLFs and the expression of α1-AR and β2-AR were assessed. The inflammatory-related cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were detected after pretreatment with the α1/β2-AR blockers phentolamine/propranolol, both in vitro and in vivo. Results show that periodontitis under CS conditions enhanced the expression of TH, α1-AR and β2-AR. Phentolamine significantly reduced the inflammatory cytokine levels. Furthermore, we observed a marked decrease in HPDLF proliferation and the increased expression of α1-ARfollowing LPS pretreatment. Pretreatment with phentolamine dramatically ameliorated LPS-inhibited cell proliferation. In addition, the blocking of α1-ARsignaling also hindered the upregulation of the inflammatory-related cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. These results suggest that CS can significantly enhance the pathological progression of periodontitis by an α1-adrenergic signaling-mediated inflammatory response. We have identified a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in those patients suffering from concurrent CS.

  20. Study of the radiation effects on nucleic acids and related compounds. Annual progress report, November 15, 1977--November 14, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.

    1978-07-01

    Acquisition of information on molecular biology involves four stages: establishment of procedures for the separation, isolation, and characterization of radiation products of nucleic acid bases, nucleosides, etc.; development of methods for the synthesis of these products once they are identified so that a constant supply in milligram to gram quantities is available for the studies in stages 3 and 4; examination of the apparent biological effects of each product in vitro and in vivo; and study of the molecular mechanism related to an observed biological phenomenon. In view of the difficulties experienced in this area of research and this deliberate and careful investigative approach, it was generally believed that progress toward our final goal would be rather prolonged. Yet the elucidation of a molecular mechanism by which ionizing radiation induces mutation in vivo is very near at hand. Further progress has been made in the separation and isolation of three hydroperoxy derivatives of thymidine. One communication has appeared and another has been submitted for publication. The former reports the efficient stereospecific synthesis of cis-pyrimidine glycols and the latter describes the study of mutagenicity and toxicity of seven radiation products of thymine and thymidine using Ames Salmonella test. Also, a quantitative study of the reversion of cytosine N(3)-oxide, a hydroperoxidation product induced by 6-TOOH, to cytosine has been carried out

  1. Recent progress of applying mesenchymal stem cells in therapy of urgent radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiangong; Guo Wanlong; Zhang Shuxian; Duan Zhikai

    2010-01-01

    At present, Cytokine therapy is the main strategy capable of preventing and reducing the acute radiation syndrome (ARS). With the problem of difficult match and severe graft versus host disease, haemopoietic stem cells can be used to find some effective approaches to treat acute radiation damage. Mesenchymal stem cells are of great therapeutic potential due to their particular characteristics including secretion of hematopoietic cytokine, reconstruction hemopoietic microenvironment, poor-immunogenicity, ease of reception ectogenic gene transfection and expression. This paper is to summarize the studies of biological characteristics of MSC and its application prospects in urgent radiation damage. (authors)

  2. Cytogenetic damage at low doses and the problem of bioindication of chronic low level radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kin, S.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Nesterov, E.B.; Vasiliev, D.V.; Dikareva, N.S.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis undertaken by us of the experimentally observed cellular responses to low dose irradiation has shown that the relationship between the yield of induced cytogenetic damage and radiation dose within low dose range is non-linear and universal in character. Because of the relationship between the yield of cytogenetic damage and dose within low dose range is non-linear, the aberration frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry in the most important in terms of practical application case. The cytogenetic damage frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry also because of the probability of synergistic and antagonistic interaction effects of the different nature factors simultaneously acting on test-object in real conditions is high within low dose (concentration) range. In our experimental study of the regularities in the yield of structural mutations in conditions of combined influence of ionizing radiation, heavy metals and pesticides it was found that synergistic and antagonistic effects are mainly induced in conditions of combined action of low exposure injuring agents. Experiments on agricultural plants were carried out in 1986-1989 at the 30-km zone around Chernobyl NPP. It was shown that chronic low dose exposure could cause an inheritable destabilization of genetic structures expressing in increase of cytogenetic damage and yield karyotypic variability in offspring's of irradiated organisms. Obviously exactly this circumstance is the reason of the phenomenon found in our researches of significant time delay of cytogenetic damage reduction rate from radioactive pollution reduction rate from time past from the accident moment. Research of cytogenetic damage of reproductive (seeds) and vegetative (needles) plant organs of the Pinus sylvestris tree micropopulations growing in contrast by radioactive pollution level sites of the 30-km ChNPP zone and also in the vicinity of the industrial plant > for processing and temporary storage of

  3. Radiation exposure to patient's skin during percutaneous coronary intervention for various lesions, including chronic total occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Furui, Shigeru; Kohtake, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Kozuma, Ken; Yamamoto, Yoshito; Isshiki, Takaaki

    2006-01-01

    Radiation skin injuries have been reported as a result of various procedures, so in the present study the patients' entrance skin dose (ESD) during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was evaluated. ESDs were assessed during 97 procedures (13 for chronic total occlusion (CTO), 14 for multivessel stenoses, 22 for single-vessel multiple stenoses, and 48 for single stenosis). The patients wore jackets that had 48 or 52 radiosensitive indicators placed on the back during the PCI procedures, with 8 other indicators placed on both upper arms. After the procedure, the color of the indicators was analyzed with a color measuring instrument, and the patients' ESDs were calculated from the color difference of the indicators. The average maximum ESDs of the patients were 4.5±2.8 Gy (median: 4.6 Gy) for CTO, 2.3±0.7 Gy (median: 2.4 Gy) for multi-vessel stenoses, 1.8±1.0 Gy (median: 1.5 Gy) for single-vessel multiple stenoses, and 1.4±0.9 Gy (median: 1.2 Gy) for single stenosis. Skin injury can occur during PCI, especially for CTO, so it is important to estimate each patient's ESD and attempt to reduce it. (author)

  4. Assessing risk of fibrosis progression and liver-related clinical outcomes among patients with both early stage and advanced chronic hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica A Konerman

    Full Text Available Assessing risk of adverse outcomes among patients with chronic liver disease has been challenging due to non-linear disease progression. We previously developed accurate prediction models for fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes among patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C (CHC. The primary aim of this study was to validate fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes models among a heterogeneous patient cohort.Adults with CHC with ≥3 years follow-up and without hepatic decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, liver transplant (LT, HBV or HIV co-infection at presentation were analyzed (N = 1007. Outcomes included: 1 fibrosis progression 2 hepatic decompensation 3 HCC and 4 LT-free survival. Predictors included longitudinal clinical and laboratory data. Machine learning methods were used to predict outcomes in 1 and 3 years.The external cohort had a median age of 49.4 years (IQR 44.3-54.3; 61% were male, 80% white, and 79% had genotype 1. At presentation, 73% were treatment naïve and 31% had cirrhosis. Fibrosis progression occurred in 34% over a median of 4.9 years (IQR 3.2-7.6. Clinical outcomes occurred in 22% over a median of 4.4 years (IQR 3.2-7.6. Model performance for fibrosis progression was limited due to small sample size. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC for 1 and 3-year risk of clinical outcomes was 0.78 (95% CI 0.73-0.83 and 0.76 (95% CI 0.69-0.81.Accurate assessments for risk of clinical outcomes can be obtained using routinely collected data across a heterogeneous cohort of patients with CHC. These methods can be applied to predict risk of progression in other chronic liver diseases.

  5. Effects of chronic exposure to ionising radiation in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fievet, B.; Devos, A.; Voiseux, C.; Leconte-Pradines, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete' Nucleaire (France); Dallas, L.; Jha, A. [University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The Cotentin peninsula (Normandy, France) hosts nuclear industry facilities which operate with controlled discharges of radionuclides in the marine environment. Compared to natural radioactivity, the increase by artificial radionuclides is small but constant. As a consequence, marine species are chronically exposed to low additional doses of ionizing radiation (IR). The effects of chronic exposure to radionuclides were investigated in early stages of development of the Japanese oyster Crassostrea gigas. On the basis of literature, mollusks are expected to be particularly resistant to acute IR (UNSCEAR, 1996. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. Report to the General Assembly, with Scientific Annex. 86 p). Two different chronic exposure conditions consisted in external ({sup 137}Cs) and internal ({sup 241}Am) irradiation for two weeks. Biological endpoints were analyzed in parallel at both the integrated (growth) and molecular (target stress gene expression) levels. To identify potential biological targets of IR, oysters were first exposed to very high dose rates and radionuclide activities with the perspective to reduce the levels and to derive dose-response curves. Although the initial exposure levels ({sup 137}Cs 30 000 μGy.h{sup -1}; {sup 241}Am 57 000 Bq.L{sup -1}) were many orders of magnitude higher than those encountered in the natural environment, no significant change in the measured parameters was observed. This result was surprising because data from the literature showed that exposure of mussel Mytilus edulis to {sup 3}H at lower doses rates (10-100 μGy.h{sup -1}) induced DNA damage in hemocytes (Jha et al., 2005. Impact of low doses of tritium on the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis: Genotoxic effects and tissue-specific bioconcentration. Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis 586, 47-57). To understand this apparent discrepancy between those two filtering bivalves, a new experiment was performed to compare the response

  6. Radiation chemistry of hydrocarbon and alkyl halide systems. Progress report, August 1, 1982-July 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanrahan, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental work was in progress during the past year on three systems: investigation of gas phase OH radical reactions using the pulse radiolysis method; studies of the radiolytic oxidation of propane; and an investigation of photochemistry and mass spectrometry of CF 3 I-CH 3 I mixtures. In addition, data analysis and interpretation of previously obtained results on H 2 /CO systems was under way. Progress made in these areas is described

  7. The third RAdiation transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Documenting progress in canopy reflectance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widlowski, J.L.; Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Bruniquel-Pinel, V.; Disney, M.I.; Fernandes, R.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.P.; Gobron, N.; Kuusk, A.; Lavergne, T.; LeBlanc, S.; Lewis, P.E.; Martin, E.; Mõttus, M.; North, P.R.J.; Qin, W.; Robustelli, M.; Rochdi, N.; Ruiloba, R.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Verstraete, M.M.; Xie, D.

    2007-01-01

    [1] The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison ( RAMI) initiative benchmarks canopy reflectance models under well-controlled experimental conditions. Launched for the first time in 1999, this triennial community exercise encourages the systematic evaluation of canopy reflectance models on a

  8. Third Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise : Documenting progress in canopy reflectance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Bruniquel-Pinel, V.; Disney, M.; Fernandes, R.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.P.; Gobron, N.; Kuusk, A.; Lavergne, T.; Leblanc, S.; Lewis, P.E.; Martin, E.; Mottus, M.; North, P.R.J.; Qin, W.; Robustelli, M.; Rochdi, N.; Ruiloba, R.; Soler, C.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Xie, D.; Thompson, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative benchmarks canopy reflectance models under well‐controlled experimental conditions. Launched for the first time in 1999, this triennial community exercise encourages the systematic evaluation of canopy reflectance models on a voluntary

  9. SERI Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Fiscal Year 1990 Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riordan, C; Maxwell, E; Stoffel, T; Rymes, M; Wilcox, S

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of the Solar Radiation Resource Project is to help meet the needs of the public, government, industry, and utilities for solar radiation data, models, and assessments as required to develop, design, deploy, and operate solar energy conversion systems. The project scientists produce information on the spatial (geographic), temporal (hourly, daily, and seasonal), and spectral (wavelength distribution) variability of solar radiation at different locations in the United States. Resources committed to the project in FY 1990 supported about four staff members, including part-time administrative support. With these resources, the staff must concentrate on solar radiation resource assessment in the United States; funds do not allow for significant efforts to respond to a common need for improved worldwide data. 34 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Molecular bases for radiation mutagenesis. Three year progress report, November 15, 1975--November 14, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.

    1978-07-01

    Studies on isolation and characterization of radiation products included: isolation and identification of cis- and trans-Thy glycols from the mixture of gamma irradiation products of Thy; identification of two isomers as radiation products from radiolysis of cytosine in aerated aqueous solutions and radiolysis of Thd in aerated aqueous solutions. Studies on synthesis of radiation products included: Stereospecific synthesis of cis- and trans-pyrimidine glycols; preparation of pyrimidine hydroperoxide; and synthesis of cis- and trans-1-carbamylimidazolidone-4, 5-diols. Studies on biological effects were conducted using human lymphocyte cultures, Chinese hamster cells, and root tip cells of Vicia faba. Effects of 6-TOOH on chromosomal aberrations, colony-forming ability, and unscheduled DNA synthesis were studied. Mutagenic effects of radiation products of Thy derivatives were investigated. Methods and procedures are described for UV-spectroscopic study, isolation of products, characterization of products, kinetic studies, mechanistic studies, and tracer studies

  11. Progress report and preliminary 1981-83 agenda of the United States Radiation Policy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The U.S. Radiation Policy Council is responsible for coordinating the formulation and implementation of Federal Policy relating to radiation protection. In carrying out this very broad and basic mandate, the RPC has been directed to: Advise on the formulation of broad radiation protection policies; monitor the implementation of Federal policies; Help resolve conflicts in jurisdiction among Federal agencies; Recommend corrective legislation, if needed; ensure effective liaison with the States and the Congress; and Serve as a forum for public participation and comment. The RPC was established by Executive Order Number 12194 in February 1980. The Council was created to coordinate the formulation and implementation of Federal policies relating to radiation protection. This report summarizes the first 7 months the Council has been in operation, its activities, and decisions through September 1980

  12. Recent progress and future perspectives regarding mutation breeding at the Institute of Radiation Breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Number of mutation species in the world is stated by some literature. 202 species are bread in Japan, which consists of 151 (by radiation), 20 (chemicals) and 31 (culture). The mutation indirect use species obtained 176 of rice, 3 wheat, 6 barleys, 8 soybeans, 3 tomatoes and 4 others. Low allergen rice, low glutelin rice, globulin deletion rice, disease resistant pear and apple, chrysanthemum and rose by radiation were studied. Control of mutation, genetics analysis, molecular scientific determination of mutation such as scale of mutation and RNA interference are reported. Advanced Radiation Application Research Center was build in Korea, 2005. Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) is being built in Malaysia. Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA) is promoting radiation breeding in Japan. (S.Y.)

  13. Radiation and biophysical studies on cells and viruses. Progress report, April 1, 1976--June 30, 1977. [Gamma radiation, alpha particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, A.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: genetic structure of DNA, chromosomes, and nucleoproteins; particle beam studies of radiosensitive sites; division delay in CHO cells induced by partly penetrating alpha particles; location of cellular sites for mutation induction; sites for radioinduced cell transformation using partly penetrating particle beams; gamma-ray and particle irradiation of nucleoproteins and other model systems; quantitation of surface antigens on normal and neoplastic cells by x-ray fluorescence; hyperthermic effects on cell survival and DNA repair mechanisms; and studies on radioinduced cell transformation. (HLW)

  14. Radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report III, 15 March 1975--15 March 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.; Gates, O.

    1976-03-01

    The attention of forensic pathologists has been drawn to the criteria essential for the recognition of radiation death or injury in the hope that such cases will be better recognized and that some false claims of radiation damage might be prevented at the local level. The results of experiments on parabiont rats, one of which had been irradiated with 1000 R of 250 kVp x-ray, the other shielded, are reviewed. With controls and related special studies the total is over 3000 pairs equally divided as to sex. Much information on the relative sensitivity of different tissues and organs to tumor induction is available and is being statistically analyzed. These experiments have provided further evidence of the effectiveness of parabiosis in assuring survival after 1000 R x-radiation and have enabled us to learn of the types of problems that might be expected in the way of late effects in heavily irradiated individuals should they be enabled by effective therapy to survive the acute phases of the radiation syndrome. Additional evidence has been brought out that carcinogenesis in some hormonally dependent tissues and organs is not so much a direct effect of radiation as it is a summation of this effect and of alterations caused by changes in hormonal balance brought about by the radiation

  15. Radiation and biophysical studies on cells and viruses. Progress report, July 1, 1978-August 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, A.

    1979-01-01

    Ionizing radiation beams of low linear energy transfer (LET) and high LET (alpha particles) which penetrated part way into or completely through cell monolayers were used to study a variety of molecular and cellular responses including: DNA damage, chromosome aberrations, division delay, lethality, mutation, and transformation. Modifiers of radiation response such as oxygen tension, cell temperature, cell growth cycle stage, dose fractionation and/or post irradiation repair incubation were studied. The following properties were evaluated: cellular location of radiation susceptible sites, optimum action cross-sections, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for high LET radiation, effect of radiation modifiers, and the kinetics of cell repair of the initial damage. Correlations among these properties suggested that similar genetic damage was involved in most responses. These and other data suggest that an important mode of genetic damage involves nuclear membrane associated DNA which suffers multiple proximate lesions induced by the high LET component of any form of ionizing radiation. Such damage may be assayed as a single or double strand DNA break but includes other DNA lesions in close proximity. Failure of the cell to properly repair such complex lesions may contribute to a variety of biological responses

  16. In vitro radiation response studies on bone marrow fibroblasts (CFU-F) obtained from normal and chronically irradiated dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.K.; Stitzel, K.A.; Greenberg, B.; Woo, L.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation resistance of bone marrow fibroblasts as measured by their proliferative potential was evaluated in chronically irradiated dogs. Bone marrows were obtained from eight dogs that had been chronically irradiated beginning at 21 days of gestation or after birth and eight age-matched controls. Of these irradiated dogs, four were either preleukemic or exhibited frank acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. The other four were clinically normal but demonstrated abnormalities in their marrow that could be attributed to radiation effects and/or other pathologic changes. Fibroblasts from six of the irradiated dogs were significantly more radioresistant than those of their controls. Five of these six dogs subsequently succumbed to hematopathologic disease, while the two irradiated dogs with normal fibroblasts remained clinically normal, suggesting that this observed radioresistance may be linked to the disease process. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Ali [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: alibabam2001@yahoo.com; Tatar, Abdulgani; Oztas, Sitki [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Seven, Bedri; Varoglu, Erhan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Yesilyurt, Ahmet [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ayan, Arif Kursad [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2009-07-15

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  18. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Ali; Tatar, Abdulgani; Oztas, Sitki; Seven, Bedri; Varoglu, Erhan; Yesilyurt, Ahmet; Ayan, Arif Kursad

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  19. Ionizing radiation exposures in treatments of solid neoplasms are not associated with subsequent increased risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Sachs, Rainer K; Gale, Robert Peter; Smith, Mitchell R; Hill, Brian T

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is not thought to cause chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Challenging this notion are recent data suggesting CLL incidence may be increased by radiation exposure from the atomic bombs (after many decades), uranium mining and nuclear power facility accidents. To assess the effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for the treatment of solid neoplasms we studied CLL risks in data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Specifically, we compared the risks of developing CLL in persons with a 1(st) non-hematologic cancer treated with or without ionizing radiation. We controlled for early detection effects on CLL risk induced by surveillance after 1(st) cancer diagnoses by forming all-time cumulative CLL relative risks (RR). We estimate such CLL RR to be 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.17, 1.23) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with ionizing radiation and 1.00 (0.96, 1.05) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was treated with ionizing radiations. These results imply that diagnosis of a solid neoplasm is associated with an increased risk of developing CLL only in persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with radiation therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Progressive pituitary hormone deficiency following radiation therapy in adults; Deficiencia progressiva dos hormonios adeno-hipofisarios apos radioterapia em adultos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Rafaela A.; Vaisman, Mario [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Endocrinologia]. E-mail: rafaela_loureiro@hotmail.com

    2004-10-01

    Hypopituitarism can be caused by radiation therapy, even when it is not directly applied on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and can lead to anterior pituitary deficiency mainly due to hypothalamic damage. The progressive loss of the anterior pituitary hormones usually occurs in the following order: growth hormone, gonadotropin hormones, adrenocorticotropic hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Although there are several different tests available to confirm anterior pituitary deficiency, this paper will focus on the gold standard tests for patients submitted to radiation therapy. We emphasize that the decline of anterior pituitary function is time- and dose-dependent with some variability among the different axes. Therefore, awareness of the need of a joint management by endocrinologists and oncologists is essential to improve treatment and quality of life of the patients. (author)

  1. Optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence findings in chronic phototoxic maculopathy secondary to snow-reflected solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Shukla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A professional mountain trekker presented with gradual, moderate visual decline in one eye. The subnormal vision could not be explained by the examination of anterior and posterior segment of either eye, which was unremarkable. Optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence imaging revealed subtle defects in the outer retina, which correlated with the extent of visual disturbance. A novel presentation of retinal phototoxicity due to indirect solar radiation reflected from snow in inadequately protected eyes of a chronically exposed subject is reported.

  2. Optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence findings in chronic phototoxic maculopathy secondary to snow-reflected solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Dhananjay

    2015-05-01

    A professional mountain trekker presented with gradual, moderate visual decline in one eye. The subnormal vision could not be explained by the examination of anterior and posterior segment of either eye, which was unremarkable. Optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence imaging revealed subtle defects in the outer retina, which correlated with the extent of visual disturbance. A novel presentation of retinal phototoxicity due to indirect solar radiation reflected from snow in inadequately protected eyes of a chronically exposed subject is reported.

  3. Diagnostic and correction of chronic-biological mis-balances of population at radiation injuries in regions with increased radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharova, T.G.; Vasil'eva, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    It was shown the possibility of bio-indication of population irradiation and its rehabilitation by estimation of chronic biological mis-balances and correction realization. Investigation were accomplished on people contingent living at the former Semipalatinsk test site

  4. Unusual progression and subsequent improvement in cystic lung disease in a child with radiation-induced lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Michael S. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Chadha, Ashley D. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Carroll, Clinton M.; Borinstein, Scott C. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Young, Lisa R. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Radiation-induced lung disease is a known complication of therapeutic lung irradiation, but the features have not been well described in children. We report the clinical, radiologic and histologic features of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in a 4-year-old child who had previously received lung irradiation as part of successful treatment for metastatic Wilms tumor. Her radiologic abnormalities and clinical symptoms developed in an indolent manner. Clinical improvement gradually occurred with corticosteroid therapy. However, the observed radiologic progression from interstitial and reticulonodular opacities to diffuse cystic lung disease, with subsequent improvement, is striking and has not been previously described in children. (orig.)

  5. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin: Progress report, February 1, 1988-January 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, F.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    Progress is described in 3 general areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal, including DNA strand breaks in the epidermis as a function of radiation penetration; oncogene activation in radiation-induced rat skin cancers; and carcinogenesis in rat skin induced by the neon ion beam. Numerous experiments have established that DNA strand breaks per unit dose in the rat epidermis are reduced by about 60% when the radiation penetration is reduced from 1.0 mm to 0.2 mm. The activation of oncogenes in the radiation-induced rat skin cancers followed a pattern. Four highly malignant cancers exhibited activation of K-ras and c-myc oncogenes, while the remaining 8 cancers exhibited only one or the other of these 2 oncogenes. Of 5 squamous carcinomas, 4 showed K-ras activation and 1 showed c-myc activation. Approximately 200 rats were exposed to the neon ion beam at the Bevalac in Berkeley, CA. The carcinogenicity of energetic electrons (2.0 MeV) was determined in conjunction with the neon ion experiment. It is too early to evaluate tumor incidence in the neon ion experiment, but for electrons an unusually large excess of connective tissue tumors, fibromas and sarcomas, have been observed so far. 59 refs., 2 tabs

  6. Radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report VI, 16 May 1978--15 May 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.; Gates, O.

    1979-01-01

    Asbestos fibers, Canadian and Rhodesian chrysotile, have induced mesotheliomas and pleural plaques in mice and rats. The pathogenesis of the lesions is being studied. Proliferation of the adrenal cortical A cells is accelerated in time and enhanced in extent by ionizing radiation in female RAP mice. The development of cortical tumors was significantly correlated with extensive A cell proliferation. Whole-body protracted doses, above 500 rads, were followed by a 9% tumor incidence. Endocrine neoplasia in mice appears related to functional ties between several endocrines particularly adrenal, ovary, and pituitary. A study of the spontaneous benign and malignant tumors ocurring in control NEDH rats has provided background for the tumorigenic effects of radiation and also of altered hormonal internal milieu. Begin tumors have been produced by radiation in a wide variety of tissues for the first time, providing data as to the relative responsiveness in benign tumor production of various tissues to a dose of 1000 rads. The hormonal changes secondary to parabiosis and hemi-irradiation of the pair are important. A radiation-induced functioning pheochromocytoma causing hypertension and death has been found widely useful by investigators. A radiation-induced malignant insulinoma has also been widely used, and insulin-producing DNA from it has served in the hands of others through genetic engineering to provide an insulin-producing strain of the bacillus E. coli

  7. Efficacy of Radiation Synovectomy with Y-90 in chronic knee joint synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roiz, C.; Raigoso, P.; Suarez, J.P.; Llana, B.; Zeidan, N.; Dominguez, M.L.; Bernardo, L.; Fernandez, J.A.; Nunez, R.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficiency of Radiation Synovectomy (RSO) with Y-90 in knee joints of patients with chronic synovitis (CS) resistant to classical conventional therapy, and assess its long-term prognosis. Material and Methods: 22 patients (7 males,15 females, mean age 50, range 12-81) with CS of the knees, of a duration ranging from 2 to 48 years, were included in the study. All patients had suffered from CS for more than 6 months, and were resistant to anti-inflammatory drugs, immunosuppressants and intraarticular (IA) steroid therapy. The cases included:10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 5 psoriatic arthritis (PA), 3 pigmented villonodular synovitis, 2 seronegative oligo-polyarthritis and 2 chronic mono arthritis. We used an IA dose of 3 to 5 mCi (37-185 MBq)of Y-90. The effect of the therapy with Y-90 on 22 knees was evaluated from 3 to 12 months after the RSO. Patients' response was assess and classified according to the results of plain radiology and following conventional rheumatological criteria as: A) Excellent (E) with a visual improvement (VI) of 80-100mm, no pain in motion, little or no palpable swelling, no inflammation; B) Good (G) VI of 60-90mm, minimal pain in motion, little palpable swelling; C) Mild (M) VI of 20-59mm, moderate reduction of pain, obvious swelling; D) Bad (B) VI of only 0-19 mm, no changes or an increase of pain in the swollen joints. Results: The response observed was classified as: E in 5 patients (23%); G in 10 patients (45%); M in 3 patients (14%); and B in 4(18%). The 4 patients with a response B, had all of them joint erosion on plain radiology. Furthermore, one of the patients was a failure from prior surgical synovectomy (SS). The other 3 patients subsequently had SS. In contrast, all the responses E and G were obtained exclusively in patients with RA or PA. No short or long-term adverse side effects were noted. Conclusion: RSO is an effective treatment for patients with persistent CS, specially in RA and PA. The

  8. Chinese reference human voxel phantoms for radiation protection: development, application and recent progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yuxi; Qiu Rui; Ren Li; Zhu Huanjun; Li Junli; Liu Liye

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the work of constructing Chinese reference human voxel phantoms, taking Chinese reference adult female voxel model for example. In this study, a site-specific skeleton structure was built, some radiation sensitive organs were supplemented. Organ sub-segmentation was taken into account. The constructed phantoms include almost all radiation sensitive organs required by ICRP new recommendation. Masses of the organs are almost consistent with the Chinese reference data within 5%. The Chinese reference human phantoms have been applied both in internal dosimetry and external dosimetry. The results provide fundamental data for Chinese radiation dosimetry. In addition, the newly established detailed breast model and micro-bone model were introduced. (authors)

  9. Effects of gamma radiation on lichens. Progress report, July 1, 1975--March 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbisch, F.H.

    1976-03-01

    This past year (1975) was spent in the completion of a Parmelia sulcata study of the Enterprise Radiation Forest. An extended study (December through June) of irradiated Cladonia sylvatica podetia was also carried out during this period. The Cladonia study indicated that lichens responds to gamma radiation, basically only after passing through a prolonged growth period. Lichens kept in summer conditions (in a growth chamber) during the seven month study period did not exhibit radiation damage as did irradiated field lichens. This was conclusively shown in photosynthesis experiments and light microscopy studies. Evidence from oxygen uptake and usnic acid content studies was much to variable and must be repeated. A means to measure podetial tensile strength was perfected and this test will be used in the final test of this study

  10. Radiation effects on transport and bubble formation in silicate glasses. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1998-01-01

    'To study the fundamental chemistry of radiation damage in silicate/borosilicate glasses and simulated high-level nuclear waste (HLW) forms. Special emphasis is on delineating molecular processes crucial for understanding the aggregation of defects and formation of oxygen bubbles. The knowledge obtained will provide the needed scientific basis for extrapolating long-term behavior of stored radiative waste glass forms. This report summarizes the first 6 months of a 3-year project. The following issues have been addressed: (i) the production of radiolytic oxygen, (ii) the chemistry of hydrogenous species, and (iii) the effect of glass composition and microstructure on the formation and accumulation of metastable point defects.'

  11. Using a progress computer for the direct acquisition and processing of radiation protection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, H.G.; Borchardt, K.D.; Hacke, J.; Kirschfeld, K.E.; Kluppak, B.

    1976-01-01

    A process computer will be used in the Hahn-Meitner-Institute to rationalize radiation protection measures. Appr. 150 transmitters are to be connected with this computer. Especially the radiation measuring devices of a nuclear reactor, of hot cells, and of a heavy ion accelerator, as well as the emission- and environment monitoring systems will be connected. The advantages of this method are described: central data acquisition, central alarm and stoppage information, data processing of certain measurement values, possibility of quick disturbance analysis. Furthermore the authors report about the preparations already finished, particularly about data transmission of digital and analog values to the computer. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Progress of research on cytoskeleton and neural cell migration obstacle induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Jun; Wu Cuiping; Wang Mingming

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic changes of the microtubules and microfilaments provide the main force that drives the normal migration. Biological effects in tissues and cells induced by ionizing radiation are closely correlated with the changes happening to the cytoskeleton. It is that the ionizing radiation can induce the depolymeration of microfilaments and the assembly obstacles of microtubules, and make neural cell incapable of entering the model of migration or abnormally migrate. The effects of relevant changes of the cytoskeleton induced by irradiation on neural cell migration were discussed in this paper. (authors)

  13. Removal of Kidney Stones by Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Is Associated with Delayed Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dong Eun; Han, Seung Hyeok; Oh, Hyung Jung; Kim, Seung Jun; Shin, Dong Ho; Lee, Mi Jung; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to elucidate whether stone removal by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is associated with delayed chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 131 nephrolithiasis patients with stage 3 and 4 CKD. We collected baseline clinical and laboratory data, kidney stone characteristics, and history of receiving ESWL. We classified study patients into two groups according to whether they underwent ESWL or not (Non-ESWL group vs. ESWL group). We initially compared annual estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) changes of Non-ESWL group with those of ESWL group before undergoing ESWL. In the next step, we sought to compare annual eGFR changes in the same patients before and after ESWL. Finally, we compared annual eGFR changes between success and failure groups among patients undergoing ESWL. Results The mean age of the patients was 62 years and 72.5% were male. The mean observation period was 3.2 years. Non-ESWL group and ESWL group before undergoing ESWL showed similar annual eGFR changes (-1.75±6.5 vs. -1.63±7.2 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, p=0.425). However, eGFR declined slower after undergoing ESWL than before ESWL (annual eGFR changes, -0.29±6.1 vs. -1.63±7.2 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, pESWL group, eGFR declined faster in the failure group than in the success group (annual eGFR change, -1.01±4.7 vs. -0.05±5.2 mL/min/1.73 m2/year, pESWL is associated with delayed deterioration of renal function in CKD patients with nephrolithiasis. PMID:22665335

  14. Different impact of aspirin on renal progression in patients with predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease with or without previous stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Huang, Jing-Yang; Lee, Chun-Te; Hung, Tung-Wei; Liaw, Yung-Po; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    The benefit of reducing the risk of stroke against increasing the risk of renal progression associated with antiplatelet therapy in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is controversial. We enrolled 1301 adult patients with advanced CKD treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents from January 1, 2002 to June 30, 2009 from the 2005 Longitudinal Health Insurance Database in Taiwan. All of the patients were followed until the development of the primary or secondary endpoints, or the end of the study (December 31, 2011). The primary endpoint was the development of ischemic stroke, and the secondary endpoints included hospitalization for bleeding events, cardiovascular mortality, all-cause mortality, and renal failure. The adjusted cumulative probability of events was calculated using multivariate Cox proportional regression analysis. Adjusted survival curves showed that the usage of aspirin was not associated with ischemic stroke, hospitalization for bleeding events, cardiovascular mortality or all-cause mortality, however, it was significantly associated with renal failure. In subgroup analysis, aspirin use was associated with renal failure in the patients with no history of stroke (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.14-1.73), and there was a borderline interaction between previous stroke and the use of aspirin on renal failure (interaction p=0.0565). There was no significant benefit in preventing ischemic stroke in the patients with advanced CKD who received aspirin therapy. Furthermore, the use of aspirin was associated with the risk of renal failure in the patients with advanced CKD without previous stroke. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative study of radiation, chemical, and aging effects on viral transformation. Annual progress report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: evaluation of isotopic antiglobulin test (IAT) to detect tumor associated antigens using antisera induced by x-irradiated tumor cells; development of cytotoxic antibody for embryonic antigens (EA); acrylamide gel cell culture assay for transformation; and evaluation of 3-MCA induced sarcomas for TSTA and cross-reacting antigens

  16. Radiation chemistry of hydrocarbon and alkyl halide systems. Progress report, August 1, 1977--August 1, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanrahan, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Progress of experimental work is reported on pulse radiolysis of simple alkyl halides in the gas phase, gas phase radiolysis of CHF 3 -CH 3 I mixtures, gamma radiolysis of the system CO/H 2 , and improvements in equipment and facilities

  17. Comparative study of radiation, chemical, and aging effects on viral transformation. Annual progress report, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1976-03-31

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: evaluation of isotopic antiglobulin test (IAT) to detect tumor associated antigens using antisera induced by x-irradiated tumor cells; development of cytotoxic antibody for embryonic antigens (EA); acrylamide gel cell culture assay for transformation; and evaluation of 3-MCA induced sarcomas for TSTA and cross-reacting antigens. (HLW)

  18. Cetuximab, bevacizumab, and irinotecan for patients with primary glioblastoma and progression after radiation therapy and temozolomide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Lassen, Ulrik; Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to investigate safety and efficacy when combining cetuximab with bevacizumab and irinotecan in patients with recurrent primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Patients were included with recurrent primary GBM and progression within 6 months of ending standard tre...

  19. Damage to the testes of a marine fish, the plaice (Pleuronectes platessa), induced by chronic exposure to low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    Although most authorised disposals of liquid radioactive waste are to the sea, effects of chronic radiation exposure on reproductive endpoints in a marine fish have not so far been investigated. For this reason we have carried out a series of experiments into effects of chronic radiation exposure on plaice, a commercially important marine food species which spends much of its life in contact with sea bed sediments where exposure from radioactive contaminants have been shown to be highest

  20. ESR study of radiation damage in pyrimidines. Progress report, August 1, 1975--April 1, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, B.W.

    1976-04-01

    The primary objective of this project is to develop general mechanisms for radiation damage to biomolecules using substituted pyrimidines as a model system. Results this year include a single crystal ESR study of 5-ethyl-5-isopropylbarbituric acid, development of the k-band microwave bridge, dose response measurements on methylated barbituric acid derivatives, and synthesis of several specifically deuterated uracil derivatives

  1. Radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report V, 16 May 1977--15 May 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.; Gates, O.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments are underway on the cocarcinogenic effects of asbestos and carcinogenic hydrocarbons using rats and mice as test objects. None of the protocols of these experiments have as yet been completed. The study of tumorigenesis in irradiated parabiont rats has been completed. Study of the benign tumors indicates that radiation is an effective neoplastic stimulus for only a limited number of organs and tissues, chiefly ovary, adrenal, mammary tissue, islands of Langerhans, and liver. In general the benign tumors did not seriously affect health, and in only a very few animals did they become malignant. The incidence of malignant tumors in the parabiont series has been tabulated and analyzed. Parabiosis alone appears to increase the incidence of leukemia and solid lymphoid tumors in NEDH rats. Our study of radiation tumorigenesis in the adrenal cortest in the mouse has been completed. The cortex is highly resistant to tumor induction by irradiation. Cortical tumorigenesis is strongly influenced by changes in pituitary and ovarian hormones. Proliferation of capsular ''A'' cells appears to be an important early factor in carcinogenesis. Hormonal imbalance continues to be an important factor in tumorigenesis in the parabiont pairs. If each of a pair of parabiont rats is irradiated sequentially at intervals, 30 days after a lethal dose of radiation is enough to permit the irradiated rat to support its partner through a like dose as effectively as would an unirradiated animal. The transplantable radiation-induced functioning pheochromocytoma and insulinoma of rats continue to be valuable research tools

  2. Quantitative dose-response of growth and development in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to chronic gamma-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, K.; Thompson, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    The response of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (Cruciferae) to a gradient of chronic gamma-radiation was examined under field conditions. Plants that were initially introduced to the gamma field as dry seeds received exposures of 1.34 to 18 800R/20 hour day from the time of seed germination. Regression analysis demonstrated a significant, but non-linear, response for three variables, number of seedlings emerging, number of plants flowering, and plant volume; the response of a fourth variable, number of leaves per plant, was not related to daily exposure. LD 50 values ranged from 66R/20 hour day for plant volume to 1231R/20 hour day for seedling emergence. Flowering and plant volume were the most sensitive indicators of radiation exposure. The demonstration of a variable threshold at low levels of exposure indicates that in nature A. thaliana may be exposed to environmental radiation throughout its life-cycle without significant modification of growth or development. (author)

  3. Ionizing radiation and risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the 15-country study of nuclear industry workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, Martine; Cardis, Elisabeth; Ashmore, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to other types of leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has long been regarded as non-radiogenic, i.e. not caused by ionizing radiation. However, the justification for this view has been challenged. We therefore report on the relationship between CLL mortality and external...... ionizing radiation dose within the 15-country nuclear workers cohort study. The analyses included, in seven countries with CLL deaths, a total of 295,963 workers with more than 4.5 million person-years of follow-up and an average cumulative bone marrow dose of 15 mSv; there were 65 CLL deaths....... In conclusion, the largest nuclear workers cohort study to date finds little evidence for an association between low doses of external ionizing radiation and CLL mortality. This study had little power due to low doses, short follow-up periods, and uncertainties in CLL ascertainment from death certificates...

  4. Genomic instability in mutation induction on normal human fibroblasts irradiated with chronic low-dose radiations in heavy-ion radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, M.; Tsuruoka, C.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: At a time when manned space exploration is more a reality with the planned the International Space Station (ISS) underway, the potential exposure of crews in a spacecraft to chronic low-dose radiations in the field of low-flux galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and the subsequent biological effects have become one of the major concerns of space science. We have studied both in vitro life span and genomic instability in cellular effects in normal human skin fibroblasts irradiated with chronic low-dose radiations in heavy-ion radiation field. Cells were cultured in a CO2 incubator, which was set in the irradiation room for the biological study of heavy ions in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), and irradiated with scattered radiations produced from heavy ions. Absorbed dose measured using a thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) and a Si-semiconductor detector was to be around 1.4 mGy per day when operating the HIMAC machine for biological experiments. The total population doubling number (tPDN) of low-dose irradiated cells was significantly smaller (79-93%) than that of unirradiated cells. The results indicate that the life span of the cell population shortens by irradiating with low-dose scattered radiations in the heavy-ion irradiation field. Genomic instability in cellular responses was examined to measure either cell killing or mutation induction in low-dose accumulated cells after exposing to X-ray challenging doses. The results showed that there was no enhanced effect on cell killing between low-dose accumulated and unirradiated cells after exposing to defined challenging doses of 200kV X rays. On the contrary, the mutation frequency on hprt locus of low-dose accumulated cells was much higher than that of unirradiated cells. The results suggested that genomic instability was induced in mutagenesis by the chronic low-dose irradiations in heavy-ion radiation field

  5. Response of a forest ecotone to ionizing radiation. Progress report, October 15, 1980-October 14, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.G.; Sharitz, R.R.

    1981-06-01

    The primary objectives of this study are to determine the effects of ionizing radiation on the tree species composition of the ecotone between two forest types in northern Wisconsin and to compare the postirradiation recovery of the tree flora in the ecotone with that in the bordering forest types. Relatively distinct ecotones constitute a spatially significant portion of many second-growth forest ecosystems. Belt transects concentric to the radiation source ( 137 Cs) are being used to measure compositional changes in the ecotone from aspen to maple-birch forest types. Information available includes population densities by size class, importance values, and diversity values. Estimates of leaf area index and leaf litter production, by species, have also been obtained. Succession in the radiation areas is presently under study. To date, redevelopment of forest vegetation at up to 20 m from the radiation source has been slowed significantly by the vigorous colonization of heliophytes. Sampling for 1980-81 is on schedule. In all three areas competition from successional ground vegetation has continued to delay re-establishment of tree seedlings under the opened canopy at 10 m. In this regard, only the aspen area has shown any signs of recovering, having experienced an influx of red maple seedlings in 1978. Even that area, however, is still less than half preirradiation levels with respect to seedling densities. As unusually high ratio of shrub leaf litter to tree leaf litter in the 10 to 20 m area reflects the displacement of canopy species by successional shrubs. As the overall impact of the radiation stress depends on the rate of forest re-establishment, observations will continue for several more years

  6. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    In this project we have proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and have detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. The results from these various techniques have resulted in an understanding of consequences of radiation damage to DNA from the early ionization event to the production of non-radical lesions (discussed in detail in Comprehensive Report). In this year's work we have found the hydroxyl radical in DNA's hydration layer. This is an important result which impacts the hole transfer hypothesis and the understanding of the direct vs. indirect effect in DNA. Further we have found the first ESR evidence for sugar radicals as a result of direct radiation damage to DNA nucleotides in an aqueous environment. This is significant as it impacts the biological endpoint of radiation damage to DNA and suggests future work in DNA. Work with DNA-polypeptides show clear evidence for electron transfer to DNA from the polypeptide which we believe is a radioprotective mechanism. Our work with ab initio molecular orbital theory has gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics involved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this year's work to new, more accurate values for the electron affinities of the DNA bases, understanding of the relative stability of all possible sugar radicals formed by hydrogen abstraction on the deoxyribose group, hydration effects on, thiol radioprotectors, and an ongoing study of radical intermediates formed from initial DNA ion radicals. During this fiscal year five articles have been published, three are in press, two are submitted and several more are in preparation

  7. Usefulness of percutaneous elastography by acoustic radiation force impulse for the non-invasive diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Julio Llamoza-Torres

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the accuracy of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI technique for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Materials and methods: We present an observational, single-center study that included patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis in the period between October 2012 and September 2015 who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS and were classified according to the standard and Rosemont criteria. The same group of patients was assessed by the ARFI technology using ACUSON S2000™ equipment with Virtual Touch™ Quantification software for the assessment of pancreatic stiffness by obtaining the shear wave velocity (SWV in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and nonparametric correlation methods. Diagnostic accuracy was obtained by analyzing receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. Results: A total of thirty-three patients were studied (45.5% women; mean age was 58.3 ± 11.8 years. Seventeen with a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and sixteen classified as normal according to standard criteria. A significant difference was detected between the means of SWV in pancreatic body of patients without (SWV: 1.27 m/s and with chronic pancreatitis (SWV 1.57 m/s, p = 0.037. The area under the ROC curve was 71.3% (95% CI 0.532-0.895 and the accuracy of ARFI for diagnosing chronic pancreatitis was 69.7% for a SWV of 1.4 m/s in the pancreatic body. The SWV means in head (r = 0.421, p < 0.05 and body (r = 0.455, p < 0.05 of the pancreas showed a significant correlation with the number of EUS criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Conclusion: Quantification of pancreatic stiffness with ARFI elastography technique has proven to be useful for the non-invasive diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Curcumin protects against radiation-induced acute and chronic cutaneous toxicity in mice and decreases mRNA expression of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunieff, Paul; Xu Jianhua; Hu Dongping; Liu Weimin; Zhang Lurong; Morrow, Gary; Pentland, Alice; Ryan, Julie L.; Ding, Ivan M.D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether curcumin ameliorates acute and chronic radiation skin toxicity and to examine the expression of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1, IL-6, IL-18, IL-1Ra, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, and lymphotoxin-β) or fibrogenic cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF]-β) during the same acute and chronic phases. Methods and Materials: Curcumin was given intragastrically or intraperitoneally to C3H/HeN mice either: 5 days before radiation; 5 days after radiation; or both 5 days before and 5 days after radiation. The cutaneous damage was assessed at 15-21 days (acute) and 90 days (chronic) after a single 50 Gy radiation dose was given to the hind leg. Skin and muscle tissues were collected for measurement of cytokine mRNA. Results: Curcumin, administered before or after radiation, markedly reduced acute and chronic skin toxicity in mice (p < 0.05). Additionally, curcumin significantly decreased mRNA expression of early responding cytokines (IL-1 IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α, and lymphotoxin-β) and the fibrogenic cytokine, TGF-β, in cutaneous tissues at 21 days postradiation. Conclusion: Curcumin has a protective effect on radiation-induced cutaneous damage in mice, which is characterized by a downregulation of both inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines in irradiated skin and muscle, particularly in the early phase after radiation. These results may provide the molecular basis for the application of curcumin in clinical radiation therapy

  9. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.8--radiation research and radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation study, radiation technology, isotope and nuclear agriculture

  10. From one body mutant to one cell mutant. A progress of radiation breeding in crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatomi, Shigeki

    1996-01-01

    An effective method was established to obtain non-chimeral mutants with wide spectrum of flower colors, regenerated from floral organs on which mutated sectors were come out on chronic irradiated plants. By this way, six mutant varieties of flower colors have been selected from one pink flower of chrysanthemum, and cultivated for cut-flower production. By the same method, 3 mutant varieties with small and spray type flowers were selected in Eustoma. Mutant varieties such as a rust disease resistant in sugarcane, 6 dwarfs in Cytisus and pure-white mushroom in velvet shank have been selected successively for short period. (J.P.N.)

  11. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA, Progress report, November 1, 1977--October 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1978-06-01

    In this project we have proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA, and have detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on the direct affect of radiation on DNA. We are currently investigating systems of DNA constituents and peptides which may shed light on indirect effects. Studies which we have completed during the past year are: π-cation radicals in DNA and dinucleoside phosphates, and conformational effects on the ESR Spectra of amino acids and peptides. Studies of γ-Irradiated Peptide Solutions at 77 0 K, and studies of spin transfer in γ-irradiated nucleoside--peptide solutions were also conducted

  12. Radiation chemistry of plastic crystals. Annual progress report, November 1, 1976--October 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingen, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    The overall purpose of this investigation is the understanding of the role that mesomorphism plays in the radiation chemistry of plastic crystals. In approaching this problem, the first step is to obtain data on the basic radiation chemistry of the most ordered solid state--the crystalline state. Thus, the results reported here are concerned with determination of the radiolysis of three plastic crystals in their highest ordered state. In addition to these studies, investigation of the optical properties and the positron life time properties of these materials in their plastic crystalline state was undertaken. The primary purpose of these studies during the current reporting period was the determination of the feasibility of these techniques to provide useful information to the overall project goal

  13. Response of a forest ecotone to ionizing radiation. Progress report, October 15, 1979-October 14, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, P.G.; Sharitz, R.R.

    1980-07-01

    Compositional and structural characteristics of three forest types, including aspen dominated, maple-birch dominated, and an intervening ecotone, were studied before and after irradiation in northern Wisconsin. Irradiation occurred during the summer of 1972. By the summer of 1973 the density of viable tree seedlings at 10 m from the radiation source was substantially reduced in all three areas relative to the preirradiation densities of 1971. As of the summer of 1979, establishment of tree seedlings continued to be inhibited by the vigorous development of ground vegetation. In most respects, the ecotone has shown properties and responses to radiation intermediate to those observed in the aspen and maple-birch areas. The rate and compositional characteristics of succession in the ecotone relative to aspen and maple-birch forest types is presently under study

  14. Health effects of low level radiation in shipyard workers. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    In order to determine the effects of low-level doses of radiation it was necessary to define an adequate population, to gather and collate data relating to this population and to organize this data in such a manner as to render it suitable for analysis. We have completed much of the groundwork, including the development of data collection systems and the establishment of liaisons with public and private data resources for ascertaining vital status and current address. The major tasks which we now face are two fold: (1) to determine the cause of death for deceased members of the population, and (2) to locate and secure information (occupational, medical and smoking histories) from living members of the population. Once these tasks have been completed we can undertake an analysis of this information to assess the risks of low-level doses of radiation and establish mechanisms through which this population can be followed prospectively

  15. Effects of radiation on model plant rice - OMICS: Recent progress and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Fukutani, Satoshi; Tamogami, Shigeru; Endo, Satoru; Sahoo, Sarat Kumar; Kimura, Shinzo

    2011-01-01

    This is the age of functional genomics, where genomes to high-throughput technologies and to the phenotype are making inroads into various biological questions and problems. In this report, I along with my co-workers will present an outline into the omics approaches, focusing on the global gene expression profiling (DNA microarray technique), plants and the environment, and culminating in the use of genomics to analyze the effects of radiation on plant life. For this, rice (Oryza sativa L.) geonome model and monocot cereal crop plant will be used as an example. It is our hope that use of both model and non-model plants in conjunction with high-throughput transcriptomics approaches will lead the way for unraveling radiation responses in plants, setting the stage for further research on this important aspect of our environment with direct and indirect impact on human life and civilization. (author)

  16. Delayed immunologic effects of low dose radiation in Japanese A-bomb survivors. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makinodan, Takashi.

    1985-01-01

    Samples collected from 832 A-bomb survivors were analyzed for natural killer activity, interleukin production, interferon production, serum interferon levels, and circulating immune complex levels. The most striking finding was a significant radiation-sex interaction for NK activity. The NK of females exposed to 100+ rads was decreased compared to those exposed to 0 to 99 rads. A significant increase in NK activity with age ATB was observed, as well as an increase with age in circulating immune complex

  17. Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in drosophila. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic characteristics of mutagen-sensitive mutants linked to the X chromosome were studied. These mutants increase loss and nondisjunction of chromosomes in female meiosis and are sensitive to radiation and mutagens. A study of chemical characteristics of the mutant suggested the existence of two separate forms of postreplication repair. One pathway is not caffeine sensitive and does not require recombination related functions; the second pathway appears to be caffeine sensitive and probably shares functions involved in meiotic recombination

  18. Progress in hprt mutation assay and its application in radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jing; Li Qiang

    2008-01-01

    hprt gene is an X-linked locus that has been well studied and widely used as a bio-marker in mutation detection, hprt mutation assay is a gene mutation test system in mammalian cells in vitro which has been used as a biological dosimeter. In this paper, the biological characteristics of hprt gene, hprt mutation detection methodology and the application of hprt mutation assay in radiation biology are comprehensively reviewed. (authors)

  19. Basic aspects of radiation action on microorganisms. Progress report, April 1, 1975--March 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, E.C.

    1976-04-01

    Results of studies on the effects of irradiation on Escherichia coli showed that error-prone repair mutagenesis can be induced by ionizing radiation and uv light; induced single-strand DNA break repair has been confirmed and its characterization is in process; and there is clearly a separation between the induction of lambda and other phenomena. The dose-effect relationship differs and the phenomenon of radioresistance is removed. The action spectra for uv induced mutagenesis was plotted

  20. International Standardization of the Clinical Dosimetry of Beta Radiation Brachytherapy Sources: Progress of an ISO Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    In 2004 a new work item proposal (NWIP) was accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 85 (TC85 -- Nuclear Energy), Subcommittee 2 (Radiation Protection) for the development of a standard for the clinical dosimetry of beta radiation sources used for brachytherapy. To develop this standard, a new Working Group (WG 22 - Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry and Protocols in Medical Applications) was formed. The standard is based on the work of an ad-hoc working group initiated by the Dosimetry task group of the Deutsches Insitiut für Normung (DIN). Initially the work was geared mainly towards the needs of intravascular brachytherapy, but with the decline of this application, more focus has been placed on the challenges of accurate dosimetry for the concave eye plaques used to treat ocular melanoma. Guidance is given for dosimetry formalisms, reference data to be used, calibrations, measurement methods, modeling, uncertainty determinations, treatment planning and reporting, and clinical quality control. The document is currently undergoing review by the ISO member bodies for acceptance as a Committee Draft (CD) with publication of the final standard expected by 2007. There are opportunities for other ISO standards for medical dosimetry within the framework of WG22.