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Sample records for chronic non-fluent aphasia

  1. Treatment of non-fluent aphasia through melody, rhythm and formulaic language

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, B

    2013-01-01

    Left-hemisphere stroke patients often suffer a profound loss of spontaneous speech — known as non-fluent aphasia. Yet, many patients are still able to sing entire pieces of text fluently. This striking finding has inspired mainly two research questions. If the experimental design focuses on one point in time (cross section), one may ask whether or not singing facilitates speech production in aphasic patients. If the design focuses on changes over several points in time (longitudinal section),...

  2. Neural correlates of syntactic processing in the non-fluent variant of primary progressive aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen M.; Dronkers, Nina F.; Ogar, Jennifer M.; Jang, Jung; Growdon, Matthew E.; Agosta, Federica; Henry, Maya L.; Miller, Bruce L.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2010-01-01

    The left posterior inferior frontal cortex (IFC) is important for syntactic processing, and has been shown in many functional imaging studies to be differentially recruited for the processing of syntactically complex sentences relative to simpler ones. In the non-fluent variant of primary progressive aphasia (PPA), degeneration of the posterior IFC is associated with expressive and receptive agrammatism, however the functional status of this region in non-fluent PPA is not well understood. Our objective was to determine whether the atrophic posterior IFC is differentially recruited for the processing of syntactically complex sentences in non-fluent PPA. Using structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, we quantified tissue volumes and functional responses to a syntactic comprehension task in eight patients with non-fluent PPA, compared to healthy age-matched controls. In controls, the posterior IFC showed more activity for syntactically complex sentences than simpler ones, as expected. In non-fluent PPA patients, the posterior IFC was atrophic and, unlike controls, showed an equivalent level of functional activity for syntactically complex and simpler sentences. This abnormal pattern of functional activity was specific to the posterior IFC: the mid superior temporal sulcus, another region modulated by syntactic complexity in controls, showed normal modulation by complexity in patients. A more anterior inferior frontal region was recruited by patients, but did not support successful syntactic processing. We conclude that in non-fluent PPA, the posterior IFC is not only structurally damaged, but is also functionally abnormal, suggesting a critical role for this region in the breakdown of syntactic processing in this syndrome. PMID:21159955

  3. Improvement of language functions in a chronic non-fluent post-stroke aphasic patient following bilateral sequential theta burst magnetic stimulation.

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    Vuksanović, Jasmina; Jelić, Milan B; Milanović, Sladjan D; Kačar, Katarina; Konstantinović, Ljubica; Filipović, Saša R

    2015-01-01

    In chronic non-fluent aphasia patients, inhibition of the intact right hemisphere (RH), by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or similar methods, can induce improvement in language functions. The supposed mechanism behind this improvement is a release of preserved left hemisphere (LH) language networks from RH transcallosal inhibition. Direct stimulation of the damaged LH can sometimes bring similar results too. Therefore, we developed a novel treatment approach that combined direct LH (Broca's area (BA)) stimulation, by intermittent theta burst stimulation (TBS), with homologue RH area's inhibition, by continuous TBS. We present the results of application of 15 daily sessions of the described treatment approach in a right-handed patient with chronic post-stroke non-fluent aphasia. The intervention appeared to improve several language functions, but most notably propositional speech, semantic fluency, short-term verbal memory, and verbal learning. Bilateral TBS modulation of activation of the language-related areas of both hemispheres seems to be a feasible and promising way to induce recovery in chronic aphasic patients. Due to potentially cumulative physiological effects of bilateral stimulation, the improvements may be even greater than following unilateral interventions.

  4. Semantic Feature Analysis (SFA in the Treatment of Naming Deficits: Evidence from a Malay Speaker with Non-Fluent Aphasia

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    Mohd Azmarul A Aziz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Semantic Feature Analysis (SFA is a treatment for lexical retrieval impairment in which participants are cued by providing semantic information regarding concepts they have difficulty with in naming tasks in an effort to facilitate accurate lexical retrieval (Boyle & Coelho, 1995. People with aphasia are commonly found to have naming deficits and speech-language therapists (SLTs face difficulties in providing an effective treatment method to treat this deficit. This study aims to examine the use of SFA to address naming deficits for nouns and verbs in a Malay patient (KM with non-fluent aphasia. Methods The following tests were administered to the subject pre- and post- treatment: 1 Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE; 2 Malay Object and Action Test (MOAT; and 3 A series of comprehension and production assessments in Malay. Subject was asked to name 101 and 50 pictures from MOAT. The stimuli were coloured photograph pictures. Treatment and probe (untrained stimuli were selected from pictures that a subject could not name, yielding 40 nouns and 30 verbs. From these, 20 stimuli were randomly chosen as probe items and 20 as treatment stimuli (nouns, 15 treatment and 15 probes (verbs. For the treatment study, single subject A-B-A design was implemented. Three baseline sessions were completed prior to treatment initiation naming for both probe and treatment pictures. Subject attended once-weekly therapy sessions over 8 months. Probes assessing generalizations to untrained pictures were presented at 4th, 8th, and 12th and so on until the end of the programme. Results Results showed that KM’s ability to name trained and untrained picture stimuli improved for both nouns and verbs. KM demonstrated steady improvement in the SFA treatment of trained nouns and verbs: from 5% baseline accuracy to over 90% accuracy at treatment end for nouns and from 0% baseline accuracy to 90% accuracy at treatment end for verbs. Generalizations to

  5. An investigation of the use of co-verbal gestures in oral discourse among Chinese speakers with fluent versus non-fluent aphasia and healthy adults

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    Anthony Pak Hin Kong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Co-verbal gestures can facilitate word production among persons with aphasia (PWA (Rose, Douglas, & Matyas, 2002 and play a communicative role for PWA to convey ideas (Sekine & Rose, 2013. Kong, Law, Kwan, Lai, and Lam (2015 recently reported a systematic approach to independently analyze gesture forms and functions in spontaneous oral discourse produced. When this annotation framework was used to compare speech-accompanying gestures used by PWA and unimpaired speakers, Kong, Law, Wat, and Lai (2013 found a significantly higher gesture-to-word ratio among PWAs. Speakers who were more severe in aphasia or produced a lower percentage of complete sentences or simple sentences in their narratives tended to use more gestures. Moreover, verbal-semantic processing impairment, but not the degree of hemiplegia, was found to affect PWAs’ employment of gestures. The current study aims to (1 investigate whether the frequency of gestural employment varied across speakers with non-fluent aphasia, fluent aphasia, and their controls, (2 examine how the distribution of gesture forms and functions differed across the three speaker groups, and (3 determine how well factors of complexity of linguistic output, aphasia severity, semantic processing integrity, and hemiplegia would predict the frequency of gesture use among PWAs. Method The participants included 23 Cantonese-speaking individuals with fluent aphasia, 21 with non-fluent aphasia, and 23 age- and education-matched controls. Three sets of language samples and video files were collected through the narrative tasks of recounting a personally important event, sequential description, and story-telling, using the Cantonese AphasiaBank protocol (Kong, Law, & Lee, 2009. While the language samples were linguistically quantified to reflect word- and sentential-level performance as well as discourse-level characteristics, the videos were annotated on the form and function of each gesture. All PWAs were

  6. Neural Correlates of Phonological and Semantic-Based Anomia Treatment in Aphasia

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    Fridriksson, Julius; Moser, Dana; Bonilha, Leonardo; Morrow-Odom, K. Leigh; Shaw, Heather; Fridriksson, Astrid; Baylis, Gordon C.; Rorden, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Most naming treatments in aphasia either assume a phonological or semantic emphasis or a combination thereof. However, it is unclear whether semantic or phonological treatments recruit the same or different cortical areas in chronic aphasia. Employing three persons with aphasia, two of whom were non-fluent, the present study compared changes in…

  7. 音乐和语言治疗在卒中后非流畅性失语症患者中的疗效观察%Therapeutic effect of music therapy and speech language therapy on post-stroke patients with non-fluent aphasia

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    张媛; 姚永坤; 卢香云

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estimating the therapeutic effect of music therapy and speech language therapy on post-stroke patients with non-fluent aphasia.Methods Eighty-four post-stroke patients diagnosed with non-fluent aphasia who came from the First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Shihezi University were collected between June 2012 and May 2014,then they were randomly divided into music therapy group (n =42) and speech language therapy group (n =42;including chronic (n =46) and acute groups (n =38)) based on table of random numbers.On the basis of conventionally using neurological drugs,music therapy and speech language therapy were given to the patients for one month,respectively.And language function was assessed by partial items of Chinese Version-Western Aphasia Battery before and after therapy.Results No significant changes were found in spontaneous speech,comprehension,repetition,naming and aphasia quotient in chronic and acute group patients through the music therapy and speech language therapy.Significant improvements were revealed in repetition (32.00 (15.00,53.75) vs 48.50(24.50,72.00),Z =2.147,P =0.032;33.00(14.50,49.25) vs 48.50(18.50,63.75),Z =2.018,P=0.038),naming (20.00 (8.50,34.75) vs 37.5(12.50,64.75),Z =2.298,P =0.022;19.50 (7.00,31.25) vs 34.50 (15.00,52.75),Z =2.039,P =0.041) and aphasia quotient (24.50 (10.50,37.50) vs 43.00 (18.00,64.75),Z =2.432,P =0.015;22.50 (10.00,34.50) vs 36.00 (14.00,54.00),Z =2.027,P =0.043) through music therapy and speech language therapy in chronic group patients.Comprehension was significantly improved through music therapy in chronic group patients.Repetition (24.50 (11.00,38.75) vs 46.50 (24.50,67.75),Z =2.038,P =0.043;26.50 (9.50,36.25) vs 42.50(19.00,64.25),Z =1.972,P =0.048) was significantly improved through music therapy and speech language therapy in acute group patients.And spontaneous speech (2.00 (1.00,3.75) vs 8.00 (4.00,12.75),Z =2.012,P =0.036),comprehension (51.00 (17.50,73.75) vs 85.00 (48.00,101.00),Z

  8. Anomia training and brain stimulation in chronic aphasia.

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    Cotelli, Maria; Fertonani, Anna; Miozzo, Antonio; Rosini, Sandra; Manenti, Rosa; Padovani, Alessandro; Ansaldo, Ana Ines; Cappa, Stefano F; Miniussi, Carlo

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies have reported enhanced performance on language tasks induced by non-invasive brain stimulation, i.e., repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), in patients with aphasia due to stroke or Alzheimer's disease (AD). The first part of this article reviews brain stimulation studies related to language recovery in aphasic patients. The second part reports results from a pilot study with three chronic stroke patients who had non-fluent aphasia, where real or placebo rTMS was immediately followed by 25 minutes of individualised speech therapy. Real rTMS consisted of high-frequency rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 8/9) for 25 minutes. Each patient underwent a total of four weeks of intervention. P1 underwent four weeks of real rTMS (5 days/week) where individualised speech therapy was provided for 25 minutes immediately following each rTMS session. P2 and P3 each underwent two weeks of placebo rTMS, followed immediately by individualised speech therapy; then two weeks of real rTMS, followed immediately by individualised speech therapy. Assessments took place at 2, 4, 12, 24 and 48 weeks post-entry/baseline testing. Relative to entry/baseline testing, a significant improvement in object naming was observed at all testing times, from two weeks post-intervention in real rTMS plus speech therapy, or placebo rTMS plus speech therapy. Our findings suggest beneficial effects of targeted behavioural training in combination with brain stimulation in chronic aphasic patients. However, further work is required in order to verify whether optimal combination parameters (rTMS alone or speech therapy alone) and length of rTMS treatment may be found.

  9. 缺血性卒中后非流利型失语患者静息态功能磁共振比率低波振幅的研究%Resting-state fMRI fALFF analysis in patients with non-fluent aphasia after ischemic stroke

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    许光; 马晓芬; 江桂华; 李淑美; 田军章; 詹文峰; 方金; 邱迎伟

    2014-01-01

    目的:对缺血性卒中后非流利型失语症患者的静息态功能磁共振原始数据进行比率低频振幅的处理分析,探讨其脑功能损伤及代偿的病理机制。方法:对17例失语患者(患者组)及19例年龄、性别、受教育程度均匹配的健康对照者(正常组)进行静息状态下的功能磁共振成像扫描,扫描序列为回波平面成像序列,应用DPARSF软件进行数据处理,并进行对比分析。结果:同正常组比较,患者组右侧颞上回、顶下小叶、中央后回及额叶皮层的fALFF值增高;右侧丘脑及双侧的小脑半球的fALFF值明显降低。结论:静息状态下,缺血性卒中后非流利型失语的患者在某些脑区存在异常激活,反映其脑功能失调的病理变化,为临床从大脑神经活动层面进一步了解失语症损伤及其代偿过程提供了客观依据。%Objective To understand the impairment and compensation mechanism of brain function in pa-tients with non-fluent aphasia after ischemic stroke. The fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) method was used to analyze the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data in the resting state between the aphasia patients and the normal controls. Methods The scans of the resting state of fMRI were performed in 17 aphasia patients and 19 age-, education-, and sex-matched healthy control subjects. The scan sequence was single-shot echo planar image,DPARSF software was used to analyze fALFF data of the aphasia patients and the healthy controls. Results Compared to the control group, the value in right superior temporal gurus, inferior parietal lob-ule, frontal lobe cortex, and postcentral gurus were significantly increased in the aphasia group. The fALFF in bilat-eral cerebellum and right thalamus were also decreased in the aphasia group. Conclusions The fALFF values in some brain region in the aphasia group were abnormal in the resting state , indicating a

  10. Measuring and inducing brain plasticity in chronic aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Brain plasticity associated with anomia recovery in aphasia is poorly understood. Here, I review four recent studies from my lab that focused on brain modulation associated with long-term anomia outcome, its behavioral treatment, and the use of transcranial brain stimulation to enhance anomia treatment success in individuals with chronic aphasia caused by left hemisphere stroke. In a study that included 15 participants with aphasia who were compared to a group of 10 normal control subjects, w...

  11. Improved Neural Processing Efficiency in a Chronic Aphasia Patient Following Melodic Intonation Therapy: A Neuropsychological and Functional MRI Study

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    Tabei, Ken-ichi; Satoh, Masayuki; Nakano, Chizuru; Ito, Ai; Shimoji, Yasuo; Kida, Hirotaka; Sakuma, Hajime; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) is a treatment program for the rehabilitation of aphasic patients with speech production disorders. We report a case of severe chronic non-fluent aphasia unresponsive to several years of conventional therapy that showed a marked improvement following intensive 9-day training on the Japanese version of MIT (MIT-J). The purpose of this study was to verify the efficacy of MIT-J by functional assessment and examine associated changes in neural processing by functional magnetic resonance imaging. MIT improved language output and auditory comprehension, and decreased the response time for picture naming. Following MIT-J, an area of the right hemisphere was less activated on correct naming trials than compared with before training but similarly activated on incorrect trials. These results suggest that the aphasic symptoms of our patient were improved by increased neural processing efficiency and a concomitant decrease in cognitive load.

  12. 强制性诱导语言治疗联合低频重复经颅磁刺激对非流畅性失语的疗效%Effectiveness of constraint induced language therapy combined with low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stim-ulation for non-fluent aphasia

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    周秋敏; 丛芳; 沈滢; 殷稚飞; 张文通; 叶芊; 陈文莉; 单春雷

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察强制性诱导语言治疗(CILT)联合低频重复经颅磁刺激(rTMS)对非流畅性失语的语言功能和交流能力的影响。方法:40例失语症患者随机分为4组各10例,分别采用常规治疗(常规组)、常规治疗+CIL T (CILT组)、常规治疗+1Hz rTMS(rTMS组)及常规治疗+CILT+1Hz rTMS(联合组)治疗10d ,治疗前后进行西方失语症成套测验(WAB)的自发言语、听理解、复述及命名前4项及日常生活交流活动检查(CADL )评定语言功能和交流能力。结果:治疗10d后,联合组WAB各项功能评分及CADL评分均较治疗前、CILT 组及常规组明显提高(P<0.05),联合组WAB评分自发言语、听理解和命名3项及CADL评分均较rTMS组明显提高(P<0.05), WAB评分复述项联合组与rTMS组组间比较差异无统计学意义;rTMS组WAB各项功能评分及CADL评分均较治疗前及常规组提高更明显(P<0.05);CILT组WAB评分自发言语、听理解和命名3项及CADL评分均较治疗前及常规组明显提高(P<0.05);常规组WAB评分仅自发言语较治疗前有提高(P<0.05),CADL评分治疗前后比较差异无统计学意义。结论:强制性诱导疗法和低频重复性经颅磁刺激对非流畅型失语疗效优于常规治疗,两者联合运用疗效更优。%Objective:To observe the effects of constraint induced language therapy(CILT) combined with low fre-quency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation(rTMS) on language functions and communication skills of non-fluent aphasia patients .Methods:Forty patients were randomly assigned to four groups accepting conventional thera-py(conventional group) ,conventional therapy + CILT (CILT group) ,conventional therapy + 1 Hz rTMS (rTMS group) ,and conventional therapy+CILT+1 Hz rTMS(combined group) for 10 days ,respectively .Before and after therapy ,the language functions were evaluated with the

  13. Association between Therapy Outcome and Right-Hemispheric Activation in Chronic Aphasia

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    Richter, Maria; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Straube, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The role of the right hemisphere for language processing and successful therapeutic interventions in aphasic patients is a matter of debate. This study explored brain activation in right-hemispheric areas and left-hemispheric perilesional areas in response to language tasks in chronic non-fluent aphasic patients before and after constraint-induced…

  14. Measuring and Inducing Brain Plasticity in Chronic Aphasia

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    Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Brain plasticity associated with anomia recovery in aphasia is poorly understood. Here, I review four recent studies from my lab that focused on brain modulation associated with long-term anomia outcome, its behavioral treatment, and the use of transcranial brain stimulation to enhance anomia treatment success in individuals with chronic aphasia…

  15. Intensive language training enhances brain plasticity in chronic aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Meinzer Marcus; Elbert Thomas; Wienbruch Christian; Djundja Daniela; Barthel Gabriela; Rockstroh Brigitte

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Focal clusters of slow wave activity in the delta frequency range (1–4 Hz), as measured by magnetencephalography (MEG), are usually located in the vicinity of structural damage in the brain. Such oscillations are usually considered pathological and indicative of areas incapable of normal functioning owing to deafferentation from relevant input sources. In the present study we investigated the change in Delta Dipole Density in 28 patients with chronic aphasia (>12 months po...

  16. Changes of right-hemispheric activation after constraint-induced, intensive language action therapy in chronic aphasia: fMRI evidence from auditory semantic processing

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    Bettina eMohr

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of the two hemispheres in the neurorehabilitation of language is still under dispute. This study explored the changes in language-evoked brain activation over a two-week treatment interval with intensive constraint induced aphasia therapy (CIAT, which is also called intensive language action therapy (ILAT. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to assess brain activation in perilesional left hemispheric and in homotopic right hemispheric areas during passive listening to high and low-ambiguity sentences and non-speech control stimuli in chronic non-fluent aphasia patients. All patients demonstrated significant clinical improvements of language functions after therapy. In an event-related fMRI experiment, a significant increase of BOLD signals was manifest in right inferior frontal and temporal areas. This activation increase was stronger for highly ambiguous sentences than for unambiguous ones. These results suggest that the known language improvements brought about by intensive constraint-induced language action therapy at least in part relies on circuits within the right-hemispheric homologues of left-perisylvian language areas, which are most strongly activated in the processing of semantically complex language.

  17. Changes of right-hemispheric activation after constraint-induced, intensive language action therapy in chronic aphasia: fMRI evidence from auditory semantic processing.

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    Mohr, Bettina; Difrancesco, Stephanie; Harrington, Karen; Evans, Samuel; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2014-01-01

    The role of the two hemispheres in the neurorehabilitation of language is still under dispute. This study explored the changes in language-evoked brain activation over a 2-week treatment interval with intensive constraint induced aphasia therapy (CIAT), which is also called intensive language action therapy (ILAT). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to assess brain activation in perilesional left hemispheric and in homotopic right hemispheric areas during passive listening to high and low-ambiguity sentences and non-speech control stimuli in chronic non-fluent aphasia patients. All patients demonstrated significant clinical improvements of language functions after therapy. In an event-related fMRI experiment, a significant increase of BOLD signal was manifest in right inferior frontal and temporal areas. This activation increase was stronger for highly ambiguous sentences than for unambiguous ones. These results suggest that the known language improvements brought about by intensive constraint-induced language action therapy at least in part relies on circuits within the right-hemispheric homologs of left-perisylvian language areas, which are most strongly activated in the processing of semantically complex language.

  18. Intensive language training enhances brain plasticity in chronic aphasia

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    Meinzer Marcus

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focal clusters of slow wave activity in the delta frequency range (1–4 Hz, as measured by magnetencephalography (MEG, are usually located in the vicinity of structural damage in the brain. Such oscillations are usually considered pathological and indicative of areas incapable of normal functioning owing to deafferentation from relevant input sources. In the present study we investigated the change in Delta Dipole Density in 28 patients with chronic aphasia (>12 months post onset following cerebrovascular stroke of the left hemisphere before and after intensive speech and language therapy (3 hours/day over 2 weeks. Results Neuropsychologically assessed language functions improved significantly after training. Perilesional delta activity decreased after therapy in 16 of the 28 patients, while an increase was evident in 12 patients. The magnitude of change of delta activity in these areas correlated with the amount of change in language functions as measured by standardized language tests. Conclusions These results emphasize the significance of perilesional areas in the rehabilitation of aphasia even years after the stroke, and might reflect reorganisation of the language network that provides the basis for improved language functions after intensive training.

  19. Effect of propranolol on naming in chronic Broca's aphasia with anomia.

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    Beversdorf, David Q; Sharma, Umesh K; Phillips, Nicole N; Notestine, Margaret A; Slivka, Andrew P; Friedman, Norman M; Schneider, Sandra L; Nagaraja, Haikady N; Hillier, Ashleigh

    2007-08-01

    Previous research suggests that the noradrenergic system modulates flexibility of access to the lexical-semantic network, with propranolol benefiting normal subjects in lexical-semantic problem solving tasks. Patients with Broca's aphasia with anomia have impaired ability to access appropriate verbal output for a given visual stimulus in a naming task. Therefore, we tested naming in a pilot study of chronic Broca's aphasia patients with anomia after propranolol and after placebo in a double-blinded crossover manner. Naming was better after propranolol than after placebo, suggesting a potential benefit from propranolol in chronic Broca's aphasia with anomia. Larger follow-up studies are necessary to further investigate this effect.

  20. Bilateral brain reorganization with memantine and constraint-induced aphasia therapy in chronic post-stroke aphasia: An ERP study.

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    Barbancho, Miguel A; Berthier, Marcelo L; Navas-Sánchez, Patricia; Dávila, Guadalupe; Green-Heredia, Cristina; García-Alberca, José M; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; López-González, Manuel V; Dawid-Milner, Marc S; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Lara, J Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Changes in ERP (P100 and N400) and root mean square (RMS) were obtained during a silent reading task in 28 patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of both memantine and constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT). Participants received memantine/placebo alone (weeks 0-16), followed by drug treatment combined with CIAT (weeks 16-18), and then memantine/placebo alone (weeks 18-20). ERP/RMS values (week 16) decreased more in the memantine group than in the placebo group. During CIAT application (weeks 16-18), improvements in aphasia severity and ERP/RMS values were amplified by memantine and changes remained stable thereafter (weeks 18-20). Changes in ERP/RMS occurred in left and right hemispheres and correlated with gains in language performance. No changes in ERP/RMS were found in a healthy group in two separated evaluations. Our results show that aphasia recovery induced by both memantine alone and in combination with CIAT is indexed by bilateral cortical potentials.

  1. logopenic型和非流利型原发性进行性失语的认知和言语障碍的比较%Profiles of cognitive and language impairment of logopenic and non-fluent variant of primary progressive aphasia

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    李丹; 赵丽娜; 靳红梅; 张敏; 郭冬梅; 于跃怡; 武力勇; 唐毅; 李芳玉

    2016-01-01

    Objective To decipher the cognitive and linguistic feature of logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lv-PPA) and nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfv-PPA) and to explore the extent to which cognitive and language impairment contribute to the dysfunction of activity of daily living (ADL).Methods Seven lv-PPA and five nfv-PPA were enrolled in memory clinic of Xuanwu Hospital,Capital Medical University from January 2015 to January 2016 accordig to the international consensus criteria for PPA and its three subtypes.20 age-matched normal controls (NC) were included.Both the patients and the NC completed a battery of neuropsychological test,lingusitic test and brain magnetic resonance imaging.All the patients conducted 11C Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging.Result Lv-PPA patients were characterized by deficits in lexical retrieval and long sentenses repetition,while nfv-PPA were with motor speech apraxia and phonetic distortion.Compared with nfv-PPA,lv-PPA patient displayed more severe cognitive deficit with younger onset of age (56 ± 5 vs 61 ± 5,P < 0.05),rapid decline of MMSE score within 1.5 years and pariental cortex dysfunctions such as ideomotor praxis,Gerstmann syndrome and contructional apraxia.Correlation analysis indicated that there was more significant association between pariental cortex dysfunction and ADL/mini-mental state examination (MMSE) than that of language deficit (r =-0.868,r =-0.922;r =0.312,r =-0.257).All seven lv-PPA were PiB-PET positive and five nfv-PPA were negative.Conclusion This study enriched the chinical and linguistic characterization of lvPPA and nfv-PPA,which has implication for diagnosis,disease management and treatment for clinicians.%目的 比较原发性进行性失语logopenic型和非流利型两种临床亚型认知和言语障碍的差异,分析言语和认知障碍对日常生活能力下降的不同影响.方法 首都医科大学宣武医院神经内科记忆门诊2015年1月至2016年1月

  2. Neurobehavioral response to increased treatment dosage in chronic, severe aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Mozeiko

    2014-04-01

    Intensive aphasia treatment has been employed with equivocal results likely due in part to variability in the severity of participants as well as in the parameters that comprise intensity (e.g., session duration. Intensive Language Action Therapy (ILAT; Difrancesco, Pulvermüller, & Mohr, 2012 is an intensive aphasia therapy that has been replicated successfully and also tends to use similar dosage parameters across replication studies (Barthel, Meinzer, Djundja, & Rockstroh, 2008; Kurland, Pulvermüller, Silva, Burke, & Andrianopoulos, 2012; Maher, 2006; Meinzer et al., 2004. Those with more severe aphasia are thought to have the most to gain from ILAT since they could potentially benefit more from the “forced use” aspect than those who have more residual language (Meinzer et al., 2008. Since Pulvermüller and colleagues’ (2001 initial study, several successful replication studies have shown increases on standardized tests, discourse measures or functional communication outcomes. The dosage for these tends to be approximately thirty hours over two weeks or less. If the dosage of ILAT contributes to gains as suggested by evidence from work in our lab (Mozeiko, Myers, & Coelho, 2011, then it is possible that increasing the dosage to sixty hours over four weeks might produce even greater outcomes. The present study employed a modified multiple probe technique (McReynolds & Kearns, 1983 in which ILAT was delivered at a dosage of three hours per day for twenty days. Discourse productivity and naming accuracy were probed daily. In addition, fMRI scanning was performed at four time points throughout the treatment process in order to compare potential language changes to changes in neural activation patterns with each participant acting as his or her own control. These results are expected to contribute to the limited fMRI results from investigations of neural recovery throughout an extended aphasia treatment period. Methods Participants Two participants were

  3. Using Visual Scene Displays as Communication Support Options for People with Chronic, Severe Aphasia: A Summary of AAC Research and Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukelman, David R; Hux, Karen; Dietz, Aimee; McKelvey, Miechelle; Weissling, Kristy

    2015-01-01

    Research about the effectiveness of communicative supports and advances in photographic technology has prompted changes in the way speech-language pathologists design and implement interventions for people with aphasia. The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of photographic images as a basis for developing communication supports for people with chronic aphasia secondary to sudden-onset events due to cerebrovascular accidents (strokes). Topics include the evolution of AAC-based supports as they relate to people with aphasia, the development and key features of visual scene displays (VSDs), and future directions concerning the incorporation of photographs into communication supports for people with chronic and severe aphasia.

  4. Constrained versus Unconstrained Intensive Language Therapy in Two Individuals with Chronic, Moderate-to-Severe Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech: Behavioral and fMRI Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Jacquie; Pulvermuller, Friedemann; Silva, Nicole; Burke, Katherine; Andrianopoulos, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I study investigated behavioral and functional MRI (fMRI) outcomes of 2 intensive treatment programs to improve naming in 2 participants with chronic moderate-to-severe aphasia with comorbid apraxia of speech (AOS). Constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT; Pulvermuller et al., 2001) has demonstrated positive outcomes in some…

  5. Lesion correlates of patholinguistic profiles in chronic aphasia: comparisons of syndrome-, modality- and symptom-level assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henseler, Ilona; Regenbrecht, Frank; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2014-03-01

    One way to investigate the neuronal underpinnings of language competence is to correlate patholinguistic profiles of aphasic patients to corresponding lesion sites. Constituting the beginnings of aphasiology and neurolinguistics over a century ago, this approach has been revived and refined in the past decade by statistical approaches mapping continuous variables (providing metrics that are not simply categorical) on voxel-wise lesion information (voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping). Here we investigate whether and how voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping allows us to delineate specific lesion patterns for differentially fine-grained clinical classifications. The latter encompass 'classical' syndrome-based approaches (e.g. Broca's aphasia), more symptom-oriented descriptions (e.g. agrammatism) and further refinement to linguistic sub-functions (e.g. lexico-semantic deficits for inanimate versus animate items). From a large database of patients treated for aphasia of different aetiologies (n = 1167) a carefully selected group of 102 first ever ischaemic stroke patients with chronic aphasia (∅ 12 months) were included in a VLSM analysis. Specifically, we investigated how performance in the Aachen Aphasia Test-the standard clinical test battery for chronic aphasia in German-relates to distinct brain lesions. The Aachen Aphasia Test evaluates aphasia on different levels: a non-parametric discriminant procedure yields probabilities for the allocation to one of the four 'standard' syndromes (Broca, Wernicke, global and amnestic aphasia), whereas standardized subtests target linguistic modalities (e.g. repetition), or even more specific symptoms (e.g. phoneme repetition). Because some subtests of the Aachen Aphasia Test (e.g. for the linguistic level of lexico-semantics) rely on rather coarse and heterogeneous test items we complemented the analysis with a number of more detailed clinically used tests in selected mostly mildly affected subgroups of patients. Our results

  6. Paving the Way for Speech: Voice-Training-Induced Plasticity in Chronic Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech—Three Single Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Jungblut; Walter Huber; Christiane Mais; Ralph Schnitker

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties with temporal coordination or sequencing of speech movements are frequently reported in aphasia patients with concomitant apraxia of speech (AOS). Our major objective was to investigate the effects of specific rhythmic-melodic voice training on brain activation of those patients. Three patients with severe chronic nonfluent aphasia and AOS were included in this study. Before and after therapy, patients underwent the same fMRI procedure as 30 healthy control subjects in our prestu...

  7. Combining Teletherapy and On-line Language Exercises in the Treatment of Chronic Aphasia: An Outcome Study

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    Richard D. Steele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 12-week outcome study in which nine persons with long-term chronic aphasia received individual and group speech-language teletherapy services, and also used on-line language exercises to practice from home between therapy sessions.  Participants were assessed at study initiation and completion using the Western Aphasia Battery, a portion of the Communicative Effectiveness Index, ASHA National Outcome Measurement System, and RIC Communication Confidence Rating Scale for Aphasia; additionally participants were polled regarding satisfaction at discharge.  Pre-treatment and post-treatment means were calculated and compared, and matched t-tests were used to determine significance of improvements following treatment, with patterns of independent on-line activity analyzed.  Analysis of scores shows that means improved on most measures following treatment, generally significantly: the WAB AQ improved +3.5 (p = .057; the CETI Overall (of items administered — +17.8 (p = .01, and CCRSA Overall — + 10.4 (p = .0004.  Independent work increased with time, and user satisfaction following participation was high.

  8. Rehabilitation of Aphasia: application of the Melodic-Rhythmic Therapy to the Italian Language

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    Maria Daniela eCortese

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aphasia is a complex disorder, frequent after stroke (~38%, with a detailed pathophysiological characterization. Proper approaches are mandatory to devise an efficient rehabilitative strategy, in order to address the everyday life and professional disability. Several rehabilitative procedures are based on psycholinguistic, cognitive, psychosocial or pragmatic approaches, among these with neurobehavioral ratio, the Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT .Van Eeckhout’s adaptation to the French language (Melodic-Rhythmic Therapy: MRT has implemented the training strategy by adding a rhythmic structure reproducing the French prosody.Purposes of this study were to adapt the MRT rehabilitation procedures to the Italian language and to verify its efficacy in a group of 6 chronic patients (5 males with severe non-fluent aphasia and without specific aphasic treatments at least from 9 months. The patients were treated 4 days a week for 16 weeks, with sessions of 30-40 min. They were assessed 6 months after the end of the treatment (follow-up. The patients showed a significant improvement at the Aachener Aphasie Test in different fields of spontaneous speech, with superimposable results at the follow-up. Albeit preliminary, these findings support the use of MRT in the rehabilitation after stroke. Specifically, MRT seems to benefit from its stronger structure than the available stimulation-facilitation procedures and allows a better quantification of the rehabilitation efficacy.

  9. 强制性诱导语言治疗对脑卒中后慢性失语症的效果观察%Effect of Constraint-induced Aphasia Therapy on Chronic Aphasia after Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢瑛; 刘惠林; 吴春薇; 李新宇; 郑萍; 陈宸; 李欣

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨短期强制性诱导语言治疗对脑卒中后慢性失语症的疗效。方法30例脑卒中后慢性失语症患者接受共30 h言语康复训练,对照组(n=15)为传统言语康复训练,治疗组(n=15)为每天3 h强制性诱导语言治疗。治疗前后采用西方失语症成套测验(WAB)和交流能力问卷(CAL)进行评定。结果治疗后,治疗组WAB口语表达、命名及复述功能显著改善(P<0.001),听理解恢复不明显(P=0.066);对照组口语表达显著改善(P<0.001)。治疗后,治疗组CAL评分显著改善(P<0.001)。结论强制性诱导语言治疗可短期内明显改善脑卒中后慢性失语症患者的语言功能。%Objective To investigate the effect of short-term constraint-induced aphasia therapy on chronic aphasia after stroke. Meth-ods 30 stroke patients with chronic aphasia accepted speech therapy for a total of 30 hours. The control group (n=15) accepted routine speech training and the treatment group (n=15) accepted constraint-induced aphasia therapy 3 hours a day. They were assessed with the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) and the Communicative Activity Log (CAL) before and after treatment. Results The treatment group im-proved significantly in oral expression, naming and repetition function of WAB after treatment (P<0.001), but not significantly in listening understanding (P=0.066);while the control group improved significantly in oral expression (P<0.001). The treatment group also significant-ly improved in CAL (P<0.001). Conclusion Constraint-induced aphasia therapy can significantly improve the speech for stroke patients with chronic aphasia in the short term.

  10. Ultra-rapid access to words in chronic aphasia: the effects of intensive language action therapy (ILAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Lucy J; Difrancesco, Stephanie; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Shtyrov, Yury; Mohr, Bettina

    2015-03-01

    Effects of intensive language action therapy (ILAT) on automatic language processing were assessed using Magnetoencephalography (MEG). Auditory magnetic mismatch negativity (MMNm) responses to words and pseudowords were recorded in twelve patients with chronic aphasia before and immediately after two weeks of ILAT. Following therapy, Patients showed significant clinical improvements of auditory comprehension as measured by the Token Test and in word retrieval and naming as measured by the Boston Naming Test. Neuromagnetic responses dissociated between meaningful words and meaningless word-like stimuli ultra-rapidly, approximately 50 ms after acoustic information first allowed for stimulus identification. Over treatment, there was a significant increase in the left-lateralisation of this early word-elicited activation, observed in perilesional fronto-temporal regions. No comparable change was seen for pseudowords. The results may reflect successful, therapy-induced, language restitution in the left hemisphere. PMID:25403745

  11. Comparing the production of complex sentences in Persian patients with ‎post-stroke aphasia and non-damaged people with normal speaking

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    Azar Mehri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebrovascular disease leading to stroke is the most common cause of aphasia. Speakers with agrammatic non-fluent aphasia have difficulties in production of movement-derived sentences such as passive sentences, topicalized constituents, and Wh-questions. To assess the production of complex sentences, some passive, topicalized and focused sentences were designed for patients with non-fluent Persian aphasic. Afterwards, patients’ performance in sentence production was tested and compared with healthy non-damaged subjects.Methods: In this cross sectional study, a task was designed to assess the different types of sentences (active, passive, topicalized and focused adapted to Persian structures. Seven Persian patients with post-stroke non-fluent agrammatic aphasia (5 men and 2 women and seven healthy non-damaged subjects participated in this study. The computed tomography (CT scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed that all the patients had a single left hemisphere lesion involved middle cerebral artery (MCA, Broca`s area and in its white matter. In addition, based on Bedside version of Persian Western Aphasia Battery (P-WAB-1, all of them were diagnosed with moderate Broca aphasia. Then, the production task of Persian complex sentences was administered.Results: There was a significant difference between four types of sentences in patients with aphasia [Degree of freedom (df = 3, P < 0.001]. All the patients showed worse performance than the healthy participants in all the four types of sentence production (P < 0.050.Conclusion: In general, it is concluded that topicalized and focused sentences as non-canonical complex sentences in Persian are very difficult to produce for patients with agrammatic non-fluent aphasia. It seems that sentences with A-movement are simpler for the patients than sentences involving A`-movement; since they include shorter movements in compare to topicalized and focused sentences.

  12. The Influence of Phonomotor Treatment on Word Retrieval Abilities in 26 Individuals with Chronic Aphasia: An Open Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Diane L.; Oelke, Megan; Brookshire, Carmel Elizabeth; Nadeau, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The ultimate goal of aphasia therapy should be to achieve gains in function that generalize to untrained exemplars and daily conversation. Anomia is one of the most disabling features of aphasia. The predominantly lexical/semantic approaches used to treat anomia have low potential for generalization due to the orthogonality of semantic…

  13. Spontaneous speech: Quantifying daily communication in Spanish-speaking individuals with aphasia.

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    Silvia Martínez-Ferreiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Observable disruptions in spontaneous speech are among the most prominent characteristics of aphasia. The potential of language production analyses in discourse contexts to reveal subtle language deficits has been progressively exploited, becoming essential for diagnosing language disorders (Vermeulen et al., 1989; Goodglass et al., 2000; Prins and Bastiaanse, 2004; Jaecks et al., 2012. Based on previous studies, short and/or fragmentary utterances, and consequently a shorter MLU, are expected in the speech of individuals with aphasia, together with a large proportions of incomplete sentences and a limited use of embeddings. Fewer verbs with a lower diversity (lower type/token ratio and fewer internal arguments are also predicted, as well as a low proportion of inflected verbs (Bastiaanse and Jonkers, 1998. However, this profile comes mainly from the study of individuals with prototypical aphasia types, mainly Broca’s aphasia, raising the question of how accurate spontaneous speech is to pinpoint deficits in individuals with less clear diagnoses. To address this question, we present the results of a spontaneous speech analysis of 25 Spanish-speaking subjects: 10 individuals with aphasia (IWAs, 7 male and 3 female (mean age: 64.2 in neural stable condition (> 1 year post-onset who suffered from a single CVA in the left hemisphere (Rosell, 2005, and 15 non-brain-damaged matched speakers (NBDs. In the aphasia group, 7 of the participants were diagnosed as non-fluent (1 motor aphasia, 4 transcortical motor aphasia or motor aphasia with signs of transcorticality, 2 mixed aphasia with motor predominance, and 3 of them as fluent (mixed aphasia with anomic predominance. The protocol for data collection included semi-standardized interviews, in which participants were asked 3 questions evoking past, present, and future events (last job, holidays, and hobbies. 300 words per participant were analyzed. The MLU over the total 300 words revealed a decreased

  14. Taking Sides: An Integrative Review of the Impact of Laterality and Polarity on Efficacy of Therapeutic Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Anomia in Chronic Poststroke Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandars, Margaret; Cloutman, Lauren; Woollams, Anna M

    2016-01-01

    Anomia is a frequent and persistent symptom of poststroke aphasia, resulting from damage to areas of the brain involved in language production. Cortical neuroplasticity plays a significant role in language recovery following stroke and can be facilitated by behavioral speech and language therapy. Recent research suggests that complementing therapy with neurostimulation techniques may enhance functional gains, even amongst those with chronic aphasia. The current review focuses on the use of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) as an adjunct to naming therapy for individuals with chronic poststroke aphasia. Our survey of the literature indicates that combining therapy with anodal (excitatory) stimulation to the left hemisphere and/or cathodal (inhibitory) stimulation to the right hemisphere can increase both naming accuracy and speed when compared to the effects of therapy alone. However, the benefits of tDCS as a complement to therapy have not been yet systematically investigated with respect to site and polarity of stimulation. Recommendations for future research to help determine optimal protocols for combined therapy and tDCS are outlined.

  15. Taking Sides: An Integrative Review of the Impact of Laterality and Polarity on Efficacy of Therapeutic Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Anomia in Chronic Poststroke Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Sandars

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anomia is a frequent and persistent symptom of poststroke aphasia, resulting from damage to areas of the brain involved in language production. Cortical neuroplasticity plays a significant role in language recovery following stroke and can be facilitated by behavioral speech and language therapy. Recent research suggests that complementing therapy with neurostimulation techniques may enhance functional gains, even amongst those with chronic aphasia. The current review focuses on the use of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS as an adjunct to naming therapy for individuals with chronic poststroke aphasia. Our survey of the literature indicates that combining therapy with anodal (excitatory stimulation to the left hemisphere and/or cathodal (inhibitory stimulation to the right hemisphere can increase both naming accuracy and speed when compared to the effects of therapy alone. However, the benefits of tDCS as a complement to therapy have not been yet systematically investigated with respect to site and polarity of stimulation. Recommendations for future research to help determine optimal protocols for combined therapy and tDCS are outlined.

  16. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION IN CHRONIC POST-STROKE APHASIA: A PILOT STUDY

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    Lucilla eVestito

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has been suggested to improve language function in patients with post-stroke aphasia. Most studies on aphasic patients, however, were conducted with a very limited follow-up period, if any. In this pilot, single-blind study on chronic post-stroke aphasic patients, we aimed to verify whether or not tDCS is able to extend its beneficial effects for a longer period of time (21 weeks after the end of stimulation. Three aphasic patients underwent anodal tDCS (A-tDCS, 20 min, 1.5 mA and sham stimulation (S-tDCS over the left frontal (perilesional region, coupled with a simultaneous naming training (on-line tDCS. Ten consecutive sessions (five days per week for two weeks were implemented. In the first five sessions we used a list of 40 figures, while in the subsequent five sessions we utilized a second set of 40 figures differing in word difficulty. At the end of the stimulation period we found a significant beneficial effect of A-tDCS (as compared to baseline and S-tDCS in all our subjects, regardless of word difficulty, although with some inter-individual differences. In the follow-up period, the percentage of correct responses persisted significantly better until the 16th week, when an initial decline in naming performance was observed. Up to the 21st week, the number of correct responses, though no longer significant, was still above the baseline level. These results in a small group of aphasic patients suggest a long-term beneficial effect of on-line A-tDCS.

  17. Treatment-Induced Neuroplasticity Following Intensive Speech Therapy and a Home Practice Program in Fifteen Cases of Chronic Aphasia

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    Jacquie Kurland

    2015-04-01

    •\tActivity in R posSTG decreased over time for CORR pictures while increasing over time for TR/PR pictures Discussion Short-term intensive treatment followed by a home practice program can produce enduring language improvements that provide rich opportunities for investigating treatment-induced neuroplasticity in aphasia. Given the high degree of individual variability in lesion location/extent, and the resulting variability in aphasia type/severity, it makes sense to examine treatment-induced changes in neural activity patterns within subjects where ‘signature’ patterns of activity are remarkably reliable across time.

  18. Drug treatment of poststroke aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, A M O

    2004-03-01

    Impairment of language function (aphasia) is one of the most common neurological symptoms after stroke. Approximately one in every three patients who have an acute stroke will suffer from aphasia. The estimated incidence and prevalence of stroke in Western Europe is 140 and 800 per 100,000 of the population. Aphasia often results in significant disability and handicap. It is a major obstacle for patients to live independently in the community. When recovery from aphasia occurs, it is usually incomplete and patients are rarely able to return to full employment and other social activities. Currently, the main treatment for aphasia is conventional speech and language therapy. However, the effectiveness of this intervention has not been conclusively demonstrated and empirical observations suggest that spontaneous biological recovery may explain most of the improvement in language function that occurs in aphasics. The generally poor prognosis of the severe forms of poststroke language impairment (Broca, Wernicke and global aphasia), coupled with the limited effectiveness of conventional speech and language therapy has stimulated the search for other treatments that may be used in conjunction with speech and language therapy, including the use of various drugs. Dopamine agonists, piracetam (Nootropil), amphetamines, and more recently donepezil (Aricept), have been used in the treatment of aphasia in both the acute and chronic phase. The justification for the use of drugs in the treatment of aphasia is based on two types of evidence. Some drugs, such as dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine), improve attention span and enhance learning and memory. Learning is an essential mechanism for the acquisition of new motor and cognitive skills, and hence, for recovery from aphasia. Second, laboratory and clinical data suggest that drug treatment may partially restore the metabolic function in the ischemic zone that surrounds the brain lesion and also has a neuroprotective effect following

  19. Adaptation to aphasia: grammar, prosody and interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhys, Catrin S; Ulbrich, Christiane; Ordin, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates recurrent use of the phrase very good by a speaker with non-fluent agrammatic aphasia. Informal observation of the speaker's interaction reveals that she appears to be an effective conversational partner despite very severe word retrieval difficulties that result in extensive reliance on variants of the phrase very good. The question that this paper addresses using an essentially conversation analytic framework is: What is the speaker achieving through these variants of very good and what are the linguistic and interactional resources that she draws on to achieve these communicative effects? Tokens of very good in the corpus were first analyzed in a bottom-up fashion, attending to sequential position, structure and participant orientation. This revealed distinct uses that were subsequently subjected to detailed acoustic analysis in order to investigate specific prosodic characteristics within and across the interactional variants. We identified specific clusters of prosodic cues that were exploited by the speaker to differentiate interactional uses of very good. The analysis thus shows how, in the adaptation to aphasia, the speaker exploits the rich interface between prosody, grammar and interaction both to manage the interactional demands of conversation and to communicate propositional content. PMID:23237417

  20. Paving the Way for Speech: Voice-Training-Induced Plasticity in Chronic Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech—Three Single Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Jungblut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Difficulties with temporal coordination or sequencing of speech movements are frequently reported in aphasia patients with concomitant apraxia of speech (AOS. Our major objective was to investigate the effects of specific rhythmic-melodic voice training on brain activation of those patients. Three patients with severe chronic nonfluent aphasia and AOS were included in this study. Before and after therapy, patients underwent the same fMRI procedure as 30 healthy control subjects in our prestudy, which investigated the neural substrates of sung vowel changes in untrained rhythm sequences. A main finding was that post-minus pretreatment imaging data yielded significant perilesional activations in all patients for example, in the left superior temporal gyrus, whereas the reverse subtraction revealed either no significant activation or right hemisphere activation. Likewise, pre- and posttreatment assessments of patients’ vocal rhythm production, language, and speech motor performance yielded significant improvements for all patients. Our results suggest that changes in brain activation due to the applied training might indicate specific processes of reorganization, for example, improved temporal sequencing of sublexical speech components. In this context, a training that focuses on rhythmic singing with differently demanding complexity levels as concerns motor and cognitive capabilities seems to support paving the way for speech.

  1. Paving the way for speech: voice-training-induced plasticity in chronic aphasia and apraxia of speech--three single cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungblut, Monika; Huber, Walter; Mais, Christiane; Schnitker, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties with temporal coordination or sequencing of speech movements are frequently reported in aphasia patients with concomitant apraxia of speech (AOS). Our major objective was to investigate the effects of specific rhythmic-melodic voice training on brain activation of those patients. Three patients with severe chronic nonfluent aphasia and AOS were included in this study. Before and after therapy, patients underwent the same fMRI procedure as 30 healthy control subjects in our prestudy, which investigated the neural substrates of sung vowel changes in untrained rhythm sequences. A main finding was that post-minus pretreatment imaging data yielded significant perilesional activations in all patients for example, in the left superior temporal gyrus, whereas the reverse subtraction revealed either no significant activation or right hemisphere activation. Likewise, pre- and posttreatment assessments of patients' vocal rhythm production, language, and speech motor performance yielded significant improvements for all patients. Our results suggest that changes in brain activation due to the applied training might indicate specific processes of reorganization, for example, improved temporal sequencing of sublexical speech components. In this context, a training that focuses on rhythmic singing with differently demanding complexity levels as concerns motor and cognitive capabilities seems to support paving the way for speech. PMID:24977055

  2. Revisiting the dissociation between singing and speaking in expressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Sylvie; Racette, Amélie; Gagnon, Lise; Peretz, Isabelle

    2003-08-01

    We investigated the production of sung and spoken utterances in a non-fluent patient, C.C., who had a severe expressive aphasia following a right-hemisphere stroke, but whose language comprehension and memory were relatively preserved. In experiment 1, C.C. repeated familiar song excerpts under four different conditions: spoken lyrics, sung lyrics on original melody, lyrics sung on new but familiar melody and melody sung to a neutral syllable "la". In experiment 2, C.C. repeated novel song excerpts under three different conditions: spoken lyrics, sung lyrics and sung-to-la melody. The mean number of words produced under the spoken and sung conditions did not differ significantly in either experiment. The mean number of notes produced was not different either in the sung-to-la and sung conditions, but was higher than the words produced, hence showing a dissociation between C.C.'s musical and verbal productions. Therefore, our findings do not support the claim that singing helps word production in non-fluent aphasic patients. Rather, they are consistent with the idea that verbal production, be it sung or spoken, result from the operation of same mechanisms.

  3. [Aphasia in a polyglot: description and neuropsychological course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinell-Gispert-Saúch, M; Gil-Saladié, D; Delgado-González, M

    1997-04-01

    We present a case of aphasia due to an ischaemic lesion in the left temporo-occipital region of the brain of a 60 year old right-handed polyglot. Mother tongues: French, Italian, Arabic. Educated at school in English. Languages learnt as an adult: German, Portuguese, Spanish. Language habitually spoken prior to illness: Spanish. His language disorder was of non-fluent type and progressed to an anomic disorder. The non-parallel recovery of languages led to an initial and predominant recovery of English (language at school) followed by French (his first language). This type of non-parallel recovery may be compatible with the inhibition-disinhibition mechanism hypothesis. This would mean that the languages of least recovery are inhibited by raising the threshold of some circuits while still permitting comprehension. PMID:9172921

  4. Vocabulary acquisition in aphasia: Modality can matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomiranta, Leena; Grönroos, Ann-Mari; Martin, Nadine; Laine, Matti

    2014-11-01

    The present case study investigated modality-specific aspects of novel word acquisition in aphasia. It was prompted by recent aphasia case studies indicating great interindividual variability in the ability to learn and maintain novel words in aphasia. Moreover, two previous case studies revealed a striking effect of input modality by showing effective word learning and re-learning via visual input only (Kohen, Sola, Tuomiranta, Laine, & Martin, 2012; Tuomiranta et al., 2014). The present participant TS with chronic nonfluent aphasia and post-semantic anomia was administered novel word-referent learning tasks. In the first experiment, the learning phase included simultaneous phonological and orthographic input, while the follow-up was probed separately for spoken and written responses. In the second experiment, we studied the effect of four different input and output modality combinations on her ability to learn to name the novel items. In the first experiment, TS's spoken naming performance during the learning phase was just within the range of healthy controls. Maintenance declined and remained outside that range during the whole 6-month follow-up. However, TS maintained the learned words better in written than in spoken naming throughout the follow-up, and in written naming, her maintenance stayed within the control's range up to 8 weeks post-training. The second experiment indicated that the best learning outcome was achieved with orthographic input. Orthographic input combined with orthographic output resulted in fast and accurate learning of the novel words. Interestingly, TS's test profile was opposite to her learning profile, as she repeated better than she read aloud in the linguistic background assessment. The results from the present case highlight the importance of multiple learning channels for word acquisition in individuals with aphasia. Probing the functionality of different input and output channels for learning may also prove valuable in tailoring

  5. Aphasia vs. Apraxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... words. Finding the word to express a thought. Understanding grammatical sentences. Reading or writing words or sentences. Therapy approaches for aphasia: Restoring language ability Understanding spoken language Example: Word/picture matching Stimulating word ...

  6. Family Adjustment to Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Family Adjustment to Aphasia Richard S. was a senior manager ... It also presents a great challenge to the family. There may be tension among family members and ...

  7. The anterior temporal lobes support residual comprehension in Wernicke's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Holly; Zahn, Roland; Keidel, James L; Binney, Richard J; Sage, Karen; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2014-03-01

    Wernicke's aphasia occurs after a stroke to classical language comprehension regions in the left temporoparietal cortex. Consequently, auditory-verbal comprehension is significantly impaired in Wernicke's aphasia but the capacity to comprehend visually presented materials (written words and pictures) is partially spared. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural basis of written word and picture semantic processing in Wernicke's aphasia, with the wider aim of examining how the semantic system is altered after damage to the classical comprehension regions. Twelve participants with chronic Wernicke's aphasia and 12 control participants performed semantic animate-inanimate judgements and a visual height judgement baseline task. Whole brain and region of interest analysis in Wernicke's aphasia and control participants found that semantic judgements were underpinned by activation in the ventral and anterior temporal lobes bilaterally. The Wernicke's aphasia group displayed an 'over-activation' in comparison with control participants, indicating that anterior temporal lobe regions become increasingly influential following reduction in posterior semantic resources. Semantic processing of written words in Wernicke's aphasia was additionally supported by recruitment of the right anterior superior temporal lobe, a region previously associated with recovery from auditory-verbal comprehension impairments. Overall, the results provide support for models in which the anterior temporal lobes are crucial for multimodal semantic processing and that these regions may be accessed without support from classic posterior comprehension regions. PMID:24519979

  8. What do pause patterns in non-fluent aphasia tell us about monitoring speech? A study of morpho-syntactic complexity, accuracy and fluency in agrammatic sentence and connected discourse production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halima Sahraoui

    2015-04-01

    Arising from the way the speaker deals with the underlying impairment in situ, trade-offs are thus clearly made between fluency and morpho-syntactic accuracy and complexity. Even though language processing cannot perform in a safe way anymore, the agrammatic speakers rely on still operating executive functions related to pre- or post-articulatory speech monitoring in order to improve morpho-syntactic encoding.

  9. Aphasia Classification Using Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axer, H.; Jantzen, Jan; Berks, G.;

    2000-01-01

    A web-based software model (http://fuzzy.iau.dtu.dk/aphasia.nsf) was developed as an example for classification of aphasia using neural networks. Two multilayer perceptrons were used to classify the type of aphasia (Broca, Wernicke, anomic, global) according to the results in some subtests...

  10. Support for Anterior Temporal Involvement in Semantic Error Production in Aphasia: New Evidence from VLSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Grant M.; Schwartz, Myrna F.; Kimberg, Daniel Y.; Faseyitan, Olufunsho; Brecher, Adelyn; Dell, Gary S.; Coslett, H. Branch

    2011-01-01

    Semantic errors in aphasia (e.g., naming a horse as "dog") frequently arise from faulty mapping of concepts onto lexical items. A recent study by our group used voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) methods with 64 patients with chronic aphasia to identify voxels that carry an association with semantic errors. The strongest associations were…

  11. Singing Therapy Can Be Effective for a Patient with Severe Nonfluent Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Akanuma, Kyoko; Hatayama, Yuka; Otera, Masako; Meguro, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe aphasia are rarely treated using speech therapy. We used music therapy to continue to treat a 79-year-old patient with chronic severe aphasia. Interventions 1, 2, and 3 were to practice singing a song that the patient knew, to practice singing a song with a therapist, and to practice saying a greeting using a song with lyrics,…

  12. Crossroads in aphasia rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.E. van de Sandt-Koenderman (Mieke)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focusses on two types of aphasia rehabilitation, cognitive linguistic treatment (CLT) and AAC (Augmentative and Alternative Communication) training. In a study of the effect of nonlinguistic variables on the outcome of CLT, it was shown, that neuropsychological data con

  13. A Behavioral Conceptualization of Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jonathan C.; LeBlanc, Linda A.; Raetz, Paige B.

    2008-01-01

    Aphasia is an acquired language impairment that affects over 1 million individuals, the majority of whom are over age 65 (Groher, 1989). This disorder has typically been conceptualized within a cognitive neuroscience framework, but a behavioral interpretation of aphasia is also possible. Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior proposes a…

  14. Novel word acquisition in aphasia: Facing the word-referent ambiguity of natural language learning contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza, Claudia; Mirman, Daniel; Tuomiranta, Leena; Benetello, Annalisa; Heikius, Ida-Maria; Järvinen, Sonja; Majos, Maria C; Cardona, Pedro; Juncadella, Montserrat; Laine, Matti; Martin, Nadine; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2016-06-01

    Recent research suggests that some people with aphasia preserve some ability to learn novel words and to retain them in the long-term. However, this novel word learning ability has been studied only in the context of single word-picture pairings. We examined the ability of people with chronic aphasia to learn novel words using a paradigm that presents new word forms together with a limited set of different possible visual referents and requires the identification of the correct word-object associations on the basis of online feedback. We also studied the relationship between word learning ability and aphasia severity, word processing abilities, and verbal short-term memory (STM). We further examined the influence of gross lesion location on new word learning. The word learning task was first validated with a group of forty-five young adults. Fourteen participants with chronic aphasia were administered the task and underwent tests of immediate and long-term recognition memory at 1 week. Their performance was compared to that of a group of fourteen matched controls using growth curve analysis. The learning curve and recognition performance of the aphasia group was significantly below the matched control group, although above-chance recognition performance and case-by-case analyses indicated that some participants with aphasia had learned the correct word-referent mappings. Verbal STM but not word processing abilities predicted word learning ability after controlling for aphasia severity. Importantly, participants with lesions in the left frontal cortex performed significantly worse than participants with lesions that spared the left frontal region both during word learning and on the recognition tests. Our findings indicate that some people with aphasia can preserve the ability to learn a small novel lexicon in an ambiguous word-referent context. This learning and recognition memory ability was associated with verbal STM capacity, aphasia severity and the integrity

  15. Structural prediction in aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Warren

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence that young healthy comprehenders predict the structure of upcoming material, and that their processing is facilitated when they encounter material matching those predictions (e.g., Staub & Clifton, 2006; Yoshida, Dickey & Sturt, 2013. However, less is known about structural prediction in aphasia. There is evidence that lexical prediction may be spared in aphasia (Dickey et al., 2014; Love & Webb, 1977; cf. Mack et al, 2013. However, predictive mechanisms supporting facilitated lexical access may not necessarily support structural facilitation. Given that many people with aphasia (PWA exhibit syntactic deficits (e.g. Goodglass, 1993, PWA with such impairments may not engage in structural prediction. However, recent evidence suggests that some PWA may indeed predict upcoming structure (Hanne, Burchert, De Bleser, & Vashishth, 2015. Hanne et al. tracked the eyes of PWA (n=8 with sentence-comprehension deficits while they listened to reversible subject-verb-object (SVO and object-verb-subject (OVS sentences in German, in a sentence-picture matching task. Hanne et al. manipulated case and number marking to disambiguate the sentences’ structure. Gazes to an OVS or SVO picture during the unfolding of a sentence were assumed to indicate prediction of the structure congruent with that picture. According to this measure, the PWA’s structural prediction was impaired compared to controls, but they did successfully predict upcoming structure when morphosyntactic cues were strong and unambiguous. Hanne et al.’s visual-world evidence is suggestive, but their forced-choice sentence-picture matching task places tight constraints on possible structural predictions. Clearer evidence of structural prediction would come from paradigms where the content of upcoming material is not as constrained. The current study used self-paced reading study to examine structural prediction among PWA in less constrained contexts. PWA (n=17 who

  16. An Introduction to Research on Aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈逸

    2014-01-01

    Language is a complex cognitive psychological activity exclusive to human beings. Based on scientific researches on aphasia, this paper reviews origin and classification of aphasiology, displays different aphasia symptoms, and briefly introduces brain function al ocation theory.

  17. Imaging in primary progressive aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) presents with aphasia, with or without other minor cognitive dysfunction. We report five patients with PPA to show the correlation between their clinical signs and imaging findings. The patients can be divided into those with nonfluent (group 1) and those with fluent (group 2) aphasia. The characteristic speech impairment was bradylalia in group 1 and word amnesia in group 2. Impairment of comprehension was common but mild in both groups. On MRI, patients in group 1 showed predominantly left frontal and perisylvian atrophy with reduced uptake in the same region on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using technetium-99m hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (99mTc HMPAO). Patients in group 2 showed left temporal atrophy involving the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus on MRI and reduced uptake in the same region on SPECT. These findings correlated well with the functional anatomy of speech impairment. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Imaging in primary progressive aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K. [Department of Neurology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan); Ukita, H. [Rehabilitation Service, Osaka University Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Yanagihara, T. [Department of Neurology, Osaka University Medical School, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) presents with aphasia, with or without other minor cognitive dysfunction. We report five patients with PPA to show the correlation between their clinical signs and imaging findings. The patients can be divided into those with nonfluent (group 1) and those with fluent (group 2) aphasia. The characteristic speech impairment was bradylalia in group 1 and word amnesia in group 2. Impairment of comprehension was common but mild in both groups. On MRI, patients in group 1 showed predominantly left frontal and perisylvian atrophy with reduced uptake in the same region on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using technetium-99m hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime ({sup 99m}Tc HMPAO). Patients in group 2 showed left temporal atrophy involving the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri, hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus on MRI and reduced uptake in the same region on SPECT. These findings correlated well with the functional anatomy of speech impairment. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Aphasia Centers and the Life Participation Approach to Aphasia: A Paradigm Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Roberta J.

    2016-01-01

    The Aphasia Center is a service delivery model that provides an interactive community for persons with aphasia. This model has been increasing in popularity over the last 20 years. Aphasia Centers are consistent with a social model of health care and disability. They offer the potential for linguistic, communicative, and psychosocial benefits. The…

  20. An Aphasia Mentoring Program: Perspectives of Speech-Language Pathology Students and of Mentors with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Barbara A.; Petersen, Jill; Puurveen, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In contrast to clinician-as-expert models, social models of clinical practice typically acknowledge people with aphasia as equal partners in intervention. Given this, there may be a place within speech-language pathology education for programs situating people with aphasia as experts. This paper describes an aphasia mentoring program that…

  1. Asymmetric inhibitory treatment effects in multilingual aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goral, Mira; Naghibolhosseini, Maryam; Conner, Peggy S

    2013-01-01

    Findings from recent psycholinguistic studies of bilingual processing support the hypothesis that both languages of a bilingual are always active and that bilinguals continually engage in processes of language selection. This view aligns with the convergence hypothesis of bilingual language representation. Furthermore, it is hypothesized that when bilinguals perform a task in one language they need to inhibit their other, nontarget language(s) and that stronger inhibition is required when the task is performed in the weaker language than in the stronger one. The study of multilingual individuals who acquire aphasia resulting from a focal brain lesion offers a unique opportunity to test the convergence hypothesis and the inhibition asymmetry. We report on a trilingual person with chronic nonfluent aphasia who at the time of testing demonstrated greater impairment in her first acquired language (Persian) than in her third, later learned language (English). She received treatment in English followed by treatment in Persian. An examination of her connected language production revealed improvement in her grammatical skills in each language following intervention in that language, but decreased grammatical accuracy in English following treatment in Persian. The increased error rate was evident in structures that are used differently in the two languages (e.g., auxiliary verbs). The results support the prediction that greater inhibition is applied to the stronger language than to the weaker language, regardless of their age of acquisition. We interpret the findings as consistent with convergence theories that posit overlapping neuronal representation and simultaneous activation of multiple languages and with proficiency-dependent asymmetric inhibition in multilinguals.

  2. Regional cerebral blood flow in aphasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soh, K; Larsen, B; Skinhøj, E;

    1978-01-01

    . In motor (nonfluent) aphasia, the rCBF method showed areas of cortical dysfunction that always included the lower part of the rolandic area while Broca's area was not consistently affected. In sensory (fluent) aphasia, the superior-posterior temporal cortex was involved in all cases. In global aphasia......, the abnormalities included both regions consistently involved in the other types of aphasia. The 133Xe injection method for mapping abnormalities relevant for localizing the cortical speech areas was superior to the classical neuroradiological methods in that several cases failed to show any relevant lesion...

  3. [Psycholinguistic aspects of aphasia diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, R S

    1980-02-01

    A central goal of psycholinguistic research on the diagnosis and therapy of aphasic patients consists of the construction of a series of language tasks which a. can provide guidelines for the development of systematic therapy programs and b. are suited to the evaluation of the recovery process in aphasia, in particular the effectiveness of speech therapy. Since current aphasia tests fall short on both points, a number of requirements are discussed which an aphasia test should minimally meet in order to satisfy the above objectives. Some of these requirements are illustrated in the light of the preliminary results of the Amsterdam Aphasia Test (AAT).

  4. Aphasia centers in North America: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Holland, Audrey L

    2011-08-01

    There is a growing trend toward dedicated programs designed to improve the lives of people with aphasia and their families. We are referring to these programs collectively as "aphasia centers." These programs purportedly differ from more traditional medically based aphasia rehabilitation. However, there is no directory of aphasia centers and no definition of what constitutes such a program. Therefore, an online survey was designed to identify and describe aphasia centers in the United States and Canada. A 37-question survey was posted online via SurveyMonkey. An introductory letter was distributed by electronic mail to a listserv and mailing lists of programs associated with aphasia. Potential respondents who considered themselves an aphasia center were asked to complete the survey. A total of 33 survey responses were analyzed, and descriptive data were compiled resulting in a description of the following aspects of aphasia centers: demographic information, mission, admission and discharge policies, assessment practices, program logistics, staffing patterns, marketing, funding, and services offered. In addition, a qualitative analysis of written text responses revealed the following key themes that appear to characterize the responding programs: services that differ from traditional aphasia rehabilitation; a sense of community; a holistic focus on quality of life, psychosocial well-being, participation, and social support; the centrality of group interaction; and variety/intensity of services. PMID:21968557

  5. TMS Suppression of Right Pars Triangularis, but Not Pars Opercularis, Improves Naming in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I.; Theoret, Hugo; Kobayashi, Masahito; Fregni, Felipe; Nicholas, Marjorie; Tormos, Jose M.; Steven, Megan S.; Baker, Errol H.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to discover if an optimum 1 cm[squared] area in the non-damaged right hemisphere (RH) was present, which could temporarily improve naming in chronic, nonfluent aphasia patients when suppressed with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Ten minutes of slow, 1 Hz rTMS was applied to suppress different RH ROIs in…

  6. Clinicoanatomical correlation in stroke related aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Bohra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: With advances in neuroimaging, traditional views regarding the clinicoanatomic correlation in stroke patients with aphasia are being challenged and it has been observed that lesions at a given cortical or subcortical site may manifest with different aphasia profiles. Aims: To study as to whether there is a strict clinicoanatomical correlation between the type of aphasia and lesion site in patients with first ever stroke. Settings and Design: Observational study, based in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Stroke patient′s ≥18 years of age were screened and those with first ever stroke and aphasia were subjected to a detailed stroke workup and language assessment using the Hindi version of Western Aphasia Battery (WAB. Statistical analysis was done with χ2 test with Yates correction and Kruskal-Wallis test. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Overall aphasia was detected in 27.9% of the 260 screened cases with stroke. Amongst 60 cases with first ever stroke and aphasia, the aphasia type was: Global (33.33%, Broca′s (28.3%, transcortical motor (13.33%, transcortical sensory (10%, Wernicke′s (8.33%, anomic (5%, and conduction (1.67% aphasia. A definite correlation between the lesion site and the type of aphasia as per the traditional classification was observed in 35% cases only. Conclusions: No absolute correlation exists between the lesion site and the type of clinical aphasia syndrome in majority of the patients with cortical and subcortical stroke.

  7. Theories of inter-hemispheric interactions in aphasia: the role of tDCS in rehabilitation of post-stroke aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy H Hamilton

    2014-04-01

    . Based on our prior findings using functional imaging meta-analysis and TMS in patients with aphasia1-2, we will make the case that these mechanisms are not mutually exclusive, and that multiple patterns of plastic change in language systems are observed across and even within individuals with aphasia. We will then the review the growing body of literature in which tDCS has been explored as a treatment for aphasia and argue that the heterogeneity of stimulation approaches speaks to the influence of multiple mechanisms of language plasticity. Moreover, based on our initial findings in a pilot study of tDCS in persons with chronic nonfluent aphasia3, we will argue that current and future approaches to aphasia treatment with tDCS should focus on identifying the influence of different mechanisms of aphasia recovery at the individual level. Future studies in this area will need to determine the relationship between clinical features such as lesion size, lesion distribution, and aphasia symptomotology and the hemispheric neuroplastic mechanisms that individual patients will preferentially employ to recover language ability, in order to optimally modulate these mechanisms using brain stimulation.

  8. Neuroimaging in the Differential Diagnosis of Primary Progressive Aphasia – Illustrative Case Series in the Light of New Diagnostic Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a progressive language disorder associated with atrophy of the dominant language hemisphere, typically left. Current PPA criteria divide PPA into three variants: non-fluent (nfvPPA), semantic (svPPA) and logopenic (lvPPA). The classification of PPA into one of the three variants may be performed at 3 levels: I) clinical, II) imaging-supported, III) definite pathologic diagnosis. This paper aimed at assessing the feasibility of the imaging-supported diagnostics of PPA variants in the Polish clinical setting with access to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) examinations. We present the clinical and neuroimaging data on 6 patients (4 women, 2 men) clinically diagnosed with PPA (3 with nfvPPA and 3 with lvPPA) in whom MRI and SPECT were performed in order to determine if imaging-supported diagnosis could be established in those cases. In 4 individuals (2 with nfvPPA and 2 with lvPPA) clinical diagnosis was supported by neuroimaging (SPECT, albeit not MRI), thus level II of PPA diagnosis could be established in those cases. MRI results were either inconsistent with the clinical diagnosis (Patients 1 and 2) or a mixed pattern of atrophy was observed (Patients 3–6). Imaging-supported diagnosis of PPA variant is more feasible with quantitative analysis of SPECT images than with purely qualitative visual analysis of MRI. Hypoperfusion abnormalities evidenced by SPECT are more variant-specific than patterns of atrophy

  9. Treatment of verb anomia in aphasia: efficacy of self-administered therapy using a smart tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Monica; Routhier, Sonia; Légaré, Annie; Macoir, Joël

    2016-01-01

    Aphasia is a chronic condition that usually requires long-term rehabilitation. However, even if many effective treatments can be offered to patients and families, speech therapy services for individuals with aphasia often remain limited because of logistical and financial considerations, especially more than 6 months after stroke. Therefore, the need to develop tools to maximize rehabilitation potential is unquestionable. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a self-administered treatment delivered with a smart tablet to improve written verb naming skills in CP, a 63-year-old woman with chronic aphasia. An ABA multiple baseline design was used to compare CP's performance in verb naming on three equivalent lists of stimuli trained with a hierarchy of cues, trained with no cues, and not trained. Results suggest that graphemic cueing therapy, done four times a week for 3 weeks, led to better written verb naming compared to baseline and to the untrained list. Moreover, generalization of the effects of treatment was observed in verb production, assessed with a noun-to-verb production task. Results of this study suggest that self-administered training with a smart tablet is effective in improving naming skills in chronic aphasia. Future studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of new technologies in self-administered treatment of acquired language deficits.

  10. The time course of neurolinguistic and neuropsychological symptoms in three cases of logopenic primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, Louise; Seidel, Barbara; Grande, Marion; Schulte, Stephanie; Pieperhoff, Peter; Südmeyer, Martin; Minnerop, Martina; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Huber, Walter; Grodzinsky, Yosef; Amunts, Katrin; Heim, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a rare clinical dementia syndrome affecting predominantly language abilities. Word-finding difficulties and comprehension deficits despite relatively preserved cognitive functions are characteristic symptoms during the first two years, and distinguish PPA from other dementia types like Alzheimer's disease. However, the dynamics of changes in language and non-linguistic abilities are not well understood. Most studies on progression used cross-sectional designs, which provide only limited insight into the course of the disease. Here we report the results of a longitudinal study in three cases of logopenic PPA over a period of 18 months, with exemplary longitudinal data from one patient even over 46 months. A comprehensive battery of neurolinguistic and neuropsychological tests was applied four times at intervals of six months. Over this period, deterioration of verbal abilities such as picture naming, story retelling, and semantic word recall was found, and the individual decline was quantified and compared between the three patients. Furthermore, decrease in non-verbal skills such as divided attention and increasing apraxia was observed in all three patients. In addition, inter-subject variability in the progression with different focuses was observed, with one patient developing a non-fluent PPA variant. The longitudinal, multivariate investigation of logopenic PPA thus provides novel insights into the progressive deterioration of verbal as well as non-verbal abilities. These deficits may further interact and thus form a multi-causal basis for the patients' problems in every-day life which need to be considered when planning individually targeted intervention in PPA.

  11. Behavioral neurology in language and aphasia: from basic studies to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Kenichi

    2012-10-01

    With increasing aging population, cognitive deteriorations due to neuro- degenerative diseases or stroke are so commonly observed that it is thought to be inevitable with aging. For dementia and stroke, a communication disorder due to language deterioration is one of the main problems. Behavioral neurology aims to clarify the relationship between brain function and behavior; language deterioration is one of the main targets, and its clinical applications are really useful for making better understanding of patients. Language is sequences of sound or characters that carry meanings for communication. From the evolutionary perspective, "language" can be thought about by considering birds and dogs: the basal ganglia and anterior cingulate, and the thalamus and cerebral cortex are thought to provide the neurobiological background, respectively. Humans can use language. The language area is a newly developed brain area in evolution and is mainly localized in the left cerebral hemisphere. Semantic memory has also developed in humans. There are two routes, the superficial and deep routes, with the latter associated with meaning, and three brain areas are involved: the peri-Sylvian area, per-peri-Sylvian area, and right hemisphere. Using these principles, language symptoms of dementia with progressive non-fluent aphasia (PA), semantic dementia (SD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) can be understood. Namely, the symptoms of PA is understood by the dysfunction of peri-Sylvian language area, those of SD and AD by that of peri-peri-Sylvian language area, and those of some VaD cases and AD cases by that of right hemisphere.

  12. Lesion localization in aphasia without hemiparesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Midori; Senoh, Yoko; Okamoto, Koichi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hirai, Shunsaku (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-06-01

    The distribution of the lesions responsible for aphasia unassociated with right-sided hemiparesis was evaluated by cranial computed tomography (CT) among stroke patients. In the Broca aphasia group were observed atypical aphasic symptoms, and the lesions were far more localized than in ordinary Broca one. In the Wernicke aphasia group showed relatively large lesions in the left superior temporal gyrus, sometimes extending to supramarginal and angular gyri, which caused such additional symptoms as apraxia without motor paresis in some cases. In the Transcortical motor aphasia group showed the occlusion of the left internal carotid artery, though without obvious abnormality at CT. In another patient a circumscribed low density lesion was disclosed in the area anterior and superior to so-called Broca's area. In the Transcortical sensory aphasia group, the lesion involved the borderzone supplied by the left middle and posterior cerebral arteries. In the Amnestic aphasia group showed a lesion in the left parietal lobe, while in another no remarkable change was demonstrated. In the Global aphasia group, one had multiple isolated lesions in both anterior and posterior speech areas. Another showed a large lesion involving the whole territory of the left middle cerebral artery. In the remaining one a high density area was observed in the left superior temporal, supramarginal and angular gyri, not extending to the frontal lobe beyond with sylvian fissure. Therefore, in interpreting CTs of such aphasic patients we must take account of not only the extent of the lesion but also the severity of destruction.

  13. 失语症%Aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董瑞国; 高素荣

    2003-01-01

    @@ 失语症(aphasia)是因大脑损伤所致的获得性语言障碍,它可由多种脑部疾病引起,尤其是脑血管病,约1/3急性卒中患者会产生失语.了解失语症的特点和诊断,不仅有助于脑与语言的关系的研究,而且有助于为失语患者制定康复计划.

  14. Training verb and sentence production in agrammatic Broca's aphasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Links, Petra; Hurkmans, Joost; Bastiaanse, Roelien

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many aphasic speakers have problems producing verbs at both the word and the sentence level. A treatment programme called ACTION (Bastiaanse, Bunge, Perk, 2004; Bastiaanse, Jonkers, Quak, Varela Put, 1997) has been developed to train verb production of both fluent and non-fluent aphasic

  15. Assessments in outcome evaluation in aphasia therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, Jytte; Brouwer, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Outcomes of aphasia therapy in Denmark are documented in evaluation sessions in which both the person with aphasia and the speech-language therapist take part. The participants negotiate agreements on the results of therapy. By means of conversation analysis, we study how such agreements...... on therapy outcome are reached interactionally. The sequential analysis of 34 video recordings focuses on a recurrent method for reaching agreements in these outcome evaluation sessions. In and through a special sequence of conversational assessment it is claimed that the person with aphasia has certain...... communicative skills. Such claims are systematically substantiated by invoking examples of the person with aphasia performing this skill either outside or inside the therapeutic setting. Substantiation can be seen as a form of validation of the claim and thereby a basis is set for agreement. The findings...

  16. Neuroimaging and neurorehabilitation for aphasia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) which can suppress neural activity of selected brain areas, has been introduced for stroke patients with aphasia as a therapeutic tool. To assess the therapeutic effects of an 11-days in-hospital protocol of intensive speech therapy (ST) combined with low-frequency rTMS on language function in patients with poststroke aphasia. Twenty patients with left-hemispheric stroke and aphasia were included in this study During their 11-day hospitalization, each patient received 10 treatment sessions consisting of 40-min of 1 Hz repetitive low-frequency TMS and 60-min of intensive ST (one session/day), excluding Sundays. The scalp area for stimulation was selected based on functional (f) MRI and determination of the type of aphasia. Repetitive low-frequency-TMS was applied to the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) for patients with motor-dominant aphasia and to the superior temporal gyrus (STG) for patients with sensory-dominant aphasia. Language function was evaluated by the Japanese version of the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB), the Standard Language Test of Aphasia (SLTA) and the supplementary test of SLTA at one week before admission, 1 hr after the last rTMS session and 4 weeks after discharge from the hospital. On pretreatment fMRI, the most activated areas were in the left hemisphere (n=11) and the right hemisphere (n=9). Aphasia types were sensory-dominant (n=9) and motor-dominant (n=11). The repetitive low-frequency TMS was applied to the right STG (n=5), left STG (n=4), right IFG (n=8) and left IFG (n=3). All patients with motor-dominant aphasia showed improvement while those with sensory-dominant aphasia showed improvement in spontaneous speed only. Our fMRI-based repetitive low-frequency TMS strategy for aphasic stroke patients seems to be a novel neurorehabilitative approach facilitating the reorganization of language function with a low risk of adverse effects. (author)

  17. Separate neural systems support representations for actions and objects during narrative speech in post-stroke aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Gleichgerrcht

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The finding that the two major grammatical classes in human speech rely on two dissociable networks has both important theoretical implications for the neurobiology of language and clinical implications for the assessment and potential rehabilitation and treatment of patients with chronic aphasia due to stroke.

  18. A Single-subject Study to Examine the Effects of Constrained-induced Aphasia Therapy on Naming Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohre Kavian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aphasia is prevalent in people following stroke, which can have a significant impact on the quality of life of the patients with stroke. One of the new methods for treatment of patients with aphasia is constraint-induced aphasia therapy (CIAT. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of CIAT on naming deficits in individuals with chronic aphasia. This study had a prospective, single-subject study with A-B-A design. The CIAT was administered to two patients with chronic aphasia. Participants were a 57-year-old male and a 45-year-old female and had a stroke 60 and 36 months ago, respectively. In this study, the naming test was used as the outcome measure. The naming test was administered in three baseline sessions with 1 week interval between tests (phase A. Patients received CIAT for four consecutive weeks (3 days/week. Four measurements were taken during the treatment phase (phase B. In follow-up phase (phase A two other measurements were performed. Visual analysis consisting of level, regression line, and variability were used to determine the effects of CIAT on naming. Both participants increased scores on naming test after phase A and B. The mean of the naming score improved from the baseline to the intervention phase in both participants. There was a positive trend in naming scores during the treatment phase compared with the trend in the baseline demonstrated by both participants. The results of this study showed that the CIAT can be effective in improving the naming deficit in patients with chronic post-stroke aphasia.

  19. Induction of neuroplasticity and recovery in post-stroke aphasia by non-invasive brain stimulation

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    Priyanka eShah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stroke victims tend to prioritize speaking, writing and walking as the three most important rehabilitation goals. Of note is that two of these goals involve communication. This underscores the significance of developing successful approaches to aphasia treatment for the several hundred thousand new aphasia patients each year and over 1 million stroke survivors with chronic aphasia in the U.S. alone. After several years of growth as a research tool, noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS is gradually entering the arena of clinical aphasiology. In this review, we first examine the current state of knowledge of post-stroke language recovery including the contributions from the dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Next, we briefly discuss the methods and the physiologic basis of the use of inhibitory and excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS as research tools in patients who experience post-stroke aphasia. Finally, we provide a critical review of the most influential evidence behind the potential use of these two brain stimulation methods as clinical rehabilitative tools.

  20. Social Participation through the Eyes of People with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalemans, Ruth J. P.; de Witte, Luc; Wade, Derick; van den Heuvel, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the way people with aphasia perceive their social participation and its influencing factors. Aims: To explore how people with aphasia perceive participation in society and to investigate influencing factors. Methods & Procedures: In this qualitative study thirteen persons with aphasia and twelve central caregivers…

  1. The Trouble with Nouns and Verbs in Greek Fluent Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambanaros, Maria

    2008-01-01

    In the past verb retrieval problems were associated primarily with agrammatism and noun retrieval difficulties with fluent aphasia. With regards to fluent aphasia, so far in the literature, three distinct patterns of verb/noun dissociations have been described for individuals with fluent anomic aphasia in languages with different underlying forms;…

  2. Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extremely limited in their ability to speak or comprehend language. They may be unable to say even ... the person’s speech. Allow the person plenty of time to talk. Help the person become involved outside ...

  3. Consistency of Repeated Naming in Aphasia

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    Elizabeth E. Galletta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background People with mild aphasia and healthy elderly often exhibit similar impairments on language tests of word retrieval. However, variable practice effects in object naming by three individuals with aphasia compared to young and elderly adults have been reported (Wingfield et al. 2006. Wingfield et al. (2006 found that naming of the same pictures of objects over five trials demonstrated decreasing response latencies over repeated trials for both older and younger adults, but not for individuals with aphasia. In fact, among their three participants with aphasia, response latencies in the consecutive trials differed considerably. The authors suggested that different underlying processes may be involved in word retrieval for people with aphasia compared to adults without brain injuries. In our study we aimed to further consider the effect of practice on both object and action naming in individuals with mild aphasia. Method One woman with anomic aphasia (age 38 years; WAB Aphasia Quotient = 88 and one healthy woman (age 25 years participated. Both were native English speakers and reported 18 years of formal education. Participants were tested individually, with a set of 27 object pictures and a set of 27 action pictures presented one at a time on a computer screen. The participants were instructed to name each picture as quickly as possible as soon as each picture appeared on the screen. There were 10 trials of each set of pictures, with different random orders for each trial. The order of presentation of the object and action picture sets alternated across participants. Naming responses were recorded to computer sound files for later measurements of response latencies. A brief tone was presented simultaneous with the picture onset, allowing later measurement of response latencies from the onset of picture presentation to the onset of the participant’s correct response. Results Our findings resembled those reported in Wingfield et al. (2006

  4. Implications of Subcortical structures in Aphasia.

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    Saleh Alamri

    2015-04-01

    Taken together, the results indicate that aphasia is a common outcome after a lesion to subcortical structures. Findings show that 110 out of 394 aphasic patients with lesion in the basal ganglia exhibited comprehension deficits, while 31 participants out of 288 with thalamic aphasia. Likewise, 129 aphasics of affected basal ganglia out of 394 had impaired naming, whereas 12 participants had impaired naming out of 288 individuals with thalamic aphasia. See figure 1. Figure 1: The percentage of language impairment in two sets of aphasic patients (the thalamus and the basal ganglia. Despite contradictory results and even cases of double dissociation (for an example of absence of language deficits in the event of thalamic lesions see Cappa et al., 1986, our literature review confirms the major role of subcortical structures in language processing.

  5. Shared neural substrates of apraxia and aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Georg; Randerath, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    Apraxia is regularly associated with aphasia, but there is controversy whether their co-occurrence is the expression of a common basic deficit or results from anatomical proximity of their neural substrates. However, neither aphasia nor apraxia is an indivisible entity. Both diagnoses embrace diverse manifestations that may occur more or less independently from each other. Thus, the question whether apraxia is always accompanied by aphasia may lead to conflicting answers depending on which of their manifestations are considered. We used voxel based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) for exploring communalities between lesion sites associated with aphasia and with apraxia. Linguistic impairment was assessed by the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT) subtests naming, comprehension, repetition, written language, and Token Test. Apraxia was examined for imitation of meaningless hand and finger postures and for pantomime of tool use. There were two areas of overlap between aphasia and apraxia. Lesions in the anterior temporal lobe interfered with pantomime of tool use and with all linguistic tests. In the left inferior parietal lobe there was a large area where lesions were associated with defective imitation of hand postures and with poor scores on written language and the Token Test. Within this large area there were also two spots in supramarginal and angular gyrus where lesions were also associated with defective pantomime. We speculate that the coincidence of language impairment and defective pantomime after anterior temporal lesions is due to impaired access to semantic memory. The combination of defective imitation of hand postures with poor scores on Token Test and written language is not easily compatible with a crucial role of parietal regions for the conversion of concepts of intended actions into motor commands. It accords better with a role of left inferior parietal lobe regions for the categorical perception of spatial relationships. PMID:26004063

  6. Inner Speech in People with Aphasia

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    William Hayward

    2014-05-01

    Here, we have demonstrated that subjective reports of IS are meaningful in at least some individuals with aphasia. Additional research is needed to confirm the degree to which self-reported IS accurately reflects phonological access, as well as to determine which processes of word retrieval and self-monitoring are needed for reliable insights into inner speech and how specific language deficits interact with these insights. Examining insight into IS could inform our understanding of the psychological and neural bases of word retrieval as well as provide a novel tool for early prognosis and individualized aphasia treatment.

  7. One case of primary progressive aphasia syndrome%原发性进行性失语综合征1例报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤颖; 王晔; 王德生

    2005-01-01

    背景:原发性进行性失语综合征是一种少见类型的痴呆综合征,国内报道较少.目的:报告1例发生在中国的以非流利型失语为主要临床表现的原发性进行性失语综合征患者.设计:以患者为研究对象,观察性研究,病例分析.单位:一所大学医院和一所军区总医院的神经科.对象:患者,男性,64岁,右利手,于2002-04哈尔滨医科大学第一临床医学院入院.方法:患者进行了神经心理学检查、头部组织成像检查(CT和MRI)和功能成像检查[单光子发射计算机断层脑显像(SPECT)].主要观察指标:①神经心理学检查结果.②影像学检查结果.结果:神经心理学检查显示为非流利型失语,以命名不能为首发症状.CT和MRI示"左侧半球颞叶萎缩,外侧裂周围区域增宽",SPECT示"左侧颞叶、额叶及部分顶叶血流灌注降低".结论:患者的临床表现、神经心理学和神经影像学检查结果支持原发性进行性失语综合征的诊断.%BACKGROUND: Primary progressive aphasia syndrome(PPA) is an unusual type of dementia, and the relevant reports are very rare in China.OBJECTIVE: To describe a Chinese PPA patient with non-fluent aphasia as the main clinical characteristic.DESIGN: An observed trial and a case analysis based on patients.SETTING: Department of Neurology in a hospital of a university and a general hospital of a military area command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANT: The patient was a 64-year-old and right-handed man, who hospitalizated in First Clinical Medical College, Harbin Medical University in April 2002.METHODS: Neuropsychological assessment, head structural computed tomograph and magnetic resonance imaging and functional single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) imaging were used in this patient.ing results.RESULTS: Neuropsychological testing revealed predominantly non-fluent aphasia, anomia was the earliest symptom. CT scan and MRI revealed atrophy of left temporal convexities and

  8. A Computational Account of Bilingual Aphasia Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Swathi; Grasemann, Uli; Sandberg, Chaleece; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2013-01-01

    Current research on bilingual aphasia highlights the paucity in recommendations for optimal rehabilitation for bilingual aphasic patients (Edmonds & Kiran, 2006; Roberts & Kiran, 2007). In this paper, we have developed a computational model to simulate an English-Spanish bilingual language system in which language representations can vary by age…

  9. Accent Identification by Adults with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Caroline; Burns, Rebecca; Bruce, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    The UK is a diverse society where individuals regularly interact with speakers with different accents. Whilst there is a growing body of research on the impact of speaker accent on comprehension in people with aphasia, there is none which explores their ability to identify accents. This study investigated the ability of this group to identify the…

  10. Global aphasia without hemiparesis: A case series

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    Aparna R Pai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Global aphasia without hemiparesis (GAWH is a rare stroke syndrome characterized by the unusual dissociation of motor and language functions. Issues regarding its etio-pathogenesis, lesion sites, and recovery patterns are extensively being debated in contemporary neuroscience literature. Materials and Methods: Four patients admitted in our hospital between 2005 and 2009 with GAWH caused by ischemic stroke were studied retrospectively with emphasis on number and site of lesions, etiology, and recovery patterns. Results: The clinical findings from our subjects showed that GAWH could result from either single/multiple lesions including subcortical lesions. The recovery was rapid, although not complete. One case evolved into Wernicke′s aphasia as seen in earlier studies. Two subjects revealed evolution to transcortical sensory aphasia and one to Broca′s aphasia which is distinct from previous proposals. Two cases showed lack of clinico-anatomic correlation during recovery. Conclusions: GAWH could result from both embolic and large vessel strokes and single or multiple lesions. The recovery pattern may be variable and may show lack of clinico-anatomical correlation indicating anomalous cerebral functional reorganization, questioning the conventional teaching of language representation in the brain.

  11. Further Evidence of Auditory Extinction in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Rebecca Shisler; Basilakos, Alexandra; Love-Myers, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preliminary research ( Shisler, 2005) suggests that auditory extinction in individuals with aphasia (IWA) may be connected to binding and attention. In this study, the authors expanded on previous findings on auditory extinction to determine the source of extinction deficits in IWA. Method: Seventeen IWA (M[subscript age] = 53.19 years)…

  12. Writing Treatment for Aphasia: A Texting Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Pelagie M.; Higginson, Kristina; Rising, Kindle

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment studies have documented the therapeutic and functional value of lexical writing treatment for individuals with severe aphasia. The purpose of this study was to determine whether such retraining could be accomplished using the typing feature of a cellular telephone, with the ultimate goal of using text messaging for…

  13. Implications of Connectionist Parsing for Aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    1985-01-01

    The relation of a neural network model of the human sentence processing mechanism to the syndrome of agrammatic aphasia is explored. The model is shown to be adequate for accounting for some recent results, and suggests further experiments. The model is submitted as evidence of the potential of Cognitive Science for generating fruitful interaction between disciplines.

  14. A Multidimensional Review of Bilingual Aphasia as a Language Disorder

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    Mohsen Akbari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aphasia as a multifaceted language disorder associated with the complicated links between language and brain has been and is of interest and significance to the stream of research in different disciplines including neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics, cognitive studies and language acquisition. Along with explorations into the manifestations of aphasia in monolingual speakers, bilingual aphasia has similarly become the most current form of this language disorder due to the rising number of bilingual speakers in recent decades all over the world and the probability of facing bilinguals suffering from this language deficit. To paint a picture of this multidimensional linguistic impairment and to get out of the labyrinth of aphasia and in particular bilingual aphasia, the present review study aims to provide a summary of aphasia-related studies in different contexts worldwide and run through the variables affecting the manifestations and language recovery patterns in bilingual aphasic speakers.

  15. Non-invasive repeated therapeutic stimulation for aphasia recovery: a multilingual, multicenter aphasia trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Alexander; Black, Sandra E; Rochon, Elizabeth A; Lanthier, Sylvain; Hartmann, Alexander; Chen, Joyce L; Mochizuki, George; Zumbansen, Anna; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-04-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been used in case series and small randomized controlled trials to improve recovery from poststroke aphasia in combination with speech and language therapy. Results of these studies suggest possible clinical efficacy and an excellent safety profile. Therefore, a larger international multicenter proof-of-concept trial was launched, to directly compare the safety and efficacy of rTMS, tDCS, and sham stimulation as adjuvant therapy to speech and language therapy in subacute poststroke aphasia. In the 4 participating centers, subacute stroke patients with aphasia are randomized between 5 and 30 days after ischemic stroke to either receive rTMS, tDCS, or sham stimulation in combination with a daily 45 minutes speech and language therapy session for 10 days. Efficacy is evaluated at 1 and 30 days after the last of the 10 treatment sessions using 3 outcome measures, validated in all participating languages: Boston naming test, Token test, and verbal fluency test. Additionally, adverse events are recorded to prove safety. In this study, a total of 90 patients will be recruited, and data analysis will be completed in 2016. This is the first multilingual and multinational randomized and controlled trial in poststroke aphasia and if positive, will add an effective new strategy for early stage poststroke aphasia rehabilitation. PMID:25735707

  16. Aphasia Therapy in the Age of Globalization: Cross-Linguistic Therapy Effects in Bilingual Aphasia

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    Ana Inés Ansaldo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Globalization imposes challenges to the field of behavioural neurology, among which is an increase in the prevalence of bilingual aphasia. Thus, aphasiologists have increasingly focused on bilingual aphasia therapy and, more recently, on the identification of the most efficient procedures for triggering language recovery in bilinguals with aphasia. Therapy in both languages is often not available, and, thus, researchers have focused on the transfer of therapy effects from the treated language to the untreated one. Aim. This paper discusses the literature on bilingual aphasia therapy, with a focus on cross-linguistic therapy effects from the language in which therapy is provided to the untreated language. Methods. Fifteen articles including two systematic reviews, providing details on pre- and posttherapy in the adult bilingual population with poststroke aphasia and anomia are discussed with regard to variables that can influence the presence or absence of cross-linguistic transfer of therapy effects. Results and Discussion. The potential for CLT of therapy effects from the treated to the untreated language depends on the word type, the degree of structural overlap between languages, the type of therapy approach, the pre- and postmorbid language proficiency profiles, and the status of the cognitive control circuit.

  17. Overt Naming fMRI Pre- and Post-TMS: Two Nonfluent Aphasia Patients, with and without Improved Naming Post-TMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paula I.; Naeser, Margaret A.; Ho, Michael; Doron, Karl W.; Kurland, Jacquie; Kaplan, Jerome; Wang, Yunyan; Nicholas, Marjorie; Baker, Errol H.; Fregni, Felipe; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Two chronic, nonfluent aphasia patients participated in overt naming fMRI scans, pre- and post-a series of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatments as part of a TMS study to improve naming. Each patient received 10, 1-Hz rTMS treatments to suppress a part of R pars triangularis. P1 was a "good responder" with improved naming…

  18. Aphasia Practice in the Year 2026.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckley, Jacqueline J

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to envision how the clinical practice of aphasia management might be done 10 years in the future. The vision of how an individual clinician's daily tasks are changed is built on current trends, including the aging of the population, the life participation approach to aphasia, development and use of evidence-based practices, person-centered care, and technology. To be prepared for the future of these trends, we will need to develop clinical capacity, not only in the number of speech-language pathologists but also most importantly in their competence for using evidence-based practices and training others to support effective communication, including other health care providers. Research needs that will support the future are also described. PMID:27232092

  19. AphasiaBank as BigData.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacWhinney, Brian; Fromm, Davida

    2016-02-01

    AphasiaBank has used a standardized protocol to collect narrative, procedural, personal, and descriptive discourse from 290 persons with aphasia, as well as 190 control participants. These data have been transcribed in the Codes for the Human Analysis of Transcripts (CHAT) format for analysis by the Computerized Language Analysis (CLAN) programs. Here, we review results from 45 studies based on these data that investigate aphasic productions in terms of these eight areas: discourse, grammar, lexicon, gesture, fluency, syndrome classification, social factors, and treatment effects. For each area, we also indicate how use of the CLAN programs has facilitated the analysis. We conclude with an examination of ways in which the size of the database could be increased through on-site recordings and data from teletherapy.

  20. Primary progressive aphasia : neuropsychological analysis and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Maruta, Carolina Pires, 1985-

    2015-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Ciências Biomédicas (Neurociências), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2015 Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is the second leading cause of early-onset (< 65 years) dementia. Some of its forms may begin by isolated language deficits, which are known as Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA). PPA is defined as the insidious onset and progressive loss of linguistic abilities in the absence of major deficits in other areas of cognition or in activities of...

  1. Epilepsy, Acquired Aphasia with Focal Cortical Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija A.S

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A six year old boy having complex partial seizures with secondary generalization of four months duration developing isolated expressive dysphasia, later progressing to global aphasia is being reported. His awake EEG showed a left temporal spike wave discharge and sleep EEG showed continuous spike and ware discharges. MR imaging demonstrated focal cortical dysplasia in the left frontal and opercular region, a combination that has not been reported earlier.

  2. Baudelaire's aphasia: from poetry to cursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Sebastian; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2007-01-01

    At 45 years of age, Charles Baudelaire suffered a left hemispheric stroke that left him with a right hemiplegia and severe aphasia. In this chapter, we investigate the nature of his symptoms, drawing mostly on his own and his contemporaries' correspondence. Before specifically examining his aphasia, we put the poet's life, work, and health in context, notably his tormented mind, his probable syphilitic infection and the intellectual milieu of 19th century France. The time when Baudelaire was struck with aphasia coincides with early discoveries and debates that centered on the nature and implications of this neurological disorder. Many of the questions raised at that time still await definitive answers. Here, we compare Baudelaire's language disorder with recent research that has shed new light on the poet's disease. Most interestingly, we explore the nature of his dramatic use of the expletive Cré nom!, which was the only word he was able to express. Finally, we discuss the links between disease and creativity and dismiss the frequent notion that Baudelaire, in the end, paid the price of his genius.

  3. Primary progressive aphasia: conceptual evolution and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyton CE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cristian E Leyton, Kirrie J Ballard Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia Abstract: Since the modern description of primary progressive aphasia (PPA more than 30 years ago, the interest in neurodegenerative conditions that selectively target the language network has grown exponentially. Fueled by advances in neuroimaging and biomarkers, progress in the field has brought new insights into clinical categorization, neural correlates of language, and pathological mechanisms of progression in PPA. Of relevance, the inception of logopenic progressive aphasia as an atypical presentation of Alzheimer's disease and the formalization of the international diagnostic criteria and classification of PPA represent milestones in the field. Paradoxically, those advances have also brought controversy and challenges. The application of the current classification in cases with mixed or very mild language deficits is still challenging, while the accurate pathological prediction at the individual level remains elusive. In addition, it is more evident now that nonlanguage deficits, including other cognitive and motor deficits, can appear early on and potentially assist in the differential diagnosis. From a historical perspective, this review addresses the conceptual evolution of PPA and the contribution that clinical refinements, cognitive neuropsychology, and pathology have made to the field. Keywords: primary progressive aphasia, nonfluent variant, logopenic variant, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, frontotemporal dementia, semantic dementia, Alzheimer's disease

  4. You Don’t Say: Dynamic Aphasia, Another Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L.; Dickerson, Bradford C.; McGinnis, Scott M.; Sapolsky, Daisy; Johnson, Keith; Searl, Meghan; Daffner, Kirk R.

    2013-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a language predominant neurodegenerative disorder that has three recognized variants: nonfluent/agrammatic, semantic, and logopenic. This report describes a 60-year-old man who presented with a progressive decline in verbal output that does not fit the currently accepted PPA subtypes. The patient exhibited a paucity of verbal output and impaired phonemic fluency with minimal associated language, cognitive, or behavioral deficits. Focal cortical thinning/hypometabolism of the left superior frontal region and a cerebrospinal fluid profile not consistent with Alzheimer’s disease pathology were identified. This case of isolated progressive dynamic aphasia extends the current boundaries of PPA diagnostic variants. PMID:23168447

  5. Mild Aphasia: Is This the Place for an Argument?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth; Fox, Sarah; Wilkinson, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with mild aphasia often report significant disruption to their communication despite seemingly minor impairment. This study explored this phenomenon through examining conversations of a person with mild aphasia engaging in argumentation--a skill she felt had significantly deteriorated after her stroke. Method: A person with…

  6. Acquired dyslexia in Serbian speakers with Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuković, Mile; Vuković, Irena; Miller, Nick

    2016-01-01

    This study examined patterns of acquired dyslexia in Serbian aphasic speakers, comparing profiles of groups with Broca's versus Wernicke's aphasia. The study also looked at the relationship of reading and auditory comprehension and between reading comprehension and reading aloud in these groups. Participants were 20 people with Broca's and 20 with Wernicke's aphasia. They were asked to read aloud and to understand written material from the Serbian adaptation of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination. A Serbian Word Reading Aloud Test was also used. The people with Broca's aphasia achieved better results in reading aloud and in reading comprehension than those with Wernicke's aphasia. Those with Wernicke's aphasia showed significantly more semantic errors than those with Broca's aphasia who had significantly more morphological and phonological errors. From the data we inferred that lesion sites accorded with previous work on networks associated with Broca's and Wernicke's aphasia and with a posterior-anterior axis for reading processes centred on (left) parietal-temporal-frontal lobes. PMID:27135368

  7. Aphasia friendly written health information: content and design characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Tanya A; Worrall, Linda E; Hickson, Louise M; Hoffmann, Tammy C

    2011-08-01

    People with aphasia need communicatively accessible written health information. Healthcare providers require knowledge of how to develop printed education materials (PEMs) in formats that people with aphasia prefer and can read. This study aimed to explore formatting characteristics considered to be barriers and facilitators to reading PEMs. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 40 adults with aphasia who were selected using maximum variation sampling across aphasia severity, reading ability, and time post-stroke. Participants were shown stroke and aphasia PEMs obtained from the recruiting stroke services, asked to rank them from most liked to least liked, and comment on factors that made the PEMs easier and harder to read. The majority of participants ranked the aphasia friendly stroke (56.4%, n = 22) and aphasia (87.2%, n = 34) PEMs as most liked. Forty-five facilitator and 46 barrier codes were identified using qualitative content analysis and grouped into two categories; (1) content characteristics and (2) design characteristics. Findings support many of the recommendations found within the literature for developing best practice PEMs and accessible information for other patient groups. Routine consideration of the facilitators and barriers identified will contribute to making written information more accessible to people with aphasia.

  8. Clinical aspects of acquired aphasia and dysarthria in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. van Dongen (Hugo)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractFor the last decade, it has been a common clinical belief that the prognosis of acquired childhood aphasia is good. However, our own clinical experiences were rather conflicting on this point. As a consequence, we re-examined all the children (15) with an acquired aphasia who in a period

  9. Diagnosis Of Aphasia Using Neural And Fuzzy Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan; Axer, Hubertus; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von

    2002-01-01

    The language disability aphasia has several sub-diagnoses such as Amnestic, Broca, Global, and Wernicke. Data concerning 265 patients is available in the form of test scores and diagnoses, made by physicians according to the Aachen Aphasia Test. A neural network model has been built, which...

  10. Diagnosis of aphasia using neural and fuzzy techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan; Axer, H.; Keyserlingk, D. Graf von

    2000-01-01

    The language disability Aphasia has several sub-diagnoses such as Amnestic, Broca, Global, and Wernicke. Data concerning 265 patients is available in the form of test scores and diagnoses, made by physicians according to the Aachen Aphasia Test. A neural network model has been built, which...

  11. Principles Underlying the Bilingual Aphasia Test (BAT) and Its Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The Bilingual Aphasia Test (BAT) is designed to be objective (so it can be administered by a lay native speaker of the language) and equivalent across languages (to allow for a comparison between the languages of a given patient as well as across patients from different institutions). It has been used not only with aphasia but also with any…

  12. Brain Perfusion in Corticobasal Syndrome with Progressive Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitake Abe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain perfusion may differ between patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS with and without aphasia. Methods: Twenty-six (9 males and 17 females; mean age 76 ± 5.3 years patients with CBS were enrolled in the study. Brain MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography were performed in all subjects. Language was evaluated using the Standard Language Test of Aphasia. The patients were divided into two subgroups according to the presence or absence of progressive aphasia. Differences in the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF between the two groups were detected based on voxel-by-voxel group analysis using Statistical Parametric Mapping 8. Results: All patients exhibited asymmetric motor symptoms and signs, including limb apraxia, bradykinesia, and akinetic rigidity. Of 26 patients, 9 had a clinically obvious language disturbance, characterized as nonfluent aphasia. Almost all CBS patients with aphasia exhibited cortical atrophy predominantly in the left frontal and temporal lobes with widening of the Sylvian fissure on MRI. The rCBF in the left middle frontal gyrus differed significantly between CBS patients with and without aphasia. Conclusion: CBS patients with aphasia exhibit motor symptoms predominantly on the right side and cortical atrophy mainly in the left perisylvian cortices. In particular, left frontal dysfunction might be related to nonfluent aphasia in CBS.

  13. Adaptation of the bilingual aphasia test [BAT] English-Bemba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kankinza, N.; Jonkers, Roel

    2010-01-01

    Background: The BAT (Paradis, 1987) is an assessment tool for Aphasia, an acquired language disorder caused by focal brain lesion which affects comprehension, production, spoken and written lan-guage.Despite extensive works in the field of aphasia, there has to date been no work undertaken on aphasi

  14. International Patterns of the Public Awareness of Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Code, Chris; Papathanasiou, Ilias; Rubio-Bruno, Silvia; Cabana, María de la Paz; Villanueva, Maria Marta; Haaland-Johansen, Line; Prizl-Jakovac, Tatjana; Leko, Ana; Zemva, Nada; Patterson, Ruth; Berry, Richard; Rochon, Elizabeth; Leonard, Carol; Robert, Amelie

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that public awareness of aphasia is vital for extending services, research support, social inclusion and targeted raising of awareness. Earlier studies show that knowledge of aphasia varies across a range of variables, but is very low compared with other conditions. Aims: To report a series of surveys of public…

  15. Time reference decoupled from tense in agrammatic and fluent aphasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Laura; Bastiaanse, Roelien

    2014-01-01

    Background: Reference to an event's time frame can be accomplished through verb inflection. In agrammatic aphasia, a deficit in past time reference has been identified by Bastiaanse and colleagues (2011). In fluent aphasia, specific problems with this time frame (expressed by the past tense) have be

  16. Using conversation analysis to assess and treat people with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeke, Suzanne; Maxim, Jane; Wilkinson, Ray

    2007-05-01

    This article gives an overview of the application to aphasia of conversation analysis (CA), a qualitative methodology for the analysis of recorded, naturally occurring talk produced in everyday human interaction. CA, like pragmatics, considers language use in context, but it differs from other analytical frameworks because the clinician is not making interpretations about how an aspect of language should be coded or judging whether an utterance is successful or adequate in terms of communication. We first outline the CA methodology before discussing its application to the assessment of aphasia, principally through the use of two published assessment tools. We then move on to illustrate applications of CA in the field of aphasia therapy by discussing two single case study interventions. Key conversation behaviors are illustrated with transcripts from interactions recorded by the person with aphasia and the person's habitual conversation partner in the home environment. Finally, we explore the implications of using CA as a tool for assessment and treatment in aphasia.

  17. Perception and production of tone in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandour, J; Petty, S H; Dardarananda, R

    1988-11-01

    An acoustical and perceptual study of lexical tone was conducted to evaluate the extent and nature of tonal disruption in aphasia. The language under investigation was Thai, a tone language which has five lexical tones--mid, low, falling, high, and rising. Subjects included six left brain-damaged aphasics (two Broca's, one transcortical motor, one global, one conduction, one Wernicke), one right brain-damaged nonaphasic, one cerebellar dysarthric, and five normals. High-quality tape recordings of each subject's productions of a minimal set of five, monosyllabic Thai words were presented to 10 adult Thai listeners for identification. Results from the phonemic identification tests indicated that tone production is relatively spared in aphasic patients with unilateral left hemisphere lesions. The performance of the global aphasic, however, was considerably below normal. Patterns of tonal confusions further revealed that the performance of all aphasics, except the global, differed from that of normal speakers primarily in degree rather than in kind. Tonal contrasts were signaled at a high level of proficiency by the right brain-damaged and dysarthric patients. Acoustical analysis revealed that F0 contours associated with the five tones for all aphasics, except the global, were similar in overall shape as well as position in the tone space to those of normals. F0 contours for the right brain-damaged patient and the dysarthric also generally agreed with those of normals in terms of shape and position. F0 ranges of both aphasic and nonaphasic brain-damaged speakers were generally larger than those of normals for all five tones. The relationship between tone and vowel duration was generally similar to that of normals for all brain-damaged speakers. A comparison of aphasics' performance on tone perception (J. Gandour & R. Dardarananda, 1983, Brain and Language, 18, 94-114) and tone production indicated that, for the normal and right brain-damaged subjects, performance on

  18. Analyses of AphasiaBank Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Macwhinney

    2015-04-01

    7.\tSocial Factors. Four studies have examined the impact of social factors such as dialect, gender, educational level, and occupation on performance in the protocol. 8.\tTreatment and Recovery. Several studies are now examining patterns of recovery based on successive administrations of the protocol, as well as repeated work with the scripting treatment. Work is in progress to extend AphasiaBank to include data on scripted repetition, participation in group therapy discussions, famous people descriptions, interactions with web-based therapy, and dense longitudinal tracking.

  19. The Aphasia Database On The Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axer, H.; Jantzen, Jan; Berks, G.;

    2000-01-01

    In aphasiology many inconsistencies exist in the definition and interpretation of aphasic syndromes. These syndromes are the co-occurrence of a set of symptoms. Thus, ambiguities in these clinical, aphasic categories are suited to be generalized to many problems of classification in medicine. In ....... In this paper the aphasia database is launched as a model for data mining in medicine. Nominal and topological data about 265 aphasic patients is collected in this database, which is a model for benchmarking different methods of soft computing....

  20. Drawing objects from memory in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainotti, G; Silveri, M C; Villa, G; Caltagirone, C

    1983-09-01

    The ability of aphasic patients to draw from memory objects with a characteristic shape has been investigated. Their capacity to reproduce the form of real objects was studied by showing them for a short time line drawings of simple objects. When the patient had analysed and recognized the figure, the model was hidden from view and the subject was asked to draw the same object from memory. This Drawing from Memory task was administered to 54 aphasics, 67 patients with right hemisphere lesions, 44 nonaphasic left brain-damaged patients and 23 normal controls. The influence of visuoconstructive disabilities was controlled by administering to the same patients a standard test for constructional apraxia (copying 10 geometrical figures). The severity and clinical form of the aphasia and the presence of semantic-lexical impairment at the receptive level were also examined in the aphasic patients. The following results were obtained. (1) Aphasic patients scored significantly less well than the control groups on the Drawing from Memory task and the intergroup differences became greater when the scores from the test for constructional apraxia were included by an analysis of covariance. (2) No significant correlation was detected between the severity and clinical form of the aphasia and the scores obtained on the Drawing from Memory task. (3) There was a significant correlation between impaired drawing from memory and disruption at the semantic-lexical level of language integration. PMID:6640272

  1. Decision Making Cognition in Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Gleichgerrcht

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to investigate the decision making profile of Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA by assessing patients diagnosed with this disease (n = 10, patients diagnosed with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n = 35, and matched controls (n = 14 using the Iowa Gambling Task, a widely used test that mimics real-life decision making. Participants were also evaluated with a complete neuropsychological battery. Patients with PPA were unable to adopt an advantageous strategy on the IGT, which resulted in a flat performance, different to that exhibited by both controls (who showed advantageous decision making and bvFTD patients (who showed risk-appetitive behavior. The decision making profile of PPA patients was not associated with performance on language tasks and did not differ between sub-variants of the disease (namely, semantic dementia and progressive nonfluent aphasia. Investigating decision making in PPA is crucial both from a theoretical perspective, as it can shed light about the way in which language interacts with other cognitive functions, as well as a clinical standpoint, as it could lead to a more objective detection of impairments of decision making deficits in this condition.

  2. Generalized Minimality : Syntactic underspecification in Broca’s aphasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grillo, N

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the issue of the relation between deviant behavior in agrammatic Broca's aphasia and the theory of grammar. Agrammatic Broca's aphasics have particular difficulties comprehending semantically reversible sentences in which the canonical order of arguments have been inverte

  3. Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.; Jackson, C.A.; Kempler, D.; van Lancker, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E. (National Institute of Aging, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Forty-four aphasic patients were examined with (F18)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a resting state to determine whether consistent glucose metabolic abnormalities were present. Ninety-seven percent of subjects showed metabolic abnormalities in the angular gyrus, 89% in the supramarginal gyrus, and 87% in the lateral and transverse superior temporal gyrus. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated between regional metabolic measures and performance on the Western Aphasia Battery. No significant correlations were found between the Western Aphasia Battery scores and right hemisphere metabolic measures. Most left hemisphere regions correlated with more than one score from the Western Aphasia Battery. Temporal but not frontal regions had significant correlations to the comprehension score. The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporoparietal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from (1) the extent of temporoparietal changes, and (2) dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas.

  4. Clinical patterns of speech-language disorders in thalamic aphasias

    OpenAIRE

    Kuljić-Obradović Dragana; Ocić Gordana G.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristic symptom cluster and the course of aphasia in 12 patients with single left thalamic lesion verified by CAT scan. The testing of language disorder was performed by standard linguistic tests for aphasia in the acute stage and one month after the insult. Although this clinical syndrome varied greatly it was possible to point out some common characteristics. Spontaneous speech was fluent, easily articulated, grammatically correct, with pr...

  5. Apoplectic Aphasia Treated by Collaterals-Pricking and Bleeding Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhan-hui

    2006-01-01

    @@ Case Example The patient, male, 68 years old, had a sudden seizure of hemiplegia on the right body, deviation of the eye and mouth, aphasia and salivation after getting up in the morning, and was sent to the hospital immediately, and was diagnosed with cerebral infarction after examination and was treated upon diagnosis for over month. Hemiplegia in the limbs and deviation of the eye and mouth had been relieved, but aphasia was still there.

  6. A case of crossed aphasia with apraxia of speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Patidar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apraxia of speech (AOS is a rare, but well-defined motor speech disorder. It is characterized by irregular articulatory errors, attempts of self-correction and persistent prosodic abnormalities. Similar to aphasia, AOS is also localized to the dominant cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of Crossed Aphasia with AOS in a 48-year-old right-handed man due to an ischemic infarct in right cerebral hemisphere.

  7. Transient Crossed Aphasia: A Case Study with SPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Ferro

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old right-handed man developed “crossed” anomie aphasia, neglect and inaccurate reaching of his left arm in both hemispaces due to a right parietal haemorrhage. Aphasia cleared in a few days. SPECT failed to demonstrate crossed left hemispheric diaschisis. This report emphasizes the importance of evaluating patients in the acute stage and of coupling “static” and “functional” imaging methods when studying brain-behavior relationships.

  8. A study on regional cerebral circulation in stroke patients with aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the pathophysiology of aphasia due to cerebral stroke, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by the 133Xe clearance method and the volume of low density area (LDA) was estimated on the basis of computerized tomography in 43 thrombotic (24 aphasia and 19 non-aphasia), 30 hemorrhagic (16 aphasia and 14 non-aphasia) and 6 non-stroke cases. 1) In the healthy hemisphere, rCBF showed no significant difference between aphasia and non-aphasia in both thrombotic and hemorrhagic cases. In the affected hemisphere, thrombotic cases showed significantly decreased rCBF in aphasic cases as compared to non-aphasic, however, hemorrhagic cases revealed no difference. 2) LDA volume showed no significant difference between aphasia and non-aphasia in cerebral thrombosis, however, LDA volume in non-aphasia was smaller than that in aphasia in cerebral hemorrage. 3) Significant differences in the pathophysiology of aphasia due to cerebral stroke were recognized between cerebral thrombosis and cerebral hemorrhage. Such differences should be taken into consideration in the management and treatment of aphasia caused by cerebral stroke. (author)

  9. The development of modern approaches to aphasia: a concise overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenborre, Dorien; Visch-Brink, Evy; Mariën, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this article is to review the rationale on which modern aphasia test batteries are based. Since the mid-1950s, a starting point chosen because the discipline of speech (language) pathology was created during that period, a corpus of English aphasia tests was identified through searches of electronic databases. The tests were critically evaluated in terms of their theoretical roots and influences. During the past 50 years, the fundamentals of aphasia assessment remained basically unchanged, that is, to identify and gain insight into the nature and the degree of a language disturbance. However, the way in which the assessment has taken place has shifted back and forth from a purely medical approach to a more neurolinguistic or social approach depending on the influence exerted by different scientific fields. Not a single model on which aphasia assessments rely covers the many and multifaceted problems of individuals with aphasia. At several points in time during the rehabilitation process, the clinician and the patient will encounter a crossroad, where it has to be decided which path to follow next and how to evaluate the covered path. Besides application of formal test batteries, observations in different natural settings, evaluations of functional communication and insights into psychosocial coping contribute towards a holistic approach to aphasia. PMID:25851837

  10. Grammatical category dissociation in multilingual aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen; Waked, Arifi N

    2010-03-01

    Word retrieval deficits for specific grammatical categories, such as verbs versus nouns, occur as a consequence of brain damage. Such deficits are informative about the nature of lexical organization in the human brain. This study examined retrieval of grammatical categories across three languages in a trilingual person with aphasia who spoke Arabic, French, and English. In order to delineate the nature of word production difficulty, comprehension was tested, and a variety of concomitant lexical-semantic variables were analysed. The patient demonstrated a consistent noun-verb dissociation in picture naming and narrative speech, with severely impaired production of verbs across all three languages. The cross-linguistically similar noun-verb dissociation, coupled with little evidence of semantic impairment, suggests that (a) the patient has a true "nonsemantic" grammatical category specific deficit, and (b) lexical organization in multilingual speakers shares grammatical class information between languages. The findings of this study contribute to our understanding of the architecture of lexical organization in bilinguals.

  11. A systematic review of nursing rehabilitation of stroke patients with aphasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poslawsky, Irina; Schuurmans, Marieke; Lindeman, Eline; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra

    2010-01-01

    Patients with poststroke aphasia have higher mortality rates and worse functional outcome than patients without aphasia. Nurses are well aware of aphasia and the associated problems for patients with stroke because they have daily contact with them. The challenge is to provide evidence-based care di

  12. Maladaptive Plasticity in Aphasia: Brain Activation Maps Underlying Verb Retrieval Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, Kerstin; Durand, Edith; Marcotte, Karine; Ansaldo, Ana Inés

    2016-01-01

    Anomia, or impaired word retrieval, is the most widespread symptom of aphasia, an acquired language impairment secondary to brain damage. In the last decades, functional neuroimaging techniques have enabled studying the neural basis underlying anomia and its recovery. The present study aimed to explore maladaptive plasticity in persistent verb anomia, in three male participants with chronic nonfluent aphasia. Brain activation maps associated with semantic verb paraphasia occurring within an oral picture-naming task were identified with an event-related fMRI paradigm. These maps were compared with those obtained in our previous study examining adaptive plasticity (i.e., successful verb naming) in the same participants. The results show that activation patterns related to semantic verb paraphasia and successful verb naming comprise a number of common areas, contributing to both maladaptive and adaptive neuroplasticity mechanisms. This finding suggests that the segregation of brain areas provides only a partial view of the neural basis of verb anomia and successful verb naming. Therefore, it indicates the importance of network approaches which may better capture the complexity of maladaptive and adaptive neuroplasticity mechanisms in anomia recovery. PMID:27429808

  13. Maladaptive Plasticity in Aphasia: Brain Activation Maps Underlying Verb Retrieval Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Spielmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anomia, or impaired word retrieval, is the most widespread symptom of aphasia, an acquired language impairment secondary to brain damage. In the last decades, functional neuroimaging techniques have enabled studying the neural basis underlying anomia and its recovery. The present study aimed to explore maladaptive plasticity in persistent verb anomia, in three male participants with chronic nonfluent aphasia. Brain activation maps associated with semantic verb paraphasia occurring within an oral picture-naming task were identified with an event-related fMRI paradigm. These maps were compared with those obtained in our previous study examining adaptive plasticity (i.e., successful verb naming in the same participants. The results show that activation patterns related to semantic verb paraphasia and successful verb naming comprise a number of common areas, contributing to both maladaptive and adaptive neuroplasticity mechanisms. This finding suggests that the segregation of brain areas provides only a partial view of the neural basis of verb anomia and successful verb naming. Therefore, it indicates the importance of network approaches which may better capture the complexity of maladaptive and adaptive neuroplasticity mechanisms in anomia recovery.

  14. Maladaptive Plasticity in Aphasia: Brain Activation Maps Underlying Verb Retrieval Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Edith; Marcotte, Karine; Ansaldo, Ana Inés

    2016-01-01

    Anomia, or impaired word retrieval, is the most widespread symptom of aphasia, an acquired language impairment secondary to brain damage. In the last decades, functional neuroimaging techniques have enabled studying the neural basis underlying anomia and its recovery. The present study aimed to explore maladaptive plasticity in persistent verb anomia, in three male participants with chronic nonfluent aphasia. Brain activation maps associated with semantic verb paraphasia occurring within an oral picture-naming task were identified with an event-related fMRI paradigm. These maps were compared with those obtained in our previous study examining adaptive plasticity (i.e., successful verb naming) in the same participants. The results show that activation patterns related to semantic verb paraphasia and successful verb naming comprise a number of common areas, contributing to both maladaptive and adaptive neuroplasticity mechanisms. This finding suggests that the segregation of brain areas provides only a partial view of the neural basis of verb anomia and successful verb naming. Therefore, it indicates the importance of network approaches which may better capture the complexity of maladaptive and adaptive neuroplasticity mechanisms in anomia recovery. PMID:27429808

  15. Is Isolated Aphasia Associated with Atrial Fibrillation A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlijn P.A. Giesbers

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: A cardioembolic source, usually atrial fibrillation (AF, is detected in 14-30% of strokes. If AF is found, anticoagulation therapy provides a substantial decrease of the risk of recurrent cerebrovascular ischemic events. AF is often paroxysmal, and extensive diagnostic procedures may be necessary to detect it in patients. Considering cost-effectiveness and patient burden, however, not every suspected patient can be thoroughly screened. Therefore, the identification of risk factors for AF may be helpful. Previous studies have identified isolated aphasia as a risk factor for AF as the cause of the stroke. These studies, however, were performed with small population samples, in a retrospective setting or focused on a specific subtype of aphasia. The aim of this observational study is to prospectively evaluate whether there is a relation between isolated aphasia and AF as the cause of cerebrovascular ischemia. Methods: All patients admitted to the Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen, the Netherlands, with cerebrovascular ischemia or transient ischemic attack in the period of August 2009 to March 2010 or October 2013 to January 2014 were included. The patients were evaluated by a neurologist and admitted to the Brain Care Unit for 24-48 h. Medical history, physical examination and diagnostic results were entered in a database. A diagnosis of isolated aphasia was assigned at admission using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS. Presence of AF was determined using a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG on admission and continuous ECG monitoring for 1-2 days. During admission, aphasia tests were done, notably the ScreeLing Test and the Boston Naming Test. Data were analyzed using Pearson's χ2 test, Fisher's exact test, the Mann-Whitney U test and univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: A total of 347 patients were included, of which 115 (33.1% met the criteria for aphasia, with 26 (7.5% meeting the criteria

  16. Chapter 36: history of aphasia: from brain to language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eling, Paul; Whitaker, Harry

    2010-01-01

    An historical overview is presented that focuses on the changes both in approach and topics with respect to language disturbances due to brain lesions. Early cases of language disorders were described without any theorizing about language or its relation to the brain. Also, three forms of speech disorder were distinguished: traulotes, psellotes and ischophonia, which are only marginally related to aphasia. In the 18th century some authors, in particular Gesner and Crichton, attempted to explain language disorders in terms of mental processes. The great debate on both the anatomical (Broca, Wernicke) and functional (Wernicke, Lichtheim) aspects of aphasia dominated late 19th century discussion of localization of function, leading to the development of what we now call the cognitive neurosciences. In this period, language processing was described in terms of a simple functional model of word recognition and production; linguistic principles played no role. At the beginning of the 20th century the discussion on language disorders waned due to a decrease of interest in the issue of localization; aphasia became primarily a clinical issue of how best to classify patients. In the second half of the 20th century, the field of aphasia developed rapidly due to studies performed at the Boston Aphasia Unit and, more importantly, to a change of orientation to linguistic notions of language structure, as introduced by Chomsky. PMID:19892139

  17. Participation and Social Inclusion in Adults with Aphasia: Bibliometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Rodríguez Riaño

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the scope and status of related research with the participation and social inclusion of adults with aphasia connected with the published literature. Materials and Methods: Descriptive analytic study on publications registered in Medline/PubMed, EBSCO and EMBASE from 2005 to 2013, 97 related documents were selected and classified into, eight common vari­ables for its study and were analyzed according to the article distribution by thematic core, year of publication and database. Results: The most represented core theme was inclusion, participa­tion, access and rights of persons with aphasia and their families and environments; production of these documents is increased between 2010 and 2011. Documents related to inclusive intern­ships for people with aphasia represented the second more representative thematic focus. Conclu­sions: Literature recognizes that elements related to family and their immediate environments are essential to ensure participation and independence of people with aphasia. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF should become the rehabilitation log for professionals to guide therapeutic actions, aimed at the inclusion and participation of people with aphasia in different contexts, and mainly to promote a successful return to a productive daily life. This rehabilitation opportunity toward independence and autonomy promotes self-esteem, identity and inclusion opportunities.

  18. Audiovisual integration of speech in a patient with Broca's Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Tobias S; Starrfelt, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Lesions to Broca's area cause aphasia characterized by a severe impairment of the ability to speak, with comparatively intact speech perception. However, some studies have found effects on speech perception under adverse listening conditions, indicating that Broca's area is also involved in speech perception. While these studies have focused on auditory speech perception other studies have shown that Broca's area is activated by visual speech perception. Furthermore, one preliminary report found that a patient with Broca's aphasia did not experience the McGurk illusion suggesting that an intact Broca's area is necessary for audiovisual integration of speech. Here we describe a patient with Broca's aphasia who experienced the McGurk illusion. This indicates that an intact Broca's area is not necessary for audiovisual integration of speech. The McGurk illusions this patient experienced were atypical, which could be due to Broca's area having a more subtle role in audiovisual integration of speech. The McGurk illusions of a control subject with Wernicke's aphasia were, however, also atypical. This indicates that the atypical McGurk illusions were due to deficits in speech processing that are not specific to Broca's aphasia.

  19. Wernicke's Aphasia Reflects a Combination of Acoustic-Phonological and Semantic Control Deficits: A Case-Series Comparison of Wernicke's Aphasia, Semantic Dementia and Semantic Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Holly; Sage, Karen; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke's aphasia (WA) is the classical neurological model of comprehension impairment and, as a result, the posterior temporal lobe is assumed to be critical to semantic cognition. This conclusion is potentially confused by (a) the existence of patient groups with semantic impairment following damage to other brain regions (semantic dementia and…

  20. FDG positron emission computed tomography in a study of aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission computed tomography (PECT) using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was used to investigate the correlations between clinical status, anatomy (as described by CT), and metabolism in five patients with stable aphasia resulting from ischemic cerebral infarction. Local cerebral metabolic activity was diminished in an area larger than the area of infarction demonstrated by CT. In one patient, FDG PECT revealed a metabolic lesion that probably caused the aphasic syndrome and was not apparent by CT. The data suggest that reliance on CT in delineating the extent of the brain lesion in aphasia or other neuropsychological defects can be misleading; FDG PECT may provide important additional information. Two patients with similar metabolic lesions had very different clinical syndromes, showing that even when currently available methods are combined, major gaps remain in clinicoanatomical correlations in aphasia

  1. Frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia, a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirshner HS

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Howard S KirshnerDepartment of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Frontotemporal dementias are neurodegenerative diseases in which symptoms of frontal and/or temporal lobe disease are the first signs of the illness, and as the diseases progress, they resemble a focal left hemisphere process such as stroke or traumatic brain injury, even more than a neurodegenerative disease. Over time, some patients develop a more generalized dementia. Four clinical subtypes characterize the predominant presentations of this illness: behavioral or frontal variant FTD, progressive nonfluent aphasia, semantic dementia, and logopenic primary progressive aphasia. These clinical variants correlate with regional patterns of atrophy on brain imaging studies such as MRI and PET scanning, as well as with biochemical and molecular genetic variants of the disorder. The treatment is as yet only symptomatic, but advances in molecular genetics promise new therapies.Keywords: FTD, behavior variant or frontal variant FTD, pick's disease, PPA, progressive nonfluent aphasia

  2. A Multimodal Communication Aid for Global Aphasia Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Schou; Dalsgaard, Paul; Lindberg, Børge

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the basic rationale behind the development and testing of a multimodal communication aid especially designed for people suffering from global aphasia, and thus having severe expressive difficulties. The principle of the aid is to trigger patient associations by presenting...... various multimodal representations of communicative expressions. The aid can in this way be seen as a conceptual continuation of previous research within the field of communication aids based on uni-modal (pictorial) representations of communicative expressions. As patients suffering from global aphasia...... expressions can be used to support patients with global aphasia in communicating by means of short sentences with their surroundings. Only a limited evaluation is carried out, and as such no statistically significant results are obtained. The tests however indicate that the aid is capable of supporting...

  3. Degenerative Jargon Aphasia: Unusual Progression of Logopenic/Phonological Progressive Aphasia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Caffarra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary progressive aphasia (PPA corresponds to the gradual degeneration of language which can occur as nonfluent/agrammatic PPA, semantic variant PPA or logopenic variant PPA. We describe the clinical evolution of a patient with PPA presenting jargon aphasia as a late feature. At the onset of the disease (ten years ago the patient showed anomia and executive deficits, followed later on by phonemic paraphasias and neologisms, deficits in verbal short-term memory, naming, verbal and semantic fluency. At recent follow-up the patient developed an unintelligible jargon with both semantic and neologistic errors, as well as with severe deficit of comprehension which precluded any further neuropsychological assessment. Compared to healthy controls, FDG-PET showed a hypometabolism in the left angular and middle temporal gyri, precuneus, caudate, posterior cingulate, middle frontal gyrus, and bilaterally in the superior temporal and inferior frontal gyri. The clinical and neuroimaging profile seems to support the hypothesis that the patient developed a late feature of logopenic variant PPA characterized by jargonaphasia and associated with superior temporal and parietal dysfunction.

  4. ALTERNATIVE FORMS OF COMMUNICATION AMONG PERSONS WITH APHASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena TASHKOVA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aphasia is the most complicated and the most difficult form of disorder of speaking and language. Most often it appears as a consequence of a brain stroke. The occurrence of aphasias is in about one third of the patients suffering from a brain stroke in an acute phase, or from 21% to 24%, and there are data for even bigger frequency. In a certain number of patients the aphasia withdraws spontaneously, but in a bigger number of patients it takes over all four models of language activity; phoneme pronunciation, carrying out a discussion, writing a letter of a full text. It spreads from the automatic to the creative expression. The process of rehabilitation of the spoken communication at the persons with aphasia is complicated, multidisciplinary and long lasting.Around the World, a big accent is placed on the use of methods and strategies of alternative communication methods (AAK for the persons with aphasia. Although the augmentative and the AAK methods for the persons with aphasia are relatively novel in the speech therapy, their applicability deserves an attention as well as the fact that they are promising new paths for researching.The master thesis is written on 104 pages, which include 35 tables and 48 graphics, as well as a glossary with 114 biographical units. The content is divided into introduction, grounding theory and methodology of research. The introduction shows the meaning and the necessity for research of alternative methods in the therapy and the treatment of persons with aphasia. The section with the theoretical grounds contains several mutually connected chapters (parts. In methodology of research section are described the subject of the research, the aim and the character of the research. Further the text contains the tasks, hypothesis, research variables, methods and techniques of the research, as well as the sample and the organization of the research. The end of the section consist the analysis and interpretation of the

  5. Novel Methods to Study Aphasia Recovery after Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2013-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that support aphasia recovery are not yet fully understood. It has been argued that the functional reorganization of language networks after left-hemisphere stroke may engage perilesional left brain areas as well as homologous right-hemisphere regions. In this chapter, we...... that language recovery after stroke may integrate left- as well as right-hemisphere brain regions to a different degree over the time course of recovery. Although the results of these preliminary studies provide some evidence that noninvasive brain stimulation may promote aphasia recovery, the reported effect...

  6. Deficits in Processing Case Markers in Individuals with Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee Eun Sung

    2015-04-01

    Individuals with aphasia demonstrated greater difficulties in the case marker assignment compared to their normal control group. Furthermore, noncanonical word-order and passive sentences elicited more errors on the task than canonical and active sentences. Passive sentences were the significant predictors for overall aphasia severity. The results suggested that PWA using a verb-final language with well-developed case-marking systems presented deficits in case marker processing. The syntactic structure and canonicity of word order need to be considered as critical linguistic features in testing their performance on dealing with case markers.

  7. Neural recruitment associated with anomia treatment in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridriksson, Julius; Morrow-Odom, Leigh; Moser, Dana; Fridriksson, Astrid; Baylis, Gordon

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in the spatial distribution of cortical activity associated with anomia treatment in three persons with aphasia. Participants underwent three fMRI sessions before and after a period of intensive language treatment focused on object naming. The results revealed bilateral hemispheric recruitment associated with improved ability to name items targeted in treatment. This is the first study to employ multiple pre- and post-treatment fMRI sessions in the study of treatment-induced recovery from aphasia and has implications for future studies of brain plasticity in stroke.

  8. Health science students’ perceptions of motor and sensory aphasia caused by stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Haewon; Koh, Hyeung Woo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study explored health science students’ perceptions of motor aphasia and sensory aphasia caused by stroke to provide basic material for the improvement of rehabilitation practitioners’ perceptions of aphasia. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 642 freshmen and sophomores majoring in health science. Perceptions of aphasia were surveyed on a semantic differential scale using the Anchoring Vignette Method and the difference in perception of the two types of aphasia was analyzed using multi-dimensional scaling. [Results] The analysis revealed that motor aphasia and sensory aphasia have mutually corresponding images. Motor aphasia had high levels of ‘quiet’, ‘passive’ ‘dumb’, ‘unstable’ and ‘gloomy’ images, while sensory aphasia had high levels of ‘noisy’, ‘unstable’, ‘cheerful’, ‘sensitive’, ‘fluctuating in emotions’, ‘active’, ‘dumb’ and ‘gloomy’ images. [Conclusion] A systematic education is required to be implemented in the future to improve health science students’ negative perceptions of the aftereffects of stroke such as aphasia. PMID:27390413

  9. Phonological Processing in Primary Progressive Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Maya L; Wilson, Stephen M; Babiak, Miranda C; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Beeson, Pelagie M; Miller, Zachary A; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) show selective breakdown in regions within the proposed dorsal (articulatory-phonological) and ventral (lexical-semantic) pathways involved in language processing. Phonological STM impairment, which has been attributed to selective damage to dorsal pathway structures, is considered to be a distinctive feature of the logopenic variant of PPA. By contrast, phonological abilities are considered to be relatively spared in the semantic variant and are largely unexplored in the nonfluent/agrammatic variant. Comprehensive assessment of phonological ability in the three variants of PPA has not been undertaken. We investigated phonological processing skills in a group of participants with PPA as well as healthy controls, with the goal of identifying whether patterns of performance support the dorsal versus ventral functional-anatomical framework and to discern whether phonological ability differs among PPA subtypes. We also explored the neural bases of phonological performance using voxel-based morphometry. Phonological performance was impaired in patients with damage to dorsal pathway structures (nonfluent/agrammatic and logopenic variants), with logopenic participants demonstrating particular difficulty on tasks involving nonwords. Binary logistic regression revealed that select phonological tasks predicted diagnostic group membership in the less fluent variants of PPA with a high degree of accuracy, particularly in conjunction with a motor speech measure. Brain-behavior correlations indicated a significant association between the integrity of gray matter in frontal and temporoparietal regions of the left hemisphere and phonological skill. Findings confirm the critical role of dorsal stream structures in phonological processing and demonstrate unique patterns of impaired phonological processing in logopenic and nonfluent/agrammatic variants of PPA. PMID:26544920

  10. Patterns of Dysgraphia in Primary Progressive Aphasia Compared to Post-Stroke Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia V. Faria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report patterns of dysgraphia in participants with primary progressive aphasia that can be explained by assuming disruption of one or more cognitive processes or representations in the complex process of spelling. These patterns are compared to those described in participants with focal lesions (stroke. Using structural imaging techniques, we found that damage to the left extrasylvian regions, including the uncinate, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and sagittal stratum (including geniculostriate pathway and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, as well as other deep white and grey matter structures, was significantly associated with impairments in access to orthographic word forms and semantics (with reliance on phonology-to-orthography to produce a plausible spelling in the spelling to dictation task. These results contribute not only to our understanding of the patterns of dysgraphia following acquired brain damage but also the neural substrates underlying spelling.

  11. Gesturing by Speakers with Aphasia: How Does It Compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Lisette; Krahmer, Emiel; van de Sandt-Koenderman, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To study the independence of gesture and verbal language production. The authors assessed whether gesture can be semantically compensatory in cases of verbal language impairment and whether speakers with aphasia and control participants use similar depiction techniques in gesture. Method: The informativeness of gesture was assessed in 3…

  12. Verb and auxiliary movement in agrammatic Broca's aphasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaanse, Y.R.M.; Thompson, C.K.

    2003-01-01

    Verb production in agrammatic Broca's aphasia has repeatedly been shown to be impaired by a number of investigators. Not only is the number of verbs produced often significantly reduced, but verb inflections and auxiliaries are often omitted as well (e.g., Bastiaanse, Jonkers, & Moltmaker-Osinga, 19

  13. Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Three Individuals with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Ellen; Basilakos, Alexandra; Marshall, Rebecca Shisler

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is evidence to suggest that people with aphasia (PWA) may have deficits in attention stemming from the inefficient allocation of resources. The inaccurate perception of task demand, or sense of effort, may underlie the misallocation of the available attention resources. Given the lack of treatment options for improving attention…

  14. Gesturing by speakers with aphasia: How does it compare?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Mol (Linda); E. Krahmer (Emiel); W.M.E. van de Sandt-Koenderman (Mieke)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To study the independence of gesture and verbal language production. The authors assessed whether gesture can besemantically compensatory in cases of verbal language impairment and whether speakers with aphasia and control participants use similar depiction techniques in gesture

  15. Script Templates: A Practical Approach to Script Training in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Rosalind C.; Cherney, Leora R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Script training for aphasia involves repeated practice of relevant phrases and sentences that, when mastered, can potentially be used in other communicative situations. Although an increasingly popular approach, script development can be time-consuming. We provide a detailed summary of the evidence supporting this approach. We then…

  16. Prosodic Disturbance in Aphasia: Speech Timing versus Intonation Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddoh, S. Amebu

    2004-01-01

    Temporal control has often been suspected to be a critical factor in intonation production. In particular, disturbance in the production of fundamental frequency (F0) associated with intonation in patients with aphasia has been attributed to a primary underlying deficit in speech timing. The present study examined the speech timing abilities of…

  17. Phoneme-Based Rehabilitation of Anomia in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Diane L.; Rosenbek, John C.; Heilman, Kenneth M.; Conway, Tim; Klenberg, Karen; Gonzalez Rothi, Leslie J.; Nadeau, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of phonologic treatment for anomia in aphasia. We proposed that if treatment were directed at the level of the phonologic processor, opportunities for naming via a phonological route, as opposed to a strictly whole word route, would be enhanced, thereby improving naming. The participants, ten people with anomia…

  18. Script Training and Generalization for People with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Samantha; Haley, Katarina L.; Jacks, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects and generalization of a modified script training intervention, delivered partly via videoconferencing, on dialogue scripts that were produced by 2 individuals with aphasia. Method: Each participant was trained on 2 personally relevant scripts. Intervention sessions occurred 3 times per week, with a combination of…

  19. White Matter Correlates of Lexical Access in Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Hula

    2014-04-01

    We also found a counterintuitive negative relationship between phonological processing and left DS integrity. This suggests that reliance on this pathway may be maladaptive for phonological processing in aphasia. Perhaps patients with more intact dorsal pathways continue to rely on this (still damaged network, while patients with greater damage are more successful at reorganizing function (cf. Parkinson, Raymer, Chang, FitzGerald, & Crosson, 2009.

  20. Non-verbal communication in severe aphasia: influence of aphasia, apraxia, or semantic processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogrefe, Katharina; Ziegler, Wolfram; Weidinger, Nicole; Goldenberg, Georg

    2012-09-01

    Patients suffering from severe aphasia have to rely on non-verbal means of communication to convey a message. However, to date it is not clear which patients are able to do so. Clinical experience indicates that some patients use non-verbal communication strategies like gesturing very efficiently whereas others fail to transmit semantic content by non-verbal means. Concerns have been expressed that limb apraxia would affect the production of communicative gestures. Research investigating if and how apraxia influences the production of communicative gestures, led to contradictory outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of limb apraxia on spontaneous gesturing. Further, linguistic and non-verbal semantic processing abilities were explored as potential factors that might influence non-verbal expression in aphasic patients. Twenty-four aphasic patients with highly limited verbal output were asked to retell short video-clips. The narrations were videotaped. Gestural communication was analyzed in two ways. In the first part of the study, we used a form-based approach. Physiological and kinetic aspects of hand movements were transcribed with a notation system for sign languages. We determined the formal diversity of the hand gestures as an indicator of potential richness of the transmitted information. In the second part of the study, comprehensibility of the patients' gestural communication was evaluated by naive raters. The raters were familiarized with the model video-clips and shown the recordings of the patients' retelling without sound. They were asked to indicate, for each narration, which story was being told and which aspects of the stories they recognized. The results indicate that non-verbal faculties are the most important prerequisites for the production of hand gestures. Whereas results on standardized aphasia testing did not correlate with any gestural indices, non-verbal semantic processing abilities predicted the formal diversity

  1. Crossed aphasia with jargonagraphia due to right putaminal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patient was a 47 year-old right handed male. He had been dextral since infancy with no familial background of sinistrality. On June 10, 1982 he suddenly developed hemiplegia, hemisensory disturbance on the left side and aphasia. On the same day he fell into a coma. CT scan revealed right putaminal hemorrhage. The patient was operated on to evacuate the hematoma. On October 25 he was admitted to our hospital, when left spastic hemiplegia, sensory deficit and left Babinski sign were noted. Neuropsychological examination showed fluent spontaneous speech but no dysprosodia. The result of Standard language test of aphasia were fairly good except for naming low frequency words. Repetition and auditory comprehension were normal. Dyslexia was not observed. Dyscaliculia was also observed. Idiomotor apraxia, ideational apraxia and dressing apraxia were not observed. This case is characterized by 1) fluent aphasia without agrammatism, and 2) jargonagraphia. Fluent aphasia in a right-hander is said to be caused by a left postrolandic lesion. Lesions judged by computed tomography were located from the right putamen to the corona radiata. Single photon emission CT (SPECT) was performed with the 133Xe inhalation method. SPECT revealed a low blood flow area in the basal ganglia, a branch of the right anterior cerebral and of the middle cerebral artery. Furthermore the low blood flow area extended to the post-central gyrus of the right cerebrum. No obvious low blood flow area was seen in the left hemisphere. The most difficult problem for clinical diagnosis of crossed aphasia is whether the lesion is localized solely in the right hemisphere or not. SPECT is very helpful for detecting lesions not revealed by CT. (J.P.N.)

  2. Characteristics of basal ganglia aphasia after stroke and the rehabilitative interventions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yating Kong; Xifeng Pan; Qimei Zhang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce the characteristics of basal ganglia aphasia after stroke and the rehabilitative interventions.DATA SOURCES: Articles related to stroke, subcortical aphasia, basal ganglia aphasia and language rehabilitation published in Chinese from January 1988 to December 2005 were searched in Chinese journal full-text database (CJFD) using the keywords of"stroke, basal ganglia aphasia, language rehabilitation" in Chinese. Meanwhile, English articles about aphasia published from January 1982 to December 2005 were searched in and Pubmed database. Besides, several books associated with the contents were looked through manually.STUDY SELECTION: The data were checked primarily, the articles about the pathomechanism and neurolinguistic characteristics of basal ganglia aphasia, diagnostic methods of aphasia and language rehabilitation were selected, and those had no obvious relation with the above contents were excluded.Inclusive criteria: literatures explain the clinical characteristics of basal ganglia aphasia, neurolinguistic pathogenesis and methods of rehabilitation therapy in details. The repetitive studies were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 95 literatures about basal ganglia aphasia were collected, including 31 about the clinical characteristics of basal ganglia aphasia, 45 about its neurolinguistic pathogenesis, 5 about the evaluation and classification of aphasia, and 14 about its rehabilitation therapy. Thirty accorded with the inclusive criteria were used for review, and the other 65 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: Concisely introduced the definition, past investigation of basal ganglia aphasia after stroke, then dwelled on the multiplicity neurolinguistics characteristics. Aphasia evaluation was dependent upon clinical aphasic symptoms. The relationship between symptom and focus of infection was explored, and the mechanism of pathosis language behavior on basal ganglia aphasia patients was understood to provide consequence data that could

  3. The effectiveness of Speech-Music Therapy for Aphasia (SMTA) in five speakers with Apraxia of Speech and aphasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; de Bruijn, Madeleen; Boonstra, Anne M.; Hartman, Paul P.; Arendzen, Hans; Reinders - Messelink, Heelen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies using musical elements in the treatment of neurological language and speech disorders have reported improvement of speech production. One such programme, Speech-Music Therapy for Aphasia (SMTA), integrates speech therapy and music therapy (MT) to treat the individual with

  4. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Wernicke's, Broca's, and conduction aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metter, E.J.; Kempler, D.; Jackson, C.; Hanson, W.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism was evaluated in patients with either Wernicke's (N = 7), Broca's (N = 11), or conduction (N = 10) aphasia using /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose with positron emission tomography. The three aphasic syndromes differed in the degree of left-to-right frontal metabolic asymmetry, with Broca's aphasia showing severe asymmetry and Wernicke's aphasia mild-to-moderate metabolic asymmetry, while patients with conduction aphasia were metabolically symmetric. On the other hand, the three syndromes showed the same degree of metabolic decline in the left temporal region. The parietal region appeared to separate conduction aphasia from both Broca's and Wernicke's aphasias. Common aphasic features in the three syndromes appear to be due to common changes in the temporal region, while unique features were associated with frontal and parietal metabolic differences.

  5. The anterior temporal lobes support residual comprehension in Wernicke’s aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Holly; Zahn, Roland; Keidel, James L.; Binney, Richard J.; Sage, Karen; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke's aphasia occurs after a stroke to classical language comprehension regions in the left temporoparietal cortex. Consequently, auditory?verbal comprehension is significantly impaired in Wernicke?s aphasia but the capacity to comprehend visually presented materials (written words and pictures) is partially spared. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural basis of written word and picture semantic processing in Wernicke?s aphasia, with the wider ai...

  6. Aphasia caused by intracerebral hemorrhage; CT-scan findings and prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuya, Kazuhide; Segawa, Hiromu; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Hasegawa, Isao; Sano, Keiji (Fuji Brain Institute and Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan))

    1992-10-01

    It is generally accepted that cases of aphasia can be divided into several groups according to verbal fluency, auditory comprehension, and repetition abilities. Although many authors have studied aphasia and its location by means of a CT scan, the primary lesion on a CT scan with regard to the subtypes of aphasia still remains controversial. In this report we present our new CT classification for the syndromes of aphasia and the prognosis. Twenty-one patients with intracerebral hematoma (ICH) were followed up for more than 3 months after onset. ICH was classified according to the mode of the horizontal extension of the hematoma on a CT scan. Four lines were decided as follows: Line (a) is between the anterior horn of the lateral ventricle and the midpoint of the third ventricle; Line (b) is the vertical line to the saggital line which originates from the midpoint of the third ventricle; Line (c) is between the trigone of the lateral ventricle and the midpoint of the third ventricle. The CT classification consisted of 4 types: in Type A, ICH was located anterior to line (a); in Type B, ICH was located between line (a) and line (b); in Type C, ICH was located between line (b) and line (c); Type B+C, was a combination of Type B and Type C. Transcortical motor aphasia belonged to the Type A group. Transcortical sensory aphasia belonged to the Type B and Type B+C groups. Wernicke's and anomic aphasia belonged to the Type C group. Conduction and global aphasia belonged to the Type B+C group. Pure Broca's aphasia could not be observed in this series. Several relationships between the syndromes of aphasia and its CT findings were evident. On the other hand, the syndromes of aphasia and the degree of recovery were not correlated, except for global aphasia. (author).

  7. CROSSLINGUISTIC GENERALIZATION OF SEMANTIC TREATMENT IN APHASIA: EVIDENCE FROM THE INDIAN CONTEXT

    OpenAIRE

    Gopeekrishnan Gopeekrishnan; Swathi Kiran; Shyamala K Chengappa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the current study, we examined the nature of crosslinguistic generalization of treatment for Indian bilinguals with aphasia. We recruited three bilingual (Kannada-English) persons with aphasia and used the treatment protocol described by Edmonds and Kiran (2006). Our findings showed a striking similarity with the previous study, thus providing further empirical evidence for crosslinguistic generalization of semantic treatment in aphasia, especially from an unexplored langua...

  8. An Analysis of the Characteristics of Aphasia Caused by The Thalamic Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Chongxia

    2000-01-01

    The aphasia of 21 patients with thalamic stroke was din ically classified and analysed with the method of standard Chinese aphasic test, and the possible relationship between the thalamic damage and aphasia was discussed. The results showed that the notable characteris tics of the aphasia caused by thalamic stroke was subcortical aphasia and the language dominance of thalamus mainly located at the left side, but the right side of thalamus was also involved with language. The data in dicated that the thalamus is a constituent part in nervous network of lan guage.

  9. How to engage the right brain hemisphere in aphasics without even singing: evidence for two paths of speech recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eStahl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an ongoing debate as to whether singing helps left-hemispheric stroke patients recover from non-fluent aphasia through stimulation of the right hemisphere. According to recent work, it may not be singing itself that aids speech production in non-fluent aphasic patients, but rhythm and lyric type. However, the long-term effects of melody and rhythm on speech recovery are largely unknown. In the current experiment, we tested 15 patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia who underwent either singing therapy, rhythmic therapy, or standard speech therapy. The experiment controlled for phonatory quality, vocal frequency variability, pitch accuracy, syllable duration, phonetic complexity and other influences, such as the acoustic setting and learning effects induced by the testing itself. The results provide the first evidence that singing and rhythmic speech may be similarly effective in the treatment of non-fluent aphasia. This finding may challenge the view that singing causes a transfer of language function from the left to the right hemisphere. Instead, both singing and rhythmic therapy patients made good progress in the production of common, formulaic phrases—known to be supported by right corticostriatal brain areas. This progress occurred at an early stage of both therapies and was stable over time. Conversely, patients receiving standard therapy made less progress in the production of formulaic phrases. They did, however, improve their production of non-formulaic speech, in contrast to singing and rhythmic therapy patients, who did not. In light of these results, it may be worth considering the combined use of standard therapy and the training of formulaic phrases, whether sung or rhythmically spoken. Standard therapy may engage, in particular, left perilesional brain regions, while training of formulaic phrases may open new ways of tapping into right-hemisphere language resources—even without singing.

  10. How to engage the right brain hemisphere in aphasics without even singing: evidence for two paths of speech recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Benjamin; Henseler, Ilona; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan; Kotz, Sonja A

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate as to whether singing helps left-hemispheric stroke patients recover from non-fluent aphasia through stimulation of the right hemisphere. According to recent work, it may not be singing itself that aids speech production in non-fluent aphasic patients, but rhythm and lyric type. However, the long-term effects of melody and rhythm on speech recovery are largely unknown. In the current experiment, we tested 15 patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia who underwent either singing therapy, rhythmic therapy, or standard speech therapy. The experiment controlled for phonatory quality, vocal frequency variability, pitch accuracy, syllable duration, phonetic complexity and other influences, such as the acoustic setting and learning effects induced by the testing itself. The results provide the first evidence that singing and rhythmic speech may be similarly effective in the treatment of non-fluent aphasia. This finding may challenge the view that singing causes a transfer of language function from the left to the right hemisphere. Instead, both singing and rhythmic therapy patients made good progress in the production of common, formulaic phrases-known to be supported by right corticostriatal brain areas. This progress occurred at an early stage of both therapies and was stable over time. Conversely, patients receiving standard therapy made less progress in the production of formulaic phrases. They did, however, improve their production of non-formulaic speech, in contrast to singing and rhythmic therapy patients, who did not. In light of these results, it may be worth considering the combined use of standard therapy and the training of formulaic phrases, whether sung or rhythmically spoken. Standard therapy may engage, in particular, left perilesional brain regions, while training of formulaic phrases may open new ways of tapping into right-hemisphere language resources-even without singing. PMID:23450277

  11. How to engage the right brain hemisphere in aphasics without even singing: evidence for two paths of speech recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Benjamin; Henseler, Ilona; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan; Kotz, Sonja A

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate as to whether singing helps left-hemispheric stroke patients recover from non-fluent aphasia through stimulation of the right hemisphere. According to recent work, it may not be singing itself that aids speech production in non-fluent aphasic patients, but rhythm and lyric type. However, the long-term effects of melody and rhythm on speech recovery are largely unknown. In the current experiment, we tested 15 patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia who underwent either singing therapy, rhythmic therapy, or standard speech therapy. The experiment controlled for phonatory quality, vocal frequency variability, pitch accuracy, syllable duration, phonetic complexity and other influences, such as the acoustic setting and learning effects induced by the testing itself. The results provide the first evidence that singing and rhythmic speech may be similarly effective in the treatment of non-fluent aphasia. This finding may challenge the view that singing causes a transfer of language function from the left to the right hemisphere. Instead, both singing and rhythmic therapy patients made good progress in the production of common, formulaic phrases-known to be supported by right corticostriatal brain areas. This progress occurred at an early stage of both therapies and was stable over time. Conversely, patients receiving standard therapy made less progress in the production of formulaic phrases. They did, however, improve their production of non-formulaic speech, in contrast to singing and rhythmic therapy patients, who did not. In light of these results, it may be worth considering the combined use of standard therapy and the training of formulaic phrases, whether sung or rhythmically spoken. Standard therapy may engage, in particular, left perilesional brain regions, while training of formulaic phrases may open new ways of tapping into right-hemisphere language resources-even without singing.

  12. Test-Retest Reliability of fMRI During Nonverbal Semantic Decisions in Moderate-Severe Nonfluent Aphasia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquie Kurland

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical reorganization in poststroke aphasia is not well understood. Few studies have investigated neural mechanisms underlying language recovery in severe aphasia patients, who are typically viewed as having a poor prognosis for language recovery. Although test-retest reliability is routinely demonstrated during collection of language data in single-subject aphasia research, this is rarely examined in fMRI studies investigating the underlying neural mechanisms in aphasia recovery.

  13. REVIEW OF A CASE OF CHILD WITH ACQUIRED APHASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana FILIPOVA

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Achieved children speech disabilities are manifested at certain level of development of speech from the age of 3 to 12 years. The speech disabilities with children from the age of one to three years have developmental and acquired characteristics. It is well-known when and why the disabilities occurr at acquired aphasia or disphasia.The child with acquired aphasia or disphasia has early brain impairements and a relative improvement happens with adequate treatment and prompt rehabilitation treatment. It is more obvious with children than with adults.This fast and complete rehabilitation happens due to the plastic character of child’s brain and the possibilities for intro-hemisphere and inter-hemisphere reorganization of speech functions in childhood.

  14. Web based aphasia test using service oriented architecture (SOA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voos, J A [Clinical Engineering R and D Center, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Facultad Regional Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Vigliecca, N S [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, CONICET, Cordoba (Argentina); Gonzalez, E A [Clinical Engineering R and D Center, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Facultad Regional Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Based on an aphasia test for Spanish speakers which analyze the patient's basic resources of verbal communication, a web-enabled software was developed to automate its execution. A clinical database was designed as a complement, in order to evaluate the antecedents (risk factors, pharmacological and medical backgrounds, neurological or psychiatric symptoms, brain injury -anatomical and physiological characteristics, etc) which are necessary to carry out a multi-factor statistical analysis in different samples of patients. The automated test was developed following service oriented architecture and implemented in a web site which contains a tests suite, which would allow both integrating the aphasia test with other neuropsychological instruments and increasing the available site information for scientific research. The test design, the database and the study of its psychometric properties (validity, reliability and objectivity) were made in conjunction with neuropsychological researchers, who participate actively in the software design, based on the patients or other subjects of investigation feedback.

  15. 基底节性失语%Basal Ganglia Aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隆昱洲; 柳华; 艾青龙

    2008-01-01

    基底节病变常导致语言功能障碍,其表现彤式复杂,既可出现口语语言障碍,也可出现书面语语言障碍,几乎包括所有失语类型.文章就基底节解剖、基底节失语的定义、特点、机制以及病变部位对语言的影响做了综述.%Basal ganglion lesions often result in language impairment. Its patterns of manifestation are complicated. Patients may either have oral language disorders or written language disorders, which almost includes all types of aphasia, The article reviews the anatomy, definition, feature and mechanisms of basal ganglia aphasia as well as the effect of lesion sites on language.

  16. Web based aphasia test using service oriented architecture (SOA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on an aphasia test for Spanish speakers which analyze the patient's basic resources of verbal communication, a web-enabled software was developed to automate its execution. A clinical database was designed as a complement, in order to evaluate the antecedents (risk factors, pharmacological and medical backgrounds, neurological or psychiatric symptoms, brain injury -anatomical and physiological characteristics, etc) which are necessary to carry out a multi-factor statistical analysis in different samples of patients. The automated test was developed following service oriented architecture and implemented in a web site which contains a tests suite, which would allow both integrating the aphasia test with other neuropsychological instruments and increasing the available site information for scientific research. The test design, the database and the study of its psychometric properties (validity, reliability and objectivity) were made in conjunction with neuropsychological researchers, who participate actively in the software design, based on the patients or other subjects of investigation feedback

  17. The Classification of Aphasia%失语症的分类

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIM Ha-kyung[韩国; 刘巧云; 周谢玲; 周文苑; 万勤

    2013-01-01

      目前,学术界对失语症的分类问题仍有不少争议,但以解剖-临床为基础将失语症分为Broca失语、Wernicke失语、传导性失语、经皮质运动性失语、经皮质感觉性失语、经皮质混合性失语、完全性失语和命名性失语8种的分类法是被广为认可的。本文以此分类方法为理论基础,重点介绍了失语症患者在自发性言语、命名、复述、听觉理解、阅读、书写等方面的临床表现,以及如何通过相应测试考察失语症患者以上能力,从而对其进行鉴别和分类。%Nowadays, there is a controversy concerning the classification of aphasia. On the anatomical and clinical basis, aphasia is divided into 8 categories, including Broca’s aphasia, Wernicke's aphasia, conduction aphasia, transcortical motor aphasia, transcortical sensory aphasia, mixed transcortical aphasia, global aphasia and anomic aphasia. This paper introduces the clinical symptoms of aphasic patients in spontaneous speech, naming, repetition, auditory comprehension, reading and writing and discusses how to test these abilities though relevant examinations, based on which, the aphasia is classified and differentiated.

  18. Semantic Aphasia and Luria's Neurolinguistic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Birgitta

    A study of eight adult chronic aphasic patients' comprehension of sentences and pictures in which comparisons of time and space were crucial was designed to assess A. R. Luria's approach to designing comprehension test tasks. The investigation required patients, with lesions of varying size and location, to determine whether a sentence expressing…

  19. Psychological distress after stroke and aphasia: the first six months

    OpenAIRE

    Hilari, K.; Northcott, S.; Roy, P; Marshall, J.; Wiggins, R. D.; Chataway, J.; Ames, D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We explored the factors that predicted psychological distress in the first six months post stroke in a sample including people with aphasia. Design: Prospective longitudinal observational study. Setting and subjects: Participants with a first stroke from two acute stroke units were assessed while still in hospital (baseline) and at three and six months post stroke. Main measures: Distress was assessed with the General Health Questionnaire-12. Other measures included: NI...

  20. Study of conduction aphasia by positron emission tomography

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    Shoji, Mikio; Harigawa, Yasuo; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Hirai, Shunsaku; Tamada, Junpei.

    1988-04-01

    We reported two cases of conduction aphasia with distinctive language disorder from early stage of stroke, as well as their cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption investigated with PET. The case was a 72-year-old right handed man whose speech disturbance began acutely. On admission, neurological examination revealed hand pronation sign on the right and speech disturbance. Other neurological findings including cortical functions were normal. Brain CT scan showed low density area in the white matter of the left supramarginal gyrus. The diagnosis was cerebral infarction. The case 2 was a 64-year-old right handed man. He suffered right hemiparesis 2 months before. Neurological examination revealed mild right hemiparesis and speech disturbance. Other cortical functions were noncontributory. Brain CT scan showed old subcortical infarction of the left frontal lobe and new cerebral infarction. with supramarginal gyrus. The low density area of the supramarginal cortex extended into the subcortical white matter. The language performances in these two cases were similar. Two patients were definitely fluent, but the verbal output was contaminated by paraphasias which were predominantly literal. They performed poorly when attempting to repeat despite good comprehension. Thus, the primary characteristics of conduction aphasia were present. PET studies resulted as follows. 1) rCBF reduced 36 % in the supramarginal cortex, 50 % in the white matter. 2) rCMRO/sub 2/ reduced 37 % in the supramarginal cortex, 45 % in the white matter. 3) The CBF and the CMRO/sub 2/ images indicated that cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption reduced in wider range of area than that shown by brain CT. These results indicated that not only the cortex but also the white matter were damaged in conduction aphasia and several methods including PET should be used to determine the locus of abnormality in conduction aphasia.

  1. Verbal Comprehension Ability in Aphasia: Demographic and Lexical Knowledge Effects

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    Panagiotis G. Simos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Assessment of sentence-level auditory comprehension can be performed with a variety of tests varying in response requirements. A brief and easy to administer measure, not requiring an overt verbal or a complex motor response, is essential in any test battery for aphasia. Objective. The present study examines the clinical utility of receptive language indices for individuals with aphasia based on the Comprehension of Instructions in Greek (CIG, a variant of the Token Test, and the Greek version of PPVT-R. Methods. Normative data from a large community sample of Greek adults aged 46–80 years was available on both measures. A word-level-independent measure of auditory comprehension was computed as the standard score difference between the two tests and used to compare patients with and without comprehension deficits as indicated by their Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination profile. Results and Conclusions. Indices of internal consistency and test-retest reliability were very good. Education and age effects on performance were significant, with the former being stronger. The potential clinical utility of differential ability indices (contrasting sentence- and word-level auditory comprehension tests is discussed.

  2. A Study of Aphasia in“A Rose for Emily”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Chun-fang; HU Ge

    2016-01-01

    “A Rose for Emily”is a famous short story, whose author is the 1949 Nobel Prize Winner William Faulkner. Influ-enced by his family and southern culture, his works are full of southern sense of humor. He describes many southern sensitive is-sues, such as the relation and the conflicts between the white and the black. Therefore, he depicts a lot of vivid images of south-ern people. Based on the southern society after American Civil War, Faulkner tells a miserable story of Miss Emily. Over these years, many experts and scholars have discussed“A Rose for Emily”from different aspects, such as the Gothic writing style, symbolism, character analysis and feminism, which made readers have a deep understanding on this story. However, related anal-ysis on Emily’s aphasia is rare. Therefore, combined with the theory of feminism and Foucault’s power discourse theory, the causes of Miss Emily’s aphasia and other people’s silence will be discussed. It mainly studies Emily’s aphasia from aspects of patriarchal oppression and southern aristocratic culture, revealing the primary cause of Emily’s tragedy is her loss of power to speak.

  3. Theodor Meynert's contribution to classical 19th century aphasia studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, H A; Etlinger, S C

    1993-11-01

    Carl Wernicke (1848-1905) is traditionally considered the first to have described the features of, and the brain pathology underlying, impaired auditory comprehension and related symptoms. Although Wernicke (1874) clearly and repeatedly indicates his indebtedness to Theodor von Meynert (1833-1892), this is usually understood as an acknowledgment that Meynert taught Wernicke neuroanatomy (Eggert, 1977); Wernicke's own words in part support this interpretation. A more sophisticated historical analysis notes that, prior to Wernicke, both Johann Schmidt in 1871 and Charlton Bastian in 1869 had described the concept of receptive aphasia, but neither had supported their analyses with autopsy evidence as did Wernicke, thus not dislodging Wernicke's claim of priority. However, a virtually unknown work by Theodor von Meynert, published in 1866, has recently been rediscovered by us ["Ein Fall von Sprachstörung, anatomisch begründet." Medizinische Jahrbücher. XII Band der Zeitschrift der K. K. Gesellleschaft der Arzte in Wien, 22. Jahr. Pp. 152-189]. In this paper Meynert analyzes the anatomical basis for localizing the comprehension of language in the superior temporal gyrus, he argues that lesions in this area should (by analogy to Broca's earlier observations on language expression) cause impairments in language comprehension, and he presents a case of receptive aphasia with autopsy evidence of destruction of the superior temporal gyrus in the left hemisphere. The patient's aphasia was classic; impaired auditory comprehension, and fluent speech with paraphasias. It is clear that Meynert should be given historical credit for his work.

  4. Masked Priming Effects in Aphasia: Evidence of Altered Automatic Spreading Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkes, JoAnn P.; Rogers, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research has suggested that impairments of automatic spreading activation may underlie some aphasic language deficits. The current study further investigated the status of automatic spreading activation in individuals with aphasia as compared with typical adults. Method: Participants were 21 individuals with aphasia (12 fluent, 9…

  5. White matter disease correlates with lexical retrieval deficits in primary progressive aphasia

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    John P. Powers

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To relate fractional anisotropy changes associated with the semantic and logopenic variants of primary progressive aphasia to measures of lexical retrieval.Methods: We collected neuropsychological testing, volumetric MRI, and diffusion-weighted imaging on semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (n=11 and logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (n=13 patients diagnosed using published criteria. We also acquired neuroimaging data on a group of demographically comparable healthy seniors (n=34. Fractional anisotropy was calculated and analyzed using a white matter tract-specific analysis approach. This approach utilizes anatomically guided data reduction to increase sensitivity and localizes results within canonically defined tracts. We used non-parametric, cluster-based statistical analysis to relate language performance to fractional anisotropy and determine regions of reduced fractional anisotropy in patients. Results: We found widespread fractional anisotropy reductions in white matter for both variants of primary progressive aphasia. Fractional anisotropy was related to both confrontation naming and category naming fluency performance in left uncinate fasciculus and corpus callosum in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia and left superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi in logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia. Conclusions: Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia and logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia are associated with distinct disruptions of a large-scale network implicated in lexical retrieval, and the white matter disease in each phenotype may contribute to language impairments including lexical retrieval.

  6. The screling: Occurence of linguistic deficits in acute aphasia post-stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. El Hachioui (Hanane); W.M.E. van de Sandt-Koenderman (Mieke); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); E.G. Visch-Brink (Evy)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To investigate the occurrence of semantic, phonological and syntactic deficits in acute aphasia with the ScreeLing after the establishment of its psychometric properties. To examine the relationship between these deficits and: (i) overall aphasia severity; and (ii) quality of

  7. Nonlinguistic Learning in Individuals with Aphasia: Effects of Training Method and Stimulus Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallila-Rohter, Sofia; Kiran, Swathi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to explore nonlinguistic learning ability in individuals with aphasia, examining the impact of stimulus typicality and feedback on success with learning. Method: Eighteen individuals with aphasia and 8 nonaphasic controls participated in this study. All participants completed 4 computerized,…

  8. A Comparison of Aphasia Therapy Outcomes before and after a Very Early Rehabilitation Programme Following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godecke, Erin; Ciccone, Natalie A.; Granger, Andrew S.; Rai, Tapan; West, Deborah; Cream, Angela; Cartwright, Jade; Hankey, Graeme J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Very early aphasia rehabilitation studies have shown mixed results. Differences in therapy intensity and therapy type contribute significantly to the equivocal results. Aims: To compare a standardized, prescribed very early aphasia therapy regimen with a historical usual care control group at therapy completion (4-5 weeks post-stroke)…

  9. Language Assessment of a Farsi-Norwegian Bilingual Speaker with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumanidi Knoph, Monica I.

    2011-01-01

    The increased occurrence of strokes combined with the high incidence of bilingualism in many regions of the world has led to an increasing number of bilingual adults with aphasia. The literature on bilingual aphasia shows the need for valid, comprehensive and reliable assessment tools for diagnostic and treatment purposes. In spite of a growing…

  10. Facilitating the participation of people with aphasia in research : a description of strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalemans, R.; Wade, D.T.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.; de Witte, L.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: People with aphasia are often excluded from research because of their communication impairments, especially when an investigation into the communication impairment is not the primary goal. In our research concerning social participation of people with aphasia, we wanted to include people

  11. Words in Action: retrieval errors in aphasia, a topic for therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Visch-Brink (Evy)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAn aphasia is defined as an acquired impairment of language based on brain damage (Benson & Ardila 1996). All modes of language use may be involved: spontaneous speech, writing and comprehension of written and spoken language. Therefore, aphasia is labelled as a supramodal language disor

  12. Direct and indirect speech in aphasia : studies of spoken discourse production and comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewold, Rimke

    2015-01-01

    Speakers with aphasia (a language impairment due to acquired brain damage) have difficulty processing grammatically complex sentences. In this dissertation we study the processing of direct speech constructions (e.g., John said: “I have to leave”) by people with and without aphasia. First, we study

  13. Use of the BAT with a Cantonese-Putonghua Speaker with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Anthony Pak-Hin; Weekes, Brendan Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to illustrate the use of the Bilingual Aphasia Test (BAT) with a Cantonese-Putonghua speaker. We describe G, who is a relatively young Chinese bilingual speaker with aphasia. G's communication abilities in his L2, Putonghua, were impaired following brain damage. This impairment caused specific difficulties in…

  14. Asking New Questions and Seeking New Answers: The Reality of Aphasia Practice in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Emerging policy in South Africa has had a marked impact on delivery of service by speech-language pathologists, particularly in the field of aphasia. This article describes major policy influences in the areas of language use, health, education, disability, and the elderly, which have had an impact on service delivery. Aphasia assessment and…

  15. Impact of Personal Relevance and Contextualization on Word-Picture Matching by People with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Miechelle L.; Hux, Karen; Dietz, Aimee; Beukelman, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of personal relevance and contextualization of images on the preferences and word-picture matching accuracy of people with severe aphasia. Method: Eight adults with aphasia performed 2 experimental tasks to reveal their preferences and accuracy during word-picture matching. The researchers used 3 types of visual…

  16. Attention and Other Cognitive Deficits in Aphasia: Presence and Relation to Language and Communication Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to further elucidate the relationship between cognition and aphasia, with a focus on attention. It was hypothesized that individuals with aphasia would display variable deficit patterns on tests of attention and other cognitive functions and that their attention deficits, particularly those of complex attention…

  17. Releasing the Constraints on Aphasia Therapy: The Positive Impact of Gesture and Multimodality Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Miranda L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: There is a 40-year history of interest in the use of arm and hand gestures in treatments that target the reduction of aphasic linguistic impairment and compensatory methods of communication (Rose, 2006). Arguments for constraining aphasia treatment to the verbal modality have arisen from proponents of constraint-induced aphasia therapy…

  18. Error Variability and the Differentiation between Apraxia of Speech and Aphasia with Phonemic Paraphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Katarina L.; Jacks, Adam; Cunningham, Kevin T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical utility of error variability for differentiating between apraxia of speech (AOS) and aphasia with phonemic paraphasia. Method: Participants were 32 individuals with aphasia after left cerebral injury. Diagnostic groups were formed on the basis of operationalized measures of recognized…

  19. Production Variability and Single Word Intelligibility in Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Katarina L.; Martin, Gwenyth

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to estimate test-retest reliability of orthographic speech intelligibility testing in speakers with aphasia and AOS and to examine its relationship to the consistency of speaker and listener responses. Monosyllabic single word speech samples were recorded from 13 speakers with coexisting aphasia and AOS. These words were…

  20. A Comparison of Intention and Pantomime Gesture Treatment for Noun Retrieval in People with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Neina F.; Evans, Kelli; Raymer, Anastasia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of intention gesture treatment (IGT) and pantomime gesture treatment (PGT) on word retrieval were compared in people with aphasia. Method: Four individuals with aphasia and word retrieval impairments subsequent to left-hemisphere stroke participated in a single-participant crossover treatment design. Each participant viewed…

  1. The Calculation of Language Lateralization Indices in Post-stroke Aphasia: A Comparison of a Standard and a Lesion-Adjusted Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Aimee; Vannest, Jennifer; Maloney, Thomas; Altaye, Mekibib; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Holland, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The language lateralization index (LI) is a valuable tool in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research, especially in people with post-stroke aphasia. However, there is inconsistent consideration for the overlap of lesions with regions of interest (ROIs). The purpose of this study was to determine whether standard LI (SLI) and lesion-adjusted LI (LALI) formulae generate different LI values and language lateralization classification for people with post-stroke chronic aphasia. Methods: SLI and LALI were calculated for an event-related (overt) verb generation task in an anterior and a posterior language ROI. Twelve people with aphasia due to a single left-hemispheric infarct (11 right-handed; 1 left-handed; 77.2 ± 41.7 months post-stroke) were included (eight females; 57 ± 8.88 years). Spearman correlation coefficients and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the relationship of the LI values generated by the SLI and the LALI formulas. Fischer’s exact test and a weighted Cohen’s Kappa determined the difference in language lateralization classification and agreement in the classification. Spearman correlation was used to examine the relationship between the difference in lateralization values produced by the LALI and SLI calculations with (1) lesion size, (2) the percentage of lesion overlap in each ROI, and (3) aphasia severity. Results: The two calculation methods were highly correlated and produced similar LI Values, yet yielded significantly different classification for language lateralization. Further, a more leftward LI resulted from application of the LALI formula in 10 participants, in either the anterior ROI (n = 3) or the posterior ROI (n = 7). Finally, for the posterior ROI only, significant correlations were revealed between the two calculation methods and the (1) lesion size and (2) percent of overlap with the ROI. Discussion: While both approaches produce highly correlated LI values, differences

  2. Mirror neuron system based therapy for aphasia rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    wenli echen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of hand action observation training, i.e. mirror neuron system (MNS based training, on language function of aphasic patients after stroke. In addition, to reveal the tentative mechanism underlying this effect.Methods: Six aphasic patients after stroke, meeting the criteria, undergo three weeks’ training protocol (30 min per day, 6 days per week. Among them, four patients accepted an ABA training design, i.e. they implemented Protocol A (hand action observation combined with repetition in the first and third weeks while carried out Protocol B (static objects observation combined with repetition in the second week. Conversely, for the other two patients, BAB training design was adopted, i.e. patients took Protocol B in the first and the third weeks and accepted Protocol A in the second week. Picture naming test, western aphasia battery (WAB and Token Test were applied to evaluate the changes of language function before and after each week’s training. Furthermore, two subjects (one aphasic patient and one healthy volunteer attended a functional MRI (fMRI experiment, by which we tried to reveal the mechanism underlying possible language function changes after training.Results: Compared with static objects observation and repetition training (Protocol B, hand action observation and repetition training (Protocol A effectively improved most aspects of the language function in all six patients, as demonstrated in the picture naming test, subtests of oral language and aphasia quotient(AQ of WAB. In addition, the fMRI experiment showed that Protocol A induced more activations in the MNS of two participants when compared to Protocol B. Conclusion: The mirror neuron based therapy may facilitate the language recovery for aphasic patients and this to some extent provides a novel direction of rehabilitation for aphasia patients.

  3. Lesion localization of global aphasia without hemiparesis by overlapping of the brain magnetic resonance images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woo Jin Kim; Nam-Jong Paik

    2014-01-01

    Global aphasia without hemiparesis is a striking stroke syndrome involving language impairment without the typically manifested contralateral hemiparesis, which is usually seen in patients with global aphasia following large left perisylvian lesions. The objective of this study is to elucidate the speciifc areas for lesion localization of global aphasia without hemiparesis by retrospectively studying the brain magnetic resonance images of six patients with global aphasia without hemi-paresis to deifne global aphasia without hemiparesis-related stroke lesions before overlapping the images to visualize the most overlapped area. Talairach coordinates for the most overlapped areas were converted to corresponding anatomical regions. Lesions where the images of more than three patients overlapped were considered significant. The overlapped global aphasia without hemiparesis related stroke lesions of six patients revealed that the signiifcantly involved anatomi-cal lesions were as follows:frontal lobe, sub-gyral, sub-lobar, extra-nuclear, corpus callosum, and inferior frontal gyrus, while caudate, claustrum, middle frontal gyrus, limbic lobe, temporal lobe, superior temporal gyrus, uncus, anterior cingulate, parahippocampal, amygdala, and subcallosal gyrus were seen less signiifcantly involved. This study is the ifrst to demonstrate the heteroge-neous anatomical involvement in global aphasia without hemiparesis by overlapping of the brain magnetic resonance images.

  4. Motor aphasia: A rare complication of scorpion sting

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    Vinayak Y Kshirsagar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion sting is common in villages, and is an important public health problem in India. The clinical symptoms of envenomation by scorpion sting are by sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation, causing a variety of symptoms. The leading causes of death are cardiac dysfunction and pulmonary edema. We present herein a case of scorpion sting in a 9-year-old boy who developed pulmonary edema and gradually developed cytotoxic cerebral edema with infarct leading to motor aphasia with upper motor neuron facial palsy.

  5. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Head Presenting with Hemiparesis and Aphasia

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    K. Saifudheen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory pseudotumor most commonly occurs in the orbit and produces orbital pseudotumor, but extension into brain parenchyma is uncommon. We report a case of inflammatory pseudotumor involving sphenoid sinus, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, orbital muscle, and intracranial extension into left temporal lobe producing right hemiparesis and wernicke's aphasia. The patient improved clinically and radiologically with steroid administration. This paper provides an insight into the spectrum of involvement of inflammatory pseudotumor and the importance of early diagnosis of the benign condition.

  6. Dissociations Between Fluency And Agrammatism In Primary Progressive Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cynthia K; Cho, Soojin; Hsu, Chien-Ju; Wieneke, Christina; Rademaker, Alfred; Weitner, Bing Bing; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Weintraub, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Classical aphasiology, based on the study of stroke sequelae, fuses speech fluency and grammatical ability. Nonfluent (Broca's) aphasia often is accompanied by agrammatism; whereas in the fluent aphasias grammatical deficits are not typical. The assumption that a similar relationship exists in primary progressive aphasia (PPA) has led to the dichotomization of this syndrome into fluent and nonfluent subtypes. AIMS: This study compared elements of fluency and grammatical production in the narrative speech of individuals with PPA to determine if they can be dissociated from one another. METHOD: Speech samples from 37 individuals with PPA, clinically assigned to agrammatic (N=11), logopenic (N=20) and semantic (N=6) subtypes, and 13 cognitively healthy control participants telling the "Cinderella Story" were analyzed for fluency (i.e., words per minute (WPM) and mean length of utterance in words (MLU-W)) and grammaticality (i.e., the proportion of grammatically correct sentences, open-to-closed-class word ratio, noun-to-verb ratio, and correct production of verb inflection, noun morphology, and verb argument structure.) Between group differences were analyzed for each variable. Correlational analyses examined the relation between WPM and each grammatical variable, and an off-line measure of sentence production. OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: Agrammatic and logopenic groups both had lower scores on the fluency measures and produced significantly fewer grammatical sentences than did semantic and control groups. However, only the agrammatic group evinced significantly impaired production of verb inflection and verb argument structure. In addition, some semantic participants showed abnormal open-to-closed and noun-to-verb ratios in narrative speech. When the sample was divided on the basis of fluency, all the agrammatic participants fell in the nonfluent category. The logopenic participants varied in fluency but those with low fluency showed variable performance on

  7. Recovery of language function in Korean-Japanese crossed bilingual aphasia following right basal ganglia hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boram; Moon, Hyun Im; Lim, Sung Hee; Cho, Hyesuk; Choi, Hyunjoo; Pyun, Sung-Bom

    2016-06-01

    Few studies have investigated language recovery patterns and the mechanisms of crossed bilingual aphasia following a subcortical stroke. In particular, Korean-Japanese crossed bilingual aphasia has not been reported. A 47-year-old, right-handed man was diagnosed with an extensive right basal ganglia hemorrhage. He was bilingual, fluent in both Korean and Japanese. After his stroke, the patient presented with crossed aphasia. We investigated changes in the Korean (L1) and Japanese (L2) language recovery patterns. Both Korean and Japanese versions of the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) were completed one month after the stroke, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed using picture-naming tasks. The WAB showed a paradoxical pattern of bilingual aphasia, with an aphasia quotient (AQ) of 32 for Korean and 50.6 for Japanese, with Broca's aphasia. The patient scored better in the Japanese version of all domains of the tests. The fMRI study showed left lateralized activation in both language tasks, especially in the inferior frontal gyrus. After six months of language therapy targeting L1, the Korean-WAB score improved significantly, while the Japanese-WAB score showed slight improvement. In this case, the subcortical lesion contributed to crossed bilingual aphasia more highly affecting L1 due to loss of the cortico-subcortical control mechanism in the dominant hemisphere. The paradoxical pattern of bilingual aphasia disappeared after lengthy language therapy targeting L1, and the therapy effect did not transfer to L2. Language recovery in L1 might have been accomplished by reintegrating language networks, including the contralesional language homologue area in the left hemisphere.

  8. Action observation as a tool for neurorehabilitation to moderate motor deficits and aphasia following stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denis Ertelt; Ferdinand Binkofski

    2012-01-01

    The mirror neuron system consists of a set of brain areas capable of matching action observation with action execution. One core feature of the mirror neuron system is the activation of motor areas by action observation alone. This unique capacity of the mirror neuron system to match action perception and action execution stimulated the idea that mirror neuron system plays a crucial role in the understanding of the content of observed actions and may participate in procedural learning. These features bear a high potential for neurorehabilitation of motor deficits and of aphasia following stroke. Since the first articles exploring this principle were published, a growing number of follow-up studies have been conducted in the last decade. Though, the combination of action observation with practice of the observed actions seems to constitute the most powerful approach. In the present review, we present the existing studies analyzing the effects of this neurorehabilitative approach in clinical settings especially in the rehabilitation of stroke associated motor deficits and give a perspective on the ongoing trials by our research group. The data obtained up to date showed significant positive effect of action observation on recovery of motor functions of the upper limbs even in the chronic state after stroke, indicating that our approach might become a new standardized add-on feature of modern neurorehabilitative treatment schemes.

  9. Historical aphasia cases: "Tan-tan", "Vot-vot", and "Cré nom!"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe three cases of aphasia in patients who were internationally famous historical personalities, such as the case of Mr. Leborgne ("Tan" published by Paul Broca in 1861, which became a reference for the study of aphasias. The other cases described here are those of the Russian revolutionary and politician Vladimir Ilyitch Ulianov (Lenin ("Vot-vot" and the French poet Charles Baudelaire ("Cré nom!". Besides their historical relevance and the clinical picture of aphasia, these three cases share as a common feature the occurrence of speech automatisms or stereotypes.

  10. Historical aphasia cases: "Tan-tan", "Vot-vot", and "Cré nom!".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Caramelli, Paulo

    2011-06-01

    We describe three cases of aphasia in patients who were internationally famous historical personalities, such as the case of Mr. Leborgne ("Tan") published by Paul Broca in 1861, which became a reference for the study of aphasias. The other cases described here are those of the Russian revolutionary and politician Vladimir Ilyitch Ulianov (Lenin) ("Vot-vot") and the French poet Charles Baudelaire ("Cré nom!"). Besides their historical relevance and the clinical picture of aphasia, these three cases share as a common feature the occurrence of speech automatisms or stereotypes.

  11. Tense and aspect in aphasia and semantic dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Koukoulioti

    2014-04-01

    There was no difference between past perfective and present imperfective for neither group, but there was an interaction between verb class and tense for the aphasic participants, as performance in unaccusative verbs in past perfective (unmarked condition was significantly better than in unergatives in past perfective (marked condition (Z=2.512, p=0.012 but performance in unaccusatives in present imperfective (marked condition was significantly worse than performance in unergatives in present imperfective (unmarked condition (Z=2.680, p=0.004. In sum, aphasic participants performed significantly better in the unmarked than in the marked conditions. Such an interaction was not found for the SD group. Aphasic participants performed significantly worse than the SD subjects in past perfective tense (M-W U= 7.5, p=0.029 in total, and the difference was significant only for unaccusative verbs (M-W U= 6.5, p=0.021, although both groups performed very well in this condition. There was no difference in present, neither for each verb class separately nor for the total score. A general past tense deficit cannot be upheld for either group. Rather, SD participants appear relatively impaired in producing present tense. We argue for slight morphosyntactic impairment in SD, although with a different underlying cause than in aphasia. Moreover, our data suggest an effect of aspectual markedness in aphasia but not in SD. We discuss this finding in the light of the different neuropathology of the two populations.

  12. Corpus-based Transitivity Biases in Individuals with Aphasia

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    Gayle DeDe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Spontaneous speech samples in individuals with aphasia (IWA have been analyzed to examine many different psycholinguistic features. The present study focused on how IWA use verbs in spontaneous speech. Some verbs can occur in more than one argument structure, but are biased to occur more frequently in one frame than another. For example, "watch" appears in transitive and intransitive structures, but is usually used transitively. This is known as a transitivity bias. It is unknown whether IWA show the same transitivity biases in production as those reported in previous corpus studies with unimpaired individuals. Studies of sentence comprehension have shown that IWA are sensitive to verb biases (e.g., DeDe, 2013. In addition, IWA have shown an overall preference for transitive structures, which are the most frequent structures in English (Roland, Dick, & Elman, 2007. The present study investigated whether IWA show the same pattern of transitive and intransitive biases in spontaneous speech as unimpaired individuals. Method Participants: 278 interviews with IWA were taken from AphasiaBank. The IWA represented a range of aphasia types. Participants were omitted if they spoke English as a second language. Materials: 54 verbs were coded. We chose verbs with the goal of representing different bias types (e.g., transitive, intransitive, sentential complement. Of these, data from 11 transitively biased and 11 intransitively biased verbs (matched for frequency of use and number of syllables are presented here. Coding: All productions of the 54 verbs were coded. The coding protocol was based on Gahl, Jurafsky, and Roland (2004. We implemented an additional level of coding to indicate erroneous verb productions, such as ungrammatical structures and verb agreement errors. Results The (intransitivity biases for IWA were compared to biases from a previously published corpus study (Gahl et al., 2004. The IWA used transitively biased verbs in

  13. Does Handedness Affect the Cerebral Organization of Speech and Language in Individuals with Aphasia?

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    Juliana Baldo

    2014-04-01

    Although some earlier studies suggested distinct cerebral organizations for right- versus non-right-handed individuals, the neural correlates of fluency and comprehension were greatly overlapping between these groups in our sample of left hemisphere patients with aphasia.

  14. The TCM-Combined Treatment for Aphasia Due to Cerebrovascular Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of scalp acupuncture (with the cluster needling, a long needle-retention and an intermittent manipulation) combined with the Schuell's stimulation and psychological care for treatment of aphasia due to cerebrovascular disorders. Method: 36 eligible cases of aphasia were randomly assigned into a treatment group and a control group. The scoring system for assessment of aphasia in speaking Chinese set by CMA Neurological Branch and that of BADE were adopted for grading the severity/degree of aphasia before and after the treatment. Results: The total effective rate in the treatment group was 84.21%, and that in the control group was 70.59%, with a very statistically significant difference (P<0.01). Conclusion: The combined scheme produced a better therapeutic effect.

  15. 卒中后失语的药物治疗%Pharmacotherapy of Poststroke Aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莺; 李焰生

    2008-01-01

    Stroke is the most common cause of aphasia. Traditional speech-language therapy remains the mainstay treatment of aphasia, however, its efficacy is uncertain. Although a number of studies have been carried out to investigate the role of pharmacological agents in the treatment of aphasia, the conclusions are controversial, This article reviews the state of pharma-colotherapy for poststroke aphasia.%卒中是引起失语的最常见病因.传统的言语-语言治疗仍是失语的主要治疗手段,但是其疗效并不肯定.尽管已开展了许多研究观察药物在治疗失语中的作用,但结论并不一致.文章就卒中后失语的药物治疗状况进行了综述.

  16. Unusual Recovery of Aphasia in a Polyglot Iranian Patient after Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Motamed, Mohammad R.; Aghaei, Mahboubeh; Jalali, Nazanin; Ghoreishi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Aphasia is a language disorder resulting from a lesion in the cerebral cortex. In this case report, we present a polyglot patient who recovered from aphasia by speaking his newly active learned language Case Report A 69 years old male referred with acute onset right hemiparesis and global aphasia. After imaging, he treated with 75 mg r-TPA (0.9 mg/kg). After the fourth day of hospitalization, he could name some objects and some short phrases but interestingly only in French language (although his mother language was Persian). Discussion In our patient, recovery was first in the last learned language and his learning memory was recovered earlier than his native languages. As in our case, we can expect to have different recovery theory that means active learning language could be the first part of recovery in aphasia. PMID:25337377

  17. Evidence for Intensive Aphasia Therapy: Consideration of Theories From Neuroscience and Cognitive Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignam, Jade K; Rodriguez, Amy D; Copland, David A

    2016-03-01

    Treatment intensity is a critical component to the delivery of speech-language pathology and rehabilitation services. Within aphasia rehabilitation, however, insufficient evidence currently exists to guide clinical decision making with respect to the optimal treatment intensity. This review considers perspectives from 2 key bodies of research, the neuroscience and cognitive psychology literature, with respect to the scheduling of aphasia rehabilitation services. Neuroscience research suggests that intensive training is a key element of rehabilitation and is necessary to achieve functional and neurologic changes after a stroke occurs. In contrast, the cognitive psychology literature suggests that optimal long-term learning is achieved when training is provided in a distributed or nonintensive schedule. These perspectives are evaluated and discussed with respect to the current evidence for treatment intensity in aphasia rehabilitation. In addition, directions for future research are identified, including study design, methods of defining and measuring treatment intensity, and selection of outcome measures in aphasia rehabilitation.

  18. Distinct regional anatomic and functional correlates of neurodegenerative apraxia of speech and aphasia: an MRI and FDG-PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Duffy, Joseph R; Strand, Edythe A; Xia, Rong; Mandrekar, Jay; Machulda, Mary M; Senjem, Matthew L; Lowe, Val J; Jack, Clifford R; Josephs, Keith A

    2013-06-01

    Progressive apraxia of speech (AOS) can result from neurodegenerative disease and can occur in isolation or in the presence of agrammatic aphasia. We aimed to determine the neuroanatomical and metabolic correlates of progressive AOS and aphasia. Thirty-six prospectively recruited subjects with progressive AOS or agrammatic aphasia, or both, underwent the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) and Token Test to assess aphasia, an AOS rating scale (ASRS), 3T MRI and 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET. Correlations between clinical measures and imaging were assessed. The only region that correlated to ASRS was left superior premotor volume. In contrast, WAB and Token Test correlated with hypometabolism and volume of a network of left hemisphere regions, including pars triangularis, pars opercularis, pars orbitalis, middle frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus and inferior parietal lobe. Progressive agrammatic aphasia and AOS have non-overlapping regional correlations, suggesting that these are dissociable clinical features that have different neuroanatomical underpinnings. PMID:23542727

  19. Adaptation and validation of stroke-aphasia quality of life (SAQOL-39) scale to Hindi

    OpenAIRE

    Ishita H Mitra; Gopee Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a major detriment to the quality of life (QOL) in its victims. Several functional limitations following stroke contribute to the denigrated QOL in this population. Aphasia, a disturbance in the comprehension, processing, and/or expression of language, is a common consequence of stroke. Yet, in most Indian languages, including the national language (Hindi), there are no published tools to measure the QOL of persons with stroke-aphasia. Objective: The current study was car...

  20. Crossed Aphasia in a Dextral without “Minor” Hemisphere Signs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Marshall

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of severe aphasia after right hemisphere stroke, confirmed by CT, in an unambiguously dextral patient is reported. The patient showed no limb apraxia, and performed well on a test of “closure” (Mooney faces. Extensive testing revealed no signs of visuo-spatial neglect. We conclude that “pure” crossed aphasia can occur in the absence of symptoms normally associated with right hemisphere lesions.

  1. Aphasia secondary to tuberculosis: a review of a nineteenth-century case report by Booth and Curtis (1893).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Noel

    2015-01-01

    The topic of aphasia secondary to tuberculosis deserves attention for two reasons: first, for better understanding rare etiologies of aphasia in medical history; and secondly, for initiating a multidisciplinary discussion relevant to aphasiologists, neurologists, pathologists, and clinicians generally. This article will focus on clinical observations of tuberculosis-related aphasia in the nineteenth century, highlighting a noteworthy case report presented by Booth and Curtis (1893).

  2. A qualitative study of legal and social justice needs for people with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Karen; Ferguson, Alison; Worrall, Linda

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an exploratory investigation of situations in which people with aphasia may be vulnerable to legal and access to justice issues. The study used a qualitative descriptive approach to analyse 167 de-identified transcriptions of previously collected interviews, with 50 participants with mild-to-severe aphasia following stroke, 48 family members, and their treating speech-language pathologists. Situations experienced by people with aphasia and their family members were coded using key-word searches based on the previously published framework developed by Ellison and colleagues to describe situations of vulnerability to legal and access to justice needs for older people. Health and financial and consumer situations were most frequently identified in the data. Additionally, there were a number of situations found specifically relating to people with aphasia involving their signatures and credit card use. Instances of discrimination and abuse were also identified, and, although infrequent, these issues point to the profound impact of aphasia on the ability to complain and, hence, to ensure rights to care are upheld. The findings of this study are consistent with previous research in suggesting that legal and access to justice needs are an important issue for people with aphasia and their families.

  3. The combination of rhythm and pitch can account for the beneficial effect of Melodic intonation therapy on connected speech improvements in Broca’s aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eZumbansen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Melodic intonation therapy (MIT is a structured protocol for language rehabilitation in people with Broca’s aphasia. The main particularity of MIT is the use of intoned-speech, a technique in which the clinician stylizes the prosody of short sentences using simple pitch and rhythm patterns. In the original MIT protocol, patients must repeat diverse sentences in order to espouse this way of speaking, with the goal of improving their natural, connected speech. MIT has long been regarded as a promising treatment but its mechanisms are still debated. Recent work showed that rhythm plays a key role in variations of MIT, leading to consider the use of pitch as relatively unnecessary in MIT. Our study primarily aimed to prospectively assess the relative contribution of rhythm and pitch in MIT’s generalization effect to non-trained stimuli and to connected speech. We compared a melodic therapy (with pitch and rhythm with a rhythmic therapy (with rhythm only and with a normally spoken therapy (without melodic elements. Three participants with chronic post-stroke Broca’s aphasia underwent the treatments in hourly sessions three days a week for six weeks, in a cross-over design. The informativeness of connected speech, speech accuracy of trained and non-trained sentences, motor-speech agility and mood was assessed before and after the treatments. The results show that the three treatments improved speech accuracy in trained sentences, but that the combination of rhythm and pitch elicited the strongest generalization effect both to non-trained stimuli and connected speech. No significant change was measured in motor-speech agility or mood measures, with neither treatment. The results emphasize the beneficial effect of both rhythm and pitch in the efficacy of original MIT on connected speech, an outcome of primary clinical importance in aphasia therapy.

  4. The Combination of Rhythm and Pitch Can Account for the Beneficial Effect of Melodic Intonation Therapy on Connected Speech Improvements in Broca's Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbansen, Anna; Peretz, Isabelle; Hébert, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) is a structured protocol for language rehabilitation in people with Broca's aphasia. The main particularity of MIT is the use of intoned speech, a technique in which the clinician stylizes the prosody of short sentences using simple pitch and rhythm patterns. In the original MIT protocol, patients must repeat diverse sentences in order to espouse this way of speaking, with the goal of improving their natural, connected speech. MIT has long been regarded as a promising treatment but its mechanisms are still debated. Recent work showed that rhythm plays a key role in variations of MIT, leading to consider the use of pitch as relatively unnecessary in MIT. Our study primarily aimed to assess the relative contribution of rhythm and pitch in MIT's generalization effect to non-trained stimuli and to connected speech. We compared a melodic therapy (with pitch and rhythm) to a rhythmic therapy (with rhythm only) and to a normally spoken therapy (without melodic elements). Three participants with chronic post-stroke Broca's aphasia underwent the treatments in hourly sessions, 3 days per week for 6 weeks, in a cross-over design. The informativeness of connected speech, speech accuracy of trained and non-trained sentences, motor-speech agility, and mood was assessed before and after the treatments. The results show that the three treatments improved speech accuracy in trained sentences, but that the combination of rhythm and pitch elicited the strongest generalization effect both to non-trained stimuli and connected speech. No significant change was measured in motor-speech agility or mood measures with either treatment. The results emphasize the beneficial effect of both rhythm and pitch in the efficacy of original MIT on connected speech, an outcome of primary clinical importance in aphasia therapy. PMID:25157222

  5. Right hemisphere grey matter structure and language outcomes in chronic left hemisphere stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shihui; Lacey, Elizabeth H; Skipper-Kallal, Laura M; Jiang, Xiong; Harris-Love, Michelle L; Zeng, Jinsheng; Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying recovery of language after left hemisphere stroke remain elusive. Although older evidence suggested that right hemisphere language homologues compensate for damage in left hemisphere language areas, the current prevailing theory suggests that right hemisphere engagement is ineffective or even maladaptive. Using a novel combination of support vector regression-based lesion-symptom mapping and voxel-based morphometry, we aimed to determine whether local grey matter volume in the right hemisphere independently contributes to aphasia outcomes after chronic left hemisphere stroke. Thirty-two left hemisphere stroke survivors with aphasia underwent language assessment with the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised and tests of other cognitive domains. High-resolution T1-weighted images were obtained in aphasia patients and 30 demographically matched healthy controls. Support vector regression-based multivariate lesion-symptom mapping was used to identify critical language areas in the left hemisphere and then to quantify each stroke survivor's lesion burden in these areas. After controlling for these direct effects of the stroke on language, voxel-based morphometry was then used to determine whether local grey matter volumes in the right hemisphere explained additional variance in language outcomes. In brain areas in which grey matter volumes related to language outcomes, we then compared grey matter volumes in patients and healthy controls to assess post-stroke plasticity. Lesion-symptom mapping showed that specific left hemisphere regions related to different language abilities. After controlling for lesion burden in these areas, lesion size, and demographic factors, grey matter volumes in parts of the right temporoparietal cortex positively related to spontaneous speech, naming, and repetition scores. Examining whether domain general cognitive functions might explain these relationships, partial correlations demonstrated that grey matter

  6. The language–gesture connection: Evidence from aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipper, Lucy; Pritchard, Madeleine; Morgan, Gary; Cocks, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A significant body of evidence from cross-linguistic and developmental studies converges to suggest that co-speech iconic gesture mirrors language. This paper aims to identify whether gesture reflects impaired spoken language in a similar way. Twenty-nine people with aphasia (PWA) and 29 neurologically healthy control participants (NHPs) produced a narrative discourse, retelling the story of a cartoon video. Gesture and language were analysed in terms of semantic content and structure for two key motion events. The aphasic data showed an influence on gesture from lexical choices but no corresponding clausal influence. Both the groups produced gesture that matched the semantics of the spoken language and gesture that did not, although there was one particular gesture–language mismatch (semantically “light” verbs paired with semantically richer gesture) that typified the PWA narratives. These results indicate that gesture is both closely related to spoken language impairment and compensatory. PMID:26169504

  7. Profiling Performance in L1 and L2 Observed in Greek-English Bilingual Aphasia Using the Bilingual Aphasia Test: A Case Study from Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambanaros, Maria; Grohmann, Kleanthes K.

    2011-01-01

    The Greek and the English versions of the Bilingual Aphasia Test (BAT) were used to assess the linguistic abilities of a premorbidly highly proficient late bilingual female after a haemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident involving the left temporo-parietal lobe. The BAT was administered in the two languages on separate occasions by the first author,…

  8. Grammatical Planning Units during Real-Time Sentence Production in Speakers with Agrammatic Aphasia and Healthy Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyeon; Yoshida, Masaya; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Grammatical encoding (GE) is impaired in agrammatic aphasia; however, the nature of such deficits remains unclear. We examined grammatical planning units during real-time sentence production in speakers with agrammatic aphasia and control speakers, testing two competing models of GE. We queried whether speakers with agrammatic aphasia…

  9. An Integrated Approach for Treating Discourse in Aphasia: Bridging the Gap between Language Impairment and Functional Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A primary goal of aphasia intervention is to improve everyday communication. Although a large body of research focuses on treatment generalization, transfer of learning to real-world interactions involving discourse does not always occur. The goal of an integrated discourse treatment for aphasia (IDTA) approach is to facilitate such…

  10. The effects of direct and indirect speech on discourse comprehension in Dutch listeners with and without aphasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewold, Rimke; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Nickels, Lyndsey; Wieling, Martijn; Huiskes, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Background: Research on language comprehension in aphasia has primarily focused on comprehension of isolated words and sentences. Even though previous studies have provided insights into comprehension abilities of individuals with aphasia at the word and grammatical level, our understanding of the n

  11. Improved Vocabulary Production after Naming Therapy in Aphasia: Can Gains in Picture Naming Generalise to Connected Speech?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Paul; Sage, Karen; Ralph, Matt Lambon

    2009-01-01

    Background: Naming accuracy for nouns and verbs in aphasia can vary across different elicitation contexts, for example, simple picture naming, composite picture description, narratives, and conversation. For some people with aphasia, naming may be more accurate to simple pictures as opposed to naming in spontaneous, connected speech; for others,…

  12. Influences of Electromagnetic Articulography Sensors on Speech Produced by Healthy Adults and Individuals with Aphasia and Apraxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, William F.; Bharadwaj, Sneha V.; Stettler, Monica P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether the intraoral transducers used in electromagnetic articulography (EMA) interfere with speech and whether there is an added risk of interference when EMA systems are used to study individuals with aphasia and apraxia. Method: Ten adult talkers (5 individuals with aphasia/apraxia, 5 controls) produced 12 American…

  13. Verifying the hypothesis of disconnection syndrome in patients with conduction aphasia using diffusion tensor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanqin Guo; Jing Xu; Yindong Yang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is thought in disconnection theory that connection of anterior and posterior language function areas, i.e. the lesion of arcuate fasciculus causes conduction aphasia.OBJECTIVE: To verify the theory of disconnection elicited by repetition disorder in patients with conduction aphasia by comparing the characteristics of diffusion tensor imaging between healthy persons and patients with conduction aphasia.DESIGN: Case-control observation.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Hongqi Hospital Affiliated to Mudanjiang Medical College.PARTICIPANTS: Five male patients with cerebral infarction-involved arcuate fasciculus conduction aphasia, averaged (43±2) years, who hospitalized in the Department of Neurology, Hongqi Hospital Affiliated to Mudanjiang Medical College from February 2004 to February 2005 were involved in this experiment. The involved patients were all confirmed as cerebral infarction by skull CT and MRI, and met the diagnosis criteria revised in 1995 4th Cerebrovascular Conference. They were examined by the method of Aphasia Battery of Chinese (ABC) edited by Surong Gao. The results were poorer than auditory comprehension disproportionately, and consistented with the mode of conduction aphasia. Another 5 male healthy persons, averaged (43 ± 1 ) years, who were physicians receiving further training in the Department of Neurology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital were also involved in this experiment. Informed consents of detected items were obtained from all the subjects.METHODS: All the subjects were performed handedness assessment with assessment criteria of handedness formulated by Department of Neurology, First Hospital Affiliated to Beijing Medical University. Arcuate fasciculus of involved patients and health controls were analyzed with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and divided into 3 parts (anterior, middle and posterior segments) for determining FA value (mean value was obtained after three times of measurements), and a comparison of FA value was

  14. Frontal dynamic aphasia in progressive supranuclear palsy: Distinguishing between generation and fluent sequencing of novel thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gail A; Spooner, Donna; Harrison, William J

    2015-10-01

    Frontal dynamic aphasia is characterised by a profound reduction in spontaneous speech despite well-preserved naming, repetition and comprehension. Since Luria (1966, 1970) designated this term, two main forms of dynamic aphasia have been identified: one, a language-specific selection deficit at the level of word/sentence generation, associated with left inferior frontal lesions; and two, a domain-general impairment in generating multiple responses or connected speech, associated with more extensive bilateral frontal and/or frontostriatal damage. Both forms of dynamic aphasia have been interpreted as arising due to disturbances in early prelinguistic conceptual preparation mechanisms that are critical for language production. We investigate language-specific and domain-general accounts of dynamic aphasia and address two issues: one, whether deficits in multiple conceptual preparation mechanisms can co-occur; and two, the contribution of broader cognitive processes such as energization, the ability to initiate and sustain response generation over time, to language generation failure. Thus, we report patient WAL who presented with frontal dynamic aphasia in the context of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). WAL was given a series of experimental tests that showed that his dynamic aphasia was not underpinned by a language-specific deficit in selection or in microplanning. By contrast, WAL presented with a domain-general deficit in fluent sequencing of novel thoughts. The latter replicated the pattern documented in a previous PSP patient (Robinson, et al., 2006); however, unique to WAL, generating novel thoughts was impaired but there was no evidence of a sequencing deficit because perseveration was absent. Thus, WAL is the first unequivocal case to show a distinction between novel thought generation and subsequent fluent sequencing. Moreover, WAL's generation deficit encompassed verbal and non-verbal responses, showing a similar (but more profoundly reduced) pattern

  15. Using others' words: conversational use of reported speech by individuals with aphasia and their communication partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengst, Julie A; Frame, Simone R; Neuman-Stritzel, Tiffany; Gannaway, Rachel

    2005-02-01

    Reported speech, wherein one quotes or paraphrases the speech of another, has been studied extensively as a set of linguistic and discourse practices. Researchers agree that reported speech is pervasive, found across languages, and used in diverse contexts. However, to date, there have been no studies of the use of reported speech among individuals with aphasia. Grounded in an interactional sociolinguistic perspective, the study presented here documents and analyzes the use of reported speech by 7 adults with mild to moderately severe aphasia and their routine communication partners. Each of the 7 pairs was videotaped in 4 everyday activities at home or around the community, yielding over 27 hr of conversational interaction for analysis. A coding scheme was developed that identified 5 types of explicitly marked reported speech: direct, indirect, projected, indexed, and undecided. Analysis of the data documented reported speech as a common discourse practice used successfully by the individuals with aphasia and their communication partners. All participants produced reported speech at least once, and across all observations the target pairs produced 400 reported speech episodes (RSEs), 149 by individuals with aphasia and 251 by their communication partners. For all participants, direct and indirect forms were the most prevalent (70% of RSEs). Situated discourse analysis of specific episodes of reported speech used by 3 of the pairs provides detailed portraits of the diverse interactional, referential, social, and discourse functions of reported speech and explores ways that the pairs used reported speech to successfully frame talk despite their ongoing management of aphasia. PMID:15934449

  16. Neural mechanisms underlying transcranial direct current stimulation in aphasia: A feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena eUlm

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the neural mechanisms by which transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS impacts on language processing in post-stroke aphasia. This was addressed in a proof-of-principle study that explored the effects of tDCS application in aphasia during simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. We employed a single subject, cross-over, sham-tDCS controlled design and the stimulation was administered to an individualized perilesional stimulation site that was identified by a baseline fMRI scan and a picture naming task. Peak activity during the baseline scan was located in the spared left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and this area was stimulated during a subsequent cross-over phase. tDCS was successfully administered to the target region and anodal- vs. sham-tDCS resulted in selectively increased activity at the stimulation site. Our results thus demonstrate that it is feasible to precisely target an individualized stimulation site in aphasia patients during simultaneous fMRI which allows assessing the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS application. The functional imaging results of this case report highlight one possible mechanism that may have contributed to beneficial behavioural stimulation effects in previous clinical tDCS trials in aphasia. In the future, this approach will allow identifying distinct patterns of stimulation effects on neural processing in larger cohorts of patients. This may ultimately yield information about the variability of tDCS-effects on brain functions in aphasia.

  17. Aphasia Rehabilitation Methods%失语症的康复训练方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢红云; 万勤; KIM Ha-kyung[韩国; 朱红; 刘巧云

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the therapies for aphasia, including speech therapy, functional communication therapy, cognitive neurorehabilitation, social psychotherapy and computer-aided therapy,and introduces the rehabilitation training methods for motor aphasia, sensory aphasia, complete aphasia and nominal aphasia in order to promote the speech rehabilitation of aphasic patients.%  本文概述了失语症康复的语言治疗、功能性交流治疗、认知神经康复治疗、社交心理治疗和计算机辅助治疗等技术,介绍了运动性失语症、感觉性失语症、完全性失语症及命名性失语症的康复训练方法,为促进失语症患者语言功能的恢复提供理论依据和实践指导。

  18. [sup 99m]Tc-ECD SPECT study in dementia and aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Otsuka, Makoto; Sasaki, Masayuki; Akashi, Yuko; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Masuda, Kouji; Ichimiya, Atsushi (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1993-09-01

    We studied clinical significance of [sup 99m]Tc-L,L,-ethyl cysteine dimer ([sup 99m]Tc-ECD) SPECT study in dementia and aphasia, and compared it with [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO SPECT study. The subjects consisted of 13 patients, including 10 patients with dementia and 3 patients with aphasia. Hypoperfusion areas were detected in 5 out of 10 patients with dementia and 2 out of 3 patients with aphasia in [sup 99m]Tc-ECD SPECT, and in 4 out of 10 patients with dementia and all of 3 patients with aphasia in [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO SPECT. The count rate ratios in [sup 99m]Tc-ECD and [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO SPECT were correlated well with each other, and the contrast of the [sup 99m]Tc-ECD SPECT image was equivalent or slightly higher as compared with [sup 99m]Tc-HMPAO. Therefore, [sup 99m]Tc-ECD SPECT study was considered to be useful for the evaluation of cerebral perfusion in dementia and aphasia. (author).

  19. Audiovisual Integration of Speech in a Patient with Broca’s Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Søren Andersen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lesions to Broca’s area cause aphasia characterised by a severe impairment of the ability to speak, with comparatively intact speech perception. However, some studies have found effects on speech perception under adverse listening conditions, indicating that Broca’s area is also involved in speech perception. While these studies have focused on auditory speech perception other studies have shown that Broca’s area is activated by visual speech perception. Furthermore, one preliminary report found that a patient with Broca’s aphasia did not experience the McGurk illusion suggesting that an intact Broca’s area is necessary for audiovisual integration of speech. Here we describe a patient with Broca’s aphasia who experienced the McGurk illusion. This indicates that an intact Broca’s area is not necessary for audiovisual integration of speech. The McGurk illusions this patient experienced were atypical, which could be due to Broca’s area having a more subtle role in audiovisual integration of speech. The McGurk illusions of a control subject with Wernicke’s aphasia were, however, also atypical. This indicates that the atypical McGurk illusions were due to deficits in speech processing that are not specific to Broca’s aphasia.

  20. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Perilesional Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Aphasia: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulm, Lena; McMahon, Katie; Copland, David; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Meinzer, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms by which transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) impacts on language processing in post-stroke aphasia. This was addressed in a proof-of-principle study that explored the effects of tDCS application in aphasia during simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We employed a single subject, cross-over, sham-tDCS controlled design, and the stimulation was administered to an individualized perilesional stimulation site that was identified by a baseline fMRI scan and a picture naming task. Peak activity during the baseline scan was located in the spared left inferior frontal gyrus and this area was stimulated during a subsequent cross-over phase. tDCS was successfully administered to the target region and anodal- vs. sham-tDCS resulted in selectively increased activity at the stimulation site. Our results thus demonstrate that it is feasible to precisely target an individualized stimulation site in aphasia patients during simultaneous fMRI, which allows assessing the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS application. The functional imaging results of this case report highlight one possible mechanism that may have contributed to beneficial behavioral stimulation effects in previous clinical tDCS trials in aphasia. In the future, this approach will allow identifying distinct patterns of stimulation effects on neural processing in larger cohorts of patients. This may ultimately yield information about the variability of tDCS effects on brain functions in aphasia. PMID:26500522

  1. 99mTc-ECD SPECT study in dementia and aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied clinical significance of 99mTc-L,L,-ethyl cysteine dimer (99mTc-ECD) SPECT study in dementia and aphasia, and compared it with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT study. The subjects consisted of 13 patients, including 10 patients with dementia and 3 patients with aphasia. Hypoperfusion areas were detected in 5 out of 10 patients with dementia and 2 out of 3 patients with aphasia in 99mTc-ECD SPECT, and in 4 out of 10 patients with dementia and all of 3 patients with aphasia in 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT. The count rate ratios in 99mTc-ECD and 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT were correlated well with each other, and the contrast of the 99mTc-ECD SPECT image was equivalent or slightly higher as compared with 99mTc-HMPAO. Therefore, 99mTc-ECD SPECT study was considered to be useful for the evaluation of cerebral perfusion in dementia and aphasia. (author)

  2. Research Progress of Melodic Intonation Therapy and Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Aphasia after Stroke (review)%旋律音调疗法与非侵入性脑刺激技术在卒中后失语中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米海霞; 张通; 刘丽旭

    2015-01-01

    卒中后语言功能恢复的神经机制仍不明确,目前认为左侧大面积脑损伤的失语患者语言功能恢复主要通过激活右侧半球的同源脑区进而改善言语功能。旋律音调疗法(MIT)可以通过旋律音调和左手拍击激活右侧半球的额颞叶脑区,特别适用于左侧大面积脑损伤的非流利性失语患者的语言康复。非侵入性脑刺激技术(NBS)通过刺激病灶侧或病灶对侧改变脑电活动,已被用于促进卒中后语言功能恢复。兴奋性经颅刺激作用于右侧半球同源性语言功能区联合MIT可一定程度上促进左侧大面积脑损伤的卒中后严重失语患者的语言恢复。未来可尝试将传统的言语治疗联合MIT及外部的经颅刺激(包括经颅直流电刺激及经颅磁刺激)促进语言相关功能区域的激活,从而更大限度地改善脑卒中患者言语功能。%The neuromechanism of language function recovery in patients with aphasia after stroke is still unclear. It is supported that the language function of aphasia after extensive damage of left hemisphere mainly recovered through activating the right hemisphere of ho-mologous regions to improve the function of speech. Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) can be achieved by melody tone and left hand clap to activate the right hemisphere of the frontal temporal lobe, which is particularly applicable to improve language function of non-fluent aphasia patients with large left hemisphere lesion. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques (NBS) changes brain activity through stimulat-ing affected or contralateral side, which has been used to facilitate language functional recovery after stroke. Excitatory transcranial stimula-tion on the right hemisphere homology combined with melodic intonation therapy can promote language recovery of patients with extensive damage of left hemisphere after stroke. It is valuable to combine traditional speech training with MIT and NBS to activate related

  3. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease with Mixed Transcortical Aphasia: Insights into Echolalia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. McPherson

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Aphasia is a common manifestation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD, and investigation of the linguistic disorders of CJD patients may provide insights into the neurobiological mechanisms of language and aphasia. We report an autopsy-confirmed case of CJD in which the presenting symptom was change in language abilities. The patient ultimately evidenced mixed transcortical aphasia (MTA with echolalia. Disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits with environmental dependency accounts for the symptoms in MTA, including intact repetition and echolalia. Observation in this patient and a review of the literature suggest that frontal-subcortical circuit dysfunction may contribute to the syndrome of echolalia. This hypothesis offers an alternative explanation to “isolation” of the speech area as the cause of MTA.

  4. 'It really makes good sense': the role of outcome evaluation in aphasia therapy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    of outcome evaluation by letting SLTs identify not only the actual demands for outcome evaluation, but also the role of outcome evaluation in aphasia therapy in the clinic. Methods & ProceduresTwelve SLTs participated in semi-structured interviews to identify the demands they met for outcome evaluation...... as well as the role the outcome evaluation had in their work with people with aphasia. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed by means of qualitative thematic analysis. Outcomes & ResultsSix themes corresponding with the aims of this study were identified. These show that the SLTs initially...... of insight and promotion of acceptance for the clients and significant others to planning the next step in therapy or in life with aphasia after therapy. In all of which the clients play a significant role, since their active participation is sought throughout the sessions. Conclusion & Implications...

  5. Variations in the presentation of aphasia in patients with closed head injuries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara Oliver

    2012-01-31

    Impairments of speech and language are important consequences of head injury as they compromise interaction between the patient and others. A large spectrum of communication deficits can occur. There are few reports in the literature of aphasia following closed head injury despite the common presentation of closed head injury. Herein we report two cases of closed head injuries with differing forms of aphasia. We discuss their management and rehabilitation and present a detailed literature review on the topic. In a busy acute surgical unit one can dismiss aphasia following head injury as behaviour related to intoxication. Early recognition with prolonged and intensive speech and language rehabilitation therapy yields a favourable outcome as highlighted in our experience. These may serve as a reference for clinicians faced with this unusual outcome.

  6. Aphasia in polyglots: report of two cases and analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronardi, L; Ferrante, L; Celli, P; Acqui, M; Fortuna, A

    1991-10-01

    Two cases of aphasia in polyglot patients who experienced different symptoms in each of the languages they knew are reported. The authors discuss the problem and analyze the available literature in an attempt to formulate a pathogenetic hypothesis of the different involvement of the known idioms sometimes observed in aphasic polyglots. In particular, when time has elapsed between the learning of the mother tongue and other languages, and all the known languages are, consequently, functionally independent, it is possible that the two or more known idioms have distinct anatomical representations, probably localized separately in the two hemispheres. This could explain why, in some polyglots, aphasia affects one of the known languages preferentially. In subjects in whom the different known idioms were learned during early childhood, the anatomical representation of the languages is similar, which explains why, in this kind of polyglot, all the known languages can be equally affected by cerebral damage that causes aphasia. PMID:1944849

  7. Bilingualism and memory: early 19th century ideas about the significance of polyglot aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Marjorie

    2007-07-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, there was very little attention given to bilingual speakers within the growing clinical literature on aphasia. The first major publication on this topic (Pitres, 1895), appeared three decades after Broca's seminal work. Previously, Ribot (1881) had discussed the phenomenon of bilingual aphasia in the context of diseases of memory. Although interest in the neurological basis of the language faculty was in fact present throughout the century, the theoretical implications of the knowledge of more than one language did not appear to be linked to this issue. A number of British authors writing in the first half of the 19th century have been identified who did consider the significance of these cases. Importantly, these writers speculated on the implication of bilingual aphasia specifically with regard to ideas about memory rather than language. Consideration of these writings helps to illuminate the history of ideas about the organization of language in the brain. PMID:17715800

  8. Variations in the Presentation of Aphasia in Patients with Closed Head Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Oliver Kavanagh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Impairments of speech and language are important consequences of head injury as they compromise interaction between the patient and others. A large spectrum of communication deficits can occur. There are few reports in the literature of aphasia following closed head injury despite the common presentation of closed head injury. Herein we report two cases of closed head injuries with differing forms of aphasia. We discuss their management and rehabilitation and present a detailed literature review on the topic. In a busy acute surgical unit one can dismiss aphasia following head injury as behaviour related to intoxication. Early recognition with prolonged and intensive speech and language rehabilitation therapy yields a favourable outcome as highlighted in our experience. These may serve as a reference for clinicians faced with this unusual outcome.

  9. Activity in preserved left hemisphere regions predicts anomia severity in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridriksson, Julius; Bonilha, Leonardo; Baker, Julie M; Moser, Dana; Rorden, Chris

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the neural mechanism that supports preserved language processing in aphasia has implications for both basic and applied science. This study examined brain activation associated with correct picture naming in 15 patients with aphasia. We contrasted each patient's activation to the activation observed in a neurologically healthy control group, allowing us to identify regions with unusual activity patterns. The results revealed that increased activation in preserved left hemisphere areas is associated with better naming performance in aphasia. This relationship was linear in nature; progressively less cortical activation was associated with greater severity of anomia. These findings are consistent with others who suggests that residual language function following stroke relies on preserved cortical areas in the left hemisphere.

  10. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  11. Aphasia or neglect after thalamic stroke: the various ways they may be related to cortical hypoperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani eSebastian

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although aphasia and hemispatial neglect are classically labeled as cortical deficits, language deficits or hemispatial neglect following lesions to subcortical regions have been reported in many studies. However, whether or not aphasia and hemispatial neglect can be caused by subcortical lesions alone has been a matter of controversy. It has been previously shown that most cases of aphasia or hemispatial neglect due to acute non-thalamic subcortical infarcts can be accounted for by concurrent cortical hypoperfusion due to arterial stenosis or occlusion, reversible by restoring blood flow to the cortex. In this study we evaluated whether aphasia or neglect occur after acute thalamic infarct without cortical hypoperfusion due to arterial stenosis or occlusion. Twenty patients with isolated acute thalamic infarcts (10 right and 10 left underwent MRI scanning and detailed cognitive testing. Results revealed that 5/10 patients with left thalamic infarcts had aphasia and only 1 had cortical hypoperfusion, whereas 2/10 patients with right thalamic infarcts had hemispatial neglect and both had cortical hypoperfusion. These findings indicate that aphasia was observed in some cases of isolated left thalamic infarcts without cortical hypoerfusion due to arterial stenosis or occlusion (measured with time to peak delays, but neglect occurred after isolated right thalamic infarcts only when there was cortical hypoperfusion due to arterial stenosis or occlusion. Therefore, neglect after acute right thalamic infarct should trigger evaluation for cortical hypoperfusion that might improve with restoration of blood flow. Further investigation in a larger group of patients and with other imaging modalities is warranted to confirm these findings.

  12. Aphasia or Neglect after Thalamic Stroke: The Various Ways They may be Related to Cortical Hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Rajani; Schein, Mara G; Davis, Cameron; Gomez, Yessenia; Newhart, Melissa; Oishi, Kenichi; Hillis, Argye E

    2014-01-01

    Although aphasia and hemispatial neglect are classically labeled as cortical deficits, language deficits or hemispatial neglect following lesions to subcortical regions have been reported in many studies. However, whether or not aphasia and hemispatial neglect can be caused by subcortical lesions alone has been a matter of controversy. It has been previously shown that most cases of aphasia or hemispatial neglect due to acute non-thalamic subcortical infarcts can be accounted for by concurrent cortical hypoperfusion due to arterial stenosis or occlusion, reversible by restoring blood flow to the cortex. In this study, we evaluated whether aphasia or neglect occur after acute thalamic infarct without cortical hypoperfusion due to arterial stenosis or occlusion. Twenty patients with isolated acute thalamic infarcts (10 right and 10 left) underwent MRI scanning and detailed cognitive testing. Results revealed that 5/10 patients with left thalamic infarcts had aphasia and only 1 had cortical hypoperfusion, whereas 2/10 patients with right thalamic infarcts had hemispatial neglect and both had cortical hypoperfusion. These findings indicate that aphasia was observed in some cases of isolated left thalamic infarcts without cortical hypoerfusion due to arterial stenosis or occlusion (measured with time-to-peak delays), but neglect occurred after isolated right thalamic infarcts only when there was cortical hypoperfusion due to arterial stenosis or occlusion. Therefore, neglect after acute right thalamic infarct should trigger evaluation for cortical hypoperfusion that might improve with restoration of blood flow. Further investigation in a larger group of patients and with other imaging modalities is warranted to confirm these findings.

  13. Cortical language activation in aphasia:a functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓俊; 张敏鸣; 商德胜; 汪启东; 罗本燕; 翁旭初

    2004-01-01

    Background Functional neuroimaging has been used in neurolinguistic research on normal subjects and on patients with brain damage. This study was designed to investigate the differences of the neural basis underlying language processing between normal subjects and aphasics.Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to map the language network in 6 normal subjects and 3 patients with aphasia who were in the stage of recovery from acute stroke. The participants performed a word generation task during multi-slice functional scanning for the measurement of signal change associated with regional neural activity induced by the task. Results In normal subjects, a distributed language network was activated. Activations were present in the frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital regions. In the patient group, however, no activation was detected in the left inferior frontal gyrus whether the patient had a lesion in the left frontal lobe or not. Two patients showed activations in some right hemisphere regions where no activation appeared in normal subjects. Conclusions fMRI with word generation task is feasible for evaluating language function in aphasic patients. Remote effect of focal lesion and functional redistribution or reorganisation can be found in aphasic patients.

  14. Effect of lexical and syllable frequency in anomic aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janeth Hernández Jaramillo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study compares the performance of two groups of participants with and without aphasia anomic in a lexical decision tasks (LDT and spelling, in relation to the effect of the variables of word frequency and syllable. Materials and methods: a prospective study with a 2x2x2 design, which administered the LDT, in which each she/he had to decide if it was a real Spanish word or not, pressing one of two keys. To the task of spelling, they had to spell orally each of words presented auditorily. Results: It was found that in the LTD, the experimental group made more errors in the high-frequency stimuli syllable while the control group had more errors in the low-frequency syllables. In terms of reaction times was evident that the experimental group took longer to solve the task than the control group. The spelling task performance showed no difference in groups or conditions (lexical frequency and syllable. Conclusions: similar than other researches in normalized population, the results of this study demonstrate the effect of lexical frequency facilitation and inhibition that generates high syllable frequency.

  15. Multimodal Communication Training in Aphasia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Mary; Van Dyke, Julie A

    2011-09-01

    Management of patients with aph asia often focuses on training nonverbal augmentative communication strategies; however, these strategies frequently do not generalize to natural situations. The limited success may be because training waS not sufficient to produce an integrated multimodal semantic representation. The purpose of this study was to examine whether simultaneous training of stimuli in both verbal and nonverbal modalities would solidify the links within the semantic network and improve switching among modalities as needed in conversation. Two individuals with severe aphasia participated in 6 to 8 hours of Multi moda I Communication Training (MeT), during which they conveyed a concept by verbalizing, gesturing, writing, and drawing. After practice with all modalities for a single concept, a new concept was introduced. Results showed that one participant increased conveyance of concepts on the functional communication task using a variety of modalities. Although some improvement was seen with the second participant, his overall performance remained poor, likely because of a greater impairment in semantic knowledge. After a brief period of semantic training, the second participant demonstrated additional gains. Thus, MeT may serve to increase switching among verbal and nonverbal modalities in individuals with intact semantic representations, thereby increasing the likelihood that individuals will use an alternative method to communicate. PMID:24558295

  16. Anomia in moderate aphasia: problems in accessing the lexical representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Dorze, G; Nespoulous, J L

    1989-10-01

    This study has two objectives: (1) to determine through the analysis of surface manifestations of anomia whether one or several anomic syndromes exist, (2) to identify the psycholinguistic process at fault in anomia with reference to M. F. Garrett's (1982, in A. Ellis (Ed.), Normality and pathology in cognitive functions, London/New York: Academic Press) language production model. Two naming tasks were administered to 24 moderate aphasics. Test A was a standard naming task, and test B was a similar task which included subtests designed to indicate which level of representation was affected whenever patients did not name the target word. The subtests required, respectively, the identification of (a) a conceptual property, (b) two semantic attributes, (c) the first and (d) last syllable of the target word, and (e) the target word itself. Descriptive statistics yielded three groups of subjects different in terms of surface anomic manifestations, yet unrelated to clinical type of aphasia. Moreover, no significant differences between groups emerged on the subtests. All groups showed a good performance on the conceptual and the semantic subtests, suggesting preservation of high-level cognitive and semantic processes. In contrast, subjects evidenced poorer performances in syllabic identification, indicating a disruption of lower level mechanisms which are assumed to retrieve and process formal lexical representations. Results support the view that aphasic anomia originates from a difficulty in accessing the formal lexical representation and not from a semantic problem.

  17. Audiovisual Integration of Speech in a Patient with Broca’s Aphasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias; Starrfelt, Randi

    2015-01-01

    perception. While these studies have focused on auditory speech perception other studies have shown that Broca's area is activated by visual speech perception. Furthermore, one preliminary report found that a patient with Broca's aphasia did not experience the McGurk illusion suggesting that an intact Broca......Lesions to Broca's area cause aphasia characterized by a severe impairment of the ability to speak, with comparatively intact speech perception. However, some studies have found effects on speech perception under adverse listening conditions, indicating that Broca's area is also involved in speech...

  18. The issue of communication and nursing care at the patient with aphasia at the neurology department

    OpenAIRE

    Lišková, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Communication is very importantfor providing high-quality nursing care.If the patient is unable to communicate there can occur a lot of misunderstandig in the nursing care process.The theoretical part is focussed on the issue of aphasia in general, on communication with the patient affected by aphasia and his or her family, on alternative means of communication and on saturation of needs connected with the speech disorder.The goal of the work was to find out what problems nurses providing aph...

  19. Audiovisual Integration of Speech in a Patient with Broca’s Aphasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias; Starrfelt, Randi

    2015-01-01

    's area is necessary for audiovisual integration of speech. Here we describe a patient with Broca's aphasia who experienced the McGurk illusion. This indicates that an intact Broca's area is not necessary for audiovisual integration of speech. The McGurk illusions this patient experienced were atypical......, which could be due to Broca's area having a more subtle role in audiovisual integration of speech. The McGurk illusions of a control subject with Wernicke's aphasia were, however, also atypical. This indicates that the atypical McGurk illusions were due to deficits in speech processing...

  20. Thresholds of visibility for masked lexical, non-lexical, and non-linguistic items in aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JoAnn P Silkes

    2015-04-01

    Data collected to date demonstrate a clear difference between individuals with and without aphasia in their ability to perceive masked real words, but there appears to be no difference between groups for non-words and non-linguistic stimuli, although a trend is seen for these groups. Given the high variability for the NW and NL conditions, these analyses may be underpowered; therefore, data collection is ongoing and a clearer picture should be available by the time of presentation. Regardless of the eventual outcome, this poster will discuss the theoretical motivation for the study, and will discuss the possible implications for understanding the nature of underlying deficits in aphasia.

  1. Case Studies Illustrating Focal Alzheimer's, Fluent Aphasia, Late-Onset Memory Loss, and Rapid Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camsari, Gamze Balci; Murray, Melissa E; Graff-Radford, Neill R

    2016-08-01

    Many dementia subtypes have more shared signs and symptoms than defining ones. We review 8 cases with 4 overlapping syndromes and demonstrate how to distinguish the cases. These include focal cortical presentations of Alzheimer's disease (AD; posterior cortical atrophy and corticobasal syndrome [CBS]), fluent aphasia (semantic dementia and logopenic aphasia), late-onset slowly progressive dementia (hippocampal sclerosis and limbic predominant AD) and rapidly progressive dementia (Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and limbic encephalitis). Recognizing the different syndromes can help the clinician to improve their diagnostic skills, leading to improved patient outcomes by early and accurate diagnosis, prompt treatment, and appropriate counseling and guidance. PMID:27445249

  2. Jean-Martin Charcot’s role in the 19th century study of music aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J K; Lorch, Marjorie P.; Nicolas, S.; Grazino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825–93) was a well-known French neurologist. Although he is widely recognized for his discovery of several neurological disorders and his research into aphasia, Charcot’s ideas about how the brain processes music are less well known. Charcot discussed the music abilities of several patients in the context of his ‘Friday Lessons’ on aphasia, which took place at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris in 1883–84. In his most comprehensive discussion about music, Charcot describe...

  3. The Definition and Assessment of Aphasia%失语症定义和失语症评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIM Ha-kyung[韩国; HWANG Young-jin[韩国; 刘巧云; 周谢玲

    2013-01-01

      根据美国失语症协会定义,失语症是一种因大脑损伤引起的获得性语言障碍,患者主要表现为口语表达、听觉理解和阅读、书写能力损失。失语症多数由脑卒中或脑外伤引起,有时也可由脑肿瘤、阿尔兹海默症等其他中枢性神经损伤引起,在言语语言治疗后会有一定程度的改善。本文主要介绍了失语症的定义和波士顿失语症诊断量表、西部失语症成套测验、明尼苏达失语症鉴别诊断测验、Porch交往能力指数测试4种标准化失语症评估量表。%Aphasia is an acquired disorder caused by brain damage. The principal symptom of aphasia is the impairment in oral expression, auditory comprehension, reading and writing skills. The most common cause of aphasia is stroke or brain damage, and some neurological disorders can also induce aphasia such as brain tumor and Alzheimer’s disease. The conditions of the patients are different, but most aphasic patients can benefit from the speech and language therapy. This article introduces the definition of aphasia and 4 standardized scales for the assessment of aphasia, including Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE),Western Aphasia Battery (WAB),Minnesota Test for the Differential Diagnosis of Aphasia (MTDDA),Porch Index of Communicative Ability (PICA).

  4. Verbal creativity in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teresa Q; Miller, Zachary A; Adhimoolam, Babu; Zackey, Diana D; Khan, Baber K; Ketelle, Robin; Rankin, Katherine P; Miller, Bruce L

    2015-02-01

    Emergence of visual and musical creativity in the setting of neurologic disease has been reported in patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), also called semantic dementia (SD). It is hypothesized that loss of left anterior frontotemporal function facilitates activity of the right posterior hemispheric structures, leading to de novo creativity observed in visual artistic representation. We describe creativity in the verbal domain, for the first time, in three patients with svPPA. Clinical presentations are carefully described in three svPPA patients exhibiting verbal creativity, including neuropsychology, neurologic exam, and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was performed to quantify brain atrophy patterns in these patients against age-matched healthy controls. All three patients displayed new-onset creative writing behavior and produced extensive original work during the course of disease. Patient A developed interest in wordplay and generated a large volume of poetry. Patient B became fascinated with rhyming and punning. Patient C wrote and published a lifestyle guidebook. An overlap of their structural MR scans showed uniform sparing in the lateral portions of the language-dominant temporal lobe (superior and middle gyri) and atrophy in the medial temporal cortex (amygdala, limbic cortex). New-onset creativity in svPPA may represent a paradoxical functional facilitation. A similar drive for production is found in visually artistic and verbally creative patients. Mirroring the imaging findings in visually artistic patients, verbal preoccupation and creativity may be associated with medial atrophy in the language-dominant temporal lobe, but sparing of lateral dominant temporal and non-dominant posterior cortices. PMID:24329034

  5. What can speech production errors tell us about cross-linguistic processing in bilingual aphasia? Evidence from four English/Afrikaans bilingual individuals with aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Kendall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study is contribute to clinical practice of bilinguals around the globe, as well as to add to our understanding of bilingual aphasia processing, by analysing confrontation naming data from four Afrikaans/English bilingual individuals with acquired aphasia due to a left hemisphere stroke.Methods: This is a case series analysis of four Afrikaans/English bilingual aphasic individuals following a left cerebrovascular accident. Error analysis of confrontation naming data in both languages was performed. Research questions were directed toward the between language differences in lexical retrieval abilities, types of errors produced and degree of cognate overlap.Results: Three of the four participants showed significantly higher naming accuracy in first acquired language (L1 relative to the second acquired language (L2 and the largest proportion of error type for those three participants in both L1 and L2 was omission. One of the four participants (linguistically balanced showed no between language accuracy difference. Regarding cognate overlap, there was a trend for higher accuracy for higher cognate words (compared to low.Discussion: This study showed that naming performance in these four individuals was reflective of their relative language proficiency and use patterns prior to their stroke. These findings are consistent with the hierarchical model, in normal bilingual speakers and with persons with bilingual aphasia.

  6. Stronger Accent Following a Stroke: The Case of a Trilingual with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Erika S.; Goral, Mira; De Diesbach, Catharine Castelluccio; Law, Franzo, II

    2011-01-01

    This study documents patterns of change in speech production in a multilingual with aphasia following a cerebrovascular accident (CVA). EC, a right-handed Hebrew-English-French trilingual man, had a left fronto-temporo-parietal CVA, after which he reported that his (native) Hebrew accent became stronger in his (second language) English. Recordings…

  7. BROCAS APHASIA - A SYNTACTIC AND/OR A MORPHOLOGICAL DISORDER - A CASE-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BASTIAANSE, R

    1995-01-01

    The patient described here suffers from Broca's aphasia without a comprehension disorder. She is unique, since she has two speech styles available and she shifts between them spontaneously. One style is characterized by a mild syntactic disorder and the other by a quite severe morphological and synt

  8. Perspectives on Public Awareness of Stroke and Aphasia among Turkish Patients in a Neurology Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavis, Ilknur

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies on awareness have drawn attention to the fact that aphasia is a little known disorder to the public, in spite of all the publicity about this frequently occurring neurogenic language disorder. Being a very new concept, studies of awareness are rare in Turkey. This survey study assessed the extent of public awareness of neurological…

  9. Legal Decision-Making by People with Aphasia: Critical Incidents for Speech Pathologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alison; Duffield, Gemma; Worrall, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Background: The assessment and management of a person with aphasia for whom decision-making capacity is queried represents a highly complex clinical issue. In addition, there are few published guidelines and even fewer published accounts of empirical research to assist. Aims: The research presented in this paper aimed to identify the main issues…

  10. The Linguistic Interpretation of Broca's Aphasia: A Reply to M.-L. Kean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, Herman H. J.

    1978-01-01

    Kean (EJ 165 107) presented a linguistic model to account for the features of the syndrome of Broca's aphasia, especially their agrammatism. This paper critiques Kean's paper by describing and evaluating her five major arguments. It is concluded that Kean's phonological model cannot account for agrammatism as well as syntactic models can.…

  11. The training of verb production in Broca's aphasia : A multiple-baseline across-behaviours study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaanse, R; Hurkmans, J; Links, P

    2006-01-01

    Background: Verb production is often impaired in Broca's aphasia: Action naming is more affected than object naming and in spontaneous speech the number and/or diversity of lexical verbs is low. Because verbs play a pivotal role in the sentence, these verb problems have a serious impact on the commu

  12. Treating Verbs in Aphasia: Exploring the Impact of Therapy at the Single Word and Sentence Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Janet; Whitworth, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Background: In recent years there has been significant interest in the differential processing of nouns and verbs in people with aphasia, but more limited consideration about whether the differences have implications for therapy. It remains unclear whether verbs can be treated in a similar way to nouns or should be treated using approaches that…

  13. Anatomic, Clinical, and Neuropsychological Correlates of Spelling Errors in Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, HyungSub; Hurley, Robert S.; Rogalski, Emily; Mesulam, M.-Marsel

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates spelling errors in the three subtypes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA): agrammatic (PPA-G), logopenic (PPA-L), and semantic (PPA-S). Forty-one PPA patients and 36 age-matched healthy controls were administered a test of spelling. The total number of errors and types of errors in spelling to dictation of regular words,…

  14. 卒中后失语的药物治疗%Drug treatment of poststroke aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许璇; 刘晓加

    2010-01-01

    Aphasia is one of the common neurological symptoms of stroke, which can seriously affect the social skills and self-care ability of patients, therefore it imposes a heavy burden on the family and society. In recent years, drug treatment of poststroke aphasia has received extensive attention. Some drugs that can affect monoamine, cholinergic and amino acid neurotransmitters have demonstrated a certain efficacy of poststroke aphasia. This article reviews the recent progress in research on drug treatment of poststroke aphasia.%失语是卒中的常见神经系统症状之一,严重影响了患者的社交能力和生活自理能力,给家庭和社会带来很大负担.近年来,卒中后失语的药物治疗方法 受到广泛关注,一些影响单胺类、胆碱能类和氨基酸类神经递质的药物对卒中后失语症显示出一定的疗效.文章就卒中后失语症的药物治疗研究进展进行了综述.

  15. 卒中后失语的药物治疗%Pharmacotherapy of poststroke aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付英子; 伞勇智; 李峰

    2012-01-01

    Poststroke aphasia is an acquired language disorder caused by stroke.It seriously affects the social ability in patients and reduces their quality of life.It might be an unbearable burden on the family and on society.However,the traditional treatment of aphasia has no positive effect.Therefore,pharmacotherapy of aphasia has received much attention.This article reviews the recent progress in researches on pharmacotherapy of poststroke aphasia.%卒中后失语是由卒中导致的获得性语言障碍,严重影响患者的社交能力并降低其生活质量,给社会和家庭都带来很大负担.传统的治疗方法没有肯定的疗效,因此失语的药物治疗备受关注.文章就卒中后失语的药物治疗研究进展进行了综述.

  16. The Effect of a Therapy Dog on the Communication Skills of an Adult with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFrance, Caroline; Garcia, Linda J.; Labreche, Julianne

    2007-01-01

    Little evidence-based research has been published within the field of communication disorders on the role of dogs as catalysts for human communication. This single participant study, a point of entry into this realm of research, explores the effects of a therapy dog on the communication skills of a patient with aphasia receiving intensive speech…

  17. Practitioners' Perspectives on Quality of Life in Aphasia Rehabilitation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruice, Madeleine; Isaksen, Jytte; Jensen, Lise Randrup;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study reports on Danish speech and language therapists' knowledge and understanding of quality of life (QoL) in aphasia, including therapists' views on education and training in relation to preparedness for working on QoL, use of measures, and barriers to applying QoL in practice...

  18. Intentional and Reactive Inhibition during Spoken-Word Stroop Task Performance in People with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompon, Rebecca Hunting; McNeil, Malcolm R.; Spencer, Kristie A.; Kendall, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The integrity of selective attention in people with aphasia (PWA) is currently unknown. Selective attention is essential for everyday communication, and inhibition is an important part of selective attention. This study explored components of inhibition--both intentional and reactive inhibition--during spoken-word production in PWA and in…

  19. Visuomotor Tracking Abilities of Speakers with Apraxia of Speech or Conduction Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Donald A.; Jacks, Adam; Hageman, Carlin; Clark, Heather M.; Woodworth, George

    2008-01-01

    This investigation examined the visuomotor tracking abilities of persons with apraxia of speech (AOS) or conduction aphasia (CA). In addition, tracking performance was correlated with perceptual judgments of speech accuracy. Five individuals with AOS and four with CA served as participants, as well as an equal number of healthy controls matched by…

  20. The Effects of Modified Melodic Intonation Therapy on Nonfluent Aphasia: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklyn, Dwyer; Novak, Eric; Boissy, Adrienne; Bethoux, Francois; Chemali, Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Positive results have been reported with melodic intonation therapy (MIT) in nonfluent aphasia patients with damage to their left-brain speech processes, using the patient's intact ability to sing to promote functional language. This pilot study sought to determine the immediate effects of introducing modified melodic intonation therapy…

  1. Psychosocial well-being in persons with aphasia participating in a nursing intervention after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronken, Berit Arnesveen; Kirkevold, Marit; Martinsen, Randi; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Kvigne, Kari

    2012-01-01

    The psychosocial adjustment process after stroke is complicated and protracted. The language is the most important tool for making sense of experiences and for human interplay, making persons with aphasia especially prone to psychosocial problems. Persons with aphasia are systematically excluded from research projects due to methodological challenges. This study explored how seven persons with aphasia experienced participating in a complex nursing intervention aimed at supporting the psychosocial adjustment process and promoting psychosocial well-being. The intervention was organized as an individual, dialogue-based collaboration process based upon ideas from "Guided self-determination." The content addressed psychosocial issues as mood, social relationships, meaningful activities, identity, and body changes. Principles from "Supported conversation for adults with aphasia" were used to facilitate the conversations. The data were obtained by participant observation during the intervention, qualitative interviews 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after the intervention and by standardized clinical instruments prior to the intervention and at 2 weeks and 12 months after the intervention. Assistance in narrating about themselves and their experiences with illness, psychological support and motivation to move on during the difficult adjustment process, and exchange of knowledge and information were experienced as beneficial and important by the participants in this study. PMID:22888417

  2. Adapting the Bilingual Aphasia Test to Rarotongan (Cook Islands Maori): Linguistic and Clinical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberber, Amanda Miller

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the adaptation of the Bilingual Aphasia Test (BAT) to the Rarotongan dialect of Cook Islands Maori, a Polynesian language spoken in the Cook Islands and expatriate communities. A brief linguistic sketch of Rarotongan is presented. As Rarotongan is characterised by a complex pronominal system, "a" versus "o" possession and…

  3. Neuroimaging in aphasia treatment research : Standards for establishing the effects of treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiran, Swathi; Ansaldo, Ana; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Cherney, Leora R.; Howard, David; Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen; Meinzer, Marcus; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to discuss experimental design options available for establishing the effects of treatment in studies that aim to examine the neural mechanisms associated with treatment-induced language recovery in aphasia, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We present bot

  4. Treatment Fidelity: Its Importance and Reported Frequency in Aphasia Treatment Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckley, Jacqueline J.; Douglas, Natalie F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment fidelity is a measure of the reliability of the administration of an intervention in a treatment study. It is an important aspect of the validity of a research study, and it has implications for the ultimate implementation of evidence-supported interventions in typical clinical settings. Method: Aphasia treatment studies…

  5. Should Pantomime and Gesticulation Be Assessed Separately for Their Comprehensibility in Aphasia? A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nispen, Karin; van de Sandt-Koenderman, Mieke; Mol, Lisette; Krahmer, Emiel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gesticulation (gestures accompanying speech) and pantomime (gestures in the absence of speech) can each be comprehensible. Little is known about the differences between these two gesture modes in people with aphasia. Aims: To discover whether there are differences in the communicative use of gesticulation and pantomime in QH, a person…

  6. Semantic Interference during Object Naming in Agrammatic and Logopenic Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cynthia K.; Cho, Soojin; Price, Charis; Wieneke, Christina; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Rogalski, Emily; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, M-Marsel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the time course of object naming in 21 individuals with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) (8 agrammatic (PPA-G); 13 logopenic (PPA-L)) and healthy age-matched speakers (n=17) using a semantic interference paradigm with related and unrelated interfering stimuli presented at stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) of -1000, -500, -100…

  7. Where language meets meaningful action: a combined behavior and lesion analysis of aphasia and apraxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Peter H; Ubben, Simon D; Kaesberg, Stephanie; Kalbe, Elke; Kessler, Josef; Liebig, Thomas; Fink, Gereon R

    2016-01-01

    It is debated how language and praxis are co-represented in the left hemisphere (LH). As voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping in LH stroke patients with aphasia and/or apraxia may contribute to this debate, we here investigated the relationship between language and praxis deficits at the behavioral and lesion levels in 50 sub-acute stroke patients. We hypothesized that language and (meaningful) action are linked via semantic processing in Broca's region. Behaviorally, half of the patients suffered from co-morbid aphasia and apraxia. While 24% (n = 12) of all patients exhibited aphasia without apraxia, apraxia without aphasia was rare (n = 2, 4%). Left inferior frontal, insular, inferior parietal, and superior temporal lesions were specifically associated with deficits in naming, reading, writing, or auditory comprehension. In contrast, lesions affecting the left inferior frontal gyrus, premotor cortex, and the central region as well as the inferior parietal lobe were associated with apraxic deficits (i.e., pantomime, imitation of meaningful and meaningless gestures). Thus, contrary to the predictions of the embodied cognition theory, lesions to sensorimotor and premotor areas were associated with the severity of praxis but not language deficits. Lesions of Brodmann area (BA) 44 led to combined apraxic and aphasic deficits. Data suggest that BA 44 acts as an interface between language and (meaningful) action thereby supporting parcellation schemes (based on connectivity and receptor mapping) which revealed a BA 44 sub-area involved in semantic processing.

  8. The Time Course of Neurolinguistic and Neuropsychological Symptoms in Three Cases of Logopenic Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, Louise; Seidel, Barbara; Grande, Marion; Schulte, Stephanie; Pieperhoff, Peter; Sudmeyer, Martin; Minnerop, Martina; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Huber, Walter; Grodzinsky, Yosef; Amunts, Katrin; Heim, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a rare clinical dementia syndrome affecting predominantly language abilities. Word-finding difficulties and comprehension deficits despite relatively preserved cognitive functions are characteristic symptoms during the first two years, and distinguish PPA from other dementia types like Alzheimer's disease.…

  9. A Comparison of Two Theoretically Driven Treatments for Verb Inflection Deficits in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen

    2008-01-01

    Errors in the production of verb inflections, especially tense inflections, are pervasive in agrammatic Broca's aphasia ("*The boy eat"). The neurolinguistic underpinnings of these errors are debated. One group of theories attributes verb inflection errors to disruptions in encoding the verb's morphophonological form, resulting from either a…

  10. Sentence production with verbs of alternating transitivity in agrammatic Broca's aphasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaanse, Y.R.M.; van Zonneveld, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Bastiaanse, Koekkoek And Van Zonneveld (2003) hypothesized that individuals with Broca's aphasia have problems with sentences in which the verb and its arguments are not in their base position. The present study is meant to test this hypothesis with the help of verbs with alternating transitivity: t

  11. Chronic Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections that cause chronic diarrhea be prevented? Chronic Diarrhea What is chronic diarrhea? Diarrhea that lasts for more than 2-4 ... represent a life-threatening illness. What causes chronic diarrhea? Chronic diarrhea has many different causes; these causes ...

  12. An intelligent system based on fuzzy probabilities for medical diagnosis – a study in aphasia diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Moshtagh Khorasani

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Aphasia diagnosis is particularly challenging due to the linguistic uncertainty and vagueness, inconsistencies in the definition of aphasic syndromes, large number of measurements with  mprecision, natural diversity and subjectivity in test objects as well as in opinions of experts who diagnose the disease.
    • METHODS: Fuzzy probability is proposed here as the basic framework for handling the uncertainties in medical diagnosis and particularly aphasia diagnosis. To efficiently construct this fuzzy probabilistic mapping, statistical analysis is performed that constructs input membership functions as well as determines an effective set of input features.
    • RESULTS: Considering the high sensitivity of performance measures to different distribution of testing/training sets, a statistical t-test of significance is applied to compare fuzzy approach results with NN  esults as well as author’s earlier work using fuzzy logic. The proposed fuzzy probability estimator approach clearly provides better diagnosis for both classes of data sets. Specifically, for the first and second type of fuzzy probability classifiers, i.e. spontaneous speech and comprehensive model, P-values are 2.24E-08 and 0.0059, espectively, strongly rejecting the null hypothesis.
    • CONCLUSIONS: The technique is applied and compared on both comprehensive and spontaneous speech test data for diagnosis of four Aphasia types: Anomic, Broca, Global and Wernicke. Statistical analysis confirms that the proposed approach can significantly improve accuracy using fewer Aphasia features.
    • KEYWORDS: Aphasia, fuzzy probability, fuzzy logic, medical diagnosis, fuzzy rules.

  13. Activation of syntax in lexical production in healthy speakers and in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Ruth; Anderson, Elizabeth; Best, Wendy; Gregory, Emma

    2014-08-01

    Theories of spoken word production agree that semantic and phonological representations are activated in spoken word production. There is less agreement concerning the role of syntax. In this study we investigated noun syntax activation in English bare noun naming, using mass and count nouns. Fourteen healthy controls and 13 speakers with aphasia took part. Participants named mass and count nouns, and completed a related noun syntax judgement task. We analysed speakers' noun syntax knowledge when naming accurately, and when making errors in production. Healthy speakers' noun syntax judgement was accurate for words they named correctly, but this did not correlate with naming accuracy. Speakers with aphasia varied in their noun syntax judgement, and this also did not correlate with naming accuracy. Healthy speakers' syntax for semantic errors was less accurate, as was that for speakers with aphasia. For phonological errors half the participants with aphasia could access syntax, half could not, indicating two types of phonological error. Individual differences were found in no responses. Finally, we found no effect of frequency for any of the above. The lack of a relationship between syntax and naming accuracy suggests that syntax is available, but access is not obligatory. This finding supports theories incorporating non-obligatory syntactic processing, which is independent of phonological access. The semantic error data are best explained within such a theory where there is damage to phonological access and hence to independent syntax. For the aphasia group we identify two types of phonological error, one implicating syntax and phonology, and one implicating phonology only, again supporting independent access to these systems. Overall the data support a model within which syntax is independent of phonology, and activation of syntax operates flexibly dependent on task demands and integrity of other processing routines.

  14. The Main Concept Analysis in Cantonese Aphasic Oral Discourse: External Validation and Monitoring Chronic Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Anthony Pak-Hin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The 1st aim of this study was to further establish the external validity of the main concept (MC) analysis by examining its relationship with the Cantonese Linguistic Communication Measure (CLCM; Kong, 2006; Kong & Law, 2004)--an established quantitative system for narrative production--and the Cantonese version of the Western Aphasia…

  15. Development and Evaluation of a New Tablet Computer Application for the Therapy of Brain-Injured Patients with Aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Januth, Silvan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Language is the most important mean of communication and plays a central role in our everyday life. Brain damage (e.g. stroke) can lead to acquired disorders of lan- guage affecting the four linguistic modalities (i.e. reading, writing, speech production and comprehension) in different combinations and levels of severity. Every year, more than 5000 people (Aphasie Suisse) are affected by aphasia in Switzerland alone. Since aphasia is highly individual, the level of difficulty ...

  16. Functional connectivity in post-stroke aphasia: innovative tools at the service of evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Durand

    2014-05-01

    This study presents an innovative approach to clinical management in post-stroke aphasia. Specifically, the evidence shows that specific anomia therapy for verbs normalizes DMN integration, thus reflecting the large scope impact of speech therapy. Also, the correlation between DMN integration values and reactivity to SFA/V shows that DMN status before therapy can be predictive of response to specific therapy. Altogether, these results show that functional integration measures of the DMN can highlight prognosis and therapy efficiency in aphasia rehabilitation.

  17. Research Progress in Aphasia after Stroke Based on Collateral Disease Theory%从络病论卒中后失语研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏裕盛; 陈立典

    2014-01-01

    卒中后失语属于络病范畴,本文从卒中后失语症发病机制研究络病理论治疗卒中后失语的临床进展,为临床治疗卒中后失语提供参考。%Aphasia after stroke belongs to the category of collateral disease, this article studies the research progress in collateral disease theory treat-ing aphasia after stroke according to the pathogenesis of aphasia after stroke, to provide the reference for clinical therapy on aphasia after stroke.

  18. Relationship between linguistic functions and cognitive functions in a clinical study of Chinese patients with post-stroke aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zeng-zhi; JIANG Shu-jun; BI Sheng; LI Jun; LEI Di; SUN Li-ling

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been a long debate among scholars surrounding the relationship between language and cognition.The worldwide study of aphasia is actively exploring the function of language from cognitive point of view.This study aimed to investigate the relationship between linguistic functions and cognitive functions in a clinical study of Chinese patients with post-stroke aphasia.Methods Cognitive functions of 63 Chinese patients with aphasia following a stroke were assessed with the Chinese version of the second edition of Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) battery and their linguistic functions were tested with the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) Scale,respectively.The correlation between the results observed on the LOTCA battery and those on the WAB was analyzed.Aphasia quotient,performance quotient,cortical quotient,and linguistic function of the patients were compared.Then,each language function was analyzed by way of dependent adopt multiple regression analysis.Results The total score of 63 patients as shown on the LOTCA battery was significantly correlated with the aphasia quotient,performance quotient,and cortical quotient observed on the WAB Scale (P <0.05,P <0.01).However,the correlation between visuomotor organization under LOTCA and repeat under WAB was not significant (P >0.05).The attention of LOTCA and WAB's spontaneous speech,repeat,naming,and aphasia quotient was not relevant either (P>0.05).In addition,correlations between the results observed on the LOTCA battery and the WAB were significant (P<0.05,P <0.01).Among the significant variables finally entered into the standardized canonical discriminant functions,main factors affected the aphasia.Multiple regression analysis showed that orientation,spatial perception,and visual perception had a notable influence on aphasia quotient and naming.Orientation and thinking operation was found to have a notable influence on spontaneous speech.Spatial perception and

  19. When semantics aids phonology: A processing advantage for iconic word forms in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteyard, Lotte; Stoppard, Emily; Snudden, Dee; Cappa, Stefano F; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2015-09-01

    Iconicity is the non-arbitrary relation between properties of a phonological form and semantic content (e.g. "moo", "splash"). It is a common feature of both spoken and signed languages, and recent evidence shows that iconic forms confer an advantage during word learning. We explored whether iconic forms conferred a processing advantage for 13 individuals with aphasia following left-hemisphere stroke. Iconic and control words were compared in four different tasks: repetition, reading aloud, auditory lexical decision and visual lexical decision. An advantage for iconic words was seen for some individuals in all tasks, with consistent group effects emerging in reading aloud and auditory lexical decision. Both these tasks rely on mapping between semantics and phonology. We conclude that iconicity aids spoken word processing for individuals with aphasia. This advantage is due to a stronger connection between semantic information and phonological forms. PMID:25637775

  20. Usefulness of MRI and SPECT studies in evaluating the lesion of aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Arai, Hisayuki; Hatano, Nobuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko; Katsunuma, Hideyo (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    Since the introduction of CT scanning, correlations between neuropsychological findings and anatomical lesions have been studied. Anatomical studies by CT scans may, however, be misleading in delineating the extent of lesions in aphasia. We have carried out MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and SPECT (single photon emission CT) examinations in 15 aphasic patients with cerebrovascular disease and discussed the usefulness of these studies. Compared to CT scan, MRI or SPECT studies were considered to be very useful in 8 of 15 patients. The useful points of these studies were: (1) easy detection of lesions with undetectable damages on CT, (2) demonstration of functional abnormalities in areas adjacent or distant from cerebrovascular lesions, and (3) precise definition of topographical abnormalities because of the three-dimensional imaging capability of MRI. As MRI or SPECT may define the actual extent of lesions and show areas of functional abnormality, these studies are useful and necessary in the assessment of lesions causing aphasia. (author).

  1. Neural activity associated with semantic versus phonological anomia treatments in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hees, Sophia; McMahon, Katie; Angwin, Anthony; de Zubicaray, Greig; Copland, David A

    2014-02-01

    Naming impairments in aphasia are typically targeted using semantic and/or phonologically based tasks. However, it is not known whether these treatments have different neural mechanisms. Eight participants with aphasia received twelve treatment sessions using an alternating treatment design, with fMRI scans pre- and post-treatment. Half the sessions employed Phonological Components Analysis (PCA), and half the sessions employed Semantic Feature Analysis (SFA). Pre-treatment activity in the left caudate correlated with greater immediate treatment success for items treated with SFA, whereas recruitment of the left supramarginal gyrus and right precuneus post-treatment correlated with greater immediate treatment success for items treated with PCA. The results support previous studies that have found greater treatment outcome to be associated with activity in predominantly left hemisphere regions, and suggest that different mechanisms may be engaged dependent on the type of treatment employed.

  2. When semantics aids phonology: A processing advantage for iconic word forms in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteyard, Lotte; Stoppard, Emily; Snudden, Dee; Cappa, Stefano F; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2015-09-01

    Iconicity is the non-arbitrary relation between properties of a phonological form and semantic content (e.g. "moo", "splash"). It is a common feature of both spoken and signed languages, and recent evidence shows that iconic forms confer an advantage during word learning. We explored whether iconic forms conferred a processing advantage for 13 individuals with aphasia following left-hemisphere stroke. Iconic and control words were compared in four different tasks: repetition, reading aloud, auditory lexical decision and visual lexical decision. An advantage for iconic words was seen for some individuals in all tasks, with consistent group effects emerging in reading aloud and auditory lexical decision. Both these tasks rely on mapping between semantics and phonology. We conclude that iconicity aids spoken word processing for individuals with aphasia. This advantage is due to a stronger connection between semantic information and phonological forms.

  3. 急性脑梗死后失语症的MRI影像学研究%Analysis of MRI Manifestation with Aphasia after Acute Cerebral Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛巍; 王敏; 朱文荣; 樊红彬; 耿德勤

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To reveal the relationship between aphasia and infarct lesion defined by MRI through analysis of 68 patients with aphasia performance after acute cerebral infarction. Methods: The potential patients were evaluated by the hand evaluation standard of Aphasia Battery of Chinese. Chinese Aphasia Examination was applied to classify the type of aphasia. The lesion site and volume of cerebral infarction in patients were determined by MRI. Results: All 68 cases of aphasia patients were right-handed. There were 18 global aphasia(GA) cases, 25 broca aphasia(BA) cases, 7 wernicke aphasia(WA) cases, 7 conduction aphasia cases, 7 transcortical motor aphasia(TCM) cases and 4 anomic aphasia(AA) cases. There were 32 cases with the classic language center and 36 cases with non-language center. Conclusion: The aphasia types were not agreed with the traditional aphasia anatomical localization, and the non-language center may also cause aphasia.%目的:应用MRI检查确定急性脑梗死后失语症类型与脑梗死部位之间的关系.方法:对68例急性脑梗死后具有失语症表现患者应用汉语失语成套测验中的利手评定标准进行利手判定和汉语失语症检查进行失语症的分类,用头颅MRI确定患者的脑梗死部位及病灶体积.结果:68例急性脑梗死失语症患者均为右利手,失语症类型分别为完全性失语18例,运动性失语25例,感觉性失语7例,传导性失语7例,经皮质运动性失语7例,命名性失语4例.累及经典语言中枢的有32例,36例为非语言中枢受累.结论:急性脑梗死失语症类型与传统的失语症解剖定位不完全符合,非语言中枢梗死也可引起失语症.

  4. 脑梗死后失语症类型与病变部位的关系%Relationship between the site of cerebral infarction induce-aphasia and aphasia types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨印东

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The location of cerebral infarction determines the onset and type of aphasia, but this relationship may fail to explain some clinical findings in these patients. The exact relationship between the type of aphasia and the locations remains to be fully unclear.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the location of cerebral infarction and the type of aphasia.DESIGN: Case-controlled study.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Hongqi Hospital Affiliated to Mudanjiang Medical University.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 98 patients admitted in the Department of Neurology, Hongqi Hospital Affiliated to Mudanjiang Medical University for aphasia secondly stroke between August 2003 and June 2004 were enrolled in this study, including 63 male and 35 female patients with the mean age of (68±4.56) years and disease course varying from 2-4 weeks.METHODS: Handedness evaluation was performed using the subtest of handedness in the Chinese aphasia test battery designed by the Department of Neurology, First Hospital of Beijing Medical University. Aphasia was classified on the basis of Western Aphasia Battery and evaluated for severity according to the grading criteria of Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination. The patients received also CT and MRI examinations.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Aphasia type and lesion site in pa-tients with cerebral infarction.RESULTS: Analysis was made according to the real data, all 98 cases entered into the result analysis. All the 98 aphasic patients were right-handed,with 21 patients having Broca's aphasia, 15 Wernicke's aphasia, 2 conduction aphasia, 8 transcortical motor aphasia, 7 transcortical sensory aphasia,12 transcortical mixed aphasia, 23 complete aphasia and 10 anomic aphasia. The lesion involved the classic language function area in 56 cases, and did not affect the language functional area in 38 cases. According to the grading criteria of Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination, 28 patients were in grade 0, 30 in grade 1, 14 in grade 2, 16

  5. When semantics aids phonology: a processing advantage for iconic word forms in aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Meteyard, Lotte; Stoppard, Emily; Snudden, Dee; Cappa, Stefano F.; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Iconicity is the non-arbitrary relation between properties of a phonological form and semantic content (e.g. “moo”, “splash”). It is a common feature of both spoken and signed languages, and recent evidence shows that iconic forms confer an advantage during word learning. We explored whether iconic forms conferred a processing advantage for 13 individuals with aphasia following left-hemisphere stroke. Iconic and control words were compared in four different tasks: repetition, reading aloud, a...

  6. Rapid improvement in verbal fluency and aphasia following perispinal etanercept in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gross Hyman; Tobinick Edward L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent clinical studies point to rapid and sustained clinical, cognitive, and behavioral improvement in both Alzheimer's disease and primary progressive aphasia following weekly perispinal administration of etanercept, a TNF-alpha inhibitor that acts by blocking the binding of this cytokine to its receptors. This outcome is concordant with recent basic science studies suggesting that TNF-alpha functions in vivo as a gliotransmitter that regulates synaptic function in the b...

  7. Does Handedness Affect the Cerebral Organization of Speech and Language in Individuals with Aphasia?

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Baldo; Dronkers, Nina F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The relationship between handedness and cerebral organization has been a longstanding area of inquiry in the aphasia literature and has been studied in both neurologic patients and healthy individuals (Binder et al., 1996; Goodglass & Quadfasel, 1954; Knecht et al., 2000; Pujol et al., 1999). In the current study, we had the opportunity to use voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) to identify the neural correlates of specific aspects of speech and language, comparing righ...

  8. Slowly progressive aphasia: three cases with language, memory, CT and PET data.

    OpenAIRE

    Kempler, D; Metter, E.J.; Riege, W H; Jackson, C. A.; Benson, D F; Hanson, W R

    1990-01-01

    Three cases of slowly progressive speech and language disturbance were studied at various points post onset (three, five and 15 years respectively). Language, neuropsychological and brain imaging (computer tomography and positron emission tomography) evaluations were completed on all three patients. The data suggest that the syndrome of "progressive aphasia": 1) does not involve a uniform symptom complex; 2) does not necessarily develop into a full blown dementia syndrome; 3) varies greatly i...

  9. Anatomic, clinical, and neuropsychological correlates of spelling errors in Primary Progressive Aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, HyungSub; Hurley, Robert S.; Rogalski, Emily; Mesulam, M.-Marsel

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates spelling errors in the three subtypes of primary progressive aphasia (PPA): agrammatic (PPA-G), logopenic (PPA-L), and semantic (PPA-S). Forty one PPA-patients and 36 age-matched healthy controls were administered a test of spelling. The total number of errors and types of errors in spelling to dictation of regular words, exception words and nonwords, were recorded. Error types were classified based on phonetic plausibility. In the first analysis, scores were evaluated by...

  10. Examining language functions: a reassessment of Bastian's contribution to aphasia assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Marjorie P

    2013-08-01

    Henry Charlton Bastian (1837-1915) developed his network model of language processing, modality deficits and correlated lesion localizations in the 1860s and was a leading clinical authority for over four decades. Although his ideas are little referenced today, having been overshadowed by his more eminent Queen Square colleague John Hughlings Jackson, his work on aphasia and paralysis was highly regarded by contemporaries. This paper traces Bastian's lasting but largely unattributed contribution to the development of standardized clinical assessment of language disorders. From 1867 onwards, Bastian trained generations of medical students in neurology. In his 1875 book On Paralysis there is evidence in his case descriptions that Bastian had already implemented a detailed set of procedures for examining aphasic patients. In 1886, Bastian published a 'Schema for the Examination of Aphasic and Amnesic Persons'. Bastian insisted on the utility of this battery for diagnosis, classification and lesion localization; he argued that its consistent use would allow the development of a patient corpus and the comparison of cases from other hospitals. In 1898 his Treatise on Aphasia included a list of 34 questions that were to be used to examine all patients to provide detailed and systematic evidence of spared and impaired abilities in all receptive and expressive modalities. Bastian's contribution to the development of standardized clinical aphasia assessment is reassessed through detailed analysis of his publications and those of his contemporaries as well as new material from archives and casebooks. This evidence demonstrates that his approach to diagnosis of language and other cognitive impairments has propagated through the decades. His legacy can be seen in the approach to standardized aphasia testing developed in the latter 20th century through to today.

  11. Aphasia and Auditory Processing after Stroke through an International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Suzanne C; Wanigasekara, Iruni; Cañete, Oscar M; Moore, Celia; McCann, Clare M

    2016-08-01

    Aphasia is an acquired language impairment affecting speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Aphasia occurs in about a third of patients who have ischemic stroke and significantly affects functional recovery and return to work. Stroke is more common in older individuals but also occurs in young adults and children. Because people experiencing a stroke are typically aged between 65 and 84 years, hearing loss is common and can potentially interfere with rehabilitation. There is some evidence for increased risk and greater severity of sensorineural hearing loss in the stroke population and hence it has been recommended that all people surviving a stroke should have a hearing test. Auditory processing difficulties have also been reported poststroke. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) can be used as a basis for describing the effect of aphasia, hearing loss, and auditory processing difficulties on activities and participation. Effects include reduced participation in activities outside the home such as work and recreation and difficulty engaging in social interaction and communicating needs. A case example of a young man (M) in his 30s who experienced a left-hemisphere ischemic stroke is presented. M has normal hearing sensitivity but has aphasia and auditory processing difficulties based on behavioral and cortical evoked potential measures. His principal goal is to return to work. Although auditory processing difficulties (and hearing loss) are acknowledged in the literature, clinical protocols typically do not specify routine assessment. The literature and the case example presented here suggest a need for further research in this area and a possible change in practice toward more routine assessment of auditory function post-stroke. PMID:27489401

  12. Crossed Aphasia. I: A Case-Study with Purely Deep Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laiacona

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the case of a right-handed man, MR, who after right thalamic haemorrhage presented subtranscortical aphasia. Of the disturbances generally associated with standard left hemisphere functions, the patient presented acalculia but not apraxia. Among the functions attributed to the standard right hemisphere, MR showed impairment in affective language and presented unilateral neglect and a strong position preference.

  13. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow with single photon emission computed tomography in patients with aphasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    5 cases are demonstrated of patients with aphasia whose brain perfusion as measured regionally by SPECT using 133Xe was correlated to the lesions seen in the CT study. Perfusion reductions exceeded the CT visible lesions, such as, that in cortical lesions perfusion in the region of basal ganglia is diminished and vice versa. The findings are discussed in relation to recent work on brain perfusion and metabolism. (orig.)

  14. Contrasting effects of errorless naming treatment and gestural facilitation for word retrieval in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymer, Anastasia M; McHose, Beth; Smith, Kimberly G; Iman, Lisa; Ambrose, Alexis; Casselton, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effects of two treatments for aphasic word retrieval impairments, errorless naming treatment (ENT) and gestural facilitation of naming (GES), within the same individuals, anticipating that the use of gesture would enhance the effect of treatment over errorless treatment alone. In addition to picture naming, we evaluated results for other outcome measures that were largely untested in earlier ENT studies. In a single participant crossover treatment design, we examined the effects of ENT and GES in eight individuals with stroke-induced aphasia and word retrieval impairments (three semantic anomia, five phonological anomia) in counterbalanced phases across participants. We evaluated effects of the two treatments for a daily picture naming/gesture production probe measure and in standardised aphasia tests and communication rating scales administered across phases of the experiment. Both treatments led to improvements in naming of trained words (small-to-large effect sizes) in individuals with semantic and phonological anomia. Small generalised naming improvements were noted for three individuals with phonological anomia. GES improved use of corresponding gestures for trained words (large effect sizes). Results were largely maintained at one month post-treatment completion. Increases in scores on standardised aphasia testing also occurred for both ENT and GES training. Both ENT and GES led to improvements in naming measures, with no clear difference between treatments. Increased use of gestures following GES provided a potential compensatory means of communication for those who did not improve verbal skills. Both treatments are considered to be effective methods to promote recovery of word retrieval and verbal production skills in individuals with aphasia.

  15. Language specificity of lexical-phonological therapy in bilingual aphasia: A clinical and electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radman, Narges; Spierer, Lucas; Laganaro, Marina; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Colombo, Françoise

    2016-08-01

    Based on findings for overlapping representations of bilingual people's first (L1) and second (L2) languages, unilingual therapies of bilingual aphasia have been proposed to benefit the untrained language. However, the generalisation patterns of intra- and cross-language and phonological therapy and their neural bases remain unclear. We tested whether the effects of an intensive lexical-phonological training (LPT) in L2 transferred to L1 word production in a Persian-French bilingual stroke patient with Broca's aphasia. Language performance was assessed using the Bilingual Aphasia Test, a 144-item picture naming (PN) task and a word-picture verification (WPV) task. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded during PN and WPV in both languages before and after an LPT in French on a wordlist from the PN task. After the therapy, naming improved only for the treated L2 items. The naming performance improved neither in the untrained L2 items nor in the corresponding items in L1. EEG analyses revealed a Language x Session topographic interaction at 540 ms post-stimulus, driven by a modification of the electrophysiological response to the treated L2 but not L1 items. These results indicate that LPT modified the brain networks engaged in the phonological-phonetic processing during naming only in the trained language for the trained items.

  16. Language specificity of lexical-phonological therapy in bilingual aphasia: A clinical and electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radman, Narges; Spierer, Lucas; Laganaro, Marina; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Colombo, Françoise

    2016-08-01

    Based on findings for overlapping representations of bilingual people's first (L1) and second (L2) languages, unilingual therapies of bilingual aphasia have been proposed to benefit the untrained language. However, the generalisation patterns of intra- and cross-language and phonological therapy and their neural bases remain unclear. We tested whether the effects of an intensive lexical-phonological training (LPT) in L2 transferred to L1 word production in a Persian-French bilingual stroke patient with Broca's aphasia. Language performance was assessed using the Bilingual Aphasia Test, a 144-item picture naming (PN) task and a word-picture verification (WPV) task. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded during PN and WPV in both languages before and after an LPT in French on a wordlist from the PN task. After the therapy, naming improved only for the treated L2 items. The naming performance improved neither in the untrained L2 items nor in the corresponding items in L1. EEG analyses revealed a Language x Session topographic interaction at 540 ms post-stimulus, driven by a modification of the electrophysiological response to the treated L2 but not L1 items. These results indicate that LPT modified the brain networks engaged in the phonological-phonetic processing during naming only in the trained language for the trained items. PMID:26010483

  17. Global aphasia as a predictor of mortality in the acute phase of a first stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F F Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To establish whether vascular aphasic syndromes can predict stroke outcomes. METHOD: Thirty-seven adults were evaluated for speech and language within 72 hours after a single first-ever ischemic brain lesion, in blind association to CT and/or MR. RESULTS: Speech or language disabilities were found in seven (87.5% of the eight deceased patients and twenty-six (89.7% of the twenty-nine survivors. Global aphasia was identified in eleven patients, all with left hemisphere lesions (nine mute; five deceased, consisting on a risk factor for death in the acute stroke phase (ρ=0.022. Age (z=1.65; ρ>0.09, thrombolysis (ρ=0.591, infarct size (ρ=0.076 and side (ρ=0.649 did not significantly influence survival. Absence of aphasia did not predict a better evolution, regardless of the affected hemisphere. Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was similar for all patient groups. CONCLUSION: Global aphasia in acute stroke can adversely affect prognosis, translated into impairment of dominant perisylvian vascular territories, with mutism as an important semiological element.

  18. Psychosocial Well-Being in Persons with Aphasia Participating in a Nursing Intervention after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Arnesveen Bronken

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial adjustment process after stroke is complicated and protracted. The language is the most important tool for making sense of experiences and for human interplay, making persons with aphasia especially prone to psychosocial problems. Persons with aphasia are systematically excluded from research projects due to methodological challenges. This study explored how seven persons with aphasia experienced participating in a complex nursing intervention aimed at supporting the psychosocial adjustment process and promoting psychosocial well-being. The intervention was organized as an individual, dialogue-based collaboration process based upon ideas from “Guided self-determination.” The content addressed psychosocial issues as mood, social relationships, meaningful activities, identity, and body changes. Principles from “Supported conversation for adults with aphasia” were used to facilitate the conversations. The data were obtained by participant observation during the intervention, qualitative interviews 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after the intervention and by standardized clinical instruments prior to the intervention and at 2 weeks and 12 months after the intervention. Assistance in narrating about themselves and their experiences with illness, psychological support and motivation to move on during the difficult adjustment process, and exchange of knowledge and information were experienced as beneficial and important by the participants in this study.

  19. How intensive does anomia therapy for people with aphasia need to be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Karen; Snell, Claerwen; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2011-01-01

    The intensity of aphasia therapy has been a key clinical question. The aim of this case-series study was to compare the outcome of intensive and non-intensive therapy in the relearning of words for people with aphasia. Eight participants took part in a study comparing the intensity of delivery of the therapy. Participants received two courses of the same therapy (each lasting 10 sessions) delivered either intensively or non-intensively. Therapy consisted of confrontation naming with progressive phonemic and orthographic cues. Post-therapy assessments were carried out immediately after the study and one month later. Performance was also monitored during each therapy session. Immediately post-therapy, both types of therapy had improved naming accuracy considerably and there was no significant difference between the two interventions. One month later, seven out of eight participants showed a small yet significant difference in naming accuracy, favouring non-intensive over intense therapy. There were no differences in the learning patterns during the therapy sessions between the intensive and non-intensive therapies. For the majority of people with aphasia post-stroke, both intense and non-intense therapy for anomia leads to improved naming performance. Retention at one-month post therapy is relatively superior after non-intensive therapy.

  20. The heterogeneity of verbal short-term memory impairment in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerus, Steve; Attout, Lucie; Artielle, Marie-Amélie; Van der Kaa, Marie-Anne

    2015-10-01

    Verbal short-term memory (STM) impairment represents a frequent and long-lasting deficit in aphasia, and it will prevent patients from recovering fully functional language abilities. The aim of this study was to obtain a more precise understanding of the nature of verbal STM impairment in aphasia, by determining whether verbal STM impairment is merely a consequence of underlying language impairment, as suggested by linguistic accounts of verbal STM, or whether verbal STM impairment reflects an additional, specific deficit. We investigated this question by contrasting item-based STM measures, supposed to depend strongly upon language activation, and order-based STM measures, supposed to reflect the operation of specific, serial order maintenance mechanisms, in a sample of patients with single-word processing deficits at the phonological and/or lexical level. A group-level analysis showed robust impairment for both item and serial order STM aspects in the aphasic group relative to an age-matched control group. An analysis of individual profiles revealed an important heterogeneity of verbal STM profiles, with patients presenting either selective item STM deficits, selective order STM deficits, generalized item and serial order STM deficits or no significant STM impairment. Item but not serial order STM impairment correlated with the severity of phonological impairment. These results disconfirm a strong version of the linguistic account of verbal STM impairment in aphasia, by showing variable impairment to both item and serial order processing aspects of verbal STM. PMID:26275964

  1. Contribution of the left and right inferior frontal gyrus in recovery from aphasia: a functional MRI study in stroke patients with preserved hemodynamic responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A.M.M. Oers; M. Vink; M.J.E. van Zandvoort; H.B. van der Worp; E.H.F. de Haan; L.J. Kappelle; N.F. Ramsey; R.M. Dijkhuizen

    2010-01-01

    The relative contribution of dominant and non-dominant language networks to recovery from aphasia is a matter of debate. We assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to what extent the left and right hemispheres are associated with recovery from aphasia after stroke. fMRI with three

  2. A Comparison of the BAT and BDAE-SF Batteries in Determining the Linguistic Ability in Greek-Speaking Patients with Broca's Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peristeri, Eleni; Tsapkini, Kyrana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test the validity and reliability of the Bilingual Aphasia Test as a measure of language impairment in a Greek-speaking Broca's aphasic population and to investigate relationships with the same aphasic group's performance on the Greek version of the short form of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination battery, mainly…

  3. Outcomes of Treatment Targeting Syntax Production in People with Broca's-Type Aphasia: Evidence from Psycholinguistic Assessment Tasks and Everyday Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragher, Marcella; Sage, Karen; Conroy, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capturing evidence of the effects of therapy within everyday communication is the holy grail of aphasia treatment design and evaluation. Whilst impaired sentence production is a predominant symptom of Broca's-type aphasia, the effects of sentence production therapy on everyday conversation have not been investigated. Given the…

  4. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Intensity of Treatment and Constraint-Induced Language Therapy for Individuals with Stroke-Induced Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Leora R.; Patterson, Janet P.; Raymer, Anastasia; Frymark, Tobi; Schooling, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This systematic review summarizes evidence for intensity of treatment and constraint-induced language therapy (CILT) on measures of language impairment and communication activity/participation in individuals with stroke-induced aphasia. Method: A systematic search of the aphasia literature using 15 electronic databases (e.g., PubMed,…

  5. A Comparison of the Visual Attention Patterns of People with Aphasia and Adults without Neurological Conditions for Camera-Engaged and Task-Engaged Visual Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Amber; Beukelman, David; Hux, Karen; Longenecker, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to compare the visual attention patterns of adults with aphasia and adults without neurological conditions when viewing visual scenes with 2 types of engagement. Method: Eye-tracking technology was used to measure the visual attention patterns of 10 adults with aphasia and 10 adults without neurological…

  6. Verb production in agrammatic aphasia: The influence of semantic class and argument structure properties on generalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sandra L; Thompson, Cynthia K

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some individuals with agrammatic aphasia have difficulty producing verbs when naming and generating sentences (Miceli, Silveri, Villa, & Caramazza, 1984; Saffran, Schwartz, & Marin, 1980; Zingeser & Berndt, 1990). And when verbs are produced there is an over-reliance on verbs requiring simple argument structure arrangements (Thompson, Lange, Schneider, & Shapiro, 1997; Thompson, Shapiro, Schneider, & Tait, 1994). Verbs, as argument-taking elements, show especially complex semantic and argument structure properties. This study investigated the role these properties have on verb production in individuals with agrammatic aphasia. AIM: This treatment study examined the extent to which semantic class and argument structure properties of verbs influenced the ability of seven individuals with agrammatic Broca's aphasia to retrieve verbs and then use them in correct sentence production. Verbs from two semantic classes and two argument structure categories were trained using either a semantic or an argument structure verb retrieval treatment. Specifically, acquisition and generalisation to trained and untrained verbs within and across semantic and argument structure categories was examined. In addition, the influence of verb production on each participant's sentence production was also examined. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; PROCEDURES: Utilising a single-subject crossover design in combination with a multiple baseline design across subjects and behaviours, seven individuals with agrammatic aphasia were trained to retrieve verbs with specific argument structures from two semantic classes under two treatment conditions-semantic verb retrieval treatment and verb argument structure retrieval treatment. Treatment was provided on two-place and three-place motion or change of state verbs, counterbalanced across subjects and behaviours. A total of 102 verbs, depicted in black and white drawings, were utilised in the study, divided equally into motion and change of state

  7. Semiology of aphasias: a critical discussion / Semiologia das afasias: uma discussão crítica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana do Carmo Novaes Pinto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the semiology of aphasias, which started being developed in the 19th century by Broca and Wernicke. We do not provide an exhaustive list of symptoms and syndromes to address the theme, since we aim to critically discuss why the semiology of aphasias is still based mainly on organic perspectives in clinical practice and scientific research. We also discuss the contributions of Luria and Jakobson to a better understanding of how language is affected in aphasias and how Modern Linguistics, in special the Discursive Neurolinguistics, may enlighten the debate. We analyze some data to illustrate the theoretical and methodological assumptions of the above mentioned approaches and also discuss the excessive strength that classifications have in the clinical context.

  8. Advance in Diagnosis and Therapy for Chinese Aphasia%失语症的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周延华; 王东

    2013-01-01

    This paper aimed to analyse and review the literature of diagnosis and treatment of Chinese aphasia at homein recent years. The traditional neuropsychological check method, had been much more applicated and studied in the diagnostic research of Chinese aphasia at present, and in thefuture the check methods of Chinese aphasiashowed diversification, systematic and standardized development. Reshearches tended to comprehensive treatment as the main approach for Chinese aphasia in a conclusion.%  本文就近年来对于汉语失语症的诊断与治疗研究文献进行综述,旨在进一步说明失语症的检查方法多样及治疗方法倾向于综合治疗。

  9. 卒中后失语患者抑郁情绪特征比较%The characteristics of post-stroke depression in patients with aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许璇; 王维清; 刘晓加; 陈东; 王心宇

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较卒中后失语患者与非失语患者抑郁情绪的特征.方法 纳入70例卒中后失语患者和70例卒中后非失语患者.对失语组采用标准化汉语失语检查量表(Aphasia Battery of Chinese,ABC)进行失语评估,并用卒中后失语患者抑郁问卷(医院版)(Stroke Aphasic Depression Questionnaire Hospital Version,SADQ-H)比较卒中后失语患者和非失语患者的抑郁情绪.结果 失语组的SADQ-H总分[(22.03±9.55)分]显著高于非失语组[(16.81±10.47)分],差异有显著性(P<0.01);卒中后失语患者在兴趣缺乏、乐趣丧失、社交回避、易怒、情绪低落、注意力下降等方面较卒中后非失语患者严重.失语组抑郁发生率[64.28%]高于非失语组[50.00%];失语组中完全性失语抑郁发生率最高[78.26%];经皮质混合性失语[62.5%]、Broca[61.53%]、Werincke[62.50%]发生率相近为[62.00%]左右;抑郁严重程度与失语严重程度相关,卡方分析差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 卒中后失语患者较非失语患者抑郁情绪的发生率高,尤其是完全性失语、经皮质混合性失语、Broca、Werincke等类型的失语患者,并且抑郁发生率与失语严重程度相关.%Objective To compare the characteristics of post-stroke depression in patients with and without aphasia.Methods Seventy patients on the first infarction with aphasia and 70 stroke patients without aphasia were recruited.The aphasia deficits in patients were evaluated by using the Aphasia Battery of Chinese ( Aphasia Battery of Chinese, ABC) .The Stroke Aphasic Depression Questionnaire Hospital Version ( Stroke Aphasic Depression Questionnaire Hospital Version, SADQ-H) was applied to analyze the depression in the two groups.Results The sore in SADQ-H of the aphasia group was significantly higher than the control group( (22.03 ±9.55 )vs ( 16.81 ± 10.47 ), P < 0.01 ) .Loss interest, anhedonia, social avoidance, irritability, depression, decreased attention were

  10. Stroke and aphasia quality of life scale in Kannada-evaluation of reliability, validity and internal consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality of life (QoL dwells in a person′s overall well-being. Recently, QoL measures have become critical and relevant in stroke survivors. Instruments measuring QoL of individuals with aphasia are apparently rare in the Indian context. The present study aimed to develop a Kannada instrument to measure the QoL of people with aphasia. Study objectives were to validate Stroke and aphasia quality of life-39 (SAQOL-39 into Kannada, to measure test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Materials and Methods: The original English instrument was modified considering socio-cultural differences among native English and Kannada speakers. Cross-linguistic adaptation of SAQOL-39 into Kannada was carried out through forward-backward translation scheme. The scale was administered on 32 people from Karnataka (a state in India having aphasia. For a direct understanding of the subject′s QoL, scores were categorized into QoL severity levels. Item reliability of the Kannada version was examined by measuring Cronbach′s alpha. Test-retest reliability was examined by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Results: Kannada SAQOL-39 showed good acceptability with minimum missing data and excellent test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.8. Value of Cronbach′s α observed for four items modified in the original version was 0.9 each and the mean α of all Kannada items was 0.9, demonstrating high internal consistency. Conclusions: The present study offers a valid, reliable tool to measure QoL in Kannada-speaking individuals with aphasia. This tool is useful in a cross-center, cross-national comparison of QoL data from people with aphasia. This instrument also permits direct translation into other Indian languages as the items are culturally validated to the Indian population. This study promotes future research using the Kannada SAQOL-39.

  11. EVALUATION OF THE LANGUAGE COMMUNICATIONAL SKILLS OF PERSONS WITH BROCA’S APHASIA AS A CONCOMITANCE FROM CEREBROVASCULAR INSULT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilija TODOROV

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Persons with Broca’s aphasia socialize in societymuch faster, because of the early rehabilitationtreatment using the speech therapy. In thebeginning of the illness, the voice production isarduous and the speech is with variable prosody.The patient expresses himself exceptionally withnouns and working verbs, also using mimics andgestures.The main purpose of the research is the evaluationof the communicational language skills of personswith Broca’s aphasia, even in the acuteness of theillness. The goal is also to examine and establishthe opinion of persons with Broca’s aphasia, theirfamily members and medical staff regarding theuse of early rehabilitation treatment with speechtherapy.The basic tasks of this research are to determinewhether the disturbance of verbal interaction isoften followed with speech apraxia andagrammatism among the persons suffering fromBroca’s aphasia. Two types of examinees areincluded in the research. The survey was conductedin Skopje and in a period of three months.The data gained from the research are grouped,tabulated, processed and graphically shownusing the program Microsoft Office Excel 2003.The differecnces in the data of the examinees isanalyzed with Chi square test with level of significanceр<0.05. From the analyzis and interpretationof the results we can see that personswith Broca’s aphasia, although produce incompletesentences, they verbalise sentences withcontent which are informative for their interlocutorand the auditory understending is less demagedthan the expressive funcion of the speech.In conclusion, the study found that earlyrehabilitation treatment using speech therapyfor persons with Broca’s aphasia resulted infaster improvements and better capabilities forspeech-language communicational skills.

  12. Please Don't Stop the Music: Song Completion in Patients with Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Victoria Kasdan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many patients with aphasia, particularly those with nonfluent aphasia, have been observed to be able to sing the lyrics of songs more easily than they can speak the same words (Wan et al., 2010. The observation that not only singing, but even intoning words, can facilitate speech output in nonfluent aphasia patients provided the foundation for Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT; Sparks, 1974, an intensive therapy lasting ten or more weeks (Schlaug et al., 2008. The current study aims to look at patients with aphasia in their ability to complete song lyrics by either singing, speaking, or humming them. Methods: Thus far, 11 patients with aphasia and 6 age- matched healthy controls have participated in an experimental stem-completion task examining singing abilities. The task consists of three conditions each consisting of 20 well-known songs and all participants completed all three conditions. Participants heard the first half of a phrase that was either sung in its original format (e.g., “Mary had a Little Lamb”, spoken, or intoned on the syllable “bum”, and were asked to complete the phrase according to the format in which the stimulus was presented, (i.e., either by singing, speaking the words, or humming/singing the melody correspondingly. The task was untimed, though most finished the task within an hour. Each participant completed a survey about their musical experience. Results: Patients were scored on their ability to complete the melody and words together in the sung condition, only the words in the spoken condition, and only the tune of the song in the melody condition. A parametric t-test indicated no significant difference between groups in the sung condition (mean patients=45.3%, mean controls=68.2%, t-value= -1.96, p=0.0684, though this test almost reached significance. There was also no significant difference between groups in the melody condition (mean patients= 18.2%, mean controls=20.0%, t-value= -0.335, p=0

  13. Preserved processing of musical syntax in a person with agrammatic aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhvi Saxena

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of work suggests that processing hierarchical structure in language and in music rely on shared systems (review: Slevc, 2012, however this conclusion is tempered by neuropsychological dissociations between linguistic and musical processing (i.e., aphasia and amusia; review: Peretz, 2006. An influential reconciliation comes from Patel’s (2003 shared syntactic integration resource hypothesis (SSIRH, which suggests that evidence for shared processes reflect reliance on shared syntactic integration processes whereas dissociations result from damage to domain-specific syntactic representations. The SSIRH thus predicts that patients with deficits in the processing of linguistic syntax–such as agrammatic aphasics–should show parallel deficits in musical structural (harmonic processing. This prediction is countered by findings of impaired harmonic processing in patients with (apparently spared linguistic syntactic processing (e.g., Sammler et al., 2011, however evidence for the opposite dissociation–preserved harmonic processing in agrammatic aphasia–is lacking. While there are reports of preserved musical abilities despite global aphasia (Basso & Capitani, 1985 or severe Wernicke’s aphasia (Luria, Tsvetkova, & Futer, 1965, of preserved reading and writing of music in the face of alexia and agraphia (Signoret et al., 1987, and of preserved musical sound naming in the face of severe anomia (Tzortzis et al., 2000, no study (to our knowledge has demonstrated preserved musical structural processing in an agrammatic patient. In addition, at least one group of agrammatic aphasics did not show normal effects of harmonic priming, and showed a relationship between accuracy on acceptability judgments in language and in music (Patel et al., 2008. Here, we report a detailed analysis of structural processing in language and in music in HV, a 63 year-old native English-speaking female musician who sustained a left peri-Sylvian stroke. She

  14. Integrating Lesion-Symptom Mapping with Other Methods to Investigate Language Networks and Aphasia Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E Turkeltaub

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM has provided valuable insights into the neural underpinnings of various language functions. Integrating lesion mapping methods with other neuroscience techniques may provide new opportunities to investigate questions related both to the neurobiology of language and to plasticity after brain injury. For example, recent diffusion tensor imaging studies have explored relationships between aphasia symptomology and damage in specific white matter tracts (Forkel et al., 2014 or disruption of the white matter connectome (Bonilha, Rorden, & Fridriksson, 2014. VLSM has also recently been used to assess correlations between lesion location and response to transcranial direct current stimulation aphasia treatment (Campana, Caltagirone, & Marangolo, 2015. We have recently undertaken studies integrating VLSM with other techniques, including voxel-based morphometry (VBM and functional MRI, in order to investigate how parts of the brain spared by stroke contribute to recovery. VLSM can be used in this context to map lesions associated with particular patterns of plasticity in brain structure, function, or connectivity. We have also used VLSM to estimate the variance in behavior due to the stroke itself so that this lesion-symptom relationship can be controlled for when examining the contributions of the rest of the brain. Using this approach in combination with VBM, we have identified areas of the right temporoparietal cortex that appear to undergo hypertrophy after stroke and compensate for speech production deficits. In this talk, I will review recent advances in integrating lesion-symptom mapping with other imaging and brain stimulation techniques in order to better understand the brain basis of language and of aphasia recovery.

  15. Progress in the last decade in our understanding of primary progressive aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnavalli Ellajosyula

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary progressive aphasia (PPA is a focal neurodegeneration of the brain affecting the language network. Patients can have isolated language impairment for years without impairment in other areas. PPA is classified as primary progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA, semantic dementia (SD, and logopenic aphasia, which have distinct patterns of atrophy on neuroimaging. PNFA and SD are included under frontotemporal lobar degenerations. PNFA patients have effortful speech with agrammatism, which is frequently associated with apraxia of speech and demonstrate atrophy in the left Broca′s area and surrounding region on neuroimaging. Patients with SD have dysnomia with loss of word and object (or face meaning with asymmetric anterior temporal lobe atrophy. Logopenic aphasics have word finding difficulties with frequent pauses in conversation, intact grammar, and word comprehension but impaired repetition for sentences. The atrophy is predominantly in the left posterior temporal and inferior parietal regions. Recent studies have described several progranulin mutations on chromosome 17 in PNFA. The three clinical syndromes have a less robust relationship to the underlying pathology, which is heterogeneous and includes tauopathy, ubiquitinopathy, Pick′s disease, corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy, and Alzheimer′s disease. Recent studies, however, seem to indicate that a better characterization of the clinical phenotype (apraxic, agrammatic, semantic, logopenic, jargon increases the predictive value of the underlying pathology. Substantial advances have been made in our understanding of PPAs but developing new biomarkers is essential in making accurate causative diagnoses in individual patients. This is critically important in the development and evaluation of disease-modifying drugs.

  16. A controlled study of changes in conversation following aphasia therapy for anomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Wendy; Grassly, Jennie; Greenwood, Alison; Herbert, Ruth; Hickin, Julie; Howard, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between change in picture naming with anomia therapy and changes in word retrieval in conversations between adults with aphasia and a regular conversational partner. We present data from two therapy projects (Hickin et al. [ 1 ] and Best et al. [ 2 ]). In each study, therapy involved cueing with the aim of improving retrieval of a set of nouns. Naming of the experimental items was assessed twice prior to therapy and again immediately afterwards. There was a significant change in word finding, as measured by picture naming, for the group and for 11 of the 13 participants. At the same time points, we collected conversations between the person with aphasia and a regular conversational partner. We analysed these using Profile of Word Errors and Retrieval in Speech (Herbert et al. [ 3 ]) and investigated a set of conversational variables predicted to change with therapy. Unsurprisingly, the conversation data is not straightforward. There is no significant change on the conversation measures for the group but some changes for individuals. We predicted change in word retrieval after therapy would relate to change in everyday conversations and tested this by correlating the change (post-therapy minus mean pre-therapy) in picture naming with the change in conversation variables. There was a significant positive relationship between the change in picture naming and change in some conversation measures including the number of nouns produced in 5 min of conversation (r = 0.50, p < 0.05, one-tailed) and the number of nouns produced per substantive turn (r = 0.55, p < 0.05, one-tailed). The findings suggest changes in word finding following therapy for aphasia can be reflected in changes in conversation. The clinical implications of the complex results are explored.

  17. Neurology of anomia in the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesulam, Marsel; Rogalski, Emily; Wieneke, Christina; Cobia, Derin; Rademaker, Alfred; Thompson, Cynthia; Weintraub, Sandra

    2009-09-01

    The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by the combination of word comprehension deficits, fluent aphasia and a particularly severe anomia. In this study, two novel tasks were used to explore the factors contributing to the anomia. The single most common factor was a blurring of distinctions among members of a semantic category, leading to errors of overgeneralization in word-object matching tasks as well as in word definitions and object descriptions. This factor was more pronounced for natural kinds than artifacts. In patients with the more severe anomias, conceptual maps were more extensively disrupted so that inter-category distinctions were as impaired as intra-category distinctions. Many objects that could not be named aloud could be matched to the correct word in patients with mild but not severe anomia, reflecting a gradual intensification of the semantic factor as the naming disorder becomes more severe. Accurate object descriptions were more frequent than accurate word definitions and all patients experienced prominent word comprehension deficits that interfered with everyday activities but no consequential impairment of object usage or face recognition. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed three characteristics: greater atrophy of the left hemisphere; atrophy of anterior components of the perisylvian language network in the superior and middle temporal gyri; and atrophy of anterior components of the face and object recognition network in the inferior and medial temporal lobes. The left sided asymmetry and perisylvian extension of the atrophy explains the more profound impairment of word than object usage and provides the anatomical basis for distinguishing the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia from the partially overlapping group of patients that fulfil the widely accepted diagnostic criteria for semantic dementia.

  18. Effects of verb meaning on lexical integration in agrammatic aphasia: Evidence from eyetracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Jennifer E; Ji, Woohyuk; Thompson, Cynthia K

    2013-11-01

    Relatively little is known about the time course of access to the lexical representations of verbs in agrammatic aphasia and its effects on the prediction and integration of the verb's arguments. The present study used visual-world eyetracking to test whether verb meaning can be used by agrammatic aphasic individuals to predict and facilitate the integration of a subsequent noun argument. Nine adults with agrammatic aphasia and ten age-matched controls participated in the study. In Experiment 1, participants viewed arrays of four objects (e.g., jar, plate, stick, pencil) while listening to sentences containing either a restrictive verb that was semantically compatible only with the target object or an unrestrictive verb compatible with all four objects (e.g., Susan will open/break the jar). For both participant groups, the restrictive condition elicited more fixations to the target object immediately after the verb. Experiment 2 differed from Experiment 1 in that the auditory sentences presented were incomplete (e.g., Susan will open/break the…). For controls, restrictive verbs elicited more target fixations immediately after the verb; however, the effects of verb type were noted downstream from the verb for the aphasic listeners. The results suggest that individuals with agrammatic aphasia have preserved ability to use verb information to facilitate integration of overt arguments, but prediction of upcoming arguments is impaired. Impaired lexical-semantic prediction processes may be caused by damage to the left inferior frontal gyrus, which has been argued to support higher-level lexical processes. PMID:24092952

  19. 神经性失语的血液供应特点分析%Analysis of blood supply in aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪典; 江文; 万琪; 张光运

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the characteristics of blood supply in neurlogical aphasia.Method The aphasia types and features of 21 cases with internal carotid artery occulsion or middle cerebral artery occulision were retrospectively reviewed .Result The ischaemic lesions in most of patients with aphasia located in dominant hemisphere,but the cases with the same artery occlusion exhibited different aphasia types.Broca's aphasia was usually accompanied with good prognosis,but it is diffcult to rehabilitate for Wernicke's aphasia and Global aphasis .Conclusion The aphasia types were associated with complicated blood supply and collateral circulation in MARE'S area.%目的 讨神经性失语的血液供应特点。方法回顾性分析21例颈内动脉或大脑中动脉闭塞病人的失语种类及特征。结果 部分失语病人的缺血病灶位于优势半球,但具有相同动脉闭塞病人的失语类型并不相同。单纯运动性失语康复较快,混合性或感觉性失语康复较困难。结论 语的类型因MARE方形区复杂血供及其侧支循环情况的不同而异。

  20. 神经性失语的血液供应特点分析%Analysis of blood supply in aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪典; 江文; 万琪; 张光运

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the characteristics of blood supply inneurlogical aphasia.Method The aphasia types and features of 21 cases with internal carotid artery occulsion or middle cerebral artery occulision were retrospectively reviewed .Result The ischaemic lesions in most of patients with aphasia located in dominant hemisphere,but the cases with the same artery occlusion exhibited different aphasia types.Broca's aphasia was usually accompanied with good prognosis,but it is diffcult to rehabilitate for Wernicke's aphasia and Global aphasis .Conclusion The aphasia types were associated with complicated blood supply and collateral circulation in MARE'S area.%目的 探讨神经性失语的血液供应特点。方法回顾性分析21例颈内动脉或大脑中动脉闭塞病人的失语种类及特征。结果 部分失语病人的缺血病灶位于优势半球,但具有相同动脉闭塞病人的失语类型并不相同。单纯运动性失语康复较快,混合性或感觉性失语康复较困难。结论 语的类型因MARE方形区复杂血供及其侧支循环情况的不同而异。

  1. Implementation of supported conversation for communication between nursing staff and in-hospital patients with aphasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lise Randrup; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Sørensen, Inger;

    2015-01-01

    access has prompted speech-language therapists to direct intervention at contextual factors, including communication partner training (Simmons-Mackie, Raymer, Armstrong, Holland, & Cherney, 2010). Aims: An implementation project is described in which supported conversation for adults with aphasia (SCA......’s involvement in adaptation, leadership support, and a working culture on the stroke unit characterized by readiness to adapt to guidelines. To ensure that the majority of staff members will actually apply tools and techniques, continued monitoring of the implementation process will be necessary as well...

  2. Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS to study and treat aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazbanou Nozari

    2014-04-01

    - What are the challenges of using tDCS for hypothesis testing and how can I reduce the risk of misinterpreting my results? In summary, the symposium is designed to (a promote the theoretical understanding of the basic science of tDCS, and (b to tackle several pragmatic issues when designing tDCS studies, with the ultimate goal of cultivating higher standards for using a potentially invaluable technique for both clinical and research purposes. Given the growing interest in the aphasia community for using tDCS and the sophistication of the audience, we believe that the Academy’s annual meeting is the ideal venue for this symposium.

  3. The relationship of music to the melody of speech and to syntactic processing disorders in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aniruddh D

    2005-12-01

    Two new empirical studies address the relationship between music and language. The first focuses on melody and uses research in phonetics to investigate the long-held notion that instrumental music reflects speech patterns in a composer's native language. The second focuses on syntax and addresses the relationship between musical and linguistic syntactic processing via the study of aphasia, an approach that has been explored very little. The results of these two studies add to a growing body of evidence linking music and language with regard to structural patterns and brain processing.

  4. Eye movements as probes of lexico-semantic processing in a patient with primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckin, Mustafa; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Rademaker, Alfred W; Voss, Joel L; Weintraub, Sandra; Rogalski, Emily J; Hurley, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Eye movement trajectories during a verbally cued object search task were used as probes of lexico-semantic associations in an anomic patient with primary progressive aphasia. Visual search was normal on trials where the target object could be named but became lengthy and inefficient on trials where the object failed to be named. The abnormality was most profound if the noun denoting the object could not be recognized. Even trials where the name of the target object was recognized but not retrieved triggered abnormal eye movements, demonstrating that retrieval failures can have underlying associative components despite intact comprehension of the corresponding noun. PMID:25982291

  5. Analysis and Remediation of Aphasia in the U.S.S.R.: The Contribution of A. R. Luria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Frances M.

    1981-01-01

    The paper surveys contribution of A. Luria to aphasiology, emphasizing unique extent to which he integrated theory and therapeutic practice. Luria's view of primary defects underlying main forms of aphasia is summarized; this is followed by brief account of his application of certain notions of structural linguists, including R. Jakobson's…

  6. Measuring Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication in Aphasia: Reliability, Validity, and Sensitivity to Change of the Scenario Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meulen, Ineke; van de Sandt-Koenderman, W. Mieke E.; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Ribbers, Gerard M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study explores the psychometric qualities of the Scenario Test, a new test to assess daily-life communication in severe aphasia. The test is innovative in that it: (1) examines the effectiveness of verbal and non-verbal communication; and (2) assesses patients' communication in an interactive setting, with a supportive…

  7. Extending the Use of Spanish Computer-Assisted Anomia Rehabilitation Program (CARP-2) in People with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Jose A.; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Buiza, Juan J.; Sage, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To extend the use of the Spanish Computer-assisted Anomia Rehabilitation Program (CARP-2) for anomia from a single case to a group of 15 people with aphasia. To evaluate whether the treatment is active (Phase 1) for this group (Robey & Schultz, 1998), providing potential explanations as to why. Methods: Fifteen participants with chronic…

  8. Verb and Noun Word Retrieval in Bilingual Aphasia: A Case Study of Language- and Modality-Specific Levels of Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambanaros, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the pattern of performance on spoken and written naming, spelling to dictation, and oral reading of single verbs and nouns in a bilingual speaker with aphasia in two first languages that differ in morphological complexity, orthographic transparency, and script: Greek (L1a) and English (L1b). The results reveal no verb/noun…

  9. Overview of the pathogenesis of stroke aphasia%中风失语症病机概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘威; 李燕梅

    2013-01-01

    中风失语症属中医学“音哑”范畴。现代中医家对中风失语症病机认为风、痰、瘀,三者相互为因。西医学者认为失语发生的机制可能为病变本身直接破坏了语言功能区。中风失语症病机多认为肝肾精气亏虚、心脾痰浊壅阻是病机共性,风火痰瘀阻滞心神之经络扰及神明,阻闭舌窍是导致中风失语症病理因素,病变涉及五脏,而心神、肝魂、肺魄以及经脉官窍皆受损害。%Stroke aphasia is included in TCM “sound dumb”category. Modern TCM realized that pathogenesis of stroke aphasia are wind, phlegm, blood stasis, as a result of three mutual. Western scholars believe that the pathogenesis of aphasia may be lesions directly undermine the language area. TCM realized that reasons of pathogenesis of stroke aphasia are Ganshen Jingqi Kuixu, Xinpi Tanzhuo Yongzu, Fenghuo Tabyu Zuzhi Xinshen, Zubi Sheqiao. Lesions involving Wuzang, Xinshen, Ganhun, Feipo, meridians are damaged.

  10. 汉语失语症诊治进展%Advance in Diagnosis and Therapy for Chinese Aphasia (review)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田野; 林伟; 叶祥明; 周亮

    2011-01-01

    本文就近年来国内对于汉语失语症的诊断与治疗研究文献进行综述.除了包括传统的神经心理学检查对于汉语失语症的诊断研究外,目前多应用先进的脑功能成像技术和事件相关电位进行研究,旨在进一步揭示汉语失语症检查法正朝着多样化、系统化以及标准化发展.已有的大量研究工作显示,汉语失语症的康复治疗仍倾向以综合治疗为主.%This paper aimed to analyse and review the literature of diagnosis and treatment of Chinese aphasia at home in recent years.The advanced brain imaging technology and events related potentials, besides the traditional neuropsychological check method, had been much more applicated and studied in the diagnostic research of Chinese aphasia at present, and in the future the check methods of Chinese aphasia showed diversification, systematic and standardized development.A large number of clinical reshearches tended to comprehensive treatment as the main approach for Chinese aphasia in a conclusion.

  11. Interaction-focused intervention for acquired language disorders: facilitating mutual adaptation in couples where one partner has aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Ray; Lock, Sarah; Bryan, Karen; Sage, Karen

    2011-02-01

    This paper discusses the implementation and evaluation of an interaction-focused intervention single case study for a couple where one partner has aphasia. Drawing on conversation analytic research, naturally occurring conversations of the couple at home pre- and post-intervention were collected and analysed. Analysis of the speaker with aphasia's topic initiating turns in the pre-intervention conversation showed that in each case a feature of the attempt was that the speaker had difficulty in getting the topic initiation accepted and established. Drawing on conversation analytic work on topic initiations in normal conversation, intervention focused on training the couple to co-produce these topic initiating turns of the speaker with aphasia in a collaborative and step-by-step manner. Post-intervention, there was evidence that the couple were now using this new method, albeit in a slightly different way to that worked on in the intervention sessions. Drawing on work into adaptation by speakers with aphasia and their conversation partners, these results are discussed in terms of a process of mutual adaptation by the couple. PMID:21329413

  12. Apraxia of Speech and Phonological Errors in the Diagnosis of Nonfluent/Agrammatic and Logopenic Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croot, Karen; Ballard, Kirrie; Leyton, Cristian E.; Hodges, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The International Consensus Criteria for the diagnosis of primary progressive aphasia (PPA; Gorno-Tempini et al., 2011) propose apraxia of speech (AOS) as 1 of 2 core features of nonfluent/agrammatic PPA and propose phonological errors or absence of motor speech disorder as features of logopenic PPA. We investigated the sensitivity and…

  13. Auditory Masking Effects on Speech Fluency in Apraxia of Speech and Aphasia: Comparison to Altered Auditory Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacks, Adam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effects of masked auditory feedback (MAF) on speech fluency in adults with aphasia and/or apraxia of speech (APH/AOS). We hypothesized that adults with AOS would increase speech fluency when speaking with noise. Altered auditory feedback (AAF; i.e., delayed/frequency-shifted feedback) was included as a control condition not…

  14. Economic Aspects of a Therapy and Support Service for People with Long-Term Stroke and Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gaag, Anna; Brooks, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background: This paper considers some economic aspects of a therapy and support service for people with stroke and aphasia. This material was part of a broader evaluation of the service, which is reported elsewhere (van der Gaag et al. 2005, van der Gaag and Mowles 2005). Aims: The purpose of this part of the study was to investigate the…

  15. Language processing in bilingual aphasia: a new insight into the problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, Elvira; Vanhoof, Gertie; Beyens, Hilde; Goeleven, Ann; Thijs, Vincent; Van Hulle, Marc M

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that a bilingual person should not be considered as two monolinguals in a single body, a view that has gradually been adopted in the diagnosis and treatment of bilingual aphasia. However, its investigation is complicated due to the large variety in possible language combinations, pre- and postmorbid language proficiencies, and age of second language acquisition. Furthermore, the tests and tasks used to assess linguistic capabilities differ in almost every study, hindering a direct comparison of their outcomes. Behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging data from healthy population show that the processing of second language domains (semantics, syntax, morphology) depends on factors such as age and method of acquisition, proficiency level and environment in which the second language was acquired. A number of single and multiple case reports that rely on behavioral testing of bilingual aphasics replicate these results. Additionally, they show that the patient's performance depends on the size and location of the lesion, as well as language typology and morphological characteristics. Furthermore, the impairment and recovery patterns and recovery generalization from treated to untreated language depend on the lexical and orthographic distances between the two languages. For healthy bilinguals, language processing is usually studied in comparison to monolinguals. We advocate that a good starting point for identifying patterns specific for bilingual aphasia is to compare patient studies of bilinguals and monolinguals.

  16. Protocol evaluation for effective music therapy for persons with nonfluent aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijin; Tomaino, Concetta M

    2008-01-01

    Although the notion of the language specificity of neural correlates has been widely accepted in the past (e.g., lefthemispheric dominance including Broca's and Wernike's area, N400 ERP component of semantic processing, and the P600 ERP component of syntactic processing, etc.), recent studies have shown that music and language share some important neurological aspects in their processing, both involving bilateral hemispheric activities. In line with this are the frequent behavioral clinical observations that persons with aphasia show improved articulation and prosody of speech in musically assisted phrases. Connecting recent neurological findings with clinical observations would not only inform clinical practice but would enhance understanding of the neurological mechanisms involved in the processing of speech/language and music. This article presents a music therapy treatment protocol study of 7 nonfluent patients with aphasia. The data and findings are discussed with regard to some of the recent focuses and issues addressed in the experimental studies using cognitive-behavioral, electrophysiological, and brain-imaging techniques. PMID:19158063

  17. For a new look at 'lexical errors': evidence from semantic approximations with verbs in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvignau, Karine; Tran, Thi Mai; Manchon, Mélanie

    2013-08-01

    The ability to understand the similarity between two phenomena is fundamental for humans. Designated by the term analogy in psychology, this ability plays a role in the categorization of phenomena in the world and in the organisation of the linguistic system. The use of analogy in language often results in non-standard utterances, particularly in speakers with aphasia. These non-standard utterances are almost always studied in a nominal context and considered as errors. We propose a study of the verbal lexicon and present findings that measure, by an action-video naming task, the importance of verb-based non-standard utterances made by 17 speakers with aphasia ("la dame déshabille l'orange"/the lady undresses the orange, "elle casse la tomate"/she breaks the tomato). The first results we have obtained allow us to consider these type of utterances from a new perspective: we propose to eliminate the label of "error", suggesting that they may be viewed as semantic approximations based upon a relationship of inter-domain synonymy and are ingrained in the heart of the lexical system.

  18. Language processing in bilingual aphasia: a new insight into the problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, Elvira; Vanhoof, Gertie; Beyens, Hilde; Goeleven, Ann; Thijs, Vincent; Van Hulle, Marc M

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that a bilingual person should not be considered as two monolinguals in a single body, a view that has gradually been adopted in the diagnosis and treatment of bilingual aphasia. However, its investigation is complicated due to the large variety in possible language combinations, pre- and postmorbid language proficiencies, and age of second language acquisition. Furthermore, the tests and tasks used to assess linguistic capabilities differ in almost every study, hindering a direct comparison of their outcomes. Behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging data from healthy population show that the processing of second language domains (semantics, syntax, morphology) depends on factors such as age and method of acquisition, proficiency level and environment in which the second language was acquired. A number of single and multiple case reports that rely on behavioral testing of bilingual aphasics replicate these results. Additionally, they show that the patient's performance depends on the size and location of the lesion, as well as language typology and morphological characteristics. Furthermore, the impairment and recovery patterns and recovery generalization from treated to untreated language depend on the lexical and orthographic distances between the two languages. For healthy bilinguals, language processing is usually studied in comparison to monolinguals. We advocate that a good starting point for identifying patterns specific for bilingual aphasia is to compare patient studies of bilinguals and monolinguals. PMID:26990465

  19. TREATMENT OF CEREBRAL PALSY WITH APHASIA BY LINGUISTIC TRAINING COMBINED WITH ACUPUNCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhen-huan; MA Mei-mei; PAN Pei-guang; FU Wen-jie; HU Jing-jun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the best remedies for cerebral palsy with aphasia. Methods: A total of 76 cases of cerebral palsy children with aphasia were evenly randomized into control group and treatment group. Patients of treatment group were treated with "consciousness-restoring needling" plus linguistic training and those of control group treated with simple linguistic training method. Acupuncture was given once every other day, and linguistic training conducted once 6 times a week, with 10 times being a therapeutic course and the interval between two weeks being 10 -15 days. Following 3 courses of treatment, the therapeutic effect was analyzed. Results: After 3 courses of treatment, of the two 38 cases in treatment and control groups, 27 (71.1%) and 13 (34.2%) had remarkable improvement in their symptoms. The therapeutic effect of treatment group was significantly superior to that of control group (P<0.01). The developmental quotient values of speech of treatment and control groups were 56.36 ±19.77 and 46.96±15.63 respectively, displaying that acupuncture could significantly improve cerebral palsy patients' speaking ability (P<0.05). Conclusion: The therapeutic effect of acupuncture therapy plus linguistic training is significantly superior to that of simple linguistic training.

  20. Unravelling Boléro: progressive aphasia, transmodal creativity and the right posterior neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, William W; Matthews, Brandy R; Crawford, Richard K; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Foti, Dean; Mackenzie, Ian R; Miller, Bruce L

    2008-01-01

    Most neurological lesion studies emphasize performance deficits that result from focal brain injury. Here, we describe striking gains of function in a patient with primary progressive aphasia, a degenerative disease of the human language network. During the decade before her language deficits arose, Anne Adams (AA), a lifelong scientist, developed an intense drive to produce visual art. Paintings from AA's artistic peak revealed her capacity to create expressive transmodal art, such as renderings of music in paint, which may have reflected an increased subjective relatedness among internal perceptual and conceptual images. AA became fascinated with Maurice Ravel, the French composer who also suffered from a progressive aphasia, and painted his best-known work, 'Boléro', by translating its musical elements into visual form. Later paintings, achieved when AA was nearly mute, moved towards increasing photographic realism, perhaps because visual representations came to dominate AA's mental landscape during this phase of her illness. Neuroimaging analyses revealed that, despite severe degeneration of left inferior frontal-insular, temporal and striatal regions, AA showed increased grey matter volume and hyperperfusion in right posterior neocortical areas implicated in heteromodal and polysensory integration. The findings suggest that structural and functional enhancements in non-dominant posterior neocortex may give rise to specific forms of visual creativity that can be liberated by dominant inferior frontal cortex injury. PMID:18057074

  1. Slowly progressive fluent aphasia; Clinical features and an imaging study including MRI, SPECT and PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Momose, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Iwata, Makoto (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Bando, Mitsuaki

    1991-05-01

    Three patients with slowly progressive fluent aphasia are reported. One of the patients presented with memory disturbance. They were characterized clinically by having selective deficits in vocabulary, which resulted in impairment of confrontation naming, and auditory comprehension. MRI showed an atrophy not only in the left temporal lobe (including the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri), hippocampus, parahippocampual gyrus, and fusiform gyrus, but also in the left parietal lobe. I-123 IMP SPECT and F-18 FDG PET were used to determine regional cerebral blood flow and regional cerebral metabolic rate, respectively. In addition to the decreased tracer uptake in the left temporal and/or parietal lobe, a decreased uptake was seen in the bilateral basal ganglia, the inner side of the temporal lobe (including the bilateral hippocampus), the right anterior temporal lobe, and the left thalamus. These findings may deny the previous thought that lesions are localized in slowly progressive fluent aphasia. Furthermore, noticeable difficulty in naming, i.e., patients unable to recognize the right answer, are considered attributable to widespread lesions from the whole left temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, to the right temporal lobe. (N.K.).

  2. White matter in aphasia: a historical review of the Dejerines' studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krestel, Heinz; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Jagella, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    The Objective was to describe the contributions of Joseph Jules Dejerine and his wife Augusta Dejerine-Klumpke to our understanding of cerebral association fiber tracts and language processing. The Dejerines (and not Constantin von Monakow) were the first to describe the superior longitudinal fasciculus/arcuate fasciculus (SLF/AF) as an association fiber tract uniting Broca's area, Wernicke's area, and a visual image center in the angular gyrus of a left hemispheric language zone. They were also the first to attribute language-related functions to the fasciculi occipito-frontalis (FOF) and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) after describing aphasia patients with degeneration of the SLF/AF, ILF, uncinate fasciculus (UF), and FOF. These fasciculi belong to a functional network known as the Dejerines' language zone, which exceeds the borders of the classically defined cortical language centers. The Dejerines provided the first descriptions of the anatomical pillars of present-day language models (such as the SLF/AF). Their anatomical descriptions of fasciculi in aphasia patients provided a foundation for our modern concept of the dorsal and ventral streams in language processing.

  3. Phonetic basis of phonemic paraphasias in aphasia: Evidence for cascading activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Kathleen; Blumstein, Sheila E

    2016-02-01

    Phonemic paraphasias are a common presenting symptom in aphasia and are thought to reflect a deficit in which selecting an incorrect phonemic segment results in the clear-cut substitution of one phonemic segment for another. The current study re-examines the basis of these paraphasias. Seven left hemisphere-damaged aphasics with a range of left hemisphere lesions and clinical diagnoses including Broca's, Conduction, and Wernicke's aphasia, were asked to produce syllable-initial voiced and voiceless fricative consonants, [z] and [s], in CV syllables followed by one of five vowels [i e a o u] in isolation and in a carrier phrase. Acoustic analyses were conducted focusing on two acoustic parameters signaling voicing in fricative consonants: duration and amplitude properties of the fricative noise. Results show that for all participants, regardless of clinical diagnosis or lesion site, phonemic paraphasias leave an acoustic trace of the original target in the error production. These findings challenge the view that phonemic paraphasias arise from a mis-selection of phonemic units followed by its correct implementation, as traditionally proposed. Rather, they appear to derive from a common mechanism with speech errors reflecting the co-activation of a target and competitor resulting in speech output that has some phonetic properties of both segments. PMID:26808838

  4. Slowing of Event-Related Potentials in Primary Progressive Aphasia. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Giaquinto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA is a rare and insidious language impairment that worsens over time. It belongs to the group of fronto–temporal dementias. This study was aimed at assessing the role of speed of cognitive abilities, such as word recognition, in PPA. The design is a single-case, longitudinal study. A male patient suffering from PPA was enrolled and 15 healthy older adults were the control group. An event-related electrical potential connected with word recognition, namely the N400, was delayed by 200 msec at baseline compared to healthy controls and progressively deteriorated. One year later, the delay was greater and two years later the potential had disappeared. Reduced speed of processing is an early pathological factor that negatively affecting higher cognitive functions in APP. Event–related electrical potentials are recommended in the field of aphasia and cognitive decline. They permit observation of a speed decline in higher cognitive abilities, when pathological changes at a central level begin and language comprehension seems to be unaffected.

  5. Duration of content and function words in oral discourse by speakers with fluent aphasia: Preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Lee

    2014-04-01

    Words that had occurred ten times or more in the speech materials was arbitrarily categorized as ‘unique words’ that could more reliably reflect syllable duration. There were a total of 206 unique words (141 content and 65 function words in the aphasia speech materials and 253 unique words (187 content and 66 function in the normal materials, most of them were disyllabic or monosyllabic. A higher lexical diversity in the normal group, but similar number of different function words for both groups, was consistent with earlier findings of impaired lexical access in aphasia. Table 1 displays the average duration per syllable and per word for content and function words among the two speaker groups. Our study showed that word duration in aphasic speech was longer than that in control speech. This is in line with our earlier results of higher speaking rate in normal speech. While content words were longer than function words in the aphasic speech, the difference was not as significant as that in controls.

  6. Measuring prosodic deficits in oral discourse by speakers with fluent aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Prosody refers to the part of phonology that includes speech rhythm, stress, and intonation (Gandour, 1998. Proper intonation is crucial for expressing one’s emotion and linguistic meaning. Most studies examining prosodic deficits have been primarily focused on Broca’s aphasia (e.g., Danly & Shapiro, 1982. The current study proposed a computer-assisted method for systematic and objective examination of intonation patterns in aphasic oral discourse. The speech materials were in Hong Kong Cantonese, which is known of being rich in tones. Since surface F0 contour is the result of complicated interplay between sentence-level intonation and syllable-level lexical tones, the challenge is on how to extract meaningful representations of intonation from acoustic signals. Methods Four individuals with fluent aphasia (two anomic and two transcortical sensory and four gender-, age-, and education-matched controls participated. Based on the Cantonese AphasiaBank protocol (Kong, Law, & Lee, 2009, narrative samples and corresponding audio recordings were collected using discourse tasks of personal monologue, picture and sequential description, and story-telling. There were eight recordings for each subject. Each oral discourse was divided into sentences by manual inspection of the orthographic transcription and the respective acoustic signal. A sentence was defined as a sequence of words that in principle covers a complete thought. However, it was common in spontaneous oral discourse, especially in aphasia, that some of the sentences did not end with a completed expression but switched to a new topic. Occasionally, an obvious interjection was observed during an attempt of restarting a statement. Phoneme-level automatic time alignment was performed on each audio recording using hidden Markov model (HMM based forced alignment technique (Lee, Kong, Chan, & Wang, 2013. F0 was estimated from the acoustic signal at intervals of 0.01 second by

  7. Using lexical variables to predict picture-naming errors in jargon aphasia

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    Catherine Godbold

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Individuals with jargon aphasia produce fluent output which often comprises high proportions of non-word errors (e.g., maf for dog. Research has been devoted to identifying the underlying mechanisms behind such output. Some accounts posit a reduced flow of spreading activation between levels in the lexical network (e.g., Robson et al., 2003. If activation level differences across the lexical network are a cause of non-word outputs, we would predict improved performance when target items reflect an increased flow of activation between levels (e.g. more frequently-used words are often represented by higher resting levels of activation. This research investigates the effect of lexical properties of targets (e.g., frequency, imageability on accuracy, error type (real word vs. non-word and target-error overlap of non-word errors in a picture naming task by individuals with jargon aphasia. Method Participants were 17 individuals with Wernicke’s aphasia, who produced a high proportion of non-word errors (>20% of errors on the Philadelphia Naming Test (PNT; Roach et al., 1996. The data were retrieved from the Moss Aphasic Psycholinguistic Database Project (MAPPD, Mirman et al., 2010. We used a series of mixed models to test whether lexical variables predicted accuracy, error type (real word vs. non-word and target-error overlap for the PNT data. As lexical variables tend to be highly correlated, we performed a principal components analysis to reduce the variables into five components representing variables associated with phonology (length, phonotactic probability, neighbourhood density and neighbourhood frequency, semantics (imageability and concreteness, usage (frequency and age-of-acquisition, name agreement and visual complexity. Results and Discussion Table 1 shows the components that made a significant contribution to each model. Individuals with jargon aphasia produced more correct responses and fewer non-word errors relative to

  8. Agrammatic aphasia verb and argument patterns in Kiswahili-English spontaneous language

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    Hillary K. Sang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The spontaneous and narrative language of Kiswahili agrammatic aphasic and non-brain-damaged speakers was analysed. The bilingual participants were also tested in English to enable comparisons of verb production in the two languages. The significance of this study was to characterise bilingual Kiswahili-English spontaneous agrammatic output. This was done by describing Kiswahili-English bilingual output data with a specific focus on the production of verbs. The description involves comparison of verb and argument production in Kiswahili and English. Methods and procedures: The participants recruited for this study were drawn from two groups of participants (six non-fluent aphasic/agrammatic speakers and six non-braindamaged. From each participant, a sample of spontaneous output was tape-recorded in English and Kiswahili based on the description and narration of the Flood rescue picture’ and the ‘Cookie theft picture’. The data elicited were compared for each subject and between the participants and relevant verb parameters have been analysed. The variables that were studied included mean length of utterance (MLU, inflectional errors, verb tokens and types, copulas and auxiliaries. Further, all verbs produced were classified as per their argument structure. Results: The results from English data supported previous findings on agrammatic output. The agrammatic participants produced utterances with shorter MLU and simpler sentence structure. However, Kiswahili data surprisingly showed reversed results, with agrammatic speakers producing longer utterances than non-brain-damaged (NBD controls. The results also revealed selective impairment in some agrammatic speakers who made inflectional errors. The verb argument structure showed contrasting results, with agrammatic speakers preferring transitive verbs whilst the NBD speakers used more intransitive verbs.Conclusions: The study attempts for the first time to characterise English

  9. Effect of early rehabilitation training on aphasia after stroke%早期康复训练对脑卒中后失语症的疗效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭春燕; 周晔; 刘驰

    2003-01-01

    @@ BACKGROUND:Stroke is the main reason of aphasia which etiology is very complicated and living quality of patients is often affected.Language trainning has an important significance for patients to return to society.

  10. A Survey into Western Studies of Aphasia, Language and Formulaic Chunks%域外失语症与语言、语块研究纵览

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李美霞; 谢媛

    2015-01-01

    失语症传统上隶属临床医学和神经科学范畴,近些年来随着语言学与认知神经科学、临床医学等学科的交叉合作,它也成了语言学研究的重大课题。在欧美国家,失语症与语言及语块相结合的研究已取得令人瞩目的成就。本文将从失语症研究中大脑与语言关系之理论演变,失语症与语言及语块研究历史进程以及失语症与语言及语块研究未来发展趋势3方面对失语症与语言及语块在域外相结合的研究作一综述,以期梳理该领域的研究进程,为国内失语症与语言及语块研究者提供新的研究思路、研究视角和研究方法,从而加速汉语失语症与语言及语块相结合的研究步伐,推动语言学、神经科学等学科的发展。%Traditionally aphasia has been a very important topic in the domains of clinical medicine and neuroscience. In recent decades, with the multidisciplinary cooperation of linguistics and cognitive neuroscience, clinical medicine, etc., aphasia has become a hot topic in the ifeld of linguistics. In western countries, studies on aphasia and language (including formulaic chunks) are numerous and fruitful. In the present article, we are going to summarize and comment on the studies of aphasia and language (including formulaic chunks) abroad from the following three aspects: (1) the changing processes of the theories of aphasia and language (including formulaic chunks); (2) the historical developments of the studies between aphasia and language as well as formulaic chunks;(3) the development trend of aphasia and language, and aphasia and formulaic chunks. Thus, this article aims to marshal the research processes in this area, and to provide new insights and research methods for linguistic aphasia studies at home so as to accelerate the research on aphasia and Chinese language, esp. aphasia and formulaic chunks, and ifnally to promote the development of linguistics, neuroscience and

  11. Conduction Aphasia, Sensory-Motor Integration, and Phonological Short-term Memory – an Aggregate analysis of Lesion and fMRI data

    OpenAIRE

    Buchsbaum, Bradley R.; Baldo, Juliana; Okada, Kayoko; Berman, Karen F.; Dronkers, Nina; D’Esposito, Mark; Hickok, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Conduction aphasia is a language disorder characterized by frequent speech errors, impaired verbatim repetition, a deficit in phonological short-term memory, and naming difficulties in the presence of otherwise fluent and grammatical speech output. While traditional models of conduction aphasia have typically implicated white matter pathways, recent advances in lesions reconstruction methodology applied to groups of patients have implicated left temporoparietal zones. Parallel work using func...

  12. Language-Specific Effects on Story and Procedural Narrative tasks between Korean-speaking and English-speaking Individuals with Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee Eun Sung

    2015-04-01

    Results suggested that Korean-speaking individuals with aphasia produced more numbers of different verbs, number of verbs per utterance and higher VNRs than English speakers. Both groups generated more words in story. The significant two-way interactions between the language group and task type suggested that there are task-specific effects on linguistic measures across the groups. The study implied that the linguistic characteristics differentially affected language symptoms of aphasia across the different languages and task types.

  13. 失语症恢复的研究与进展%Research and development of aphasia recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金旻; 赵纯; 曹京波

    2006-01-01

    目的:临床中约有70%的脑卒中患者存在着不同程度的功能障碍,其中失语症影响了患者的社会交往能力,甚至给社会和家庭带来沉重的经济负担.本文综述了有关失语症恢复机制的文献,力求为进一步的研究提供借鉴.资料来源:应用计算机检索Medline1980-01/2004-01期间的相关文章,检索词"aphasia,recovery","language,recovery",并限定文章语言种类为English.资料选择:对资料进行初审,选取有关失语症恢复机制的相关文献,然后筛除明显不随机临床试验的研究,对剩余的文献查找全文,进一步判断是否为随机对照实验.纳入标准为随机对照临床研究,无论是否为盲法.资料提炼:共收集到22篇关于失语症恢复机制的相关文献,12篇符合纳入标准.排除的10篇试验均为重复的同一研究.资料综合:语言功能的恢复与性别、年龄、受教育程度、病变性质、病变范围、发病到语言康复的时间及患者语言障碍的自知力、自我纠正能力等因素有关,因此,以往的有关失语症恢复机制的研究各有不同的发现和观点.结论:关于失语症的恢复机制,目前尚无统一的结论.脑语言功能的可塑性可能为失语症的恢复机制.%OBJECTIVE: About 70% patients with stroke have dysfunction at various degrees in clinic, especially aphasia would affect their social communication and even offer a serious economic load for family and social. This paper aims to summarize the relevant articles on aphasia recovery so as to provide researching evidences in the future. DATA SOURCES: Relevant articles were retrieved from the Medline with the key words of "aphasia, recovery, language, recovery" in English from January 1980 to January 2004. STUDY SELECTION: All articles were selected firstly, those which were related to aphasia recovery were selected, and the non-randomly clinical papers were excluded. The full text of rest was looked up to determine whether

  14. Neural mechanisms underlying the facilitation of naming in aphasia using a semantic task: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Shiree

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous attempts to investigate the effects of semantic tasks on picture naming in both healthy controls and people with aphasia have typically been confounded by inclusion of the phonological word form of the target item. As a result, it is difficult to isolate any facilitatory effects of a semantically-focused task to either lexical-semantic or phonological processing. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study examined the neurological mechanisms underlying short-term (within minutes and long-term (within days facilitation of naming from a semantic task that did not include the phonological word form, in both participants with aphasia and age-matched controls. Results Behavioral results showed that a semantic task that did not include the phonological word form can successfully facilitate subsequent picture naming in both healthy controls and individuals with aphasia. The whole brain neuroimaging results for control participants identified a repetition enhancement effect in the short-term, with modulation of activity found in regions that have not traditionally been associated with semantic processing, such as the right lingual gyrus (extending to the precuneus and the left inferior occipital gyrus (extending to the fusiform gyrus. In contrast, the participants with aphasia showed significant differences in activation over both the short- and the long-term for facilitated items, predominantly within either left hemisphere regions linked to semantic processing or their right hemisphere homologues. Conclusions For control participants in this study, the short-lived facilitation effects of a prior semantic task that did not include the phonological word form were primarily driven by object priming and episodic memory mechanisms. However, facilitation effects appeared to engage a predominantly semantic network in participants with aphasia over both the short- and the long-term. The findings of the present study

  15. Carotid angioplasty with stenting for chronic internal carotid artery occlusion: technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Nozomu; Tanasawa, Toshihiko; Okada, Takeshi; Endo, Otone; Yamamoto, Naohito [Kainan Hospital Aichi Prefectural Welfare Federation of Agricultural Cooperatives, Department of Neurosurgery, Aichi (Japan); Miyachi, Shigeru; Hattori, Kenichi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    Carotid angioplasty with stenting (CAS) is becoming accepted as an effective and reliable treatment option for severe carotid artery stenosis. However, it is rarely applied for carotid occlusion, especially in its chronic stage. We report our experience of CAS for chronic internal carotid artery occlusion representing compromised cerebral blood flow using various protection methods. A 77-year-old woman, who was already diagnosed with severe left internal carotid artery stenosis, suddenly had right hemiparesis and aphasia. At that time, she was treated conservatively because her neurological status was quite good, in spite of left carotid artery occlusion. Her symptoms improved in the short term, except slight aphasia, but deteriorated again 18 days from the onset, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed new ischemic lesions. CAS was then performed for the occluded carotid artery on the 23rd day from the first onset. Using the proximal protection technique, the occluded lesion was crossed carefully with a microguidewire. Stents were also placed successfully with the distal protection technique. The occluded carotid artery was completely recanalized without any unfavorable events or neurological deterioration. In this patient, CAS was successfully to treat chronic carotid artery occlusion. These procedures and techniques are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  16. Action and Object Word Writing in a Case of Bilingual Aphasia

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    Maria Kambanaros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the spoken and written naming of a bilingual speaker with aphasia in two languages that differ in morphological complexity, orthographic transparency and script Greek and English. AA presented with difficulties in spoken picture naming together with preserved written picture naming for action words in Greek. In English, AA showed similar performance across both tasks for action and object words, i.e. difficulties retrieving action and object names for both spoken and written naming. Our findings support the hypothesis that cognitive processes used for spoken and written naming are independent components of the language system and can be selectively impaired after brain injury. In the case of bilingual speakers, such processes impact on both languages. We conclude grammatical category is an organizing principle in bilingual dysgraphia.

  17. Measuring working memory in aphasia: Comparing performance on complex span and N-back tasks

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    Maria Ivanova

    2014-04-01

    No significant correlations were observed between performance on complex span task and N-back tasks.Furthermore, performance on the modified listening span was related to performance on the comprehension subtest of the QASA, while no relationship was found for 2-back and 0-back tasks.Our results mirror studies in healthy controls that demonstrated no relationship between performance on the two tasks(Jaeggi et al., 2010; Kane et al., 2007. Thus although N-back tasks seem similar to traditional complex span measures and may also index abilities related to cognitive processing, the evidence to date does not warrant their direct association with the construct of WM. Implications for future investigation of cognitive deficits in aphasia will be discussed.

  18. The Time-course of Lexical Reactivation of Unaccusative Verbs in Broca’s Aphasia

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    Natalie Sullivan

    2014-04-01

    Similar to Friedmann et al.’s (2008 findings of normally delayed re-access of the displaced argument, the results for all 12 participants (Fig.1 revealed priming only at the downstream probe position [*2], t(11=3.08, p=.01. In a separate subgroup analysis, the same pattern was found for the Broca group, t(6=4.77, p=.003. These results suggest that participants with Broca’s aphasia can take advantage of the inherent delay of unaccusatives and exhibit similar patterns of syntactic dependency linking as unimpaired individuals. We discuss these findings with reference to its generalizability across patient groups, the DLA, and the interaction between lexical and syntactic processes.

  19. Unexpected Reading Dissociation in a Brazilian “nisei” with Crossed Aphasia

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    P. Caramelli

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an increased interest in reading impairments in the Japanese language, due to its particular writing system which includes two different scripts, Kanji (logograms and Kana (phonograms. Reading dissociations between Kanji and Kana have been described, showing that each system is processed differently by the cerebral hemispheres. We describe the case of a 68 year old Brazilian “nisei” (i.e. born from Japanese parents who had knowledge of both Japanese and Portuguese. He presented an ischemic stroke affecting the right hemisphere and subsequently developed a Broca's aphasia and an unexpected reading dissociation, with an impairment in Kana reading comprehension and a good performance in Kanji and in Portuguese. These findings suggest that the patient's right and left hemispheres have assumed opposite roles not only for oral but also for written language decodification.

  20. A Survey on Aphasia of Chinese Culture among Non-English Majors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迟腾飞

    2014-01-01

    Chinese college students have learned English for years, but they have put too much emphasis on English language and the culture in English speaking countries and societies. Therefore, they have great difficulty in expressing their own traditional culture in English, failing in inter-cultural communication. Since the foreign language education in China has almost occupied by English and its culture, linguistic imperialism and educational imperialism come into our vision. This paper makes a survey on Aphasia of Chinese Culture among Chinese college students, including the textbooks used and students' performance in specific Chinese culture items. And this paper aims at getting to know its current situation and tries to find possible solutions to this problem.

  1. Primary progressive aphasia patients evaluated using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel based volumetry-preliminary results

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    Fábio Pascotto de Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available There are individuals who have a progressive language deficit without presenting cognitive deficits in other areas. One of the diseases related to this presentation is primary progressive aphasia (PPA. OBJECTIVE: Identify by means of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and measurements of cortical volume, brain areas that lead to dysphasia when presenting signs of impaired connectivity or reduced volume. METHOD: Four patients with PPA were evaluated using DTI, and measurements of cortical volumes in temporal areas. These patients were compared with two normal volunteers. RESULTS: There is a trend to a difference in the number and volume of related fibers between control group and patients with PPA. Comparing cortical volumes in temporal areas between groups yielded a trend to a smaller volume in PPA patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with PPA have a trend to impairment in cortical and subcortical levels regarding relevant areas.

  2. Cognitive neuropsychological analysis of differential reading and spelling disorder mechanisms in a patient with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kosei; Uno, Akira

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if differential reading and spelling mechanisms were involved in a Japanese patient with aphasia. In our case, the patient scored low on all of the administered reading tasks, suggesting that both the reading lexical and non-lexical routes were impaired. In contrast, his writing-to-dictation score for Kana nonwords was high, suggesting that the spelling non-lexical route was intact. However, the patient scored low on a writing-to-dictation task comprised of high-familiarity Kanji words. The spelling lexical route was thought to be impaired. Therefore, the mechanism(s) involved in reading and spelling may differ in this case. PMID:26927940

  3. Treatment of Aphasia Combining Neuromodulation and Behavioral Intervention: Taking an Impairment and Functional Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E. Galletta

    2014-04-01

    Baseline measures of naming nouns and verbs in single words, and sentences, were obtained. While there was no improvement in production of nouns or verbs in single words or sentence production after sham tDCS, and no improvement of noun production after anodal tDCS and speech-language treatment, production of verbs in sentences improved after a 10-session treatment block of anodal tDCS and behavioral therapy. Conclusion Administering a behavioral treatment that is impairment-based as well as functionally-based in conjunction with tDCS is both feasible and promising. Anodal tDCS in conjunction with behavioral intervention is a treatment approach that warrants continued investigation. The results will be discussed in relation to the tDCS and aphasia literature.

  4. Recursive Subsystems in Aphasia and Alzheimer's Disease: Case Studies in Syntax and Theory of Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánréti, Zoltán; Hoffmann, Ildikó; Vincze, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between recursive sentence embedding and theory-of-mind (ToM) inference is investigated in three persons with Broca's aphasia, two persons with Wernicke's aphasia, and six persons with mild and moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). We asked questions of four types about photographs of various real-life situations. Type 4 questions asked participants about intentions, thoughts, or utterances of the characters in the pictures ("What may X be thinking/asking Y to do?"). The expected answers typically involved subordinate clauses introduced by conjunctions or direct quotations of the characters' utterances. Broca's aphasics did not produce answers with recursive sentence embedding. Rather, they projected themselves into the characters' mental states and gave direct answers in the first person singular, with relevant ToM content. We call such replies "situative statements." Where the question concerned the mental state of the character but did not require an answer with sentence embedding ("What does X hate?"), aphasics gave descriptive answers rather than situative statements. Most replies given by persons with AD to Type 4 questions were grammatical instances of recursive sentence embedding. They also gave a few situative statements but the ToM content of these was irrelevant. In more than one third of their well-formed sentence embeddings, too, they conveyed irrelevant ToM contents. Persons with moderate AD were unable to pass secondary false belief tests. The results reveal double dissociation: Broca's aphasics are unable to access recursive sentence embedding but they can make appropriate ToM inferences; moderate AD persons make the wrong ToM inferences but they are able to access recursive sentence embedding. The double dissociation may be relevant for the nature of the relationship between the two recursive capacities. Broca's aphasics compensated for the lack of recursive sentence embedding by recursive ToM reasoning represented in very simple

  5. Syntactic and Morphosyntactic Processing in Stroke-Induced and Primary Progressive Aphasia

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    Cynthia K. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports findings derived from three experiments examining syntactic and morphosyntactic processing in individuals with agrammatic and logopenic variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA-G and PPA-L, respectively and stroke-induced agrammatic and anomic aphasia (StrAg and StrAn, respectively. We examined comprehension and production of canonical and noncanonical sentence structures and production of tensed and nontensed verb forms using constrained tasks in experiments 1 and 2, using the Northwestern Assessment of Verbs and Sentences (NAVS [57] and the Northwestern Assessment of Verb Inflection (NAVI, Thompson and Lee, experimental version test batteries, respectively. Experiment 3 examined free narrative samples, focusing on syntactic and morphosyntactic measures, i.e. production of grammatical sentences, noun to verb ratio, open-class to closed-class word production ratio, and the production of correctly inflected verbs. Results indicate that the two agrammatic groups (i.e., PPA-G and StrAg pattern alike on syntactic and morphosyntactic measures, showing more impaired noncanonical compared to canonical sentence comprehension and production and greater difficulties producing tensed compared to nontensed verb forms. Their spontaneous speech also contained significantly fewer grammatical sentences and correctly inflected verbs, and they produced a greater proportion of nouns compared to verbs, than healthy speakers. In contrast, PPA-L and StrAn individuals did not display these deficits, and performed significantly better than the agrammatic groups on these measures. The findings suggest that agrammatism, whether induced by degenerative disease or stroke, is associated with characteristic deficits in syntactic and morphosyntactic processing. We therefore recommend that linguistically sophisticated tests and narrative analysis procedures be used to systematically evaluate the linguistic ability of individuals with PPA, contributing to

  6. The representation of lexical-syntactic information: evidence from syntactic and lexical retrieval impairments in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biran, Michal; Friedmann, Naama

    2012-10-01

    This study explored lexical-syntactic information - syntactic information that is stored in the lexicon - and its relation to syntactic and lexical impairments in aphasia. We focused on two types of lexical-syntactic information: predicate argument structure (PAS) of verbs (the number and types of arguments the verb selects) and grammatical gender of nouns. The participants were 17 Hebrew-speaking individuals with aphasia who had a syntactic deficit (agrammatism) or a lexical retrieval deficit (anomia) located at the semantic lexicon, the phonological output lexicon, or the phonological output buffer. After testing the participants' syntactic and lexical retrieval abilities and establishing the functional loci of their deficits, we assessed their PAS and grammatical gender knowledge. This assessment included sentence completion, sentence production, sentence repetition, and grammaticality judgment tasks. The participants' performance on these tests yielded several important dissociations. Three agrammatic participants had impaired syntax but unimpaired PAS knowledge. Three agrammatic participants had impaired syntax but unimpaired grammatical gender knowledge. This indicates that lexical-syntactic information is represented separately from syntax, and can be spared even when syntax at the sentence level, such as embedding and movement are impaired. All 5 individuals with phonological output buffer impairment and all 3 individuals with phonological output lexicon impairment had preserved lexical-syntactic knowledge. These selective impairments indicate that lexical-syntactic information is represented at a lexical stage prior to the phonological lexicon and the phonological buffer. Three participants with impaired PAS (aPASia) and impaired grammatical gender who showed intact lexical-semantic knowledge indicate that the lexical-syntactic information is represented separately from the semantic lexicon. This led us to conclude that lexical-syntactic information is

  7. Is the logopenic-variant of primary progressive aphasia a unitary disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyton, Cristian E; Hodges, John R; McLean, Catriona A; Kril, Jillian J; Piguet, Olivier; Ballard, Kirrie J

    2015-06-01

    Logopenic progressive aphasia is one of the clinical presentations of primary progressive aphasia and formally defined by the co-occurrence of impaired naming and sentence repetition. Impaired naming is attributed to failure of lexical retrieval, which is a multi-staged process subserved by anatomically segregated brain regions. By dissecting the neurocognitive processes involved in impaired naming, we aimed to disentangle the clinical and neuroanatomical heterogeneity of this syndrome. Twenty-one individuals (66.7% females, age range 53-83 years) who fulfilled diagnostic criteria for logopenic variant and had at least two clinical and language assessments, 1 year apart, were recruited and matched for age, sex distribution and level of education with a healthy control sample (n = 18). All participants underwent a structural brain scan at the first visit and surface-wise statistical analysis using Freesurfer. Seventeen participants with logopenic variant underwent amyloid imaging, with 14 demonstrating high amyloid retention. Based on their performance on single-word comprehension, repetition and confrontation naming, three subgroups of logopenic cases with distinctive linguistic profiles and distribution of atrophy were identified. The first subgroup (n = 10) demonstrated pure anomia and left-sided atrophy in the posterior inferior parietal lobule and lateral temporal cortex. The second subgroup (n = 6), presented additional mild deficits in single-word comprehension, and also exhibited bilateral thinning of the fusiform gyri. The third subgroup (n = 5) showed additional impaired single-word repetition, and cortical thinning focused on the left superior temporal gyrus. The subgroups differed in the proportion of cases with high amyloid retention and in the rate of decline of naming performance over time, suggesting that neurodegeneration spreads differentially throughout regions subserving word processing. In line with previous reports, these results

  8. Clinical Application of Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment Battery-Second Edition in Evaluating of Cognitive Function of Chinese Patients with Post-stroke Aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng-zhi Yu; Shu-jun Jiang; Jun Li; Sheng Bi; Fei Li; Tao Xie; Rui Wang; Xiao-tan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical application value of Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) battery in Chinese patients with post-stroke aphasia. Methods Cognitive functions of 59 Chinese patients with aphasia following a stroke were assessed with the Chinese version of the second edition of LOTCA battery and their linguistic functions were tested with the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) Scale, respectively. The results of LOTCA were analyzed and compared across different groups, in the light of gender, age, educational background, the length of illness, and the degree of aphasia. Results Neither the score of subtests of the LOTCA nor the overall scores of LOTCA of aphasia patients with different gender and educational background differed (all P>0.05). In different age groups, apart from thinking operation (F=3.373, P=0.016), visuomotor organization (F=3.124, P=0.022), attention (F=3.729, P=0.009) and the total score (F=2.683, P=0.041), there was no difference in terms of the other subtest scores of LOTCA (all P>0.05). In the groups of different length of time with illness, apart from orientation (F=2.982, P=0.039) and attention (F=3.485, P=0.022), the score of other subtests and the total score of LOTCA were not different (all P>0.05). In the groups of different degree of aphasia, apart from attention (F=2.061, P=0.074), both the score of other subtests and the total score of LOTCA differed (all P Conclusion LOTCA might be suitable to assessing the cognitive ability of post-stroke Chinese patients with aphasia.

  9. Achievement report for fiscal 1998. Home rehabilitation system for aphasia patients; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Shitsugosho zaitaku rehabilitation shien system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    Development has been made on the element technologies for a home rehabilitation system for aphasia patients. First, studies were performed on an authoring procedure for aphasia patient training, and partial trial production and development were carried out on an authoring system for the training program formula. Then, studies were executed on a training simulation and analysis filter, and partial trial production and development were implemented on a home rehabilitation supporting and self-teaching system. Next, an input and output mechanism for voice signal processing was studied, and aphasia patient and caregiver human interface was partially fabricated on a trial basis. In addition, a remote rehabilitation communicating method was researched, and partial trial production was carried out on a remote rehabilitation evaluation and diagnosis support means. Finally, communication assisting means were researched, and a communication assisting system was partially produced on a trial basis. Good evaluation results were given on a demonstration system. Although partial indications were given on minute parts, practical agreement was obtained as a whole. Great expectation was given particularly on the remote rehabilitation system and the authoring system. (NEDO)

  10. Evaluating the Benefits of Aphasia Intervention Delivered in Virtual Reality: Results of a Quasi-Randomised Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jane; Booth, Tracey; Devane, Niamh; Galliers, Julia; Greenwood, Helen; Hilari, Katerina; Talbot, Richard; Wilson, Stephanie; Woolf, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study evaluated an intervention for people with aphasia delivered in a novel virtual reality platform called EVA Park. EVA Park contains a number of functional and fantastic locations and allows for interactive communication between multiple users. Twenty people with aphasia had 5 weeks’ intervention, during which they received daily language stimulation sessions in EVA Park from a support worker. The study employed a quasi randomised design, which compared a group that received immediate intervention with a waitlist control group. Outcome measures explored the effects of intervention on communication and language skills, communicative confidence and feelings of social isolation. Compliance with the intervention was also explored through attrition and usage data. Results There was excellent compliance with the intervention, with no participants lost to follow up and most (18/20) receiving at least 88% of the intended treatment dose. Intervention brought about significant gains on a measure of functional communication. Gains were achieved by both groups of participants, once intervention was received, and were well maintained. Changes on the measures of communicative confidence and feelings of social isolation were not achieved. Results are discussed with reference to previous aphasia therapy findings. PMID:27518188

  11. Translational Treatment of Aphasia Combining Neuromodulationand Behavioral Intervention for Lexical Retrieval: Implications from a Single Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E. Galletta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, a non-invasive method of brain stimulation, is an adjunctive research-therapy for aphasia. The concept supporting translational application of tDCS is that brain plasticity, facilitated by language intervention, can be enhanced by non-invasive brain stimulation. This study combined tDCS with an ecologically-focused behavioral approach that involved training nouns and verbs in sentences. MethodParticipant: A 43-year-old, right-handed male with fluent-anomic aphasia who sustained a single-left-hemisphere-temporal-parietal stroke was recruited. Treatment: Instrumentation included the Soterix Medical 1x1 Device. Anodal tDCS was applied over Broca’s area. Behavioral materials included: sentence production, naming in the sentence context, and implementation of a social-conversational-discourse treatment.Design and Procedures: The independent variable of this crossover case-study was tDCS, and the dependent variables were language and quality-of-life measures. In each session the subject received language treatment with the first twenty minutes additionally including tDCS. ResultsPerformance in naming nouns and verbs in single words and sentences were obtained. Verb production in the sentence context increased after active anodal tDCS and speech-language treatment. ConclusionAphasia treatment that involves naming in the sentence context in conjunction with translational application of tDCS may be a promising approach for language-recovery post stroke.

  12. [Chronicity, chronicization, systematization of delusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapet, P; Fernandez, C; Galtier, M C; Gisselmann, A

    1984-05-01

    Chronicity in psychopathology is indicative of a term, a decay. Chronicization only leads the way to this term. Here, chronicization is taken literally as an inscription in the time course of delusions. The mechanism of systematization seems to be a central mark in the approach to chronic delusions. It is not an alienation or an irreversible closing but an attempted accommodation with reality in the life of psychotic subjects, irrespective of the delusional structure. The role of therapy and drug treatment as a follow-up may in that case assume another meaning.

  13. The application of aphasia strengthening training software system in aphasia after stroke%失语症强化训练软件系统在脑卒中后失语治疗中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨标; 古剑雄; 梁钊明; 黄小妹; 林长缨; 李波

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of aphasia strengthening training software system on aphasia patients after stroke .Methods Forty aphasia patients after stroke in our hospital were selected in recent years and randomly divided into observation group (n=20) and control group (n=20).In control group, speech therapists with routine and artificial method was provided , and family self training by the help of the family members to complete the speech therapist project arrangement were given to the subjects;while in observation group , speech therapists using self -developed aphasia training software system were provided , and the generated system training packages for training in the home environment were given .Before and after the treatment , the Chinese standard aphasia examination ( CRRCAE ) of language function evaluation were recorded for analysis .Results The repetition, oral expression, oral reading, reading, copying, description and dictation ability were significantly improved in both groups , while they were significantly in ob-servation group (P<0.05).Conclusion The aphasia training software system is well developed with satisfied efficacy on aphasia after stroke .%目的:研发及应用失语症强化训练软件系统,观察其对脑卒中后失语的治疗效果。方法选取40例脑卒中后失语症患者,分为观察组和对照组,每组20例。对照组由言语治疗师对患者采用常规人工方法进行治疗,再由家属协助患者进行家庭自我训练,完成言语治疗师安排的作业项目;观察组由言语治疗师使用自行研发的失语症强化训练软件系统对患者进行治疗,再使用该系统生成的训练软件包在家庭环境进行强化训练。在治疗前后两组患者均采用汉语标准失语症检查表进行语言功能评估,统计并对比两组结果。结果治疗2个月后,两组患者的复述、口语表达、朗读、阅读理解、抄写、描写、听写

  14. Assessment of arcuate fasciculus with diffusion-tensor tractography may predict the prognosis of aphasia in patients with left middle cerebral artery infarcts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosomi, Akiko; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Kuriyama, Nagato; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan); Yamada, Kei; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    It is often clinically difficult to assess the severity of aphasia in the earliest stage of cerebral infarction. A method enabling objective assessment of verbal function is needed for this purpose. We examined whether diffusion tensor (DT) tractography is of clinical value in assessing aphasia. Thirteen right-handed patients with left middle cerebral artery infarcts who were scanned within 2 days after stroke onset were enrolled in this study. Magnetic resonance data of ten control subjects were also examined by DT tractography. Based on the severity of aphasia at discharge, patients were divided into two groups: six patients in the aphasic group and seven in the nonaphasic group. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and number of arcuate fasciculus fibers were evaluated. Asymmetry index was calculated for both FA and number of fibers. FA values for the arcuate fasciculus fibers did not differ between hemispheres in either the patient groups or the controls. Number of arcuate fasciculus fibers exhibited a significant leftward asymmetry in the controls and the nonaphasic group but not in the aphasic group. Asymmetry index of number of fibers was significantly lower (rightward) in the aphasic group than in the nonaphasic (P = 0.015) and control (P = 0.005) groups. Loss of leftward asymmetry in number of AF fibers predicted aphasia at discharge with a sensitivity of 0.83 and specificity of 0.86. Asymmetry of arcuate fasciculus fibers by DT tractography may deserve to be assessed in acute infarction for predicting the fate of vascular aphasia. (orig.)

  15. 丘脑性失语症的临床研究%Clinical research on thalamic aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦卫华; 寇丽; 刘汉伟; 韩蓉蓉

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨丘脑血管病所致的丘脑性失语症的言语特点、解剖机制及预后.方法 选择2002年6月至2008年7月我科收治的13例丘脑性失语症患者,采用汉语失语症检查法进行失语检查,同时行神经系统检查、常规实验室检查,及头颅CT、MRI检查.所有患者按原发病治疗.结果 13例患者均有自发言语减少,音量减少;3例伴命名障碍;10例伴错语;11例伴理解障碍.3例头颅CT示优势半球侧丘脑出血;头颅CT正常的10例中,9例头部MRI示优势半球丘脑腹外侧核中上部处腔隙性梗死灶、1例示优势半球丘脑背内侧核腔隙性梗死灶.所有患者于5~12天丘脑性失语的临床表现肖失.结论 丘脑性失语症有其独特的言语特点,优势半球侧丘脑腹外侧核和丘脑背内侧核可能为责任病灶区.头颅MRI对丘脑出血及梗死均敏感,能明确丘脑性失语症的病灶.经积极治疗原发病,丘脑性失语症预后较好.%Objective To study the language characteristics, anatomical mechanism and prognosis of thalamic aphasia caused by cerebrovascular diseases of thalamus. Methods Thirteen patients with thalamic aphasia during June 2002 to July 2008 in our department were studied. Aphasia examination, physical examination of central nervous system, routine laboratory examinations, as well as CT and MRI scanning of brain were taken. All patients were treated according to thalamic infarction or hemorrhage. Results All patients presented as sparse verbal output and low tone, 3 cases accompanied with anomia, 10 cases with paraphasia, and 11 cases with disturbance of comprehension. Thalamic hemorrhage in dominant hemisphere was detected in three cases by CT scanning. Among the other ten patients with normal CT, lacunar infarction in ventrolateral nucleus of thalamas (VL) of dominant hemisphere was detected in nine cases, while lacunar infarction in dorsomedial nucleus of thalamas ( DM ) of dominant hemisphere was detected in one

  16. Review of research progress of computer used in aphasia rehabilitation nursing%计算机应用于失语症患者康复护理的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶颖; 何小俊

    2016-01-01

    The computer used in aphasia rehabilitation nursing status are reviewed. This paper will mainly elaborate the overview of computer implementation in aphasia rehabilitation nursing and several applications of computer are used in aphasia rehabilitation nursing, so as to trace the progress of computer application in aphasia rehabilitation nursing and provide clinical guidance for aphasia rehabilitation nursing.%对计算机在失语症康复护理中应用现况进行综述,主要阐述国内外计算机在失语症康复护理中应用的概况及计算机在失语症康复护理中的几种应用,以期追踪计算机应用于失语症康复护理研究的进展,为失语症康复护理提供临床信息指导.

  17. An Exploratory Investigation of e-REST: Teletherapy for Chronically Agrammatic Speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina B. Ruiter

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Delivering aphasia therapy via telecommunication may provide a means to deliver intensive therapy in a cost-effective way. Teletherapy, remotely-administered (language treatment, may support the repetitive drill practices that people with chronic aphasia need to perform when learning to compensate for their lasting language difficulties. The use of teletherapy may allow speech and language pathologists (SLPs to focus in-person sessions more strongly on the generalisation of therapy effects to daily life. This single subject study is an investigation whether a teletherapy application called e-REST meets the criteria of accessibility, user-friendliness, as well as effectiveness. e-REST, the teletherapy version of the Dutch and adapted Reduced Syntax Therapy, teaches chronically aphasic speakers of Dutch who experience difficulties in sentence production to convey their messages in a kind of telegraphic style. The results obtained suggest that it is reasonable to conduct a larger study into the user-friendliness, accessibility, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of e-REST.

  18. Rapid improvement in verbal fluency and aphasia following perispinal etanercept in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross Hyman

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent clinical studies point to rapid and sustained clinical, cognitive, and behavioral improvement in both Alzheimer's disease and primary progressive aphasia following weekly perispinal administration of etanercept, a TNF-alpha inhibitor that acts by blocking the binding of this cytokine to its receptors. This outcome is concordant with recent basic science studies suggesting that TNF-alpha functions in vivo as a gliotransmitter that regulates synaptic function in the brain. We hypothesized that perispinal etanercept had the potential to improve verbal function in Alzheimer's disease, so we included several standarized measures of verbal ability to evaluate language skills in a clinical trial of perispinal etanercept for Alzheimer's disease. Methods This was a prospective, single-center, open-label, pilot study, in which 12 patients with mild-to-severe Alzheimer's disease were administered etanercept, 25–50 mg, weekly by perispinal administration for six months. Two additional case studies are presented. Results Two-tailed, paired t-tests were conducted comparing baseline performance to 6-month performance on all neuropsychological measures. Test batteries included the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition, Adult Version; Logical Memory I and II(WMS-LM-II from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Abbreviated; the Comprehensive Trail Making Test (TMT; Boston Naming Test; and letter(FAS and category verbal fluency. All measures revealed a significant effect except for the Boston Naming Test and the TMT-4, with WMS-LM-II being marginally significant at p = .05. The FAS test for letter fluency was most highly significant with a p Conclusion In combination with the previously reported results of perispinal etanercept in Alzheimer's disease and primary progressive aphasia, these results further argue that larger scale studies of this therapeutic intervention, including Phase 3 trials, are warranted in dementias. In addition

  19. Chronic cholecystitis

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    ... foods may relieve symptoms in people. However, the benefit of a low-fat diet has not been proven. Alternative Names Cholecystitis - chronic Images Cholecystitis, CT scan Cholecystitis, cholangiogram Cholecystolithiasis Gallstones, cholangiogram Cholecystogram References Wang ...

  20. Chronic Meningitis

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    ... School Lunch Lines FDA Cracks Down on Antibacterial Soaps Health Tip: Schedule a Back-to-School Dental ... the Professional Version Meningitis Introduction to Meningitis Acute Bacterial Meningitis Viral Meningitis Noninfectious Meningitis Recurrent Meningitis Chronic ...

  1. Mechanism of anomia in Chinese Broca aphasia patients%汉语Broca失语症患者命名障碍机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱秋江; 陈卓铭

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the mechanism of anomia in Broca aphasia patients.Methods Chinese aphasiaexamination method was used to screen Broca aphasia patients.Twenty Broca aphasia patients and 20 normal people were performed neuropsychological tests:picture naming test,word recognition test,vocabulary classification test and reading a map test.Results The accuracy of reading a map test of patients with Broca aphasia (69.60%) was significantly higher than that of picture naming (9.50%,P<0.05).Conclusion The glyph conversion semantic function in Chinese Broca aphasia patients is significantly better than function of semantic access speech output.The anomia in Chinese Broca patients with aphasia is mainly due to the difficulties caused by voice activation.%目的 探索Broca失语症患者命名障碍的机制. 方法 自2014年6月至2015年3月期间,分别对20名Broca失语症患者及正常人行神经心理学测验,包括看图命名测验、词汇辨认、词汇分类与看词指图测验. 结果 Broca失语症患者看字指图准确率(69.60%)高于看图命名准确率(9.50%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 汉语Broca失语症患者的字形通达语义功能显著优于语义通达语音输出功能,命名障碍主要是由于语音激活困难导致的.

  2. Mechanisms of recovery from aphasia: evidence from serial xenon 133 cerebral blood flow studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 21 patients who suffered aphasia resulting from left hemisphere ischemic infarction, the xenon 133 inhalation cerebral blood flow technique was used to measure cerebral blood flow within 3 months and 5 to 12 months after stroke. In addition to baseline measurements, cerebral blood flow measurements were also carried out while the patients were performing purposeful listening. In patients with incomplete recovery of comprehension and left posterior temporal-inferior parietal lesions, greater cerebral blood flow occurred with listening in the right inferior frontal region in the late studies than in the early studies. In patients with nearly complete recovery of comprehension and without left posterior temporal-inferior parietal lesions, early listening studies showed diffuse right hemisphere increases in cerebral blood flow. Later listening studies in this latter patient group showed greater cerebral blood flow in the left posterior temporal-inferior parietal region. The study provides evidence for participation of the right hemisphere in language comprehension in recovering aphasics, and for later return of function in left hemisphere regions that may have been functionally impaired early during recovery

  3. Computer-aided therapy in aphasia therapy: evaluation of assignment criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christina; Schupp, Wilfried; Seewald, Barbara; Haase, Ingo

    2007-12-01

    Recent studies in neurorehabilitation research show that success in aphasia therapy is linked to a high treatment frequency. Computer-aided therapy offers a solution to the dilemma of increasing therapy frequency while maintaining or reducing the load on therapists' resources. Until now it has, however, been unclear which patients can reasonably be treated with computer-aided therapy. The study investigates therapists' indication choices of a new computer-aided training programme designed to supplement conventional speech therapy for aphasics (EvoCare therapy, Dr Hein GmbH, Nuremberg, Germany). The goal was to ascertain which patients were suitable for the training and which (individual) allocation criteria played a role in the therapists' decision for or against the new therapy concept. The study is an explorative prospective application study in inpatient rehabilitation care. To determine the allocation criteria, comprehensive medical, psychosocial and neurolinguistic questionnaires were used. The speech therapists were surveyed separately. Forty-nine of the 75 patients were treated with EvoCare therapy; the others received purely conventional speech therapy. Patients chosen for computer-aided therapy suffered more frequently from problems with everyday mobility and serious neurolinguistic disorders. Type and extent of brain damage, degree of reliance on caregivers, sensomotoric and cognitive deficits and depression were irrelevant to the allocation. PMID:17975448

  4. Neuroradiological findings in primary progressive aphasia: CT, MRI and cerebral perfusion SPECT

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    Sinnatamby, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Antoun, N.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Freer, C.E.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Miles, K.A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hodges, J.R. [Dept. of Neurology, Addenbrooke`s Hospital NHS Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is defined as progressive decline in language for 2 or more years with preservation of activities of daily living and general cognitive functions. Whereas the clinical features of this syndrome have been well documented, the neuroradiological findings have not been studied systematically. We studied 13 patients with PPA retrospectively: 10 underwent CT, 12 MRI and 12 cerebral perfusion studies using {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT. CT and MR images were scored for focal atrophy by two independent assessors. Initial qualitative assessment of SPECT images was confirmed by quantitative analysis. CY was normal in 5 patients. Focal atrophy, affecting predominantly the left temporal lobe, was seen in 4 of 10 patients on CT, and 10 of 12 on MRI. Atrophy was localised primarily to the superior and middle temporal gyri on MRI. All 12 patients who underwent SPECT had unilateral temporal lobe perfusion defects, in 2 patients of whom MRI was normal. CT is relatively insensitive to focal abnormalities in PPA; MRI and SPECT are the imaging modalities of choice. MRI allows accurate, specific localisation of atrophy with the temporal neocortex. SPECT may reveal a functional decrease in cerebral perfusion prior to establishment of structural change. (orig.)

  5. Treatment for Apraxia of Speech in Nonfluent Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia

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    M. L. Henry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of literature examining the utility of behavioral treatment in primary progressive aphasia (PPA. There are, however, no studies exploring treatment approaches to improve speech production in individuals with apraxia of speech (AOS associated with the nonfluent variant of PPA. The purpose of this study was to examine a novel approach to treatment of AOS in nonfluent PPA. We implemented a treatment method using structured oral reading as a tool for improving production of multisyllabic words in an individual with mild AOS and nonfluent variant PPA. Our participant showed a reduction in speech errors during reading of novel text that was maintained at one year post-treatment. Generalization of improved speech production was observed on repetition of words and sentences and the participant showed stability of speech production over time in connected speech. Results suggest that oral reading treatment may offer an efficient and effective means of addressing multisyllabic word production in AOS associated with nonfluent PPA, with lasting and generalized treatment effects.

  6. Lack of Frank Agrammatism in the Nonfluent Agrammatic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia

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    Graham, Naida L.; Leonard, Carol; Tang-Wai, David F.; Black, Sandra; Chow, Tiffany W.; Scott, Chris J.M.; McNeely, Alicia A.; Masellis, Mario; Rochon, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Frank agrammatism, defined as the omission and/or substitution of grammatical morphemes with associated grammatical errors, is variably reported in patients with nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfPPA). This study addressed whether frank agrammatism is typical in agrammatic nfPPA patients when this feature is not required for diagnosis. Method We assessed grammatical production in 9 patients who satisfied current diagnostic criteria. Although the focus was agrammatism, motor speech skills were also evaluated to determine whether dysfluency arose primarily from apraxia of speech (AOS), instead of, or in addition to, agrammatism. Volumetric MRI analyses provided impartial imaging-supported diagnosis. Results The majority of cases exhibited neither frank agrammatism nor AOS. Conclusion There are nfPPA patients with imaging-supported diagnosis and preserved motor speech skills who do not exhibit frank agrammatism, and this may persist beyond the earliest stages of the illness. Because absence of frank agrammatism is a subsidiary diagnostic feature in the logopenic variant of PPA, this result has implications for differentiation of the nonfluent and logopenic variants, and indicates that PPA patients with nonfluent speech in the absence of frank agrammatism or AOS do not necessarily have the logopenic variant.

  7. Jonathan Osborne (1794-1864) and his recognition of conduction aphasia in 1834.

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    Breathnach, C S

    2011-03-01

    In 1833 an accomplished 26-year-old linguist suffered a non-paralytic stroke. After he recovered, though he could utter a variety of syllables with ease, he spoke an unintelligible jargon that caused him to be mistaken as a foreigner. He was examined repeatedly over the course of a year by Jonathan Osborne (1794-1864), a Dublin physician and professor of materia medica, who found that the patient understood whatever was said to him, that he could read and write fluently, but had difficulty repeating words read to him or in reading aloud. Osborne recommended that he learn to speak English, his natural language, de novo and over 8 months measured his considerable improvement. To explain the patient's singular difficulty in repeating spoken words Osborne argued it was 'highly probable that, having been conversant with five languages, the muscular apparatus ranged among them, forming a kind of polyglot jargon [that was] wholly unintelligible' and the patient was 'unable to penetrate into and select the contents of the store according as the [words] were required'. The discrepancy between comprehension and repetition was later termed conduction aphasia. PMID:21052861

  8. Does linguistic ability impact nonlinguistic learning? The neural bases of nonlinguistic learning in aphasia

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    Sofia Vallila-Rohter

    2015-05-01

    We have collected data from 6 PWA and two controls and anticipate enrolling 10 PWA. Whole brain analyses reveal a set of regions activated for the learning>baseline contrast across all participants that includes bilateral middle frontal gyrus (MFG, right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, right angular gyrus and bilateral middle temporal gyrus (MTG. ROI analyses over data for two PWA and two controls demonstrate that controls produce positive percent signal change differences in the caudate (implicit system and negative percent signal change difference in the hippocampus (verbal, explicit system. In contrast, PWA show positive signal change in the hippocampus and negative percent signal change in the caudate. Conclusions PWA and controls engage a similar overall network of regions during probabilistic category learning. ROI analyses suggest, however, that PWA may exhibit a greater reliance on verbally mediated strategies, compared with a greater reliance on implicit strategies in controls. PWA with mild aphasia who have access to language, may be predisposed to utilize that language to learn, even if it is not a productive strategy.

  9. Atrophy and structural covariance of the cholinergic basal forebrain in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teipel, Stefan; Raiser, Theresa; Riedl, Lina; Riederer, Isabelle; Schroeter, Matthias L; Bisenius, Sandrine; Schneider, Anja; Kornhuber, Johannes; Fliessbach, Klaus; Spottke, Annika; Grothe, Michel J; Prudlo, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Straub, Sarah; Otto, Markus; Danek, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by profound destruction of cortical language areas. Anatomical studies suggest an involvement of cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in PPA syndromes, particularly in the area of the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP). Here we aimed to determine the pattern of atrophy and structural covariance as a proxy of structural connectivity of BF nuclei in PPA variants. We studied 62 prospectively recruited cases with the clinical diagnosis of PPA and 31 healthy older control participants from the cohort study of the German consortium for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We determined cortical and BF atrophy based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Patterns of structural covariance of BF with cortical regions were determined using voxel-based partial least square analysis. We found significant atrophy of total BF and BF subregions in PPA patients compared with controls [F(1, 82) = 20.2, p covariance analysis in healthy controls revealed associations of the BF nuclei, particularly the NSP, with left hemispheric predominant prefrontal, lateral temporal, and parietal cortical areas, including Broca's speech area (p covariance of the BF nuclei mostly with right but not with left hemispheric cortical areas (p covariance of the BF with left hemispheric cortical areas in healthy aging towards right hemispheric cortical areas in PPA, possibly reflecting a consequence of the profound and early destruction of cortical language areas in PPA.

  10. Mechanisms underlying syntactic comprehension deficits in vascular aphasia: new evidence from self-paced listening.

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    Caplan, David; Michaud, Jennifer; Hufford, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Sixty-one people with aphasia (pwa) and 41 matched controls were tested for the ability to understand sentences that required the ability to process particular syntactic elements and assign particular syntactic structures. Participants paced themselves word-by-word through 20 examples of 11 spoken sentence types and indicated which of two pictures corresponded to the meaning of each sentence. Sentences were developed in pairs such that comprehension of the experimental version of a pair required an aspect of syntactic processing not required in the corresponding baseline sentence. The need for the syntactic operations required only in the experimental version was triggered at a "critical word" in the experimental sentence. Listening times for critical words in experimental sentences were compared to those for corresponding words in the corresponding baseline sentences. The results were consistent with several models of syntactic comprehension deficits in pwa: resource reduction, slowed lexical and/or syntactic processing, abnormal susceptibility to interference from thematic roles generated non-syntactically. They suggest that a previously unidentified disturbance limiting the duration of parsing and interpretation may lead to these deficits, and that this mechanism may lead to structure-specific deficits in pwa. The results thus point to more than one mechanism underlying syntactic comprehension disorders both across and within pwa. PMID:26165856

  11. Afasia global sem hemiparesia: relato de caso Global aphasia without hemiparesis: case report

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    MARCUS TULIUS TEIXEIRA DA SILVA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Afasia global geralmente é acompanhada por hemiparesia direita devido à extensão da lesão subjacente. Recentemente têm sido registrados na literatura casos em que tal síndrome ou não se acompanha do déficit motor ou este é apenas transitório, sendo esta condição conhecida como afasia global sem hemiparesia (AGSH. Relatamos caso de AGSH devido a infarto cerebral embólico cardiogênico, corroborando a tese de que esta condição pode ter valor preditivo para o diagnóstico de infartos embólicos.Symptoms and signs of a stroke indicate which areas of the brain are affected and may also suggest the pathophysiology. We report herein a case of global aphasia without hemiparesis due to embolic infarct. Our case suggests that this situation may be an important sign for embolic cerebral infarction, as reported in literature.

  12. Performance of a Brazilian population sample in the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination: A pilot study

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    Radanovic M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian researchers and health professionals often face the challenge of having to use tests developed in foreign languages and standardized for populations of other countries, especially in the fields of Neuropsychology and Neurolinguistics. This fact promotes a feeling that some scoring systems may be inadequate for our sociocultural reality. In the present study, we describe the performance of a Brazilian population sample submitted to a translated and adapted version of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE. Sixty normal volunteers (21 men and 39 women, all Portuguese native speakers, ranging in age from 15 to 78 years (average 43.7 and with an educational level of 2 to 16 years (average 9.9, were tested using a translated and adapted Portuguese version of the BDAE. Cut-off scores are suggested for our population and the performance of the Brazilian sample is compared to that of American and Colombian samples, with the results being closely similar in all tasks. We also performed a correlation analysis between age, gender and educational level and the influence of these variables on the performance of the subjects. We found no statistically significant differences between genders. Educational level correlated positively with performance, especially in the subtests involving reading and writing. There was a negative correlation between age and performance in two subtests (Visual Confrontation Naming and Sentences to Dictation, but a coexisting effect of educational level could not be ruled out.

  13. 维吾尔语失语症与脑卒中病变部位关系的临床研究%Relationships between types of Uighur aphasia and the lesion in patients with stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静; 席艳玲; 库尔班乃木·卡合曼; 张小宁

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析脑卒中后维吾尔语失语症类型与病变部位的关系.方法 选择符合入选标准的脑卒中后维吾尔语失语症患者52例,应用改良的失语检查法进行失语症的评定,并在入院后1w内完成头部CT或MRI检查.结果 52例患者中,运动性失语24例,完全性失语12例,命名性失语4例,基底节性失语4例,经皮质运动性失语4例,感觉性失语2例,混合性失语1例,经皮质感觉性失语1例.病变部位位于经典语言中枢的30例,占57.69%.结论 脑卒中后维吾尔语失语症类型与病变部位有一定关系,部分与经典的语言中枢一致.%Objective To analysis the relationship of types of Uighur aphasia and lesion locations in stroke patients. Methods 52 cases after stroke were selected on standard and their aphasia were assessed with Translated Aphasia Examination. They all finished CT or MRI scan in a week after onset. Results There were 24 cases of Broca aphasia, 12 cases of global aphasia,4 cases of anomic aphasia,4 cases of basel ganglion aphasia,4 cases of transcortical moter aphasia,2 cases of Wernicke aphasia, 1 case of mixed aphasia, 1 case of transcortical sensory aphasia. There were 30 cases, about 57.69% suffered lesion in the classical language centers. Conclusion Types of Uighur aphasia after stroke have something to do with the lesion locations. The lesion locations of Uighur aphasia ispartly accord with the classical language centers.

  14. The contribution of the right cerebral hemisphere to the recovery from aphasia: a single longitudinal case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldo, Ana Inés; Arguin, Martin; Roch Lecours, André

    2002-08-01

    We examined the role of the right cerebral hemisphere in the recovery from aphasia of HJ, a 50-year-old right-handed and unilingual man who suffered from severe aphasia caused by an extensive left hemisphere (LH) lesion. He was followed-up over 10 months at 4-month intervals, with a lateralized lexical decision task (LDT), an attentional task, and a language battery. Testing started when HJ was 2 months poststroke. In the LDT, words were presented to central vision or lateralized to the left or right visual hemifield. At each test period, we examined the effect of the degree of imageability (high vs. low), and the grammatical class (noun vs. verb) of the targets on HJ's response times and error rates, with left visual field, right visual field, and central vision presentations. The results of the experiment showed that the pattern obtained with the LDT could not be accounted for by fluctuations in attention. There was an interaction of grammatical class with degree of imageability with left visual field displays only. The right hemisphere (RH) was faster with high-imageability words than with low-imageability words, regardless of their grammatical class. There was also an overall RH advantage on response times at 2 and 6 months after onset. This RH predominance coincided with a major recovery of language comprehension and the observation of semantic paralexias, while no major change in language expression was observed at that point. Ten months after onset, the pattern of lateralization changed, and response times for the LDT with either presentation site were equivalent. This LH improvement coincided with some recovery of language expression at the single-word level. The results of this study suggest that, in cases of severe aphasia caused by extensive LH lesions, the RH may play an important role in the recovery process. Furthermore, these results show that the contribution of the two cerebral hemispheres to recovery may vary overtime and affect specific aspects

  15. Semiologia das afasias: uma discussão crítica Semiology of aphasias: a critical discussion

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    Rosana do Carmo Novaes Pinto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo discute a semiologia das afasias, que teve início no século XIX com Broca e Wernicke. Não é nosso objetivo fornecer uma lista exaustiva de sintomas e síndromes para tratar do tema, já que buscamos discutir criticamente por que a semiologia das afasias ainda se baseia principalmente em perspectivas orgânicas na prática clínica e na pesquisa científica. Também discutimos as contribuições de Luria e de Jakobson para uma melhor compreensão de como a linguagem está comprometida nas afasias e como a Lingüística Moderna, sobretudo a Neurolingüística Discursiva, pode iluminar o debate. Analisamos alguns dados para ilustrar os pressupostos teóricos e metodológicos das referidas abordagens e discutimos ainda o peso excessivo que as classificações têm no contexto clínico.The article discusses the semiology of aphasias, which started being developed in the 19th century by Broca and Wernicke. We do not provide an exhaustive list of symptoms and syndromes to address the theme, since we aim to critically discuss why the semiology of aphasias is still based mainly on organic perspectives in clinical practice and scientific research. We also discuss the contributions of Luria and Jakobson to a better understanding of how language is affected in aphasias and how Modern Linguistics, in special the Discursive Neurolinguistics, may enlighten the debate. We analyze some data to illustrate the theoretical and methodological assumptions of the above mentioned approaches and also discuss the excessive strength that classifications have in the clinical context.

  16. The feasibility of using pupillometry to measure cognitive effort in aphasia: Evidence from a working memory span task

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    Esther Sung Kim

    2015-05-01

    In this study, three PWA completed a computerized picture span task while an eye-tracker measured pupil dilation. As short-term memory demands (i.e., span size increased, average pupil size significantly increased in all three PWA. These data provide preliminary support for the use of pupillometry to gauge cognitive effort in PWA. A larger study of PWA and demographically-matched control participants is currently underway, allowing for analysis of change in pupil size within and between groups. Examination of cognitive effort will provide a more comprehensive understanding of the nature of linguistic and cognitive functioning in aphasia.

  17. Lexical processing of vocabulary class in patients with Broca's aphasia: An event-related brain potential study on agrammatic comprehension

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    Ter Keurs, M.; Brown, C.; Hagoort, P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents electrophysiological evidence of an impairment in the on-line processing of word class information in patients with Broca’s aphasia with agrammatic comprehension. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded from the scalp while Broca patients and non-aphasic control subjects read open- and closed-class words that appeared one at a time on a PC screen. Separate waveforms were computed for open- and closed-class words. The non-aphasic control subjects showed a modula...

  18. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

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    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    ... airways disease; Chronic obstructive lung disease; Chronic bronchitis; Emphysema; Bronchitis - chronic ... a protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin can develop emphysema. Other risk factors for COPD are: Exposure to ...

  20. Using big-data to validate theories of rehabilitation in aphasia

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    Swathi Kiran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. While the evidence for efficacy of rehabilitation of language disorders is fairly robust and conclusive (Allen, et al., 2012; Brady, et al., 2012; Kelly, Brady, & Enderby, 2010; Cherney, et al., 2008, a major limitation identified by these reviews is that the sample size of patients in each of the interventions have been modest (5-20 patients. As technology moves our field forward, we can now collect and analyze larger sets of data to validate theories of rehabilitation. As a first step, we report data from a recently completed study examining the effectiveness of software platform (Constant Therapy to deliver, monitor and analyze treatment for individuals with aphasia (Des Roches et al., 2015. Methods. Fifty one individuals with language and cognitive deficits were administered standardized tests (Western Aphasia Battery, Boston Naming Test, Pyramids and Palm Trees, and Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test prior to initiation and following completion of therapy. Forty-two experimental patients used the iPad-based therapy once a week with the clinician and up to six days a week for home practice. Nine control patients practiced therapy on the iPad once per week with the clinician only. Thirty-eight therapy tasks were divided into language and cognitive activities that were developed (Des Roches et al., 2015, 28 of these tasks included buttons that revealed a hint to assist the patient answer the item. The assigned therapy tasks were tailored to that individual’s language and cognitive impairment profile based on an initial baseline assessment. Each task was practiced until accuracy on task reached 100% on multiple occasions at which point that task was replaced with the task at the next level of difficulty. The 51 patients each completed a 10 week program leading to total of 3327 therapy sessions across patients. Analysis and Results: Mixed regression models showed that both the experimental and control groups improved but

  1. The Impact of Similarity-Based Interference in Processing Wh-Questions in Aphasia

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    Shannon Mackenzie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe two experiments investigating the comprehension of different types of Wh-questions in neurotypical adults (Experiment 1 and adults with Broca’s aphasia (Experiment 2. Consider as examples: Two mailmen and a fireman got into a fight yesterday afternoon. 1a. Who pushed the fireman yesterday afternoon? – Subject-extracted Who 1b. Who did the fireman push ___ yesterday afternoon? – Object-extracted Who 2a. Which mailman pushed the fireman yesterday afternoon? – Subject-extracted Which 2b. Which mailman did the fireman push ___ yesterday afternoon? – Object-extracted Which There is evidence from the linguistic and psycholinguistic literatures that suggest Which-questions are more difficult to understand than Who/What-questions and within those, that object-extracted are more difficult than subject-extracted. We used a unique eye tracking-while listening method where listeners were presented with sentences like (1 and (2 above while gazing at a three-figure picture (e.g., a picture of a mailman pushing a fireman who is pushing another mailman; we measured gazes to the referents in the pictures across the time-course of the sentences, and also collected accuracy and response time data to answer the questions (by button press. We examined four specific hypotheses: Discourse, Memory Retrieval, Word Order, and Intervener. The Discourse hypothesis suggests that Which-questions should be more difficult to process than Who-questions because the former is required to refer to an individual taken from a set of entities previously mentioned in the discourse (Donkers & Stowe, 2006; Shapiro, 2000. The Memory Retrieval hypothesis makes the opposite claim; Which-questions, unlike Who-questions, contain specific information in the Wh-phrase that should speed memory retrieval (Hofmeister, 2007. The Word Order hypothesis suggests that, regardless of question type (Which or Who, object-extracted questions should be more difficult to understand

  2. Training and generalized production of wh- and NP-movement structures in agrammatic aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C K; Shapiro, L P; Ballard, K J; Jacobs, B J; Schneider, S S; Tait, M E

    1997-04-01

    The present research examines production of "complex" sentences, which involve movement of noun phrases (NPs), in 2 agrammatic aphasic subjects. According to linguistic theory (Chomsky, 1991, 1993), such sentences are derived using one of two movement operations, either wh- or NP-movement, subsumed under the general rule "move alpha." In this experiment recovery of both wh- and NP-movement derived sentences was investigated using a treatment research paradigm. Subjects were sequentially trained to produce either wh-movement (i.e., who questions, object clefts) or NP-movement (i.e., passives, subject-raising structures) derived sentences. Throughout training, generalization to untrained sentences relying on both types of movement was tested. The influence of training on aspects of narrative discourse also was examined. Results showed generalization patterns constrained to type of movement. Training wh-movement structures resulted in generalized production of untrained wh-movement structures without influencing production of NP-movement structures. Similarly, training of NP-movement structures resulted in generalization only to other sentence types also relying on NP-movement. Aspects of sentence production in narrative contexts also was improved with treatment. These data indicate that movement to an argument (A) position as in NP-movement is distinct from movement to a non-argument (A-bar) position, required in wh-movement. The site where movement terminates in the s-structure of noncanonical sentences appears to influence sentence production. These findings show that linguistic properties of sentences influence sentence production breakdown and recovery in aphasia. PMID:9130196

  3. Clinical and MRI models predicting amyloid deposition in progressive aphasia and apraxia of speech

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    Jennifer L. Whitwell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-amyloid (Aβ deposition can be observed in primary progressive aphasia (PPA and progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS. While it is typically associated with logopenic PPA, there are exceptions that make predicting Aβ status challenging based on clinical diagnosis alone. We aimed to determine whether MRI regional volumes or clinical data could help predict Aβ deposition. One hundred and thirty-nine PPA (n = 97; 15 agrammatic, 53 logopenic, 13 semantic and 16 unclassified and PAOS (n = 42 subjects were prospectively recruited into a cross-sectional study and underwent speech/language assessments, 3.0 T MRI and C11-Pittsburgh Compound B PET. The presence of Aβ was determined using a 1.5 SUVR cut-point. Atlas-based parcellation was used to calculate gray matter volumes of 42 regions-of-interest across the brain. Penalized binary logistic regression was utilized to determine what combination of MRI regions, and what combination of speech and language tests, best predicts Aβ (+ status. The optimal MRI model and optimal clinical model both performed comparably in their ability to accurately classify subjects according to Aβ status. MRI accurately classified 81% of subjects using 14 regions. Small left superior temporal and inferior parietal volumes and large left Broca's area volumes were particularly predictive of Aβ (+ status. Clinical scores accurately classified 83% of subjects using 12 tests. Phonological errors and repetition deficits, and absence of agrammatism and motor speech deficits were particularly predictive of Aβ (+ status. In comparison, clinical diagnosis was able to accurately classify 89% of subjects. However, the MRI model performed well in predicting Aβ deposition in unclassified PPA. Clinical diagnosis provides optimum prediction of Aβ status at the group level, although regional MRI measurements and speech and language testing also performed well and could have advantages in predicting Aβ status in unclassified

  4. The Role of Executive Function in the Semantic Comprehension Deficits of Stroke Aphasia and Semantic Dementia

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    Curtiss Chapman

    2015-05-01

    Results from 5 SD patients and 4 SA patients in our ongoing study suggest similar patterns of impairment on both semantic and executive function tasks for both patient groups. Both showed multi-modal semantic deficits via poor performance on at least 3 out of 5 semantic tasks tapping different modalities. Also, SA and SD patients showed no difference in consistency across semantic tasks (see Fig. 1a & b. Both groups also showed consistently poor performance on trail-making and verbal Stroop tasks compared to controls (see Figs. 1c & 1d. SD patients seem to be less impaired on both span measures (word span range: 2.17 – 4.43; digit span: 3.17 – 5.5 than SA patients (word span range: 1.63 – 3.75; digit span: 1.17 – 4.17, and performance was variable for both groups on non-verbal Stroop and picture-word interference. SD patients found many executive tasks too difficult to understand, which may be the reason for limited prior data for them on EF tasks.. These findings suggest that the use of syndrome categories like semantic dementia and comprehension-impaired stroke aphasia are not useful in distinguishing between storage and access deficits. Patients classified as having SD seem as likely as SA patients to have certain kinds of executive deficits and SA patients may be as likely as SD patients to show consistency across semantic tasks. The results imply that some other behavioral or neuroanatomical basis rather than syndrome classification should be used to address the hypothesized separation of storage vs. control aspects of semantic memory.

  5. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism for Broca's aphasia using positron emission tomography

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    Kato, Toshiaki

    1987-12-01

    A total of 11 patients with Broca's aphasia (BA) underwent positron emission tomography (PET) with the purpose of investigating the responsible region and the symptomatic flow and metabolism thresholds for BA. Computed tomography (CT) was concurrently performed. In the group of 3 patients undergoing PET with C-11 glucose, both PET and CT provided abnormal findings in the region that is thought to be responsible for BA (Broca's area), including the cortex and subcortex in the anterior region to Sylvian fissure. The Broca's area in the remaining one was shown as low C-11 accumulation area on PET and as isodensity on CT. The second group, consisting of 8 BA patients and 30 control patients without BA, underwent PET using O-15 steady method. PET showed reduction of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolic rate (rCMRO/sub 2/) in the Broca's area in all BA patients. Computed tomography showed abnormal low density in the Broca's area in 3 patients, and abnormal findings in the basal ganglionic region and subcortex without evidence for abnormal low density in the Broca's area in the other 5 patients. Comparison of rCBF and rCMRO/sub 2/ in BA patients with those in control patients may show the symptomatic thresholds to be 20 - 27 ml100 gmin for rCBF and 2.0 ml100 gmin for rCMRO/sub 2/. (Namekawa, K.).

  6. Clinical and MRI models predicting amyloid deposition in progressive aphasia and apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Weigand, Stephen D; Duffy, Joseph R; Strand, Edythe A; Machulda, Mary M; Senjem, Matthew L; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Lowe, Val J; Jack, Clifford R; Josephs, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition can be observed in primary progressive aphasia (PPA) and progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS). While it is typically associated with logopenic PPA, there are exceptions that make predicting Aβ status challenging based on clinical diagnosis alone. We aimed to determine whether MRI regional volumes or clinical data could help predict Aβ deposition. One hundred and thirty-nine PPA (n = 97; 15 agrammatic, 53 logopenic, 13 semantic and 16 unclassified) and PAOS (n = 42) subjects were prospectively recruited into a cross-sectional study and underwent speech/language assessments, 3.0 T MRI and C11-Pittsburgh Compound B PET. The presence of Aβ was determined using a 1.5 SUVR cut-point. Atlas-based parcellation was used to calculate gray matter volumes of 42 regions-of-interest across the brain. Penalized binary logistic regression was utilized to determine what combination of MRI regions, and what combination of speech and language tests, best predicts Aβ (+) status. The optimal MRI model and optimal clinical model both performed comparably in their ability to accurately classify subjects according to Aβ status. MRI accurately classified 81% of subjects using 14 regions. Small left superior temporal and inferior parietal volumes and large left Broca's area volumes were particularly predictive of Aβ (+) status. Clinical scores accurately classified 83% of subjects using 12 tests. Phonological errors and repetition deficits, and absence of agrammatism and motor speech deficits were particularly predictive of Aβ (+) status. In comparison, clinical diagnosis was able to accurately classify 89% of subjects. However, the MRI model performed well in predicting Aβ deposition in unclassified PPA. Clinical diagnosis provides optimum prediction of Aβ status at the group level, although regional MRI measurements and speech and language testing also performed well and could have advantages in predicting Aβ status in unclassified PPA subjects

  7. Electrophysiology of Sentence Processing in Aphasia: Prosodic Cues and Thematic Fit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M. Sheppard

    2015-05-01

    * [ ] Indicates prosodic contour Methods: Twenty-four healthy college-age control participants (YNCs and ten adults with a Broca’s aphasia participated in this study. Each sentence was presented aurally to the participants over headphones. ERP Data Recording & Analysis. ERPs were recorded from 32-electrode sites across the scalp according to the 10-20 system. ERPs were averaged (100ms prestimulus baseline from artifact free trials time-locked to critical words (i.e., the point of disambiguation “pleased” in the prosodic comparison, and the NP “the song”/”the beer” in the semantic comparison. Mean amplitudes were calculated in two windows: 300-500ms for the N400 effects and 500-1000ms for the P600 effects. Results: The data from our YNCs revealed a biphasic N400-P600 complex in the prosody comparison (Figure 1A. We also found an N400 effect immediately at the NP in the incongruent relative to congruent thematic fit comparison. For the prosodic comparison in the PWA group, a delayed N400 effect was found one word downstream relative to the YNC data in the prosody comparison (Figure 1B. Additionally, an N400 effect was observed in the thematic fit comparison. Discussion: The results suggests that PWA possess a delayed sensitivity to prosodic cues, which then may affect their ability to recover from misanalysis from an incorrect parse. The results also indicate that PWA are sensitive to thematic fit information and have the capacity to process this information similarly to YNCs.

  8. Normative data for the Brazilian population in the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination: influence of schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radanovic M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In Neurolinguistics, the use of diagnostic tests developed in other countries can create difficulties in the interpretation of results due to cultural, demographic and linguistic differences. In a country such as Brazil, with great social contrasts, schooling exerts a powerful influence on the abilities of normal individuals. The objective of the present study was to identify the influence of schooling on the performance of normal Brazilian individuals in the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE, in order to obtain reference values for the Brazilian population. We studied 107 normal subjects ranging in age from 15 to 84 years (mean ± SD = 47.2 ± 17.6 years, with educational level ranging from 1 to 24 years (9.9 ± 4.8 years. Subjects were compared for scores obtained in the 28 subtests of the BDAE after being divided into groups according to age (15 to 30, N = 24, 31 to 50, N = 33 and 51 years or more, N = 50 and education (1 to 4, N = 26, 5 to 8, N = 17 and 9 years or more, N = 61. Subjects with 4 years or less of education performed poorer in Word Discrimination, Visual Confrontation Naming, Reading of Sentences and Paragraphs, and Primer-Level Dictation (P < 0.05. When breakdown by schooling was 8 years or less, subjects performed poorer in all subtests (P < 0.05, except Responsive Naming, Word Recognition and Word-Picture Matching. The elderly performed poorer (P < 0.05 in Complex Ideational Material, Visual Confrontation Naming, Comprehension of Oral Spelling, Written Confrontation Naming, and Sentences to Dictation. We present the reference values for the cut-off scores according to educational level.

  9. Visual and statistical analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in primary progressive aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matias-Guiu, Jordi A.; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Garcia-Ramos, Rocio; Fernandez-Matarrubia, Marta; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Matias-Guiu, Jorge [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Department of Neurology, Madrid (Spain); Cabrera-Martin, Maria Nieves; Perez-Castejon, Maria Jesus; Rodriguez-Rey, Cristina; Ortega-Candil, Aida; Carreras, Jose Luis [San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC) Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    Diagnosing progressive primary aphasia (PPA) and its variants is of great clinical importance, and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) may be a useful diagnostic technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate interobserver variability in the interpretation of FDG PET images in PPA as well as the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the technique. We also aimed to compare visual and statistical analyses of these images. There were 10 raters who analysed 44 FDG PET scans from 33 PPA patients and 11 controls. Five raters analysed the images visually, while the other five used maps created using Statistical Parametric Mapping software. Two spatial normalization procedures were performed: global mean normalization and cerebellar normalization. Clinical diagnosis was considered the gold standard. Inter-rater concordance was moderate for visual analysis (Fleiss' kappa 0.568) and substantial for statistical analysis (kappa 0.756-0.881). Agreement was good for all three variants of PPA except for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant studied with visual analysis. The sensitivity and specificity of each rater's diagnosis of PPA was high, averaging 87.8 and 89.9 % for visual analysis and 96.9 and 90.9 % for statistical analysis using global mean normalization, respectively. In cerebellar normalization, sensitivity was 88.9 % and specificity 100 %. FDG PET demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of PPA and its variants. Inter-rater concordance was higher for statistical analysis, especially for the nonfluent/agrammatic variant. These data support the use of FDG PET to evaluate patients with PPA and show that statistical analysis methods are particularly useful for identifying the nonfluent/agrammatic variant of PPA. (orig.)

  10. Conduction aphasia, sensory-motor integration, and phonological short-term memory - an aggregate analysis of lesion and fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchsbaum, Bradley R; Baldo, Juliana; Okada, Kayoko; Berman, Karen F; Dronkers, Nina; D'Esposito, Mark; Hickok, Gregory

    2011-12-01

    Conduction aphasia is a language disorder characterized by frequent speech errors, impaired verbatim repetition, a deficit in phonological short-term memory, and naming difficulties in the presence of otherwise fluent and grammatical speech output. While traditional models of conduction aphasia have typically implicated white matter pathways, recent advances in lesions reconstruction methodology applied to groups of patients have implicated left temporoparietal zones. Parallel work using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has pinpointed a region in the posterior most portion of the left planum temporale, area Spt, which is critical for phonological working memory. Here we show that the region of maximal lesion overlap in a sample of 14 patients with conduction aphasia perfectly circumscribes area Spt, as defined in an aggregate fMRI analysis of 105 subjects performing a phonological working memory task. We provide a review of the evidence supporting the idea that Spt is an interface site for the integration of sensory and vocal tract-related motor representations of complex sound sequences, such as speech and music and show how the symptoms of conduction aphasia can be explained by damage to this system. PMID:21256582

  11. Reliability and Validity of the Computerized Revised Token Test: Comparison of Reading and Listening Versions in Persons with and without Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Malcolm R.; Pratt, Sheila R.; Szuminsky, Neil; Sung, Jee Eun; Fossett, Tepanta R. D.; Fassbinder, Wiltrud; Lim, Kyoung Yuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the reliability and validity of intermodality associations and differences in persons with aphasia (PWA) and healthy controls (HC) on a computerized listening and 3 reading versions of the Revised Token Test (RTT; McNeil & Prescott, 1978). Method: Thirty PWA and 30 HC completed the test versions, including a…

  12. [Is Freud the author of the "aphasia" article in Villaret's Handwörterbuch der Gesamten Medizin (1888)? A reply to Anneliese Menninger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    In 2011/12 Menninger rejected my proposition that Freud could not have composed the "aphasia" article in Villaret's medical dictionary. In this reply I argue in favour of my initial view that Freud is not the author of the article that has been attributed to him for over 60 years.

  13. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in poststroke aphasia%卒中后失语患者的功能磁共振成像

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘少霓; 肖壮伟; 庄伟端

    2009-01-01

    Aphasia is the loss or impairment of language caused by brain damage. Stroke is the most common cause of aphasia. The language function in most patients with aphasia will get recovery with different degrees no matter whether they have performed language training or not. In recent years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology has been widely used in neuro-linguistic research, This article reviews the advances in research on investigating the recovery mechanisms of poststroke aphasia with fMRI.%失语是脑损害所致语言受损或丧失.卒中是失语的常见原因之一.无论是否经过语言康复治疗,大部分失语患者的语言功能都会有不同程度的恢复.近年来,功能磁共振成像(functional magnetic resonance imaging,fMRI)技术已被广泛应用于神经语言学研究中.文章埘探讨卒中后失语恢复机制的fMRI研究进展进行了综述.

  14. Comparison of the Recovery Patterns of Language and Cognitive Functions in Patients with Post-Traumatic Language Processing Deficits and in Patients with Aphasia Following a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Mile; Vuksanovic, Jasmina; Vukovic, Irena

    2008-01-01

    In this study we investigated the recovery patterns of language and cognitive functions in patients with post-traumatic language processing deficits and in patients with aphasia following a stroke. The correlation of specific language functions and cognitive functions was analyzed in the acute phase and 6 months later. Significant recovery of the…

  15. Jean Langlais (1907-91): an historical case of a blind organist with stroke-induced aphasia and Braille alexia but without amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, C A H; Larner, A J

    2008-11-01

    The subject of a prior report of a blind organist with aphasia and Braille alexia without amusia, published in French, has been identified as Jean Langlais. His artistic and medical history is presented, the latter via translation of the original 1987 paper.

  16. The Effects of Verb Argument Complexity on Verb Production in Persons with Aphasia: Evidence from a Subject-Object-Verb Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jee Eun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of verb argument complexity on verb production in individuals with aphasia using a verb-final language. The verb-argument complexity was examined by the number of arguments (1-, 2-, and 3-place) and the types of arguments (unaccusative vs. unergative comparisons). Fifteen Korean-speaking…

  17. Self-Awareness and Self-Monitoring of Cognitive and Behavioral Deficits in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia, Primary Progressive Aphasia and Probable Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Sarah; Weintraub, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Lack of insight is a core diagnostic criterion for behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and is believed to be intact in the early stages of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). In other neurological conditions, symptom-specific insight has been noted, with behavioral symptoms appearing especially vulnerable to reduced insight.…

  18. Restoring one's language edifice: A case study of long-term effects of intensive aphasia therapy employing cognitive modifiability strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaki, David; Goldenberg, Rosalind; Devisheim, Haim; Rosenfelder, Diana; Falik, Lou; Harif, Idit

    2016-06-23

    NG is an architect who suffered a left occipital-parietal hemorrhage cerebral vascular accident (CVA) in 2000, resulting in aphasia of Wernicke and conduction types. He was characterized with fluent paraphasic speech, decreased repetition, and impaired object naming. Comprehension was relatively preserved but reading and writing were severely compromised, as well as his auditory working memory. Despite a grim prognosis he underwent intensive aphasia therapy, lasting from 2001 to 2010, at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation of the Brain Injured at the Feuerstein Institute. The tailored-made interventions, applied in NG's therapy, were based upon the implementation of the principles of the Structural Mediated Learning Experience (MLE) and the Feuerstein Instrumental Enrichment (FIE) Program, to optimize his rehabilitation. As a result NG improved in most of his impaired linguistic capacities, attested by the results of neuropsychological and linguistic assessments performed throughout the years. More importantly, he was able to manage again his daily functions at a high level, and to resume his occupational role as an architect, a role which he holds to this day. PMID:27341358

  19. Restoring one's language edifice: A case study of long-term effects of intensive aphasia therapy employing cognitive modifiability strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaki, David; Goldenberg, Rosalind; Devisheim, Haim; Rosenfelder, Diana; Falik, Lou; Harif, Idit

    2016-06-23

    NG is an architect who suffered a left occipital-parietal hemorrhage cerebral vascular accident (CVA) in 2000, resulting in aphasia of Wernicke and conduction types. He was characterized with fluent paraphasic speech, decreased repetition, and impaired object naming. Comprehension was relatively preserved but reading and writing were severely compromised, as well as his auditory working memory. Despite a grim prognosis he underwent intensive aphasia therapy, lasting from 2001 to 2010, at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation of the Brain Injured at the Feuerstein Institute. The tailored-made interventions, applied in NG's therapy, were based upon the implementation of the principles of the Structural Mediated Learning Experience (MLE) and the Feuerstein Instrumental Enrichment (FIE) Program, to optimize his rehabilitation. As a result NG improved in most of his impaired linguistic capacities, attested by the results of neuropsychological and linguistic assessments performed throughout the years. More importantly, he was able to manage again his daily functions at a high level, and to resume his occupational role as an architect, a role which he holds to this day.

  20. Short-term memory treatment: patterns of learning and generalisation to sentence comprehension in a person with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salis, Christos

    2012-01-01

    Auditory-verbal short-term memory deficits (STM) are prevalent in aphasia and can contribute to sentence comprehension deficits. This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel STM treatment in improving STM (measured with span tasks) and sentence comprehension (measured with the Token Test and the Test for the Reception of Grammar, TROG) in a person with severe aphasia (transcortical motor). In particular, the research questions were: (1) Would STM training improve STM? (2) Would improvements from the STM training generalise to improvements in comprehension of sentences? STM was trained using listening span tasks of serial word recognition. No other language or sentence comprehension skills were trained. Following treatment, STM abilities improved (listening span, forward digit span). There was also evidence of generalisation to untreated sentence comprehension (only on the TROG). Backward digit span, phonological processing and single word comprehension did not improve. Improvements in sentence comprehension may have resulted from resilience to rapid decay of linguistic representations within sentences (words and phrases). This in turn facilitated comprehension.

  1. Transcortical mixed aphasia due to cerebral infarction in left inferior frontal lobe and temporo-parietal lobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeshima, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Ueyoshi, A. [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama (Japan); Toshiro, H.; Sekiguchi, E.; Okita, R.; Yamaga, H.; Ozaki, F.; Moriwaki, H. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Hidaka General Hospital, Wakayama (Japan); Roger, P. [School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2002-02-01

    We present a case of transcortical mixed aphasia caused by a cerebral embolism. A 77-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our hospital with speech disturbance and a right hemianopia. His spontaneous speech was remarkably reduced, and object naming, word fluency, comprehension, reading and writing were all severely disturbed. However, repetition of phonemes and sentences and reading aloud were fully preserved. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebral infarcts in the left frontal and parieto-occipital lobe which included the inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus, single photon emission CT revealed a wider area of low perfusion over the entire left hemisphere except for part of the left perisylvian language areas. The amytal (Wada) test, which was performed via the left internal carotid artery, revealed that the left hemisphere was dominant for language. Hence, it appears that transcortical mixed aphasia may be caused by the isolation of perisylvian speech areas, even if there is a lesion in the inferior frontal gyrus, due to disconnection from surrounding areas. (orig.)

  2. Chronic pain - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  3. Low back pain - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  4. Chronic motor tic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  5. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Chronic Pelvic Pain Home For Patients Search FAQs Chronic Pelvic Pain ... Pain FAQ099, August 2011 PDF Format Chronic Pelvic Pain Gynecologic Problems What is chronic pelvic pain? What ...

  6. Employees with Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Chronic Pain By Beth Loy, Ph.D. Preface Introduction Information ... at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Chronic Pain How prevalent is chronic pain? Chronic pain has ...

  7. A correlativity study of amplitude of low frequency fluctuation change of resting-state brain activity and aphasia quotient in aphasia patients after stroke%卒中后失语患者脑功能成像与失语商的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春星; 李华; 卓兵芝; 高磊

    2013-01-01

    目的 通过研究失语症患者静息态脑活动的低频振幅变化及其与失语商的相关性,以探讨失语症的发生及恢复机制.方法 采用低频振幅(amplitude of low frequency fluctuation,ALFF)算法的血氧水平依赖功能磁共振成像(blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI,BOLD-fMRI)技术,运用西门子3.0T磁共振仪对12例卒中后失语患者和20例正常对照者进行扫描获得静息态数据,采用DPARSF软件对静息态数据进行预处理,然后运用低频振幅算法对数据进行分析,REST软件行两样本t检验,并对失语组ALFF减低的脑区与失语商做相关分析.结果 失语组ALFF减低脑区有左侧颞中回、左侧前额叶内侧回和右侧小脑.3个脑区失语商呈正相关,相关系数分别为rRoi1=0.48,rRoi2口=0.36,r Roi3=0.28.失语组ALFF高于正常对照组的脑区有左侧枕叶、中央前回、岛叶及右侧楔前叶.结论 失语组ALFF明显减低且与失语商呈正相关的脑区,可能是失语发生机制之一;失语组ALFF明显增高的脑区,可能参与语言功能的恢复.%Objective To study a correlativity of amplitude of low frequency fluctuation change of restingstate brain activity and aphasia quotient in aphasia patients after stroke and investigate recovery and mechanism of the aphasia.Methods Adopting amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) in blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI(BOLD-fMRI) and Siemens version 3.0T MR Scanner was used to obtain 12 aphasia patients and 20 normal volunteers of fMRI data.The fMRI data were processed with the software of DPARSF and analyzed by ALFF,and group analysis was performed with two sample t-test by REST software to obtain increased and decreased ALFF map.Brain regions,in which,ALFF of aphasia group was lower than that of normal control group,were done correlation analysis with aphasia quotient.Results As compared with those in normal subjects,the regions showing decreased ALFF in aphasia

  8. Chronic coughing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic coughing was acknowledged to result from pathological state of the respiratory organs. Cardiac diseases could be accompanied by coughing as well. It was recommended to perform x-ray examinations, including biomedical radiography of the chest, computerized tomography, scintiscanning with 67Ga-citrate, bronchi examination in order to exclude heart disease. The complex examination permitted to detect localization and type of the changes in the lungs and mediastinum, to distinguish benign tumor from malignant one

  9. 运动性失语患者早期语言康复训练护理的研究进展%Nursing research progress of early language rehabilitation training in patients with motor aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱凌云; 唐怡; 张淑芳

    2016-01-01

    Motor aphasia, known as Broca aphasia, is a common type of aphasia. Early language rehabilitation training can maximumly improve language function and have a positive impact on patients′ daily life. This paper would review the aphasia language characteristics, classification, diagnosis and early language rehabilitation training and nursing care of patients.%运动性失语又称Broca失语,是失语症的常见类型,早期语言康复训练可以最大限度地改善失语患者的语言功能恢复,对患者的日常生活产生积极影响。现就运动性失语的语言特点、分类、诊断,以及患者早期语言康复训练及护理做一综述。

  10. Översättning och anpassning av Kortfattad Afasiprövning till arabiska : Jämförelse med arabiska Bilingual Aphasia Test och självskattad språkförmåga

    OpenAIRE

    Neffati, Hammadi

    2015-01-01

    With the growing amount of citizens with another mother tongue than Swedish, the need for assessment instruments in other languages than Swedish within the Swedish health care increases. To enable this, the knowledge of multilingualism and adequate assessments are required. The aim is to develop a modern Arabic version of a screening material that is comparable to what is used in the Swedish clinic in the assessment of people diagnosed with aphasia. In the present study, Short Aphasia Examina...

  11. Logopenic and nonfluent variants of primary progressive aphasia are differentiated by acoustic measures of speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Kirrie J; Savage, Sharon; Leyton, Cristian E; Vogel, Adam P; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of logopenic (lvPPA) and nonfluent/agrammatic (nfvPPA) variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia is important yet remains challenging since it hinges on expert based evaluation of speech and language production. In this study acoustic measures of speech in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry were used to determine the success of the measures as an adjunct to diagnosis and to explore the neural basis of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA. Forty-one patients (21 lvPPA, 20 nfvPPA) were recruited from a consecutive sample with suspected frontotemporal dementia. Patients were diagnosed using the current gold-standard of expert perceptual judgment, based on presence/absence of particular speech features during speaking tasks. Seventeen healthy age-matched adults served as controls. MRI scans were available for 11 control and 37 PPA cases; 23 of the PPA cases underwent amyloid ligand PET imaging. Measures, corresponding to perceptual features of apraxia of speech, were periods of silence during reading and relative vowel duration and intensity in polysyllable word repetition. Discriminant function analyses revealed that a measure of relative vowel duration differentiated nfvPPA cases from both control and lvPPA cases (r(2) = 0.47) with 88% agreement with expert judgment of presence of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA cases. VBM analysis showed that relative vowel duration covaried with grey matter intensity in areas critical for speech motor planning and programming: precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, only affected in the nfvPPA group. This bilateral involvement of frontal speech networks in nfvPPA potentially affects access to compensatory mechanisms involving right hemisphere homologues. Measures of silences during reading also discriminated the PPA and control groups, but did not increase predictive accuracy. Findings suggest that a measure of relative vowel duration from of a polysyllable word repetition task

  12. The Brain Network of Naming: A Lesson from Primary Progressive Aphasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Migliaccio

    Full Text Available Word finding depends on the processing of semantic and lexical information, and it involves an intermediate level for mapping semantic-to-lexical information which also subserves lexical-to-semantic mapping during word comprehension. However, the brain regions implementing these components are still controversial and have not been clarified via a comprehensive lesion model encompassing the whole range of language-related cortices. Primary progressive aphasia (PPA, for which anomia is thought to be the most common sign, provides such a model, but the exploration of cortical areas impacting naming in its three main variants and the underlying processing mechanisms is still lacking.We addressed this double issue, related to language structure and PPA, with thirty patients (11 semantic, 12 logopenic, 7 agrammatic variant using a picture-naming task and voxel-based morphometry for anatomo-functional correlation. First, we analyzed correlations for each of the three variants to identify the regions impacting naming in PPA and to disentangle the core regions of word finding. We then combined the three variants and correlation analyses for naming (semantic-to-lexical mapping and single-word comprehension (lexical-to-semantic mapping, predicting an overlap zone corresponding to a bidirectional lexical-semantic hub.Our results showed that superior portions of the left temporal pole and left posterior temporal cortices impact semantic and lexical naming mechanisms in semantic and logopenic PPA, respectively. In agrammatic PPA naming deficits were rare, and did not correlate with any cortical region. Combined analyses revealed a cortical overlap zone in superior/middle mid-temporal cortices, distinct from the two former regions, impacting bidirectional binding of lexical and semantic information. Altogether, our findings indicate that lexical/semantic word processing depends on an anterior-posterior axis within lateral-temporal cortices, including an

  13. The Brain Network of Naming: A Lesson from Primary Progressive Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Raffaella; Boutet, Claire; Valabregue, Romain; Ferrieux, Sophie; Nogues, Marie; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Dormont, Didier; Levy, Richard; Dubois, Bruno; Teichmann, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Objective Word finding depends on the processing of semantic and lexical information, and it involves an intermediate level for mapping semantic-to-lexical information which also subserves lexical-to-semantic mapping during word comprehension. However, the brain regions implementing these components are still controversial and have not been clarified via a comprehensive lesion model encompassing the whole range of language-related cortices. Primary progressive aphasia (PPA), for which anomia is thought to be the most common sign, provides such a model, but the exploration of cortical areas impacting naming in its three main variants and the underlying processing mechanisms is still lacking. Methods We addressed this double issue, related to language structure and PPA, with thirty patients (11 semantic, 12 logopenic, 7 agrammatic variant) using a picture-naming task and voxel-based morphometry for anatomo-functional correlation. First, we analyzed correlations for each of the three variants to identify the regions impacting naming in PPA and to disentangle the core regions of word finding. We then combined the three variants and correlation analyses for naming (semantic-to-lexical mapping) and single-word comprehension (lexical-to-semantic mapping), predicting an overlap zone corresponding to a bidirectional lexical-semantic hub. Results and Conclusions Our results showed that superior portions of the left temporal pole and left posterior temporal cortices impact semantic and lexical naming mechanisms in semantic and logopenic PPA, respectively. In agrammatic PPA naming deficits were rare, and did not correlate with any cortical region. Combined analyses revealed a cortical overlap zone in superior/middle mid-temporal cortices, distinct from the two former regions, impacting bidirectional binding of lexical and semantic information. Altogether, our findings indicate that lexical/semantic word processing depends on an anterior-posterior axis within lateral

  14. Afasia global sem hemiparesia: AVC ou transtorno conversivo? Global aphasia without hemiparesis: stroke or conversion disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Philippi de Negreiros

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A realização de diagnóstico neurológico e psiquiátrico em ambiente de emergência hospitalar com freqüência é uma tarefa complexa e exige colaboração interdisciplinar. Um dos diagnósticos diferenciais de doenças neurológicas é o transtorno conversivo, cuja característica principal é a presença de sintomas afetando funções motoras ou sensoriais, que sugerem desordem clínica ou neurológica, porém sem doença orgânica subjacente que explique o quadro. RELATO DE CASO: Os autores relatam o caso de uma paciente de 23 anos com apresentação clínica atípica de acidente vascular cerebral, afasia global sem hemiparesia, que foi inicialmente diagnosticada como transtorno psiquiátrico pelo serviço de clínica médica de emergência. CONCLUSÃO: Certas apresentações neurológicas podem ser interpretadas como transtorno conversivo pelas similaridades clínicas entre as duas desordens, raridade do quadro clínico, pela presença de sintomatologia psiquiátrica e fatores psicossociais nos pacientes neurológicos. Mesmo com apresentações neurológicas atípicas e sintomas psiquiátricos, pacientes com quadro sugestivo de transtorno conversivo devem ser sempre investigados de forma interdisciplinar.BACKGROUND: The neurologic and psychiatric diagnosis in emergency settings are difficult tasks and require interdisciplinary effort. Conversion disorder is one of the differential diagnosis for certain neurologic disorders. The main characteristic is motor or sensory deficits suggesting neurologic or medical condition, but without organic disease that explains the symptoms. CASE REPORT: We present a 23 year-old-woman with an atypical clinical presentation of stroke: global aphasia without hemiparesis. This patient was initially diagnosed with conversion disorder by the internal medicine service in the emergency room. CONCLUSION: Some rare neurologic diseases can be interpreted as conversive disorders due to some reasons

  15. Chronic Insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Buysse, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Ms. F, a 42-year-old divorced woman, presents for evaluation of chronic insomnia. She complains of difficulty falling asleep, often 30 minutes or longer, and difficulty maintaining sleep during the night, with frequent awakenings that often last 30 minutes or longer. These symptoms occur nearly every night, with only one or two “good” nights per month. She typically goes to bed around 10:00 p.m. to give herself adequate time for sleep, and she gets out of bed around 7:00 a.m. on work days and...

  16. 原发性进行性失语的语言学分析%Linguistic analysis of primary progressive aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵性泉; 方瑞乐; 曹京波; 孙学进; 陈红燕

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary progressive aphasia is a degenerative disease of nervous system clinically characterized by the progressive decrease of speech ability and the relatively reserved memory. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the characteristics of speech dysfunction and the clinical features of primary progressive aphasia we by reported onel patient with primary progressive aphasia. DESIGN: A case analysis. SETTING: Department of Neurology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital affiliated to Capital University of Medical Sciences. PARTICIPANT: One male patient of 56 years old with primary progressive aphasia was selected from the Department of Neurology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital in March 2004, he had got education in senior middle school. The patient had been unable to tell the names of daily living objects at the beginning of 2001. Not only his ability of listening comprehension had gradually declined, but his characters had gradually changed except that his memory had not been affected obviously since 2003. Although he was able in self-care now, he could not normally work. METHODS: ① The spoken fluent types of the patient were evaluated with the standards for the fluency of spoken language in Aphasia battery of Chinese. Western battery aphasia was used to assess the type of aphasia of the patient. Boston diagnostic aphasia examination severity grading standard was applied to grade the severity of aphasia. ② The cognitive psychological tests of visual character-figure matching, denomination for figures and oral reading were used to judge whether the patient had verb-noun dissociation. ③The memory of the patient was assessed with clinical memory scale. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① spoken fluency, the type and grade of aphasia; ② condition of verb-noun dissociation for the patient; ③ memory of the patient. RESULTS: ① Examination of aphasia: The patient presented the spontaneous talking that named the fluent type, there were wrong meanings in his talks so that he was diagnosed

  17. Mechanisms on onset and recovery of aphasia%失语症的发病及恢复机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉梅; 王拥军; 张宁

    2005-01-01

    目的:研究失语症的发病与恢复机制,为失语症患者语言恢复提供理论依据,是当前脑血管病研究的热点之一.资料来源:应用计算机检索Medline1980-01/2004-01期间的相关文章,检索词"aphasia,recovery","aphasia,hypoperfusion","aphasia,metabolic",并限定语种为English.同时计算机检索万方数据库2002-01/2004-10期间的相关文章,检索词为"失语症".限定文章语言种类为中文.资料选择:对资料进行初审,选取有关失语症发病及恢复机制的相关文献,然后筛除明显不随机临床试验的研究,对剩余的文献查找全文,进一步判断是否为随机对照临床研究(RCT).纳入标准为RCT,无论是否为单盲,双盲或非盲法.资料提炼:共收集到34篇关于失语症发病及恢复机制的相关文献,26个试验符合纳入标准.排除的8篇试验中,均为重复的同一研究.资料综合:26试验包括620例患者,分别对失语症发病及恢复机制进行了论述.结论:关于失语症发病及恢复机制,目前尚无统一的结论.语言中枢的低灌注、低代谢可能为失语症的发病机制,脑语言功能的可塑性可能为失语症的恢复机制.

  18. Corrections between the types of aphasia and lesion location in patients with stroke%失语症类型与病变部位的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈营; 李华

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Through types of aphasia and CT,MRI imagings, to analysis the relationship of types of aphasia and lesion location in stroke patients. Methods:The damdged lesion of 36 inpatients from sep 2012 to Mar 2014 in shihezi people of hospitcal, these patients carry out the western aphasia and grade criterion of the boston diagnostic sphasia and CT, MRI imagings. Result:From the western aphasia images , they are all skilled right hands.Of all 36 aphasia cases, there were 5 global aphasia cases, 13 Broca aphasia cases, 4 Wernicke aphasia cases,1 conduction aphasia cases,2 transcortical mix aphasia cases,2 transcortical sensory aphasia cases,3 transcortical motor aphasia cases and 6 anomic aphasia cases, 28 cases which damaged were located in classical language centres, 8 cases were located in other sites. From to grade criterion of the boston diagnostic sphasia 0,1,2,3,4 were 16,7,6,2,5 cases respectively ,1and 1 grade were disttributed in classical language centres. Conclusion:Between types of aphasia and lesion location in patients with stroke have some correction; Not classical languang of centres may lead to aphasia; A few language disorder of patients which are serious may in not classical language of centres.%目的:通过对脑梗死后失语症的类型分类及影像学检查,探究失语症类型与病变部位的相关性。方法:选取2012年9月-2014年3月在石河子市人民医院脑卒中单元住院并符合纳入标准的脑梗死患者36例,采用北京大学第一医院神经内科汉语失语检查法(ABC)的利手评定标准进行利手判定,运用西方失语成套测验(WAB)对失语进行分类,波士顿诊断性失语分级标准进行失语严重程度分级和影像学检查。结果:36例患者采用北京大学第一医院神经内科汉语失语检查(ABC)的利手评分标准均为右利手;失语症类型分为完全性失语5例,Broca失语13例,Wernicke失语4例,传导性失语1例,

  19. 抗抑郁剂对脑卒中患者失语的影响%Effect of antidepressant on aphasia in patients with stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁晓明; 康成; 汤连军; 李忠楚

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of antidepressant (Sertraline tablets) on aphasia in patients with acute stroke.Methods Fifty-four patients with aphasia after acute stroke were randomized into the control group and the treatment group equally.Conventional treatment was given to all patients and Sertraline at a dose of 50 mg were given to patients of the treatment group once daily before sleep for 30 days.Western aphasia battery (WAB) and neurological function deficit scores were measured before and after 30 days' treatment in all patients.Results Aphasia and neurological fiunction of all patients were improved alter 30 days' treatment.The degree of improvement in the treatment group were significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05).Conclusion Sertraline tablets can obviously improve aphasia in patients with acute stroke and facilitate recovery of neurological function.%目的 观察急性脑卒中伴失语患者使用抗抑郁剂(舍曲林片)治疗后失语的改善程度.方法 选择急性脑卒中伴失语患者54例,随机分为对照组和治疗组各27例.对照组采用常规治疗,治疗组加用舍曲林片50mg,睡前1次,疗程30d;分别于治疗前和治疗后30 d对患者进行西部失语成套测验(Western aphasia battery,WAB)和神经功能缺损评分.结果 两组在治疗30 d后失语和神经功能缺损均有改善,治疗组改善程度明显优于对照组,其差异均具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 舍曲林片治疗急性脑卒中患者失语有明显的疗效,并有利于神经功能的恢复.

  20. Effect of low-frequency rTMS on aphasia in stroke patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Li Ren

    Full Text Available Small clinical trials have reported that low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS might improve language recovery in patients with aphasia after stroke. However, no systematic reviews or meta-analyses studies have investigated the effect of rTMS on aphasia. The objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of studies that explored the effects of low-frequency rTMS on aphasia in stroke patients.We searched PubMed, CENTRAL, Embase, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, and Journals@Ovid for randomized controlled trials published between January 1965 and October 2013 using the keywords "aphasia OR language disorders OR anomia OR linguistic disorders AND repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation OR rTMS". We used fixed- and random-effects models to estimate the standardized mean difference (SMD and a 95% CI for the language outcomes.Seven eligible studies involving 160 stroke patients were identified in this meta-analysis. A significant effect size of 1.26 was found for the language outcome severity of impairment (95% CI = 0.80 to 1.71 without heterogeneity (I2 = 0%, P = 0.44. Further analyses demonstrated prominent effects for the naming subtest (SMD = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.18 to 0.87, repetition (SMD = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.16 to 0.92, writing (SMD = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.19 to 1.22, and comprehension (the Token test: SMD = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.07 to 1.09 without heterogeneity (I2 = 0%. The SMD of AAT and BDAE comprehension subtests was 0.32 (95% CI = -0.08 to 0.72 with moderate heterogeneity (I2 = 32%,P = 0.22. The effect size did not change significantly even when any one trial was eliminated. None of the patients from the 7 included articles reported adverse effects from rTMS.Low-frequency rTMS with a 90% resting motor threshold that targets the triangular part of the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG has a positive effect on language recovery in patients with aphasia following

  1. A comparison of processing load during non-verbal decision-making in two individuals with aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salima Suleman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION A growing body of evidence suggests people with aphasia (PWA can have impairments to cognitive functions such as attention, working memory and executive functions.(1-5 Such cognitive impairments have been shown to negatively affect the decision-making (DM abilities adults with neurological damage. (6,7 However, little is known about DM abilities of PWA.(8 Pupillometry is “the measurement of changes in pupil diameter”.(9;p.1 Researchers have reported a positive relationship between processing load and phasic pupil size (i.e., as processing load increases, pupil size increases.(10 Thus pupillometry has the potential to be a useful tool for investigating processing load during DM in PWA. AIMS The primary aim of this study was to establish the feasibility of using pupillometry during a non-verbal DM task with PWA. The secondary aim was to explore non-verbal DM performance in PWA and determine the relationship between DM performance and processing load using pupillometry. METHOD DESIGN. A single-subject case-study design with two participants was used in this study. PARTICIPANTS. Two adult males with anomic aphasia participated in this study. Participants were matched for age and education. Both participants were independent, able to drive, and had legal autonomy. MEASURES. PERFORMANCE ON A DM TASK. We used a computerized risk-taking card game called the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT as our non-verbal DM task.(11 In the IGT, participants made 100 selections (via eye gaze from four decks of cards presented on the computer screen with the goal of maximizing their overall hypothetical monetary gain. PROCESSING LOAD. The EyeLink 1000+ eye tracking system was used to collect pupil size measures while participants deliberated before each deck selection during the IGT. For this analysis, we calculated change in pupil size as a measure of processing load. RESULTS P1. P1 made increasingly advantageous decisions as the task progressed (Fig.1. When

  2. [Consensual recommendations for the description of three variants of primary progressive aphasia: limits and controversies regarding language impairments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auclair-Ouellet, Noémie; Fossard, Marion; Macoir, Joël

    2015-12-01

    Consensual recommendations for the diagnostic criteria of three variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) were published in 2011. Since their publication, these recommendations were the object of criticism, which has recently led to the proposition of their revision. This article gives a description of the criteria that preceded the consensual criteria currently in use, and presents the different limits and controversies regarding the description of each PPA variant's language profile. These controversies will be examined in terms of the description of each variant's central manifestations, their differential diagnosis, the links between each clinical entity and its underlying pathology, and the evolution of the language profile. Lastly, this article offers perspectives regarding language evaluation in PPA that have several implications for clinical practice and research. PMID:26707562

  3. Improving verb anomia in the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia: the effectiveness of a semantic-phonological cueing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macoir, J; Leroy, M; Routhier, S; Auclair-Ouellet, N; Houde, M; Laforce, R

    2015-01-01

    The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is known to affect the comprehension and production of all content words, including verbs. However, studies of the treatment of anomia in this disorder focused on relearning object names only. This study reports treatment of verb anomia in an individual with svPPA. The semantic-phonological cueing therapy resulted in significant improvement in naming abilities, for treated verbs only. This case study demonstrates that improvement in verb-naming abilities may be possible in svPPA. The almost complete maintenance of the treatment's effects in the patient 4 weeks after the end of the therapy also suggests improvements may be durable, at least in the short term, for some individuals with svPPA.

  4. Chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... 2012_CKD_GL.pdf . McCullough PA. Interface between renal disease ... patients with kidney failure. N Engl J Med . 2010;362(14):1312- ...

  5. Morpho-syntactic processing of Arabic plurals after aphasia: dissecting lexical meaning from morpho-syntax within word boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaileh, Tariq; Body, Richard; Herbert, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Within the domain of inflectional morpho-syntax, differential processing of regular and irregular forms has been found in healthy speakers and in aphasia. One view assumes that irregular forms are retrieved as full entities, while regular forms are compiled on-line. An alternative view holds that a single mechanism oversees regular and irregular forms. Arabic offers an opportunity to study this phenomenon, as Arabic nouns contain a consonantal root, delivering lexical meaning, and a vocalic pattern, delivering syntactic information, such as gender and number. The aim of this study is to investigate morpho-syntactic processing of regular (sound) and irregular (broken) Arabic plurals in patients with morpho-syntactic impairment. Three participants with acquired agrammatic aphasia produced plural forms in a picture-naming task. We measured overall response accuracy, then analysed lexical errors and morpho-syntactic errors, separately. Error analysis revealed different patterns of morpho-syntactic errors depending on the type of pluralization (sound vs broken). Omissions formed the vast majority of errors in sound plurals, while substitution was the only error mechanism that occurred in broken plurals. The dissociation was statistically significant for retrieval of morpho-syntactic information (vocalic pattern) but not for lexical meaning (consonantal root), suggesting that the participants' selective impairment was an effect of the morpho-syntax of plurals. These results suggest that irregular plurals forms are stored, while regular forms are derived. The current findings support the findings from other languages and provide a new analysis technique for data from languages with non-concatenative morpho-syntax. PMID:26437457

  6. Morpho-syntactic processing of Arabic plurals after aphasia: dissecting lexical meaning from morpho-syntax within word boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaileh, Tariq; Body, Richard; Herbert, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Within the domain of inflectional morpho-syntax, differential processing of regular and irregular forms has been found in healthy speakers and in aphasia. One view assumes that irregular forms are retrieved as full entities, while regular forms are compiled on-line. An alternative view holds that a single mechanism oversees regular and irregular forms. Arabic offers an opportunity to study this phenomenon, as Arabic nouns contain a consonantal root, delivering lexical meaning, and a vocalic pattern, delivering syntactic information, such as gender and number. The aim of this study is to investigate morpho-syntactic processing of regular (sound) and irregular (broken) Arabic plurals in patients with morpho-syntactic impairment. Three participants with acquired agrammatic aphasia produced plural forms in a picture-naming task. We measured overall response accuracy, then analysed lexical errors and morpho-syntactic errors, separately. Error analysis revealed different patterns of morpho-syntactic errors depending on the type of pluralization (sound vs broken). Omissions formed the vast majority of errors in sound plurals, while substitution was the only error mechanism that occurred in broken plurals. The dissociation was statistically significant for retrieval of morpho-syntactic information (vocalic pattern) but not for lexical meaning (consonantal root), suggesting that the participants' selective impairment was an effect of the morpho-syntax of plurals. These results suggest that irregular plurals forms are stored, while regular forms are derived. The current findings support the findings from other languages and provide a new analysis technique for data from languages with non-concatenative morpho-syntax.

  7. [Aphasia without amusia in a blind organist. Verbal alexia-agraphia without musical alexia-agraphia in braille].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signoret, J L; van Eeckhout, P; Poncet, M; Castaigne, P

    1987-01-01

    A 77 year old right handed male was blind since the age of 2. He presented with an infarction involving the territory of the left middle cerebral artery involving the temporal and the inferior parietal lobes. He had learned to read and write language as well as read and write music in braille, ultimately becoming a famous organist and composer. There were no motor or sensory deficits. Wernicke's aphasia with jargonaphasia, major difficulty in repetition, anomia and a significant comprehension deficit without word deafness was present; verbal alexia and agraphia in braille were also present. There was no evidence of amusia. He could execute in an exemplary fashion pieces of music for the organ in his repertory as well as improvise. All his musical capabilities: transposition, modulation, harmony, rythm, were preserved. The musical notation in braille remained intact: he could read by touch and play unfamiliar scores, he could also read and sing the musical notes, he could copy and write a score. Nine months after the stroke his aphasia remained unchanged. Nevertheless he composed pieces for the organ which were published. Such data highly suggest the independence of linguistic and musical competences, defined as the analysis and organization of sounds according to the rules of music. This independence in an extremely talented musician leads to a discussion of the role of the right hemisphere in the anatomical-functional processes at the origin of musical competence. The use of braille in which the same constellations of dots correspond either to letters of the alphabet or musical notes supports the independence between language and music. PMID:3616363

  8. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia , and other conditions . Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Key Points Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease ... chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease in which too many myelocytes ...

  9. Effects of familiarity, context, and abstract representations on idiom processing in aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Arko Milburn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available People with aphasia (PWA often have impaired idiom processing. This could result from difficulty suppressing the literal meaning (Cacciari et al., 2006; Papagno et al., 2004. Supporting this, in an idiom-probe matching task in which PWA had to choose which of four probe words went best with familiar idioms, Cacciari et al. (2006 found that most errors were associated with the idiom’s literal meaning. However a post hoc analysis showed that PWA also chose more abstract foils than concrete foils. Cacciari et al. interpreted the choice of an abstract foil as indicating that the participant did not know the figurative meaning of the idiom, but knew that the literal meaning was not correct. This account predicts that the less accessible the figurative meaning of an idiom is, the more abstract errors PWA will make. Familiarity and context both can influence the accessibility of figurative meanings for idioms. Highly-familiar idioms have more familiar figurative meanings than literal meanings (Nordmann et al., 2014. Likewise, a figuratively-biased context can speed access of an idiom’s figurative meaning (Ortony et al., 1978, and aid healthy young adults’ comprehension of unfamiliar idioms (Qualls et al., 2003. The current study investigates the effects of the accessibility of figurative meaning on idiom comprehension in PWA by examining error patterns after reading high- and low-familiarity idioms presented with and without figuratively-biased contexts. PWA (n=18 and healthy age-matched controls (n=32 read sentence pairs in a 3x2 design, crossing idiom type (highly-familiar vs. less-familiar vs. a literal paraphrase of the idiom’s figurative meaning with the position of a figuratively-biased context sentence (before vs. after the idiom sentence; 1a-f, Figure 1a. Participants then chose which of four probe words (figurative target, literal foil, unrelated concrete foil, unrelated abstract foil went best with the pair. For controls, the odds of

  10. Is translation semantically mediated? Evidence from Welsh-English bilingual aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Kate Hughes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The involvement of the semantic system in picture naming is undisputed. However, it has been proposed that translation could take place via direct lexical links between L1 and L2 word forms in addition to or instead of via semantics (i.e., with translation going from a spoken word in L1 accessing its meaning and this meaning then leading to the retrieval of the translation equivalent in L2. There is conflicting evidence in the psycholinguistic literature as to the extent of semantic mediation in translation vs. picture naming tasks (Potter et al, 1984; Kroll and Stewart, 1994. More recently, Hernandez et al (2010 investigated this question in a case study of JFF, a proficient bilingual Spanish-Catalan speaker with Alzheimer’s disease and naming difficulties due to a semantic deficit. As JFF’s semantic deficit did not only affect picture naming but also translation tasks, the authors concluded against the existence of functional direct lexical links to support translation. The goal of our study was to explore this issue further in a larger sample of proficient bilingual patients with aphasia and word finding difficulties in both languages. More specifically, we compare the rate of semantic errors produced in naming vs. translation tasks. Hypotheses: If there is equal involvement of the semantic system in naming and in translation tasks, then there should be no difference in the rate of semantic errors produced in the two tasks. However, if there are at least partly functional direct lexical links between translation equivalents, then we should observe fewer semantic errors in translation than in naming. Participants. Nine Welsh-English early proficient bilingual aphasic participants were selected for participation. Each patient scored significantly lower (p < .05 than age-matched controls (N=37 on at least one task using the modified t-tests for single cases (Crawford & Howell, 1998, and made semantic errors on naming tasks in

  11. A bridge between a lonely soul and the surrounding world: A study on existential consequences of being closely related to a person with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Maria

    2011-01-01

    This study illuminates existential consequences of being closely related to a person suffering from aphasia. Seventeen close relatives were interviewed and their narratives were interpreted with inspiration from Ricoeur, Levinas, Husserl, Winnicot, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. The emerging interpretations resulted in four themes that illuminate a life characterized by lost freedom, staying, a new form of relationship, and growing strong together with others. An overarching theme suggests that a life together with an aphasic person means being used as a bridge between the aphasic person and the surrounding world. Moreover, it illuminates that a close relative to a person with aphasia is a person who does not leave, despite a heavy burden of lonely responsibility. It is concluded that community services need to fulfill their responsibility of providing support to informal caregivers as suggested by the Swedish lawmakers.

  12. 重复经颅磁刺激治疗卒中后失语%Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of poststroke aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳红; 张国忠; 李娜; 王艳萍

    2014-01-01

    失语是一种常见的卒中并发症.经颅磁刺激是一种无创性脑部刺激方法.一些病例研究和随机对照试验证实了重复经颅磁刺激治疗卒中后失语的有效性,但其具体机制尚不完全清楚.%Aphasia is a common complication of stroke.Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a noninvasive brain stimulation approach.Some case studies and randomized controlled trials have confirmed the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of poststroke aphasia,but its specific mechanism remains unclear.

  13. [Hemispheric functional specialization in motor aphasia. Neurophysiologic findings with computerized electroencephalographic brain mapping during musical and oral sound stimulation. Study of 2 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszkat, M; Correia, C M; Noffs, M H; de Vincenzo, N S; de Campos, C J

    1995-03-01

    This study concerns about brain electrical activity during auditory stimulation in 2 aphasic patients, one with classical (left hemisphere lesion) and another with cross aphasia (right hemisphere lesion). Both cases were submitted to dichotic listening test (consonant-vowel-consonant task) and music audition (gregorian chant), during brain mapping examination. We found, in both cases, a great proportion in delta frequency and power in non-lesional hemisphere during dichotic and musical stimulation. Besides, increasing in frequency of alpha activity was observed only in the non-lesional hemisphere restricted to temporal lobe region. Such findings suggest an interesting field of research about measurements of neurophysiological correlates of auditory stimulation and brain electrical activity in aphasia. PMID:7575214

  14. Electrophysiological manifestations of open- and closed-class words in patients with Broca's aphasia with agrammatic comprehension: An event-related brain potential study

    OpenAIRE

    Ter Keurs, M.; Brown, C.; Hagoort, P.; Stegeman, D

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents electrophysiological data on the on-line processing of open- and closed-class words in patients with Broca’s aphasia with agrammatic comprehension. Event-related brain potentials were recorded from the scalp when Broca patients and nonaphasic control subjects were visually presented with a story in which the words appeared one at a time on the screen. Separate waveforms were computed for open- and closed-class words. The non-aphasic control subjects showed clear difference...

  15. Aproximaciones lingüísticas a la afasiología en torno a la repetición Neurolinguistic approaches about aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluis Barraquer Bordas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Las afasias son una patología del lenguaje y éste es un sistema de mediación cultural lógica, situado netamente por encima de lo meramente natural. Arranca de la función simbólica, que establece la distinción y el nexo entre significante y significado. Se establece, a grandes rasgos, una clasificación neurolingüística de las afasias, rechazando las expresiones inadecuadas de sensitiva o sensorial y motora. Se insiste particularmente aquí sobre la cuestión de la "repetición" en la semiología afásica, tanto en lo que se refiere a su pérdida como a su "exaltación". Ello conduce a una revisión de la mal llamada afasia "de conducción" y del "transcorticalismo".Aphasias are language pathologies, therefore the acquaintance of its structure is required for proper understanding. Language is a cultural interaction system, logical, set much above common natural. It separates the symbolic function, which establishes the distinction between significant and signification. We establish a neurolinguistic classification of aphasias, refuting improper expressions. We broach the wrongly called "conduction aphasia". We detach the unit of speech act and we distinguish the existence of a joint project that sheds light on all sentences brought forth. The complex texture of the "transcorticalism" qualify is analyzed. Aphasia field and some forms of its unfolding are questions aborded under the light of basic neurolinguistic concepts. We detach the unit of speech act and we distinguish the existence of a common project that sheds light on all sentences brought forth.

  16. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, L; Thomsen, S F; Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls;

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is a common condition in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Little is known about the incidence, prevalence and determinants of CMH in younger individuals....

  17. Clinical analysis of 26 cases of crossed aphasia after stroke%脑卒中后交叉性失语26例临床病例分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐晶

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of crossed aphasia clinical type, observation of conventional therapy combined with rehabilitation therapy effect. Methods Determination of crossed aphasia diagnosis standard and according to the screening cases, 26 patients with stroke in accordance with the standards of the posterior crossed aphasia patients with aphasia assessment, and observe the effect of rehabilitation after a month. Results This group of 26 cases of crossed aphasia patients with aphasia cases, accounted for 1.90%, 1 months after treatment and recovery in 19 cases, consistent results with several reports in the literature. Conclusion Crossed aphasia after stroke with conventional therapy combined with rehabilitation therapy effect in line with expectations.%目的通过临床病例研究交叉性失语的特点,观察常规治疗结合康复疗法的治疗效果。方法 确定交叉性失语诊断标准并据之筛选病例,对符合标准的26例脑卒中后交叉失语患者进行失语评定,同时观察一个月后康复效果。结果 本组26例交叉性失语患者,占全部失语病例的1.90%,治疗后1个月内恢复19例,研究结果与多种文献报道相一致。结论 脑卒中后交叉性失语采用常规治疗结合康复疗法的治疗效果符合预期。

  18. Thinking for Speaking and Thinking for Listening: The Interaction of Thought and Language in Typical and Non-Fluent Comprehension and Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipper, Lucy T.; Black, Maria; Bryan, Karen L.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we reconsider some of the processes that distinguish production and comprehension. In particular, we discuss the specific forms of thinking involved in each: "thinking for speaking" and "thinking for listening" (Black and Chiat, 2000; Slobin, 1996). We argue that thinking for speaking (or for any form of language output) crucially…

  19. Chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sachdeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic urticaria (CU is a disturbing allergic condition of the skin. Although frequently benign, it may sometimes be a red flag sign of a serious internal disease. A multitude of etiologies have been implicated in the causation of CU, including physical, infective, vasculitic, psychological and idiopathic. An autoimmune basis of most of the ′idiopathic′ forms is now hypothesized. Histamine released from mast cells is the major effector in pathogenesis and it is clinically characterized by wheals that have a tendency to recur. Laboratory investigations aimed at a specific etiology are not always conclusive, though may be suggestive of an underlying condition. A clinical search for associated systemic disease is strongly advocated under appropriate circumstances. The mainstay of treatment remains H1 antihistaminics. These may be combined with complementary pharmacopeia in the form of H2 blockers, doxepin, nifedipine and leukotriene inhibitors. More radical therapy in the form of immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide may be required for recalcitrant cases. Autologous transfusion and alternative remedies like acupuncture have prospects for future. A stepwise management results in favorable outcomes. An update on CU based on our experience with patients at a tertiary care centre is presented.

  20. Fast self paced listening times in syntactic comprehension is aphasia -- implications for deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Michaud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sixty one people with aphasia (pwa and forty one matched controls were tested for the ability to understand sentences that required the ability to assign particular syntactic structures. Participants paced themselves word-by-word through twenty examples of eleven spoken sentence types and indicated which of two pictures corresponded to the meaning of each sentence. Sentences were developed in pairs such that comprehension of the experimental version of a pair required an aspect of syntactic processing not required in the corresponding baseline sentence. The need for the syntactic operations required only in the experimental version was triggered at a “critical word” in the experimental sentence. Listening times for critical words in experimental sentences were compared to those for corresponding words in the corresponding baseline sentences. We adjusted self paced listening times for word duration by subtracting word durations from tag-to-tag self paced listening times to correct for word duration, yielding what we have previously called “corrected listening times.” Corrected listening times above ceiling (10,000 msec for sentence-final words and 5,000 msec for all other words were discarded. For controls, this led to 0.2% of data being discarded and for PWAs 2.2% were discarded. Corrected listening times that were more than 3 standard deviations above or below the mean for that sentence type for each subject were adjusted either down to the upper limit or up to the lower limit of the 3SD range (not discarded. For accurate sentences, 1.7% of the control data were adjusted and 1.8% of the aphasic data were adjusted. For inaccurate sentences, 10% of the corrected listening times were adjusted for controls and 3.3% for aphasics. Our interest is in incremental parsing and interpretation. The measure we used of this process was the residual of a regression of corrected self paced listening times for critical words in experimental sentences

  1. Neuromodulation of chronic headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martelletti, Paolo; Jensen, Rigmor H; Antal, Andrea;

    2013-01-01

    The medical treatment of patients with chronic primary headache syndromes (chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, chronic cluster headache, hemicrania continua) is challenging as serious side effects frequently complicate the course of medical treatment and some patients may be even...

  2. Common methods for estimation of aphasia%失语症的常用评价方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹京波; 赵纯; 金旻; 张玉梅

    2006-01-01

    目的:脑卒中后患有失语症的患者比例较多,致使患者交流困难,甚至丧失社会交往能力,严重影响患者的生活质量.资料来源:应用计算机检索Ovid 1980-01/2004-01期间与失语症评价方法相关的文章,检索词"aphasia,estimate","aphasia,evaluate","aphasia,estimation method",并限定语种为English;同时也检索中国医学期刊网1980-01/2004-01期间相关的文章,检索词为"失语症,评估","失语症,检测",限定语言种类为汉语.资料选择:对资料进行初审,选取有关失语症评定方法的相关文献,然后筛除明显不随机临床试验的研究,对剩余的文献查找全文,进一步判断是否为随机对照临床研究.无论是否为单盲,双盲或非盲法.排除重复性研究.资料提炼:共收集到21篇关于失语症评价方法的相关文献,排除8篇重复的同一研究试验.采用其余13篇进行综述.资料综合:目前国内外已经有许多失语症的评估方法,国外常用的评价方法有:The Token Test;波士顿诊断性失语症检查;西部失语症检查;双语失语检查法;失语症的标准语言试验;日常生活交流能力检查;HenryHead's Test;Weisenbury and McBride's Battery;明尼苏达失语鉴别诊断;Porch交流能力指数;功能交流概貌测定;国内常用的评价方法有:汉语失语成套测验;北京医院汉语失语症检查;中国康复研究中心汉语标准失语症检查.结论:失语症的评估方法国内外有很多,如何依据患者的语言障碍程度,选择失语症的评估方法是判断失语症类型及制定失语症患者语言康复计划的关键问题.

  3. Functional reorganization of the large-scale brain networks that support high-level cognition following brain damage in aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idan Asher Blank

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, a number of large-scale networks in the human cortex that support high-level cognition have been identified. Here, we focus on two of these networks: the fronto-temporal language network (e.g., Fedorenko et al., 2010, and the fronto-parietal “multiple demand (MD” network (e.g., Duncan, 2010. These two networks are clearly distinct from one another: first, their respective regions show distinct functional profiles, with language regions showing selective responses to language stimuli (Fedorenko et al., 2011; Monti et al., 2012 and MD regions showing domain-general responses to cognitive effort across a wide range of tasks (Duncan & Owen, 2001; Fedorenko et al., 2013. Second, during “rest” and cognitive processing, each network shows strong activity synchronization among its constituent regions, whereas regions across the two networks are not synchronized (Blank et al., 2014; Lee et al., 2012; Mantini et al., 2013. In the current study, we examined how these functional characteristics of the two networks were affected following aphasia-inducing strokes. In particular, we asked whether damage to the language network would alter the involvement of the MD network in linguistic processing, and whether such damage would alter the patterns of synchronization across the two networks. Four male individuals with aphasia (age: M=53, having suffered a single left MCA CVA, were scanned in fMRI on two paradigms that enable basic functional characterization of language and MD regions: (i a language localizer task, where they passively read sentences and sequences of pseudowords (Fedorenko et al., 2010; and (ii a spatial working memory task, where they had to remember fewer (easy or more (hard locations in a grid (Fedorenko et al., 2013. Language and MD regions were defined in each individual using the sentences > pseudowords contrast and the hard > easy contrast, respectively. Subjects were also scanned while listening to

  4. Investigation and analysis of depression in patients with aphasia after stroke%卒中后失语患者抑郁情绪调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 王安黎; 郭大芬; 雷丹; 张国艺; 余琳

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the depression situation in the patients with aphasia after stroke ,and to analyze the depression related factors in the stoke patients with aphasia to provide the basis for their psychological rehabilitation. Methods Thirty stroke patients with aphasia in the neurology department of our hospital from June to December 2015 were selected as the research subjects. The Stroke Aphasic Depression Questionnaire Hospital Version (SADQ-H)was applied to conduct the question-naire survey. Results Thirty SADQ-H questionnaires were issued and valid 30 questionnaires were recovered. Among the stroke patients with aphasia,7 cases[23.3%(7/30)] had no depression symptoms and 23 cases[76.7%(23/30)] had depression,in which 1 case[3.3%(1/30)] was mild depression,3 cases[10.0%(3/30)] were moderate depression and 19 cases[63.3%(19/30)] were severe depression;among the patients aged≥60 years old and with primary school cultural level ,the occurrence rate of middle to severe depression was highest,which was 76.2%(16/21) and 77.3%(17/22)respectively. Conclusion Majority of the patients with aphasia after stroke have depression ,which is related with the age and cultural level. The individualized rehabilitation man-agement and psychological nursing in the stroke patients with aphasia should be strengthened. The health education should be strengthened to increase the rehabilitation confidence and rehabilitation skills in stroke patients with aphasia.%目的:调查卒中后患失语症患者的抑郁情况,分析卒中后失语患者抑郁情绪相关因素,为脑卒中失语患者的心理康复提供依据。方法选取2015年6~12月遵义医学院附属医院脑血管科收治的30例脑卒中失语症患者作为研究对象。应用医院版卒中后失语患者抑郁问卷(SADQ·H)中文修订版进行问卷调查。结果本研究共发放SADQ·H调查问卷30份,回收有效问卷30份。脑卒中失语患者中无抑郁者7例[23.3%(7/30

  5. Untying chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Häuser, Winfried; Wolfe, Frederik; Henningsen, Peter; Schmutzer, Gabriele; Brähler, Elmar; Hinz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic pain is a major public health problem. The impact of stages of chronic pain adjusted for disease load on societal burden has not been assessed in population surveys. Methods: A cross-sectional survey with 4360 people aged ≥ 14 years representative of the German population was conducted. Measures obtained included demographic variables, presence of chronic pain (based on the definition of the International Association for the Study of Pain), chronic pain stages (by chronic ...

  6. Chronic pain after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsborg, B.; Nikolajsen, L.; Kehlet, H.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a well-known adverse effect of surgery, but the risk of chronic pain after gynaecological surgery is less established. METHOD: This review summarizes studies on chronic pain following hysterectomy. The underlying mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic...... post-hysterectomy pain are discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Chronic pain is reported by 5-32% of women after hysterectomy. A guideline is proposed for future prospective studies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  7. Chronic pain after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsborg, B; Nikolajsen, L; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a well-known adverse effect of surgery, but the risk of chronic pain after gynaecological surgery is less established. METHOD: This review summarizes studies on chronic pain following hysterectomy. The underlying mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic...... post-hysterectomy pain are discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Chronic pain is reported by 5-32% of women after hysterectomy. A guideline is proposed for future prospective studies. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar...

  8. Progressive Dyslexia: Evidence from Hungarian and English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Druks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with non-fluent Primary Progressive Aphasia who was premorbidly literate in two alphabetic scripts, Hungarian (L1 and English (L2. Testing was performed over a two-year period to assess the impact of progressive illness on oral reading and repetition of single words. Results showed significant decline in oral reading in both languages, and an effect of language status in favour of oral reading in L1. Phonological complexity was a significant predictor of oral reading decline in both languages. Of interest, we observed an effect of language status on task performance whereby repetition was better in L2 than L1 but oral reading was better in L1 than L2. We conclude that language status has an effect on repetition and oral reading abilities for bilingual speakers with non-fluent Primary Progressive Aphasia.

  9. Study on the correlation between clinical aphasia and cerebral blood perfusion after acute cerebral infarction%急性脑梗死后失语症与脑血流灌注的相关性探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡军; 朱文炳; 谢瑞满; 修雁

    2002-01-01

    Objective The SPECT brain perfusion was performed to explore the correlation between the yielded image data and the clinical characteristics of aphasia.Method The language function assessment of WAB and SPECT blood perfusion imaging were applied to 21 aphasia patients with dominant ischemic stroke.The correlations between the aphasic characteristics and the ROI rCBF of language regions were analyzed.Result The significant correlations were found between the different brain regions and the different language function deficits,and the correlation between temporal lobe and language function deficits was even higher.Conclusion SPECT brain perfusion imaging can show function disorder of language and aphasia probably caused by the destruction of language nervous network.

  10. Rotterdam Aphasia Therapy Study (RATS – 3: “The efficacy of intensive cognitive-linguistic therapy in the acute stage of aphasia”; design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouwens Femke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aphasia is a severely disabling condition occurring in 20 to 25% of stroke patients. Most patients with aphasia due to stroke receive speech and language therapy. Methodologically sound randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of specific interventions for patients with aphasia following stroke are scarce. The currently available evidence suggests that intensive speech and language therapy is beneficial for restoration of communication, but the optimal timing of treatment is as yet unclear. In the Rotterdam Aphasia Therapy Study-3 we aim to test the hypothesis that patients with aphasia due to stroke benefit more from early intensive cognitive-linguistic therapy than from deferred regular language therapy. Methods/design In a single blinded, multicentre, randomised controlled trial, 150 patients with first ever aphasia due to stroke will be randomised within two weeks after stroke to either early intensive cognitive-linguistic therapy (Group A or deferred regular therapy (Group B. Group A will start as soon as possible, at the latest two weeks after stroke, with a four week period of one hour a day treatment with cognitive-linguistic therapy. In Group B professional speech and language therapy is deferred for four weeks. After this period, patients will follow the conventional procedure of speech and language therapy. Participants will be tested with an extensive linguistic test battery at four weeks, three months and six months after inclusion. Primary outcome measure is the difference in score between the two treatment groups on the Amsterdam-Nijmegen Everyday Language Test, a measure of everyday verbal communication, four weeks after randomisation. Trial registration This trial is registered in the Dutch Trial Register (http://www.trialregister.nl, NTR3271.

  11. 外语教育与母语文化失语%Foreign Language Education and Mother Tongue Culture Aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭云鹏

    2012-01-01

    A few great powers in culture implement "cultural hegemony" policy,the disequilibrium in international cultural exchange results in the embarrassment of Chinese culture aphasia.Now Chinese national culture becomes increasingly important and cultural exchange presents oriental transfer.Particular emphasis should be placed on mother tongue culture in intercultural communication so as to enhance the sense of national identity,spread Chinese culture,cultivate students' cultural consciousness and make them become "intercultural persons" with intercultural communication competence.%少数文化强国实施文化霸权政策,国际文化交流的不平衡使中国文化尴尬失语。当前,中华民族文化越来越显示出其重要性,国际文化交流呈现东方转向。外语教育应凸显母语文化在跨文化交际中的地位和作用,强化民族文化认同意识,传播中华民族文化,培养学生的文化自觉,使学生成为具有跨文化交际能力的"跨文化人"。

  12. Migrânea com afasia: relato de uma família Migraine with aphasia: report of a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL BENZECRY ALMEIDA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos uma família brasileira na qual a mãe e três filhas apresentam episódios compatíveis com migrânea, acompanhados por alteração no conteúdo da linguagem (afasia, sem paresias. Alguns aspectos relativos à genética das migrâneas são revisados. Chamamos a atenção para a necessidade de investigação genética para saber se é uma variante das formas conhecidas de migrânea, como a migrânea hemiplégica familiar.We describe a Brazilian family in which one female patient and her three daughters present a clinical course compatible with migraine, preceded by language disorders (aphasia, without paresis. Several aspects related to genetics of migraine are reviewed. We conclude that further genetical studies are necessary to establish if these cases are different sources of weel-known migraine subtypes as the familial hemiplegic migraine.

  13. Speech-language pathologists' contribution to the assessment of decision-making capacity in aphasia: a survey of common practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldous, Kerryn; Tolmie, Rhiannon; Worrall, Linda; Ferguson, Alison

    2014-06-01

    Speech-language pathologists' scope of practice is currently unclear in relation to their contribution to the multi-disciplinary assessment of decision-making capacity for clients with aphasia and related neurogenic communication disorders. The primary aim of the current research study was to investigate the common practices of speech-language pathologists involved in assessments of decision-making capacity. The study was completed through the use of an online survey. There were 51 of 59 respondents who indicated involvement in evaluations of decision-making. Involvement in this kind of assessment was most commonly reported by speech-language pathologists working in inpatient acute and rehabilitation settings. Respondents reported using a variety of formal and informal assessment methods in their contributions to capacity assessment. Discussion with multidisciplinary team members was reported to have the greatest influence on their recommendations. Speech-language pathologists reported that they were dissatisfied with current protocols for capacity assessments in their workplace and indicated they would benefit from further education and training in this area. The findings of this study are discussed in light of their implications for speech-language pathology practice. PMID:24400775

  14. Postoperative Cervical Haematoma Complicated by Ipsilateral Carotid Thrombosis and Aphasia after Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley R. Chin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematoma alone is the most common vascular complication reported after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF. We present this case to report the occurrence of postoperative cervical hematoma complicated by ipsilateral carotid thrombosis and aphasia after an uncomplicated C4–6 ACDF. This is a case of a 65-year-old woman who underwent revision fusions of the C4-5 and C6-7 levels complicated by postoperative cervical hematoma and carotid thrombosis. The patient's history, clinical examination, imaging findings, and treatment are reported. The revision fusions were performed and deemed routine. Approximately eight hours later 200 mL of blood was evacuated from a postoperative cervical hematoma. The patient became unresponsive and disoriented a few hours after evacuating the hematoma. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were normal, but magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated total occlusion of the left carotid artery. Thrombectomy was performed and the patient was discharged without residual deficits. At the latest followup she is fully functional and asymptomatic in her neck. We suggest, after evacuating a cervical hematoma, an evaluation of the carotids be made with MRA or cerebral angiography, as this may demonstrate a clot before the patient develops symptoms.

  15. The Third Man: Robert Dunn's (1799-1877) Contribution to Aphasia Research in Mid-Nineteenth-Century England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Marjorie Perlman

    2016-01-01

    Throughout his medical career, Robert Dunn (1799-1877) published a number of clinical cases with postmortem reports involving acquired language disorders, with the first noted in 1842. He developed a physiologically informed approach to psychological function during the 1850s along with a group of notable colleagues Benjamin Collins Brodie, Henry Holland, Thomas Laycock, John Daniel Morell, and Daniel Noble. He was also active in ethnographic research on human origins and racial diversity. As such, Dunn represents an interesting player in the developing fields of neurology, psychology, and anthropology in England in the latter part of the nineteenth century. These various strands converged at the meeting of the British Association of the Advancement of Science in 1868, where Dunn shared the program of lectures on the cutting-edge topic of aphasia with Paul Broca (1824-1880) and John Hughlings Jackson (1835-1911). Dunn's ideas developed over a longer time frame than his younger colleagues and as such represent a unique blending of concepts from the earlier work of Franz Josef Gall (1758-1828) and Jean-Baptiste Bouillaud (1798-1881) to the perspectives on language organization in the brain developed after 1861.

  16. Predicting the outcome of anomia therapy for people with aphasia post CVA: both language and cognitive status are key predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Snell, Claerwen; Fillingham, Joanne K; Conroy, Paul; Sage, Karen

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether it was possible to predict therapy gain from participants' performance on background tests of language and cognitive ability. To do this, we amalgamated the assessment and therapy results from 33 people with aphasia following cerebral vascular accident (CVA), all of whom had received the same anomia therapy (based on progressive phonemic and orthographic cueing). Previous studies with smaller numbers of participants had found a possible relationship between anomia therapy performance and some language and cognitive assessments. Because this study had access to a larger data set than previous studies, we were able to replicate the previous findings and also to verify two overarching factors which were predictive of therapy gain: a cognitive factor and a phonological factor. The status of these two domains was able to predict both immediate and longer-term therapy gain. Pre-treatment naming ability also predicted gain after the anomia therapy. When combined, both cognitive and language (naming or phonological) skills were found to be independent predictors of therapy outcome.

  17. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Nepper-Christensen, Steen;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults.......To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults....

  18. Chronic Diarrhea in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can include cramping abdominal pain nausea or vomiting fever chills bloody stools Children with chronic diarrhea who have ... can include cramping, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, fever, chills, or bloody stools. Children with chronic diarrhea who ...

  19. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyneuropathy - chronic inflammatory; CIDP; Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy; Guillain-Barré - CIDP ... CIDP is one cause of damage to nerves outside the brain or spinal cord ( peripheral neuropathy ). Polyneuropathy ...

  20. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett RM. Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and myofascial pain. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 274. Engleberg NC. Chronic ...