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Sample records for chronic nicotine administration

  1. Withdrawal from Chronic Nicotine Administration Impairs Contextual Fear Conditioning in C57BL/6 Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jennifer A.; James, John R.; Siegel, Steven J.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of acute nicotine administration (0.09 mg/kg nicotine), chronic nicotine administration (6.3 mg/kg/d nicotine for 14 d), and withdrawal from chronic nicotine administration on fear conditioning in C57BL/6 mice were examined. Mice were trained using two coterminating conditioned stimulus (30 s; 85 dB white noise)– unconditioned stimulus (2 s; 0.57 mA foot shock) pairings and tested 24 h later for contextual and cued fear conditioning. Acute nicotine administration enhanced contextu...

  2. Behavioral and Physiological Responses to Nicotine Patch Administration Among Nonsmokers Based on Acute and Chronic Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, Chizimuzo; Kodet, Jonathan; Robertson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Despite the large amount that is known about the physical health effects of secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure, little is known about the behavioral health effects. Nicotine, the principle psychoactive substance in SHS, elicits subjective mood and physiological responses in nonsmokers. However, no studies have examined the subjective mood or physiological responses to nicotine in nonsmokers while accounting for prior chronic or acute SHS exposure. A 7-mg nicotine patch was administered to 17 adult nonsmokers for 2 hr. Main outcome measures obtained at ½ hr, 1 hr, and 2 hr were subjective behavioral drug effects (based on eleven 10-cm Visual Analog Scales [VASs]) and the physiological measures of heart rate, blood pressure, and serum nicotine levels. Analysis of outcome data was based on participants' chronic (using hair nicotine) or acute (using saliva cotinine) SHS exposure. Greater chronic SHS exposure was negatively associated with pleasurable responses to nicotine administration ("drug feels good" score at 2-hr time point, Spearman's ρ = -.65, p < .004), whereas greater acute SHS exposure was associated with positive responses ("like feeling of drug" score at 2-hr time point, Spearman's ρ = .63, p < .01). There were no associations between chronic or acute exposure and physiological changes in response to nicotine administration. The findings of this study may be useful in providing preliminary empirical data for future explorations of the mechanism whereby SHS exposure can influence behavioral outcomes in nonsmokers. Such studies can inform future interventions to reduce the physical and behavioral health risks associated with SHS exposure. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Chronic Nicotine Treatment During Adolescence Attenuates the Effects of Acute Nicotine in Adult Contextual Fear Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Erica D; Gould, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Adolescent onset of nicotine abuse is correlated with worse chances at successful abstinence in adulthood. One reason for this may be due to enduring learning deficits resulting from nicotine use during adolescence. Previous work has indicated that chronic nicotine administration beginning in late adolescence (PND38) caused learning deficits in contextual fear when tested in adulthood. The purpose of this study was to determine if chronic nicotine treatment during adolescence would alter sensitivity to nicotine's cognitive enhancing properties in adulthood. C57BL/6J mice received saline or chronic nicotine (12.6mg/kg/day) during adolescence (postnatal day 38) or adulthood (postnatal day 54) for a period of 12 days. Following a 30-day protracted abstinence, mice received either an acute injection of saline or nicotine (0.045, 0.18, and 0.36mg/kg) prior to training and testing a mouse model of contextual fear. It was found that chronic nicotine administration in adult mice did not alter sensitivity to acute nicotine following a protracted abstinence. In adolescent mice, chronic nicotine administration disrupted adult learning and decreased sensitivity to acute nicotine in adulthood as only the highest dose tested (0.36mg/kg) was able to enhance contextual fear learning. These results suggest that adolescent nicotine exposure impairs learning in adulthood, which could increase the risk for continued nicotine use in adulthood by requiring administration of higher doses of nicotine to reverse learning impairments caused by adolescent nicotine exposure. Results from this study add to the growing body of literature suggesting chronic nicotine exposure during adolescence leads to impaired learning in adulthood and demonstrates that nicotine exposure during adolescence attenuates the cognitive enhancing effects of acute nicotine in adulthood, which suggests altered cholinergic function. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  4. Antidepressant-like effects of the acute and chronic administration of nicotine in the rat forced swimming test and its interaction with fluoxetine [correction of flouxetine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Palacios, G; Bonilla-Jaime, H; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J

    2004-05-01

    An antidepressant action of nicotine (NIC) has recently been suggested. Flouxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is currently the most widely used antidepressant. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of the administration of NIC, fluoxetine (FLX), and the combination of both drugs given acutely, subchronically, and chronically as well as 7 days after chronic administration of these drugs on the forced swim test. Results showed that NIC induced a significant reduction of the time in immobility during the forced swim test (antidepressant effect), with a concomitant increase in swimming activity (serotonergic activation), after acute administration. These effects remain the same after subchronic and chronic administration. FLX failed to induce any effect after acute administration but did induce a significant decrease of immobility and an increase of swimming after subchronic administration. The effect of the chronic administration was significantly larger compared to subchronic administration. The combination of both drugs induced a larger effect than that observed after a single administration but only after subchronic treatment. No effect was observed after the end of the 7-day treatments. Data suggest that NIC has an antidepressant action that is expressed faster than FLX but remains the same later. Thus, cholinergic-serotonergic interactions could play an important role in the treatment of depression.

  5. Nicotine self-administration and reinstatement of nicotine-seeking in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltenstein, Matthew W; Ghee, Shannon M; See, Ronald E

    2012-03-01

    Tobacco addiction is a relapsing disorder that constitutes a substantial worldwide health problem, with evidence suggesting that nicotine and nicotine-associated stimuli play divergent roles in maintaining smoking behavior in men and women. While animal models of tobacco addiction that utilize nicotine self-administration have become more widely established, systematic examination of the multiple factors that instigate relapse to nicotine-seeking have been limited. Here, we examined nicotine self-administration and subsequent nicotine-seeking in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats using an animal model of self-administration and relapse. Rats lever pressed for nicotine (0.03 and 0.05 mg/kg/infusion, IV) during 15 daily 2-h sessions, followed by extinction of lever responding. Once responding was extinguished, we examined the ability of previously nicotine-paired cues (tone+light), the anxiogenic drug yohimbine (2.5mg/kg, IP), a priming injection of nicotine (0.3mg/kg, SC), or combinations of drug+cues to reinstate nicotine-seeking. Both males and females readily acquired nicotine self-administration and displayed comparable levels of responding and intake at both nicotine doses. Following extinction, exposure to the previously nicotine-paired cues or yohimbine, but not the nicotine-prime alone, reinstated nicotine-seeking in males and females. Moreover, when combined with nicotine-paired cues, both yohimbine and nicotine enhanced reinstatement. No significant sex differences or estrous cycle dependent changes were noted across reinstatement tests. These results demonstrate the ability to reinstate nicotine-seeking with multiple modalities and that exposure to nicotine-associated cues during periods of a stressful state or nicotine can increase nicotine-seeking. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic nicotine differentially alters spontaneous recovery of contextual fear in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumolo, Jessica M; Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Gould, Thomas J

    2018-04-02

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a devastating disorder with symptoms such as flashbacks, hyperarousal, and avoidance of reminders of the traumatic event. Exposure therapy, which attempts to extinguish fear responses, is a commonly used treatment for PTSD but relapse following successful exposure therapy is a frequent problem. In rodents, spontaneous recovery (SR), where extinguished fear responses resurface following extinction treatment, is used as a model of fear relapse. Previous studies from our lab showed that chronic nicotine impaired fear extinction and acute nicotine enhanced SR of contextual fear in adult male mice. In addition, we showed that acute nicotine's effects were specific to SR as acute nicotine did not affect recall of contextual fear conditioning in the absence of extinction. However, effects of chronic nicotine administration on SR are not known. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated if chronic nicotine administration altered SR or recall of contextual fear in adult male and female C57BL/6J mice. Our results showed that chronic nicotine significantly enhanced SR in female mice and significantly decreased SR in males. Chronic nicotine had no effect on recall of contextual fear in males or females. Female sham mice also had significantly less baseline SR than male sham mice. Overall, these results demonstrate sex differences in SR of fear memories and that chronic nicotine modulates these effects on SR but nicotine does not alter recall of contextual fear. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic oral nicotine increases brain [3H]epibatidine binding and responsiveness to antidepressant drugs, but not nicotine, in the mouse forced swim test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen T., Jesper; Nielsen, Elsebet O; Redrobe, John P

    2009-01-01

    Smoking rates among depressed individuals is higher than among healthy subjects, and nicotine alleviates depressive symptoms. Nicotine increases serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal activity and facilitates serotonin and noradrenaline release. In mice, acute nicotine administration enhances...... the activity of antidepressants in the mouse forced swim (mFST) and tail suspension tests. Here, we investigated if this action of nicotine is also reflected in a chronic treatment regimen....

  8. Extended nicotine self-administration increases sensitivity to nicotine, motivation to seek nicotine and the reinforcing properties of nicotine-paired cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Kelly J; Lay, Belinda P P; Holmes, Nathan M

    2017-03-01

    An array of pharmacological and environmental factors influence the development and maintenance of tobacco addiction. The nature of these influences likely changes across the course of an extended smoking history, during which time drug seeking can become involuntary and uncontrolled. The present study used an animal model to examine the factors that drive nicotine-seeking behavior after either brief (10 days) or extended (40 days) self-administration training. In Experiment 1, extended training increased rats' sensitivity to nicotine, indicated by a leftward shift in the dose-response curve, and their motivation to work for nicotine, indicated by an increase in the break point achieved under a progressive ratio schedule. In Experiment 2, extended training imbued the nicotine-paired cue with the capacity to maintain responding to the same high level as nicotine itself. However, Experiment 3 showed that the mechanisms involved in responding for nicotine or a nicotine-paired cue are dissociable, as treatment with the partial nicotine receptor agonist, varenicline, suppressed responding for nicotine but potentiated responding for the nicotine-paired cue. Hence, across extended nicotine self-administration, pharmacological and environmental influences over nicotine seeking increase such that nicotine seeking is controlled by multiple sources, and therefore highly resistant to change. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Does chronic nicotine alter neurotransmitter receptors involved in Parkinson's disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, M.A.; Lapin, E.P.; Lajtha, A.; Maker, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    Cigarette smokers are fewer in number among Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients than among groups of persons who do not have PD. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this observation. One which must be tested is the possibility that some pharmacologic agent present in cigarette smoke may interact with some central nervous system component involved in PD. To this end, they have investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on receptors for some of the neurotransmitters that are affected in PD. Rats were injected for six weeks with saline or nicotine 0.8 mg/kg S.C., then killed and brains removed and dissected. The binding of ( 3 H)-ketanserin to serotonin receptors in frontal cortex and of ( 3 H)-domperidone to dopamine receptors in caudate was not affected. However, the binding of ( 3 H)-domperidone in nucleus accumbens was altered: the K/sub d/ increased from 0.16 +/- 0.02 nM to 0.61 +/- 0.07 nM, and the B/sub max/ increased from 507 +/- 47 fmol/mg protein to 910 +/- 43 fmol/mg (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). These values are based on three ligand concentrations. Additional studies are in progress to substantiate the data. It is concluded that chronic nicotine administration may alter dopamine receptors in nucleus accumbens

  10. Effect Of Nicotine Administration On Weight And Histology Of Some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: It has been emphasized that cigarette smoking is not always synonymous with nicotine administration but the toxic effect of cigarette has often been associated with the nicotine content in cigarette. Epidemiologic studies have clearly indicated that cigarette smoking have many deleterious effects on visceral ...

  11. Effect of chronic (-)-nicotine treatment on rat cerebral benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magata, Yasuhiro; Kitano, Haruhiro; Shiozaki, Toshiki; Iida, Yasuhiko; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Saji, Hideo; Konishi, Junji

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of (-)-nicotine on cerebral benzodiazepine receptors (BzR) with radiotracer methods. The effect of (-)-nicotine on BzR was examined in in vitro studies using chronic (-)-nicotine-treated rats using 3 H-diazepam. The in vitro radioreceptor assay showed a 14% increase in the maximum number of binding sites of BzR in chronic (-)-nicotine-treated rats in comparison with the control rats. Moreover, a convenient in vivo uptake index of 125 I-iomazenil was calculated and a higher uptake of the radioactivity was observed in the chronic (-)-nicotine-treated group than in the control group. Although further studies of the mechanism of (-)-nicotine on such BzR changes are required, an increase in the amount of BzR in the cerebral cortex was found in rats that underwent chronic (-)-nicotine treatment, and this result contributed to the understanding of the effects of (-)-nicotine and smoking on neural functions

  12. Effects of Oral Administration of Nicotine on Organ Weight, Serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of oral administration of nicotine on body and reproductive organ weight, serum testosterone level and testicular histology in adult male rats. Forty male rats divided into five groups and treated for a period of 30 days with 0.5mg/kg (low dose) and 1.0mg/kg (high dose) body weight of ...

  13. In vivo imaging of nicotinic receptor upregulation following chronic (-)-nicotine treatment in baboon using SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassiou, Michael; Eberl, Stefan; Meikle, Steven R.; Birrell, Alex; Constable, Chris; Fulham, Michael J.; Wong, Dean F.; Musachio, John L.

    2001-01-01

    To quantify changes in neuronal nAChR binding in vivo, quantitative dynamic SPECT studies were performed with 5-[ 123 I]-iodo-A-85380 in baboons pre and post chronic treatment with (-)-nicotine or saline control. Infusion of (-)-nicotine at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg/24h for 14 days resulted in plasma (-)-nicotine levels of 27.3 ng/mL. This is equivalent to that found in an average human smoker (20 cigarettes a day). In the baboon brain the regional distribution of 5-[ 123 I]-iodo-A-85380 was consistent with the known densities of nAChRs (thalamus > frontal cortex > cerebellum). Changes in nAChR binding were estimated from the volume of distribution (V d ) and binding potential (BP) derived from 3-compartment model fits. In the (-)-nicotine treated animal V d was significantly increased in the thalamus (52%) and cerebellum (50%) seven days post cessation of (-)-nicotine treatment, suggesting upregulation of nAChRs. The observed 33% increase in the frontal cortex failed to reach significance. A significant increase in BP was seen in the thalamus. In the saline control animal no changes were observed in V d or BP under any experimental conditions. In this preliminary study, we have demonstrated for the first time in vivo upregulation of neuronal nAChR binding following chronic (-)-nicotine treatment

  14. Nicotine Significantly Improves Chronic Stress-Induced Impairments of Cognition and Synaptic Plasticity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xueliang; Shang, Yingchun; Fu, Jingxuan; Zhang, Tao

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if nicotine was able to improve cognition deficits in a mouse model of chronic mild stress. Twenty-four male C57BL/6 mice were divided into three groups: control, stress, and stress with nicotine treatment. The animal model was established by combining chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) and isolated feeding. Mice were exposed to CUMS continued for 28 days, while nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) was also administrated for 28 days. Weight and sucrose consumption were measured during model establishing period. The anxiety and behavioral despair were analyzed using the forced swim test (FST) and open-field test (OFT). Spatial cognition was evaluated using Morris water maze (MWM) test. Following behavioral assessment, both long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation (DEP) were recorded in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) region. Both synaptic and Notch1 proteins were measured by Western. Nicotine increased stressed mouse's sucrose consumption. The MWM test showed that spatial learning and reversal learning in stressed animals were remarkably affected relative to controls, whereas nicotine partially rescued cognitive functions. Additionally, nicotine considerably alleviated the level of anxiety and the degree of behavioral despair in stressed mice. It effectively mitigated the depression-induced impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, in which both the LTP and DEP were significantly inhibited in stressed mice. Moreover, nicotine enhanced the expression of synaptic and Notch1 proteins in stressed animals. The results suggest that nicotine ameliorates the depression-like symptoms and improves the hippocampal synaptic plasticity closely associated with activating transmembrane ion channel receptors and Notch signaling components. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. effect of nicotine administration on weight and histology of some vital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    However it is not certain whether this effect is produced entirely by nicotine as cigarettes contain other toxic ... nicotine treatment while weights of the heart and liver increased with 60days treatment with the appearance of .... carried out in ascending grade of alcohol. .... This study showed that chronic nicotine treatment.

  16. Effects of a selective cannabinoid CB2 agonist and antagonist on intravenous nicotine self administration and reinstatement of nicotine seeking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Gamaleddin

    Full Text Available Over the last decade there have been significant advances in the discovery and understanding of the cannabinoid system along with the development of pharmacologic tools that modulate its function. Characterization of the crosstalk between nicotine addiction and the cannabinoid system may have significant implications on our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying nicotine dependence. Two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2 have been identified. CB1 receptors are expressed in the brain and modulate drug taking and drug seeking for various drugs of abuse, including nicotine. CB2 receptors have been recently identified in the brain and have been proposed to play a functional role in mental disorders and drug addiction. Our objective was to explore the role of CB2 receptors on intravenous nicotine self administration under two schedules of reinforcement (fixed and progressive ratio and on nicotine seeking induced by nicotine priming or by nicotine associated cues. For this, we evaluated the effects of various doses of the selective CB2 antagonist AM630 (1.25 to 5 mg/kg and CB2 agonist AM1241 (1 to 10 mg/kg on these behavioral responses in rats. Different groups of male Long Evans rats were trained to lever press for nicotine at a unit dose of 30 µg/kg/infusion. Subsequently, animals were randomized using a Latin-square design and injected with either AM1241 or AM630 using a counterbalanced within subject design. Administration of the CB2 ligands did not affect either nicotine-taking nicotine-seeking behavior. Our results do not support the involvement of CB2 receptors in nicotine-taking or nicotine-seeking behavior.

  17. Sex differences in nicotine intravenous self-administration: A meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Rodolfo J; Uribe, Kevin P; Swalve, Natashia; O'Dell, Laura E

    2017-11-21

    This report reflects a meta-analysis that systematically reviewed the literature on intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of nicotine in female and male rats. The goal was to determine if sex differences in nicotine IVSA exist, estimate the magnitude of the effect, and identify potential moderators of the relationship between sex differences and nicotine consumption. Extensive search procedures identified 20 studies that met the inclusion criteria of employing both female and male rats in nicotine IVSA procedures. The meta-analysis was conducted on effect size values that were calculated from mean total intake or nicotine deliveries using the Hedges' unbiased g u statistic. A random effects analysis revealed that overall females self-administered more nicotine than males (weighted g u =0.18, 95% CI [0.003, 0.34]). Subsequent moderator variable analyses revealed that certain procedural conditions influenced the magnitude of sex differences in nicotine IVSA. Specifically, higher reinforcement requirements (>FR1) and extended-access sessions (23h) were associated with greater nicotine IVSA in females versus males. Females also displayed higher nicotine intake than males when the experiment included a light cue that signaled nicotine delivery. Sex differences were not influenced by the diurnal phase of testing, dose of nicotine, or prior operant training. Overall, the results revealed that female rats display higher levels of nicotine IVSA than males, suggesting that the strong reinforcing effects of nicotine promote tobacco use in women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chronic ethanol or nicotine treatment results in partial cross-tolerance between these agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, J B; de Fiebre, C M; Marks, M J; Collins, A C

    1988-01-01

    Female DBA/2Ibg mice were treated chronically (21 days) with ethanol- or dextrin-containing liquid diets or infused chronically with nicotine (8 mg/kg/h) or saline for 10 days. The responses of these animals to challenge doses of ethanol (2.5 g/kg) or nicotine (1 or 2 mg/kg) were measured using a test battery consisting of respiration rate, acoustic startle response, Y-maze crosses and rears, heart rate and body temperature. Chronic ethanol-treated animals were tolerant to the effects elicited by a challenge dose of ethanol on four of the six measures and were cross-tolerant to nicotine's effects on the acoustic startle test. Chronic nicotine-treated animals were tolerant to nicotine's effects on five of the six measures and cross-tolerant to ethanol's effects on heart rate and body temperature. Thus, partial cross-tolerance between ethanol and nicotine exists. Chronic nicotine treatment resulted in significant increases in L-[3H]-nicotine binding in six of seven brain regions and in alpha-[125I]-bungarotoxin binding in three of seven brain regions. Chronic ethanol treatment failed to alter the binding of either ligand. Therefore, the cross-tolerance that develops between ethanol and nicotine is not totally dependent on alterations in the number of brain nicotinic receptors.

  19. Prior nicotine self-administration attenuates subsequent dopaminergic deficits of methamphetamine in rats: role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladi, Michelle G; Nielsen, Shannon M; McIntosh, J Michael; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that oral nicotine exposure attenuates long-term dopaminergic damage induced by toxins, including repeated, high doses of methamphetamine. It is suggested that alterations in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expression, including α4β2* and α6β2* subtypes, likely contribute to this protection. The current study extended these findings by investigating whether nicotine self-administration in male, Sprague-Dawley rats (a) attenuates short-term dopaminergic damage induced by methamphetamine and (b) causes alterations in levels of α4β2* and α6β2* nAChR subtypes. The findings indicate that nicotine self-administration (0.032 mg/kg/infusion for 14 days) per se did not alter α4β2* and α6β2* nAChR expression or dopamine transporter (DAT) expression and function. Interestingly, prior nicotine self-administration attenuated methamphetamine-induced decreases in DAT function when assessed 24 h, but not 1 h, after methamphetamine treatment (4×7.5 mg/kg/injection). The ability of nicotine to attenuate the effects of methamphetamine on DAT function corresponded with increases in α4β2*, but not α6β2*, nAChR binding density. Understanding the role of nAChRs in methamphetamine-induced damage has the potential to elucidate mechanisms underlying the etiology of disorders involving dopaminergic dysfunction, as well as to highlight potential new therapeutic strategies for prevention or reduction of dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

  20. NMDA receptors regulate nicotine-enhanced brain reward function and intravenous nicotine self-administration: role of the ventral tegmental area and central nucleus of the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Paul J; Chartoff, Elena; Roberto, Marisa; Carlezon, William A; Markou, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine is considered an important component of tobacco responsible for the smoking habit in humans. Nicotine increases glutamate-mediated transmission throughout brain reward circuitries. This action of nicotine could potentially contribute to its intrinsic rewarding and reward-enhancing properties, which motivate consumption of the drug. Here we show that the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist LY235959 (0.5-2.5 mg per kg) abolished nicotine-enhanced brain reward function, reflected in blockade of the lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds usually observed after experimenter-administered (0.25 mg per kg) or intravenously self-administered (0.03 mg per kg per infusion) nicotine injections. The highest LY235959 dose (5 mg per kg) tested reversed the hedonic valence of nicotine from positive to negative, reflected in nicotine-induced elevations of ICSS thresholds. LY235959 doses that reversed nicotine-induced lowering of ICSS thresholds also markedly decreased nicotine self-administration without altering responding for food reinforcement, whereas the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor antagonist NBQX had no effects on nicotine intake. In addition, nicotine self-administration upregulated NMDA receptor subunit expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), suggesting important interactions between nicotine and the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, nicotine (1 microM) increased NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents in rat CeA slices, similar to its previously described effects in the VTA. Finally, infusion of LY235959 (0.1-10 ng per side) into the CeA or VTA decreased nicotine self-administration. Taken together, these data suggest that NMDA receptors, including those in the CeA and VTA, gate the magnitude and valence of the effects of nicotine on brain reward systems, thereby regulating motivation to consume the drug.

  1. Chronic nicotine modifies skeletal muscle Na,K-ATPase activity through its interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and phospholemman.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Chibalin

    Full Text Available Our previous finding that the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR and the Na,K-ATPase interact as a regulatory complex to modulate Na,K-ATPase activity suggested that chronic, circulating nicotine may alter this interaction, with long-term changes in the membrane potential. To test this hypothesis, we chronically exposed rats to nicotine delivered orally for 21-31 days. Chronic nicotine produced a steady membrane depolarization of ∼3 mV in the diaphragm muscle, which resulted from a net change in electrogenic transport by the Na,K-ATPase α2 and α1 isoforms. Electrogenic transport by the α2 isoform increased (+1.8 mV while the activity of the α1 isoform decreased (-4.4 mV. Protein expression of Na,K-ATPase α1 or α2 isoforms and the nAChR did not change; however, the content of α2 subunit in the plasma membrane decreased by 25%, indicating that its stimulated electrogenic transport is due to an increase in specific activity. The physical association between the nAChR, the Na,K-ATPase α1 or α2 subunits, and the regulatory subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, phospholemman (PLM, measured by co-immuno precipitation, was stable and unchanged. Chronic nicotine treatment activated PKCα/β2 and PKCδ and was accompanied by parallel increases in PLM phosphorylation at Ser(63 and Ser(68. Collectively, these results demonstrate that nicotine at chronic doses, acting through the nAChR-Na,K-ATPase complex, is able to modulate Na,K-ATPase activity in an isoform-specific manner and that the regulatory range includes both stimulation and inhibition of enzyme activity. Cholinergic modulation of Na,K-ATPase activity is achieved, in part, through activation of PKC and phosphorylation of PLM.

  2. Smoking history, nicotine dependence and opioid use in patients with chronic non-malignant pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, K; Jensen, H I; Højsted, J

    2016-01-01

    doses than never smokers and former smokers not using nicotine. CONCLUSIONS: The study supports previous evidence that smoking is associated with chronic pain. Our data suggest that information about use of nicotine substitution in chronic non-malignant patients are relevant both in a clinical setting......BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated a positive association between smoking and addiction to opioids in patients with chronic non-malignant pain. This could be explained by a susceptibility in some patients to develop addiction. Another explanation could be that nicotine influences both...... pain and the opioid system. The objective of the study was to investigate whether smoking, former smoking ± nicotine use and nicotine dependence in patients with chronic non-malignant pain were associated with opioid use and addiction to opioids. METHODS: The study was a cross-sectional study carried...

  3. Effect of nicotine and tobacco administration method on the mechanical properties of healing bone following closed fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Sidsel Gaarn; Chen, Xinqian; Bechtold, Joan E; Kyle, Richard F; Rahbek, Ole; Keyler, Daniel E; Skoett, Martin; Soeballe, Kjeld

    2010-09-01

    We previously showed different effects of tobacco and nicotine on fracture healing, but due to pump reservoir limits, maximum exposure period was 4 weeks. To allow flexibility in pre- and post-fracture exposure periods, the objective of this study was to compare a new oral administration route for nicotine to the established pump method. Four groups were studied: (1) pump saline, (2) pump saline + oral tobacco, (3) pump saline/nicotine + oral tobacco, and (4) pump saline + oral nicotine/tobacco. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 84) received a transverse femoral fracture stabilized with an intramedullary pin 1 week after initiating dosing. After 3 weeks, no difference was found in torsional strength or stiffness between oral nicotine/tobacco or pump nicotine + tobacco, while energy absorption with oral nicotine/tobacco was greater than pump nicotine + tobacco (p < 0.05). Compared to saline control, strength for oral nicotine/tobacco was higher than control (p < 0.05), and stiffnesses for pump nicotine + tobacco and oral nicotine/tobacco were higher than control (p < 0.05). No differences in energy were found for either nicotine-tobacco group compared to saline control. Mean serum cotinine (stable nicotine metabolite) was different between pump and oral nicotine at 1 and 4 weeks, but all groups were in the range of 1-2 pack/day smokers. In summary, relevant serum cotinine levels can be reached in rats with oral nicotine, and, in the presence of tobacco, nicotine can influence mechanical aspects of fracture healing, dependent on administration method. Caution should be exercised when comparing results of fracture healing studies using different methods of nicotine administration. (c) 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dextromethorphan interactions with histaminergic and serotonergic treatments to reduce nicotine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Scott A; Hall, Brandon J; Wells, Corinne; Slade, Susan; Jaskowski, Paul; Morrison, Margaret; Rezvani, Amir H; Rose, Jed E; Levin, Edward D

    2016-03-01

    Combining effective treatments with diverse mechanisms of action for smoking cessation may provide better therapy by targeting multiple points of control in the neural circuits underlying addiction. Previous research in a rat model has shown that dextromethorphan, which has α3β4 nicotinic and NMDA glutamatergic antagonist actions, significantly decreases nicotine self-administration. We have found in the rat model that the H1 histamine antagonist pyrilamine and the serotonin 5HT2C agonist lorcaserin also significantly reduce nicotine self-administration. The current studies were conducted to determine the interactive effects of dextromethorphan with pyrilamine and lorcaserin on nicotine self-administration in rats. Young adult female rats were fitted with jugular IV catheters and trained to self-administer a nicotine infusion dose of 0.03-mg/kg/infusion. In an initial dose-effect function study of dextromethorphan, we found a monotonic decrease in nicotine self-administration over a dose range of 1 to 30-mg/kg with the lowest effective dose of 3-mg/kg. Then, with two separate cohorts of rats, dextromethorphan (0, 3.3, and 10-mg/kg) interactions with pyrilamine (0, 4.43, and 13.3-mg/kg) were investigated as well as interactions with lorcaserin (0, 0.3125 and 0.625-mg/kg). In the pyrilamine-dextromethorphan interaction study, an acute dose of pyrilamine (13.3-mg/kg) as well as an acute dose of dextromethorphan caused a significant decrease in nicotine self-administration. There were mutually augmenting effects of these two drugs. The combination of dextromethorphan (10-mg/kg) and pyrilamine (13.3-mg/kg) significantly lowered nicotine self-administration relative to either 10-mg/kg of dextromethorphan alone (pdextromethorphan study, an acute dose of lorcaserin (0.312-mg/kg) as well as an acute dose of dextromethorphan (10-mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in nicotine self-administration replicating previous findings. Augmenting interactions were observed with

  5. Changes in the α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine system during chronic controlled alcohol exposure in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmer, Ansel T; Tudorascu, Dana L; Wooten, Dustin W; Lao, Patrick J; Barnhart, Todd E; Ahlers, Elizabeth O; Resch, Leslie M; Larson, Julie A; Converse, Alexander K; Moore, Colleen F; Schneider, Mary L; Christian, Bradley T

    2014-05-01

    The precise nature of modifications to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) system in response to chronic ethanol exposure is poorly understood. The present work used PET imaging to assay α4β2* nAChR binding levels of eight rhesus monkeys before and during controlled chronic ethanol intake. [(18)F]Nifene PET scans were conducted prior to alcohol exposure, and then again after at least 8 months controlled ethanol exposure, including 6 months at 1.5 g/kg/day following a dose escalation period. Receptor binding levels were quantified with binding potentials (BPND) using the cerebellum as a reference region. Alcohol self-administration was assessed as average daily alcohol intake during a 2 month free drinking period immediately following controlled alcohol. Significant decreases in α4β2* nAChR binding were observed in both frontal and insular cortex in response to chronic ethanol exposure. During chronic alcohol exposure, BPND in the lateral geniculate region correlated positively with the amount of alcohol consumed during free drinking. The observed decreases in nAChR availability following chronic alcohol consumption suggest alterations to this receptor system in response to repeated alcohol administration, making this an important target for further study in alcohol abuse and alcohol and nicotine codependence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of chronic sazetidine-A, a selective α4β2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors desensitizing agent on pharmacologically-induced impaired attention in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Amir H; Cauley, Marty; Xiao, Yingxian; Kellar, Kenneth J; Levin, Edward D

    2013-03-01

    Nicotine and nicotinic agonists have been shown to improve attentional function. Nicotinic receptors are easily desensitized, and all nicotinic agonists are also desensitizing agents. Although both receptor activation and desensitization are components of the mechanism that mediates the overall effects of nicotinic agonists, it is not clear how each of the two opposed actions contributes to attentional improvements. Sazetidine-A has high binding affinity at α4β2 nicotinic receptors and causes a relatively brief activation followed by a long-lasting desensitization of the receptors. Acute administration of sazetidine-A has been shown to significantly improve attention by reversing impairments caused by the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist scopolamine and the NMDA glutamate antagonist dizocilpine. In the current study, we tested the effects of chronic subcutaneous infusion of sazetidine-A (0, 2, or 6 mg/kg/day) on attention in Sprague-Dawley rats. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of chronic sazetidine-A treatment on attentional impairment induced by an acute administration of 0.02 mg/kg scopolamine. During the first week period, the 6-mg/kg/day sazetidine-A dose significantly reversed the attentional impairment induced by scopolamine. During weeks 3 and 4, the scopolamine-induced impairment was no longer seen, but sazetidine-A (6 mg/kg/day) significantly improved attentional performance on its own. Chronic sazetidine-A also reduced response latency and response omissions. This study demonstrated that similar to its acute effects, chronic infusions of sazetidine-A improve attentional performance. The results indicate that the desensitization of α4β2 nicotinic receptors with some activation of these receptors may play an important role in improving effects of sazetidine-A on attention.

  7. Chronic agmatine treatment prevents behavioral manifestations of nicotine withdrawal in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagale, Nandkishor R; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Taksande, Brijesh G

    2015-05-05

    Smoking cessation exhibits an aversive withdrawal syndrome characterized by both increases in somatic signs and affective behaviors including anxiety and depression. In present study, abrupt withdrawal of daily nicotine injections (2mg/kg, s.c., four times daily, for 10 days) significantly increased somatic signs viz. rearing, grooming, jumping, genital licking, leg licking, head shakes with associated depression (increased immobility in forced swim test) as well as anxiety (decreased the number of entries and time spent in open arm in elevated plus maze) in nicotine dependent animals. The peak effect was observed at 24h time point of nicotine withdrawal. Repeated administration of agmatine (40-80µg/mouse, i.c.v.) before the first daily dose of nicotine from day 5 to 10 attenuated the elevated scores of somatic signs and abolished the depression and anxiety like behavior induced by nicotine withdrawal in dependent animals. However, in separate groups, its acute administration 30min before behavior analysis of nicotine withdrawal was ineffective. This result clearly shows the role of agmatine in development of nicotine dependence and its withdrawal. In extension to behavioral experiments, brain agmatine analyses, carried out at 24h time point of nicotine withdrawal demonstrated marked decrease in basal brain agmatine concentration as compared to control animals. Taken together, these data support the role of agmatine as common biological substrate for somatic signs and affective symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. This data may project therapies based on agmatine in anxiety, depression and mood changes associated with tobacco withdrawal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The tendency to sign-track predicts cue-induced reinstatement during nicotine self-administration, and is enhanced by nicotine but not ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versaggi, Cassandra L.; King, Christopher P.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Some individuals are particularly responsive to reward-associated stimuli (“cues”), including the effects of these cues on craving and relapse to drug-seeking behavior. In the cases of nicotine and alcohol, cues may acquire these abilities via the incentive-enhancing properties of the drug. Objectives To determine the interaction between cue-responsivity and nicotine reinforcement, we studied the patterns of nicotine self-administration in rats categorized based on their tendency to approach a food predictive cue (“sign-trackers”) or a reward-delivery location (“goal-trackers”). In a second experiment, we determined whether nicotine and ethanol altered the incentive value of a food cue. Methods Rats were classified as sign- or goal-trackers during a Pavlovian conditioned approach paradigm. Rats then self-administered intravenous nicotine (0.03 mg/kg infusions) followed by extinction and cue induced reinstatement tests. We also tested the effects of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg base s.c.) or ethanol (0.7 g/kg i.p.) on the approach to, and reinforcing efficacy of, a food cue. Results Sign-trackers showed greater reinstatement in response to a nicotine cue. Further, nicotine enhanced sign-tracking but not goal-tracking to a food cue, and also enhanced responding for the food cue during the conditioned reinforcement test. Conversely, ethanol reduced sign-tracking and increased goal-tracking, but had no effect on conditioned reinforcement. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that the tendency to attribute incentive value to a food cue predicts enhanced cue-induced reinstatement. Additionally, the incentive value of food cues is differentially modulated by nicotine and ethanol, which may be related to the reinforcing effects of these drugs. PMID:27282365

  9. The tendency to sign-track predicts cue-induced reinstatement during nicotine self-administration, and is enhanced by nicotine but not ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versaggi, Cassandra L; King, Christopher P; Meyer, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Some individuals are particularly responsive to reward-associated stimuli ("cues"), including the effects of these cues on craving and relapse to drug-seeking behavior. In the cases of nicotine and alcohol, cues may acquire these abilities via the incentive-enhancing properties of the drug. To determine the interaction between cue-responsivity and nicotine reinforcement, we studied the patterns of nicotine self-administration in rats categorized based on their tendency to approach a food-predictive cue ("sign-trackers") or a reward-delivery location ("goal-trackers"). In a second experiment, we determined whether nicotine and ethanol altered the incentive value of a food cue. Rats were classified as sign- or goal-trackers during a Pavlovian conditioned approach paradigm. Rats then self-administered intravenous nicotine (0.03 mg/kg infusions) followed by extinction and cue-induced reinstatement tests. We also tested the effects of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg base s.c.) or ethanol (0.7 g/kg i.p.) on the approach to, and reinforcing efficacy of, a food cue. Sign-trackers showed greater reinstatement in response to a nicotine cue. Further, nicotine enhanced sign-tracking but not goal-tracking to a food cue and also enhanced responding for the food cue during the conditioned reinforcement test. Conversely, ethanol reduced sign-tracking and increased goal-tracking, but had no effect on conditioned reinforcement. Our studies demonstrate that the tendency to attribute incentive value to a food cue predicts enhanced cue-induced reinstatement. Additionally, the incentive value of food cues is differentially modulated by nicotine and ethanol, which may be related to the reinforcing effects of these drugs.

  10. Chronic Nicotine Exposure Initiated in Adolescence and Unpaired to Behavioral Context Fails to Enhance Sweetened Ethanol Seeking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aric C. Madayag

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine use in adolescence is pervasive in the United States and, according to the Gateway Hypothesis, may lead to progression towards other addictive substances. Given the prevalence of nicotine and ethanol comorbidity, it is difficult to ascertain if nicotine is a gateway drug for ethanol. Our study investigated the relationship between adolescent exposure to nicotine and whether this exposure alters subsequent alcohol seeking behavior. We hypothesized that rats exposed to nicotine beginning in adolescence would exhibit greater alcohol seeking behavior than non-exposed siblings. To test our hypothesis, beginning at P28, female rats were initially exposed to once daily nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, SC or saline for 5 days. Following these five initial injections, animals were trained to nose-poke for sucrose reinforcement (10%, w/v, gradually increasing to sweetened ethanol (10% sucrose; 10% ethanol, w/v on an FR5 reinforcement schedule. Nicotine injections were administered after the behavioral sessions to minimize acute effects of nicotine on operant self-administration. We measured the effects of nicotine exposure on the following aspects of ethanol seeking: self-administration, naltrexone (NTX-induced decreases, habit-directed behavior, motivation, extinction and reinstatement. Nicotine exposure did not alter self-administration or the effectiveness of NTX to reduce alcohol seeking. Nicotine exposure blocked habit-directed ethanol seeking. Finally, nicotine did not alter extinction learning or cue-induced reinstatement to sweetened ethanol seeking. Our findings suggest that nicotine exposure outside the behavioral context does not escalate ethanol seeking. Further, the Gateway Hypothesis likely applies to scenarios in which nicotine is either self-administered or physiologically active during the behavioral session.

  11. [Safety and effectiveness of nicotinic acid in the management of patients with chronic renal disease and hyperlipidemia associated to hyperphosphatemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo Valencia, C A; Cruz, J

    2008-01-01

    To establish if the nicotinic acid in patients with chronic renal disease reduce significantly and with security the levels of lipids and serum phosphate in refractory patients to the classical management. Observational study Place: Renal Unity RTS Ltda Caldas Santa Sofìa Hospital. All the patients with chronic renal disease in dialysis therapy to whom the classical treatment for their hyperlipidaemia and hyperphosphatemia didn't manage a satisfactory reduce of their serum levels. It was identified that those patients who in the 3 previous months to the intervention hadn't presented changes in the lipids profile even though they received low fats diet and a lipid lowering therapies (statin o fibric acid derivates). It was determined in them whether they presented levels of serum phosphorus greater than 5.5 mg/dl even though having received nutritional recommendations and treatment with oral phosphate binding agents (Aluminum hydroxide, Calcium salts or Sevelamer). In them it was proceeded to administrate nicotinic acid via oral at night until a doses of 1,000 milligrams was reached (preceded of 100 mgs of acetylsalicylic acid 1 hour before) during a period of 8 months, observing its therapeutical effectivity and security profile to improve the lipids profile and reduce the serum phosphorus. 9 patients complied with the requirements, average time in dialysis 34 months, 3 in hemodialysis and 6 in peritoneal dialysis. All patients started with 500 mgs and 3 months later correctly tolerated the dose of 1,000 mgs. Between the evaluated variables, the most important changes were: the phosphorus reduced reaching a significant value at eight months: initial 6.46+/-0.53, four months 4.37+/-0.63 (p>0.05) and eight months 3.94+/-0.76 (padherence to the medicament 100%. The nicotinic acid is efficient, very well tolerated and economical in comparison with others drugs, which makes it ideal for the treatment of patients with hyperlipidaemia and refractory hyperphosphatemia to

  12. Effects of chronic inhalation of electronic cigarettes containing nicotine on glial glutamate transporters and α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in female CD-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Crotty Alexander, Laura E; Nelson, Jessica A; Schiefer, Isaac T; Breen, Ellen; Drummond, Christopher A; Sari, Youssef

    2017-07-03

    Alteration in glutamate neurotransmission has been found to mediate the development of drug dependence, including nicotine. We and others, through using western blotting, have reported that exposure to drugs of abuse reduced the expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) as well as cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT), which consequently increased extracellular glutamate concentrations in the mesocorticolimbic area. However, our previous studies did not reveal any changes in glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) following exposure to drugs of abuse. In the present study, for the first time, we investigated the effect of chronic exposure to electronic (e)-cigarette vapor containing nicotine, for one hour daily for six months, on GLT-1, xCT, and GLAST expression in frontal cortex (FC), striatum (STR), and hippocampus (HIP) in outbred female CD1 mice. In this study, we also investigated the expression of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α-7 nAChR), a major pre-synaptic nicotinic receptor in the glutamatergic neurons, which regulates glutamate release. We found that inhalation of e-cigarette vapor for six months increased α-7 nAChR expression in both FC and STR, but not in the HIP. In addition, chronic e-cigarette exposure reduced GLT-1 expression only in STR. Moreover, e-cigarette vapor inhalation induced downregulation of xCT in both the STR and HIP. We did not find any significant changes in GLAST expression in any brain region. Finally, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques, we detected high concentrations of nicotine and cotinine, a major metabolite of nicotine, in the FC tissues of e-cigarette exposed mice. These data provide novel evidence about the effects of chronic nicotine inhalation on the expression of key glial glutamate transporters as well as α-7 nAChR. Our work may suggest that nicotine exposure via chronic inhalation of e-cigarette vapor may be mediated in part by alterations in the glutamatergic

  13. Animal models of nicotine exposure: relevance to second-hand smoking, electronic cigarette use and compulsive smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami eCohen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Much evidence indicates that individuals use tobacco primarily to experience the psychopharmacological properties of nicotine and that a large proportion of smokers eventually become dependent on nicotine. In humans, nicotine acutely produces positive reinforcing effects, including mild euphoria, whereas a nicotine abstinence syndrome with both somatic and affective components is observed after chronic nicotine exposure. Animal models of nicotine self-administration and chronic exposure to nicotine have been critical in unveiling the neurobiological substrates that mediate the acute reinforcing effects of nicotine and emergence of a withdrawal syndrome during abstinence. However, important aspects of the transition from nicotine abuse to nicotine dependence, such as the emergence of increased motivation and compulsive nicotine intake following repeated exposure to the drug, have only recently begun to be modeled in animals. Thus, the neurobiological mechanisms that are involved in these important aspects of nicotine addiction remain largely unknown. In this review, we describe the different animal models available to date and discuss recent advances in animal models of nicotine exposure and nicotine dependence. This review demonstrates that novel animal models of nicotine vapor exposure and escalation of nicotine intake provide a unique opportunity to investigate the neurobiological effects of second-hand nicotine exposure, electronic cigarette use and the mechanisms that underlie the transition from nicotine use to compulsive nicotine intake.

  14. Effect of systemic administration of nicotine on healing in osseous defects. An experimental study in rabbits. Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balatsouka, Dimitra; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Sørensen, Lars

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of systemic administration of nicotine on bone healing in osseous defects in the tibia of rabbits. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen female rabbits received nicotine (n=8; test group) or saline (n=8; control group) via subcutaneously...... 4 weeks and in the left leg after 6 weeks of nicotine/placebo exposure. Thus, 2- and 4-week healing groups were created for the bone defects. After 8 weeks, the animals were killed. Tissue blocks including the bone defects were prepared for histological analysis. RESULTS: The animals in the test...... group lost weight, while the control group gained weight during the experiment. The prostaglandin E(2) levels in plasma increased significantly following nicotine exposure in the test group. No significant differences in the percentage of vessels and bone density in the osseous defects were found...

  15. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist lorcaserin reduces nicotine self-administration, discrimination, and reinstatement: relationship to feeding behavior and impulse control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Guy A; Silenieks, Leo B; Rossmann, Anne; Rizos, Zoe; Noble, Kevin; Soko, Ashlie D; Fletcher, Paul J

    2012-04-01

    Lorcaserin ((1R)-8-chloro-1-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine HCl) is a selective 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist with clinical efficacy in phase-III obesity trials. Based on evidence that this drug class also affects behaviors motivated by drug reinforcement, we compared the effect of lorcaserin on behavior maintained by food and nicotine reinforcement, as well as the stimulant and discriminative stimulus properties of nicotine in the rat. Acutely administered lorcaserin (0.3-3 mg/kg, subcutaneous (SC)) dose dependently reduced feeding induced by 22-h food deprivation or palatability. Effects up to 1 mg/kg were consistent with a specific effect on feeding motivation. Lorcaserin (0.6-1 mg/kg, SC) reduced operant responding for food on progressive and fixed ratio schedules of reinforcement. In this dose range lorcaserin also reversed the motor stimulant effect of nicotine, reduced intravenous self-administration of nicotine, and attenuated the nicotine cue in rats trained to discriminate nicotine from saline. Lorcaserin also reduced the reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior elicited by a compound cue comprising a nicotine prime and conditioned stimulus previously paired with nicotine reinforcement. Lorcaserin did not reinstate nicotine-seeking behavior or substitute for a nicotine cue. Finally, lorcaserin (0.3-1 mg/kg) reduced nicotine-induced increases in anticipatory responding, a measure of impulsive action, in rats performing the five-choice serial reaction time task. Importantly, these results indicate that lorcaserin, and likely other selective 5-HT(2C) receptor agonists, similarly affect both food- and nicotine-motivated behaviors, and nicotine-induced impulsivity. Collectively, these findings highlight a therapeutic potential for 5-HT(2C) agonists such as lorcaserin beyond obesity into addictive behaviors, such as nicotine dependence.

  16. Nicotine reverses anhedonic-like response and cognitive impairment in the rat chronic mild stress model of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen T., Jesper; Henningsen, Kim; Bate, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Smoking rates among depressed individuals are higher than is observed in the background population, and nicotine alleviates depressive symptoms. In rodents, nicotine shows antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim and learned helplessness paradigms. Clinical depression is associated with both...... anhedonia and cognitive impairments. In rats, chronic mild stress (CMS) decreases voluntary sucrose intake, reflecting an anhedonic-like state, and impairs performance in the spontaneous alternation behaviour (SAB) test, suggesting impaired cognitive function. Here, we examine the effect of chronic...... with depression....

  17. Sex differences in the effect of wheel running on subsequent nicotine-seeking in a rat adolescent-onset self-administration model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Victoria; Moore, Catherine F; Brunzell, Darlene H; Lynch, Wendy J

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Wheel running attenuates nicotine-seeking in male adolescent rats; however it is not known if this effect extends to females. Objective To determine if wheel running during abstinence would differentially attenuate subsequent nicotine-seeking in male and female rats that had extended access to nicotine self-administration during adolescence. Methods Male (N = 49) and female (N = 43) adolescent rats self-administered saline or nicotine (5μg/kg) under an extended access (23-hour) paradigm. Following the last self-administration session, rats were moved to polycarbonate cages for an abstinence period where they either had access to a locked or unlocked running wheel for 2-hours/day. Subsequently, nicotine-seeking was examined under a within-session extinction/cue-induced reinstatement paradigm. Due to low levels of nicotine-seeking in females in both wheel groups, additional groups were included that were housed without access to a running wheel during abstinence. Results Females self-administered more nicotine as compared to males; however, within males and females, intake did not differ between groups prior to wheel assignment. Compared to saline controls, males and females that self-administered nicotine showed a significant increase in drug-seeking during extinction. Wheel running during abstinence attenuated nicotine-seeking during extinction in males. In females, access to either locked or unlocked wheels attenuated nicotine-seeking during extinction. While responding was reinstated by cues in both males and females, levels were modest and not significantly affected by exercise in this adolescent-onset model. Conclusions While wheel running reduced subsequent nicotine-seeking in males, access to a wheel, either locked or unlocked, was sufficient to suppress nicotine-seeking in females. PMID:24271035

  18. Chronic vitamin C administration induces thermal hyperalgesia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Against a backdrop of neurological effects, the effects of acute and chronic administration of vitamin C (600mg/kg) on pain processing were investigated in male rats. Chronic administration of vitamin C induced significant thermal hyperalgesia while acute administration had no effect. In addition, the intraperitoneal ...

  19. Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in stress-induced potentiation of nicotine reward in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Parastoo; Rezayof, Ameneh; Sardari, Maryam; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the possible role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1 regions), the medial prefrontal cortex or the basolateral amygdala in the effect of acute or sub-chronic stress on nicotine-induced conditioned place preference. Our results indicated that subcutaneous administration of nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) induced significant conditioned place preference. Exposure to acute or sub-chronic elevated platform stress potentiated the response of an ineffective dose of nicotine. Pre-conditioning intra-CA1 (0.5-4 µg/rat) or intra-medial prefrontal cortex (0.2-0.3 µg/rat) microinjection of mecamylamine (a non-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) reversed acute stress-induced potentiation of nicotine reward as measured in the conditioned place preference paradigm. By contrast, pre-conditioning intra-basolateral amygdala microinjection of mecamylamine (4 µg/rat) potentiated the effects of acute stress on nicotine reward. Our findings also showed that intra-CA1 or intra-medial prefrontal cortex, but not intra-basolateral amygdala, microinjection of mecamylamine (4 µg/rat) prevented the effect of sub-chronic stress on nicotine reward. These findings suggest that exposure to elevated platform stress potentiates the rewarding effect of nicotine which may be associated with the involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. It seems that there is a different contribution of the basolateral amygdala, the medial prefrontal cortex or the CA1 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in stress-induced potentiation of nicotine-induced conditioned place preference.

  20. Chronic Nicotine Exposure In Vivo and In Vitro Inhibits Vitamin B1 (Thiamin Uptake by Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmanabhan Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Thiamin (vitamin B1, a member of the water-soluble family of vitamins, is essential for normal cellular functions; its deficiency results in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Pancreatic acinar cells (PAC obtain thiamin from the circulation using a specific carrier-mediated process mediated by both thiamin transporters -1 and -2 (THTR-1 and THTR-2; encoded by the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes, respectively. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of chronic exposure of mouse PAC in vivo and human PAC in vitro to nicotine (a major component of cigarette smoke that has been implicated in pancreatic diseases on thiamin uptake and to delineate the mechanism involved. The results showed that chronic exposure of mice to nicotine significantly inhibits thiamin uptake in murine PAC, and that this inhibition is associated with a marked decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 at the protein, mRNA and hnRNAs level. Furthermore, expression of the important thiamin-metabolizing enzyme, thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPKase, was significantly reduced in PAC of mice exposed to nicotine. Similarly, chronic exposure of cultured human PAC to nicotine (0.5 μM, 48 h significantly inhibited thiamin uptake, which was also associated with a decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 proteins and mRNAs. This study demonstrates that chronic exposure of PAC to nicotine impairs the physiology and the molecular biology of the thiamin uptake process. Furthermore, the study suggests that the effect is, in part, mediated through transcriptional mechanism(s affecting the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes.

  1. Alcohol's actions on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tiffany J; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2006-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that alcoholism and tobacco addiction often co-occur, relatively little information is available on the biological factors that regulate the co-use and abuse of nicotine and alcohol. In the brain, nicotine acts at several different types of receptors collectively known as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Alcohol also acts on at least some of these receptors, enhancing the function of some nAChR subtypes and inhibiting the activity of others. Chronic alcohol and nicotine administration also lead to changes in the numbers of nAChRs. Natural variations (i.e., polymorphisms) in the genes encoding different nAChR subunits may be associated with individual differences in the sensitivity to some of alcohol's and nicotine's effects. Finally, at least one subtype of nAChR may help protect cells against alcohol-induced neurotoxicity.

  2. The effects of co-administration of opium and morphine with nicotine during pregnancy on spatial learning and memory of adult male offspring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Gholamreza; Parsania, Shahrnaz; Hajzadeh, Mousa-Al-Reza; Haghpanah, Tahereh; Sheibani, Vahid; Divsalar, Kouros; Shekarforoush, Shahnaz; Afarinesh, Mohammad Reza

    2014-09-01

    Smoking opium/cigarette is a global health concern. The aim of this study was to examine learning and memory of rat male offsprings whose mothers had been exposed to either opium or morphine with nicotine during pregnancy. Wistar rats were used for the experiments. In the female rats, opium, morphine and nicotine dependencies were induced by daily injections of drug solution for 10 days before mating. Spatial memory was tested by Morris water maze test in male pups at the postnatal day 60. The duration that took until the rats found the platform in the maze and also their swimming speed were recorded. An increase in the platform finding duration was observed for the pups of dependent mothers in comparison with the control in the training trial (Popium/morphine and nicotine significantly decreased the time spent in the trigger zone to find the hidden platform (Peffect on the swimming speed in the probe test. However, no significant difference was observed in the learning and memory behavior of offspring whose mothers received morphine, opium, nicotine or the co-administration of either morphine or opium with nicotine. The present study showed that the opium, morphine and nicotine abuse and co-administration of opium/morphine with nicotine during pregnancy may cause deficits in spatial learning of male rat offspring. Based on our data, no synergistic effects of co-drug administration were observed on learning and memory in male rat offspring.

  3. Timing of nicotine lozenge administration to minimize trigger induced craving and withdrawal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Michael; Lindgren, Bruce R; Vuchetich, John P; Le, Chap; Mills, Anne M; Amiot, Elizabeth; Hatsukami, Dorothy K

    2017-08-01

    Smokers are often advised to use nicotine lozenge when craving or withdrawal symptoms occur. This may be too late to prevent lapses. This study assessed if nicotine lozenge use prior to a common smoking trigger can minimize trigger induced increases in craving and withdrawal symptoms. Eighty-four smokers completed two laboratory sessions in random order. At one session, nicotine lozenge was given immediately after a stressor (to approximate current recommended use - i.e., after craving and withdrawal symptoms occur); at the other session subjects were randomized to receive nicotine lozenge at time points ranging from immediately to 30min prior to the stressor. Withdrawal symptoms and urge to smoke were measured using the Minnesota Nicotine Withdrawal Scale and the Questionnaire of Smoking Urges (QSU). Relative to receiving lozenge after the stressor, a smaller increase in pre-stressor to post-stressor withdrawal symptom scores occurred when lozenge was used immediately (p=0.03) and 10min prior (p=0.044) to the stressor. Results were similar for factors 1 and 2 of the QSU when lozenge was used immediately prior to the stressor (pnicotine lozenge prior to a smoking trigger can decrease trigger induced craving and withdrawal symptoms. Future studies are needed to determine if such use would increase cessation rates. Clinicaltrials.gov # NCT01522963. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic electronic cigarette exposure in mice induces features of COPD in a nicotine-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Arcos, Itsaso; Geraghty, Patrick; Baumlin, Nathalie; Campos, Michael; Dabo, Abdoulaye Jules; Jundi, Bakr; Cummins, Neville; Eden, Edward; Grosche, Astrid; Salathe, Matthias; Foronjy, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The use of electronic (e)-cigarettes is increasing rapidly, but their lung health effects are not established. Clinical studies examining the potential long-term impact of e-cigarette use on lung health will take decades. To address this gap in knowledge, this study investigated the effects of exposure to aerosolised nicotine-free and nicotine-containing e-cigarette fluid on mouse lungs and normal human airway epithelial cells. Mice were exposed to aerosolised phosphate-buffered saline, nicotine-free or nicotine-containing e-cigarette solution, 1-hour daily for 4 months. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells cultured at an air-liquid interface were exposed to e-cigarette vapours or nicotine solutions using a Vitrocell smoke exposure robot. Inhalation of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes increased airway hyper-reactivity, distal airspace enlargement, mucin production, cytokine and protease expression. Exposure to nicotine-free e-cigarettes did not affect these lung parameters. NHBE cells exposed to nicotine-containing e-cigarette vapour showed impaired ciliary beat frequency, airway surface liquid volume, cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator and ATP-stimulated K+ ion conductance and decreased expression of FOXJ1 and KCNMA1. Exposure of NHBE cells to nicotine for 5 days increased interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion. Exposure to inhaled nicotine-containing e-cigarette fluids triggered effects normally associated with the development of COPD including cytokine expression, airway hyper-reactivity and lung tissue destruction. These effects were nicotine-dependent both in the mouse lung and in human airway cells, suggesting that inhaled nicotine contributes to airway and lung disease in addition to its addictive properties. Thus, these findings highlight the potential dangers of nicotine inhalation during e-cigarette use. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Differential Modulation of GABAA and NMDA Receptors by an α7-nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonist in Chronic Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xujiao Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Presynaptic modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA release by an alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR agonist promotes retinal ganglion cell (RGC survival and function, as suggested by a previous study on a chronic glaucomatous model from our laboratory. However, the role of excitatory and inhibitory amino acid receptors and their interaction with α7-nAChR in physiological and glaucomatous events remains unknown. In this study, we investigated GABAA and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor activity in control and glaucomatous retinal slices and the regulation of amino acid receptor expression and function by α7-nAChR. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from RGCs revealed that the α7-nAChR specific agonist PNU-282987 enhanced the amplitude of currents elicited by GABA and reduced the amplitude of currents elicited by NMDA. The positive modulation of GABAA receptor and the negative modulation of NMDA receptor (NMDAR by PNU-282987-evoked were prevented by pre-administration of the α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA. The frequency and the amplitude of glutamate receptor-mediated miniature glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs were not significantly different between the control and glaucomatous RGCs. Additionally, PNU-282987-treated slices showed no alteration in the frequency or amplitude of mEPSCs relative to control RGCs. Moreover, we showed that expression of the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor was downregulated and the expression of the NMDAR NR2B subunit was upregulated by intraocular pressure (IOP elevation, and the changes of high IOP were blocked by PNU-282987. In conclusion, retina GABAA and NMDARs are modulated positively and negatively, respectively, by activation of α7-nAChR in in vivo chronic glaucomatous models.

  6. Exposure to chronic mild stress prevents kappa opioid-mediated reinstatement of cocaine and nicotine place preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ream eAl-Hasani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stress increases the risk of drug abuse, causes relapse to drug seeking, and potentiates the rewarding properties of both nicotine and cocaine. Understanding the mechanisms by which stress regulates the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse provides valuable insight into potential treatments for drug abuse. Prior reports have demonstrated that stress causes dynorphin release, activating kappa-opioid receptors (KOR in monoamine circuits resulting in both potentiation and reinstatement of cocaine and nicotine conditioned place preference. Here we report that kappa-opioid dependent reinstatement of cocaine and nicotine place preference is reduced when the mice are exposed to a randomized chronic mild stress regime prior to training in a conditioned place preference-reinstatement paradigm. The chronic mild stress schedule involves seven different stressors (removal of nesting for 24hr, 5min forced swim stress at 15°C, 8hr food and water deprivation, damp bedding overnight, white noise, cage tilt and disrupted home cage lighting rotated over a three-week period. This response is KOR-selective, because chronic mild stress does not protect against cocaine or nicotine drug-primed reinstatement. This protection from reinstatement is also observed following sub-chronic social defeat stress, where each mouse is placed in an aggressor mouse home cage for a period of 20 min over five days. In contrast, a single acute stressor resulted in a potentiation of KOR-induced reinstatement, similarly to previously reported. Prior studies have shown that stress alters sensitivity to opioids and prior stress can influence the pharmacodynamics of the opioid receptor system. Together, these findings suggest that exposure to different forms of stress may cause a dysregulation of kappa opioid circuitry and that changes resulting from mild stress can have protective and adaptive effects against drug relapse.

  7. Effects of Nicotine Administration and Stress on Sensory-Gating Depend on Rat Strain and Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    L., & Rosecrans, J. (1993). Nicotine: An addictive drug with therapeutic potential. Medicinal Chemistry Research, 2, 509-513. Levin, E.D., Morgan...11, 863-870. Russell, M.A.H., Peto, J., & Patel, U.A. (1974). The classification of smoking by factorial structure of motives. Journal ofthe Royal...Takada, Y., Thara, H., Urano, T., & Takada, A. (1995). Changes in the central and peripheral serotonergic system in rats exposed to water-immersion

  8. Similar precipitated withdrawal effects on intracranial self-stimulation during chronic infusion of an e-cigarette liquid or nicotine alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A C; Muelken, P; Smethells, J R; Krueger, M; LeSage, M G

    2017-10-01

    The FDA recently extended their regulatory authority to electronic cigarettes (ECs). Because the abuse liability of ECs is a leading concern of the FDA, animal models are urgently needed to identify factors that influence the relative abuse liability of these products. The ability of tobacco products to induce nicotine dependence, defined by the emergence of anhedonia and other symptoms of nicotine withdrawal following cessation of their use, contributes to tobacco abuse liability. The present study compared the severity of precipitated withdrawal during chronic infusion of nicotine alone or nicotine-dose equivalent concentrations of three different EC refill liquids in rats, as indicated by elevations in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds (anhedonia-like behavior). Because these EC liquids contain constituents that may enhance their abuse liability (e.g., minor alkaloids), we hypothesized that they would be associated with greater withdrawal effects than nicotine alone. Results indicated that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine precipitated elevations in ICSS thresholds in rats receiving a chronic infusion of nicotine alone or EC liquids (3.2mg/kg/day, via osmotic pump). Magnitude of this effect did not differ between formulations. Our findings indicate that nicotine alone is the primary CNS determinant of the ability of ECs to engender dependence. Combined with our previous findings that nicotine alone and these EC liquids do not differ in other preclinical addiction models, these data suggest that product standards set by the FDA to reduce EC abuse liability should primarily target nicotine, other constituents with peripheral sensory effects (e.g. flavorants), and factors that influence product appeal (e.g., marketing). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In vivo effect of chronic nicotine exposure on outcome of Plasmodium berghei ANKA malaria

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    Tsige Ketema

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess effect of nicotine, major addictive component of tobacco smoke, on outcomes of the deadly malaria parasite using mice as animal model. Methods: Male Swiss albino mice were treated with 100 and 200 µg/mL of nicotine in drinking water daily for 6 weeks followed by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA infection. On the seventh day of post infection (p.i., physical, clinical, histopathological, biochemical and hematological parameters were assessed. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Nicotine was significantly (P < 0.05 positively associated with lower levels of hemoglobin (Hb, hematocrit (HCT, red blood cells (RBCs, C-reactive protein (CRP and uric acid (UA, higher risk to incidence of pulmonary edema, elevated level of liver and kidney biomarkers. Also significant increment (P < 0.01 of monocyte-lymphocyte count ratio (MLCR was observed. Risk to high temperature, lower platelet count, high parastemia and cerebral malaria was lesser in mice treated with nicotine (100 and 200 µg/mL followed by PbA infection than the positive control. Lack of neurological symptoms might be accounted to the anti-inflammatory property of nicotine that could inhibit production of pro-inflammatory mediators responsible for occurrence of cerebral malaria. Conclusions: This study showed that despite down regulation of most cerebral malaria symptoms nicotine was strongly associated with increased risk to most clinical symptoms of malaria. Thus, like in respiratory infections, nicotine use might enhance susceptibility to malaria.

  10. Changes in orexinergic immunoreactivity of the piglet hypothalamus and pons after exposure to chronic postnatal nicotine and intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Nicholas J; Russell, Benjamin; Du, Man K; Waters, Karen A; Machaalani, Rita

    2016-06-01

    We recently showed that orexin expression in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) infants was reduced by 21% in the hypothalamus and by 40-50% in the pons as compared with controls. Orexin maintains wakefulness/sleeping states, arousal, and rapid eye movement sleep, abnormalities of which have been reported in SIDS. This study examined the effects of two prominent risk factors for SIDS, intermittent hypercapnic hypoxia (IHH) (prone-sleeping) and chronic nicotine exposure (cigarette-smoking), on orexin A (OxA) and orexin B (OxB) expression in piglets. Piglets were randomly assigned to five groups: saline control (n = 7), air control (n = 7), nicotine [2 mg/kg per day (14 days)] (n = 7), IHH (6 min of 7% O2 /8% CO2 alternating with 6-min periods of breathing air, for four cycles) (n = 7), and the combination of nicotine and IHH (N + IHH) (n = 7). OxA/OxB expression was quantified in the central tuberal hypothalamus [dorsal medial hypothalamus (DMH), perifornical area (PeF), and lateral hypothalamus], and the dorsal raphe, locus coeruleus of the pons. Nicotine and N + IHH exposures significantly increased: (i) orexin expression in the hypothalamus and pons; and (ii) the total number of neurons in the DMH and PeF. IHH decreased orexin expression in the hypothalamus and pons without changing neuronal numbers. Linear relationships existed between the percentage of orexin-positive neurons and the area of pontine orexin immunoreactivity of control and exposure piglets. These results demonstrate that postnatal nicotine exposure increases the proportion of orexin-positive neurons in the hypothalamus and fibre expression in the pons, and that IHH exposure does not prevent the nicotine-induced increase. Thus, although both nicotine and IHH are risk factors for SIDS, it appears they have opposing effects on OxA and OxB expression, with the IHH exposure closely mimicking what we recently found in SIDS. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John

  11. Chronic nicotine-induced changes in gene expression of delta and kappa-opioid receptors and their endogenous ligands in the mesocorticolimbic system of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugur, Muzeyyen; Kaya, Egemen; Gozen, Oguz; Koylu, Ersin O; Kanit, Lutfiye; Keser, Aysegul; Balkan, Burcu

    2017-09-01

    Delta and kappa opioid receptors (DOR and KOR, respectively) and their endogenous ligands, proenkephalin (PENK) and prodynorphin (PDYN)-derived opioid peptides are proposed as important mediators of nicotine reward. This study investigated the regulatory effect of chronic nicotine treatment on the gene expression of DOR, KOR, PENK and PDYN in the mesocorticolimbic system. Three groups of rats were injected subcutaneously with nicotine at doses of 0.2, 0.4, or 0.6 mg/kg/day for 6 days. Rats were decapitated 1 hr after the last dose on day six, as this timing coincides with increased dopamine release in the mesocorticolimbic system. mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), amygdala (AMG), dorsal striatum (DST), nucleus accumbens, and medial prefrontal cortex were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Our results showed that nicotine upregulated DOR mRNA in the VTA at all of the doses employed, in the AMG at the 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg doses, and in the DST at the 0.4 mg/kg dose. Conversely, PDYN mRNA was reduced in the LHA with 0.6 mg/kg nicotine and in the AMG with 0.4 mg/kg nicotine. KOR mRNA was also decreased in the DST with 0.6 mg/kg nicotine. Nicotine did not regulate PENK mRNA in any brain region studied. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs.

  13. Withdrawal from chronic exposure to amphetamine, but not nicotine, leads to an immediate and enduring deficit in motivated behavior without affecting social interaction in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Der-Avakian, Andre; Markou, Athina

    2010-01-01

    Psychostimulant withdrawal leads to depressive symptoms, such as anhedonia and social dysfunction. We determined the effects of withdrawal from chronic exposure to nicotine (9 mg/kg/day salt, 28 days) or amphetamine (10 mg/kg/day salt, 7 days) on the motivated response for a sucrose reward and on social interaction in rats. Both nicotine and amphetamine exposure increased the motivated response for sucrose. However, only spontaneous amphetamine withdrawal led to an immediate and persistent de...

  14. Chronic electronic cigarette exposure in mice induces features of COPD in a nicotine-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Arcos, Itsaso; Geraghty, Patrick; Baumlin, Nathalie; Campos, Michael; Dabo, Abdoulaye Jules; Jundi, Bakr; Cummins, Neville; Eden, Edward; Grosche, Astrid; Salathe, Matthias; Foronjy, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of electronic (e)-cigarettes is increasing rapidly, but their lung health effects are not established. Clinical studies examining the potential long-term impact of e-cigarette use on lung health will take decades. To address this gap in knowledge, this study investigated the effects of exposure to aerosolised nicotine-free and nicotine-containing e-cigarette fluid on mouse lungs and normal human airway epithelial cells. Methods Mice were exposed to aerosolised phosphate-buf...

  15. Co-administration of ethanol and nicotine: the enduring alterations in the rewarding properties of nicotine and glutamate activity within the mesocorticolimbic system of female alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deehan, Gerald A; Hauser, Sheketha R; Waeiss, R Aaron; Knight, Christopher P; Toalston, Jamie E; Truitt, William A; McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A

    2015-12-01

    The co-abuse of ethanol (EtOH) and nicotine (NIC) increases the likelihood that an individual will relapse to drug use while attempting to maintain abstinence. There is limited research examining the consequences of long-term EtOH and NIC co-abuse. The current experiments determined the enduring effects of chronic EtOH, NIC, or EtOH + NIC intake on the reinforcing properties of NIC and glutamate (GLU) activity within the mesocorticolimbic (MCL) system. Alcohol-preferring (P) rats self-administered EtOH, Sacc + NIC, or EtOH + NIC combined for 10 weeks. The reinforcing properties of 0.1-3.0 μM NIC within the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) were assessed following a 2-3-week drug-free period using intracranial self-administration (ICSA) procedures. The effects of EtOH, Sacc, Sacc + NIC, or EtOH + NIC intake on extracellular levels and clearance of glutamate (GLU) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were also determined. Binge intake of EtOH (96-100 mg%) and NIC (21-27 mg/mL) were attained. All groups of P rats self-infused 3.0 μM NIC directly into the AcbSh, whereas only animals in the EtOH + NIC co-abuse group self-infused the 0.3 and 1.0 μM NIC concentrations. Additionally, self-administration of EtOH + NIC, but not EtOH, Sacc or Sacc + NIC, resulted in enduring increases in basal extracellular GLU levels in the mPFC. Overall, the co-abuse of EtOH + NIC produced enduring neuronal alterations within the MCL which enhanced the rewarding properties of NIC in the AcbSh and elevated extracellular GLU levels within the mPFC.

  16. A comparison of the development of tolerance to ethanol and cross-tolerance to nicotine after chronic ethanol treatment in long- and short-sleep mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, C M; Collins, A C

    1993-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that inbred mouse strains differ in the development of tolerance to both nicotine and ethanol, indicating that genetic factors regulate tolerance development. Those mouse strains that are most sensitive to an acute challenge dose of either drug develop the most tolerance to that drug. The ethanol-sensitive long-sleep (LS) mice are more sensitive to several behavioral and physiological effects of nicotine than are the ethanol-resistant short-sleep (SS) mice. The experiments reported here assessed whether the LS and SS mice develop tolerance to ethanol after chronic treatment with ethanol-containing liquid diets and whether cross-tolerance to nicotine also developed. Tolerance and cross-tolerance were measured by assessing the effects of acute challenge doses of drug on Y-maze crossing and rearing activities, heart rate and body temperature. The LS mice developed tolerance to ethanol's effects on three of the four measures and were cross-tolerant to nicotine on all of the measures. In contrast, the SS mice developed tolerance to ethanol for only two of the measures, but failed to develop cross-tolerance to any action of nicotine. These findings support the hypothesis that ethanol and nicotine share sites of action and that common genes regulate responses to these two drugs. Evidence suggests that tolerance to nicotine may be related to an up-regulation of brain nicotinic receptors, at least in some inbred mouse strains, but chronic ethanol treatment did not reproducibly change either [3H]nicotine or alpha-[125I]bungarotoxin binding. Therefore, other mechanisms must underlie the tolerance and cross-tolerance that was seen.

  17. The Effect of Nicotine Administration on Physical and Psychological Signs of Withdrawal Syndrome Induced by Single or Frequent Doses of Morphine in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Allahtavakoli

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Morphine addiction and morphine withdrawal syndrome are the two main problems of today’s human society. The present study has investigated the effects of nicotine on the strength of physical and psychological dependency in single and repeated doses morphine administrated rats. Materials and methods. Male Wistar rats were subjected to morphine consumption with single or frequent dose protocols. In the single dose protocol, rats received only one dose of morphine and 24hrs later they also received one dose of nicotine 30 min prior to injection of naloxone. In the repeated dose protocol, rats received incremental doses of morphine for 7 days and 24hr after the last dose (the 8th day were given naloxone. However, the nicotine regimen of this group was injected 15 min before the morphine injection, for 4 days, from the 4th to the 7th day. Five minutes after naloxone injection, each rat′s behavior was captured for 30 min, and then physical and psychological signs of withdrawal syndrome were recorded. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by Tukey tests and p<0.05 was considered as significant difference. Findings. Results showed that the injection of frequent and single doses of morphine lead to morphine dependency. In single dose protocol, nicotine consumption attenuated the signs of withdrawal syndrome, especially weight of excrement and total withdrawal score. In frequent dose protocol, in addition to these effects, nicotine induced weight loss and place aversion. Conclusion. The inhibitory effects of nicotine on signs of withdrawal syndrome may involve a dopaminergic portion of the central nervous system and is mediated by central nicotinic receptors. There is also a cross-dependence between nicotine and morphine.

  18. ‌‌The effect of nicotine administration on physical and psychological signs of withdrawal syndrome induced by single or frequent doses of morphine in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shamsizadeh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Morphine addiction and morphine withdrawal syndrome are the two main problems of today’s human society. The present study has investigated the effects of nicotine on the strength of physical and psychological dependency in single and repeated doses morphine administrated rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were subjected to morphine consumption with single or frequent dose protocols. In the single dose protocol, rats received only one dose of morphine and 24hrs later they also received one dose of nicotine 30 min prior to injection of naloxone. In the repeated dose protocol, rats received incremental doses of morphine for 7 days and 24hr after the last dose (the 8th day were given naloxone. However, the nicotine regimen of this group was injected 15 min before the morphine injection, for 4 days, from the 4th to the 7th day. Five minutes after naloxone injection, each rat′s behavior was captured for 30 min, and then physical and psychological signs of withdrawal syndrome were recorded. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by Tukey tests and p<0.05 was considered as significant difference. Results: Results showed that the injection of frequent and single doses of morphine lead to morphine dependency. In single dose protocol, nicotine consumption attenuated the signs of withdrawal syndrome, especially weight of excrement and total withdrawal score. In frequent dose protocol, in addition to these effects, nicotine induced weight loss and place aversion. Discussion: The inhibitory effects of nicotine on signs of withdrawal syndrome may involve a dopaminergic portion of the central nervous system and is mediated by central nicotinic receptors. There is also a cross-dependence between nicotine and morphine.

  19. Adolescent chronic variable social stress influences exploratory behavior and nicotine responses in male, but not female, BALB/cJ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, M J; Reiss, D E; Caulfield, J I; Thomas, J L; Baker, A N; Cavigelli, S A; Kamens, H M

    2018-04-01

    Anxiety disorders and nicotine use are significant contributors to global morbidity and mortality as independent and comorbid diseases. Early-life stress, potentially via stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) dysregulation, can exacerbate both. However, little is known about the factors that predispose individuals to the development of both anxiety disorders and nicotine use. Here, we examined the relationship between anxiety-like behaviors and nicotine responses following adolescent stress. Adolescent male and female BALB/cJ mice were exposed to either chronic variable social stress (CVSS) or control conditions. CVSS consisted of repeated cycles of social isolation and social reorganization. In adulthood, anxiety-like behavior and social avoidance were measured using the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and social approach-avoidance test, respectively. Nicotine responses were assessed with acute effects on body temperature, corticosterone production, locomotor activity, and voluntary oral nicotine consumption. Adolescent stress had sex-dependent effects on nicotine responses and exploratory behavior, but did not affect anxiety-like behavior or social avoidance in males or females. Adult CVSS males exhibited less exploratory behavior, as indicated by reduced exploratory locomotion in the EPM and social approach-avoidance test, compared to controls. Adolescent stress did not affect nicotine-induced hypothermia in either sex, but CVSS males exhibited augmented nicotine-induced locomotion during late adolescence and voluntarily consumed less nicotine during adulthood. Stress effects on male nicotine-induced locomotion were associated with individual differences in exploratory locomotion in the EPM and social approach-avoidance test. Relative to controls, adult CVSS males and females also exhibited reduced corticosterone levels at baseline and adult male CVSS mice exhibited increased corticosterone levels following an acute nicotine injection. Results

  20. Nicotine poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine is found in: Chewing tobacco Cigarettes E-cigarettes Liquid nicotine Nicotine gum (Nicorette) Nicotine patches (Habitrol, Nicoderm) Pipe tobacco Some insecticides Tobacco leaves Note: This list may not be all-inclusive.

  1. Effect of MK-801 on the development of nicotine sensitization of nucleus accumbens dopamine release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Soo Kyung; Choung, In Soon; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We have previously found that MK-801, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, prevents behavioral sensitization to nicotine. This study aimed to investigate the effect of MK-801 on a neurochemical component of nicotine sensitization by evaluating the effect of the drug on nicotine sensitization of nucleus accumbens dopamine (DA) release. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with MK-801 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline 30 min before injection of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, s.c., once daily) for 7 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the last drug injection, animals were challenged with local perfusion of 5 mM nicotine into the shell of nucleus accumbens and DA release was monitored using in vivo microdialysis. In rats pretreated with chronic nicotine, local nicotine challenge induced a greater increase of accumbal DA release than in saline-treated animals (maximal DA response 969 {+-} 235% (mean {+-} SEM) of basal level vs. 520 {+-} 93%, P < 0.05). Co-administration of MK-801 with nicotine attenuated an increase of DA release elicited by local nicotine challenge, compared with nicotine alone (maximal DA response 427 {+-} 83% of basal level vs. 969 {+-} 235%, P < 0.01). These results suggest that MK-801 blocks the development of nicotine sensitization of nucleus accumbens DA release, further supporting the involvement of NMDA receptors in the development of behavioral sensitization to nicotine.

  2. Effect of MK-801 on the development of nicotine sensitization of nucleus accumbens dopamine release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Soo Kyung; Choung, In Soon; Kim, Sang Eun

    2005-01-01

    We have previously found that MK-801, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, prevents behavioral sensitization to nicotine. This study aimed to investigate the effect of MK-801 on a neurochemical component of nicotine sensitization by evaluating the effect of the drug on nicotine sensitization of nucleus accumbens dopamine (DA) release. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with MK-801 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline 30 min before injection of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, s.c., once daily) for 7 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the last drug injection, animals were challenged with local perfusion of 5 mM nicotine into the shell of nucleus accumbens and DA release was monitored using in vivo microdialysis. In rats pretreated with chronic nicotine, local nicotine challenge induced a greater increase of accumbal DA release than in saline-treated animals (maximal DA response 969 ± 235% (mean ± SEM) of basal level vs. 520 ± 93%, P < 0.05). Co-administration of MK-801 with nicotine attenuated an increase of DA release elicited by local nicotine challenge, compared with nicotine alone (maximal DA response 427 ± 83% of basal level vs. 969 ± 235%, P < 0.01). These results suggest that MK-801 blocks the development of nicotine sensitization of nucleus accumbens DA release, further supporting the involvement of NMDA receptors in the development of behavioral sensitization to nicotine

  3. 78 FR 277 - Food and Drug Administration Actions Related to Nicotine Replacement Therapies and Smoking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... Dependence; Public Hearing; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of public hearing; Extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 15 [Docket No...

  4. Chronic Underactivity of Medial Frontal Cortical β2-Containing Nicotinic Receptors Increases Clozapine-Induced Working Memory Impairment in Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Edward D.; Perkins, Abigail; Brotherton, Terrell; Qazi, Melissa; Berez, Chantal; Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza; Davis, Kasey; Williams, Paul; Christopher, N. Channelle

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic receptor decreases in the frontal cortex and hippocampus are important mediators of cognitive impairment in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Drug treatments for these diseases should take into account the impacts of compromised brain function on drug response. This study investigated the impact of compromised nicotinic receptor activity in the frontal cortex in rats on memory function. Since both Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia can involve psychosis, antipsychotic drugs are often given. The impacts of antipsychotic drugs on cognitive function have been found to be quite variable. It is the hypothesis of this and previous studies that the cognitive effects of antispychotic drugs on cognitive function depend on the integrity of brain systems involved in cognition. Previously in studies of the hippocampus, we found that chronic inhibition of β2-containing nicotinic receptors with dihydro-β-erythrodine (DHβE) impaired working memory and that this effect was attenuated by the antipsychotic drug clozapine. In contrast, chronic hippocampal α7 nicotinic receptor blockade with methyllycaconitine (MLA) potentiated the clozapine-induced memory impairment which is seen in rats without compromised nicotinic receptor activity. The current study determined medial frontal cortical α7 and β2-containing nicotinic receptor involvement in memory and the interactions with antipsychotic drug therapy with clozapine. Chronic DHβE and MLA infusion effects and interactions with systemic clozapine were assessed in female rats tested for memory on the radial-arm maze. Antipsychotic drug interactions with chronic systemic nicotine were investigated because nicotinic procognitive treatment has been proposed. The same local infusion DHβE dose that impaired memory with hippocampal infusion did not impair memory when infused in the medial frontal cortex. Frontal DHβE infusion potentiated clozapine-induced memory impairment, whereas previously the memory

  5. Chronic underactivity of medial frontal cortical beta2-containing nicotinic receptors increases clozapine-induced working memory impairment in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Edward D; Perkins, Abigail; Brotherton, Terrell; Qazi, Melissa; Berez, Chantal; Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza; Davis, Kasey; Williams, Paul; Christopher, N Channelle

    2009-03-17

    Nicotinic receptor decreases in the frontal cortex and hippocampus are important mediators of cognitive impairment in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Drug treatments for these diseases should take into account the impacts of compromised brain function on drug response. This study investigated the impact of compromised nicotinic receptor activity in the frontal cortex in rats on memory function. Since both Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia can involve psychosis, antipsychotic drugs are often given. The impacts of antipsychotic drugs on cognitive function have been found to be quite variable. It is the hypothesis of this and previous studies that the cognitive effects of antispychotic drugs on cognitive function depend on the integrity of brain systems involved in cognition. Previously in studies of the hippocampus, we found that chronic inhibition of beta2-containing nicotinic receptors with dihydro-beta-erythrodine (DHbetaE) impaired working memory and that this effect was attenuated by the antipsychotic drug clozapine. In contrast, chronic hippocampal alpha7 nicotinic receptor blockade with methyllycaconitine (MLA) potentiated the clozapine-induced memory impairment which is seen in rats without compromised nicotinic receptor activity. The current study determined medial frontal cortical alpha7 and beta2-containing nicotinic receptor involvement in memory and the interactions with antipsychotic drug therapy with clozapine. Chronic DHbetaE and MLA infusion effects and interactions with systemic clozapine were assessed in female rats tested for memory on the radial-arm maze. Antipsychotic drug interactions with chronic systemic nicotine were investigated because nicotinic procognitive treatment has been proposed. The same local infusion DHbetaE dose that impaired memory with hippocampal infusion did not impair memory when infused in the medial frontal cortex. Frontal DHbetaE infusion potentiated clozapine-induced memory impairment, whereas previously

  6. Voluntary co-consumption of alcohol and nicotine: Effects of abstinence, intermittency, and withdrawal in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Kyu Y; Touchette, Jillienne C; Hartell, Elizabeth C; Bade, Elizabeth J; Lee, Anna M

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are often used together, and there is a high rate of co-occurrence between alcohol and nicotine addiction. Most animal models studying alcohol and nicotine interactions have utilized passive drug administration, which may not be relevant to human co-addiction. In addition, the interactions between alcohol and nicotine in female animals have been understudied, as most studies have used male animals. To address these issues, we developed models of alcohol and nicotine co-consumption in male and female mice that utilized voluntary, oral consumption of unsweetened alcohol, nicotine and water. We first examined drug consumption and preference in single-drug, sequential alcohol and nicotine consumption tests in male and female C57BL/6 and DBA/2J mice. We then tested chronic continuous and intermittent access alcohol and nicotine co-consumption procedures. We found that male and female C57BL/6 mice readily co-consumed unsweetened alcohol and nicotine. In our continuous co-consumption procedures, we found that varying the available nicotine concentration during an alcohol abstinence period affected compensatory nicotine consumption during alcohol abstinence, and affected rebound alcohol consumption when alcohol was re-introduced. Consumption of alcohol and nicotine in an intermittent co-consumption procedure produced higher alcohol consumption levels, but not nicotine consumption levels, compared with the continuous co-consumption procedures. Finally, we found that intermittent alcohol and nicotine co-consumption resulted in physical dependence. Our data show that these voluntary co-consumption procedures can be easily performed in mice and can be used to study behavioral interactions between alcohol and nicotine consumption, which may better model human alcohol and nicotine co-addiction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of Chronic Administration of Aloe Vera Gel On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic administration of Aloe vera gel extract on markers of hepatic damage, lipid profiles and erythrocyte osmotic fragility using the Wistar rats. Forty male Wistar rats divided into four groups of ten rats per group were used in the study. Group I which served as the control ...

  8. The association between nicotine dependence and physical health among people receiving injectable diacetylmorphine or hydromorphone for the treatment of chronic opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Palis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People with chronic opioid use disorder often present to treatment with individual and structural vulnerabilities and remain at risk of reporting adverse health outcomes. This risk is greatly compounded by tobacco smoking, which is highly prevalent among people with chronic opioid use disorder. Despite the known burden of tobacco smoking on health, the relationship between nicotine dependence and health has not been studied among those receiving injectable opioid agonist treatment. As such, the present study aims to explore the association between nicotine dependence and physical health among participants of the Study to Assess Longer-Term Opioid Medication Effectiveness (SALOME at baseline and six-months. Methods: SALOME was a double-blind phase III clinical trial testing the non-inferiority of injectable hydromorphone to injectable diacetylmorphine for chronic opioid use disorder. Participants reporting tobacco smoking were included in a linear regression analysis of physical health at baseline (before receiving treatment and at six-months. Results: At baseline, nicotine dependence score, lifetime history of emotional, physical, or sexual abuse and prior month safe injection site access were independently and significantly associated with physical health. At six-months nicotine dependence score was the only variable that maintained this significant and independent association with physical health. Conclusions: Findings indicate that after six-months, the injectable treatment effectively brought equity to patients' physical health status, yet the association with nicotine dependence remained. Findings could inform whether the provision of treatment for nicotine dependence should be made a priority in settings where injectable opioid agonist treatment is delivered to achieve improvements in overall physical health in this population.

  9. In vivo interactions between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α: Implication for nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Asti; Bagdas, Deniz; Muldoon, Pretal P; Lichtman, Aron H; Carroll, F Ivy; Greenwald, Mark; Miles, Michael F; Damaj, M Imad

    2017-05-15

    Chronic tobacco use dramatically increases health burdens and financial costs. Limitations of current smoking cessation therapies indicate the need for improved molecular targets. The main addictive component of tobacco, nicotine, exerts its dependency effects via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Activation of the homomeric α7 nAChR reduces nicotine's rewarding properties in conditioned place preference (CPP) test and i.v. self-administration models, but the mechanism underlying these effects is unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor type-α (PPARα) has been implicated as a downstream signaling target of the α7 nAChR in ventral tegmental area dopamine cells. The present study investigated PPARα as a possible mediator of the effect of α7 nAChR activation in nicotine dependence. Our results demonstrate the PPARα antagonist GW6471 blocks actions of the α7 nAChR agonist PNU282987 on nicotine reward in an unbiased CPP test in male ICR adult mice. These findings suggests that α7 nAChR activation attenuates nicotine CPP in a PPARα-dependent manner. To evaluate PPARα activation in nicotine dependence we used the selective and potent PPARα agonist, WY-14643 and the clinically used PPARα activator, fenofibrate, in nicotine CPP and we observed attenuation of nicotine preference, but fenofibrate was less potent. We also studied PPARα in nicotine dependence by evaluating its activation in nicotine withdrawal. WY-14643 reversed nicotine withdrawal signs whereas fenofibrate had modest efficacy. This suggests that PPARα plays a role in nicotine reward and withdrawal and that further studies are warranted to elucidate its function in mediating the effects of α7 nAChRs in nicotine dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nicotine Lozenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine lozenges are used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine lozenges are in a class of medications called smoking cessation aids. They work by providing nicotine to your body to decrease the withdrawal symptoms ...

  11. The Effect of Nicotine Administration on Physical and Psychological Signs of Withdrawal Syndrome Induced by Single or Frequent Doses of Morphine in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Allahtavakoli; Fatemeh Amin; Elham Hakimizadeh; Ali Roohbakhsh; Sayed Ali Haeri Rohani; Ahmad Taghavi Rafsanjani; Abbas Haghparast; Ali Shamsizadeh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Morphine addiction and morphine withdrawal syndrome are the two main problems of today’s human society. The present study has investigated the effects of nicotine on the strength of physical and psychological dependency in single and repeated doses morphine administrated rats. Materials and methods. Male Wistar rats were subjected to morphine consumption with single or frequent dose protocols. In the single dose protocol, rats received only one dose of morphine and 24hrs later t...

  12. Endocrinological Responses to the Administration of Nicotine: Interactions with Drug Initiation, Conditioned Effects, and Conditions of Stress, Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-07

    Benowitz, Kuyt and Jacob, 1982; Feyerabend S Russe l l , 1978). 273 10 Measurement of hematocrit was performed as follows: 1) after centrifugation of...Incentives, Washington, D.C.: Winston. Feyerabend , C. , & Russell, M. A. H. (1978). Effect of urinary pH and nicotine excretion rate can plasma...s Feyerabend , c. (1978). Cigarette smoking: A dependence on high-nicotine boll. Drug Metabolism Review, 8_, 29-57. Russell, M. A. H. , Wilson, C

  13. Methods for identifying 30 chronic conditions: application to administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Marcello; Wiebe, Natasha; Fortin, Martin; Guthrie, Bruce; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; James, Matthew T; Klarenbach, Scott W; Lewanczuk, Richard; Manns, Braden J; Ronksley, Paul; Sargious, Peter; Straus, Sharon; Quan, Hude

    2015-04-17

    Multimorbidity is common and associated with poor clinical outcomes and high health care costs. Administrative data are a promising tool for studying the epidemiology of multimorbidity. Our goal was to derive and apply a new scheme for using administrative data to identify the presence of chronic conditions and multimorbidity. We identified validated algorithms that use ICD-9 CM/ICD-10 data to ascertain the presence or absence of 40 morbidities. Algorithms with both positive predictive value and sensitivity ≥70% were graded as "high validity"; those with positive predictive value ≥70% and sensitivity <70% were graded as "moderate validity". To show proof of concept, we applied identified algorithms with high to moderate validity to inpatient and outpatient claims and utilization data from 574,409 people residing in Edmonton, Canada during the 2008/2009 fiscal year. Of the 40 morbidities, we identified 30 that could be identified with high to moderate validity. Approximately one quarter of participants had identified multimorbidity (2 or more conditions), one quarter had a single identified morbidity and the remaining participants were not identified as having any of the 30 morbidities. We identified a panel of 30 chronic conditions that can be identified from administrative data using validated algorithms, facilitating the study and surveillance of multimorbidity. We encourage other groups to use this scheme, to facilitate comparisons between settings and jurisdictions.

  14. Effects of chronic administration of caffeine and stress on feeding behavior of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettenuzzo, Leticia Ferreira; Noschang, Cristie; von Pozzer Toigo, Eduardo; Fachin, Andrelisa; Vendite, Deusa; Dalmaz, Carla

    2008-10-20

    Anorectic effects of caffeine are controversial in the literature, while stress and obesity are growing problems in our society. Since many stressed people are coffee drinkers, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of stress and chronic administration of caffeine on feeding behavior and body weight in male and female rats. Wistar rats (both males and females) were divided into 3 groups: control (receiving water), caffeine 0.3 g/L and caffeine 1.0 g/L (in the drinking water). These groups were subdivided into non-stressed and stressed (repeated-restraint stress for 40 days). During the entire treatment, chow consumption was monitored and rats were weighed monthly. Afterwards, feeding behavior was evaluated during 3-min trials in food-deprived and ad libitum fed animals and also in repeated exposures, using palatable food (Froot Loops and Cheetos). Chronic administration of caffeine did not affect rat chow consumption or body weight gain, but diminished the consumption of both salty (Cheetos) and sweet (Froot Loops) palatable food. In the repeated trial tests, stress diminished savory snack consumption in the later exposures [I.S. Racotta, J. Leblanc, D. Richard The effect of caffeine on food intake in rats: involvement of corticotropin-releasing factor and the sympatho-adrenal system. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1994, 48:887-892; S.D. Comer, M. Haney, R.W. Foltin, M.W. Fischman Effects of caffeine withdrawal on humans living in a residential laboratory. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 1997, 5:399-403; A. Jessen, B. Buemann, S. Toubro, I.M. Skovgaard, A. Astrup The appetite-suppressant effect of nicotine is enhanced by caffeine. Diab Ob Metab. 2005, 7:327-333; J.M. Carney Effects of caffeine, theophylline and theobromine on scheduled controlled responding in rats. Br J Pharmacol. 1982, 75:451-454] and caffeine diminished consumption of both palatable foods (savory and sweet) during the early and later exposures. Most responses to caffeine were stronger

  15. Withdrawal from chronic exposure to amphetamine, but not nicotine, leads to an immediate and enduring deficit in motivated behavior without affecting social interaction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der-Avakian, Andre; Markou, Athina

    2010-07-01

    Psychostimulant withdrawal leads to depressive symptoms, such as anhedonia and social dysfunction. We determined the effects of withdrawal from chronic exposure to nicotine (9 mg/kg/day salt, 28 days) or amphetamine (10 mg/kg/day salt, 7 days) on the motivated response for a sucrose reward and on social interaction in rats. Both nicotine and amphetamine exposure increased the motivated response for sucrose. However, only spontaneous amphetamine withdrawal led to an immediate and persistent decrease in motivated behavior, which was not correlated with body weight loss. Social interaction was not affected during withdrawal from either drug. These results indicate that withdrawal from chronic amphetamine exposure leads to an immediate and enduring anhedonic state.

  16. Regulation of nicotinic receptor subtypes following chronic nicotinic agonist exposure in M10 and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warpman, U; Friberg, L; Gillespie, A

    1998-01-01

    investigated in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells (expressing alpha3, alpha5, beta2, and beta4 nAChR subunits). Nicotine exhibited a 14 times lower affinity for the nAChRs in SH-SY5Y cells as compared with M10 cells, whereas epibatidine showed similar affinities for the nAChRs expressed in the two cell lines...

  17. Reduction of Aggressive Episodes after Repeated Transdermal Nicotine Administration in a Hospitalized Adolescent with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I.; Lewis, Alan S.; Qayyum, Zheala; Koslosky, Kourtney; Picciotto, Marina R.; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2015-01-01

    Aggression remains a major cause of morbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current pharmacotherapy for aggression is not always effective and is often associated with morbidity. Nicotinic acetylcholinergic neurotransmission may play a prominent role in ASD pathophysiology based on human and animal studies, and preclinical…

  18. Chronic administration of sildenafil improves erectile function in a rat model of chronic renal failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, Nilgun; Kol, Arif; Ipekci, Tumay; Ates, Erhan; Baykal, Asli; Usta, Mustafa F

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between erectile dysfunction (ED) and chronic renal failure (CRF) has been reported in several studies. This study aimed to investigate whether the chronic use of sildenafil could enhance the erectile capacity in CRF-induced rats. In addition, we assessed the effect of that treatment on certain molecules, which have been suggested to play crucial roles in erectile physiology and CRF-related ED as well. Three groups of animals were utilized: (1) age-matched control rats, (2) CRF-induced rats, (3) CRF-induced rats treated with chronic administration of sildenafil (5 mg kg−1 p.o. for 6 weeks [treatment started after 6 weeks of CRF induction]). At 3 months, all animals underwent cavernosal nerve stimulation (CNS) to assess erectile function. Penile tissue advanced glycation end products (AGE's)/5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, malondialdehyde (MDA), cGMP (ELISA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) (Western blot) analyses were performed in all rat groups. CRF-induced rats had a significant decrease in erectile function when compared to control rats (P chronic sildenafil administration on erectile function in CRF-induced rats. PMID:25652632

  19. α7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated anti-inflammatory effect in a chronic migraine rat model via the attenuation of glial cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Q

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing Liu,1 Chaoyang Liu,1 Li Jiang,1 Maolin Li,1 Ting Long,1 Wei He,1 Guangcheng Qin,2 Lixue Chen,2 Jiying Zhou1 1Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China; 2Laboratory Research Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China Background: Evidence suggests that the activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR can greatly decrease the neuroinflammation response. Neuroinflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of chronic migraine (CM. Clinical observations also show that nicotine gum induces analgesic effects in migraine patients. However, whether α7nAChR is involved in CM is unclear.Objective: To investigate the role of α7nAChR in CM and provide a new therapeutic target for CM.Materials and methods: Thirty-six male Sprague–Dawley rats were distributed randomly into control, CM, PNU-282987, and α-bungarotoxin groups (n=9 rats in each group. The CM model was established by the recurrent daily administration of inflammatory soup on the dura over the course of 1 week. The hind paw threshold and facial allodynia were assessed by the von Frey test. The expression levels of α7nAChR, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1 beta were analyzed by Western blot and real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The location of α7nAChR in the hippocampus was quantified by immunofluorescence, as well as the microglial and astrocyte alterations. Changes in the calcitonin gene-related peptide and the phosphorylated JNK protein among different groups were measured by Western blot.Results: We found that the expression of α7nAChR was reduced after repeated inflammatory soup administration. The increased expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and calcitonin gene-related peptide in CM group were significantly decreased by PNU-282987 and aggravated by α-bungarotoxin. Moreover, PNU-282987

  20. Long-term exposure to nicotine markedly reduces kynurenic acid in rat brain - In vitro and ex vivo evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, Elzbieta; Kuc, Damian; Zgrajka, Wojciech; Turski, Waldemar A.; Dekundy, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a recognized broad-spectrum antagonist of excitatory amino acid receptors with a particularly high affinity for the glycine co-agonist site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex. KYNA is also a putative endogenous neuroprotectant. Recent studies show that KYNA strongly blocks α7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). The present studies were aimed at assessing effects of acute and chronic nicotine exposure on KYNA production in rat brain slices in vitro and ex vivo. In brain slices, nicotine significantly increased KYNA formation at 10 mM but not at 1 or 5 mM. Different nAChR antagonists (dihydro-β-erythroidine, methyllycaconitine and mecamylamine) failed to block the influence exerted by nicotine on KYNA synthesis in cortical slices in vitro. Effects of acute (1 mg/kg, i.p.), subchronic (10-day) and chronic (30-day) administration of nicotine in drinking water (100 μg/ml) on KYNA brain content were evaluated ex vivo. Acute treatment with nicotine (1 mg/kg i.p.) did not affect KYNA level in rat brain. The subchronic exposure to nicotine in drinking water significantly increased KYNA by 43%, while chronic exposure to nicotine resulted in a reduction in KYNA by 47%. Co-administration of mecamylamine with nicotine in drinking water for 30 days reversed the effect exerted by nicotine on KYNA concentration in the cerebral cortex. The present results provide evidence for the hypothesis of reciprocal interaction between the nicotinic cholinergic system and the kynurenine pathway in the brain.

  1. Effects of acute administration of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic agonists and antagonists on performance in different cost-benefit decision making tasks in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Ian A; Gilbert, Ryan J; Bizon, Jennifer L; Setlow, Barry

    2012-12-01

    Alterations in cost-benefit decision making accompany numerous neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and addiction. Central cholinergic systems have been linked to the etiology and/or treatment of many of these conditions, but little is known about the role of cholinergic signaling in cost-benefit decision making. The goal of these experiments was to determine how cholinergic signaling is involved in cost-benefit decision making, using a behavioral pharmacological approach. Male Long-Evans rats were trained in either "probability discounting" or "delay discounting" tasks, in which rats made discrete-trial choices between a small food reward and a large food reward associated with either varying probabilities of omission or varying delays to delivery, respectively. The effects of acute administration of different doses of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists were assessed in each task. In the probability discounting task, acute nicotine administration (1.0 mg/kg) significantly increased choice of the large risky reward, and control experiments suggested that this was due to robust nicotine-induced impairments in behavioral flexibility. In the delay discounting task, the muscarinic antagonists scopolamine (0.03, 0.1, and 0.3 mg/kg) and atropine (0.3 mg/kg) both significantly increased choice of the small immediate reward. Neither mecamylamine nor oxotremorine produced reliable effects on either of the decision making tasks. These data suggest that cholinergic receptors play multiple roles in decision making contexts which include consideration of reward delay or probability. These roles should be considered when targeting these receptors for therapeutic purposes.

  2. Effects of acute administration of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic agonists and antagonists on performance in different cost–benefit decision making tasks in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Ian A.; Gilbert, Ryan J.; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Alterations in cost–benefit decision making accompany numerous neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and addiction. Central cholinergic systems have been linked to the etiology and/or treatment of many of these conditions, but little is known about the role of cholinergic signaling in cost–benefit decision making. Objectives The goal of these experiments was to determine how cholinergic signaling is involved in cost–benefit decision making, using a behavioral pharmacological approach. Methods Male Long-Evans rats were trained in either “probability discounting” or “delay discounting” tasks, in which rats made discrete-trial choices between a small food reward and a large food reward associated with either varying probabilities of omission or varying delays to delivery, respectively. The effects of acute administration of different doses of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists were assessed in each task. Results In the probability discounting task, acute nicotine administration (1.0 mg/kg) significantly increased choice of the large risky reward, and control experiments suggested that this was due to robust nicotine-induced impairments in behavioral flexibility. In the delay discounting task, the muscarinic antagonists scopolamine (0.03, 0.1, and 0.3 mg/kg) and atropine (0.3 mg/kg) both significantly increased choice of the small immediate reward. Neither mecamylamine nor oxotremorine produced reliable effects on either of the decision making tasks. Conclusions These data suggest that cholinergic receptors play multiple roles in decision making contexts which include consideration of reward delay or probability. These roles should be considered when targeting these receptors for therapeutic purposes. PMID:22760484

  3. Nicotine Prevents and Reverses Paclitaxel-Induced Mechanical Allodynia in a Mouse Model of CIPN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, S Lauren; Toma, Wisam; Bagdas, Deniz; Meade, Julie A; Schurman, Lesley D; Lichtman, Aron H; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Del Fabbro, Egidio; Fang, Xianjun; Bigbee, John W; Damaj, M Imad; Gewirtz, David A

    2018-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), a consequence of peripheral nerve fiber dysfunction or degeneration, continues to be a dose-limiting and debilitating side effect during and/or after cancer chemotherapy. Paclitaxel, a taxane commonly used to treat breast, lung, and ovarian cancers, causes CIPN in 59-78% of cancer patients. Novel interventions are needed due to the current lack of effective CIPN treatments. Our studies were designed to investigate whether nicotine can prevent and/or reverse paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model of CIPN, while ensuring that nicotine will not stimulate lung tumor cell proliferation or interfere with the antitumor properties of paclitaxel. Male C57BL/6J mice received paclitaxel every other day for a total of four injections (8 mg/kg, i.p.). Acute (0.3-0.9 mg/kg, i.p.) and chronic (24 mg/kg per day, s.c.) administration of nicotine respectively reversed and prevented paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. Blockade of the antinociceptive effect of nicotine with mecamylamine and methyllycaconitine suggests that the reversal of paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia is primarily mediated by the α 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype. Chronic nicotine treatment also prevented paclitaxel-induced intraepidermal nerve fiber loss. Notably, nicotine neither promoted proliferation of A549 and H460 non-small cell lung cancer cells nor interfered with paclitaxel-induced antitumor effects, including apoptosis. Most importantly, chronic nicotine administration did not enhance Lewis lung carcinoma tumor growth in C57BL/6J mice. These data suggest that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways may be promising drug targets for the prevention and treatment of CIPN. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  4. Effects of triiodothyronine administration in patients with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J N; Eastman, C J; Corcoran, J M; Lazarus, L

    1977-12-01

    Clinically euthyroid patients with severe, chronic, non-thyroidal illnesses usually have decreased serum total and absolute free T3 concentrations. Since T3 is the metabolically more active of the two thyroid hormones, it has been suggested that these patients may be hypothyroid and thus may benefit from T3 therapy. To test this hypothesis, five patients with chronic renal failure requiring maintenance haemodialysis were treated with 5 microgram T3 eight hourly, increasing at three weekly intervals to 10 microgram eight hourly, 20 microgram eight hourly and finally 30 microgram eight hourly. The mean +/- SD serum T3 level did not change over the 12 week period (1.42 +/- 0.17 vs. 1.41 +/- 0.26 nmoll-1 whilst the mean serum T4 and TSH levels fell from 87.0 +/- 15.2 to 47.5 +/- 18.8 nmoll-1 and 1.9 +/- 0.9 to 1.3 +/- 1.6 mUl-1 respectively. Only the change in T4 levels was significant (P less than 0.005). A significant decrease in mean serum T4 levels was apparent even after the treatment period with 5 microgram T3 eight hourly (87.0 +/- 15.2 vs. 51.2 +/- 15.7; P less than 0.005). The mean fasting serum triglyceride level fell from 1.16 +/- 0.74 to 0.94 +/- 0.74 mmoll-1 (P less than 0.05) and the mean fasting serum cholesterol level fell from 6.06 +/- 1.13 to 4.69 +/- 1.10 mmoll-1 (P less than 0.05). There were no subjective improvements in any of the patients. From the marked changes in serum T4 levels during the administration of T3, it is concluded that, prior to treatment, the patients were biochemically euthyroid and not hypothyroid and thus did not require T3 therapy.

  5. Nicotine dependence and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salín-Pascual, Rafael J; Alcocer-Castillejos, Natasha V; Alejo-Galarza, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    Nicotine addiction is the single largest preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. Smoking is not any more just a bad habit, but a substance addiction problem. The pharmacological aspects of nicotine show that this substance has a broad distribution in the different body compartnents, due mainly to its lipophilic characteristic. There are nicotinic receptors as members of cholinergic receptors' family. They are located in neuromuscular junction and in the central nervous system (CNS). Although they are similar, pentameric structure with an ionic channel to sodium, there are some differences in the protein chains characteristics. Repeated administration of nicotine in rats, results in the sensitization phenomenon, which produces increase in the behavioral locomotor activity response. It has been found that most psychostimulants-induced behavioral sensitization through a nicotine receptor activation. Nicotine receptors in CNS are located mainly in presynaptic membrane and in that way they regulated the release of several neurotransmitters, among them acetylcholine, dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine. In some activities like sleep-wake cycle, nicotine receptors have a functional significance. Nicotine receptor stimulation promotes wake time, reduces both, total sleep time and rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). About nicotine dependence, this substance full fills all the criteria for dependence and withdrawal syndrome. There are some people that have more vulnerability for to become nicotine dependent, those are psychiatric patients. Among them schizophrenia, major depression, anxiety disorders and attention deficit disorder, represent the best example in this area. Nicotine may have some beneficial effects, among them are some neuroprotective effects in disorders like Parkinson's disease, and Gilles de la Tourette' syndrome. Also there are several evidences that support the role of nicotine in cognitive improvement functions like attention

  6. Predictors of the nicotine reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand in a rodent model of nicotine reduction policy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenstein, Patricia E.; Burroughs, Danielle; Roiko, Samuel A.; Pentel, Paul R.; LeSage, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The FDA is considering reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products as a population-based strategy to reduce tobacco addiction. Research is needed to determine the threshold level of nicotine needed to maintain smoking and the extent of compensatory smoking that could occur during nicotine reduction. Sources of variability in these measures across sub-populations also need to be identified so that policies can take into account the risks and benefits of nicotine reduction in vulnerable populations. Methods The present study examined these issues in a rodent nicotine self- administration model of nicotine reduction policy to characterize individual differences in nicotine reinforcement thresholds, degree of compensation, and elasticity of demand during progressive reduction of the unit nicotine dose. The ability of individual differences in baseline nicotine intake and nicotine pharmacokinetics to predict responses to dose reduction was also examined. Results Considerable variability in the reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand was evident. High baseline nicotine intake was not correlated with the reinforcement threshold, but predicted less compensation and less elastic demand. Higher nicotine clearance predicted low reinforcement thresholds, greater compensation, and less elastic demand. Less elastic demand also predicted lower reinforcement thresholds. Conclusions These findings suggest that baseline nicotine intake, nicotine clearance, and the essential value of nicotine (i.e. elasticity of demand) moderate the effects of progressive nicotine reduction in rats and warrant further study in humans. They also suggest that smokers with fast nicotine metabolism may be more vulnerable to the risks of nicotine reduction. PMID:25891231

  7. Protective Effect of Nicotine on Sepsis-Induced Oxidative Multiorgan Damage: Role of Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir-Kumral, Zarife N; Özbeyli, Dilek; Özdemir, Ahmet F; Karaaslan, Bugra M; Kaytaz, Kübra; Kara, Mustafa F; Tok, Olgu E; Ercan, Feriha; Yegen, Berrak Ç

    2017-07-01

    Despite its adverse health consequences, tobacco smoking is associated with lower incidence of several neurodegenerative and inflammatory diseases. The present study is aimed to show the effects of nicotine, major tobacco constituent, on five organs targeted by sepsis. Male Wistar albino rats received tap water with (5mg/kg) or without nicotine for 14 days. Under ketamine anesthesia, sepsis (n = 50) was induced by ligation and puncture of the cecum, while sham group (n = 8) had only laparotomy. In other rats, nicotine drink was withdrawn for 5 days before sepsis induction, while in acute nicotine group, rats were injected with nicotine (30mg/kg, i.p.) before sepsis, but had no oral intake. Rats were decapitated 24 hours after surgery to obtain lung, liver, ileum, heart, and kidney tissues to determine malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparison tests or Student's t test. Chronic nicotine administration or its withdrawal reduced lipid peroxidation and MPO activity and prevented GSH depletion with some varying results in different target tissues. Nicotine injection prior to sepsis depressed MPO activity in all tissues and reduced MDA levels except for the lung, while GSH levels were elevated only in the hepatic and ileal tissues. Histologically observed injury was ameliorated by all nicotine treatments at varying degrees. The findings of the present study indicate that long-term nicotine administration reduces sepsis-induced oxidative damage in several tissues, which appears to involve inhibition of neutrophil activity in the inflamed tissues. Nicotine administration or its withdrawal reduced lipid peroxidation and neutrophil content and prevented GSH depletion with some varying results in different target tissues. A single injection prior to sepsis induction depressed MPO activity in all the tissues and reduced all tissue MDA levels except

  8. Water metabolism in rats subjected to chronic alcohol administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Pohl, C.; Bode, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: While the diuretic action of acute ingestion of alcohol has been studied extensively, the effect of chronic alcohol consumption has received less attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on the balance of water intake and excretion ...... the body as hidden water loss increases after alcohol consumption by up to 25-26% over control values.......AIM: While the diuretic action of acute ingestion of alcohol has been studied extensively, the effect of chronic alcohol consumption has received less attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on the balance of water intake and excretion...... and certain renal functions in rats during a period of 12 months. ANIMALS AND STUDY DESIGN: Male Wistar rats received either alcohol (15% v/v; group A, n = 65) or tap water (group C, n = 35) as drinking fluid. Urine and faeces were collected from 6 rats of each group during 7 days, at monthly intervals...

  9. effect of chronic administration of indomethacin on haematological

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Ibadan. Ibadan, Nigeria. Chronic treatment with ... been used widely as a rodenticide in the local community and the drug is potent in causing death ... 0.05) when compared with the untreated control (Group. C). On the other hand the total leucocyte count ...

  10. Nicotine Gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a smoking cessation program, which may include support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine gum ... and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or ...

  11. Extinction Training Regulates Neuroadaptive Responses to Withdrawal from Chronic Cocaine Self-Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Self, David W.; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Simmons, Diana; Walker, John R.; Smagula, Cynthia S.

    2004-01-01

    Cocaine produces multiple neuroadaptations with chronic repeated use. Many of these neuroadaptations can be reversed or normalized by extinction training during withdrawal from chronic cocaine self-administration in rats. This article reviews our past and present studies on extinction-induced modulation of the neuroadaptive response to chronic cocaine in the mesolimbic dopamine system, and the role of this modulation in addictive behavior in rats. Extinction training normalizes tyrosine hydro...

  12. Cellular, Molecular, and Genetic Substrates Underlying the Impact of Nicotine on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Thomas J.; Leach, Prescott T.

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic disorder marked by long-lasting maladaptive changes in behavior and in reward system function. However, the factors that contribute to the behavioral and biological changes that occur with addiction are complex and go beyond reward. Addiction involves changes in cognitive control and the development of disruptive drug-stimuli associations that can drive behavior. A reason for the strong influence drugs of abuse can exert on cognition may be the striking overlap between the neurobiological substrates of addiction and of learning and memory, especially areas involved in declarative memory. Declarative memories are critically involved in the formation of autobiographical memories, and the ability of drugs of abuse to alter these memories could be particularly detrimental. A key structure in this memory system is the hippocampus, which is critically involved in binding multimodal stimuli together to form complex long-term memories. While all drugs of abuse can alter hippocampal function, this review focuses on nicotine. Addiction to tobacco products is insidious, with the majority of smokers wanting to quit; yet the majority of those that attempt to quit fail. Nicotine addiction is associated with the presence of drug-context and drug-cue associations that trigger drug seeking behavior and altered cognition during periods of abstinence, which contributes to relapse. This suggests that understanding the effects of nicotine on learning and memory will advance understanding and potentially facilitate treating nicotine addiction. The following sections examine: 1) how the effects of nicotine on hippocampus-dependent learning change as nicotine administration transitions from acute to chronic and then to withdrawal from chronic treatment and the potential impact of these changes on addiction, 2) how nicotine usurps the cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, 3) the physiological changes in the hippocampus that may contribute to nicotine withdrawal

  13. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of chronic administration of reserpine and SKF-38393 in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neisewander, J.L.; Lucki, I.; McGonigle, P.

    1991-01-01

    Alterations in the density of dopamine receptor subtypes and behaviors mediated by the D1-selective agonist SKF-38393 were examined in rats treated chronically with reserpine, SKF-38393 or the combination of these drugs. Animals received either vehicle or reserpine (1 mg/kg s.c.) on days 1 to 28 and, in addition, half of each of these groups were treated with vehicle and half were treated with SKF-38393 (5-10 mg/kg s.c.) on days 15 to 29. Quantitative autoradiographic measurement of D1 receptors labeled with [ 3 H]SCH-23390 and D2 receptors labeled with [ 3 H]spiroperidol revealed that chronic administration of reserpine increased the density of both receptor subtypes in the nucleus accumbens and caudate-putamen, but not in the substantia nigra. Chronic administration of SKF-38393 alone did not alter D1 receptor density in any of these regions. However, chronic administration of the agonist in reserpinized animals decreased D1 receptor density in the nucleus accumbens, but not in the caudate-putamen or substantia nigra, demonstrating that this partial agonist can selectively down-regulate D1 receptors when endogenous dopaminergic tone is removed. The chronic drug treatments also altered behavioral responses. Chronic administration of SKF-38393 alone produced sensitization of the oral dyskinesia response elicited by a challenge injection of the agonist, but no significant change in the grooming response. Acute administration of SKF-38393 in rats treated with reserpine for 14 days produced stereotypy which was not altered after chronic administration of the agonist. Surprisingly, chronic administration of reserpine alone produced a spontaneous oral dyskinesia, which was blocked dose-dependently by the D2-selective antagonist spiroperidol. These findings are discussed in terms of their relevance to Parkinson's disease and tardive dyskinesia

  14. Blastomogenic effect of Cs137, Sr90 and Ca45 in single and chronic administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapol'skaya, N.A.; Fedorova, A.V.; Borisova, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The blastomogenic actions of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and 45 Ca were considered in experiments on white rats, and it was found that the site and type of tumor were determined by the organotropism of the radionuclide. With chronic administration of radionuclides, the tumor rate was low as compared to single-occasion administration

  15. Histological effects of chronic administration of Phyllanthus amarus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of administration of Phyllanthus amarus commonly used for the treatment of jaundice, diarrhea, dysentery, urogenital disease and wound on the superior colliculus of adult wistar rats was carefully studied. Rats of both sexes (n = 24), with average weight of 200 g were randomly assigned into two treatments (A and B) ...

  16. Effect of chronic pain on fentanyl self-administration in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie L Wade

    Full Text Available The development of opioid addiction in subjects with established chronic pain is an area that is poorly understood. It is critically important to clearly understand the neurobiology associated with propensity toward conversion to addiction under conditions of chronic pain. To pose the question whether the presence of chronic pain influences motivation to self-administer opioids for reward, we applied a combination of rodent models of chronic mechanical hyperalgesia and opioid self-administration. We studied fentanyl self-administration in mice under three conditions that induce chronic mechanical hyperalgesia: inflammation, peripheral nerve injury, and repeated chemotherapeutic injections. Responding for fentanyl was compared among these conditions and their respective standard controls (naïve condition, vehicle injection or sham surgery. Acquisition of fentanyl self-administration behavior was reduced or absent in all three conditions of chronic hyperalgesia relative to control mice with normal sensory thresholds. To control for potential impairment in ability to learn the lever-pressing behavior or perform the associated motor tasks, all three groups were evaluated for acquisition of food-maintained responding. In contrast to the opioid, chronic hyperalgesia did not interfere with the reinforcing effect of food. These studies indicate that the establishment of chronic hyperalgesia is associated with reduced or ablated motivation to seek opioid reward in mice.

  17. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and prote......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...... in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, α7 nAChR agonists and allosteric modulators differentially alter expression and functionality of the α7 nAChR with repeated administration, which suggests that there may be fundamentally different outcomes of long-term administration...... with these different types of compounds. Finally, we describe the special case of Aβ1-42 binding to the α7 nAChR, which may pose a unique challenge to drug development of α7 nAChR-specific ligands for Alzheimer's disease. Hopefully, a greater knowledge of the many factors influencing α7 nAChR function as well...

  18. Effect of Sub-Chronic Administration of Tetracera potatoria Roots ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Triglyceride levels were non-significantly reduced in T. potatoria treated rats but were increased from 74.0±3.8 mg/dl (control) to 139.3±4.8 mg/dl in rats administered with BA (40 mg/kg). In conclusion, sub-acute administration of T. potatoria root was relatively nontoxic, but BA showed relatively more toxicity to blood cells ...

  19. Tolerance to and cross tolerance between ethanol and nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A C; Burch, J B; de Fiebre, C M; Marks, M J

    1988-02-01

    Female DBA mice were subjected to one of four treatments: ethanol-containing or control diets, nicotine (0.2, 1.0, 5.0 mg/kg/hr) infusion or saline infusion. After removal from the liquid diets or cessation of infusion, the animals were challenged with an acute dose of ethanol or nicotine. Chronic ethanol-fed mice were tolerant to the effects of ethanol on body temperature and open field activity and were cross tolerant to the effects of nicotine on body temperature and heart rate. Nicotine infused animals were tolerant to the effects of nicotine on body temperature and rotarod performance and were cross tolerant to the effects of ethanol on body temperature. Ethanol-induced sleep time was decreased in chronic ethanol- but not chronic nicotine-treated mice. Chronic drug treatment did not alter the elimination rate of either drug. Chronic ethanol treatment did not alter the number or affinity of brain nicotinic receptors whereas chronic nicotine treatment elicited an increase in the number of [3H]-nicotine binding sites. Tolerance and cross tolerance between ethanol and nicotine is discussed in terms of potential effects on desensitization of brain nicotinic receptors.

  20. Acute and chronic in vivo effects of exposure to nicotine and propylene glycol from an E-cigarette on mucociliary clearance in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Beth L; Afshar-Mohajer, Nima; Koehler, Kirsten; Chen, Gang; Lazarus, Philip; Collaco, Joseph M; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A

    2017-04-01

    To determine the effect of an acute (1 week) and chronic (3 weeks) exposure to E-cigarette (E-cig) emissions on mucociliary clearance (MCC) in murine lungs. C57BL/6 male mice (age 10.5 ± 2.4 weeks) were exposed for 20 min/day to E-cigarette aerosol generated by a Joyetech 510-T ® E-cig containing either 0% nicotine (N)/propylene glycol (PG) for 1 week (n = 6), or 3 weeks (n = 9), or 2.4% N/PG for one week (n = 6), or 3 weeks (n = 9), followed by measurement of MCC. Control mice (n = 15) were not exposed to PG alone, or N/PG. MCC was assessed by gamma camera following aspiration of 99m technetium aerosol and was expressed as the amount of radioactivity removed from both lungs over 6 hours (MCC6hrs). Venous blood was assayed for cotinine levels in control mice and in mice exposed for 3-weeks to PG alone and N/PG. MCC6hrs in control mice and in mice acutely exposed to PG alone and N/PG was similar, averaging (±1 standard deviation) 8.6 ± 5.2%, 7.5 ± 2.8% and 11.2 ± 5.9%, respectively. In contrast, chronic exposure to PG alone stimulated MCC6hrs (17.2 ± 8.0)% and this stimulation was significantly blunted following chronic exposure to N/PG (8.7 ± 4.6)% (p < .05). Serum cotinine levels were <0.5 ng/ml in control mice and in mice exposed to PG alone, whereas, N/PG exposed mice averaged 14.6 ± 12.0 ng/ml. In this murine model, a chronic, daily, 20 min-exposure to N/PG, but not an acute exposure, slowed MCC, compared to exposure to PG alone and led to systemic absorption of nicotine.

  1. Acute administration of nicotine into the higher order auditory Te2 cortex specifically decreases the fear-related charge of remote emotional memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Grosso, Anna; Renna, Annamaria; Concina, Giulia; Sacchetti, Benedetto

    2015-12-01

    Nicotine elicits several behavioural effects on mood as well as on stress and anxiety processes. Recently, it was found that the higher order components of the sensory cortex, such as the secondary auditory cortex Te2, are essential for the long-term storage of remote fear memories. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the effects of acute nicotine injection into the higher order auditory cortex Te2, on the remote emotional memories of either threat or incentive experiences in rats. We found that intra-Te2 nicotine injection decreased the fear-evoked responses to a tone previously paired with footshock. This effect was cue- and dose-specific and was not due to any interference with auditory stimuli processing, innate anxiety and fear processes, or with motor responses. Nicotine acts acutely in the presence of threat stimuli but it did not determine the permanent degradation of the fear-memory trace, since memories tested one week after nicotine injection were unaffected. Remarkably, nicotine did not affect the memory of a similar tone that was paired to incentive stimuli. We conclude from our results that nicotine, when acting acutely in the auditory cortex, relieves the fear charge embedded by learned stimuli. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Neurochemical Effects of Chronic Administration of Calcitriol in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Jiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite accumulating data showing the various neurological actions of vitamin D (VD, its effects on brain neurochemistry are still far from fully understood. To further investigate the neurochemical influence of VD, we assessed neurotransmitter systems in the brain of rats following 6-week calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D administration (50 ng/kg/day or 100 ng/kg/day. Both the two doses of calcitriol enhanced VDR protein level without affecting serum calcium and phosphate status. Rats treated with calcitriol, especially with the higher dose, exhibited elevated γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA status. Correspondingly, the mRNA expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD 67 was increased. 100 ng/kg of calcitriol administration also increased glutamate and glutamine levels in the prefrontal cortex, but did not alter glutamine synthetase (GS expression. Additionally, calcitriol treatment promoted tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2 expression without changing dopamine and serotonin status. However, the concentrations of the metabolites of dopamine and serotonin were increased and the drug use also resulted in a significant rise of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA expression, which might be responsible to maintain the homeostasis of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission. Collectively, the present study firstly showed the effects of calcitriol in the major neurotransmitter systems, providing new evidence for the role of VD in brain function.

  3. Neural Signatures of Cognitive Flexibility and Reward Sensitivity Following Nicotinic Receptor Stimulation in Dependent Smokers: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Elise; Aronson, Sarah E; Sutherland, Matthew T; Ross, Thomas J; Salmeron, Betty Jo; Stein, Elliot A

    2017-06-01

    Withdrawal from nicotine is an important contributor to smoking relapse. Understanding how reward-based decision making is affected by abstinence and by pharmacotherapies such as nicotine replacement therapy and varenicline tartrate may aid cessation treatment. To independently assess the effects of nicotine dependence and stimulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on the ability to interpret valence information (reward sensitivity) and subsequently alter behavior as reward contingencies change (cognitive flexibility) in a probabilistic reversal learning task. Nicotine-dependent smokers and nonsmokers completed a probabilistic reversal learning task during acquisition of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a 2-drug, double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design conducted from January 21, 2009, to September 29, 2011. Smokers were abstinent from cigarette smoking for 12 hours for all sessions. In a fully Latin square fashion, participants in both groups underwent MRI twice while receiving varenicline and twice while receiving a placebo pill, wearing either a nicotine or a placebo patch. Imaging analysis was performed from June 15, 2015, to August 10, 2016. A well-established computational model captured effects of smoking status and administration of nicotine and varenicline on probabilistic reversal learning choice behavior. Neural effects of smoking status, nicotine, and varenicline were tested for on MRI contrasts that captured reward sensitivity and cognitive flexibility. The study included 24 nicotine-dependent smokers (12 women and 12 men; mean [SD] age, 35.8 [9.9] years) and 20 nonsmokers (10 women and 10 men; mean [SD] age, 30.4 [7.2] years). Computational modeling indicated that abstinent smokers were biased toward response shifting and that their decisions were less sensitive to the available evidence, suggesting increased impulsivity during withdrawal. These behavioral impairments were mitigated with nicotine and varenicline

  4. Vitamin E Nicotinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimbell R. Duncan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E refers to a family of compounds that function as lipid-soluble antioxidants capable of preventing lipid peroxidation. Naturally occurring forms of vitamin E include tocopherols and tocotrienols. Vitamin E in dietary supplements and fortified foods is often an esterified form of α-tocopherol, the most common esters being acetate and succinate. The vitamin E esters are hydrolyzed and converted into free α-tocopherol prior to absorption in the intestinal tract. Because its functions are relevant to many chronic diseases, vitamin E has been extensively studied in respect to a variety of diseases as well as cosmetic applications. The forms of vitamin E most studied are natural α-tocopherol and the esters α-tocopheryl acetate and α-tocopheryl succinate. A small number of studies include or focus on another ester form, α-tocopheryl nicotinate, an ester of vitamin E and niacin. Some of these studies raise the possibility of differences in metabolism and in efficacy between vitamin E nicotinate and other forms of vitamin E. Recently, through metabolomics studies, we identified that α-tocopheryl nicotinate occurs endogenously in the heart and that its level is dramatically decreased in heart failure, indicating the possible biological importance of this vitamin E ester. Since knowledge about vitamin E nicotinate is not readily available in the literature, the purpose of this review is to summarize and evaluate published reports, specifically with respect to α-tocopheryl nicotinate with an emphasis on the differences from natural α-tocopherol or α-tocopheryl acetate.

  5. Metals and Nicotine Level in Preparations of Rubisco Purified from Cuban Tobacco Varieties, for Chronic Renal Insufficiency Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geada, D.; Ares, D.; Del Castillo, N.; Valdes, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Ferro, W.; Gomez, L.; Padilla, S.; Roman, M. R.; Hidalgo, A.; Zamora, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text: Foods are the major source of metals accumulation in the humans. Plants contain large quantities of Rubisco to attain reasonable rates of photosynthesis, and thus, is the most abundant protein on Earth. Rubisco could be used as additive in nutrition for people with renal insufficiency, comatose state and severely restrict Na and K because the absence of these metals can greatly reduce the frequency of haemodialysis. Our purpose was to measure the metal levels and estimate the potential intake of copper, iron, zinc and manganese in patients under haemodialysis treatment and coma. Additionally we also studied sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium quantities. Intakes of these metals were estimated, attending to the quantity of protein by person, from their daily diets and compared with the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intakes (PTWI) as established by the FAO/WHO and the US Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA) or the US Safe and Adequate Daily Dietary Intakes (ESADDI). All the determinations of these metals were done using atomic absorption spectrometry and none of them exceeds PTWI, RDA and ESADDI values; nevertheless they were higher than the values previously obtained. The highest metal value, respect the daily allowances, was obtained for iron. Lowest values were reported for sodium, potassium and copper which support the protein use as a nutritional supplement. On the other hand, nicotine is a very harmful alkaloid in tobacco plants and the LD 50 oral is 40mg in humans. The nicotine contents were analyzed by gas chromatography and it does not exceed the 7ug/ml

  6. Nicotine response and nicotinic receptors in long-sleep and short-sleep mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fiebre, C M; Medhurst, L J; Collins, A C

    1987-01-01

    Nicotine response and nicotinic receptor binding were characterized in long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice which have been selectively bred for differential "sleep-time" following ethanol administration. LS mice are more sensitive than SS mice to nicotine as measured by a battery of behavioral and physiological tests and as measured by sensitivity to nicotine-induced seizures. The greater sensitivity of the LS mice is not due to differences in binding of [3H]nicotine. Unlike inbred mouse strains which differ in sensitivity to nicotine-induced seizures, these selected mouse lines do not differ in levels of binding of [125I]alpha-bungarotoxin (BTX) in the hippocampus. Significant differences in BTX binding were found in the cerebellum and striatum. Although these two mouse lines do not differ in blood levels of nicotine following nicotine administration, they differ slightly in brain levels of nicotine indicating differential distribution of the drug. Since this distribution difference is much smaller than the observed behavioral differences, these mice probably differ in CNS sensitivity to nicotine; however, follow-up studies are necessary to test whether the differential response of these mice is due to subtle differences in distribution of nicotine to the brain.

  7. Nicotine Addiction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel I van; Rambali AB; Amsterdam JGC van; Wolterink G; Aerts LAGJM van; Vleeming W; TOX; SIR; BMT

    2003-01-01

    This report discusses the current knowledge on nicotine dependence, devoting a special chapter to smoking among youths, given that most smoking careers start in adolescence. The transition period, in which youths go from elementary to high school (ages 13-14), showes to be particularly risky for

  8. Spinal activation of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor attenuates posttraumatic stress disorder-related chronic pain via suppression of glial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rao; Zhang, Wei; Bo, Jinhua; Zhang, Zuoxia; Lei, Yishan; Huo, Wenwen; Liu, Yue; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2017-03-06

    The high prevalence of chronic pain in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) individuals has been widely reported by clinical studies, which emphasized an urgent need to uncover the underlying mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic targets. Recent studies suggested that targeting activated glia and their pro-inflammatory products may provide a novel and effective therapy for the stress-related pain. In this study, we investigated whether activation of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR), a novel anti-inflammatory target, could attenuate PTSD-related chronic pain. The experiments were conducted in a rat model of single prolonged stress (SPS), an established model of PTSD-pain comorbidity. We found that SPS exposure produced persistent mechanical allodynia. Immunohistochemical and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay analysis showed that SPS also induced elevated activation of glia cells (including microglia and astrocytes) and accumulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in spinal cord. In another experiment, we found that intrathecal injection of PHA-543613, a selective α7 nAchR agonist, attenuated the SPS-evoked allodynia in a dose dependent manner. However, this anti-hyperalgesic effect was blocked by pretreatment with methyllycaconitine (MLA), a selective α7 nAchR antagonist. Further analyses showed that PHA-543613 suppressed SPS-induced spinal glial activation and SPS-elevated spinal pro-inflammatory cytokines, and these were abolished by MLA. Taken together, the present study showed that spinal activation of α7 nAChR by PHA-543613 attenuated mechanical allodynia induced by PTSD-like stress, and the suppression of spinal glial activation may underlie this anti-hyperalgesic effect. Our study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of targeting α7 nAChR in the treatment of PTSD-related chronic pain. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 21 CFR 172.310 - Aluminum nicotinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.310 Aluminum nicotinate. Aluminum nicotinate may be safely...

  10. Adolescents' understanding and use of nicotine in e-cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Jessica K; Farrelly, Matthew C; Watson, Kimberly A

    2018-07-01

    Nicotine harms adolescent brain development and contributes to addiction. Some adolescents report using nicotine-free e-cigarettes, but the accuracy of their reporting is unclear. We explored adolescents' use of nicotine-free e-cigarettes and understanding of chemicals in e-cigarettes, including nicotine. Using social media, we recruited 1589 US adolescents (aged 15-17) who reported past 30-day use of e-cigarettes in 2016. We assessed perceptions of the nicotine source in e-liquid and whether e-cigarette aerosol is just "water vapor." We explored differences among adolescents who usually used e-cigarettes with nicotine (n = 473) and without nicotine (n = 452). We used weights to calibrate our sample to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Twenty-nine percent usually used e-cigarettes without nicotine, 28% with nicotine, 39% with "both," and 5% were "not sure." Few participants (17% of non-nicotine users vs. 34% of nicotine users, p e-cigarette aerosol was just water vapor were more likely to usually use without nicotine. Older adolescents and current tobacco users were less likely to usually use without nicotine. The adolescents who reported usually using e-cigarettes without nicotine had poorer knowledge of e-cigarettes. This lack of understanding could contribute to inaccurate reporting of nicotine use. Most youth thought the nicotine in e-cigarettes was artificial, potentially indicating a belief that this nicotine is "safer." The US Food & Drug Administration will require nicotine warnings on e-cigarettes in 2018; a complementary educational campaign could address youths' misperceptions about nicotine and other chemicals in e-cigarette aerosol. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of chronic administration of drugs of abuse on impulsive choice (delay discounting) in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, Barry; Mendez, Ian A; Mitchell, Marci R; Simon, Nicholas W

    2009-09-01

    Drug-addicted individuals show high levels of impulsive choice, characterized by preference for small immediate over larger but delayed rewards. Although the causal relationship between chronic drug use and elevated impulsive choice in humans has been unclear, a small but growing body of literature over the past decade has shown that chronic drug administration in animal models can cause increases in impulsive choice, suggesting that a similar causal relationship may exist in human drug users. This article reviews this literature, with a particular focus on the effects of chronic cocaine administration, which have been most thoroughly characterized. The potential mechanisms of these effects are described in terms of drug-induced neural alterations in ventral striatal and prefrontal cortical brain systems. Some implications of this research for pharmacological treatment of drug-induced increases in impulsive choice are discussed, along with suggestions for future research in this area.

  12. Nicotine replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoking cessation - nicotine replacement; Tobacco - nicotine replacement therapy ... Before you start using a nicotine replacement product, here are some things to know: The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher the dose you may need to ...

  13. Brain energy metabolism is activated after acute and chronic administration of fenproporex in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Jeremias, Isabela C; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Cardoso, Mariane R; Morais, Meline O S; Gomes, Lara M; Martinello, Otaviana B; Valvassori, Samira S; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2011-12-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease of multiple etiologies, including genetic, metabolic, environmental, social, and other factors. Pharmaceutical strategies in the treatment of obesity include drugs that regulate food intake, thermo genesis, fat absorption, and fat metabolism. Fenproporex is the second most commonly consumed amphetamine-based anorectic worldwide; this drug is rapidly converted in vivo into amphetamine. Studies suggest that amphetamine induces neurotoxicity through generation of free radicals and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by cytochrome c release, accompanied by a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that play a crucial role in ATP production. Thus, in the present study we evaluated the activities of some enzymes of Krebs cycle, mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and creatine kinase in the brain of young rats submitted to acute and chronic administration of fenproporex. In the acute administration, the animals received a single injection of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/kg i.p.) or tween. In the chronic administration, the animals received a single injection daily for 14 days of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/Kg i.p.). Two hours after the last injection, the rats were sacrificed by decapitation and the brain was removed for evaluation of biochemical parameters. Our results showed that the activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase were increased by acute and chronic administration of fenproporex. Complexes I, II, II-III and IV and creatine kinase activities were also increased after acute and chronic administration of the drug. Our results are consistent with others reports that showed that some psychostimulant drugs increased brain energy metabolism in young rats. Copyright © 2011 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress in rat lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Lopes Torres

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effects of acute and chronic administration of methylprednisolone on oxidative stress, as quantified by measuring lipid peroxidation (LPO and total reactive antioxidant potential (TRAP, in rat lungs. Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: acute treatment, comprising rats receiving a single injection of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg i.p.; acute control, comprising rats i.p. injected with saline; chronic treatment, comprising rats receiving methylprednisolone in drinking water (6 mg/kg per day for 30 days; and chronic control, comprising rats receiving normal drinking water. Results: The levels of TRAP were significantly higher in the acute treatment group rats than in the acute control rats, suggesting an improvement in the pulmonary defenses of the former. The levels of lung LPO were significantly higher in the chronic treatment group rats than in the chronic control rats, indicating oxidative damage in the lung tissue of the former. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the acute use of corticosteroids is beneficial to lung tissue, whereas their chronic use is not. The chronic use of methylprednisolone appears to increase lung LPO levels.

  15. Effect of the MK 801 and (-) nicotine intracerebral administration on Glu and Gaba extracellular concentration in the pedunculopontine nucleus from rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Lezcano, Lisette; Lorigados Pedre, Lourdes del Carmen; Gonzalez Fraguela, Maria Elena and others

    2011-01-01

    Although the pharmacological manipulation of the glutamatergic and cholinergic systems have been studied in animal models of Parkinson's Disease (PD), only some authors have done work on this topic at the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN). The present work studied the changes in glutamate (Glu) and δ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) extracellular concentrations (EC) in the PPN from hemiparkinsonian rats by 6hydroxydopamine injection. The rats were locally perfused by MK-801 (10 μ mol/l) or (-) nicotine (10 mm) solutions by cerebral microdialysis. The biochemical studies were carried out through high performance liquid chromatography coupled to fluorescence detection. Mk-801 infusion induced a significant decrease of Glu (p< 0.01) and GABA (p< 0.01) EC in PPN. On the other hand (-) nicotine infusion induced a significant increase of Glu (p< 0.001) and GABA (p< 0.001) EC in PPN from hemiparkinsonian rats. The local blockade of NMDA receptors by MK-801 infusion facilitates the interaction between Glu and their metabotropic receptors that take part in presynaptic inhibition mechanisms and interfere with neurotransmitters release. Meanwhile, the nicotine infusion sums the effects of nicotinic receptor activation with the glutamatergic and gabaergic neurotransmission changes produced in the PPN in the parkinsonian condition. The cholinergic and glutamergic drug infusion in PPN impose a new adjustment to the neurotransmission at this level that is added to the neurochemical changes associated to dopaminergic denervation.

  16. Predictors of the nicotine reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand in a rodent model of nicotine reduction policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenstein, Patricia E; Burroughs, Danielle; Roiko, Samuel A; Pentel, Paul R; LeSage, Mark G

    2015-06-01

    The FDA is considering reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products as a population-based strategy to reduce tobacco addiction. Research is needed to determine the threshold level of nicotine needed to maintain smoking and the extent of compensatory smoking that could occur during nicotine reduction. Sources of variability in these measures across sub-populations also need to be identified so that policies can take into account the risks and benefits of nicotine reduction in vulnerable populations. The present study examined these issues in a rodent nicotine self-administration model of nicotine reduction policy to characterize individual differences in nicotine reinforcement thresholds, degree of compensation, and elasticity of demand during progressive reduction of the unit nicotine dose. The ability of individual differences in baseline nicotine intake and nicotine pharmacokinetics to predict responses to dose reduction was also examined. Considerable variability in the reinforcement threshold, compensation, and elasticity of demand was evident. High baseline nicotine intake was not correlated with the reinforcement threshold, but predicted less compensation and less elastic demand. Higher nicotine clearance predicted low reinforcement thresholds, greater compensation, and less elastic demand. Less elastic demand also predicted lower reinforcement thresholds. These findings suggest that baseline nicotine intake, nicotine clearance, and the essential value of nicotine (i.e. elasticity of demand) moderate the effects of progressive nicotine reduction in rats and warrant further study in humans. They also suggest that smokers with fast nicotine metabolism may be more vulnerable to the risks of nicotine reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of chronic administration of fenproporex on cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cinara L; Furlanetto, Camila B; Valvassori, Samira S; Bavaresco, Daniela V; Varela, Roger B; Budni, Josiane; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2015-04-01

    Fenproporex (Fen) is an amphetamine-based anorectic; amphetamine use causes a broad range of severe cognitive deficits and anxiogenic-like effects. In this study we evaluated pharmacological effects of the chronic administration of Fen on cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors. Male adult Wistar rats received intraperitoneal administration of vehicle (control group) or Fen (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/kg) for 14 days; the animals were then subjected to habituation and object recognition tasks in open-field apparatus, and elevated plus-maze task. The administration of Fen (12.5 and 25 mg/kg) impaired habituation during the second exposure to the habituation task. In addition, the same doses of Fen also impaired the performance in object recognition task. In elevated plus-maze task, the administration of Fen (in all doses tested) induced anxiogenic-like effects in rats. Our results suggest that chronic Fen administration alters memory and induces anxiogenic-like effects in rats.

  18. The nicotinic α6 subunit gene determines variability in chronic pain sensitivity via cross-inhibition of P2X2/3 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Mathur, Jayanti; Limapichat, Walrati

    2015-01-01

    expression levels of Chrna6, which encodes the α6 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), as highly associated with allodynia. We confirmed the importance of α6* (α6-containing) nAChRs by analyzing both gain- and loss-of-function mutants. We find that mechanical allodynia associated...... with neuropathic and inflammatory injuries is significantly altered in α6* mutants, and that α6* but not α4* nicotinic receptors are absolutely required for peripheral and/or spinal nicotine analgesia. Furthermore, we show that Chrna6's role in analgesia is at least partially due to direct interaction and cross...

  19. [The role of chronic gastritis in past medical history with NSAID administration in patients with osteoarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M Iu

    2014-11-01

    122 patients with osteoarthrosis, who have in the past medical history verified chronic gastritis (50 males and 72 females) at the age from 42 to 64 have been examined. Control group was comprised of 40 patients with osteoarthrosis without gastroduodenal zone pathology in the past medical history. For arthralgia relief patients were prescribed meloxicam (average dose--12.5 - 1.39 mg daily) or nimesulide (average dose--150 ± 14.91 mg daily). As a result of this research it was determined that administration of selective NSAID (meloxicam and nimesulide) in patients with chronic gastritis in the past medical history raised the risk of NSAID gastropathy/dyspepsia 2.9 times (P 0.05) of erosive gastropathy. Patients with chronic gastritis in the past medical history when taking NSAID with the purpose of gastropathy prevention are recommended to undergo gastroprotective therapy.

  20. Validation of a case definition to define chronic dialysis using outpatient administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Fiona M; James, Matthew T; Chin, Rick; Klarenbach, Scott W; Manns, Braden J; Quinn, Robert R; Ravani, Pietro; Tonelli, Marcello; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2011-03-01

    Administrative health care databases offer an efficient and accessible, though as-yet unvalidated, approach to studying outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The objective of this study is to determine the validity of outpatient physician billing derived algorithms for defining chronic dialysis compared to a reference standard ESRD registry. A cohort of incident dialysis patients (Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 2008) and prevalent chronic dialysis patients (Jan 1, 2008) was selected from a geographically inclusive ESRD registry and administrative database. Four administrative data definitions were considered: at least 1 outpatient claim, at least 2 outpatient claims, at least 2 outpatient claims at least 90 days apart, and continuous outpatient claims at least 90 days apart with no gap in claims greater than 21 days. Measures of agreement of the four administrative data definitions were compared to a reference standard (ESRD registry). Basic patient characteristics are compared between all 5 patient groups. 1,118,097 individuals formed the overall population and 2,227 chronic dialysis patients were included in the ESRD registry. The three definitions requiring at least 2 outpatient claims resulted in kappa statistics between 0.60-0.80 indicating "substantial" agreement. "At least 1 outpatient claim" resulted in "excellent" agreement with a kappa statistic of 0.81. Of the four definitions, the simplest (at least 1 outpatient claim) performed comparatively to other definitions. The limitations of this work are the billing codes used are developed in Canada, however, other countries use similar billing practices and thus the codes could easily be mapped to other systems. Our reference standard ESRD registry may not capture all dialysis patients resulting in some misclassification. The registry is linked to on-going care so this is likely to be minimal. The definition utilized will vary with the research objective.

  1. Validation of a case definition to define chronic dialysis using outpatient administrative data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klarenbach Scott W

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Administrative health care databases offer an efficient and accessible, though as-yet unvalidated, approach to studying outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The objective of this study is to determine the validity of outpatient physician billing derived algorithms for defining chronic dialysis compared to a reference standard ESRD registry. Methods A cohort of incident dialysis patients (Jan. 1 - Dec. 31, 2008 and prevalent chronic dialysis patients (Jan 1, 2008 was selected from a geographically inclusive ESRD registry and administrative database. Four administrative data definitions were considered: at least 1 outpatient claim, at least 2 outpatient claims, at least 2 outpatient claims at least 90 days apart, and continuous outpatient claims at least 90 days apart with no gap in claims greater than 21 days. Measures of agreement of the four administrative data definitions were compared to a reference standard (ESRD registry. Basic patient characteristics are compared between all 5 patient groups. Results 1,118,097 individuals formed the overall population and 2,227 chronic dialysis patients were included in the ESRD registry. The three definitions requiring at least 2 outpatient claims resulted in kappa statistics between 0.60-0.80 indicating "substantial" agreement. "At least 1 outpatient claim" resulted in "excellent" agreement with a kappa statistic of 0.81. Conclusions Of the four definitions, the simplest (at least 1 outpatient claim performed comparatively to other definitions. The limitations of this work are the billing codes used are developed in Canada, however, other countries use similar billing practices and thus the codes could easily be mapped to other systems. Our reference standard ESRD registry may not capture all dialysis patients resulting in some misclassification. The registry is linked to on-going care so this is likely to be minimal. The definition

  2. Chronic central administration of Ghrelin increases bone mass through a mechanism independent of appetite regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jin Choi

    Full Text Available Leptin plays a critical role in the central regulation of bone mass. Ghrelin counteracts leptin. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic intracerebroventricular administration of ghrelin on bone mass in Sprague-Dawley rats (1.5 μg/day for 21 days. Rats were divided into control, ghrelin ad libitum-fed (ghrelin ad lib-fed, and ghrelin pair-fed groups. Ghrelin intracerebroventricular infusion significantly increased body weight in ghrelin ad lib-fed rats but not in ghrelin pair-fed rats, as compared with control rats. Chronic intracerebroventricular ghrelin infusion significantly increased bone mass in the ghrelin pair-fed group compared with control as indicated by increased bone volume percentage, trabecular thickness, trabecular number and volumetric bone mineral density in tibia trabecular bone. There was no significant difference in trabecular bone mass between the control group and the ghrelin ad-lib fed group. Chronic intracerebroventricular ghrelin infusion significantly increased the mineral apposition rate in the ghrelin pair-fed group as compared with control. In conclusion, chronic central administration of ghrelin increases bone mass through a mechanism that is independent of body weight, suggesting that ghrelin may have a bone anabolic effect through the central nervous system.

  3. Chronic cocaine administration induces opposite changes in dopamine receptors in the striatum and nucleus accumbens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeders, N.E.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of clinical and animal data suggest that the repeated administration of cocaine and related psychomotor stimulants may be associated with a behavioral sensitization whereby the same dose of the drug results in increasing behavioral pathology. This investigation was designed to determine the effects of chronic cocaine administration on the binding of [ 3 H]sulpiride, a relatively specific ligand for D2 dopaminergic receptors, in the rat brain using in vitro homogenate binding and light microscopic quantitative autoradiographic methodologies. Chronic daily injections of cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) for 15 days resulted in a significant decrease in the maximum concentration of sulpiride binding sites in the striatum and a significant increase in the maximum number of these binding sites in the nucleus accumbens. No significant differences in binding affinity were observed in either brain region. These data suggest that chronic cocaine administration may result in differential effects on D2 receptors in the nigro-striatal and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems

  4. R-Modafinil Attenuates Nicotine-Taking and Nicotine-Seeking Behavior in Alcohol-Preferring Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Bi, Guo-Hua; He, Yi; Yang, Hong-Ju; Gao, Jun-Tao; Okunola-Bakare, Oluyomi M; Slack, Rachel D; Gardner, Eliot L; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2015-01-01

    (±)-Modafinil (MOD) is used clinically for the treatment of sleep disorders and has been investigated as a potential medication for the treatment of psychostimulant addiction. However, the therapeutic efficacy of (±)-MOD for addiction is inconclusive. Herein we used animal models of self-administration and in vivo microdialysis to study the pharmacological actions of R-modafinil (R-MOD) and S-modafinil (S-MOD) on nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking behavior, and mechanisms underlying such actions. We found that R-MOD is more potent and effective than S-MOD in attenuating nicotine self-administration in Long–Evans rats. As Long–Evans rats did not show a robust reinstatement response to nicotine, we used alcohol-preferring rats (P-rats) that display much higher reinstatement responses to nicotine than Long–Evans rats. We found that R-MOD significantly inhibited intravenous nicotine self-administration, nicotine-induced reinstatement, and nicotine-associated cue-induced drug-seeking behavior in P-rats. R-MOD alone neither sustained self-administration in P-rats previously self-administering nicotine nor reinstated extinguished nicotine-seeking behavior. The in vivo brain microdialysis assays demonstrated that R-MOD alone produced a slow-onset moderate increase in extracellular DA. Pretreatment with R-MOD dose-dependently blocked nicotine-induced dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in both naive and nicotine self-administrating rats, suggesting a DA-dependent mechanism underlying mitigation of nicotine's effects. In conclusion, the present findings support further investigation of R-MOD for treatment of nicotine dependence in humans. PMID:25613829

  5. Increasing Neuroplasticity to Bolster Chronic Pain Treatment: A Role for Intermittent Fasting and Glucose Administration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Kimberly T; Bartsch, Felix; Reddy, Divya; Fillingim, Roger B; Keil, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Neuroplastic changes in brain structure and function are not only a consequence of chronic pain but are involved in the maintenance of pain symptoms. Thus, promotion of adaptive, treatment-responsive neuroplasticity represents a promising clinical target. Emerging evidence about the human brain's response to an array of behavioral and environmental interventions may assist in identifying targets to facilitate increased neurobiological receptivity, promoting healthy neuroplastic changes. Specifically, strategies to maximize neuroplastic responsiveness to chronic pain treatment could enhance treatment gains by optimization of learning and positive central nervous system adaptation. Periods of heightened plasticity have been traditionally identified with the early years of development. More recent research, however, has identified a wide spectrum of methods that can be used to "reopen" and enhance plasticity and learning in adults. In addition to transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation, behavioral and pharmacological interventions have been investigated. Intermittent fasting and glucose administration are two propitious strategies, that are noninvasive, inexpensive to administer, implementable in numerous settings, and might be applicable across differing chronic pain treatments. Key findings and neurophysiological mechanisms are summarized, and evidence for the potential clinical contributions of these two strategies toward ameliorating chronic pain is presented. Neuroplastic changes are a defining feature of chronic pain and a complicating factor in treatment. Noninvasive strategies to optimize the brain's response to treatment interventions might improve learning and memory, increase the positive adaptability of the central nervous system, and enhance treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nicotine, adolescence, and stress: A review of how stress can modulate the negative consequences of adolescent nicotine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    In order to continue the decline of smoking prevalence, it is imperative to identify factors that contribute to the development of nicotine and tobacco addiction, such as adolescent initiation of nicotine use, adolescent stress, and their interaction. This review highlights the biological differences between adolescent and adults in nicotine use and resulting effects, and examines the enduring consequences of adolescent nicotine administration. A review of both clinical and preclinical literature indicates that adolescent, but not adult, nicotine administration leads to increased susceptibility for development of long-lasting impairments in learning and affect. Finally, the role stress plays in normal adolescent development, the deleterious effects stress has on learning and memory, and the negative consequences resulting from the interaction of stress and nicotine during adolescence is reviewed. The review concludes with ways in which future policies could benefit by addressing adolescent stress as a means of reducing adolescent nicotine abuse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. AN ANIMAL MODEL OF SCHIZOPHRENIA BASED ON CHRONIC LSD ADMINISTRATION: OLD IDEA, NEW RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marona-Lewicka, Danuta; Nichols, Charles D.; Nichols, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Many people who take LSD experience a second temporal phase of LSD intoxication that is qualitatively different, and was described by Daniel Freedman as “clearly a paranoid state.” We have previously shown that the discriminative stimulus effects of LSD in rats also occur in two temporal phases, with initial effects mediated by activation of 5-HT2A receptors (LSD30), and the later temporal phase mediated by dopamine D2-like receptors (LSD90). Surprisingly, we have now found that non-competitive NMDA antagonists produced full substitution in LSD90 rats, but only in older animals, whereas in LSD30, or in younger animals, these drugs did not mimic LSD. Chronic administration of low doses of LSD (>3 months, 0.16 mg/kg every other day) induces a behavioral state characterized by hyperactivity and hyperirritability, increased locomotor activity, anhedonia, and impairment in social interaction that persists at the same magnitude for at least three months after cessation of LSD treatment. These behaviors, which closely resemble those associated with psychosis in humans, are not induced by withdrawal from LSD; rather, they are the result of neuroadaptive changes occurring in the brain during the chronic administration of LSD. These persistent behaviors are transiently reversed by haloperidol and olanzapine, but are insensitive to MDL-100907. Gene expression analysis data show that chronic LSD treatment produced significant changes in multiple neurotransmitter system-related genes, including those for serotonin and dopamine. Thus, we propose that chronic treatment of rats with low doses of LSD can serve as a new animal model of psychosis that may mimic the development and progression of schizophrenia, as well as model the established disease better than current acute drug administration models utilizing amphetamine or NMDA antagonists such as PCP. PMID:21352832

  8. An animal model of schizophrenia based on chronic LSD administration: old idea, new results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marona-Lewicka, Danuta; Nichols, Charles D; Nichols, David E

    2011-09-01

    Many people who take LSD experience a second temporal phase of LSD intoxication that is qualitatively different, and was described by Daniel Freedman as "clearly a paranoid state." We have previously shown that the discriminative stimulus effects of LSD in rats also occur in two temporal phases, with initial effects mediated by activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors (LSD30), and the later temporal phase mediated by dopamine D2-like receptors (LSD90). Surprisingly, we have now found that non-competitive NMDA antagonists produced full substitution in LSD90 rats, but only in older animals, whereas in LSD30, or in younger animals, these drugs did not mimic LSD. Chronic administration of low doses of LSD (>3 months, 0.16 mg/kg every other day) induces a behavioral state characterized by hyperactivity and hyperirritability, increased locomotor activity, anhedonia, and impairment in social interaction that persists at the same magnitude for at least three months after cessation of LSD treatment. These behaviors, which closely resemble those associated with psychosis in humans, are not induced by withdrawal from LSD; rather, they are the result of neuroadaptive changes occurring in the brain during the chronic administration of LSD. These persistent behaviors are transiently reversed by haloperidol and olanzapine, but are insensitive to MDL-100907. Gene expression analysis data show that chronic LSD treatment produced significant changes in multiple neurotransmitter system-related genes, including those for serotonin and dopamine. Thus, we propose that chronic treatment of rats with low doses of LSD can serve as a new animal model of psychosis that may mimic the development and progression of schizophrenia, as well as model the established disease better than current acute drug administration models utilizing amphetamine or NMDA antagonists such as PCP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Animal Research on Nicotine Reduction: Current Evidence and Research Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tracy T; Rupprecht, Laura E; Denlinger-Apte, Rachel L; Weeks, Jillian J; Panas, Rachel S; Donny, Eric C; Sved, Alan F

    2017-09-01

    A mandated reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes may improve public health by reducing the prevalence of smoking. Animal self-administration research is an important complement to clinical research on nicotine reduction. It can fill research gaps that may be difficult to address with clinical research, guide clinical researchers about variables that are likely to be important in their own research, and provide policy makers with converging evidence between clinical and preclinical studies about the potential impact of a nicotine reduction policy. Convergence between clinical and preclinical research is important, given the ease with which clinical trial participants can access nonstudy tobacco products in the current marketplace. Herein, we review contributions of preclinical animal research, with a focus on rodent self-administration, to the science of nicotine reduction. Throughout this review, we highlight areas where clinical and preclinical research converge and areas where the two differ. Preclinical research has provided data on many important topics such as the threshold for nicotine reinforcement, the likelihood of compensation, moderators of the impact of nicotine reduction, the impact of environmental stimuli on nicotine reduction, the impact of nonnicotine cigarette smoke constituents on nicotine reduction, and the impact of nicotine reduction on vulnerable populations. Special attention is paid to current research gaps including the dramatic rise in alternative tobacco products, including electronic nicotine delivery systems (ie, e-cigarettes). The evidence reviewed here will be critical for policy makers as well as clinical researchers interested in nicotine reduction. This review will provide policy makers and clinical researchers interested in nicotine reduction with an overview of the preclinical animal research conducted on nicotine reduction and the regulatory implications of that research. The review also highlights the utility of

  10. Increasing Neuroplasticity to Bolster Chronic Pain Treatment: A Role for Intermittent Fasting and Glucose Administration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, KT; Bartsch, F; Reddy, D; Fillingim, RB; Keil, A

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplastic changes in brain structure and function are not only a consequence of chronic pain but are involved in the maintenance of pain symptoms. Thus, promoting adaptive, treatment responsive neuroplasticity represents a promising clinical target. Emerging evidence about the human brain’s response to an array of behavioral and environmental interventions may assist in identifying targets to facilitate increased neurobiological receptivity, promoting healthy neuroplastic changes. Specifically, strategies to maximize neuroplastic responsiveness to chronic pain treatment could enhance treatment gains by optimizing learning and positive central nervous system (CNS) adaptation. Periods of heightened plasticity have been traditionally identified with the early years of development. More recent research however has identified a wide spectrum of methods that can be used to “re-open” and enhance plasticity and learning in adults. In addition to transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation, behavioral and pharmacological interventions have been investigated. Intermittent fasting and glucose administration are two propitious strategies, which are non-invasive, inexpensive to administer, implementable in numerous settings, and may be applicable across differing chronic pain treatments. Key findings and neurophysiological mechanisms are summarized, providing evidence for the potential clinical contributions of these two strategies toward ameliorating chronic pain. PMID:26848123

  11. Oral administration of synthetic human urogastrone promotes healing of chronic duodenal ulcers in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1986-01-01

    The effect of oral administration of synthetic human epidermal growth factor/urogastrone (EGF/URO) on healing of chronic duodenal ulcers induced by cysteamine in rats was investigated and compared with that of cimetidine, a H2-receptor antagonist. After 25 and 50 days of treatment, synthetic human...... EGF/URO significantly increased healing of chronic duodenal ulcers to the same extent as cimetidine. Combined treatment with synthetic human EGF/URO and cimetidine for 25 days was more effective than synthetic human EGF/URO given alone, whereas combined treatment for 50 days was significantly more...... human EGF/URO is a potent inhibitor of gastric acid secretion when administered intravenously, but had no effect on acid secretion when given intraduodenally, which suggests that the effect of synthetic human EGF/URO is a direct action on the duodenal mucosa. In conclusion, this study showed that oral...

  12. The data set describing cognitive performance after varenicline administration in a 3-choice serial reaction time task in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ohmura

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The data shows attentional function, impulsivity, motivation, motor function, and motor activity in rats treated with varenicline, a stop-smoking aid. The data also shows these parameters in rats treated with varenicline after acute/chronic nicotine administration. Our interpretation and discussion of these data were described in the article “Varenicline Provokes Impulsive Action by Stimulating α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Infralimbic Cortex in a Nicotine Exposure Status-Dependent Manner” (Ohmura et al., 2017 [1].

  13. Sex-specific respiratory effects of acute and chronic caffeine administration in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchi, Hayet; Uppari, NagaPraveena; Joseph, Vincent; Bairam, Aida

    2017-06-01

    Caffeine is widely used for the treatment of apnea of prematurity (AoP) but whether this effect varies with sex is unknown. To shed some light on this question, we present a summary of data obtained on the effects of caffeine on the respiratory chemoreflexes and apnea frequency in 1- and 12-days old male and female rats. Caffeine was either administered as a single acute injection (10mg/kg, i.p.) or for 10 consecutive days (7.5mg/kg/day between 3 and 12days of life by gavage, simulating its clinical use). Acute caffeine had little effects on breathing in 1-day old male and female rats. In 12-days old female rats caffeine reduced the response to hypercapnia (not hypoxia) compared to males. During the steady state of hypoxia females had a lower frequency of apneas than males, and acute injection of caffeine decreased the frequency of apnea, suppressing the differences between males and females. In 12-days old rats chronic administration of caffeine stimulated basal breathing and decreased the frequency of apnea similarly in males and females. In response to hypoxia, chronic caffeine administration also masked the difference in respiratory frequency between males and females observed in control rats. Female rats had lower frequency of apnea than males with or without caffeine treatment. These observations indicate that sex influences the respiratory responses to caffeine and this effect seems to depend on the modality of administration (acute vs chronic) and environmental oxygen (normoxia vs hypoxia). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chronic cladribine administration increases amyloid beta peptide generation and plaque burden in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal D Hayes

    Full Text Available The clinical uses of 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-CDA or cladribine which was initially prescribed to patients with hematological and lymphoid cancers is now extended to treat patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Previous data has shown that 2-CDA has high affinity to the brain and readily passes through the blood brain barrier reaching CSF concentrations 25% of that found in plasma. However, whether long-term administration of 2-CDA can lead to any adverse effects in patients or animal models is not yet clearly known.Here we show that exposure of 2-CDA to CHO cells stably expressing wild-type APP751 increased generation and secretion of amyloid β peptide (Aβ in to the conditioned medium. Interestingly, increased Aβ levels were noticed even at non-toxic concentrations of 2-CDA. Remarkably, chronic treatment of APdE9 mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease with 2-CDA for 60 days increased amyloid plaque burden by more than 1-fold. Increased Aβ generation appears to result from increased turnover of APP as revealed by cycloheximide-chase experiments. Additionally, surface labeling of APP with biotin and immunoprecipitation of surface labeled proteins with anti-biotin antibody also indicated increased APP at the cell surface in 2-CDA treated cells compared to controls. Increased turnover of APP by 2-CDA in turn might be a consequence of decreased protein levels of PIN 1, which is known to regulate cis-trans isomerization and phosphorylation of APP. Most importantly, like many other oncology drugs, 2-CDA administration led to significant delay in acquiring a reward-based learning task in a T maze paradigm.Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence for the first time that chronic 2-CDA administration can increase amyloidogenic processing of APP leading to robustly increased plaque burden which may be responsible for the observed deficits in learning skills. Thus chronic treatment of mice with 2-CDA can have deleterious effects in vivo.

  15. The Effect of Chronic Administration of Buspirone on 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Catalepsy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdolah Sharifi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Several evidences show that serotonergic neurons play a role in the regulation of movements executed by the basal ganglia. Recently we have reported that single dose of buspirone improved 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA and haloperidol-induced catalepsy. This study is aimed to investigate effect of chronic intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of buspirone on 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy in male Wistar rats. Methods: Catalepsy was induced by unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA (8 μg/2 μl/rat into the central region of the SNc and was assayed by the bar-test method 5, 60, 120 and 180 min after drugs administration in 10th day. The effect of buspirone (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p. for 10 days was assessed in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Results: The results showed that chronic injection of buspirone (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p. for 10 days decreased catalepsy when compared with the control group. The best anticataleptic effect was observed at the dose of 1 mg/kg. The catalepsy-improving effect of buspirone was reversed by 1-(2-methoxyphenyl- 4-[4-(2-phthalimido butyl]piperazine hydrobromide (NAN-190, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.,as a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. Conclusion: Our study indicates that chronic administration of buspirone improves catalepsy in a 6-OHDA-induced animal model of parkinson's disease (PD. We also suggest that buspirone may be used as an adjuvant therapy to increase effectiveness of antiparkinsonian drugs. In order to prove this hypothesis, further clinical studies should be done.

  16. Acute effects of nicotine amplify accumbal neural responses during nicotine-taking behavior and nicotine-paired environmental cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Guillem

    Full Text Available Nicotine self-administration (SA is maintained by several variables, including the reinforcing properties of nicotine-paired cues and the nicotine-induced amplification of those cue properties. The nucleus accumbens (NAc is implicated in mediating the influence of these variables, though the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are not yet understood. In the present study, Long-Evans rats were trained to self-administer nicotine. During SA sessions each press of a lever was followed by an intravenous infusion of nicotine (30 µg/kg paired with a combined light-tone cue. Extracellular recordings of single-neuron activity showed that 20% of neurons exhibited a phasic change in firing during the nicotine-directed operant, the light-tone cue, or both. The phasic change in firing for 98% of neurons was an increase. Sixty-two percent of NAc neurons additionally or alternatively showed a sustained decrease in average firing during the SA session relative to a presession baseline period. These session decreases in firing were significantly less prevalent in a group of neurons that were activated during either the operant or the cue than in a group of neurons that were nonresponsive during those events (referred to as task-activated and task-nonactivated neurons, respectively. Moreover, the session decrease in firing was dose-dependent for only the task-nonactivated neurons. The data of the present investigation provide supportive correlational evidence for two hypotheses: (1 excitatory neurophysiological mechanisms mediate the NAc role in cue-maintenance of nicotine SA, and (2 a differential nicotine-induced inhibition of task-activated and task-nonactivated neurons mediates the NAc role in nicotine-induced amplification of cue effects on nicotine SA.

  17. Differential effects of acute and chronic fructose administration on pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and lipogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, L.

    1988-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to distinguish between the acute and chronic effects of fructose administration. In vivo, liver lipogenesis, as measured by 3 H 2 O incorporation, was greater in rats fed 60% fructose than in their glucose fed controls. Both fructose feeding, and fructose feeding plus intraperitoneal fructose injection increased the activities of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme. Liver PDH activity was increased by fructose feeding, and was increased even more by fructose feeding and injection of fructose, but this was not associated with any changes in hepatic ATP concentrations

  18. Use of radiotelemetry to evaluate respiratory depression produced by chronic methadone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewanowitsch, Tanya; White, Jason M; Irvine, Rodney J

    2004-01-26

    Illicit and therapeutic opioid administration can result in overdose due to opioid-induced respiratory depression. Research investigating the respiratory depressant effects of opioids has been limited due to difficulties associated with acquiring long-term respiratory data. This study examined the novel use of radiotelemetry to measure respiratory rate, heart rate, locomotor activity and blood pressure in rats treated chronically with methadone. Over 4 days of treatment, respiratory rate decreased, but partial tolerance appeared to develop during active (night) periods. Decreased heart rate was observed during the night periods and tolerance appeared to develop to this effect. Activity and blood pressure did not change with treatment. The effects of naloxone hydrochloride and naloxone methiodide administration on the methadone-treated rats were also examined and both antagonists increased respiratory rate and heart rate, with only naloxone hydrochloride producing significant increases in activity. Radiotelemetry offers a means of evaluating drug effects on respiratory rate continually in ambulatory, unstressed animals.

  19. Chronic organic manganese administration in the rat does not damage dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, V W; Perry, T L; Godolphin, W J; Jones, K A; Clavier, R M; Ito, M; Foulks, J G

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to produce an animal model of Parkinson's disease, we injected rats repeatedly with high doses of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), a compound which has been reported to lower striatal dopamine content in mice. Chronic MMT administration for up to 5 months, even though it produced a substantial elevation in brain manganese content during the period of exposure, did not destroy dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. This was assessed by measurements of tyrosine hydroxylase activity and contents of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum, and by histological examination of the substantia nigra. Our results differ from those of others who administered manganese chloride in drinking water to rats. This discrepancy is unlikely to be a consequence of differences in duration of exposure or route of administration. It could be due to our having used an organic rather than an inorganic manganese compound, or to a species difference in vulnerability to organic manganese between rats and mice.

  20. Effects of chronic ethanol administration on hepatic glycoprotein secretion in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorrell, M.F.; Nauss, J.M.; Donohue, T.M. Jr.; Tuma, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol feeding on protein and glycoprotein synthesis and secretion were studied in rat liver slices. Liver slices from rats fed ethanol for 4-5 wk showed a decreased ability to incorporate [ 14 C]glucosamine into medium trichloracetic acid-precipitable proteins when compared to the pair-fed controls; however, the labeling of hepatocellular glycoproteins was unaffected by chronic ethanol treatment. Immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled secretory (serum) glycoproteins with antiserum against rat serum proteins showed a similar marked inhibition in the appearance of glucosamine-labeled proteins in the medium of slices from ethanol-fed rats. Minimal effects, however, were noted in the labeling of intracellular secretory glycoproteins. Protein synthesis, as determined by measuring [ 14 C]leucine incorporation into medium and liver proteins, was decreased in liver slices from ethanol-fed rats as compared to the pair-fed controls. This was the case for both total proteins as well as immunoprecipitable secretory proteins, although the labeling of secretory proteins retained in the liver slices was reduced to a lesser extent than total radiolabeled hepatic proteins. When the terminal sugar, [ 14 C]fucose, was employed as a precursor in order to more closely focus on the final steps of hepatic glycoprotein secretion, liver slices obtained from chronic ethanol-fed rats exhibited impaired secretion of fucose-labeled proteins into the medium. When ethanol (5 or 10 mM) was added to the incubation medium containing liver slices from the ethanol-fed rats, the alterations in protein and glycoprotein synthesis and secretion caused by the chronic ethanol treatment were further potentiated. The results of this study indicate that liver slices prepared from chronic ethanol-fed rats exhibit both impaired synthesis and secretion of proteins and glycoproteins, and these defects are further potentiated by acute ethanol administration

  1. Short- and long-term cognitive effects of chronic cannabinoids administration in late-adolescence rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Abush

    Full Text Available The use of cannabis can impair cognitive function, especially short-term memory. A controversial question is whether long-term cannabis use during the late-adolescence period can cause irreversible deficits in higher brain function that persist after drug use stops. In order to examine the short- and long-term effects of chronic exposure to cannabinoids, rats were administered chronic i.p. treatment with the CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 1.2 mg/kg for two weeks during the late adolescence period (post-natal days 45-60 and tested for behavioral and electrophysiological measures of cognitive performance 24 hrs, 10 and 30 days after the last drug injection. The impairing effects of chronic WIN on short-term memory in the water maze and the object recognition tasks as well as long-term potentiation (LTP in the ventral subiculum (vSub-nucleus accumbens (NAc pathway were temporary as they lasted only 24 h or 10 d after withdrawal. However, chronic WIN significantly impaired hippocampal dependent short-term memory measured in the object location task 24 hrs, 10, 30, and 75 days after the last drug injection. Our findings suggest that some forms of hippocampal-dependent short-term memory are sensitive to chronic cannabinoid administration but other cognitive impairments are temporary and probably result from a residue of cannabinoids in the brain or acute withdrawal effects from cannabinoids. Understanding the effects of cannabinoids on cognitive function may provide us with tools to overcome these impairments and for cannabinoids to be more favorably considered for clinical use.

  2. Glucose administration attenuates spatial memory deficits induced by chronic low-power-density microwave exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yonghui; Xu, Shangcheng; He, Mindi; Chen, Chunhai; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chuan; Chu, Fang; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou; Zhong, Min

    2012-07-16

    Extensive evidence indicates that glucose administration attenuates memory deficits in rodents and humans, and cognitive impairment has been associated with reduced glucose metabolism and uptake in certain brain regions including the hippocampus. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose treatment attenuated memory deficits caused by chronic low-power-density microwave (MW) exposure, and the effect of MW exposure on hippocampal glucose uptake. We exposed Wistar rats to 2.45 GHz pulsed MW irradiation at a power density of 1 mW/cm(2) for 3 h/day, for up to 30 days. MW exposure induced spatial learning and memory impairments in rats. Hippocampal glucose uptake was also reduced by MW exposure in the absence or presence of insulin, but the levels of blood glucose and insulin were not affected. However, these spatial memory deficits were reversed by systemic glucose treatment. Our results indicate that glucose administration attenuates the spatial memory deficits induced by chronic low-power-density MW exposure, and reduced hippocampal glucose uptake may be associated with cognitive impairment caused by MW exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Chronic Administration of Resveratrol on Cognitive Performance during Aging Process in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Navarro-Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the elderly population has generated concern to meet health demands. The research efforts to elucidate the mechanisms of damage associated with aging have also been significantly increased, especially in order to avoid the reduction of the cognitive abilities in geriatric patients, resulting from the damage generated mainly at the level of the hippocampus during old age. At present, many studies describe resveratrol as an antiaging component. There are reports that it can activate the Sirt1 gene related to antiaging, emulating the effects obtained by caloric restriction in rodents. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of chronic administration of resveratrol (10 mg/kg on cognitive performance in behavioral tests after 8 months of treatment and on the preservation of cerebral integrity in the cytoarchitecture of regions CA1 and CA2. Results showed that the cytoarchitecture of the CA1 and CA2 regions in the hippocampus retained their integrity over time in rats treated with resveratrol, and the behavioral test performed revealed that chronic resveratrol administration for 8 months showed improvements in cognitive performance. The results indicate that resveratrol may exhibit therapeutic potential for age-related conditions.

  4. Life-threatening haematological complication occurring in a cat after chronic carbimazole administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mosca

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Case summary An 11-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat with a history of hyperthyroidism treated with carbimazole for 7 months was presented for a check-up after a few episodes of vomiting. The cat had been receiving prednisolone at 0.5 mg/kg PO q12h for recent pancreatitis and concurrent inflammation of liver and small intestines confirmed by biopsies. Clinical examination revealed pale mucous membranes with a capillary refill time of 120 s and fibrinogen serum concentration (3.5 g/l. Morphological changes of thrombocytes in the absence of thrombocytopenia were also noted. In-saline agglutination test was positive. Abdominal radiographic and ultrasonographic examinations excluded the presence of organ abnormalities and peritoneal effusion. Blood biochemistry was unremarkable. Feline leukaemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus tests were negative. On the basis of these findings, immune-mediated anaemia secondary to chronic carbimazole administration was suspected. Prednisolone was increased to 2 mg/kg PO q24h and carbimazole tablets were stopped. Despite close monitoring and intensive care, the cat died the same evening of admission to the hospital. Relevance and novel information This report suggests that severe haemotoxicity may occur as a sequel of chronic carbimazole administration in cats. Routine bloodwork and accurate follow-up of cats under treatment with thyrotoxic therapy may be advisable, in order to detect haematological changes before lethal complications occur.

  5. Progressive and Lasting Amplilfication of Accumbal Nicotine-Seeking Neural Signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillem, K.; Peoples, L.L.

    2010-01-01

    Although neuroadaptations in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) are thought to contribute to nicotine addiction, little is known about the chronic effects of nicotine on NAc neuronal activity. In the present experiment, rats were exposed to a 23 d period of nicotine selfadministration (SA), a 30 d

  6. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds and prote......The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a promising drug target for a number of diseases ranging from schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to chronic pain and inflammatory diseases. Focusing on the central nervous system, we describe how endogenous and experimental compounds...

  7. Neonatal Nicotine Exposure Increases Excitatory Synaptic Transmission and Attenuates Nicotine-stimulated GABA release in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Griffith, William H.; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental exposure to nicotine has been linked to long-lasting changes in synaptic transmission which may contribute to behavioral abnormalities seen in offspring of women who smoke during pregnancy. Here, we examined the long-lasting effects of developmental nicotine exposure on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, and on acute nicotine-induced glutamate and GABA release in the adult hippocampus, a structure important in cognitive and emotional behaviors. We utilized a chronic neonatal nicotine treatment model to administer nicotine (6 mg/kg/day) to rat pups from postnatal day (P) 1–7, a period that falls developmentally into the third human trimester. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we measured excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents in neonatally control- and nicotine-treated young adult males. Neonatal nicotine exposure significantly increased AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous and evoked excitatory signaling, with no change in glutamate release probability in adults. Conversely, there was no increase in spontaneous GABAergic neurotransmission in nicotine-males. Chronic neonatal nicotine treatment had no effect on acute nicotine-stimulated glutamate release in adults, but acute nicotine-stimulated GABA release was significantly attenuated. Thus, neonatal nicotine exposure results in a persistent net increase in excitation and a concurrent loss of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated regulation of presynaptic GABA but not glutamate release, which would exacerbate excitation following endogenous or exogenous nAChR activation. Our data underscore an important role for nAChRs in hippocampal excitatory synapse development, and suggest selective long-term changes at specific presynaptic nAChRs which together could explain some of the behavioral abnormalities associated with maternal smoking. PMID:24950455

  8. High-affinity α4β2 nicotinic receptors mediate the impairing effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Previously, studies from our lab have shown that while acute nicotine administered prior to training and testing enhances contextual fear conditioning, acute nicotine injections prior to extinction sessions impair extinction of contextual fear. Although there is also strong evidence showing that the acute nicotine's enhancing effects on contextual fear conditioning require high-affinity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are involved in the acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute nicotine administration on contextual fear extinction in knock-out (KO) mice lacking α4, β2 or α7 subtypes of nAChRs and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Both KO and WT mice were first trained and tested for contextual fear conditioning and received a daily contextual extinction session for 4 days. Subjects received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) or saline 2-4 min prior to each extinction session. Our results showed that the mice that lack α4 and β2 subtypes of nAChRs showed normal contextual fear extinction but not the acute nicotine-induced impairment while the mice that lack the α7 subtype showed both normal contextual extinction and nicotine-induced impairment of contextual extinction. In addition, control experiments showed that acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction persisted when nicotine administration was ceased and repeated acute nicotine administrations alone did not induce freezing behavior in the absence of context-shock learning. These results clearly demonstrate that high-affinity α4β2 nAChRs are necessary for the effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Therapeutic serum phenobarbital concentrations obtained using chronic transdermal administration of phenobarbital in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamaide Gasper, Joy A; Barnes Heller, Heidi L; Robertson, Michelle; Trepanier, Lauren A

    2015-04-01

    Seizures are a common cause of neurologic disease, and phenobarbital (PB) is the most commonly used antiepileptic drug. Chronic oral dosing can be challenging for cat owners, leading to poor compliance. The purpose of this study was to determine if the transdermal administration of PB could achieve serum PB concentrations of between 15 and 45 μg/ml in healthy cats. Nineteen healthy cats were enrolled in three groups. Transdermal PB in pluronic lecithin organogel (PLO) was applied to the pinnae for 14 days at a dosage of 3 mg/kg q12h in group 1 (n = 6 cats) and 9 mg/kg q12h in group 2 (n = 7 cats). Transdermal PB in Lipoderm Activemax was similarly applied at 9 mg/kg q12h for 14 days in group 3 (n = 6 cats). Steady-state serum PB concentrations were measured at trough, and at 2, 4 and 6 h after the morning dose on day 15. In group 1, median concentrations ranged from 6.0-7.5 μg/ml throughout the day (observed range 0-11 μg/ml). Group 2 median concentrations were 26.0 μg/ml (observed range 18.0-37.0 μg/ml). For group 3, median concentrations ranged from 15.0-17.0 μg/ml throughout the day (range 5-29 μg/ml). Side effects were mild. One cat was withdrawn from group 2 owing to ataxia and sedation. These results show therapeutic serum PB concentrations can be achieved in cats following chronic transdermal administration of PB in PLO at a dosage of 9 mg/kg q12h. More individual variation was noted using Lipoderm Activemax. Transdermal administration may be an alternative for cats that are difficult to medicate orally. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  10. Sensitivity to Chronic Methamphetamine Administration and Withdrawal in Mice with Relaxin-3/RXFP3 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Mouna; Lam, Monica; Chua, Berenice E; Smith, Craig M; Gundlach, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant, and cessation of use is associated with reduced monoamine signalling, and increased anxiety/depressive states. Neurons expressing the neuropeptide, relaxin-3 (RLN3), and its cognate receptor, RXFP3, constitute a putative 'ascending arousal system', which shares neuroanatomical and functional similarities with serotonin (5-HT)/dorsal raphe and noradrenaline (NA)/locus coeruleus monoamine systems. In light of possible synergistic roles of RLN3 and 5-HT/NA, endogenous RLN3/RXFP3 signalling may compensate for the temporary reduction in monoamine signalling associated with chronic METH withdrawal, which could alter the profile of 'behavioural despair', bodyweight reductions, and increases in anhedonia and anxiety-like behaviours observed following chronic METH administration. In studies to test this theory, Rln3 and Rxfp3 knockout (KO) mice and their wildtype (WT) littermates were injected once daily with saline or escalating doses of METH (2 mg/kg, i.p. on day 1, 4 mg/kg, i.p. on day 2 and 6 mg/kg, i.p. on day 3-10). WT and Rln3 and Rxfp3 KO mice displayed an equivalent sensitivity to behavioural despair (Porsolt swim) during the 2-day METH withdrawal and similar bodyweight reductions on day 3 of METH treatment. Furthermore, during a 3-week period after the cessation of chronic METH exposure, Rln3 KO, Rxfp3 KO and corresponding WT mice displayed similar behavioural responses in paradigms that measured anxiety (light/dark box, elevated plus maze), anhedonia (saccharin preference), and social interaction. These findings indicate that a whole-of-life deficiency in endogenous RLN3/RXFP3 signalling does not markedly alter behavioural sensitivity to chronic METH treatment or withdrawal, but leave open the possibility of a more significant interaction with global or localised manipulations of this peptide system in the adult brain.

  11. Nicotine Reduction Revisited: Science and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Perkins, Kenneth A.; LeSage, Mark G.; Ashley, David L.; Henningfield, Jack E.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Backinger, Cathy; Zeller, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of nicotine levels in cigarettes and other tobacco products is now possible with the passage of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA) in 2009 giving the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authority to regulate tobacco products, and with Articles 9-11 of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.[1-2] Both regulatory approaches allow establishing product standards for tobacco constituents, including nicotine. The FSPTCA does not allow nicotine levels to be decreased to zero, although FDA has the authority to reduce nicotine yields to very low, presumably non-addicting levels. The proposal to reduce levels of nicotine to a level that is non-addicting was originally suggested in 1994.[3] Reduction of nicotine in tobacco products could potentially have a profound impact on reducing tobacco-related morbidity and mortality. To examine this issue, two meetings were convened in the United States with non-tobacco-industry scientists of varied disciplines, tobacco control policy-makers and representatives of government agencies. This article provides an overview of the current science in the area of reduced nicotine content cigarettes and key conclusions and recommendations for research and policy that emerged from the deliberations of the meeting members. PMID:20876072

  12. Adsorption of nicotine on different zeolite types, from aqueous solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Stošić Dušan K.; Dondur Vera T.; Rac Vladislav A.; Rakić Vesna M.; Zakrzewska Joanna S.

    2007-01-01

    The plant alkaloid, nicotine, is a strongly toxic heterocyclic compound: the lethal dose for an adult human being (40-60 mg) is importantly lower in comparison with the other known poisons such as arsenic or strychni­ne. Cigarettes represent "the most toxic and addictive form of nicotine". Besides the negative effects of nicotine on public health produced by self-administration, recently another potentially very dangerous effect has been recognized: because of its miscibility with water, nico...

  13. Polydatin administration improves serum biochemical parameters and oxidative stress markers during chronic alcoholism: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Maria Caterina; Passavanti, Maria Beatrice; Aurilio, Caterina; Sansone, Pasquale; Aurilio, Rossella; DE Maria, Salvatore; Lama, Stefania; Federico, Alessandro; Ravagnan, Gianpietro; Caraglia, Michele; Stiuso, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Polydatin, a hydroxystilbene derived from the rhizome of Polygonum cuspidatum, elicits hepatoprotective and neuroprotective effects through its anti-oxidant properties. The present study aimed to determine the effects of oral administration of polydatin in alcoholic patients in order to improve liver biochemical parameters, serum oxidative stress and mental state. We enrolled 20 chronic alcoholic patients hospitalized for rehabilitative therapy. The patients were divided into two groups receiving the following treatment regimes for two weeks: administration of an anti-oxidant nutritional supplement containing glutathione and vitamin C (group 1), or glutathione, vitamin C and polydatin (group 2). The results of the present study show that elevated plasma aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels in patients after two weeks of alcohol withdrawal were significantly reduced by polydatin (group 2), when compared to group 1. Polydatin also significantly reduced lipid peroxidation levels. Finally, our preliminary data resulting from the analysis of the Mini-Mental Status suggest that polydatin improves cognitive performance. Daily dietary administration of polydatin should be considered for prevention and treatment of liver disease and cognitive impairment in alcoholic patients. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen handler om den praksis, vi kalder administration. Vi er i den offentlige sektor i Danmark hos kontorfolkene med deres sagsmapper, computere, telefoner,, lovsamlinger,, retningslinier og regneark. I bogen udfoldes en mangfoldighed af konkrete historier om det administrative arbejde fra...... forskellige områder i den offentlige sektor. Hensigten er at forstå den praksis og faglighed der knytter sig til det administrative arbejde...

  15. Effects of acute and chronic administration of neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate on neuronal excitability in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svob Strac D

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dubravka Svob Strac,1 Josipa Vlainic,1 Janko Samardzic,2 Julija Erhardt,3 Zeljka Krsnik41Laboratory for Molecular Neuropsychiatry, Division of Molecular Medicine, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; 2Institute of Pharmacology, Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia; 3Department of Animal Physiology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 4Croatian Institute for Brain Research, Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, CroatiaBackground: Neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS has been associated with important brain functions, including neuronal survival, memory, and behavior, showing therapeutic potential in various neuropsychiatric and cognitive disorders. However, the antagonistic effects of DHEAS on γ-amino-butyric acidA receptors and its facilitatory action on glutamatergic neurotransmission might lead to enhanced brain excitability and seizures and thus limit DHEAS therapeutic applications. The aim of this study was to investigate possible age and sex differences in the neuronal excitability of the mice following acute and chronic DHEAS administration.Methods: DHEAS was administered intraperitoneally in male and female adult and old mice either acutely or repeatedly once daily for 4 weeks in a 10 mg/kg dose. To investigate the potential proconvulsant properties of DHEAS, we studied the effects of acute and chronic DHEAS treatment on picrotoxin-, pentylentetrazole-, and N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced seizures in mice. The effects of acute and chronic DHEAS administration on the locomotor activity, motor coordination, and body weight of the mice were also studied. We also investigated the effects of DHEAS treatment on [3H]flunitrazepam binding to the mouse brain membranes.Results: DHEAS did not modify the locomotor activity, motor coordination, body weight, and brain [3H]flunitrazepam binding of male and female mice. The results

  16. Nicotine Modifies Corticostriatal Plasticity and Amphetamine Rewarding Behaviors in Mice123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Granville P.; Heimbigner, Lauren; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Bamford, Nigel S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Corticostriatal signaling participates in sensitized responses to drugs of abuse, where short-term increases in dopamine availability provoke persistent, yet reversible, changes in glutamate release. Prior studies in mice show that amphetamine withdrawal promotes a chronic presynaptic depression in glutamate release, whereas an amphetamine challenge reverses this depression by potentiating corticostriatal activity in direct pathway medium spiny neurons. This synaptic plasticity promotes corticostriatal activity and locomotor sensitization through upstream changes in the activity of tonically active cholinergic interneurons (ChIs). We used a model of operant drug-taking behaviors, in which mice self-administered amphetamine through an in-dwelling catheter. Mice acquired amphetamine self-administration under fixed and increasing schedules of reinforcement. Following a period of abstinence, we determined whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modified drug-seeking behavior and associated alterations in ChI firing and corticostriatal activity. Mice responding to conditioned reinforcement showed reduced ChI and corticostriatal activity ex vivo, which paradoxically increased following an amphetamine challenge. Nicotine, in a concentration that increases Ca2+ influx and desensitizes α4β2*-type nicotinic receptors, reduced amphetamine-seeking behaviors following abstinence and amphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization. Nicotine blocked the depression of ChI firing and corticostriatal activity and the potentiating response to an amphetamine challenge. Together, these results demonstrate that nicotine reduces reward-associated behaviors following repeated amphetamine and modifies the changes in ChIs firing and corticostriatal activity. By returning glutamatergic activity in amphetamine self-administering mice to a more stable and normalized state, nicotine limits the depression of striatal activity in withdrawal and the increase in activity following

  17. Sympathomimetic Effects of Acute E-Cigarette Use: Role of Nicotine and Non-Nicotine Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moheimani, Roya S; Bhetraratana, May; Peters, Kacey M; Yang, Benjamin K; Yin, Fen; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Araujo, Jesus A; Middlekauff, Holly R

    2017-09-20

    Chronic electronic (e) cigarette users have increased resting cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. The purpose of the present study is to determine the role of nicotine versus non-nicotine constituents in e-cigarette emissions in causing these pathologies in otherwise healthy humans. Thirty-three healthy volunteers who were not current e-cigarette or tobacco cigarette smokers were studied. On different days, each participant used an e-cigarette with nicotine, an e-cigarette without nicotine, or a sham control. Cardiac sympathetic nerve activity was determined by heart rate variability, and susceptibility to oxidative stress was determined by plasma paraoxonase activity. Following exposure to the e-cigarette with nicotine, but not to the e-cigarette without nicotine or the sham control, there was a significant and marked shift in cardiac sympathovagal balance towards sympathetic predominance. The decrease in high-frequency component and the increases in the low-frequency component and the low-frequency to high-frequency ratio were significantly greater following exposure to the e-cigarette with nicotine compared with exposure to the e-cigarette without nicotine or to sham control. Oxidative stress, as estimated by plasma paraoxonase, did not increase following any of the 3 exposures. The acute sympathomimetic effect of e-cigarettes is attributable to the inhaled nicotine, not to non-nicotine constituents in e-cigarette aerosol, recapitulating the same heart rate variability pattern associated with increased cardiac risk in multiple populations with and without known cardiac disease. Evidence of oxidative stress, as estimated by plasma paraoxonase activity, was not uncovered following acute e-cigarette exposure. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  18. Impact of benzodiazepines on brain FDG-PET quantification after single-dose and chronic administration in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús; García-Varela, Lara; López-Arias, Esteban; Domínguez-Prado, Inés; Cortés, Julia; Pardo-Montero, Juan; Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Current guidelines for brain PET imaging advice against the injection of diazepam prior to brain FDG-PET examination in order to avoid possible interactions of benzodiazepines with the radiotracer uptake. Nevertheless, many patients undergoing PET studies are likely to be under chronic treatment with benzodiazepines, for example due to the use of different medications such as sleeping pills. Animal studies may provide an extensive and accurate estimation of the effect of benzodiazepines on brain metabolism in a well-defined and controlled framework. Aim: This study aims at evaluating the impact of benzodiazepines on brain FDG uptake after single-dose administration and chronic treatment in rats. Methods: Twelve Sprague–Dawley healthy rats were randomly divided into two groups, one treated with diazepam and the other used as control group. Both groups underwent PET/CT examinations after single-dose and chronic administration of diazepam (treated) or saline (controls) during twenty-eight days. Different atlas-based quantification methods were used to explore differences on the total uptake and uptake patterns of FDG between both groups. Results: Our analysis revealed a significant reduction of global FDG uptake after acute (−16.2%) and chronic (−23.2%) administration of diazepam. Moreover, a strong trend pointing to differences between acute and chronic administrations (p < 0.08) was also observed. Uptake levels returned to normal after interrupting the administration of diazepam. On the other hand, patterns of FDG uptake were not affected by the administration of diazepam. Conclusions: The administration of diazepam causes a progressive decrease of the FDG global uptake in the rat brain, but it does not change local patterns within the brain. Under these conditions, visual assessment and quantification methods based on regional differences such as asymmetry indexes or SPM statistical analysis would still be valid when administrating this

  19. Effect of acetaminophen administration to rats chronically exposed to depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueguen, Y.; Grandcolas, L.; Baudelin, C.; Grison, S.; Tissandie, E.; Jourdain, J.R.; Paquet, F.; Voisin, P.; Aigueperse, J.; Gourmelon, P.; Souidi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The extensive use of depleted uranium (DU) in both civilian and military applications results in the increase of the number of human beings exposed to this compound. We previously found that DU chronic exposure induces the expression of CYP enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics (drugs). In order to evaluate the consequences of these changes on the metabolism of a drug, rats chronically exposed to DU (40 mg/l) were treated by acetaminophen (APAP, 400 mg/kg) at the end of the 9-month contamination. Acetaminophen is considered as a safe drug within the therapeutic range but in the case of overdose or in sensitive animals, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity could occur. In the present work, plasma concentration of APAP was higher in the DU group compared to the non-contaminated group. In addition, administration of APAP to the DU-exposed rats increased plasma ALT (p < 0.01) and AST (p < 0.05) more rapidly than in the control group. Nevertheless, no histological alteration of the liver was observed but renal injury characterized by incomplete proximal tubular cell necrosis was higher for the DU-exposed rats. Moreover, in the kidney, CYP2E1 gene expression, an important CYP responsible for APAP bioactivation and toxicity, is increased (p < 0.01) in the DU-exposed group compared to the control group. In the liver, CYP's activities were decreased between control and DU-exposed rats. These results could explain the worse elimination of APAP in the plasma and confirm our hypothesis of a modification of the drug metabolism following a DU chronic contamination

  20. Nicotinic receptor blockade decreases fos immunoreactivity within orexin/hypocretin-expressing neurons of nicotine-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Steven J; Gentile, Taylor A; Mo, Lili; Tran, Fionya H; Ma, Sisi; Muschamp, John W

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Nicotine is the principal psychoactive ingredient in tobacco that causes addiction. The structures governing nicotine addiction, including those underlying withdrawal, are still being explored. Nicotine withdrawal is characterized by negative affective and cognitive symptoms that enhance relapse susceptibility, and suppressed dopaminergic transmission from ventral tegmental area (VTA) to target structures underlies behavioral symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. Agonist and partial agonist therapies help 1 in 4 treatment-seeking smokers at one-year post-cessation, and new targets are needed to more effectively aid smokers attempting to quit. Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons send excitatory projections to dopamine (DA)-producing neurons of VTA and modulate mesoaccumbal DA release. The effects of nicotinic receptor blockade, which is commonly used to precipitate withdrawal, on orexin neurons remain poorly investigated and present an attractive target for intervention. The present study sought to investigate the effects of nicotinic receptor blockade on hypothalamic orexin neurons using mecamylamine to precipitate withdrawal in rats. Separate groups of rats were treated with either chronic nicotine or saline for 7-days at which point effects of mecamylamine or saline on somatic signs and anxiety-like behavior were assessed. Finally, tissue from rats was harvested for immunofluorescent analysis of Fos within orexin neurons. Results demonstrate that nicotinic receptor blockade leads to reduced orexin cell activity, as indicated by lowered Fos-immunoreactivity, and suggest that this underlying cellular activity may be associated with symptoms of nicotine withdrawal as effects were most prominently observed in rats given chronic nicotine. We conclude from this study that orexin transmission becomes suppressed in rats upon nicotinic receptor blockade, and that behavioral symptoms associated

  1. Inside-out neuropharmacology of nicotinic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brandon J; Lester, Henry A

    2015-09-01

    Upregulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) is a venerable result of chronic exposure to nicotine; but it is one of several consequences of pharmacological chaperoning by nicotine and by some other nicotinic ligands, especially agonists. Nicotinic ligands permeate through cell membranes, bind to immature AChR oligomers, elicit incompletely understood conformational reorganizations, increase the interaction between adjacent AChR subunits, and enhance the maturation process toward stable AChR pentamers. These changes and stabilizations in turn lead to increases in both anterograde and retrograde traffic within the early secretory pathway. In addition to the eventual upregulation of AChRs at the plasma membrane, other effects of pharmacological chaperoning include modifications to endoplasmic reticulum stress and to the unfolded protein response. Because these processes depend on pharmacological chaperoning within intracellular organelles, we group them as "inside-out pharmacology". This term contrasts with the better-known, acute, "outside-in" effects of activating and desensitizing plasma membrane AChRs. We review current knowledge concerning the mechanisms and consequences of inside-out pharmacology. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect Of Nicotine And Tobacco Consumption On Brain Acetyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of nicotine and tobacco consumption on brain acetyl cholinesterase and serum alkaline phosphatase in rats was studied. Rats were divided into three groups and the first group was fed rat chow and water ad libitum and an oral administration of 2ml of 0.1%(v/v) nicotine per 100g body weight of rats per day.

  3. Efficacy of probiotic administration in the complex treatment of chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Godovanets

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the leading pathogenic mechanisms of chronic catarrhal gingivitis development in children is disorders in the system of child macroorganism and oral cavity microorganisms interrelation as a result of normal microflora inhibition against the background of general amount of opportunistic and pathogenic microorganisms. The oral cavity protective mechanisms condition plays an important role in this process. Due to this fact a perspective direction is to study the methods of mentioned pathology treatment using probiotics containing strains of normal microflora with high antagonistic, enzymatic and immune-modeling properties able to inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria. Objective: to improve the common method of catarrhal gingivitis treatment in children by means of oral microbiocenosis correction on the local level. Materials and methods. The method of catarrhal gingivitis treatment in children with administration of the probiotic “BioGaia Prodentis” has been developed. 30 children at the age of 12 with clinical signs of chronic catarrhal gingivitis were treated and dynamically observed. The children were divided into two groups: the main (with application of the improved method and the group of comparison (the common method was applied. The periodontal tissue condition in children was assessed on the basis of OHI-S, PMA, CPI indices, and Schiller-Pisaref test. The oral cavity local immunity was assessed by means of lysozyme activity, the level of secretory immunoglobulin A, the degree of dysbiosis by urease activity detection in the oral fluid of children. Results. Administration of the drug “BioGaia Prodentis” in the complex of chronic catarrhal gingivitis treatment in children resulted in a quick reverse development of clinical signs. Among the children of the main group on the 3–4th day of treatment a tendency to subsidence of inflammatory signs was observed. In the group of comparison the signs such as hyperemia, swelling and

  4. Effects of acute and chronic administration of fenproporex on DNA damage parameters in young and adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Cinara L; Rezin, Gislaine T; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Jeremias, Isabela C; Cardoso, Mariane R; Valvassori, Samira S; Munhoz, Bruna J P; Borges, Gabriela D; Bristot, Bruno N; Leffa, Daniela D; Andrade, Vanessa M; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is a chronic and multifactorial disease, whose prevalence is increasing in many countries. Pharmaceutical strategies for the treatment of obesity include drugs that regulate food intake, thermogenesis, fat absorption, and fat metabolism. Fenproporex is the second most commonly consumed amphetamine-based anorectic worldwide; this drug is rapidly converted in vivo into amphetamine, which is associated with neurotoxicity. In this context, the present study evaluated DNA damage parameters in the peripheral blood of young and adult rats submitted to an acute administration and chronic administration of fenproporex. In the acute administration, both young and adult rats received a single injection of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle. In the chronic administration, both young and adult rats received one daily injection of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5, or 25 mg/kg i.p.) or Tween for 14 days. 2 h after the last injection, the rats were killed by decapitation and their peripheral blood removed for evaluation of DNA damage parameters by alkaline comet assay. Our study showed that acute administration of fenproporex in young and adult rats presented higher levels of damage index and frequency in the DNA. However, chronic administration of fenproporex in young and adult rats did not alter the levels of DNA damage in both parameters of comet assay. The present findings showed that acute administration of fenproporex promoted damage in DNA, in both young and adult rats. Our results are consistent with other reports which showed that other amphetamine-derived drugs also caused DNA damage. We suggest that the activation of an efficient DNA repair mechanism may occur after chronic exposition to fenproporex. Our results are consistent with other reports that showed some amphetamine-derived drugs also caused DNA damage.

  5. Effects of simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine on nicotine-induced locomotor activation in adolescent and adult rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zago, A. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Leão, R.M.; Carneiro-de-Oliveira, P.E. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos/Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Marin, M.T.; Cruz, F.C. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Planeta, C.S. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos/Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-18

    Preclinical studies have shown that repeated stress experiences can result in an increase in the locomotor response to the subsequent administration of drugs of abuse, a phenomenon that has been termed behavioral cross-sensitization. Behavioral sensitization reflects neuroadaptive processes associated with drug addiction and drug-induced psychosis. Although crosssensitization between stress- and drug-induced locomotor activity has been clearly demonstrated in adult rats, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon in adolescent rats. In the present study, we determined if the simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine was capable of inducing behavioral sensitization to nicotine in adolescent and adult rats. To this end, adolescent (postnatal day (P) 28-37) and adult (P60-67) rats received nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline (0.9% NaCl, sc) and were immediately subjected to restraint stress for 2 h once a day for 7 days. The control group for stress was undisturbed following nicotine or saline injections. Three days after the last exposure to stress and nicotine, rats were challenged with a single dose of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline and nicotine-induced locomotion was then recorded for 30 min. In adolescent rats, nicotine caused behavioral sensitization only in animals that were simultaneously exposed to stress, while in adult rats nicotine promoted sensitization independently of stress exposure. These findings demonstrate that adolescent rats are more vulnerable to the effects of stress on behavioral sensitization to nicotine than adult rats.

  6. Effects of simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine on nicotine-induced locomotor activation in adolescent and adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zago, A.; Leão, R.M.; Carneiro-de-Oliveira, P.E.; Marin, M.T.; Cruz, F.C.; Planeta, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that repeated stress experiences can result in an increase in the locomotor response to the subsequent administration of drugs of abuse, a phenomenon that has been termed behavioral cross-sensitization. Behavioral sensitization reflects neuroadaptive processes associated with drug addiction and drug-induced psychosis. Although crosssensitization between stress- and drug-induced locomotor activity has been clearly demonstrated in adult rats, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon in adolescent rats. In the present study, we determined if the simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine was capable of inducing behavioral sensitization to nicotine in adolescent and adult rats. To this end, adolescent (postnatal day (P) 28-37) and adult (P60-67) rats received nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline (0.9% NaCl, sc) and were immediately subjected to restraint stress for 2 h once a day for 7 days. The control group for stress was undisturbed following nicotine or saline injections. Three days after the last exposure to stress and nicotine, rats were challenged with a single dose of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline and nicotine-induced locomotion was then recorded for 30 min. In adolescent rats, nicotine caused behavioral sensitization only in animals that were simultaneously exposed to stress, while in adult rats nicotine promoted sensitization independently of stress exposure. These findings demonstrate that adolescent rats are more vulnerable to the effects of stress on behavioral sensitization to nicotine than adult rats

  7. Adsorption of nicotine on different zeolite types, from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stošić Dušan K.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The plant alkaloid, nicotine, is a strongly toxic heterocyclic compound: the lethal dose for an adult human being (40-60 mg is importantly lower in comparison with the other known poisons such as arsenic or strychni­ne. Cigarettes represent "the most toxic and addictive form of nicotine". Besides the negative effects of nicotine on public health produced by self-administration, recently another potentially very dangerous effect has been recognized: because of its miscibility with water, nicotine can be found in industrial wastewaters, and consequently, in groundwater. Therefore, the problem of nicotine removal from aqueous solutions has became an interesting topic. In this work, the removal of nicotine has been probed by adsorption on solid materials. Adsorption of nicotine on different zeolites (clinoptilolite, ZSM-5 and β zeolite and on activated carbon was investigated from aqueous solutions, at 298 K. The obtained results are presented as adsorption isotherms: the amount of adsorbed nicotine as a function of equilibrium concentration. These data were obtained from the residual amount of nicotine in the aqueous phase, by the use of UV spectroscopy. The highest amounts of adsorbed nicotine was found for activated carbon and p zeolite (~ mmol·g-1. The attempt to modify the adsorption properties of ZSM-5 zeolite has been also done: ZSM-5 was modified by ion-exchange with VIII group metal (Cu2+ and Fe3+. In addition, the adsorption of nicotine on ZSM-5 zeolite with different Si/Al ratios has been done. It has been noticed that ion-exchange did not improve the adsorption possibilities, while the adsorption was importantly lower in the case of higher silicon content in ZMS-5 structure. 13C NMR spectra were collected for suspensions formed of solid adsorbent and aqueous solution of nicotine; in this way, the part of nicotine molecule which is most probably connected with the adsorbent was recognized.

  8. Effects of nicotine on body weight in rats with access to "junk" foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunberg, N E; Popp, K A; Winders, S E

    1988-01-01

    The present experiment examined effects of nicotine on body weight of male and female rats when Oreo cookies, potato chips, laboratory chow, and water were available. Body weight and eating behavior were measured for 17-day periods before, during, and after nicotine or saline administration. There was an inverse relationship between nicotine and body weight. These effects were paralleled by changes in consumption of sweet foods. There were no effects of nicotine on salty or bland food consumption. Excessive gains in body weight after cessation of nicotine administration were greater for females than for males.

  9. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walley, Susan C; Jenssen, Brian P

    2015-11-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are rapidly growing in popularity among youth. ENDS are handheld devices that produce an aerosolized mixture from a solution typically containing concentrated nicotine, flavoring chemicals, and propylene glycol to be inhaled by the user. ENDS are marketed under a variety of names, most commonly electronic cigarettes and e-cigarettes. In 2014, more youth reported using ENDS than any other tobacco product. ENDS pose health risks to both users and nonusers. Nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in ENDS solutions, is both highly addictive and toxic. In addition to nicotine, other toxicants, carcinogens, and metal particles have been detected in solutions and aerosols of ENDS. Nonusers are involuntarily exposed to the emissions of these devices with secondhand and thirdhand aerosol. The concentrated and often flavored nicotine in ENDS solutions poses a poisoning risk for young children. Reports of acute nicotine toxicity from US poison control centers have been increasing, with at least 1 child death reported from unintentional exposure to a nicotine-containing ENDS solution. With flavors, design, and marketing that appeal to youth, ENDS threaten to renormalize and glamorize nicotine and tobacco product use. There is a critical need for ENDS regulation, legislative action, and counter promotion to protect youth. ENDS have the potential to addict a new generation of youth to nicotine and reverse more than 50 years of progress in tobacco control. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. The effects of chronic alcohol self-administration in nonhuman primate brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesford, Qawi K; Laurienti, Paul J; Davenport, April T; Friedman, David P; Kraft, Robert A; Daunais, James B

    2015-04-01

    Long-term alcohol abuse is associated with change in behavior, brain structure, and brain function. However, the nature of these changes is not well understood. In this study, we used network science to analyze a nonhuman primate model of ethanol self-administration to evaluate functional differences between animals with chronic alcohol use and animals with no exposure to alcohol. Of particular interest was how chronic alcohol exposure may affect the resting state network. Baseline resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging was acquired in a cohort of vervet monkeys. Animals underwent an induction period where they were exposed to an isocaloric maltose dextrin solution (control) or ethanol in escalating doses over three 30-day epochs. Following induction, animals were given ad libitum access to water and a maltose dextrin solution (control) or water and ethanol for 22 h/d over 12 months. Cross-sectional analyses examined region of interests in hubs and community structure across animals to determine differences between drinking and nondrinking animals after the 12-month free access period. Animals were classified as lighter (intake pattern during the 12-month ethanol free access period. Statistical analysis of hub connectivity showed significant differences in heavier drinkers for hubs in the precuneus, posterior parietal cortices, superior temporal gyrus, subgenual cingulate, and sensorimotor cortex. Heavier drinkers were also shown to have less consistent communities across the brain compared to lighter drinkers. The different level of consumption between the lighter and heavier drinking monkeys suggests that differences in connectivity may be intake dependent. Animals that consume alcohol show topological differences in brain network organization, particularly in animals that drink heavily. Differences in the resting state network were linked to areas that are associated with spatial association, working memory, and visuomotor processing. Copyright

  11. The influence of interferon alpha on the rat liver injured by chronic administration of carbon tetrachloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madro, Agnieszka; Słomka, Maria; Celiński, Krzysztof; Chibowski, Daniel; Czechowska, Grazyna; Kleinrok, Zdzisław; Karpińska, Agnieszka

    2002-01-01

    Due to their complex and not fully known etiopathogenesis as well as difficulties in treatment, chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis still remain one of the main problems of hepatologists. Nowadays, the use of IFN alpha is considered the most effective method of treatment in chronic hepatitis. Recently, a new property of IFN, i.e. its effects on the reduction of fibrosis, has been discovered. The aim of the paper was to examine the effects of IFN alpha on biochemical parameters (AlAt and AspAt activities), on the metabolic function of the liver and its morphologic picture observed under the light and electron microscope after the 3- and 6-week CCl4-induced damage. The experiments were carried out in Wistar male rats. To evaluate the liver function, the test of aminophenazone elimination in the isolated perfused rat livers was used according to Miller modified by Hafte. Additionally, AspAt and AlAt activities were determined. The liver specimens were analysed under the light and electron microscope and using immunohistochemical methods. The findings show that after the 3-week CCl4-induced liver damage, IFN alpha does not significantly affect AlAt and AspAt activities, irrespective of the dose used. IFN alpha administered after the 6-week damage significantly changes those activities when the doses used are high. It was found that carbon tetrachloride does not result in evident cirrhotic changes, however it activates Ito cells, causes focal retraction of the stroma and fibrosis. The increased number of Ito cells in Disse's space observed in immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examinations is indicative of the activation of liver fibrotic processes following CCl4 administration in both variants used. IFN alpha substantially weakens fibrogenesis of the CCl4-damaged liver which is visible in the decreased number of Ito cells and weaker expression of the stroma retraction. Moreover, IFN alpha administered to the experimental animals after the CCl4-induced injury of the

  12. Elimination of alfentanil delivered by infusion is not altered by the chronic administration of atorvastatin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, C G

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Statins are prescribed for patients with hypercholesterolemia. Atorvastatin is metabolized by cytochrome P4503A4 and inhibits P4503A4 activity in vitro. Alfentanil is a potent opioid used in clinical anaesthetic practice and is also metabolized by P4503A4. This study tested the hypothesis that chronic atorvastatin administration inhibits the metabolism of alfentanil. METHODS: Sixteen patients undergoing elective surgery were studied as matched pairs. One member of each pair was maintained on standard doses of atorvastatin for at least 4 months. Each patient received an alfentanil bolus (80 microg kg(-1)) intravenously (i.v.), followed by an alfentanil infusion (0.67 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) for 90 min. Serial plasma alfentanil concentrations were measured using gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorous detection. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using two-compartment linear modelling. RESULTS: One patient and the corresponding match were excluded from the analysis. The elimination half-life of alfentanil was similar in the control and atorvastatin groups (98.8 +\\/- 12.4 versus 98.3 +\\/- 11.3 min, respectively). The clearance (Cl), volume of distribution at steady-state (Vdss) and area under the curve (AUC) were similar in the two groups (Cl = 0.20 (+\\/- 0.06) and 0.22 (+\\/- 0.04) L min(-1), Vdss = 0.38 (+\\/- 0.07) and 0.39 (+\\/- 0.07) L kg(-1), AUC = 0.05 (+\\/- 0.02) and 0.04 (+\\/- 0.01) mg min mL(-1)). CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent atorvastatin administration does not alter the pharmacokinetics of alfentanil in patients undergoing elective surgery.

  13. T-type calcium channel antagonism decreases motivation for nicotine and blocks nicotine- and cue-induced reinstatement for a response previously reinforced with nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslaner, Jason M; Vardigan, Joshua D; Drott, Jason M; Uebele, Victor N; Renger, John J; Lee, Ariel; Li, Zhaoxia; Lê, A D; Hutson, Pete H

    2010-10-15

    Recent evidence suggests an involvement of T-type calcium channels in the effects of drugs of abuse. We examined the influence of the novel, potent, and selective T-type calcium channel antagonist [2-(4-cyclopropylphenyl)-N-((1R)-1-{5-[2,2,2-trifluoroethyl]oxo}pyridine-2-yl)ethyl]acetamide] (TTA-A2) (.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg) on motivation for nicotine, as measured by nicotine self-administration on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule, and nicotine- and cue-induced reinstatement for a response previously reinforced with nicotine delivery (n = 11 or 12 Long Evans rats/group). Furthermore, we examined the specificity of the TTA-A2 effects by characterizing its influence on PR responding for food (in the absence or presence of nicotine-potentiated responding), food- versus nicotine-induced cue-potentiated reinstatement for a response previously reinforced by food administration (n = 11 or 12 Wistar Hannover rats/group), and its ability to induce a conditioned place aversion. TTA-A2 dose-dependently decreased self-administration of nicotine on a PR schedule and the ability of both nicotine and a cue paired with nicotine to reinstate responding. The effects were specific for nicotine's incentive motivational properties, as TTA-A2 did not influence responding for food on a PR schedule but did attenuate the ability of nicotine to potentiate responding for food. Likewise, TTA-A2 did not alter food-induced cue-potentiated reinstatement for a response previously reinforced by food but did decrease nicotine-induced cue-potentiated reinstatement. Finally, TTA-A2 did not produce an aversive state, as indicated by a lack of ability to induce conditioned place aversion. These data suggest that T-type calcium channel antagonists have potential for alleviating nicotine addiction by selectively decreasing the incentive motivational properties of nicotine. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cadmium chronic administration to lactating ewes. Reproductive performance, cadmium tissue accumulation and placental transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floris, B.; Bomboi, G.; Sechi, P.; Marongiu, M. L. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia Animale; Pirino, S. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Ist. di Patologia Generale, Anatomia Patologica e Clinica Ostetrico-chirurgica Veterinaria

    2000-12-01

    20 lactating ewes were allotted to two groups: 10 subjects received orally 100 mg/day of CdCl{sub 2} for 108 consecutive days, and the remaining 10 acted as control. Reproductive performance in ewes and cadmium tissue accumulation, both in ewes and their lambs, were investigated. The results showed that in ewes: 1) the regular cadmium intestinal intake negatively influences all reproductive parameters; 2) cadmium is particularly accumulated in kidney and liver, bur also in mammary gland, although at distinctly lower level; 3) chronic administration does not increase cadmium placental transfer in lactating pregnant subjects. [Italian] 20 pecore in lattazione sono state suddivise in 2 gruppi: 10 soggetti ricevettero per os 100 mg/giorno di CdCl{sub 2} per 108 giorni consecutivi, e i restanti 10 funsero da controllo. Sono stati studiati i parametri riproduttivi delle pecore e l'accumulo di cadmio nei tessuti, sia delle pecore che dei loro agnelli. I risultati hanno mostrato che negli ovini: 1) il regolare assorbimento intestinale di cadmio influenza negativamente tutti i parametri riproduttivi; 2) il cadmio viene accumulato principalmente nei reni e nel fegato, ma anche dalla ghiandola mammaria, sebbene in misura nettamente inferiore; 3) la somministrazione cronica di cadmio nei soggetti gravidi non incrementa il suo passaggio transplacentare.

  15. PET Imaging Reveals Brain Metabolic Changes in Adolescent Rats Following Chronic Escalating Morphine Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Hou, Haifeng; Feng, Jin; Zhang, Xiaohui; Chen, Yao; Wang, Jing; Ji, Jianfeng; He, Xiao; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Hong

    2018-04-10

    Non-medical use of prescription opioids, especially among adolescents, has been substantially increased in recent years. However, the neuromechanism remains largely unexplored. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the brain metabolic changes in adolescent rats following chronic escalating morphine administration using positron emission tomography (PET). 2-Deoxy-2-[ 18 F]Fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) microPET imaging was performed, and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used for image analysis. Glucose transporter 3 (Glut-3), dopamine D 2 receptor (D 2 R), and Mμ-opioid receptor (μ-OR) were used for immunostaining analysis. Cerebral glucose metabolism was increased in the corpus callosum (CC) and right retrosplenial dysgranular cortex (rRSD), while it was decreased in the right ventral pallidum (rVP). The expressions of Glut-3, D 2 R, and μ-OR were increased in CC and rRSD, while they were decreased in rVP. Furthermore, glucose metabolism and Glut-3 expression were positively correlated with the expressions of D 2 R or μ-OR in CC, rRSD, and rVP. [ 18 F]FDG microPET brain imaging study in combination with immunohistological investigation revealed that CC, rRSD, and rVP were specifically involved in opioid dependence in adolescents. Our findings provided valuable insights into the neuromechanism of adolescent addiction of prescription opioids and might have important implications for the development of prevention and intervention approaches.

  16. alpha-Glucosidase-albumin conjugates: effect of chronic administration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.M.; Murray, L.; Bhardwaj, D.; Poznansky, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Enzyme albumin conjugates have been proposed as a means of increasing the efficacy of enzyme use in vivo and decreasing immune response to the enzyme. Particulate drug carriers, however, have a pronounced tendency to localize in the mononuclear phagocyte (reticuloendothelial) system. The authors have examined in mice the effect on phagocytic index, tissue distribution and organ size of continued administration of conjugates of alpha-glucosidase with either homologous or heterologous albumin. Mice received 10 X 2-mg injections of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or mouse serum albumin (MSA), either free, polymerized or conjugated with alpha-glucosidase. Experiments involving BSA had to be terminated before the end of the experiment because of anaphylaxis, but these reactions were less severe to the polymerized albumin than to free albumin. Free BSA, BSA polymer and BSA-enzyme conjugates all caused a decrease in phagocytic index after six injections. Mice receiving MSA showed no evidence of anaphylaxis, but mice receiving six or more injections of free MSA, MSA polymer or MSA-enzyme conjugate had significantly decreased phagocytic indices as compared to controls. Phagocytic indices had returned to normal by 7 days after the final injection. Tissue distribution of 125 I-labeled albumin preparations was determined in either naive or chronically injected mice

  17. Nicotinic plant poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schep, Leo J; Slaughter, Robin J; Beasley, D Michael G

    2009-09-01

    A wide range of plants contain nicotinic and nicotinic-like alkaloids. Of this diverse group, those that have been reported to cause human poisoning appear to have similar mechanisms of toxicity and presenting patients therefore have comparable toxidromes. This review describes the taxonomy and principal alkaloids of plants that contain nicotinic and nicotinic-like alkaloids, with particular focus on those that are toxic to humans. The toxicokinetics and mechanisms of toxicity of these alkaloids are reviewed and the clinical features and management of poisoning due to these plants are described. This review was compiled by systematically searching OVID MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science. This identified 9,456 papers, excluding duplicates, all of which were screened. Reviewed plants and their principal alkaloids. Plants containing nicotine and nicotine-like alkaloids that have been reported to be poisonous to humans include Conium maculatum, Nicotiana glauca and Nicotiana tabacum, Laburnum anagyroides, and Caulophyllum thalictroides. They contain the toxic alkaloids nicotine, anabasine, cytisine, n-methylcytisine, coniine, n-methylconiine, and gamma-coniceine. These alkaloids act agonistically at nicotinic-type acetylcholine (cholinergic) receptors (nAChRs). The nicotinic-type acetylcholine receptor can vary both in its subunit composition and in its distribution within the body (the central and autonomic nervous systems, the neuromuscular junctions, and the adrenal medulla). Agonistic interaction at these variable sites may explain why the alkaloids have diverse effects depending on the administered dose and duration of exposure. Nicotine and nicotine-like alkaloids are absorbed readily across all routes of exposure and are rapidly and widely distributed, readily traversing the blood-brain barrier and the placenta, and are freely distributed in breast milk. Metabolism occurs predominantly in the liver followed by rapid renal elimination. Following acute exposure

  18. Cigarette nicotine yields and nicotine intake among Japanese male workers

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, K; Kawachi, I; Nakamura, M; Nogami, H; Shirokawa, N; Masui, S; Okayama, A; Oshima, A

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse brand nicotine yield including "ultra low" brands (that is, cigarettes yielding ≤ 0.1 mg of nicotine by Federal Trade Commission (FTC) methods) in relation to nicotine intake (urinary nicotine, cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine) among 246 Japanese male smokers.

  19. A behavioral economic analysis of the value-enhancing effects of nicotine and varenicline and the role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Scott T; Geary, Trevor N; Steiner, Amy N; Bevins, Rick A

    2018-04-09

    Reinforcement value enhancement by nicotine of non-nicotine rewards is believed to partially motivate smoking behavior. Recently, we showed that the value-enhancing effects of nicotine are well characterized by reinforcer demand models and that the value-enhancing effects of the smoking-cessation aid bupropion (Zyban) are distinct from those of nicotine and differ between the sexes. The present study evaluated potential sex differences in the enhancement effects of nicotine and varenicline (Chantix) using a reinforcer demand methodology. The role of α4β2* and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the enhancing effects of nicotine and varenicline is also evaluated. Male and female rats (n=12/sex) were trained to lever press maintained by sensory reinforcement by visual stimulus (VS) presentations. Changes in the VS value following nicotine and varenicline administration were assessed using an established reinforcer demand approach. Subsequently, the effects of antagonism of α4β2* and α7 nAChRs on varenicline and nicotine-induced enhancement active lever-pressing were assessed using a progressive ratio schedule. Nicotine and varenicline enhanced VS demand equivalently between the sexes as evaluated by reinforcer demand. However, α4β2* receptor antagonism attenuated value enhancement by nicotine and varenicline in females, but only of nicotine in males.

  20. Melatonin protects uterus and oviduct exposed to nicotine in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Saadat Seyedeh Nazanin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Smoking is associated with higher infertility risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate protective effects of melatonin on the uterus and oviduct in mice exposed to nicotine. Adult female mice (n=32 were divided into four groups. Group A: control animals received normal saline, Group B: injected with nicotine 40 μg/kg, Group C: injected with melatonin 10 μg, Group D: injected with nicotine 40 μg/kg and melatonin 10 μg. All animals were treated over 15 days intraperitoneally. On the 16th day, animals in the estrus phase were dissected and their uterus and oviducts were removed. Immunohistochemistry was recruited for studying apoptosis and for detection of estrogen receptor (ER alpha in luminal epithelium of the uterus and oviduct. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for serum estradiol level determination. Nicotine in group B decreased estradiol level and ERalpha numbers both in the uterus and oviduct (p<0.05. Co-administration of melatonin-nicotine in Group D ameliorated the histology of the uterus and oviduct, increased ERalpha numbers and reduced apoptosis in the uterus and oviduct compared with the nicotine Group B (p<0.05. This study indicates that nicotine impairs the histology of the uterus and oviduct and co-administration of melatonin-nicotine ameliorates these findings, partly through alteration in ERalpha numbers and reduction of apoptosis

  1. Neurotensin Agonist Attenuates Nicotine Potentiation to Cocaine Sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Fredrickson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco usage typically precedes illicit drug use in adolescent and young adult populations. Several animal studies suggest nicotine increases the risk for subsequent cocaine abuse, and may be a negative prognostic factor for treatment of cocaine addiction; i.e., a “gateway drug”. Neurotensin (NT is a 13-amino acid neuropeptide that modulates dopamine, acetylcholine, glutamate, and GABA neurotransmission in brain reward pathways. NT69L, a NT(8-13 analog, blocks behavioral sensitization (an animal model for psychostimulant addiction to nicotine, and nicotine self-administration in rats. The present study tested the effect of NT69L on the potentiating effects of nicotine on cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Male Wistar rats were injected daily for seven days with nicotine or saline (control followed by four daily injections of cocaine. NT69L was administered 30 min prior to the last cocaine injection. Behavior was recorded with the use of activity chambers. Subchronic administration of nicotine enhanced cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in Wistar rats, consistent with an hypothesized gateway effect. These behavioral effects of cocaine were attenuated by pretreatment with NT69L. The effect of the neurotensin agonist on cocaine sensitization in the nicotine treated group indicated a possible therapeutic effect for cocaine addiction, even in the presence of enhanced behavioral sensitization induced by nicotine.

  2. Repeated administration of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, but not positive allosteric modulators, increases alpha7 nAChR levels in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ditte Z; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    AChR binding sites in several brain regions, particularly in the prefrontal cortex. The alpha7 nAChR agonists SSR180711 and PNU-282987 also increase [(125)I]-BTX binding, suggesting that this is a general consequence of alpha7 nAChR agonism. Interestingly, the alpha7 nAChR positive allosteric modulators PNU......The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is an important target for treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. However, the receptor desensitizes rapidly in vitro, which has led to concern regarding its applicability as a clinically relevant drug target....... Here we investigate the effects of repeated agonism on alpha7 nAChR receptor levels and responsiveness in vivo in rats. Using [(125)I]-alpha-bungarotoxin (BTX) autoradiography we show that acute or repeated administration with the selective alpha7 nAChR agonist A-582941 increases the number of alpha7 n...

  3. Activation of Peripheral κ-Opioid Receptors Normalizes Caffeine Effects Modified in Nicotine-Dependent Rats during Nicotine Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakov, S K; Bogdanova, N G

    2016-10-01

    The study examined the effect of peripheral (intragastric) ICI-204,448, an agonist of gastric κ-opioid receptors, on the psychostimulating and anxiolytic effects of caffeine in nicotinedependent rats at the stage of nicotine withdrawal. In these rats, the effects of caffeine (10 mg/kg) were perverted. In nicotine-dependent rats, caffeine produced an anxiolytic effect accompanied by pronounced stimulation of motor activity, in contrast to anxiogenic effect induced by caffeine in intact rats without nicotine dependence. During nicotine withdrawal, nicotine-dependent rats demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to nicotine. Intragastric administration of κ-opioid receptor agonist ICI-204,448 normalized the effect of caffeine in nicotinedependent rats. We have previously demonstrated that activation of peripheral κ-opioid receptors inhibited central κ-opioid activity and eliminated manifestations of nicotine withdrawal syndrome in nicotine-dependent rats, e.g. metabolism activation, stimulation of motor activity, and enhancement of food consumption. In its turn, inhibition of central κ-opioid structures activates the brain adenosine system, which can attenuate the caffeine-induced effects in nicotine-dependent rats.

  4. Oxytocin attenuates aversive response to nicotine and anxiety-like behavior in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunchan; Jang, Minji; Noh, Jihyun

    2017-02-01

    Initial tobacco use is initiated with rewarding and aversive properties of nicotine and aversive response to nicotine plays a critical role in nicotine dependency. Decrease of nicotine aversion increases the nicotine use that causes behavioral and neuronal changes of animals. Oxytocin influences drug abuse and reciprocally affect vulnerability to drug use. To assess the effect of oxytocin on initial nicotine aversion and anxiety, we examined voluntary oral nicotine intake and anxiety-like behavior following oxytocin treatment in adolescent rats. Sprague-Dawley male rats (4 weeks old) were used. For oxytocin administration, rats were injected subcutaneously with saline or oxytocin (0.01, 0.1 and 1mg/kg) according to the assigned groups. Voluntary oral nicotine consumption test was performed by two bottle free-choice paradigm. To examine anxiety-like behavior in rats, we performed a light/dark box test. Oxytocin not only significantly increased the nicotine intake but also alleviated nicotine aversion after acclimation to nicotine solution in a concentration dependent manner. Meanwhile, oxytocin significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior. We suggest that oxytocin itself mitigates aversive response toward initial nicotine intake and anxiety-like behavior. These results widen the psychophysiological perspective on oxytocin for better understanding of nicotine addiction related behaviors influenced by diverse social factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Chronic administration of R-flurbiprofen attenuates learning impairments in transgenic amyloid precursor protein mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukar, Thomas; Prescott, Sonya; Eriksen, Jason L; Holloway, Vallie; Murphy, M Paul; Koo, Edward H; Golde, Todd E; Nicolle, Michelle M

    2007-01-01

    Background Long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with a reduced incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We and others have shown that certain NSAIDs reduce secretion of Aβ42 in cell culture and animal models, and that the effect of NSAIDs on Aβ42 is independent of the inhibition of cyclooxygenase by these compounds. Since Aβ42 is hypothesized to be the initiating pathologic molecule in AD, the ability of these compounds to lower Aβ42 selectively may be associated with their protective effect. We have previously identified R-flurbiprofen (tarenflurbil) as a selective Aβ42 lowering agent with greatly reduced cyclooxygenase activity that shows promise for testing this hypothesis. In this study we report the effect of chronic R-flurbiprofen treatment on cognition and Aβ loads in Tg2576 APP mice. Results A four-month preventative treatment regimen with R-flurbiprofen (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to young Tg2576 mice prior to robust plaque or Aβ pathology. This treatment regimen improved spatial learning as assessed by the Morris water maze, indicated by an increased spatial bias during the third probe trial and an increased utilization of a place strategy to solve the water maze. These results are consistent with an improvement in hippocampal- and medial temporal lobe-dependent memory function. A modest, though not statistically significant, reduction in formic acid-soluble levels of Aβ was also observed. To determine if R-flurbiprofen could reverse cognitive deficits in Tg2576 mice where plaque pathology was already robust, a two-week therapeutic treatment was given to older Tg2576 mice with the same dose of R-flurbiprofen. This approach resulted in a significant decrease in Aβ plaque burden but no significant improvement in spatial learning. Conclusion We have found that chronic administration of R-flurbiprofen is able to attenuate spatial learning deficits if given prior to plaque deposition in Tg2576 mice. Given its

  6. Chronic administration of R-flurbiprofen attenuates learning impairments in transgenic amyloid precursor protein mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo Edward H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is associated with a reduced incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We and others have shown that certain NSAIDs reduce secretion of Aβ42 in cell culture and animal models, and that the effect of NSAIDs on Aβ42 is independent of the inhibition of cyclooxygenase by these compounds. Since Aβ42 is hypothesized to be the initiating pathologic molecule in AD, the ability of these compounds to lower Aβ42 selectively may be associated with their protective effect. We have previously identified R-flurbiprofen (tarenflurbil as a selective Aβ42 lowering agent with greatly reduced cyclooxygenase activity that shows promise for testing this hypothesis. In this study we report the effect of chronic R-flurbiprofen treatment on cognition and Aβ loads in Tg2576 APP mice. Results A four-month preventative treatment regimen with R-flurbiprofen (10 mg/kg/day was administered to young Tg2576 mice prior to robust plaque or Aβ pathology. This treatment regimen improved spatial learning as assessed by the Morris water maze, indicated by an increased spatial bias during the third probe trial and an increased utilization of a place strategy to solve the water maze. These results are consistent with an improvement in hippocampal- and medial temporal lobe-dependent memory function. A modest, though not statistically significant, reduction in formic acid-soluble levels of Aβ was also observed. To determine if R-flurbiprofen could reverse cognitive deficits in Tg2576 mice where plaque pathology was already robust, a two-week therapeutic treatment was given to older Tg2576 mice with the same dose of R-flurbiprofen. This approach resulted in a significant decrease in Aβ plaque burden but no significant improvement in spatial learning. Conclusion We have found that chronic administration of R-flurbiprofen is able to attenuate spatial learning deficits if given prior to plaque deposition

  7. Oral opioid administration and hyperalgesia in patients with cancer or chronic nonmalignant pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Igor; Pud, Dorit; Eisenberg, Elon

    2005-09-01

    Previous research has reported on reduced paw withdrawal latencies to heat and mechanical stimuli after parenteral administration of opioids in animals and on increased pain sensitivity in humans subsequent to postoperative infusions of short-acting opioids or in drug addicts. The aim of the present study was to explore the possibility that oral opioid treated patients with cancer-related or chronic nonmalignant pain differ in their pain sensitivity from patients treated with non-opioid analgesics. The study population consisted of 224 patients, including 142 in the opioid-treated group and 82 in the non-opioid-treated group. Pain thresholds for punctuate measured by von Frey filaments (g), mechanical pressure measured by pressure algometer (mmHg), heat stimuli measured by quantitative sensory testing (degrees C), as well as suprathreshold tonic heat pain intensity (46.5 degrees C for 1 min) measured by 0-10 numerical pain scale (NPS) were obtained at a nonpainful site (thenar eminence) in all patients. No differences between the groups were found for gender, age, duration of pain, or duration of treatment (independent variables). No significant differences between the groups were found in punctuate (difference = 17.0 g (95% CI -8.8, 42.8), P = 0.19), pressure (2.2 mmHg (-28.7, 33.2), P = 0.89) and heat (-0.3 degrees C (-1.5, 0.9), P = 0.70) pain thresholds, or in suprathreshold heat pain intensity (difference between maximal pain intensities -0.4 NPS units (95% CI -1.2, 0.4), P = 0.31). Pearson correlations within the opioid-treated group failed to show significant relationships between any of the independent variables and the outcome measures. A further comparison of the outcomes between the 'weak' opioid-treated subgroup and the 'strong' opioid-treated subgroup again revealed insignificant results. These results suggest that the administration of 'commonly used' dosages of oral opioids does not result in abnormal pain sensitivity beyond that of patients

  8. Nicotine and endogenous opioids: neurochemical and pharmacological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiconstantinou, Maria; Neff, Norton H

    2011-06-01

    Although the mesolimbic dopamine hypothesis is the most influential theory of nicotine reward and reinforcement, there has been a consensus that other neurotransmitter systems contribute to the addictive properties of nicotine as well. In this regard, the brain opioidergic system is of interest. Striatum is rich in opioid peptides and opioid receptors, and striatal opioidergic neurons are engaged in a bidirectional communication with midbrain dopaminergic neurons, closely regulating each other's activity. Enkephalins and dynorphins exert opposing actions on dopaminergic neurons, increasing and decreasing dopamine release respectively, and are components of circuits promoting positive or negative motivational and affective states. Moreover, dopamine controls the synthesis of striatal enkephalins and dynorphins. Evidence suggests that opioidergic function is altered after nicotine and endogenous opioids are involved in nicotine's behavioral effects. 1) The synthesis and release of β-endorphin, met-enkephalin and dynorphin in brain, especially nucleus accumbens (NAc), are altered after acute or chronic nicotine treatment and during nicotine withdrawal. 2) Although opioid receptor binding and mRNA do not appear to change in the striatum during nicotine withdrawal, the activity of κ-opioid (KOPr) and δ-opioid (DOPr) receptors is attenuated in NAc. 3) The nicotine withdrawal syndrome reminisces that of opiates, and naloxone precipitates some of its somatic, motivational, and affective signs. 4) Genetic and pharmacological studies indicate that μ-opioid (MOPr) receptors are mainly involved in nicotine reward, while DOPrs contribute to the emotional and KOPrs to the aversive responses of nicotine. 5) Finally, MOPrs and enkephalin, but not β-endorphin or dynorphin, are necessary for the physical manifestations of nicotine withdrawal. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier

  9. Olanzapine induced biochemical and histopathological changes after its chronic administration in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehmat Shah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Olanzapine is a second generation antipsychotic acting mainly as a dopamine D2 and serotonine 5-HT2 receptors antagonist prescribed in the treatment of schizophrenia and various other psychiatric illnesses. Even though olanzapine is widely used in psychiatry, its effects on the architecture of pancreas, liver and kidneys are little known. The histology of pancreas especially has never been studied. For these reasons, the current study was designed to elucidate the toxic effects of chronic administration of olanzapine on pancreas, liver and kidneys and the enzymes released by these tissues in an escalating dose manner. Methods: Fourteen male rats were divided into two groups equally, the olanzapine group and the controls. Olanzapine was administered in a dose of 5 mg/kg/d for the first eight weeks, 10 mg/kg/d for next four weeks and 15 mg/kg/d through the last two week period of 14 weeks experiment. The controls received acidified saline only. Both the groups received restricted diet (20 g/12 h. The body weight and level of random blood sugar (RBS were measured on a weekly basis. The levels of lipase, amylase, alanine transaminase (ALT and aspartate transaminase (AST were determined terminally. At the end of the experiment, the tissues were dissected out for histopathological evaluation. Results: Significant loss in body weight, change in the level of random blood sugar (∗∗P  0.05. The pancreas has shown derangement of beta cells and fibrotic growth. A mild to moderate focal increase in glomerular cellularity, cellular proliferation and glomerular capsules with negligible basement membranes were observed in the kidneys. No changes were observed in the architecture of the liver. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that the incidence of adverse effects associated with olanzapine could be prevented/alleviated/delayed by allowing restricted diet.

  10. Transcoronary sinus administration of autologous bone marrow in patients with chronic refractory stable angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicario, J.; Campos, C.; Piva, J.; Faccio, F.; Gerardo, L.; Becker, C.; Ortega, H.H.; Pierini, A.; Lofeudo, C.; Novero, R.; Licheri, A.; Milesi, R.; Perez Balino, N.; Monti, A.; Amin, A.; Pfeiffer, H.; De Giovanni, E.; Fendrich, I.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Based on our preclinic studies with autologous unfractionated bone marrow (AUBM) via coronary sinus with transitory occlusion, a clinic study in patients with chronic stable angina was designed. The objectives were to evaluate safety, tolerance and feasibility. Methods and materials: A multicenter prospective study with inclusion and exclusion criteria defined by an Independent Clinical Committee was carried out. Fourteen patients underwent transcoronary sinus administration of freshly aspirated and filtered AUBM (60-120 ml). Safety and tolerance were evaluated. Feasibility was evaluated with Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ), Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) angina classification (baseline-Day 180), myocardial perfusion (baseline-Day 90) with independent core laboratory and coronary angiography (baseline and Day 30). Results: There were no changes in the safety and tolerance parameters. Preliminary clinical efficacy at Day 180 disclosed a significant improvement of 38%, evaluated by the SAQ. The CCS angina classification shows that the mean angina class was 3.0±0.55 at baseline and improved to 2.0±0.00 at Day 180 (P<.001). Semiquantitative radionuclide perfusion imaging (core lab) showed a significant improvement at Day 90 in 13/14 patients, with a mean improvement of 24% at rest (P<.01) and 33% at stress (P<.05). Coronary angiography showed more collateral vessels in 9/14 patients. Conclusions: We can conclude that AUBM via coronary sinus with transitory occlusion is tolerable and safe. Significant improvement in the myocardial perfusion at Day 90 and in the quality of life at Day 180 was observed

  11. Endogenous Opioid Inhibition of Chronic Low Back Pain Influences Degree of Back Pain Relief Following Morphine Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruehl, Stephen; Burns, John W.; Gupta, Rajnish; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Chont, Melissa; Schuster, Erik; France, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Factors underlying differential responsiveness to opioid analgesic medications used in chronic pain management are poorly understood. We tested whether individual differences in endogenous opioid inhibition of chronic low back pain were associated with magnitude of acute reductions in back pain ratings following morphine administration. Methods In randomized, counterbalanced order over three sessions, 50 chronic low back pain patients received intravenous naloxone (8mg), morphine (0.08 mg/kg), or placebo. Back pain intensity was rated pre-drug and again after peak drug activity was achieved using the McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (Sensory and Affective subscales, VAS intensity measure). Opioid blockade effect measures to index degree of endogenous opioid inhibition of back pain intensity were derived as the difference between pre-to post-drug changes in pain intensity across placebo and naloxone conditions, with similar morphine responsiveness measures derived across placebo and morphine conditions. Results Morphine significantly reduced back pain compared to placebo (MPQ-Sensory, VAS; P effects of opioid blockade on back pain intensity. However, individual differences in opioid blockade effects were significantly associated with degree of acute morphine-related reductions in back pain on all measures, even after controlling for effects of age, sex, and chronic pain duration (P morphine. Conclusions Morphine appears to provide better acute relief of chronic back pain in individuals with lower natural opioidergic inhibition of chronic pain intensity. Possible implications for personalized medicine are discussed. PMID:24553304

  12. The effects of chronic intraperitoneal administration of the GABA B receptor agonist baclofen on food intake in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunit M; Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2008-09-28

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of repeated administration of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen on food intake in male Wistar rats. In the 1st Experiment, the effects of daily administration of physiological saline and baclofen (2 mg/kg, i.p.) for 27 days were investigated on food intake and body weight in non-deprived rats (n=6 in each group). Baclofen significantly (P<0.05) increased cumulative food intake each day over the treatment period during the 60 min measurement period following administration. Tolerance did not develop to the short-term hyperphagic effect of baclofen over the course of the experiment. In addition, treatment with baclofen did not alter body weight of the animals over the 27 day treatment period when compared with the saline control rats. In the 2nd Experiment, the effects of acute and chronic administration of baclofen (2 mg/kg) were investigated on 24 h food intake in rats. The rats were injected daily for 21 days with either saline (n=6) or baclofen (n=6). Food intake was measured in 30 min time bins for 24 h on treatment Days 1, 12 and 21 following injection. The results showed that while baclofen produced short-term increases in food consumption following injection on treatment Days 1, 12 and 21, the daily (24 h) food intake of the animals was not significantly different from those of control rats. Thus, these data reveal that while chronic administration of baclofen (2 mg/kg) produces short-term increases in feeding without the development of tolerance, daily (24 h) food consumption is not affected. These findings are consistent with the observation that chronic administration of baclofen (2 mg/kg) had no effect on the body weight of these animals.

  13. Emergence of dormant conditioned incentive approach by conditioned withdrawal in nicotine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel; Hiroi, Noboru

    2010-10-15

    Nicotine is one of the determinants for the development of persistent smoking, and this maladaptive behavior is characterized by many symptoms, including withdrawal and nicotine seeking. The process by which withdrawal affects nicotine seeking is poorly understood. The impact of a withdrawal-associated cue on nicotine (.2 mg/kg)-conditioned place preference was assessed in male C57BL/6J mice (n = 8-17/group). To establish a cue selectively associated with withdrawal distinct from those associated with nicotine, a tone was paired with withdrawal in their home cages; mice were chronically exposed to nicotine (200 μg/mL for 15 days) from drinking water in their home cages and received the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine (2.5 mg/kg) to precipitate withdrawal in the presence of a tone. The effect of the withdrawal-associated tone on nicotine-conditioned place preference was then evaluated in the place-conditioning apparatus after a delay, when nicotine-conditioned place preference spontaneously disappeared. A cue associated with precipitated withdrawal reactivated the dormant effect of nicotine-associated cues on conditioned place preference. This effect occurred during continuous exposure to nicotine but not during abstinence. A conditioned withdrawal cue could directly amplify the incentive properties of cues associated with nicotine. This observation extends the contemporary incentive account of the role of withdrawal in addiction to cue-cue interaction. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Attenuated nicotine‐like effects of varenicline but not other nicotinic ACh receptor agonists in monkeys receiving nicotine daily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Colin S; Moerke, Megan J; Javors, Martin A; Carroll, F Ivy

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chronic treatment can differentially impact the effects of pharmacologically related drugs that differ in receptor selectivity and efficacy. Experimental Approach The impact of daily nicotine treatment on the effects of nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) agonists was examined in two groups of rhesus monkeys discriminating nicotine (1.78 mg·kg−1 base weight) from saline. One group received additional nicotine treatment post‐session (1.78 mg·kg−1 administered five times daily, each dose 2 h apart; i.e. Daily group), and the second group did not (Intermittent group). Key Results Daily repeated nicotine treatment produced a time‐related increase in saliva cotinine. There was no significant difference in the ED50 values of the nicotine discriminative stimulus between the Daily and Intermittent group. Mecamylamine antagonized the effects of nicotine, whereas dihydro‐β‐erythroidine did not. Midazolam produced 0% nicotine‐lever responding. The nAChR agonists epibatidine, RTI‐36, cytisine and varenicline produced >96% nicotine‐lever responding in the Intermittent group. The respective maximum effects in the Daily group were 100, 72, 59 and 28%, which shows that the ability of varenicline to produce nicotine‐like responding was selectively decreased in the Daily as compared with the Intermittent group. When combined with nicotine, both varenicline and cytisine increased the potency of nicotine to produce discriminative stimulus effects. Conclusion and Implications Nicotine treatment has a greater impact on the sensitivity to the effects of varenicline as compared with some other nAChR agonists. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that varenicline differs from nicotine in its selectivity for multiple nAChR subtypes. PMID:27667659

  15. Hormones, Nicotine and Cocaine: Clinical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Nancy K.

    2009-01-01

    Nicotine and cocaine each stimulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and -gonadal axis hormones, and there is increasing evidence that the hormonal milieu may modulate the abuse-related effects of these drugs. This review summarizes some clinical studies of the acute effects of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine on plasma drug and hormone levels, and subjective effects ratings. The temporal covariance between these dependent measures was assessed with a rapid (two min) sampling procedure in nicotine-dependent volunteers or current cocaine users. Cigarette smoking and IV cocaine each stimulated a rapid increase in LH and ACTH, followed by gradual increases in cortisol and DHEA. Positive subjective effects ratings increased immediately after initiation of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine administration. However, in contrast to cocaine’s sustained positive effects (hormones on nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse, and implications for treatment of these addictive disorders is discussed. PMID:19835877

  16. Revisiting nicotine's role in the ageing brain and cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majdi, Alireza; Kamari, Farzin; Vafaee, Manouchehr Seyedi

    2017-01-01

    stress, excitotoxicity, amyloid-β toxicity, apoptosis, neuroinflammation, and perturb neurotrophic factors in the brain. Nicotine is an exogenous agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and acts as a pharmacological chaperone in the regulation of nAChR expression, potentially intervening...... in age-related changes in diverse molecular pathways leading to pathology. Although nicotine has therapeutic potential, paradoxical effects have been reported, possibly due to its inverted U-shape dose-response effects or pharmacokinetic factors. Additionally, nicotine administration should result...... in optimum therapeutic effects without imparting abuse potential or toxicity. Overall, this review aims to compile the previous and most recent data on nicotine and its effects on cognition-related mechanisms and age-related cognitive impairment....

  17. Co-treatment with grapefruit juice inhibits while chronic administration activates intestinal P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchagnula, R; Bansal, T; Varma, M V S; Kaul, C L

    2005-12-01

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated efflux is recognized as a significant biochemical barrier affecting oral absorption for a number of drugs. Various conflicting reports have been published regarding the effects of grapefruit juice (GFJ) on P-gp-mediated drug efflux, in which GFJ has been shown both to inhibit and activate it. Hence, the present study adopted a two-way approach, involving both co-treatment and chronic administration. Bi-directional transport of paclitaxel (PCL) was carried out in the absence and presence of GFJ extract, in rat everted ileum sac. Further, the effect of chronic administration of GFJ to rats was characterized by permeability studies with indinavir (INDI). Co-treatment of GFJ extract at 100% concentration reduced the asymmetric transport of PCL (efflux ratio = 20.8) by increasing absorptive (A --> B) transport by 921% and reducing secretory (B --> A) transport by 41%. Further, GFJ showed a concentration dependent effect on PCL permeability. Imipramine, a passive permeability marker with absorptive permeability of 15.33 +/- 4.26 x 10(-6) cm/s showed no asymmetric transport and also no significant (P extract inhibited P-gp-mediated efflux in co-treatment, whereas chronic administration led to increased levels of P-gp expression, thus having a profound effect on intestinal absorption and GFJ-drug interactions in vivo.

  18. Nicotine and tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ease your withdrawal symptoms. Health experts warn that e-cigarettes are not a replacement therapy for cigarette smoking. ... not known exactly how much nicotine is in e-cigarette cartridges, because information on labels is often wrong.

  19. Nicotine Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a smoking cessation program, which may include support groups, counseling, or specific behavior change techniques. Nicotine nasal ... and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or ...

  20. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a smoking cessation program, which may include support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine inhalation ... and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or ...

  1. Chronic administration of the probiotic kefir improves the endothelial function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friques, Andreia G F; Arpini, Clarisse M; Kalil, Ieda C; Gava, Agata L; Leal, Marcos A; Porto, Marcella L; Nogueira, Breno V; Dias, Ananda T; Andrade, Tadeu U; Pereira, Thiago Melo C; Meyrelles, Silvana S; Campagnaro, Bianca P; Vasquez, Elisardo C

    2015-12-30

    The beverage obtained by fermentation of milk with kefir grains, a complex matrix containing acid bacteria and yeasts, has been shown to have beneficial effects in various diseases. However, its effects on hypertension and endothelial dysfunction are not yet clear. In this study, we evaluated the effects of kefir on endothelial cells and vascular responsiveness in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). SHR were treated with kefir (0.3 mL/100 g body weight) for 7, 15, 30 and 60 days and compared with non-treated SHR and with normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. Vascular endothelial function was evaluated in aortic rings through the relaxation response to acetylcholine (ACh). The balance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) synthase was evaluated through specific blockers in the ACh-induced responses and through flow cytometry in vascular tissue. Significant effects of kefir were observed only after treatment for 60 days. The high blood pressure and tachycardia exhibited by the SHR were attenuated by approximately 15 % in the SHR-kefir group. The impaired ACh-induced relaxation of the aortic rings observed in the SHR (37 ± 4 %, compared to the Wistar rats: 74 ± 5 %), was significantly attenuated in the SHR group chronically treated with kefir (52 ± 4 %). The difference in the area under the curve between before and after the NADPH oxidase blockade or NO synthase blockade of aortic rings from SHR were of approximately +90 and -60 %, respectively, when compared with Wistar rats. In the aortic rings from the SHR-kefir group, these values were reduced to +50 and -40 %, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis of aortic endothelial cells revealed increased ROS production and decreased NO bioavailability in the SHR, which were significantly attenuated by the treatment with kefir. Scanning electronic microscopy showed vascular endothelial surface injury in SHR, which was partially protected following administration of kefir for 60 days. In addition, the

  2. Insight into nicotine addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Handa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of the epidemic of nicotine addiction in India and other nations is a global public health tragedy of untoward proportions. Smoking or chewing tobacco can seriously affect general, as well as oral health. Smoking-caused disease is a consequence of exposure to toxins in tobacco smoke and addiction to nicotine is the proximate cause of these diseases. This article focuses on nicotine as a determinant of addiction to tobacco and the pharmacologic effects of nicotine that sustain cigarette smoking. The pharmacologic reasons for nicotine use are an enhancement of mood, either directly or through relief of withdrawal symptoms and augmentation of mental or physical functions. Tobacco cessation is necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality related to tobacco use. Strategies for tobacco cessation involves 5A's and 5R's approach and pharmacotherapy. Dental professionals play an important role in helping patients to quit tobacco at the community and national levels, to promote tobacco prevention and control nicotine addiction. Dentists are in a unique position to educate and motivate patients concerning the hazards of tobacco to their oral and systemic health, and to provide intervention programs as a part of routine patient care.

  3. Effects of chronic administration of clenbuterol on contractile properties and calcium homeostasis in rat extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvent, Pascal; Douillard, Aymerick; Galbes, Olivier; Ramonatxo, Christelle; Py, Guillaume; Candau, Robin; Lacampagne, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Clenbuterol, a β2-agonist, induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a shift from slow-oxidative to fast-glycolytic muscle fiber type profile. However, the cellular mechanisms of the effects of chronic clenbuterol administration on skeletal muscle are not completely understood. As the intracellular Ca2+ concentration must be finely regulated in many cellular processes, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on force, fatigue, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in fast-twitch skeletal muscles (the extensor digitorum longus, EDL, muscle), as they are more sensitive to clenbuterol-induced hypertrophy. Male Wistar rats were chronically treated with 4 mg.kg-1 clenbuterol or saline vehicle (controls) for 21 days. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, Ca2+-transient amplitude and Ca2+ spark properties. EDL muscles from clenbuterol-treated animals displayed hypertrophy, a shift from slow to fast fiber type profile and increased absolute force, while the relative force remained unchanged and resistance to fatigue decreased compared to control muscles from rats treated with saline vehicle. Compared to control animals, clenbuterol treatment decreased Ca2+-transient amplitude, Ca2+ spark amplitude and frequency and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load was markedly reduced. Conversely, calpain activity was increased by clenbuterol chronic treatment. These results indicate that chronic treatment with clenbuterol impairs Ca2+ homeostasis and this could contribute to the remodeling and functional impairment of fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

  4. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in brain and behavioral analysis in adult rats after chronic administration of fenproporex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Scaini, Giselli; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Cardoso, Mariane R; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Constantino, Larissa S; Deroza, Pedro F; Ghedim, Fernando V; Valvassori, Samira S; Resende, Wilson R; Quevedo, João; Zugno, Alexandra I; Streck, Emilio L

    2012-12-01

    Fenproporex is an amphetamine-based anorectic and it is rapidly converted in vivo into amphetamine. It elevates the levels of extracellular dopamine in the brain. Acetylcholinesterase is a regulatory enzyme which is involved in cholinergic synapses and may indirectly modulate the release of dopamine. Thus, we investigated whether the effects of chronic administration of fenproporex in adult rats alters acquisition and retention of avoidance memory and acetylcholinesterase activity. Adult male Wistar rats received repeated (14 days) intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/kg i.p.). For behavioral assessment, animals were submitted to inhibitory avoidance (IA) tasks and continuous multiple trials step-down inhibitory avoidance (CMIA). Acetylcholinesterase activity was measured in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum. The administration of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/kg) did not induce impairment in short and long-term IA or CMIA retention memory in rats. In addition, longer periods of exposure to fenproporex administration decreased acetylcholinesterase activity in prefrontal cortex and striatum of rats, but no alteration was verified in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. In conclusion, the present study showed that chronic fenproporex administration decreased acetylcholinesterase activity in the rat brain. However, longer periods of exposure to fenproporex did not produce impairment in short and long-term IA or CMIA retention memory in rats.

  5. The effects of nicotine and non-nicotine smoking factors on working memory and associated brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClernon, Francis Joseph; Froeliger, Brett; Rose, Jed E; Kozink, Rachel V; Addicott, Merideth A; Sweitzer, Maggie M; Westman, Eric C; Van Wert, Dana M

    2016-07-01

    Smoking abstinence impairs executive function, which may promote continued smoking behavior and relapse. The differential influence of nicotine and non-nicotine (i.e. sensory, motor) smoking factors and related neural substrates is not known. In a fully factorial, within-subjects design, 33 smokers underwent fMRI scanning following 24 hours of wearing a nicotine or placebo patch while smoking very low nicotine content cigarettes or remaining abstinent from smoking. During scanning, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal was acquired while participants performed a verbal N-back task. Following 24-hour placebo (versus nicotine) administration, accuracy on the N-back task was significantly worse and task-related BOLD signal lower in dorsomedial frontal cortex. These effects were observed irrespective of smoking. Our data provide novel evidence that abstinence-induced deficits in working memory and changes in underlying brain function are due in large part to abstinence from nicotine compared with non-nicotine factors. This work has implications both for designing interventions that target abstinence-induced cognitive deficits and for nicotine-reduction policy. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Effects of Nicotine Metabolites on Nicotine Withdrawal Behaviors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhassan, Sagi; Bagdas, Deniz; Damaj, M Imad

    2017-06-01

    Rodent studies suggest that nicotine metabolites and minor tobacco alkaloids such as nornicotine and cotinine may promote cigarette smoking by enhancing nicotine rewarding and reinforcing effects. However, there is little information on the effects of these minor tobacco alkaloids on nicotine withdrawal. The present studies were conducted to determine whether the minor tobacco alkaloids nornicotine and cotinine exhibit nicotine-like behavioral effects in a mouse model of spontaneous nicotine withdrawal. Mice were infused with nicotine or saline for 14 days. Experiments were conducted on day 15, 18-24 hours after minipump removal. Ten minutes prior to testing, nicotine-dependent ICR male mice received an acute injection of nicotine (0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg), nornicotine (2.5 and 25 mg/kg), or cotinine (5 and 50 mg/kg) to determine effects on somatic signs, anxiety-like behaviors, and hyperalgesia spontaneous signs of withdrawal. Nicotine and the minor tobacco alkaloid nornicotine, but not cotinine, produced dose-dependent reversal of nicotine withdrawal signs in the mouse. The minor tobacco alkaloid and nicotine metabolite nornicotine at high doses have nicotinic like effects that may contribute to tobacco consumption and dependence. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Waterpipe tobacco products: nicotine labelling versus nicotine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansickel, Andrea R; Shihadeh, Alan; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Waterpipe tobacco package labelling typically indicates "0.0% tar" and "0.05% or 0.5% nicotine". To determine the extent to which nicotine labeling is related to nicotine delivery. 110 waterpipe smokers engaged in a 45-minute waterpipe smoking session. Puff topography and plasma nicotine were measured. Three waterpipe tobacco brands were used: Nakhla (0.5% nicotine), Starbuzz (0.05% nicotine), and Al Fakher (0.05% nicotine). Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Topography did not differ across brands. Peak plasma nicotine varied significantly across brands. Al Fakher had the highest nicotine delivery (11.4 ng/ml) followed by Nakhla (9.8 ng/ml) and Starbuzz (5.8 ng/ml). Nicotine labelling on waterpipe tobacco products does not reflect delivery; smoking a brand with a "0.05% nicotine" label led to greater plasma nicotine levels than smoking a brand with a "0.5% nicotine" label. Waterpipe tobacco products should be labelled in a manner that does not mislead consumers.

  8. Nicotine anxiogenic and rewarding effects are decreased in mice lacking beta-endorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, José M; Zimmer, Andreas; Maldonado, Rafael

    2009-06-01

    The endogenous opioid system plays an important role in the behavioral effects of nicotine. Thus, micro-opioid receptor and the endogenous opioids derived from proenkephalin are involved in the central effects of nicotine. However, the role played by the different endogenous opioid peptides in the acute and chronic effects of nicotine remains to be fully established. Mice lacking beta-endorphin were acutely injected with nicotine at different doses to evaluate locomotor, anxiogenic and antinociceptive responses. The rewarding properties of nicotine were evaluated by using the conditioned place-preference paradigm. Mice chronically treated with nicotine were acutely injected with mecamylamine to study the behavioral expression of nicotine withdrawal. Mice lacking beta-endorphin exhibited a spontaneous hypoalgesia and hyperlocomotion and a reduction on the anxiogenic and rewarding effects induced by nicotine. Nicotine induced similar antinociception and hypolocomotion in both genotypes and no differences were found in the development of physical dependence. The dissociation between nicotine rewarding properties and physical dependence suggests a differential implication of beta-endorphin in these addictive related responses.

  9. Nicotine anxiogenic and rewarding effects are decreased in mice lacking β-endorphin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, José M.; Zimmer, Andreas; Maldonado, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system plays an important role in the behavioral effects of nicotine. Thus, μ-opioid receptor and the endogenous opioids derived from proenkephalin are involved in the central effects of nicotine. However, the role played by the different endogenous opioid peptides in the acute and chronic effects of nicotine remains to be fully established. Mice lacking β-endorphin were acutely injected with nicotine at different doses to evaluate locomotor, anxiogenic and antinociceptive responses. The rewarding properties of nicotine were evaluated by using the conditioned place-preference paradigm. Mice chronically treated with nicotine were acutely injected with mecamylamine to study the behavioral expression of nicotine withdrawal. Mice lacking β-endorphin exhibited a spontaneous hypoalgesia and hyperlocomotion and a reduction on the anxiogenic and rewarding effects induced by nicotine. Nicotine induced similar antinociception and hypolocomotion in both genotypes and no differences were found in the development of physical dependence. The dissociation between nicotine rewarding properties and physical dependence suggests a differential implication of β-endorphin in these addictive related responses. PMID:19376143

  10. Agmatine attenuates nicotine induced conditioned place preference in mice through modulation of neuropeptide Y system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagale, Nandkishor R; Walke, Sonali; Shelkar, Gajanan P; Kokare, Dadasaheb M; Umekar, Milind J; Taksande, Brijesh G

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of agmatine on nicotine induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in male albino mice. Intra-peritoneal (ip) administration of nicotine (1mg/kg) significantly increased time spent in drug-paired compartment. Agmatine (20 and 40 mg/kg, ip) co-administered with nicotine during the 6 days conditioning sessions completely abolished the acquisition of nicotine-induced CPP in mice. Concomitant administration of neuropeptide Y (NPY) (1 pg/mouse, icv) or [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-NPY (0.1 pg/mouse, icv), selective NPY Y1 receptor agonist potentiated the inhibitory effect of agmatine (10 mg/kg, ip) on nicotine CPP. Conversely, pretreatment with NPY Y1 receptor antagonist, BIBP3226 (0.01 ng/mouse, icv) blocked the effect of agmatine (20 mg/kg, ip) on nicotine induced CPP. In immunohistochemical study, nicotine decreased NPY-immunoreactivity in nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), bed nucleus of stria terminalis, lateral part (BNSTl), arcuate nucleus (ARC) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Conversely, administration of agmatine prior to the nicotine significantly reversed the effect of nicotine on NPY-immunoreactivity in the above brain nuclei. This data indicate that agmatine attenuate nicotine induced CPP via modulation of NPYergic neurotransmission in brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Crosstalk between liver antioxidant and the endocannabinoid systems after chronic administration of the FAAH inhibitor, URB597, to hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biernacki, Michał; Łuczaj, Wojciech; Gęgotek, Agnieszka [Department of Analytical Chemistry Medical University of Bialystok, Mickiewicza 2D, 15-222 Bialystok (Poland); Toczek, Marek [Department of Experimental Physiology and Pathophysiology Medical University of Bialystok, Mickiewicza 2A, 15-222 Bialystok (Poland); Bielawska, Katarzyna [Department of Analytical Chemistry Medical University of Bialystok, Mickiewicza 2D, 15-222 Bialystok (Poland); Skrzydlewska, Elżbieta, E-mail: elzbieta.skrzydlewska@umb.edu.pl [Department of Analytical Chemistry Medical University of Bialystok, Mickiewicza 2D, 15-222 Bialystok (Poland)

    2016-06-15

    Hypertension is accompanied by perturbations to the endocannabinoid and antioxidant systems. Thus, potential pharmacological treatments for hypertension should be examined as modulators of these two metabolic systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic administration of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor [3-(3-carbamoylphenyl)phenyl]N-cyclohexylcarbamate (URB597) on the endocannabinoid system and on the redox balance in the livers of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Hypertension caused an increase in the levels of endocannabinoids [anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA)] and CB{sub 1} receptor and the activities of FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). These effects were accompanied by an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a decrease in antioxidant activity/level, enhanced expression of transcription factor Nrf2 and changes to Nrf2 activators and inhibitors. Moreover, significant increases in lipid, DNA and protein oxidative modifications, which led to enhanced levels of proapoptotic caspases, were also observed. URB597 administration to the hypertensive rats resulted in additional increases in the levels of AEA, NADA and the CB{sub 1} receptor, as well as decreases in vitamin E and C levels, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities and Nrf2 expression. Thus, after URB597 administration, oxidative modifications of cellular components were increased, while the inflammatory response was reduced. This study revealed that chronic treatment of hypertensive rats with URB597 disrupts the endocannabinoid system, which causes an imbalance in redox status. This imbalance increases the levels of electrophilic lipid peroxidation products, which later participate in metabolic disturbances in liver homeostasis. - Highlights: • Chronic administration of URB597 to hypertensive rats reduces liver inflammation. • URB597 enhances the redox imbalance in the

  12. Crosstalk between liver antioxidant and the endocannabinoid systems after chronic administration of the FAAH inhibitor, URB597, to hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biernacki, Michał; Łuczaj, Wojciech; Gęgotek, Agnieszka; Toczek, Marek; Bielawska, Katarzyna; Skrzydlewska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is accompanied by perturbations to the endocannabinoid and antioxidant systems. Thus, potential pharmacological treatments for hypertension should be examined as modulators of these two metabolic systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic administration of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor [3-(3-carbamoylphenyl)phenyl]N-cyclohexylcarbamate (URB597) on the endocannabinoid system and on the redox balance in the livers of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Hypertension caused an increase in the levels of endocannabinoids [anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA)] and CB 1 receptor and the activities of FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). These effects were accompanied by an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a decrease in antioxidant activity/level, enhanced expression of transcription factor Nrf2 and changes to Nrf2 activators and inhibitors. Moreover, significant increases in lipid, DNA and protein oxidative modifications, which led to enhanced levels of proapoptotic caspases, were also observed. URB597 administration to the hypertensive rats resulted in additional increases in the levels of AEA, NADA and the CB 1 receptor, as well as decreases in vitamin E and C levels, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities and Nrf2 expression. Thus, after URB597 administration, oxidative modifications of cellular components were increased, while the inflammatory response was reduced. This study revealed that chronic treatment of hypertensive rats with URB597 disrupts the endocannabinoid system, which causes an imbalance in redox status. This imbalance increases the levels of electrophilic lipid peroxidation products, which later participate in metabolic disturbances in liver homeostasis. - Highlights: • Chronic administration of URB597 to hypertensive rats reduces liver inflammation. • URB597 enhances the redox imbalance in the liver of

  13. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine dependence and reward: participation of the endogenous opioid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Trigo, José Manuel; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary component of tobacco that maintains the smoking habit and develops addiction. The adaptive changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors produced by repeated exposure to nicotine play a crucial role in the establishment of dependence. However, other neurochemical systems also participate in the addictive effects of nicotine including glutamate, cannabinoids, GABA and opioids. This review will cover the involvement of these neurotransmitters in nicotine addictive properties, with a special emphasis on the endogenous opioid system. Thus, endogenous enkephalins and beta-endorphins acting on mu-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine rewarding effects, whereas opioid peptides derived from prodynorphin participate in nicotine aversive responses. An upregulation of mu-opioid receptors has been reported after chronic nicotine treatment that could counteract the development of nicotine tolerance, whereas the downregulation induced on kappa-opioid receptors seems to facilitate nicotine tolerance. Endogenous enkephalins acting on mu-opioid receptors also play a role in the development of physical dependence to nicotine. In agreement with these actions of the endogenous opioid system, the opioid antagonist naltrexone has shown to be effective for smoking cessation in certain subpopulations of smokers. PMID:20170672

  14. Thermochemical Properties of Nicotine Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riggs DM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results presented in this report clearly show that the thermal stability and the endothermic peak nicotine release temperatures are different for different nicotine salts and these temperatures appear to be linked to the general microstructural details of the salt itself. In addition, the peak nicotine release temperatures are highly dependent upon the sample size used. The heat of vaporization for neat (non-protonated nicotine is also sample-size dependent. The TGA data showed that the least stable of the salts tested at elevated temperatures was the liquid salt nicotine triacetate followed by the crystalline materials (e.g., nicotine gallate and finally, the amorphous salts (e.g., nicotine alginate. The DSC results revealed that the liquid and crystalline salts exhibit nicotine release endotherms that are strongly related to the sample weight being tested. The amorphous salts show nicotine endotherm peak temperatures that are nearly independent of the sample weight. The range of peak nicotine release temperatures varied depending upon the specific salts and the sample size from 83 oC to well over 200 oC. Based on these results, the evolution of nicotine from the nicotine salt should be expected to vary based on the composition of the salt, the details of its microstructure, and the amount of nicotine salt tested.

  15. Differential sensitivity to nicotine among hypothalamic magnocellular neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J D; Jacobsen, Julie; Kiss, Adrian Emil

    2012-01-01

    The magnocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) either contain vasopressin or oxytocin. Even though both hormones are released after systemic administration of nicotine, the mechanism through which the two populations of neurons are activated...... is not known. This study was carried out in the rat to investigate the effect of increasing doses of nicotine on subsets of magnocellular neurons containing either oxytocin or vasopressin....

  16. Nicotine Withdrawal Disrupts Contextual Learning but Not Recall of Prior Contextual Associations: Implications for Nicotine Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Portugal, George S.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between nicotine and learning could contribute to nicotine addiction. Although previous research indicates that nicotine withdrawal disrupts contextual learning, the effects of nicotine withdrawal on contextual memories acquired before withdrawal are unknown. The present study investigated whether nicotine withdrawal disrupted recall of prior contextual memories by examining the effects of nicotine withdrawal on recall of nicotine conditioned place preference (CPP) and contextual...

  17. MR imaging in chronic epicondylitis humeri radialis at 1.0 T: is Gd-DTPA administration useful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herber, S.; Kalden, P.; Kreitner, K.-F.; Thelen, M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the diagnostic value and confidence of contrast-enhanced MR imaging in patients with lateral epicondylitis in comparison to clinical diagnosis. Material and Methods: 42 consecutive patients with clinically proven chronic lateral epicondylitis and 10 elbow joints of healthy controls have been examined on a 1.0 T MR-unit. Criteria for inclusion in the prospective study were: persistant pain and a failed conservative therapy. The MR protocol included STIR sequence, a native, T 2 -weighted, fat-supressed TSE sequence, and a flash-2-D sequence. Also, fat-supressed, T 1 -weighted SE sequences before and after administration of Gd-DTPA contrast media have been recorded. Results: In 39/42 patients the STIR sequence showed an increased SI of the common extensor tendom. Increased MR signal of the lateral collateral ligament combined with a thickening and a partial rupture or a full thickness tear have been observed in 15/42 cases. A bone marrow edema at the lateral epicondylus was noticed in 6 of the studied patients and a joint effusion in 18/42 patients. After administration of contrast media we noticed an average increase of SI by about 150%. However, enhanced MR imaging did not provide additional information. Conclusion: In MR imaging of chronic epicondylitis administration of gadolinium-DTPA does not provide additional information. (orig.) [de

  18. Chronic ethanol administration increases the binding of 3H Ro-15-4513 in primary cultured spinal cord neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlatre, M.; Ticku, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    Ro 15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5, 6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1,5α], [1,4] benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) is reported to be a selective ethanol antagonist in biochemical and behavioral studies. The effect of chronic ethanol treatment on the binding of [ 3 H]Ro 15-4513 was investigated in cultured spinal cord neurons, which are shown to possess all the elements of GABA benzodiazepine receptor complex. Chronic ethanol treatment (50 mM for 6 hr, 12 hr, 18 hr, 3 days, and 5 3 days) produced an increase in the specific binding of [ 3 H]Ro 15-4513. The increase in binding in these neurons was due to an increase in the number (B max ) of receptor sites. This effect was specific for Ro 15-4513, since identical ethanol treatment did not alter the binding of benzodiazepine antagonist [ 3 H]Ro 15-1788 or agonist [ 3 H]flunitrazepam or inverse agonist [ 3 H]methyl-β-carboline-3-carboxylate. Similar results have been reported following chronic ethanol treatment to rats. These results suggest that the Ro 15-4513 binding sites on the oligomeric GABA receptor complex are altered following chronic ethanol administration, and support the notion of a unique role of Ro 15-4513 as an ethanol antagonist

  19. Mensuration of cardioangiopulmonary indices by radiocardiogram before and after the verapamil oral administration in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, P.F.; Hueb, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were studied. The diagnosis was obtained from the history, clinical evaluation, pulmonary radiography, pulmonary and hepatic scintigraphies and spirometry. About 360 mg of verapamil was administered daily, every eight hours for ten days. Before and after drug administration, the arterial pressures, the spirometric measurements and nine cardiac roentgenographic indexes were measured. Vital capacity increased in all cases, but did not reach the normal levels. These data suggest that the effect of verapamil on the pulmonary circulation brought benefits to the subjects. This occurred either by direct pulmonary vasodilation, or by bronchodilation, reducing hypoxia. In all cases, the pulmonary resistance was diminished. Finally, verapamil seems to be a drug with real benefits in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and we advise a continuation of the studies. (author)

  20. Effects of simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine on nicotine-induced locomotor activation in adolescent and adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies have shown that repeated stress experiences can result in an increase in the locomotor response to the subsequent administration of drugs of abuse, a phenomenon that has been termed behavioral cross-sensitization. Behavioral sensitization reflects neuroadaptive processes associated with drug addiction and drug-induced psychosis. Although cross-sensitization between stress- and drug-induced locomotor activity has been clearly demonstrated in adult rats, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon in adolescent rats. In the present study, we determined if the simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine was capable of inducing behavioral sensitization to nicotine in adolescent and adult rats. To this end, adolescent (postnatal day (P 28-37 and adult (P60-67 rats received nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc or saline (0.9% NaCl, sc and were immediately subjected to restraint stress for 2 h once a day for 7 days. The control group for stress was undisturbed following nicotine or saline injections. Three days after the last exposure to stress and nicotine, rats were challenged with a single dose of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc or saline and nicotine-induced locomotion was then recorded for 30 min. In adolescent rats, nicotine caused behavioral sensitization only in animals that were simultaneously exposed to stress, while in adult rats nicotine promoted sensitization independently of stress exposure. These findings demonstrate that adolescent rats are more vulnerable to the effects of stress on behavioral sensitization to nicotine than adult rats.

  1. Nicotine Blocks Brain Estrogen Synthase (Aromatase): In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography Studies in Female Baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biegon, A.; Kim, S.-W.; Logan, J.; Hooker, J.M.; Muench, L.; Fowler, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smoking and nicotine have complex effects on human physiology and behavior, including some effects similar to those elicited by inhibition of aromatase, the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. We report the first in vivo primate study to determine whether there is a direct effect of nicotine administration on brain aromatase. Brain aromatase availability was examined with positron emission tomography and the selective aromatase inhibitor ( 11 C)vorozole in six baboons before and after exposure to IV nicotine at .015 and .03 mg/kg. Nicotine administration produced significant, dose-dependent reductions in ( 11 C)vorozole binding. The amygdala and preoptic area showed the largest reductions. Plasma levels of nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine were similar to those found in cigarette smokers. Nicotine interacts in vivo with primate brain aromatase in regions involved in mood, aggression, and sexual behavior.

  2. Activated mesenchymal stem cell administration inhibits chronic alcohol drinking and suppresses relapse-like drinking in high-alcohol drinker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezquer, Fernando; Quintanilla, María Elena; Morales, Paola; Ezquer, Marcelo; Lespay-Rebolledo, Carolyne; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Israel, Yedy

    2017-10-18

    Neuroinflammation has been reported to follow chronic ethanol intake and may perpetuate alcohol consumption. Present studies determined the effect of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), known for their anti-inflammatory action, on chronic ethanol intake and relapse-like ethanol intake in a post-deprivation condition. Rats were allowed 12-17 weeks of chronic voluntary ethanol (10% and 20% v/v) intake, after which a single dose of activated hMSCs (5 × 10 5 ) was injected into a brain lateral ventricle. Control animals were administered vehicle. After assessing the effect of hMSCs on chronic ethanol intake for 1 week, animals were deprived of ethanol for 2 weeks and thereafter an ethanol re-access of 60 min was allowed to determine relapse-like intake. A single administration of activated hMSCs inhibited chronic alcohol consumption by 70% (P 80 mg/dl. The single hMSC administration reduced relapse-like blood ethanol levels to 20 mg/dl. Chronic ethanol intake increased by 250% (P chronic ethanol intake, an effect that was fully abolished by the administration of hMSCs. This study supports the neuroinflammation-chronic ethanol intake hypothesis and suggest that mesenchymal stem cell administration may be considered in the treatment of alcohol use disorders. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine-induced hepatotoxicity in rats: Oxidative stress after acute and chronic administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković Milica

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The underlying mechanisms of N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine-MDMA-induced hepatotoxicity are still unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate hepatic oxido-reductive status in the rats liver after the single and repeated administration of MDMA. Methods. MDMA was dissolved in distilled water and administered in the doses of 5 mg, 10 mg, 20 mg, and 40 mg/kg. The animals from the acute experiment were treated per os with the single dose of the appropriate solution, through the orogastric tube. The animals from the chronic experiment were treated per os, with the doses of 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg of MDMA every day during 14 days. The control groups were treated with water only. Eight hours after the last dose, the animals were sacrificed, dissected their livers were rapidly removed, frozen and stored at -70°C until the moment of analysis. The parameters of oxidative stress in the crude mitochondrial fractions of the livers were analyzed. Results. Superoxide dismutase (SOD activity increased in the livers of the animals that were treated with single doses of MDMA. Chronically treated animals showed the increased SOD activity only after the highest dose (20 mg/kg. The content of reduced glutathione decreased in both groups, but the depletion was much more expressed after the single administration. Lipid peroxidation index increased in dose-dependent manner in both groups, being much higher after the single administration. Conclusion. The increased index of lipid peroxidation and the decreased reduced glutathione levels suggested that MDMA application induced the state of oxidative stress in the liver. These changes were much more expressed after the single administration of MDMA.

  4. Subcutaneous injection of kisspeptin-54 acutely stimulates gonadotropin secretion in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea, but chronic administration causes tachyphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Channa N; Nijher, Gurjinder M K; Chaudhri, Owais B; Murphy, Kevin G; Ranger, Amita; Lim, Adrian; Patel, Daksha; Mehta, Amrish; Todd, Catriona; Ramachandran, Radha; Salem, Victoria; Stamp, Gordon W; Donaldson, Mandy; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2009-11-01

    Kisspeptin is a critical regulator of normal reproductive function. A single injection of kisspeptin in healthy human volunteers potently stimulates gonadotropin release. However, the effects of kisspeptin on gonadotropin release in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) and the effects of repeated administration of kisspeptin to humans are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of acute and chronic kisspeptin administration on gonadotropin release in women with HA. We performed a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, parallel design study. Women with HA received twice-daily sc injections of kisspeptin (6.4 nmol/kg) or 0.9% saline (n = 5 per group) for 2 wk. Changes in serum gonadotropin and estradiol levels, LH pulsatility, and ultrasound measurements of reproductive activity were assessed. On the first injection day, potent increases in serum LH and FSH were observed after sc kisspeptin injection in women with HA (mean maximal increment from baseline within 4 h after injection: LH, 24.0 +/- 3.5 IU/liter; FSH, 9.1 +/- 2.5 IU/liter). These responses were significantly reduced on the 14th injection day (mean maximal increment from baseline within 4 h postinjection: LH, 2.5 +/- 2.2 IU/liter, P < 0.05; FSH, 0.5 +/- 0.5 IU/liter, P < 0.05). Subjects remained responsive to GnRH after kisspeptin treatment. No significant changes in LH pulsatility or ultrasound measurements of reproductive activity were observed. Acute administration of kisspeptin to women with infertility due to HA potently stimulates gonadotropin release, but chronic administration of kisspeptin results in desensitization to its effects on gonadotropin release. These data have important implications for the development of kisspeptin as a novel therapy for reproductive disorders in humans.

  5. Neuronal effects of nicotine during auditory selective attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smucny, Jason; Olincy, Ann; Eichman, Lindsay S; Tregellas, Jason R

    2015-06-01

    Although the attention-enhancing effects of nicotine have been behaviorally and neurophysiologically well-documented, its localized functional effects during selective attention are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the neuronal effects of nicotine during auditory selective attention in healthy human nonsmokers. We hypothesized to observe significant effects of nicotine in attention-associated brain areas, driven by nicotine-induced increases in activity as a function of increasing task demands. A single-blind, prospective, randomized crossover design was used to examine neuronal response associated with a go/no-go task after 7 mg nicotine or placebo patch administration in 20 individuals who underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T. The task design included two levels of difficulty (ordered vs. random stimuli) and two levels of auditory distraction (silence vs. noise). Significant treatment × difficulty × distraction interaction effects on neuronal response were observed in the hippocampus, ventral parietal cortex, and anterior cingulate. In contrast to our hypothesis, U and inverted U-shaped dependencies were observed between the effects of nicotine on response and task demands, depending on the brain area. These results suggest that nicotine may differentially affect neuronal response depending on task conditions. These results have important theoretical implications for understanding how cholinergic tone may influence the neurobiology of selective attention.

  6. Administration of venlafaxine after chronic methadone detoxification blocks post-depression relapse in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Fadaei-Kenarsary

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Relapse is highly prevalent after detoxification and depression. Due to the advantages of venlafaxine compared with other antidepressants, it is expected that venlafaxine administration may reduce relapse after detoxification and depression. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of venlafaxine on depression-induced relapse to morphine dependence after methadone detoxification. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats were habituated and conditioned with morphine (10 mg/kg, S.C., for 4 days. After that, primary forced swimming and conditioned place preference (CPP were tested. They were followed by methadone (70 mg/kg/day, P.O., for 7 days administration, extinguishing, forced swimming stress (FSS and administration of venlafaxine (80 mg/kg/day, I.P., for 7 days. Finally same tests were performed. Administration of venlafaxine resulted in a decrement in final preference scores associated with a prime morphine injection (PMI compared to the primary scores in methadone treated (MTD+ animals. In a swimming test, venlafaxine increased the amount of final floating and decreased final activity scores compared with the primary scores after administration of methadone. Venlafaxine reduced locomotor activity in MTD+ animals in the final test with PMI. There was a positive correlation between the final activity and preference scores after PMI. In conclusion, venlafaxine improved anxiety and depression-induced relapse on methadone detoxified rats.

  7. Delivery of nicotine aerosol to mice via a modified electronic cigarette device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefever, Timothy W; Lee, Youn O K; Kovach, Alexander L; Silinski, Melanie A R; Marusich, Julie A; Thomas, Brian F; Wiley, Jenny L

    2017-03-01

    Although both men and women use e-cigarettes, most preclinical nicotine research has focused on its effects in male rodents following injection. The goals of the present study were to develop an effective e-cigarette nicotine delivery system, to compare results to those obtained after subcutaneous (s.c.) injection, and to examine sex differences in the model. Hypothermia and locomotor suppression were assessed following aerosol exposure or s.c. injection with nicotine in female and male mice. Subsequently, plasma and brain concentrations of nicotine and cotinine were measured. Passive exposure to nicotine aerosol produced concentration-dependent and mecamylamine reversible hypothermic and locomotor suppressant effects in female and male mice, as did s.c. nicotine injection. In plasma and brain, nicotine and cotinine concentrations showed dose/concentration-dependent increases in both sexes following each route of administration. Sex differences in nicotine-induced hypothermia were dependent upon route of administration, with females showing greater hypothermia following aerosol exposure and males showing greater hypothermia following injection. In contrast, when they occurred, sex differences in nicotine and cotinine levels in brain and plasma consistently showed greater concentrations in females than males, regardless of route of administration. In summary, the e-cigarette exposure device described herein was used successfully to deliver pharmacologically active doses of nicotine to female and male mice. Further, plasma nicotine concentrations following exposure were similar to those after s.c. injection with nicotine and within the range observed in human smokers. Future research on vaped products can be strengthened by inclusion of translationally relevant routes of administration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Chronic Uridine Administration Induces Fatty Liver and Pre-Diabetic Conditions in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyo Urasaki

    Full Text Available Uridine is a pyrimidine nucleoside that exerts restorative functions in tissues under stress. Short-term co-administration of uridine with multiple unrelated drugs prevents drug-induced liver lipid accumulation. Uridine has the ability to modulate liver metabolism; however, the precise mechanism has not been delineated. In this study, long-term effects of uridine on liver metabolism were examined in both HepG2 cell cultures and C57BL/6J mice. We report that uridine administration was associated with O-GlcNAc modification of FOXO1, increased gluconeogenesis, reduced insulin signaling activity, and reduced expression of a liver-specific fatty acid binding protein FABP1. Long-term uridine feeding induced systemic glucose intolerance and severe liver lipid accumulation in mice. Our findings suggest that the therapeutic potentials of uridine should be designed for short-term acute administration.

  9. Repeated administration of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, but not positive allosteric modulators, increases alpha7 nAChR levels in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ditte Z; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is an important target for treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. However, the receptor desensitizes rapidly in vitro, which has led to concern regarding its applicability as a clinically relevant drug target...

  10. Topical Administration of Pirfenidone Increases Healing of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Randomized Crossover Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Janka-Zires

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Only 30 percent of chronic diabetic foot ulcers heal after 20 weeks of standard treatment. Pirfenidone is a drug with biological, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical pirfenidone added to conventional treatment in noninfected chronic diabetic foot ulcers. This was a randomized crossover study. Group 1 received topical pirfenidone plus conventional treatment for 8 weeks; after this period, they were switched to receive conventional treatment only for 8 more weeks. In group 2, the order of the treatments was the opposite. The end points were complete ulcer healing and size reduction. Final data were obtained from 35 ulcers in 24 patients. Fifty-two percent of ulcers treated with pirfenidone healed before 8 weeks versus 14.3% treated with conventional treatment only (P=0.025. Between 8 and 16 weeks, 30.8% ulcers that received pirfenidone healed versus 0% with conventional treatment (P=0.081. By week 8, the reduction in ulcer size was 100% [73–100] with pirfenidone versus 57.5% with conventional treatment [28.9–74] (P=0.011. By week 16, the reduction was 93% [42.7–100] with pirfenidone and 21.8% [8–77.5] with conventional treatment (P=0.050. The addition of topical pirfenidone to conventional treatment significantly improves the healing of chronic diabetic noninfected foot ulcers.

  11. Nicotine enhances the reconsolidation of novel object recognition memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shaowen; Pan, Si; You, Yong

    2015-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that nicotine is involved in learning and memory. However, there are only few studies that have evaluated the relationship between nicotine and memory reconsolidation. In this study, we investigated the effects of nicotine on the reconsolidation of novel object recognition memory in rats. Behavior procedure involved four training phases: habituation (Days 1 and 2), sample (Day 3), reactivation (Day 4) and test (Day 6). Rats were injected with saline or nicotine (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) immediately or 6h after reactivation. The discrimination index was used to assess memory performance and calculated as the difference in time exploring on the novel and familiar objects. Results showed that nicotine administration immediately but not 6 h after reactivation significantly enhanced memory performance of rats. Further results showed that the enhancing effect of nicotine on memory performance was dependent on memory reactivation, and was not attributed to the changes of the nonspecific responses (locomotor activity and anxiety level) 48 h after nicotine administration. The results suggest that post-reactivation nicotine administration enhances the reconsolidation of novel object recognition memory. Our present finding extends previous research on the nicotinic effects on learning and memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Systemic administration of thrombin peptide TP508 enhances VEGF-stimulated angiogenesis and attenuates effects of chronic hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska-Pazdrak, Barbara; Carney, Darrell H.

    2015-01-01

    Revascularization of chronic wounds and ischemic tissue is attenuated by endothelial dysfunction and the inability of angiogenic factors to stimulate angiogenesis. We recently showed that TP508, a nonproteolytic thrombin peptide, increases perfusion and NO-dependent vasodilation in hearts with chronic ischemia and stimulates NO production by endothelial cells. In this study, we investigated systemic in vivo effects of TP508 on VEGF-stimulated angiogenesis in vitro using aortic explants in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Mice were injected with saline or TP508 and 24h later aortas were removed and cultured to quantify endothelial sprouting. TP508 injection increased endothelial sprouting and potentiated the in vitro response to VEGF. Exposure of control explants to hypoxia inhibited basal and VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell sprouting. This effect of hypoxia was significantly prevented by TP508 injection. Thus, TP508 systemic administration increases responsiveness of aortic endothelial cells to VEGF and diminishes the effect of chronic hypoxia on endothelial cell sprouting. Studies using human endothelial cells in culture suggest that protective effects of TP508 during hypoxia may involve stimulation of endothelial cell NO production. These data suggest potential clinical benefit of using a combination of systemic TP508 and local VEGF as a therapy for revascularization of ischemic tissue. PMID:23594718

  13. Effects of nicotine on homeostatic and hedonic components of food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojakovic, Andrea; Espinosa, Enma P; Farhad, Osman T; Lutfy, Kabirullah

    2017-10-01

    Chronic tobacco use leads to nicotine addiction that is characterized by exaggerated urges to use the drug despite the accompanying negative health and socioeconomic burdens. Interestingly, nicotine users are found to be leaner than the general population. Review of the existing literature revealed that nicotine affects energy homeostasis and food consumption via altering the activity of neurons containing orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the brain. Hypothalamus is one of the critical brain areas that regulates energy balance via the action of these neuropeptides. The equilibrium between these two groups of peptides can be shifted by nicotine leading to decreased food intake and weight loss. The aim of this article is to review the existing literature on the effect of nicotine on food intake and energy homeostasis and report on the changes that nicotine brings about in the level of these peptides and their receptors that may explain changes in food intake and body weight induced by nicotine. Furthermore, we review the effect of nicotine on the hedonic aspect of food intake. Finally, we discuss the involvement of different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the regulatory action of nicotine on food intake and energy homeostasis. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  14. Effects of chronic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration on neurotransmitter concentrations and receptor binding in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.F.; Newport, G.D.; Scallet, A.C.; Gee, K.W.; Paule, M.G.; Brown, R.M.; Slikker, W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    THC is the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana and is also known as an hallucinogenic compound. Numerous reports have shown that large doses of THC produce significant alterations in various neurotransmitter systems. The present study was designed to determine whether chronic exposure to THC produces significant alterations in selected neurotransmitter systems (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, GABAergic, benzodiazepine, and opiate) in the rat brain. In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged with vehicle, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg body weight daily, 5 days/week for 90 days. Animals were killed either 24 hours or two months after the last dose. Brains were dissected into different regions for neurochemical analyses. Two months after the cessation of chronic administration, there was a significant decrease in GABA receptor binding in the hippocampus of animals in the high dose group. However, no other significant changes were found in neurotransmitter receptor binding characteristics in the hippocampus or in neurotransmitter concentrations in the caudate nucleus, hypothalamus or septum after chronic THC administration. In an attempt to replicate the GABA receptor binding changes and also to determine the [35S]TBPS binding in hippocampus, we designed Experiment 2. In this experiment, we dosed the animals by gavage with 0, 5, 10 or 20 mg THC/kg daily, 5 days/week or with 20 mg THC/kg Monday through Thursday and 60 mg/kg on Friday for 90 days. Results from this experiment failed to replicate the dose-dependent effect of THC on GABA receptor binding in hippocampus. Modulation of [35S]TBPS binding by GABA or 3 alpha-OH-DHP or inhibition by cold TBPS in frontal cortex did not show any significant dose-related effects

  15. Orally administered nicotine induces urothelial hyperplasia in rats and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodmane, Puttappa R.; Arnold, Lora L.; Pennington, Karen L.; Cohen, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Rats and mice orally administered with nicotine tartrate for total of 4 weeks. • No treatment-related death or whole body toxicity observed in any of the groups. • Urothelium showed simple hyperplasia in treated rats and mice. • No significant change in BrdU labeling index or SEM classification of urothelium. - Abstract: Tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for multiple human cancers including urinary bladder carcinoma. Tobacco smoke is a complex mixture containing chemicals that are known carcinogens in humans and/or animals. Aromatic amines a major class of DNA-reactive carcinogens in cigarette smoke, are not present at sufficiently high levels to fully explain the incidence of bladder cancer in cigarette smokers. Other agents in tobacco smoke could be excreted in urine and enhance the carcinogenic process by increasing urothelial cell proliferation. Nicotine is one such major component, as it has been shown to induce cell proliferation in multiple cell types in vitro. However, in vivo evidence specifically for the urothelium is lacking. We previously showed that cigarette smoke induces increased urothelial cell proliferation in mice. In the present study, urothelial proliferative and cytotoxic effects were examined after nicotine treatment in mice and rats. Nicotine hydrogen tartrate was administered in drinking water to rats (52 ppm nicotine) and mice (514 ppm nicotine) for 4 weeks and urothelial changes were evaluated. Histopathologically, 7/10 rats and 4/10 mice showed simple hyperplasia following nicotine treatment compared to none in the controls. Rats had an increased mean BrdU labeling index compared to controls, although it was not statistically significantly elevated in either species. Scanning electron microscopic visualization of the urothelium did not reveal significant cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that oral nicotine administration induced urothelial hyperplasia (increased cell proliferation), possibly due to a

  16. Implications of chronic daily anti-oxidant administration on the inflammatory response to intracortical microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Stewart, Wade G.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Wong, Chun T.; Meador, William D.; Ziats, Nicholas P.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Oxidative stress events have been implicated to occur and facilitate multiple failure modes of intracortical microelectrodes. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the ability of a sustained concentration of an anti-oxidant and to reduce oxidative stress-mediated neurodegeneration for the application of intracortical microelectrodes. Approach. Non-functional microelectrodes were implanted into the cortex of male Sprague Dawley rats for up to sixteen weeks. Half of the animals received a daily intraperitoneal injection of the natural anti-oxidant resveratrol, at 30 mg kg-1. The study was designed to investigate the biodistribution of the resveratrol, and the effects on neuroinflammation/neuroprotection following device implantation. Main results. Daily maintenance of a sustained range of resveratrol throughout the implantation period resulted in fewer degenerating neurons in comparison to control animals at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Initial and chronic improvements in neuronal viability in resveratrol-dosed animals were correlated with significant reductions in local superoxide anion accumulation around the implanted device at two weeks after implantation. Controls, receiving only saline injections, were also found to have reduced amounts of accumulated superoxide anion locally and less neurodegeneration than controls at sixteen weeks post-implantation. Despite observed benefits, thread-like adhesions were found between the liver and diaphragm in resveratrol-dosed animals. Significance. Overall, our chronic daily anti-oxidant dosing scheme resulted in improvements in neuronal viability surrounding implanted microelectrodes, which could result in improved device performance. However, due to the discovery of thread-like adhesions, further work is still required to optimize a chronic anti-oxidant dosing regime for the application of intracortical microelectrodes.

  17. Effects of chronic administration of tamsulosin and tadalafil, alone or in combination, in rats with bladder outlet obstruction induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regadas, Rommel Prata; Reges, Ricardo; Cerqueira, João Batista Gadelha; Sucupira, Daniel Gabrielle; Jamacaru, Francisco Vagnaldo F; Moraes, Manoel Odorico de; Gonzaga-Silva, Lúcio Flávio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define if tadalafil causes detrusor muscle impairment and to observe the effect of combination of tadalafil with tamsulosin on the lower urinary tract of rats with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency. Thirty-one male rats were randomized to following groups: 1 - control; 2 - L-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME); 3 - Tamsulosin + L-NAME, 4 Tadalafil+L-NAME; and 5 - Tamsulosin + Tadalafil + L-NAME. At the end of the treatment period (30 days), all animals were submitted to urodynamic study. The administration of L-NAME increased the number of non-voiding contractions (NVC) (1.04 ± 0.22), volume threshold (VT) (1.86 ± 0.35), and micturition cycle (MC) (1.34 ± 0.11) compared with control (0.52 ± 0.06, 0.62 ± 0.06, and 0.67 ± 0.30), respectively. The administration of tamsulosin reduced the number of NVC (0.57 ± 0.42) and VT (0.76 ± 0.24 ) compared with L-NAME group. Co-treatment with tadalafil decreased the number of VT (0.85 ± 0.53) and MC (0.76 ± 0.22) compared with L-NAME group. The combination of tamsulosin with tadalafil improved the number of NVC (0.56 ± 0.18), VT (0.97 ± 0.52) and MC (0.68 ± 0.30) compared with L-NAME group. In rats with BOO induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency, tadalafil did not cause impairment in detrusor muscle and seems to have an addictive effect to tamsulosin because the combination decreased non voiding contractions as well the number of micturition cycles.

  18. Effects of chronic administration of tamsulosin and tadalafil, alone or in combination, in rats with bladder outlet obstruction induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Prata Regadas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this study was to define if tadalafil causes detrusor muscle impairment and to observe the effect of combination of tadalafil with tamsulosin on the lower urinary tract of rats with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency. Materials and Methods Thirty-one male rats were randomized to following groups: 1 - control; 2 - L-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 3 - Tamsulosin + L-NAME, 4 Tadalafil+L-NAME; and 5 - Tamsulosin + Tadalafil + L-NAME. At the end of the treatment period (30 days, all animals were submitted to urodynamic study. Results The administration of L-NAME increased the number of non-voiding contractions (NVC (1.04 ± 0.22, volume threshold (VT (1.86 ± 0.35, and micturition cycle (MC (1.34 ± 0.11 compared with control (0.52 ± 0.06, 0.62 ± 0.06, and 0.67 ± 0.30, respectively. The administration of tamsulosin reduced the number of NVC (0.57 ± 0.42 and VT (0.76 ± 0.24 compared with L-NAME group. Co-treatment with tadalafil decreased the number of VT (0.85 ± 0.53 and MC (0.76 ± 0.22 compared with L-NAME group. The combination of tamsulosin with tadalafil improved the number of NVC (0.56 ± 0.18, VT (0.97 ± 0.52 and MC (0.68 ± 0.30 compared with L-NAME group. Conclusion In rats with BOO induced by chronic nitric oxide deficiency, tadalafil did not cause impairment in detrusor muscle and seems to have an addictive effect to tamsulosin because the combination decreased non voiding contractions as well the number of micturition cycles.

  19. Nicotine Vapor Method to Induce Nicotine Dependence in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallupi, Marsida; George, Olivier

    2017-07-05

    Nicotine, the main addictive component of tobacco, induces potentiation of brain stimulation reward, increases locomotor activity, and induces conditioned place preference. Nicotine cessation produces a withdrawal syndrome that can be relieved by nicotine replacement therapy. In the last decade, the market for electronic cigarettes has flourished, especially among adolescents. The nicotine vaporizer or electronic nicotine delivery system is a battery-operated device that allows the user to simulate the experience of tobacco smoking without inhaling smoke. The device is designed to be an alternative to conventional cigarettes that emits vaporized nicotine inhaled by the user. This report describes a procedure to vaporize nicotine in the air to produce blood nicotine levels in rodents that are clinically relevant to those that are observed in humans and produce dependence. We also describe how to construct the apparatus to deliver nicotine vapor in a stable, reliable, and consistent manner, as well as how to analyze air for nicotine content. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Chronic intraventricular administration of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) affects the sensitivity of cortical cells to monocular deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, M A; Tieman, D G; Hirsch, H V

    1982-11-04

    In kittens, but not in adult cats, depriving one eye of pattern vision by suturing the lids shut (monocular deprivation or MD) for one week reduces the proportion of binocular units in the visual cortex. A sensitivity of cortical units in adult cats to MD can be produced by infusing exogenous monoamines into the visual cortex. Since LSD interacts with monoamines, we have examined the effects of chronic administration of LSD on the sensitivity to MD for cortical cells in adult cats. Cats were assigned randomly to one of four conditions: MD/LSD, MD/No-LSD, No-MD/LSD, No-MD/No-LSD. An osmotic minipump delivered either LSD or the vehicle solution alone during a one-week period of MD. The animals showed no obvious anomalies during the administration of the drug. After one week the response properties of single units in area 17 of the visual cortex were studied without knowledge of the contents of the individual minipumps. With the exception of ocular dominance, the response properties of units recorded in all animals did not differ from normal. In the control animals (MD/No-LSD, No-MD/LSD, No-MD/No-LSD) the average proportion of binocular cells was 78%; similar to that observed for normal adult cats. However, in the experimental animals, which received LSD during the period of MD, only 52% of the cells were binocular. Our results suggest that chronic intraventricular administration of LSD affects either directly or indirectly the sensitivity of cortical neurons to MD.

  1. Acute agmatine administration, similar to ketamine, reverses depressive-like behavior induced by chronic unpredictable stress in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neis, Vivian B; Bettio, Luis E B; Moretti, Morgana; Rosa, Priscila B; Ribeiro, Camille M; Freitas, Andiara E; Gonçalves, Filipe M; Leal, Rodrigo B; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    Agmatine is an endogenous neuromodulator that has been shown to have antidepressant-like properties. We have previously demonstrated that it can induce a rapid increase in BDNF levels after acute administration, suggesting that agmatine may be a fast-acting antidepressant. To investigate this hypothesis, the present study evaluated the effects of a single administration of agmatine in mice subjected to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), a model of depression responsive only to chronic treatment with conventional antidepressants. The ability of agmatine to reverse CUS-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations was evaluated and compared with those elicited by the fast-acting antidepressant (ketamine) and the conventional antidepressant (fluoxetine). After exposed to CUS for 14days, mice received a single oral dose of agmatine (0.1mg/kg), ketamine (1mg/kg) or fluoxetine (10mg/kg), and were submitted to behavioral evaluation after 24h. The exposure to CUS caused an increased immobility time in the tail suspension test (TST) but did not change anhedonic-related parameters in the splash test. Our findings provided evidence that, similarly to ketamine, agmatine is able to reverse CUS-induced depressive-like behavior in the TST. Western blot analyses of prefrontal cortex (PFC) demonstrated that mice exposed to CUS and/or treated with agmatine, fluoxetine or ketamine did not present alterations in the immunocontent of synaptic proteins [i.e. GluA1, postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) and synapsin]. Altogether, our findings indicate that a single administration of agmatine is able to reverse behavioral alterations induced by CUS in the TST, suggesting that this compound may have fast-acting antidepressant-like properties. However, there was no alteration in the levels of synaptic proteins in the PFC, a result that need to be further investigated in other time points. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Delayed nootropic effects of arginine vasopressin after early postnatal chronic administration to albino rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P A; Voskresenskaya, O G; Kamensky, A A

    2009-06-01

    Intranasal administration of arginine vasopressin (10 microg/kg) to albino rat pups had a strong nootropic effect during training with positive and negative reinforcement. This effect was different in animals of various age groups: training with positive reinforcement was improved in "adolescent" rats and pubertal animals, while during training with negative reinforcement, the nootropic effect of the peptide was more prolonged and persisted also in adult animals.

  3. Chronic administration of fluoxetine and pro-inflammatory cytokine change in a rat model of depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxia Lu

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the chronic effects of fluoxetine, a commonly prescribed SSRI antidepressant, on the peripheral and central levels of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-17 over a 4-interval in a rat model of chronic mild stress (CMS which resembles the human experience of depression. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to CMS+vehicle (n = 9, CMS+fluoxetine (n = 9 and the control (n = 6 groups. Sucrose preference and forced swim tests were performed to assess behavioral change. Blood samples were collected on day 0, 60, 90 and 120 for measurement of cytokine levels in plasma. On day 120, the brain was harvested and central level of cytokines was tested using Luminex. Four months of fluoxetine treatment resulted in changes in the sucrose preference and immobility time measurements, commensurate with antidepressant effects. The CMS+vehicle group exhibited elevated plasma levels of IL-1β, IL-17, and TNF-α on day 60 or 120. Rats treated with fluoxetine demonstrated lower IL-1β in plasma and brain after 90 and 120-day treatment respectively (p<0.05. There was a trend of reduction of IL-6 and TNF-α concentration. This study revealed the potential therapeutic effects of fluoxetine by reducing central and peripheral levels of IL-1β in the alleviation of depressive symptoms.

  4. Delayed effect of chronic administration of corticoids on the taste aversion learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Petr; Mrzilkova, Jana; Stuchlik, Ales; Vales, Karel; Rezacova, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    Long term permanent changes of eating behavior and concomitant structural changes in the CNS are matter of debade in literature. Often there is not enough distinction beween acute and chronic exposure to corticoids in evaluating its effect on behavior and/or brain structural changes. For behavioral evaluation we used well established conditioned taste aversion (CTA) paradigm and coronal Nissl-stained brain sections for evaluation of neuroanatomical changes. The CTA is part of complex adaptive behavioral processes controling food intake. It is well established methodological tool for study of biological substrates of learning and memory. Our hypothesis was that long term changes in laboratory rat behavior induced by exogenous corticosterone are not accompanyied by neurohistological changes in the rat brain, previously described in literature. Firstly, our results support CTA paradigm as promising tool for testing chronic influence of stress hormones on eating behavior and memory. The results support fact that previous long term elevated corticosterone levels disrupt normal eating behavior and it could also lead to structural changes, which could be biological substrates of behavioral changes. The fact we have not found significant morphological changes in brain strengthen the notion of possible subcellular impairment taking place instead of simple neuronal loss.

  5. Chronic administration of the soluble, nonbacterial fraction of kefir attenuates lipid deposition in LDLr-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanna, Adriélly F; Filete, Placielle F; Lima, Ewelyne M; Porto, Marcella L; Meyrelles, Silvana S; Vasquez, Elisardo C; Endringer, Denise C; Lenz, Dominik; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P; Pereira, Thiago M C; Andrade, Tadeu U

    2017-03-01

    Kefir is obtained by the action of acidic bacteria and yeasts that exist in symbiotic association in kefir grains. Recently, this fermented milk drink has been recommended for the treatment of several clinical conditions, such as inflammatory, gastrointestinal, or cardiovascular-related diseases, or a combination of these diseases. However, its effects on atherosclerosis are not yet clear. The aim of this study was to prove that chronic treatment with a soluble, nonbacterial fraction of kefir could reduce the progression of atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLr -/- ) mice. LDLr -/- mice were divided into four groups as follows: RESULTS: The soluble, nonbacterial fraction of kefir reduced lipid deposition (P < 0.05) independent of hypercholesterolemia. Moreover, kefir was capable of diminishing the circulating proinflammatory intereukin (IL)-6 level and the ratio of tumor necrosis factor-α to IL-10 (50% and 42%, P < 0.05, respectively) and augmenting the antiinflammatory IL-10 level by approximately 74% (P < 0.05). Chronic treatment with a soluble nonbacterial fraction of kefir was able to decrease the lipid deposition in LDLr -/- hypercholesteremic mice, at least in part through modifying the circulating cytokine profile. The beneficial effects of kefir provide new perspectives for its use as an adjuvant in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic administration of anticonvulsants but not antidepressants impairs bone strength: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, P W; Pavlatou, M G; Michelson, D; Mouro, C M; Kling, M A; Wong, M-L; Licinio, J; Goldstein, S A

    2015-06-02

    Major depression and bipolar disorder are associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD). Antidepressants such as imipramine (IMIP) and specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been implicated in reduced BMD and/or fracture in older depressed patients. Moreover, anticonvulsants such as valproate (VAL) and carbamazepine (CBZ) are also known to increase fracture rates. Although BMD is a predictor of susceptibility to fracture, bone strength is a more sensitive predictor. We measured mechanical and geometrical properties of bone in 68 male Sprague Dawley rats on IMIP, fluoxetine (FLX), VAL, CBZ, CBZ vehicle and saline (SAL), given intraperitoneally daily for 8 weeks. Distinct regions were tested to failure by four-point bending, whereas load displacement was used to determine stiffness. The left femurs were scanned in a MicroCT system to calculate mid-diaphyseal moments of inertia. None of these parameters were affected by antidepressants. However, VAL resulted in a significant decrease in stiffness and a reduction in yield, and CBZ induced a decrease in stiffness. Only CBZ induced alterations in mechanical properties that were accompanied by significant geometrical changes. These data reveal that chronic antidepressant treatment does not reduce bone strength, in contrast to chronic anticonvulsant treatment. Thus, decreased BMD and increased fracture rates in older patients on antidepressants are more likely to represent factors intrinsic to depression that weaken bone rather than antidepressants per se. Patients with affective illness on anticonvulsants may be at particularly high risk for fracture, especially as they grow older, as bone strength falls progressively with age.

  7. Chronic administration of fluoxetine and pro-inflammatory cytokine change in a rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanxia; Ho, Cyrus S; Liu, Xin; Chua, Anna N; Wang, Wei; McIntyre, Roger S; Ho, Roger C

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the chronic effects of fluoxetine, a commonly prescribed SSRI antidepressant, on the peripheral and central levels of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-17 over a 4-interval in a rat model of chronic mild stress (CMS) which resembles the human experience of depression. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to CMS+vehicle (n = 9), CMS+fluoxetine (n = 9) and the control (n = 6) groups. Sucrose preference and forced swim tests were performed to assess behavioral change. Blood samples were collected on day 0, 60, 90 and 120 for measurement of cytokine levels in plasma. On day 120, the brain was harvested and central level of cytokines was tested using Luminex. Four months of fluoxetine treatment resulted in changes in the sucrose preference and immobility time measurements, commensurate with antidepressant effects. The CMS+vehicle group exhibited elevated plasma levels of IL-1β, IL-17, and TNF-α on day 60 or 120. Rats treated with fluoxetine demonstrated lower IL-1β in plasma and brain after 90 and 120-day treatment respectively (pfluoxetine by reducing central and peripheral levels of IL-1β in the alleviation of depressive symptoms.

  8. Chronic antidepressant administration alleviates frontal and hippocampal BDNF deficits in CUMS rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Gu, Fenghua; Chen, Jia; Dong, Wenxin

    2010-12-17

    Stress activates the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, regulates the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the brain, and mediates mood. Antidepressants alleviate stress and up-regulate BDNF gene expression. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) and the different kinds of antidepressant treatments on the HPA axis and the BDNF expression in the rat brain. Adult Wistar male rats were exposed to a six-week CUMS procedure and received different antidepressant treatments including venlafaxine, mirtazapine, and fluoxetine. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR were used to measure BDNF expression levels in the rat brain, and ELISAs were used to investigate the plasma corticosterone (CORT) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. CUMS significantly decreased the BDNF protein level in the DG, CA1, and CA3 of the hippocampus and increased plasma CORT level. Chronic antidepressant treatments all significantly increased BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus and the pre-frontal cortex. In addition, venlafaxine and mirtazapine inhibited the increase of plasma CORT level. These results suggested that an increase in the BDNF level in the brain could be a pivotal mechanism of various antidepressants to exert their therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tai Chi: a new star for the administration of chronic diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tai Chi Quan (Tai Chi, a traditional Chinese martial art, has become increasingly popular in western countries. Tai Chi integrates deep diaphragmatic breathing with body movements to achieve a harmonious balance between the body and mind, which facilitates the flow of internal energy (Qi. An increasing number of studies have reported that Tai Chi significantly benefits aerobic capacity, muscular strength, balance, and psychological well-being. In addition, Tai Chi offers unique advantages for physical fitness and the treatment of chronic diseases. This paper reviews the existing literatures on Tai Chi, introduces its health-promotion effects and the potential clinical applications, and summarizes recent studies that prove Tai Chi is safe and effective for patients with neurological diseases, rheumatological diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and cancers. After reviewing the literatures in this field, we conclude that the long-term results of practicing Tai Chi may benefit the cardiovascular system, motor system, respiratory system, and nervous system. However, the potential role and mechanism of Tai Chi has not yet been determined. Further studies with long follow-up periods are necessary to meet the standards of clinical applications.

  10. Analysis of hepatic gene expression during fatty liver change due to chronic ethanol administration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, H.-Q.; Je, Young-Tae; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    Chronic consumption of ethanol can cause cumulative liver damage that can ultimately lead to cirrhosis. To explore the mechanisms of alcoholic steatosis, we investigated the global intrahepatic gene expression profiles of livers from mice administered alcohol. Ethanol was administered by feeding the standard Lieber-DeCarli diet, of which 36% (high dose) and 3.6% (low dose) of the total calories were supplied from ethanol for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Histopathological evaluation of the liver samples revealed fatty changes and punctate necrosis in the high-dose group and ballooning degeneration in the low-dose group. In total, 292 genes were identified as ethanol responsive, and several of these differed significantly in expression compared to those of control mice (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05). Specifically, the expression levels of genes involved in hepatic lipid transport and metabolism were examined. An overall net increase in gene expression was observed for genes involved in (i) glucose transport and glycolysis, (ii) fatty acid influx and de novo synthesis, (iii) fatty acid esterification to triglycerides, and (iv) cholesterol transport, de novo cholesterol synthesis, and bile acid synthesis. Collectively, these data provide useful information concerning the global gene expression changes that occur due to alcohol intake and provide important insights into the comprehensive mechanisms of chronic alcoholic steatosis

  11. Use of Nicotine in Electronic Nicotine and Non-Nicotine Delivery Systems by US Adults, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Scott R; Kemp, Catherine B; Heath, J Wesley; Pechacek, Terry F; Eriksen, Michael P

    Nicotine in electronic nicotine and non-nicotine delivery systems (ENDS/ENNDS) may present a risk of harm to those with cardiovascular disease and the fetuses of pregnant women. We assessed the extent to which adult users of ENDS/ENNDS used these products with nicotine. We obtained data for this study from a national probability survey of 6051 US adults that was conducted in August and September 2015. Of 399 adult ENDS/ENNDS users who were current smokers, 337 (80.7%) used ENDS/ENNDS containing nicotine, whereas only 29 of 71 (36.9%) ENDS/ENNDS users who were never smokers used ENDS/ENNDS containing nicotine. Assessments of the population health impact of ENDS/ENNDS use among never smokers should take into account the extent to which use involves nicotine.

  12. Distribution of carbon-11 labeled methamphetamine and the effect of its chronic administration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizugaki, Michinao; Hishinuma, Takanori; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    1993-01-01

    [ 11 C]Methamphetamine, a psychotropic agent, was synthesized by N-methylation of amphetamine with [ 11 C]CH 3 I in hopes that it could be applied in the near future to assist positron emission tomography (PET) in the imaging of its distribution in the human brain. The regional distribution of [ 11 C]methamphetamine was investigated in the mice brain at various intervals after an intravenous (i.v.) injection. Radioactivity was higher in the hypothalamus, cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Furthermore, in chronically administered mice, the uptake of [ 11 C]methamphetamine was higher in the striatum than those in other regions. The regional differences in the distribution of methamphetamine in the mice brain may enable the imaging of its distribution by PET using [ 11 C]methamphetamine. (Author)

  13. Distribution of carbon-11 labeled methamphetamine and the effect of its chronic administration in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizugaki, Michinao; Hishinuma, Takanori; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    1993-01-01

    [ 11 C]methamphetamine, a psychotropic agent, was synthesized by N-methylation of amphetamine with [ 11 C]CH 3 I in hopes that it could be applied in the near future to assist positron emission tomography (PET) in the imaging of its distribution in the human brain. The regional distribution of [ 11 C]methamphetamine was investigated in the mouse brain at various intervals after an intravenous (i.v.) injection. Radioactivity was higher in the hypothalamus, cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Furthermore, in chronically administered mice, the uptake of [ 11 C]methamphetamine was higher in the striatum than those in other regions. The regional differences in the distribution of methamphetamine in the mice brain may enable the imaging of its distribution by PET using [ 11 C]methamphetamine. (author)

  14. Distribution of carbon-11 labeled methamphetamine and the effect of its chronic administration in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizugaki, Michinao; Hishinuma, Takanori; Nakamura, Hitoshi (Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences) (and others)

    1993-05-01

    [[sup 11]C]methamphetamine, a psychotropic agent, was synthesized by N-methylation of amphetamine with [[sup 11]C]CH[sub 3]I in hopes that it could be applied in the near future to assist positron emission tomography (PET) in the imaging of its distribution in the human brain. The regional distribution of [[sup 11]C]methamphetamine was investigated in the mouse brain at various intervals after an intravenous (i.v.) injection. Radioactivity was higher in the hypothalamus, cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Furthermore, in chronically administered mice, the uptake of [[sup 11]C]methamphetamine was higher in the striatum than those in other regions. The regional differences in the distribution of methamphetamine in the mice brain may enable the imaging of its distribution by PET using [[sup 11]C]methamphetamine. (author).

  15. Spinal neuropeptide expression and neuropathic behavior in the acute and chronic phases after spinal cord injury: Effects of progesterone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, María F; Villar, Marcelo J; Brumovsky, Pablo R; González, Susana L

    2017-02-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) develop chronic pain that severely compromises their quality of life. We have previously reported that progesterone (PG), a neuroprotective steroid, could offer a promising therapeutic strategy for neuropathic pain. In the present study, we explored temporal changes in the expression of the neuropeptides galanin and tyrosine (NPY) and their receptors (GalR1 and GalR2; Y1R and Y2R, respectively) in the injured spinal cord and evaluated the impact of PG administration on both neuropeptide systems and neuropathic behavior. Male rats were subjected to spinal cord hemisection at T13 level, received daily subcutaneous injections of PG or vehicle, and were evaluated for signs of mechanical and thermal allodynia. Real time PCR was used to determine relative mRNA levels of neuropeptides and receptors, both in the acute (1day) and chronic (28days) phases after injury. A significant increase in Y1R and Y2R expression, as well as a significant downregulation in GalR2 mRNA levels, was observed 1day after SCI. Interestingly, PG early treatment prevented Y1R upregulation and resulted in lower NPY, Y2R and GalR1 mRNA levels. In the chronic phase, injured rats showed well-established mechanical and cold allodynia and significant increases in galanin, NPY, GalR1 and Y1R mRNAs, while maintaining reduced GalR2 expression. Animals receiving PG treatment showed basal expression levels of galanin, NPY, GalR1 and Y1R, and reduced Y2R mRNA levels. Also, and in line with previously published observations, PG-treated animals did not develop mechanical allodynia and showed reduced sensitivity to cold stimulation. Altogether, we show that SCI leads to considerable changes in the spinal expression of galanin, NPY and their associated receptors, and that early and sustained PG administration prevents them. Moreover, our data suggest the participation of galaninergic and NPYergic systems in the plastic changes associated with SCI-induced neuropathic pain

  16. Evaluation of nicotine in tobacco-free-nicotine commercial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinghausen, Garrett; Lee, Jauh T; Weatherly, Choyce A; Lopez, Diego A; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2017-06-01

    Recently, a variety of new tobacco-free-nicotine, TFN, products have been commercialized as e-liquids. Tobacco-derived nicotine contains predominantly (S)-(-)-nicotine, whereas TFN products may not. The TFN products are said to be cleaner, purer substances, devoid of toxic components that come from the tobacco extraction process. A variety of commercial tobacco and TFN products were analyzed to identify the presence and composition of each nicotine enantiomer. A rapid and effective enantiomeric separation of nicotine has been developed using a modified macrocyclic glycopeptide bonded to superficially porous particles. The enantiomeric assay can be completed in nicotine, which is present in much greater quantities in commercial TFN products compared to commercial tobacco-derived products. Such studies are required by the FDA for new enantiomeric pharmacological products. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Multifactorial comparative proteomic study of cytochrome P450 2E1 function in chronic alcohol administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Wang

    Full Text Available With the use of iTRAQ technique, a multifactorial comparative proteomic study can be performed. In this study, to obtain an overview of ethanol, CYP2E1 and gender effects on liver injury and gain more insight into the underlying molecular mechanism, mouse liver proteomes were quantitatively analyzed using iTRAQ under eight conditions including mice of different genders, wild type versus CYP2E1 knockout, and normal versus alcohol diet. A series of statistical and bioinformatic analyses were explored to simplify and clarify multifactorial comparative proteomic data. First, with the Principle Component analysis, six proteins, CYP2E1, FAM25, CA3, BHMT, HIBADH and ECHS1, involved in oxidation reduction, energy and lipid metabolism and amino acid metabolism, were identified as the most differentially expressed gene products across all of the experimental conditions of our chronic alcoholism model. Second, hierarchical clustering analysis showed CYP2E1 knockout played a primary role in the overall differential protein expression compared with ethanol and gender factors. Furthermore, pair-wise multiple comparisons have revealed that the only significant expression difference lied in wild-type and CYP2E1 knockout mice both treated with ethanol. Third, K-mean clustering analysis indicated that the CYP2E1 knockout had the reverse effect on ethanol induced oxidative stress and lipid oxidation. More importantly, IPA analysis of proteomic data inferred that the gene expressions of two upstream regulators, NRF2 and PPARα, regulated by chronic alcohol feeding and CYP2E1 knockout, are involved in ethanol induced oxidative stress and lipid oxidation. The present study provides an effectively comprehensive data analysis strategy to compare multiple biological factors, contributing to biochemical effects of alcohol on the liver. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with data set identifier of PXD000635.

  18. Effect of a nicotine vaccine on nicotine binding to the beta2-nAChRs in vivo in human tobacco smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterlis, Irina; Hannestad, Jonas O.; Perkins, Evgenia; Bois, Frederic; D’Souza, D. Cyril; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Seibyl, John P.; Hatsukami, Dorothy M.; Cosgrove, Kelly P.; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Nicotine acts in the brain to promote smoking in part by binding to the beta2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (β2*-nAChRs) and acting in the mesolimbic reward pathway. The effects of nicotine from smoking one tobacco cigarette are significant (80% of β2*-nAChRs occupied for >6h). This likely contributes to the maintenance of smoking dependence and low cessation outcomes. Development of nicotine vaccines provides potential for alternative treatments. We used [123I]5IA-85380 SPECT to evaluate the effect of 3′-AmNic-rEPA on the amount of nicotine that binds to the β2*-nAChRs in the cortical and subcortical regions in smokers. Method Eleven smokers (36years (SD=13); 19cig/day (SD=11) for 10years (SD=7) who were dependent on nicotine (Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence score =5.5 (SD=3); plasma nicotine 9.1 ng/mL (SD=5)) participated in 2 SPECT scan days: before and after immunization with 4–400μg doses of 3′-AmNic-rEPA. On SPECT scan days, 3 30-min baseline emission scans were obtained, followed by administration of IV nicotine (1.5mg/70kg) and up to 9 30-min emission scans. Results β2*-nAChR availability was quantified as VT/fP and nicotine binding was derived using the Lassen plot approach. Immunization led to a 12.5% reduction in nicotine binding (F=5.19, df=1,10, p=0.05). Significant positive correlations were observed between nicotine bound to β2*-nAChRs and nicotine injected before but not after vaccination (p=0.05 vs. p=0.98). There was a significant reduction in the daily number of cigarettes and desire for a cigarette (p=.01 and p=.04, respectively). Conclusions This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that immunization with nicotine vaccine can reduce the amount of nicotine binding to β2*-nAChRs and disrupt the relationship between nicotine administered vs. nicotine available to occupy β2*-nAChRs. PMID:23429725

  19. A Two-Day Continuous Nicotine Infusion Is Sufficient to Demonstrate Nicotine Withdrawal in Rats as Measured Using Intracranial Self-Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muelken, Peter; Schmidt, Clare E.; Shelley, David; Tally, Laura; Harris, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance of the negative affective (emotional) symptoms of nicotine withdrawal (e.g., anhedonia, anxiety) contributes to tobacco addiction. Establishing the minimal nicotine exposure conditions required to demonstrate negative affective withdrawal signs in animals, as well as understanding moderators of these conditions, could inform tobacco addiction-related research, treatment, and policy. The goal of this study was to determine the minimal duration of continuous nicotine infusion required to demonstrate nicotine withdrawal in rats as measured by elevations in intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds (anhedonia-like behavior). Administration of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine (3.0 mg/kg, s.c.) on alternate test days throughout the course of a 2-week continuous nicotine infusion (3.2 mg/kg/day via osmotic minipump) elicited elevations in ICSS thresholds beginning on the second day of infusion. Magnitude of antagonist-precipitated withdrawal did not change with further nicotine exposure and mecamylamine injections, and was similar to that observed in a positive control group receiving mecamylamine following a 14-day nicotine infusion. Expression of a significant withdrawal effect was delayed in nicotine-infused rats receiving mecamylamine on all test days rather than on alternate test days. In a separate study, rats exhibited a transient increase in ICSS thresholds following cessation of a 2-day continuous nicotine infusion (3.2 mg/kg/day). Magnitude of this spontaneous withdrawal effect was similar to that observed in rats receiving a 9-day nicotine infusion. Our findings demonstrate that rats exhibit antagonist-precipitated and spontaneous nicotine withdrawal following a 2-day continuous nicotine infusion, at least under the experimental conditions studied here. Magnitude of these effects were similar to those observed in traditional models involving more prolonged nicotine exposure. Further development of these models

  20. Effect of chronic administration of Tamoxifen on fertility in male bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, A J; Ramachandra, S G; Ramesh, V; Krishnamurthy, H N; Jayaraman, S; Gopalakrishnan, K; Juneja, H S

    1998-01-01

    Administration of Tamoxifen via the Alzet pump at a rate of 50 micrograms hr-1 for 90 days in the adult male bonnet monkeys Macaca radiata had no effect on the serum testosterone concentration determined at 10 AM and 10 PM as well as total sperm count determined at 15-day intervals over a period of 260 days. However, a significant reduction in sperm motility was observed beyond 90 days up until the 225th day. Breeding studies conducted from day 90 to 260 revealed that these males were infertile.

  1. Acute effects of high-dose intragastric nicotine on mucosal defense mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindell, G; Bukhave, Klaus; Lilja, I

    1997-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is overrepresented among smokers; they also heal slowly and relapse frequently. Data are accumulating that smoking is detrimental to gastroduodenal mucosal cytoprotection. This study was designed to assess acute effects of high-dose intragastric nicotine, as it has been shown...... that nicotine is accumulated in gastric juice when smoking, Seven healthy smokers were given nicotine base (6 mg) as tablets, which yielded very high intragastric concentrations and plasma levels comparable to those seen when smoking. In addition to nicotine analysis, concentration levels of prostaglandin E(2......) (PGE(2)), phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), and phospholipid classes were measured before and after nicotine administration, Nicotine inhibited PGE(2) levels by 27-81%, whereas PLA(2) and total phospholipids were unaffected. Lysolecithin, a degradation product of the main constituent of gastric surfactant...

  2. Synthesis of 4,4-ditritio-(+)-nicotine: comparative binding and distribution studies with natural enantiomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincek, W.C.; Martin, B.R.; Aceto, M.D.; Tripathi, H.L.; May, E.L.; Harris, L.S.

    1981-11-01

    The preparation of 4,4-ditritio-(+)-nicotine (Vb) (specific activity 10.3 Ci/mmole)from (+)-nicotine (Ib) via (-) 4,4-dibromocotinine (IIIb) is described. Although Ib is 10-30 times less potent than (-)-nicotine (Ia) in the CNS, its binding affinity for the crude mitochondrial or nuclear fraction of whole rat brain is only three times less than that of Ia. However, distribution studies showed that the maximum brain levels of (-)-(3H) nicotine are nearly twice those of (+)-(3H)-nicotine following administration of a 2-micrograms/kg dose. Binding affinity and disposition of the stereoisomers account for a portion of the pharmacological stereospecificity of nicotine.

  3. The effect of chronic administration of ketoconazol on spermatogenesis indices and testis tissue in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E Safavi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Ketoconazole, a broad spectrum antifungal agent has been employed widely in the treatment of fungal diseases. In addition to being antifungal, studies have indicated that this drug has an inhibitory effect on steroid hormone production including glucocorticoids and sex hormones and also its administration causes reduction in the amount of blood testosterone level and histologic changes in testicular tissue of laboratory animals. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of long term ketoconazole administration on spermatogenesis indices in testicular tissue of mice. In this experimental study 50 male mice were used which were allocated to 5 groups each containing 10 animals. The mice received a 50 mg/kg dose of ketoconazole daily for a period of 15 days, 1, 2 and 3 months orally. One group was used as the control and the other 4 groups received Ketoconazole, testicular tissue samples were collected at the end of the aforementioned time period, and after preparation of tissue sections and staining with hematoxylin and coin the spermiogenesis indices including tubular differentiation index (TDI, spermatogenesis index (SI and repopulation index (RI were studied. The results indicated that SI and RI decreased significantly (p

  4. Effect of chronic administration of phenobarbital, or bromide, on pharmacokinetics of levetiracetam in dogs with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñana, K R; Nettifee-Osborne, J A; Papich, M G

    2015-01-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is a common add-on antiepileptic drug (AED) in dogs with refractory seizures. Concurrent phenobarbital administration alters the disposition of LEV in healthy dogs. To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of LEV in dogs with epilepsy when administered concurrently with conventional AEDs. Eighteen client-owned dogs on maintenance treatment with LEV and phenobarbital (PB group, n = 6), LEV and bromide (BR group, n = 6) or LEV, phenobarbital and bromide (PB-BR group, n = 6). Prospective pharmacokinetic study. Blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours after LEV administration. Plasma LEV concentrations were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. To account for dose differences among dogs, LEV concentrations were normalized to the mean study dose (26.4 mg/kg). Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed on adjusted concentrations, using a noncompartmental method, and area-under-the-curve (AUC) calculated to the last measured time point. Compared to the PB and PB-BR groups, the BR group had significantly higher peak concentration (Cmax ) (73.4 ± 24.0 versus 37.5 ± 13.7 and 26.5 ± 8.96 μg/mL, respectively, P phenobarbital in dogs. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. Influence of acute and chronic administration of methadone hydrochloride on NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome P-450 of mouse liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, R K; Johnson, E A; Bhattacharjee, G; Stenger, R J

    1976-03-01

    Administration of a single acute dose (20 mg/kg body weight) of methadone hydrochloride to both male and female mice increased the specific activity of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and did not change much the content of cytochrome P-450 of their liver microsomes. Administration of multiple acute doses of methadone in male mice increased the specific activity of cytochrome c reductase and the content of cytochrome P-450 of their liver microsomes. Chronic administration of progressively increasing doses of methadone (up to 40 mg/kg body weight) to male mice increased the specific activity of c reductase. Similar chronic administration of methadone up to 28 mg/kg body weight also increased the microsomal content of P-450, but with higher doses of methadone, the content of P-450 declined and finally dropped slightly below control levels. The levels of c reductase activity and P-450 content returned to normal about two weeks after discontinuation of methadone administration.

  6. Effect of chronic ethanol administration on iron metabolism in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, J.; Casas, M.; Rama, R.

    1988-01-01

    This study shows that the ingestion of ethanol provokes alterations in iron metabolism which may lead to iron overload. Impaired release of reticuloendothelial iron was shown by a decrease of the maximum red blood cell utilization when radioactive iron was supplied as colloidal iron. An impairment in the erythropoietic activity of ethanoltreated animals was also observed, as can be seen from the reduced plasma iron turnover and red blood cell utilization within 24 h of iron administration. A rise in marrow transit time was also observed. In ethanol-treated rats there was an increase in the amount of iron retained both in the liver and the spleen. This was observed in both sexes and also in the offspring from ethanol-treated mothers. (author)

  7. The effect of chronic administration of Apium graveolens aqueous extract on learning and memory in normal and diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdad Roghani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract   Introduction: Diabetes mellitus accompanies with disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills in the human society and experimental animals. Considering the beneficial antidiabetic potential of Apium graveolens (AG , this research study was conducted to evaluate the effect of chronic i.p. administration of AG on learning and memory in diabetic rats using passive avoidance and Y-maze tests.   Methods: Female Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, AG-treated control, diabetic, and AG-treated diabetic groups. AG treatment continued for 4 weeks. For induction of diabetes, streptozotocin was injected i.p. at a single dose of 60 mg/kg. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency (IL and step-through latency (STL were determined at the end of study using passive avoidance test. Meanwhile, alternation behavior percentage was determined using Y maze. Results: There was a significant increase (p<0.05 in IL in diabetic and AG-treated diabetic groups after 4 weeks as compared to control group. In this respect, there was no significant difference between diabetic and AG-treated diabetic groups. On the other hand, STL significantly decreased (p<0.05 in diabetic group and significantly increased (p<0.05 in AG-treated diabetic group as compared to control group at the end of study. In addition, STL did not significantly change in AG-treated control group in comparison with control group. In addition, results of Y-maze test showed that there is no significant difference between diabetic and Ag-treated diabetic groups and between control and Ag-treated control group regarding alternation behavior. Discussion: In summary, chronic oral administration of AG could enhance the consolidation and recall capability of stored information only in diabetic animals and did not affect spatial memory of diabetic animals.  

  8. The effect of chronic administration of Apium graveolens aqueous extract on learning and memory in normal and diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdad Roghani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract   Introduction: Diabetes mellitus accompanies with disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills in the human society and experimental animals. Considering the beneficial antidiabetic potential of Apium graveolens (AG , this research study was conducted to evaluate the effect of chronic i.p. administration of AG on learning and memory in diabetic rats using passive avoidance and Y-maze tests.   Methods: Female Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, AG-treated control, diabetic, and AG-treated diabetic groups. AG treatment continued for 4 weeks. For induction of diabetes, streptozotocin was injected i.p. at a single dose of 60 mg/kg. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency (IL and step-through latency (STL were determined at the end of study using passive avoidance test. Meanwhile, alternation behavior percentage was determined using Y maze. Results: There was a significant increase (p<0.05 in IL in diabetic and AG-treated diabetic groups after 4 weeks as compared to control group. In this respect, there was no significant difference between diabetic and AG-treated diabetic groups. On the other hand, STL significantly decreased (p<0.05 in diabetic group and significantly increased (p<0.05 in AG-treated diabetic group as compared to control group at the end of study. In addition, STL did not significantly change in AG-treated control group in comparison with control group. In addition, results of Y-maze test showed that there is no significant difference between diabetic and Ag-treated diabetic groups and between control and Ag-treated control group regarding alternation behavior. Discussion: In summary, chronic oral administration of AG could enhance the consolidation and recall capability of stored information only in diabetic animals and did not affect spatial memory of diabetic animals.

  9. Effects of the repeated administration of adenosine and heparin on myocardial perfusion in patients with chronic stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, H V; Sciammarella, M G; Lenihan, K; Michaels, A D; Botvinick, E H

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism by which ischemia stimulates angiogenesis is unknown. Adenosine is released during myocardial ischemia and may be a mediator of this process. Experimental data suggest that heparin may enhance this effect. The purpose of this open-labeled, placebo-controlled trial was to determine whether repeated intravenous administration of adenosine and heparin could mimic physiologic angiogenesis and reduce the amount of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease. Subjects with chronic stable angina refractory to conventional medical therapy and not suitable for revascularization received either adenosine (140 microg/kg/min for 6 minutes) and heparin (10,000 U bolus), (n = 14), or placebo, (n = 7) daily for 10 days. All patients underwent baseline and follow-up exercise testing with thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging. A semiquantitative assessment of the extent and severity of the perfusion abnormalities was calculated by 2 blinded investigators. There was no significant change in exercise duration or in the peak heart rate systolic blood pressure product associated with adenosine and heparin compared with placebo treatment. There was, however, a 9% reduction in the extent (60.6 +/- 4.0 vs 54.9 +/- 4.1, p = 0.03) and a 14% improvement in severity (41.5 +/- 3.2 vs 35.7 +/- 2.9, p = 0.01) of the myocardial perfusion abnormalities seen in patients who received adenosine and heparin compared with placebo. Thus, in this pilot study, repeated administration of adenosine and heparin reduced the amount of exercise-induced ischemia in patients with chronic stable angina refractory to conventional treatment.

  10. Alternative Splicing of AMPA subunits in Prefrontal Cortical Fields of Cynomolgus Monkeys following Chronic Ethanol Self-Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen eAcosta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional impairment of the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex underlies deficits in executive control that characterize addictive disorders, including alcohol addiction. Previous studies indicate that alcohol alters glutamate neurotransmission and one substrate of these effects may be through the reconfiguration of the subunits constituting ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR complexes. Glutamatergic transmission is integral to cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical communication and alcohol-induced changes in the abundance of the receptor subunits and/or their splice variants may result in critical functional impairments of prefrontal cortex in alcohol dependence. To this end, the effects of chronic ethanol self-administration on glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA (GRIA subunit variant and kainate (GRIK subunit mRNA expression were studied in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC of male cynomolgus monkeys. In DLPFC, total AMPA splice variant expression and total kainate receptor subunit expression were significantly decreased in alcohol drinking monkeys. Expression levels of GRIA3 flip and flop and GRIA4 flop mRNAs in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations averaged over the six months prior to necropsy. In OFC, AMPA subunit splice variant expression was reduced in the alcohol treated group. GRIA2 flop mRNA levels in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations averaged over the six months prior to necropsy. Results from these studies provide further evidence of transcriptional regulation of iGluR subunits in the primate brain following chronic alcohol self-administration. Additional studies examining the cellular localization of such effects in the framework of primate prefrontal cortical circuitry are warranted.

  11. Evaluation of skeletal and cardiac muscle function after chronic administration of thymosin beta-4 in the dystrophin deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Spurney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tbeta4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. We studied the effects of chronic administration of Tbeta4 on the skeletal and cardiac muscle of dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Female wild type (C57BL10/ScSnJ and mdx mice, 8-10 weeks old, were treated with 150 microg of Tbeta4 twice a week for 6 months. To promote muscle pathology, mice were exercised for 30 minutes twice a week. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function were assessed via grip strength and high frequency echocardiography. Localization of Tbeta4 and amount of fibrosis were quantified using immunohistochemistry and Gomori's tri-chrome staining, respectively. Mdx mice treated with Tbeta4 showed a significant increase in skeletal muscle regenerating fibers compared to untreated mdx mice. Tbeta4 stained exclusively in the regenerating fibers of mdx mice. Although untreated mdx mice had significantly decreased skeletal muscle strength compared to untreated wild type, there were no significant improvements in mdx mice after treatment. Systolic cardiac function, measured as percent shortening fraction, was decreased in untreated mdx mice compared to untreated wild type and there was no significant difference after treatment in mdx mice. Skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis were also significantly increased in untreated mdx mice compared to wild type, but there was no significant improvement in treated mdx mice. In exercised dystrophin deficient mice, chronic administration of Tbeta4 increased the number of regenerating fibers in skeletal muscle and could have a potential role in treatment of skeletal muscle disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  12. Ginger extract protects rat's kidneys against oxidative damage after chronic ethanol administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirpoor, Aireza; Rezaei, Farzaneh; Fard, Amin Abdollahzade; Afshari, Ali Taghizadeh; Gharalari, Farzaneh Hosseini; Rasmi, Yousef

    2016-12-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion is associated with pronounced detrimental effects on the renal system. In the current study, the protective effect of ginger extract on ethanol-induced damage was evaluated through determining 8-OHdG, cystatin C, glomerular filtration rate, and pathological changes such as cell proliferation and fibrosis in rats' kidneys. Male wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups and were treated as follows: (1) control, (2) ethanol and (3) ginger extract treated ethanolic (GETE) groups. After a six weeks period of treatment, the results revealed proliferation of glomerular and tubular cells, fibrosis in glomerular and peritubular and a significant rise in the level of 8-OHdG, cystatin C, plasma urea and creatinine. Moreover, compared to the control group, the ethanol group showed a significant decrease in the urine creatinine and creatinine clearance. In addition, significant amelioration of changes in the structure of kidneys, along with restoration of the biochemical alterations were found in the ginger extract treated ethanolic group, compared to the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces kidneys abnormality by oxidative DNA damage and oxidative stress, and that these effects can be alleviated using ginger as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Naloxone Induces Frequent Jumping after Chronic Morphine and Methamphetamine Co-Administration in Rats

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    Gholamreza Kaka

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Combined use of an opioid with a psychostimulant is popular among drug abusers. Such “polydrug use” may increase drug effects or attenuate adverse effects of either drug alone. We proposed that a combination of methamphetamine (meth and morphine may change physical opioid withdrawal symptoms. Adult male rats were chronically injected with cumulative subcutaneous (s.c. doses of morphine, meth or a combination of both drugs within five days. On day six, a challenge dose of the same drug was injected. Two hours later, precipitated withdrawal symptoms were scored within 30 minutes after naloxone (1mg/kg, i.p. injection. Both frequency and incidence of jumping significantly increased in combined treated animals (P<0.05. The sole emergent symptom in combined treated animals was digging which we consider as another escaping behavior in addition to jumping. Our findings imply that combined use of meth and morphine may exacerbate averseness of morphine withdrawal which may cause more intense opioid dependence

  14. Diazepam administration prevents testosterone decrease and lipofuscin accumulation in testis of mouse exposed to chronic noise stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoli, R; Carpi, A; Giambelluca, M A; Grasso, L; Scavuzzo, M C; Giannessi F, F

    2006-10-01

    Lipofuscin is an autofluorescent and undegradable material, which accumulates in tissues during ageing and under different types of stress. Among these, oxidative stress represents a major trigger for lipofuscin formation. However, prolonged noise exposure is also an effective stressful stimuli. Diazepam may inhibit lipofuscinogenesis in liver and prevent the noise-induced reduction of the steroidogenesis in the adrenal gland. The aim of the study was to ascertain whether chronic noise exposure causes lipofuscin accumulation in mouse testis, and to evaluate the effects of diazepam administration. Eight-week old mice were either exposed for 6 weeks (6 h day(-1)) to white-noise (group A), or received diazepam (3 mg kg(-1), i.p.) before noise exposures (group B), while a further group was used as control (group C). Light fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed lipofuscin in large amounts in the Leydig cells in mice of group A, which concomitantly had low serum testosterone levels; pre-treatment with diazepam occluded both effects. The present study indicates that: (i) chronic noise exposure causes lipofuscin accumulation at the level of the Leydig cells and a decrease in testosterone; (ii) all these effects are suppressed by pre-treatment with diazepam. As the Leydig cells represent the only cellular type of the interstitial testicular tissue having peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, these results could be explained by the capacity of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptors to prevent reactive oxygen species damage and to increase the resistance of these cells to oxidative stress.

  15. Does Chronic Administration of Sodium Valproate to Juvenile Rats Induce Movement Disorder and Cognitive Dysfunction during Adulthood?

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    Namitha Nair

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children with seizure disorder are often treated with sodium valproate (SV on long-term basis. SV acts mainly through gamma amino butyric acid pathways, reducing the excitatory neurotransmission and modifying the monoamine concentration. Altered monoamine concentration by SV is expected to cause movement disorder and cognitive dysfunction, considered reversible after the withdrawal of treatment, but some claim it to be irreversible. It is not clear whether such adverse effects continue during adulthood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chronic administration of SV in juvenile rats causes movement disorder and cognitive dysfunction during their early adulthood. Methods: Sixteen-day-old male Wistar rats from the central animal house, KMC, Mangalore, India in 2015, received either 200 or 400 mg/kg dose of SV for 45 consecutive days and another group served as control. Thirty days after discontinuation of the drug, at postnatal day 90, the rats were tested for movement disorder and cognitive function. Results: Chronic SV treatment in juvenile rats resulted in slow movement, tremors during adulthood but did not affect muscle tone, locomotor and exploratory activities. It also caused cognitive dysfunction in adult rats. Conclusion: Despite the reported safety of chronic SV therapy, its adverse effects such as Parkinsonism symptoms or cognitive dysfunctions should be of concern in all young patients treated with SV for many years. Persistence of cognitive impairment, tremors and generalized slow movement during adulthood after cessation of treatment that was observed in this study, warrants a close monitoring system in children who receive long-term sodium valproate.

  16. Effects of acute and chronic aripiprazole treatment on choice between cocaine self-administration and food under a concurrent schedule of reinforcement in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Woldbye, David

    2008-01-01

    the hypothesis that aripiprazole, both as acute and as chronic treatment, would preferentially decrease cocaine self-administration while sparing behavior maintained by a natural reinforcer, resulting in a shift in the allocation of behavior from cocaine-taking towards the alternative reinforcer. MATERIALS......-administration or cocaine choice, despite a dose-dependent decrease in overall response rates and food-maintained behavior. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm and extend earlier findings and indicate that acute administration of aripiprazole can decrease cocaine self-administration. However, based on the present data...

  17. Histologic evaluation of the effect of nicotine administration on bone regeneration: a study in dogs Avaliação histológica do efeito da nicotina sobre a regeneração óssea: estudo em cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Bezerra Saldanha

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the histometric impact of nicotine on bone regeneration of surgically created alveolar ridge defects in dogs. Sixteen mongrel dogs were used. One defect was surgically created unilaterally in the mandible, and left to heal spontaneously. The animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: Group 1 - control (n = 8 and Group 2 - subcutaneous nicotine administration (2 mg/kg twice a day (n = 8. After 4 months, the animals were sacrificed and the specimens routinely processed for semi-serial decalcified sections. Bone height (BH, bone width (BW, bone density (BD, and bone area (BA of the newly-formed bone were evaluated. Intergroup analysis (Mann-Whitney rank sum test showed that regardless of the presence of nicotine, no significant differences were observed regarding bone width (BW, bone area (BA and bone height (BH (p > 0.05. On the other hand, it was demonstrated that nicotine administration significantly influenced the proportion of mineralized tissue within the limits of the newly-formed bone (BD (p O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar histometricamente a influência da nicotina sobre a regeneração óssea de defeitos criados cirurgicamente em rebordos alveolares edêntulos de cães. Defeitos ósseos foram criados cirurgicamente em um dos lados da mandíbula de dezesseis cães e foram deixados para que curassem espontanea-mente. Os animais foram aleatoriamente designados para um dos seguintes grupos: Grupo 1 - controle (n = 8 e Grupo 2 - administração subcutânea de nicotina (2 mg/kg duas vezes ao dia durante 4 meses (n = 8. Os animais foram sacrificados, e secções semi-seriadas descalcificadas, obtidas. Os parâmetros histométricos avaliados foram altura, largura, área e densidade do tecido ósseo neoformado. A análise intergrupos (Mann-Whitney "rank sum test" demonstrou que a administração de nicotina não influenciou altura, largura e área de tecido

  18. Nicotine disrupts safety learning by enhancing fear associated with a safety cue via the dorsal hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, David A; Kutlu, Munir G; Gould, Thomas J

    2017-07-01

    Learned safety, a learning process in which a cue becomes associated with the absence of threat, is disrupted in individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A bi-directional relationship exists between smoking and PTSD and one potential explanation is that nicotine-associated changes in cognition facilitate PTSD emotional dysregulation by disrupting safety associations. Therefore, we investigated whether nicotine would disrupt learned safety by enhancing fear associated with a safety cue. In the present study, C57BL/6 mice were administered acute or chronic nicotine and trained over three days in a differential backward trace conditioning paradigm consisting of five trials of a forward conditioned stimulus (CS)+ (Light) co-terminating with a footshock unconditioned stimulus followed by a backward CS- (Tone) presented 20 s after cessation of the unconditioned stimulus. Summation testing found that acute nicotine disrupted learned safety, but chronic nicotine had no effect. Another group of animals administered acute nicotine showed fear when presented with the backward CS (Light) alone, indicating the formation of a maladaptive fear association with the backward CS. Finally, we investigated the brain regions involved by administering nicotine directly into the dorsal hippocampus, ventral hippocampus, and prelimbic cortex. Infusion of nicotine into the dorsal hippocampus disrupted safety learning.

  19. [123I]FP-CIT binding in rat brain after acute and sub-chronic administration of dopaminergic medication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavalaye, J.; Knol, R.J.J.; Bruin, K. de; Reneman, L.; Booij, J.; Janssen, A.G.M.

    2000-01-01

    The recently developed radioligand [ 123 I]FP-CIT is suitable for clinical single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging of the dopamine (DA) transporter in vivo. To date it has remained unclear whether dopaminergic medication influences the striatal [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of this medication on [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding in the brain. We used an animal model in which we administered dopaminomimetics, antipsychotics and an antidepressant. In vivo [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding to the DA and serotonin transporters was evaluated after sub-chronic and acute administration of the drugs. The administered medication induced small changes in striatal [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding which were not statistically significant. As expected, the DA reuptake blocker GBR 12,909 induced a significant decrease in [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding. [ 123 I]FP-CIT binding in the serotonin-rich hypothalamus was decreased only after acute administration of fluvoxamine. The results of this study suggest that dopaminergic medication will not affect the results of DA transporter SPET imaging with [ 123 I]FP-CIT. (orig.)

  20. Autoradiographic analysis of regional alterations in brain receptors following chronic administration and withdrawal of typical and atypical neuroleptics in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See, R.E.; Ellison, G.; Toga, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    Rats were administered haloperidol, clozapine, raclopride, or no drug for 28 days or 8 months. Following a 3 week withdrawal period, in vitro autoradiography was utilized to examine receptor binding for dopamine D2([ 3 H]spiperone and [ 3 H]raclopride), dopamine D1([ 3 H]SCH23390), GABA A ([ 3 H]muscimol), benzodiazepine ([ 3 H]RO15-1788), and muscarinic ACh receptors ([ 3 H]QNB). [ 3 H]spiperone was elevated in striatal subregions only in haloperidol-treated rats, with the largest increases seen in the 8 month duration animals. Striatal [ 3 H]raclopride binding was increased after both short- and long-term treatment in both haloperidol and raclopride, but not clozapine-treated animals. Clozapine-treated rats showed significant increases in [ 3 H]SCH23390 in the nucleus accumbens after 28-day administration; otherwise no changes were seen for this ligand in any other groups. Increases in [ 3 H]muscimol binding in the substantia nigra reticulata were seen in haloperidol-treated rats after 8 month treatment. Binding of [ 3 H]QNB and [ 3 H]RO15-1788 were not significantly different from control for any of the drug-treated groups. These data suggest that persisting alterations in receptor binding are primarily seen in dopamine D2 and GABA receptors after withdrawal from chronic administration of haloperidol but not the atypical neuroleptics, clozapine and raclopride. (Authors)

  1. Developmental hippocampal neuroplasticity in a model of nicotine replacement therapy during pregnancy and breastfeeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Mahar

    Full Text Available The influence of developmental nicotine exposure on the brain represents an important health topic in light of the popularity of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT as a smoking cessation method during pregnancy.In this study, we used a model of NRT during pregnancy and breastfeeding to explore the consequences of chronic developmental nicotine exposure on cerebral neuroplasticity in the offspring. We focused on two dynamic lifelong phenomena in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus that are highly sensitive to the environment: granule cell neurogenesis and long-term potentiation (LTP.Pregnant rats were implanted with osmotic mini-pumps delivering either nicotine or saline solutions. Plasma nicotine and metabolite levels were measured in dams and offspring. Corticosterone levels, DG neurogenesis (cell proliferation, survival and differentiation and glutamatergic electrophysiological activity were measured in pups.Juvenile (P15 and adolescent (P41 offspring exposed to nicotine throughout prenatal and postnatal development displayed no significant alteration in DG neurogenesis compared to control offspring. However, NRT-like nicotine exposure significantly increased LTP in the DG of juvenile offspring as measured in vitro from hippocampal slices, suggesting that the mechanisms underlying nicotine-induced LTP enhancement previously described in adult rats are already functional in pups.These results indicate that synaptic plasticity is disrupted in offspring breastfed by dams passively exposed to nicotine in an NRT-like fashion.

  2. Chronic administration of branched-chain amino acids impairs spatial memory and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaini, Giselli; Comim, Clarissa M; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Pasquali, Matheus A B; Quevedo, João; Gelain, Daniel P; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Bogo, Maurício R; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-09-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a neurometabolic disorder that leads to the accumulation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and their α-keto branched-chain by-products. Because the neurotoxic mechanisms of MSUD are poorly understood, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of chronic administration of a BCAA pool (leucine, isoleucine and valine). This study examined the effects of BCAA administration on spatial memory and the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF). We examined both pro-BDNF and bdnf mRNA expression levels after administration of BCAAs. Furthermore, this study examined whether antioxidant treatment prevented the alterations induced by BCAA administration. Our results demonstrated an increase in BDNF in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, accompanied by memory impairment in spatial memory tasks. Additionally, chronic administration of BCAAs did not induce a detectable change in pro-BDNF levels. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine prevented both the memory deficit and the increase in the BDNF levels induced by BCAA administration. In conclusion, these results suggest that when the brain is chronically exposed to high concentrations of BCAA (at millimolar concentrations) an increase in BDNF levels occurs. This increase in BDNF may be related to the impairment of spatial memory. In addition, we demonstrated that antioxidant treatment prevented the negative consequences related to BCAA administration, suggesting that oxidative stress might be involved in the pathophysiological mechanism(s) underlying the brain damage observed in MSUD.

  3. Neurochemical metabolomics reveals disruption to sphingolipid metabolism following chronic haloperidol administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClay, Joseph L.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Batman, Angela M.; Crowley, James J.; Vann, Robert E.; Beardsley, Patrick M.; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2015-01-01

    Haloperidol is an effective antipsychotic drug for treatment of schizophrenia, but prolonged use can lead to debilitating side effects. To better understand the effects of long-term administration, we measured global metabolic changes in mouse brain following 3 mg/kg/day haloperidol for 28 days. These conditions lead to movement-related side effects in mice akin to those observed in patients after prolonged use. Brain tissue was collected following microwave tissue fixation to arrest metabolism and extracted metabolites were assessed using both liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (MS). Over 300 unique compounds were identified across MS platforms. Haloperidol was found to be present in all test samples and not in controls, indicating experimental validity. Twenty-one compounds differed significantly between test and control groups at the p haloperidol-treated mice (p = 0.004), a marker previously associated with demyelination. This study further demonstrates the utility of murine neurochemical metabolomics as a method to advance understanding of CNS drug effects. PMID:25850894

  4. Emerging nicotine delivery products. Implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Neal L

    2014-02-01

    The idea of clean nicotine delivery systems that would satisfy nicotine craving and promote smoking cessation has been considered as a possible public health tool for many years. Nicotine medications have been useful for smoking cessation but have not found widespread popularity among smokers, perhaps because of slow nicotine delivery and other sensory characteristics that differ from cigarettes. Traditional smokeless tobacco delivers as much nicotine as cigarettes and has been advocated for harm reduction but contains carcinogenic nitrosamines and has not been proven to promote cessation. Furthermore, there is concern that dual use of smokeless tobacco and cigarettes may inhibit quitting smoking. Newer oral dissolvable tobacco products contain lower levels of toxicants than other smokeless tobacco but also deliver much less nicotine and have not been popular with consumers. Electronic cigarettes that aerosolize nicotine without generating toxic tobacco combustion products have become quite popular and hold promise as a way to attract smokers away from cigarettes, although efficacy in promoting smoking cessation has not yet been demonstrated. There are concerns about safety of long-term use, and there is evidence that youth, including nonsmokers, are taking up e-cigarette use. E-cigarettes are marketed for use when one cannot smoke conventional cigarettes, and such use might result in more persistent cigarette smoking. Although their benefits and risks are being vigorously debated, e-cigarettes or other clean nicotine delivery devices could play an important role as an adjunct to a U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulatory intervention to make cigarettes less addictive and in this context could contribute to the end of cigarette smoking and smoking-induced disease.

  5. Effects of mecamylamine (a nicotinic receptor antagonist on harman induced-amnesia in an inhibitory avoidance test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasehi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: β-carbolines alkaloids suchv as harmane have been found in common plant-derived foodstuffs (wheat, rice, corn, barley, grape and mushrooms. These alkaloids have many cognitive effects including alteration short and long term memory. In the present study, the effect of intra-CA1 injection of the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine on amnesia induced by harmane was examined in mice. Materials and Methods: Mice were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus. One week after cannulae implantation, mice were trained in a step-down type inhibitory avoidance task, and were tested 24 h after training to measure step-down latency as a scale of memory. Results: Pre-training or post-training systemic injection of harmane induced amnesia. Pre-testing intra-dorsal hippocampus administration of the high dose of nicotinic receptor antagonist, mecamylamine (4 µg/mice also induced amnesia. On the other hand, pre-test intra-CA1 injection of ineffective doses of mecamylamine (0.5, 1 and 2 µg/mice fully restored harmane induced amnesia. Conclusion: The present finding in this study indicated that a complex interaction exists between nicotinic receptor of dorsal hippocampus and amnesia induced by Harmane.

  6. Chronic administration during early adulthood does not alter the hormonally-dependent disruptive effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) on complex behavior in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsauer, Peter J; Sutton, Jessie L

    2014-02-01

    This study examined whether chronic Δ(9)-THC during early adulthood would produce the same hormonally-dependent deficits in learning that are produced by chronic Δ(9)-THC during adolescence. To do this, either sham-operated (intact) or ovariectomized (OVX) female rats received daily saline or 5.6 mg/kg of Δ(9)-THC i.p. for 40 days during early adulthood. Following chronic administration, and a drug-free period to train both a learning and performance task, acute dose-effect curves for Δ(9)-THC (0.56-10 mg/kg) were established in each of the four groups (intact/saline, intact/THC, OVX/saline and OVX/THC). The dependent measures of responding under the learning and performance tasks were the overall response rate and the percentage of errors. Although the history of OVX and chronic Δ(9)-THC in early adulthood did not significantly affect non-drug or baseline behavior under the tasks, acute administration of Δ(9)-THC produced both rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects on learning and performance behavior, and these effects were dependent on their hormone condition. More specifically, both intact groups were more sensitive to the rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects of Δ(9)-THC than the OVX groups irrespective of chronic Δ(9)-THC administration, as there was no significant main effect of chronic treatment and no significant interaction between chronic treatment (saline or Δ(9)-THC) and the dose of Δ(9)-THC administered as an adult. Post mortem examination of 10 brain regions also indicated there were significant differences in agonist-stimulated GTPγS binding across brain regions, but no significant effects of chronic treatment and no significant interaction between the chronic treatment and cannabinoid signaling. Thus, acute Δ(9)-THC produced hormonally-dependent effects on learning and performance behavior, but a period of chronic administration during early adulthood did not alter these effects significantly, which is contrary to what we

  7. Establishment of a schizophrenic animal model through chronic administration of MK-801 in infancy and social isolation in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiqing; Wang, Xiuyan; Hong, Wenjuan; Wang, Dong; Chen, Xiaogang

    2017-02-01

    Although an increasing amount of evidence supports a "two-hit" hypothesis for the neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia, there has been no development in animal models to test this hypothesis. An animal model was established by chronic administration of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5mg/kg MK-801 in P7-P21 rats followed by four weeks of social isolation in childhood and then five days of social housing. Animal behaviors were measured by the open field (OF) test, the novel object recognition (NOR) test, the prepulse inhibition (PPI) test, and the elevated plus maze (EPM) test. We found a significant decrease in the NOR index in adolescent rats compared to saline control rats when administering 0.5mg/kg of MK-801 (P=0.02). We found that social isolation had no significant effect on NOR index, though social isolation significantly increased the total distance traveled and significantly decreased the resting time in adolescent rats in the OF test (Psocial isolation had no significant effect on the percent of PPI and startle amplitudes in adolescent rats. Social isolation significantly reduced the open arm entries in adolescent rats in the EPM test (P=0.023), but it did not reduce the ratio to enter the open arms and the stay time in open arm. Administration of MK-801 showed no significant effect on the indexes of entering the open arms in the EPM test on adolescent rats. MK-801 intervention in infancy is associated with the damage of long-term visual memory, whereas social isolation in childhood is associated with the increased spontaneous activity and anxiety levels. Administration of MK-801 in infancy and social isolation in childhood are two independent factors on the neurodevelopmental defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Duplex-assisted carotid artery stenting without administration of contrast medium for patients with chronic kidney disease or allergic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizowaki, Takashi; Fujita, Atsushi; Imahori, Taichiro; Uyama, Atsushi; Inoue, Satoshi; Kohta, Masaaki; Hamaguchi, Hirotoshi; Sasayama, Takashi; Hosoda, Kohkichi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to investigate the safety and feasibility of duplex-assisted carotid artery stenting (CAS) without administration of contrast medium for the prevention of adverse reactions. Fifteen patients (9 % of all CASs) with severe carotid stenosis (≥70 %) associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) (stage ≥3) or allergy to contrast medium underwent duplex-assisted CAS without administration of contrast medium over 4 years. The procedural success rate and perioperative complication rates were compared between the duplex-assisted CAS (n = 15) and conventional CAS (n = 153) groups. The technical success rate was 100 % in both groups. Combined stroke or death rates during the post-procedural period did not differ significantly between the duplex-assisted CAS group (0/15, 0 %) and conventional CAS group (4/153, 2.6 %). None of the 14 patients with CKD in the duplex-assisted CAS group experienced further deterioration of renal function. The mean surface radiation dose of participants in the duplex-assisted CAS group (n = 13, 312 ± 131 mGy) was significantly lower than that of the conventional CAS group (n = 31, 1036 ± 571 mGy) (p duplex-assisted CAS group (156 ± 39.7 min) and the conventional CAS group (156 ± 37.4 min). Duplex-assisted CAS without administration of contrast medium could be an alternative option in selected patients deemed to be at high risk for renal failure from nephrotoxic contrast medium or who have an allergy to contrast medium.

  9. Reduced-Nicotine Cigarettes in Young Smokers: Impact of Nicotine Metabolism on Nicotine Dose Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Paul; Ghahremani, Dara G; Tyndale, Rachel F; Cox, Chelsea M; Kazanjian, Ari S; Paterson, Neil; Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Hellemann, Gerhard S; Petersen, Nicole; Vigil, Celia; London, Edythe D

    2017-07-01

    The use of cigarettes delivering different nicotine doses allows evaluation of the contribution of nicotine to the smoking experience. We compared responses of 46 young adult smokers to research cigarettes, delivering 0.027, 0.110, 0.231, or 0.763 mg nicotine, and conventional cigarettes. On five separate days, craving, withdrawal, affect, and sustained attention were measured after overnight abstinence and again after smoking. Participants also rated each cigarette, and the nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) was used to identify participants as normal or slow metabolizers. All cigarettes equally alleviated craving, withdrawal, and negative affect in the whole sample, but normal metabolizers reported greater reductions of craving and withdrawal than slow metabolizers, with dose-dependent effects. Only conventional cigarettes and, to a lesser degree, 0.763-mg nicotine research cigarettes increased sustained attention. Finally, there were no differences between ratings of lower-dose cigarettes, but the 0.763-mg cigarettes and (even more so) conventional cigarettes were rated more favorably than lower-dose cigarettes. The findings indicate that smoking-induced relief of craving and withdrawal reflects primarily non-nicotine effects in slow metabolizers, but depends on nicotine dose in normal metabolizers. By contrast, relief of withdrawal-related attentional deficits and cigarette ratings depend on nicotine dose regardless of metabolizer status. These findings have bearing on the use of reduced-nicotine cigarettes to facilitate smoking cessation and on policy regarding regulation of nicotine content in cigarettes. They suggest that normal and slow nicotine metabolizers would respond differently to nicotine reduction in cigarettes, but that irrespective of metabolizer status, reductions to <0.763 mg/cigarette may contribute to temporary attentional deficits.

  10. The effect of chronic alcohol administration on bone mineral content and bone strength in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broulík, P D; Vondrová, J; Růzicka, P; Sedlácek, R; Zíma, T

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol use has been identified as a risk factor for the development of osteoporosis. Eight male Wistar rats at two months of age were alcoho-fed (7.6 g 95 % ethanol/kg b.w. per day) to evaluate the effects of long-term administration (three months) of alcohol in drinking water. We have used a dose which is considered to be comparable to a dose of 1 liter of wine or 2.5 liters of 12(°) beer used in male adults daily. The bones were tested mechanically by a three-point bending test in a Mini Bionix (MTS) testing system. The bones from alcohol-fed rats were characterized by a reduction in bone density as well as in ash, calcium and phosphate content. In alcohol-fed rats the reduction in bone mineral density (10 %) was reflected by about 12 % reduction of mechanical strength of femur (158+/-5.5 vs. 178+/-3.2 N/mm(2)). Alcohol significantly altered femoral cortical thickness. In our experiment alcohol itself did not exert any antiandrogenic effect and it did not produce changes in the weight of seminal vesicles. Liver function test (GGT, ALP, AST) did not differ between alcohol-fed rats and control rats. Alcohol-induced bone loss is associated with increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation. These results document the efficacy of alcohol at the dose of 7.6 g 95 % ethanol/kg b.w. to cause bone loss and loss of bone mechanical strength in intact rats. The results of the present study may be interpreted as supporting the hypothesis of alcohol as a risk factor for osteoporosis.

  11. Neurochemical Metabolomics Reveals Disruption to Sphingolipid Metabolism Following Chronic Haloperidol Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClay, Joseph L; Vunck, Sarah A; Batman, Angela M; Crowley, James J; Vann, Robert E; Beardsley, Patrick M; van den Oord, Edwin J

    2015-09-01

    Haloperidol is an effective antipsychotic drug for treatment of schizophrenia, but prolonged use can lead to debilitating side effects. To better understand the effects of long-term administration, we measured global metabolic changes in mouse brain following 3 mg/kg/day haloperidol for 28 days. These conditions lead to movement-related side effects in mice akin to those observed in patients after prolonged use. Brain tissue was collected following microwave tissue fixation to arrest metabolism and extracted metabolites were assessed using both liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (MS). Over 300 unique compounds were identified across MS platforms. Haloperidol was found to be present in all test samples and not in controls, indicating experimental validity. Twenty-one compounds differed significantly between test and control groups at the p < 0.05 level. Top compounds were robust to analytical method, also being identified via partial least squares discriminant analysis. Four compounds (sphinganine, N-acetylornithine, leucine and adenosine diphosphate) survived correction for multiple testing in a non-parametric analysis using false discovery rate threshold < 0.1. Pathway analysis of nominally significant compounds (p < 0.05) revealed significant findings for sphingolipid metabolism (p = 0.015) and protein biosynthesis (p = 0.024). Altered sphingolipid metabolism is suggestive of disruptions to myelin. This interpretation is supported by our observation of elevated N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate in the haloperidol-treated mice (p = 0.004), a marker previously associated with demyelination. This study further demonstrates the utility of murine neurochemical metabolomics as a method to advance understanding of CNS drug effects.

  12. Neuroprotection and mechanisms of atractylenolide III in preventing learning and memory impairment induced by chronic high-dose homocysteine administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Ji, Z-H; Liu, C; Yu, X-Y

    2015-04-02

    Studies demonstrated that chronic high-dose homocysteine administration induced learning and memory impairment in animals. Atractylenolide III (Aen-III), a neuroprotective constituent of Atractylodis macrocephalae Koidz, was isolated in our previous study. In this study, we investigated potential benefits of Aen-III in preventing learning and memory impairment following chronic high-dose homocysteine administration in rats. Results showed that administration of Aen-III significantly ameliorated learning and memory impairment induced by chronic high-dose homocysteine administration in rats, decreased homocysteine-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and restored homocysteine-induced decrease of phosphorylated protein kinase C expression level. Moreover, Aen-III protected primary cultured neurons from apoptotic death induced by homocysteine treatment. This study provides the first evidence for the neuroprotective effect of Aen-III in preventing learning and impairment induced by chronic administration of homocysteine. Aen-III may have therapeutic potential in treating homocysteine-mediated cognitive impairment and neuronal injury. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nicotine Receptor Subtype-Specific Effects on Auditory Evoked Oscillations and Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Robert E.; Phillips, Jennifer M.; Thieu, Tony; Ehrlichman, Richard S.; Halene, Tobias B.; Leiser, Steven C.; Christian, Edward; Johnson, Edwin; Lerman, Caryn; Siegel, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Individuals with schizophrenia show increased smoking rates which may be due to a beneficial effect of nicotine on cognition and information processing. Decreased amplitude of the P50 and N100 auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) is observed in patients. Both measures show normalization following administration of nicotine. Recent studies identified an association between deficits in auditory evoked gamma oscillations and impaired information processing in schizophrenia, and there is evidence that nicotine normalizes gamma oscillations. Although the role of nicotine receptor subtypes in augmentation of ERPs has received some attention, less is known about how these receptor subtypes regulate the effect of nicotine on evoked gamma activity. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the effects of nicotine, the α7 nicotine receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) the α4β4/α4β2 nicotine receptor antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHβE), and the α4β2 agonist AZD3480 on P20 and N40 amplitude as well as baseline and event-related gamma oscillations in mice, using electrodes in hippocampal CA3. Nicotine increased P20 amplitude, while DHβE blocked nicotine-induced enhancements in P20 amplitude. Conversely, MLA did not alter P20 amplitude either when presented alone or with nicotine. Administration of the α4β2 specific agonist AZD3480 did not alter any aspect of P20 response, suggesting that DHβE blocks the effects of nicotine through a non-α4β2 receptor specific mechanism. Nicotine and AZD3480 reduced N40 amplitude, which was blocked by both DHβE and MLA. Finally, nicotine significantly increased event-related gamma, as did AZD3480, while DHβE but not MLA blocked the effect of nicotine on event-related gamma. Conclusions/Significance These results support findings showing that nicotine-induced augmentation of P20 amplitude occurs via a DHβE sensitive mechanism, but suggests that this does not occur through activation of α4β2

  14. Interaction between 5-HTTLPR genotype and cognitive stress vulnerability on sleep quality: effects of sub-chronic tryptophan administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalfsen, Jens H; Markus, C Rob

    2015-02-02

    Abundant evidence suggests that allelic variation in the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) influences susceptibility to stress and its affective consequences due to brain serotonergic vulnerability. Based on recent assumptions, the present study examined whether the 5-HTTLPR genotype may also interact with a vulnerability to chronic stress experience (conceptualized by trait neuroticism) in order to influence sleep quality and, additionally, whether this is influenced by brain serotonergic manipulations. In a well-balanced experimental design, homozygous S-allele (n = 57) and L-allele (n = 54) genotypes with high and low chronic stress vulnerability (neuroticism) were first assessed for general past sleep quality during a month before onset of the experiment. Then subjects were assessed for sleep quality following 7 days of tryptophan (3.0g/day) or placebo intake. Although high neuroticism was significantly related to a higher frequency of stressful life events and daily hassles, it did not interact with the 5-HTTLPR genotype on general past sleep quality. However, as expected, a 7 day period of tryptophan administration was exclusively associated with better sleep quality scores in the S'/S' genotype with high trait neuroticism. Current findings suggest that 5-HTTLPR does not directly interact with stress vulnerability in order to influence sleep quality. Instead, based on current and previous findings, it is suggested that the S'/S' 5-HTTLPR genotype promotes the risk for stress-related sleep disturbances because of an increased susceptibility to the depressogenic consequences of stress. Accordingly, by way of reducing depressive symptomatology, tryptophan augmentation may particularly improve sleep quality in stress-vulnerable individuals carrying the 5-HTTLPR S-allele. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  15. Effects of pharmacological manipulation of the kappa opioid receptors on the aversive effects of nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Melissa; Norman, Haval; D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2018-02-15

    Nicotine, an addictive component of tobacco smoke, produces both rewarding and aversive effects. Increasing the aversive effects of nicotine may help in promoting smoking cessation. However, neural targets mediating the aversive effects of nicotine have not been fully identified. In this study, we evaluated the role of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in the aversive effects of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, base; s.c.) using the nicotine-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) model in Wistar rats. The KORs were activated using the selective KOR agonist (±)U-50,488H (0, 0.03, 0.15 & 0.3mg/kg; s.c.) and inhibited using the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI; 0, 15 & 30mg/kg; s.c.) in separate groups of rats using a between-subjects design. Pretreatment with the KOR agonist (±)U-50,488H (0.3mg/kg) significantly increased aversion for the nicotine-associated solution. Additionally, (±)U-50,488H (0.3mg/kg) on its own induced aversion to the flavored solution associated with it even in the absence of nicotine, suggesting that the KOR agonist induced increase in nicotine-induced aversion was an additive effect. Interestingly, administration of the KOR antagonist nor-BNI (30mg/kg) prior to conditioning with nicotine/saline, but not after conditioning with nicotine/saline, attenuated nicotine-induced aversive effects compared to saline controls. Taken together, these data suggest a role for KORs in the aversive effects of nicotine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutagenicity of nicotine in Schistosoma mansoni - infected mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of meiotic chromosomes showed significant elevation in the Schistosoma-infected mice. Administration of nicotine to infected mice substantially increased the percentages of micronucleated cells and total CAs. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in spermatocyte metaphase-I cells increased significantly ...

  17. For Nicotine, Dose Matters | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is frequently part of a person’s regimen for smoking cessation. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved use of this approach for 12 weeks in supervised quitting programs. Unfortunately for some patients, though, this length of time is not long enough to break their addiction to tobacco. 

  18. Effects of Nicotine Withdrawal in Adult Male and Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    the planning and organization strategies required of the experimentalist. I am also indebted to Manuel Marwein, Alberta Nyarko, Becca Dieffenbach, Juan ...no difference in self-administration behavior between women who were randomly assigned to placebo and nicotine (Perkins, Grobe, D’Amico, Fonte

  19. Drinking typography established by scheduled induction predicts chronic heavy drinking in a monkey model of ethanol self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Kathleen A; Leng, Xiaoyan; Green, Heather L; Szeliga, Kendall T; Rogers, Laura S M; Gonzales, Steven W

    2008-10-01

    We have developed an animal model of alcohol self-administration that initially employs schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) to establish reliable ethanol consumption under open access (22 h/d) conditions with food and water concurrently available. SIP is an adjunctive behavior that is generated by constraining access to an important commodity (e.g., flavored food). The induction schedule and ethanol polydipsia generated under these conditions affords the opportunity to investigate the development of drinking typologies that lead to chronic, excessive alcohol consumption. Adult male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were induced to drink water and 4% (w/v in water) ethanol by a Fixed-Time 300 seconds (FT-300 seconds) schedule of banana-flavored pellet delivery. The FT-300 seconds schedule was in effect for 120 consecutive sessions, with daily induction doses increasing from 0.0 to 0.5 g/kg to 1.0 g/kg to 1.5 g/kg every 30 days. Following induction, the monkeys were allowed concurrent access to 4% (w/v) ethanol and water for 22 h/day for 12 months. Drinking typographies during the induction of drinking 1.5 g/kg ethanol emerged that were highly predictive of the daily ethanol intake over the next 12 months. Specifically, the frequency in which monkeys ingested 1.5 g/kg ethanol without a 5-minute lapse in drinking (defined as a bout of drinking) during induction strongly predicted (correlation 0.91) subsequent ethanol intake over the next 12 months of open access to ethanol. Blood ethanol during induction were highly correlated with intake and with drinking typography and ranged from 100 to 160 mg% when the monkeys drank their 1.5 g/kg dose in a single bout. Forty percent of the population became heavy drinkers (mean daily intakes >3.0 g/kg for 12 months) characterized by frequent "spree" drinking (intakes >4.0 g/kg/d). This model of ethanol self-administration identifies early alcohol drinking typographies (gulping the equivalent of 6 drinks) that evolve into

  20. E-cigarette versus nicotine inhaler: comparing the perceptions and experiences of inhaled nicotine devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Michael B; Zimmermann, Mia Hanos; Delnevo, Cristine D; Lewis, M Jane; Shukla, Parth; Coups, Elliot J; Foulds, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Novel nicotine delivery products, such as electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), have dramatically grown in popularity despite limited data on safety and benefit. In contrast, the similar U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved nicotine inhaler is rarely utilized by smokers. Understanding this paradox could be helpful to determine the potential for e-cigarettes as an alternative to tobacco smoking. To compare the e-cigarette with the nicotine inhaler in terms of perceived benefits, harms, appeal, and role in assisting with smoking cessation. A cross-over trial was conducted from 2012 to 2013 PARTICIPANTS/INTERVENTIONS: Forty-one current smokers age 18 and older used the e-cigarette and nicotine inhaler each for 3 days, in random order, with a washout period in between. Thirty-eight participants provided data on product use, perceptions, and experiences. The Modified Cigarette Evaluation Questionnaire (mCEQ) measured satisfaction, reward, and aversion. Subjects were also asked about each product's helpfulness, similarity to cigarettes, acceptability, image, and effectiveness in quitting smoking. Cigarette use was also recorded during the product-use periods. The e-cigarette had a higher total satisfaction score (13.9 vs. 6.8 [p e-cigarette received higher ratings for helpfulness, acceptability, and "coolness." More subjects would use the e-cigarette to make a quit attempt (76 %) than the inhaler (24 %) (p e-cigarette vs. 10 % (4/38) using the inhaler (p = 0.18). The e-cigarette was more acceptable, provided more satisfaction, and had higher perceived benefit than the inhaler during this trial. E-cigarettes have the potential to be important nicotine delivery products owing to their high acceptance and perceived benefit, but more data are needed to evaluate their actual efficacy and safety. Providers should be aware of these issues, as patients will increasingly inquire about them.

  1. Intravenous fluid administration may improve post-operative course of patients with chronic subdural hematoma: a retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslaw Janowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH is still charged of significant risk of hematoma recurrence. Patient-related predictors and the surgical procedures themselves have been addressed in many studies. In contrast, postoperative management has infrequently been subjected to detailed analysis. Moreover variable intravenous fluid administration (IFA was not reported in literature till now in the context of cSDH treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 45 patients with cSDH were operated in our department via two burr hole craniostomy within one calendar year. Downward drainage was routinely left in hematoma cavity for a one day. Independent variables selected for the analysis were related to various aspects of patient management, including IFA. Two dependent variables were chosen as measure of clinical course: the rate of hematoma recurrence (RHR and neurological status at discharge from hospital expressed in points of Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Hematoma recurrence with subsequent evacuation occurred in 7 (15% patients. Univariate regression analysis revealed that length of IFA after surgery influenced both dependent variables: RHR (p = 0.045 and GOS (p = 0.023. Multivariate regression performed by backward elimination method confirmed that IFA is a sole independent factor influencing RHR. Post hoc dichotomous division of patients revealed that those receiving at least 2000 ml/day over 3 day period revealed lower RHR than the group with less intensive IFA. (p = 0.031. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IFA has been found to be a sole factor influencing both: RHR and GOS. Based on those results we may recommend administration of at least 2000 ml per 3 days post-operatively to decrease the risk of hematoma recurrence.

  2. Autoradiographic analysis of regional alterations in brain receptors following chronic administration and withdrawal of typical and atypical neuroleptics in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    See, R E; Ellison, G; Toga, A W [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). School of Medicine

    1990-01-01

    Rats were administered haloperidol, clozapine, raclopride, or no drug for 28 days or 8 months. Following a 3 week withdrawal period, in vitro autoradiography was utilized to examine receptor binding for dopamine D2(({sup 3}H)spiperone and ({sup 3}H)raclopride), dopamine D1(({sup 3}H)SCH23390), GABA{sub A}(({sup 3}H)muscimol), benzodiazepine (({sup 3}H)RO15-1788), and muscarinic ACh receptors (({sup 3}H)QNB). ({sup 3}H)spiperone was elevated in striatal subregions only in haloperidol-treated rats, with the largest increases seen in the 8 month duration animals. Striatal ({sup 3}H)raclopride binding was increased after both short- and long-term treatment in both haloperidol and raclopride, but not clozapine-treated animals. Clozapine-treated rats showed significant increases in ({sup 3}H)SCH23390 in the nucleus accumbens after 28-day administration; otherwise no changes were seen for this ligand in any other groups. Increases in ({sup 3}H)muscimol binding in the substantia nigra reticulata were seen in haloperidol-treated rats after 8 month treatment. Binding of ({sup 3}H)QNB and ({sup 3}H)RO15-1788 were not significantly different from control for any of the drug-treated groups. These data suggest that persisting alterations in receptor binding are primarily seen in dopamine D2 and GABA receptors after withdrawal from chronic administration of haloperidol but not the atypical neuroleptics, clozapine and raclopride. (Authors).

  3. Increased presynaptic regulation of dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens core following chronic ethanol self-administration in female macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Cody A.; Calipari, Erin S.; Yorgason, Jordan T.; Lovinger, David M.; Mateo, Yolanda; Jimenez, Vanessa A.; Helms, Christa M.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Hypofunction of striatal dopamine neurotransmission, or hypodopaminergia, is a consequence of excessive ethanol use, and is hypothesized to be a critical component of alcoholism, driving alcohol intake in an attempt to restore dopamine levels; however, the neurochemical mechanisms involved in these dopaminergic deficiencies are unknown. Objective Here we examined the specific dopaminergic adaptations that produce hypodopaminergia and contribute to alcohol use disorders using direct, sub-second measurements of dopamine signaling in nonhuman primates following chronic ethanol self-administration. Methods Female rhesus macaques completed one year of daily (22 hr/day) ethanol self-administration. Subsequently, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used in nucleus accumbens core brain slices to determine alterations in dopamine terminal function, including release and uptake kinetics, and sensitivity to quinpirole (D2/D3 dopamine receptor agonist) and U50,488 (kappa-opioid receptor agonist) induced inhibition of dopamine release. Results Ethanol drinking greatly increased uptake rates, which were positively correlated with lifetime ethanol intake. Furthermore, the sensitivity of dopamine D2/D3 autoreceptors and kappa-opioid receptors, which both act as negative regulators of presynaptic dopamine release, were moderately and robustly enhanced in ethanol drinkers. Conclusions Greater uptake rates and sensitivity to D2-type autoreceptor and kappa-opioid receptor agonists could converge to drive a hypodopaminergic state, characterized by reduced basal dopamine and an inability to mount appropriate dopaminergic responses to salient stimuli. Together, we outline the specific alterations to dopamine signaling that may drive ethanol-induced hypofunction of the dopamine system, and suggest that the dopamine and dynorphin/kappa-opioid receptor systems may be efficacious pharmcotherapeutic targets in the treatment of alcohol use disorders. PMID:26892380

  4. Present epidemiology of chronic subdural hematoma in Japan: analysis of 63,358 cases recorded in a national administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toi, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Keita; Hirai, Satoshi; Takai, Hiroki; Hara, Keijiro; Matsushita, Nobuhisa; Matsubara, Shunji; Otani, Makoto; Muramatsu, Keiji; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Uno, Masaaki

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Aging of the population may lead to epidemiological changes with respect to chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The objectives of this study were to elucidate the current epidemiology and changing trends of CSDH in Japan. The authors analyzed patient information based on reports using a Japanese administrative database associated with the diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) system. METHODS This study included patients with newly diagnosed CSDH who were treated in hospitals participating in the DPC system. The authors collected data from the administrative database on the following clinical and demographic characteristics: patient age, sex, and level of consciousness on admission; treatment procedure; and outcome at discharge. RESULTS A total of 63,358 patients with newly diagnosed CSDH and treated in 1750 DPC participation hospitals were included in this study. Analysis according to patient age showed that the most common age range for these patients was the 9th decade of life (in their 80s). More than half of patients 70 years old or older presented with some kind of disturbance of consciousness. Functional outcomes at discharge were good in 71.6% (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score 0-2) of cases and poor in 28.4% (mRS score 3-6). The percentage of poor outcomes tended to be higher in elderly patients. Approximately 40% of patients 90 years old or older could not be discharged to home. The overall recurrence rate for CSDH was 13.1%. CONCLUSIONS This study shows a chronological change in the age distribution of CSDH among Japanese patients, which may be affecting the prognosis of this condition. In the aging population of contemporary Japan, patients in their 80s were affected more often than patients in other age categories, and approximately 30% of patients with CSDH required some help at discharge. CSDH thus may no longer have as good a prognosis as had been thought.

  5. Increased presynaptic regulation of dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens core following chronic ethanol self-administration in female macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Cody A; Calipari, Erin S; Yorgason, Jordan T; Lovinger, David M; Mateo, Yolanda; Jimenez, Vanessa A; Helms, Christa M; Grant, Kathleen A; Jones, Sara R

    2016-04-01

    Hypofunction of striatal dopamine neurotransmission, or hypodopaminergia, is a consequence of excessive ethanol use and is hypothesized to be a critical component of alcoholism, driving alcohol intake in an attempt to restore dopamine levels; however, the neurochemical mechanisms involved in these dopaminergic deficiencies are not fully understood. Here we examined the specific dopaminergic adaptations that produce hypodopaminergia and contribute to alcohol use disorders using direct, sub-second measurements of dopamine signaling in nonhuman primates following chronic ethanol self-administration. Female rhesus macaques completed 1 year of daily (22 h/day) ethanol self-administration. Subsequently, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used in nucleus accumbens core brain slices to determine alterations in dopamine terminal function, including release and uptake kinetics, and sensitivity to quinpirole (D2/D3 dopamine receptor agonist) and U50,488 (kappa opioid receptor agonist) induced inhibition of dopamine release. Ethanol drinking greatly increased uptake rates, which were positively correlated with lifetime ethanol intake. Furthermore, the sensitivity of dopamine D2/D3 autoreceptors and kappa opioid receptors, which both act as negative regulators of presynaptic dopamine release, was moderately and robustly enhanced in ethanol drinkers. Greater uptake rates and sensitivity to D2-type autoreceptor and kappa opioid receptor agonists could converge to drive a hypodopaminergic state, characterized by reduced basal dopamine and an inability to mount appropriate dopaminergic responses to salient stimuli. Together, we outline the specific alterations to dopamine signaling that may drive ethanol-induced hypofunction of the dopamine system and suggest that the dopamine and dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor systems may be efficacious pharmacotherapeutic targets in the treatment of alcohol use disorders.

  6. Toward a comprehensive long term nicotine policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, N; Henningfield, J E; Benowitz, N L; Connolly, G N; Dresler, C; Fagerstrom, K; Jarvis, M J; Boyle, P

    2005-06-01

    Global tobacco deaths are high and rising. Tobacco use is primarily driven by nicotine addiction. Overall tobacco control policy is relatively well agreed upon but a long term nicotine policy has been less well considered and requires further debate. Reaching consensus is important because a nicotine policy is integral to the target of reducing tobacco caused disease, and the contentious issues need to be resolved before the necessary political changes can be sought. A long term and comprehensive nicotine policy is proposed here. It envisages both reducing the attractiveness and addictiveness of existing tobacco based nicotine delivery systems as well as providing alternative sources of acceptable clean nicotine as competition for tobacco. Clean nicotine is defined as nicotine free enough of tobacco toxicants to pass regulatory approval. A three phase policy is proposed. The initial phase requires regulatory capture of cigarette and smoke constituents liberalising the market for clean nicotine; regulating all nicotine sources from the same agency; and research into nicotine absorption and the role of tobacco additives in this process. The second phase anticipates clean nicotine overtaking tobacco as the primary source of the drug (facilitated by use of regulatory and taxation measures); simplification of tobacco products by limitation of additives which make tobacco attractive and easier to smoke (but tobacco would still be able to provide a satisfying dose of nicotine). The third phase includes a progressive reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes, with clean nicotine freely available to take the place of tobacco as society's main nicotine source.

  7. Studies on the metabolism and bioactivation of (S)-nicotine and beta-nicotyrine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigenaga, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    (S)-Nicotine has long been suspected of contributing to the chronic toxicities associated with the use of cigarettes and other tobacco products. The possibility that (S)-nicotine could contribute to these chronic toxicities by causing irreversible damage to cellular macromolecules has prompted studies aimed at characterizing the metabolic pathways of (S)-nicotine that form reactive metabolites which bind covalently. In order to study these processes, (S)-5- 3 H-nicotine was synthesized by catalytic tritiolysis of (S)-5-bromonicotine with carrier-free tritium gas, purified by HPLC and characterized by tritium NMR, diode array VV and HPLC chromatographic analysis. The metabolism of (S)-5- 3 H-nicotine by rabbit liver and lung microsomal enzymes produced reactive intermediates which bound covalently to microsomal macromolecules in a time, NADPH and cytochrome P-450 dependent manner. The results of studies employing rabbit lung microsomes and agents which inhibit or alter the expression of the cytochrome P-450 isozyme composition in this tissue indicated that the covalent binding of (S)-nicotine requires (S)-nicotine Δ 1',5' -iminium ion as an obligate intermediate and the catalytic activity of lung cytochrome P-450 isozyme-2. Investigations of the effects of (S)-nicotine and related tobacco alkaloids on the oxidation of the Parkinson's disease inducing agent MPTP by the mitochondrial enzyme MAO-B were prompted by the inverse correlation between cigarette smoking and Parkinson's disease. In the author studies (S)-nicotine A 1',5' -iminium bisperchlorate inhibited the MAOB catalyzed oxidation of MPTP by a linear-mixed type mechanism. Subsequent studies identified β-nicotyrine as a MAO-B catalyzed oxidation product of (S)-nicotine A 1',5' -iminium ion

  8. Chronic Binge Alcohol Administration Dysregulates Hippocampal Genes Involved in Immunity and Neurogenesis in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. Maxi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorders (AUD exacerbate neurocognitive dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV+ patients. We have shown that chronic binge alcohol (CBA administration (13–14 g EtOH/kg/wk prior to and during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection in rhesus macaques unmasks learning deficits in operant learning and memory tasks. The underlying mechanisms of neurocognitive alterations due to alcohol and SIV are not known. This exploratory study examined the CBA-induced differential expression of hippocampal genes in SIV-infected (CBA/SIV+; n = 2 macaques in contrast to those of sucrose administered, SIV-infected (SUC/SIV+; n = 2 macaques. Transcriptomes of hippocampal samples dissected from brains obtained at necropsy (16 months post-SIV inoculation were analyzed to determine differentially expressed genes. MetaCore from Thomson Reuters revealed enrichment of genes involved in inflammation, immune responses, and neurodevelopment. Functional relevance of these alterations was examined in vitro by exposing murine neural progenitor cells (NPCs to ethanol (EtOH and HIV trans-activator of transcription (Tat protein. EtOH impaired NPC differentiation as indicated by decreased βIII tubulin expression. These findings suggest a role for neuroinflammation and neurogenesis in CBA/SIV neuropathogenesis and warrant further investigation of their potential contribution to CBA-mediated neurobehavioral deficits.

  9. Chronic tiagabine administration and aggressive responding in individuals with a history of substance abuse and antisocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowin, Joshua L; Green, Charles E; Alcorn, Joseph L; Swann, Alan C; Moeller, F Gerard; Lane, Scott D

    2012-07-01

    Anticonvulsants, notably those which modulate GABA activity, have shown efficacy in reducing aggressive behavior. Previously, we found dose-related decreases in human aggressive responding following acute tiagabine administration. Here, we examined the effects of chronic tiagabine over a 5-week period. Twelve individuals at increased risk for aggressive and violent behavior (currently on parole/probation with personality and/or substance use disorders) were randomly assigned to placebo (n = 6) or an escalating dose sequence of placebo, 4 mg, 8 mg, 12 mg, placebo (n = 6). Data were analyzed using both frequentist and Bayesian mixed models, evaluating aggressive behavior as a function of time, dose condition, and their interaction. For aggressive responding, there was a significant interaction of drug condition and time. Aggression in the tiagabine condition decreased for each additional week in the study, while participants in the placebo condition failed to demonstrate similar change over time. For monetary-reinforced responding, no drug or drug by time interactions were observed, suggesting specificity of drug effects on aggression. The small number of subjects limits the generality of the findings, and previous studies with tiagabine are limited to acute dosing and case report investigations. However, the present data provide an indication that tiagabine merits further examination as an agent for management of impulsive aggression.

  10. Effects of chronic acetazolamide administration on gas exchange and acid-base control in pulmonary circulation in exercising horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengust, M; Stämpfli, H; De Moraes, A N; Teixeiro-Neto, F; Viel, L; Heigenhauser, G

    2010-11-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) catalyses the hydration/dehydration reaction of CO(2) and increases the rate of Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-) exchange between the erythrocytes and plasma. Therefore, chronic inhibition of CA has a potential to attenuate CO(2) output and induce greater metabolic and respiratory acidosis in exercising horses. To determine the effects of Carbonic anhydrase inhibition on CO(2) output and ionic exchange between erythrocytes and plasma and their influence on acid-base balance in the pulmonary circulation (across the lung) in exercising horses with and without CA inhibition. Six horses were exercised to exhaustion on a treadmill without (Con) and with CA inhibition (AczTr). CA inhibition was achieved with administration of acetazolamide (10 mg/kg bwt t.i.d. for 3 days and 30 mg/kg bwt before exercise). Arterial, mixed venous blood and CO(2) output were sampled at rest and during exercise. An integrated physicochemical systems approach was used to describe acid base changes. AczTr decreased the duration of exercise by 45% (P changes across the lung with exception of lactate. CO(2) and chloride changes in erythrocytes across the lung seem to be the major contributors to acid-base and ions balance in pulmonary circulation in exercising horses. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  11. "Effects of the novel relatively short-acting kappa opioid receptor antagonist LY2444296 in behaviors observed after chronic extended-access cocaine self-administration in rats".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Marta; Butelman, Eduardo R; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2017-08-01

    The recruitment of the stress circuitry contributes to a shift from positive to negative reinforcement mechanisms sustaining long-term cocaine addiction. The kappa opioid receptor (KOPr) signaling is upregulated by stress and chronic cocaine exposure. While KOPr agonists induce anhedonia and dysphoria, KOPr antagonists display antidepressant and anxiolytic properties. Most of the knowledge on KOPr antagonism is based on drugs with unusual pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, complicating interpretation of results. Here we characterized in vivo behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of the novel relatively short-acting KOPr antagonist LY2444296. To date, no study has investigated whether systemic KOPr blockade reduced anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviors in animals previously exposed to chronic extended access cocaine self-administration. We tested the effect of LY2444296 in blocking KOPr-mediated aversive and neuroendocrine effects. Then, we tested acute systemic LY2444296 in reducing anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, as well as releasing the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT), observed after chronic extended access (18 h/day for 14 days) cocaine self-administration. LY2444296 blocked U69,593-induced place aversion and -reduced motor activity as well as U69,593-induced release of serum CORT, confirming its major site of action, without exerting an effect per se. Acute systemic administration of LY2444296 reduced anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviors, as well as CORT release, in rats tested after chronic extended access cocaine self-administration, but not in cocaine-naïve rats. Results suggest that acute blockade of KOPr by a relatively short-acting antagonist produces therapeutic-like effects selectively in rats with a history of chronic extended access cocaine self-administration.

  12. Tobacco and Nicotine Product Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Lois; Leischow, Scott J.; Zeller, Mitch R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco product testing is a critical component of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (FSPTCA), which grants the Food and Drug Administration the authority to regulate tobacco products. The availability of methods and measures that can provide accurate data on the relative health risks across types of tobacco products, brands, and subbrands of tobacco products on the validity of any health claims associated with a product, and on how consumers perceive information on products toxicity or risks is crucial for making decisions on the product's potential impact on public health. These tools are also necessary for making assessments of the impact of new indications for medicinal products (other than cessation) but more importantly of tobacco products that may in the future be marketed as cessation tools. Objective: To identify research opportunities to develop empirically based and comprehensive methods and measures for testing tobacco and other nicotine-containing products so that the best science is available when decisions are made about products or policies. Methods: Literature was reviewed to address sections of the FSPTCA relevant to tobacco product evaluation; research questions were generated and then reviewed by a committee of research experts. Results: A research agenda was developed for tobacco product evaluation in the general areas of toxicity and health risks, abuse liability, consumer perception, and population effects. Conclusion: A cohesive, systematic, and comprehensive assessment of tobacco products is important and will require building consensus and addressing some crucial research questions. PMID:21460383

  13. Effect of zeolite nano-materials and artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) leaf extract on increase in urinary clearance of systematically absorbed nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekshah, R E; Mahjub, R; Rastgarpanah, M; Ghorbani, M; Partoazar, A R; Mehr, S E; Dehpour, A R; Dorkoosh, F A

    2012-12-01

    Nicotine, the main pharmacologically active component in tobacco and cigarette, has some toxic effects and also high potential for addiction. In this study, the effect of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) and zeolite nano-materials on urinary excretion of nicotine and consequently elimination of systematically absorbed nicotine was investigated. A simple, valid and highly sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method has been developed for determination of nicotine in rat urine according to guidelines for bioanalysis.It was found that nano-zeolites can cause increase in urinary concentration of nicotine due to its high surface adsorption. Artichoke leaf extract can cause increase in urinary excretion of nicotine in longer post administration times. It was observed that co-administration of nanozeolites and the leaf extract has the synergetic effect on increasing the urinary excretion of nicotine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Monitoring compliance with standards of care for chronic diseases using healthcare administrative databases in Italy: Strengths and limitations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Gini

    Full Text Available A recent comprehensive report on healthcare quality in Italy published by the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD recommended that regular monitoring of quality of primary care by means of compliance with standards of care for chronic diseases is performed. A previous ecological study demonstrated that compliance with standards of care could be reliably estimated on regional level using administrative databases. This study compares estimates based on administrative data with estimates based on GP records for the same persons, to understand whether ecological fallacy played a role in the results of the previous study.We compared estimates of compliance with diagnostic and therapeutic standards of care for type 2 diabetes (T2DM, hypertension and ischaemic heart disease (IHD from administrative data (IAD with estimates from medical records (MR for the same persons registered with 24 GP's in 2012. Data were linked at an individual level.32,688 persons entered the study, 12,673 having at least one of the three diseases according to at least one data source. Patients not detected by IAD were many, for all three conditions: adding MR increased the number of cases of T2DM, hypertension, and IHD by +40%, +42%, and +104%, respectively. IAD had imperfect sensitivity in detecting population compliance with therapies (adding MR increased the estimate, from +11.5% for statins to +14.7% for antithrombotics, and, more substantially, with diagnostic recommendations (adding MR increased the estimate, from +23.7% in glycated hemoglobin tests, to +50.5% in electrocardiogram. Patients not detected by IAD were less compliant with respect to those that IAD correctly identified (from -4.8 percentage points in proportion of IHD patients compliant with a yearly glycated hemoglobin test, to -40.1 points in the proportion of T2DM patients compliant with the same recommendation. IAD overestimated indicators of compliance with therapeutic standards

  15. The effects of acute nicotine on contextual safety discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir G; Oliver, Chicora; Gould, Thomas J

    2014-11-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), may be related to an inability to distinguish safe versus threatening environments and to extinguish fear memories. Given the high rate of cigarette smoking in patients with PTSD, as well as the recent finding that an acute dose of nicotine impairs extinction of contextual fear memory, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate the effect of acute nicotine in an animal model of contextual safety discrimination. Following saline or nicotine (at 0.0275, 0.045, 0.09 and 0.18 mg/kg) administration, C57BL/6J mice were trained in a contextual discrimination paradigm, in which the subjects received presentations of conditioned stimuli (CS) that co-terminated with a foot-shock in one context (context A (CXA)) and only CS presentations without foot-shock in a different context (context B (CXB)). Therefore, CXA was designated as the 'dangerous context', whereas CXB was designated as the 'safe context'. Our results suggested that saline-treated animals showed a strong discrimination between dangerous and safe contexts, while acute nicotine dose-dependently impaired contextual safety discrimination (Experiment 1). Furthermore, our results demonstrate that nicotine-induced impairment of contextual safety discrimination learning was not a result of increased generalized freezing (Experiment 2) or contingent on the common CS presentations in both contexts (Experiment 3). Finally, our results show that increasing the temporal gap between CXA and CXB during training abolished the impairing effects of nicotine (Experiment 4). The findings of this study may help link nicotine exposure to the safety learning deficits seen in anxiety disorder and PTSD patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Does longstanding nicotine exposure impair bone healing and osseointegration? An experimental study in rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus; Lindh, Christian H; Berglundh, Tord

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of longstanding nicotine exposure on bone healing and osseointegration of titanium implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 20 female rabbits received either nicotine (n = 10) or saline (n = 10) administered subcutaneously via mini-osmotic pumps...... for 32 weeks. The pump delivered 6 microg/kg/min of nicotine for the animals in the test group. Blood samples were collected and plasma cotinine levels were measured monthly. Six months after the commencement of nicotine or saline administration three osteotomy preparations, one in right, femoral condyle...... increase in RMT between 2 and 4 weeks within each group. The histomorphometric analysis of bone-to-implant contact and bone density in the bone defects revealed no differences between the test and the control group after 2 or 4 weeks of healing. CONCLUSION: Longstanding (6 months) nicotine exposure did...

  17. TRV0109101, a G Protein-Biased Agonist of the µ-Opioid Receptor, Does Not Promote Opioid-Induced Mechanical Allodynia following Chronic Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblish, Michael; Carr, Richard; Siuda, Edward R; Rominger, David H; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Cowan, Conrad L; Crombie, Aimee L; Violin, Jonathan D; Lark, Michael W

    2017-08-01

    Prescription opioids are a mainstay in the treatment of acute moderate to severe pain. However, chronic use leads to a host of adverse consequences including tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), leading to more complex treatment regimens and diminished patient compliance. Patients with OIH paradoxically experience exaggerated nociceptive responses instead of pain reduction after chronic opioid usage. The development of OIH and tolerance tend to occur simultaneously and, thus, present a challenge when studying the molecular mechanisms driving each phenomenon. We tested the hypothesis that a G protein-biased µ -opioid peptide receptor (MOPR) agonist would not induce symptoms of OIH, such as mechanical allodynia, following chronic administration. We observed that the development of opioid-induced mechanical allodynia (OIMA), a model of OIH, was absent in β -arrestin1 -/- and β -arrestin2 -/- mice in response to chronic administration of conventional opioids such as morphine, oxycodone and fentanyl, whereas tolerance developed independent of OIMA. In agreement with the β -arrestin knockout mouse studies, chronic administration of TRV0109101, a G protein-biased MOPR ligand and structural analog of oliceridine, did not promote the development of OIMA but did result in drug tolerance. Interestingly, following induction of OIMA by morphine or fentanyl, TRV0109101 was able to rapidly reverse allodynia. These observations establish a role for β -arrestins in the development of OIH, independent of tolerance, and suggest that the use of G protein-biased MOPR ligands, such as oliceridine and TRV0109101, may be an effective therapeutic avenue for managing chronic pain with reduced propensity for opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Nicotine enhances skin necrosis and expression of inflammatory mediators in a rat pressure ulcer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutakawa, S; Kobayashi, D; Kusama, M; Moriya, T; Nakahata, N

    2009-11-01

    Many bedridden patients develop pressure ulcers, not only in hospital but also at home. Clinical studies have indicated cigarette smoking to be a risk factor for pressure ulcers. However, the contribution of nicotine to pressure ulcer formation has not been identified. We aimed to clarify the effect of nicotine on pressure ulcer formation, and its mechanism. Ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) was performed in rat dorsal skin to induce pressure ulcers. The extent of the resulting necrotic area was determined. To clarify the mechanism of the effect of nicotine, mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS in the necrotic area were investigated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of the COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 and the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine on necrosis were examined. Skin necrosis in the I/R-treated area was significantly increased by intraperitoneal administration of nicotine (0.175 mg kg(-1) daily). Repeated nicotine administration had little effect on systolic and diastolic blood pressure. I/R treatment increased mRNA levels of COX-2, IL-1beta, IL-6 and iNOS, which were further augmented by nicotine in a dose-dependent manner. Correspondingly, nicotine (0.35 mg kg(-1) daily) markedly enhanced the protein expression of COX-2 and iNOS. Moreover, NS-398 and aminoguanidine showed a tendency to abrogate the increase of I/R-induced skin necrosis caused by nicotine. These results suggest that the increased risk of pressure ulcers due to cigarette smoking is mediated, in part, by nicotine. They also indicated that the effect of nicotine is not mediated by a change in blood pressure, but is elicited via an increase of inflammatory mediators in the I/R-treated skin.

  19. Activation of the GABAB receptor prevents nicotine-induced locomotor stimulation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eLobina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated that activation of the GABAB receptor, either by means of orthosteric agonists or positive allosteric modulators (PAMs, inhibited different nicotine-related behaviors, including intravenous self-administration and conditioned place preference, in rodents. The present study investigated whether the anti-nicotine effects of the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, and GABAB PAMs, CGP7930 and GS39783, extend to nicotine stimulant effects. To this end, CD1 mice were initially treated with baclofen (0, 1.25, and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p., CGP7930 (0, 25, and 50 mg/kg, i.g., or GS39783 (0, 25, and 50 mg/kg, i.g., then treated with nicotine (0 and 0.05 mg/kg, s.c., and finally exposed to an automated apparatus for recording of locomotor activity. Pretreatment with doses of baclofen, CGP7930, or GS39783 that did not alter locomotor activity when given with nicotine vehicle fully prevented hyperlocomotion induced by 0.05 mg/kg nicotine. These data extend to nicotine stimulant effects the capacity of baclofen and GABAB PAMs to block the reinforcing, motivational, and rewarding properties of nicotine. These data strengthen the hypothesis that activation of the GABAB receptor may represent a potentially useful, anti-smoking therapeutic strategy.

  20. Effect of urinary pH and nicotine excretion rate on plasma nicotine during cigarette smoking and chewing nicotine gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, C.; Russell, M. A. H.

    1978-01-01

    1 Plasma nicotine levels produced by chewing nicotine gum were compared with those obtained by cigarette smoking under conditions of controlled urinary pH. 2 Although absorption was slower, plasma levels comparable to cigarette smoking were built up on 4 mg (but not 2 mg) nicotine gum. 3 Urinary excretion of nicotine was influenced markedly by pH and the rate of urine flow. 4 Plasma nicotine was higher under alkaline compared to acidic conditions (P < 0.001) but the rate of urinary nicotine excretion appeared to have little effect on the plasma level.

  1. Inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) enhances cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Jose M; Le Foll, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Tobacco smoking is still a major population health issue. The endocannabinoid system has been shown to control drug-seeking behaviors. There are two main endocannabinoids: anandamide degraded by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) degraded by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The role of MAGL has only been explored recently, and so far, no study have been performed to evaluate the effects of MAGL inhibitor on nicotine reinforcing properties and cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. Here, we investigated the effects of the MAGL inhibitor JZL184 on nicotine self-administration under fixed and progressive-ratio schedules of reinforcement and on cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking in mice. We also evaluated the effects of JZL184 on food self-administration for possible non-specific effects. JZL184 (0, 8, and 16 mg/kg) did not affect food taking, nicotine taking, or motivation for nicotine. MAGL inhibition by JZL184 (16 mg/kg) increased reinstatement of previously extinguished nicotine seeking induced by presentation of nicotine-associated cues, but did not produce reinstatement on its own. This study implicates involvement of 2-AG in nicotine-seeking behaviors.

  2. Will chronic e-cigarette use cause lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Temperance R; Tarran, Robert

    2015-12-15

    Chronic tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the lung, tobacco smoking increases the risk of lung cancer, and also causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which encompasses both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. E-cigarettes (E-Cigs), or electronic nicotine delivery systems, were developed over a decade ago and are designed to deliver nicotine without combusting tobacco. Although tobacco smoking has declined since the 1950s, E-Cig usage has increased, attracting both former tobacco smokers and never smokers. E-Cig liquids (e-liquids) contain nicotine in a glycerol/propylene glycol vehicle with flavorings, which are vaporized and inhaled. To date, neither E-Cig devices, nor e-liquids, are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has proposed a deeming rule, which aims to initiate legislation to regulate E-Cigs, but the timeline to take effect is uncertain. Proponents of E-Cigs say that they are safe and should not be regulated. Opposition is varied, with some opponents proposing that E-Cig usage will introduce a new generation to nicotine addiction, reversing the decline seen with tobacco smoking, or that E-Cigs generally may not be safe and will trigger diseases like tobacco. In this review, we shall discuss what is known about the effects of E-Cigs on the mammalian lung and isolated lung cells in vitro. We hope that collating this data will help illustrate gaps in the knowledge of this burgeoning field, directing researchers toward answering whether or not E-Cigs are capable of causing disease. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Toxicity of lead acetate to female rabbits after chronic subcutaneous administration. Pt. 1. Biochemical and clinical effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falke, H.E. (Nijverheidsorganisatie TNO, Zeist (Netherlands). Toxicology and Nutrition Inst.); Zwennis, W.C.M. (Nijverheidsorganisatie TNO, Rijswijk (Netherlands). Medical Biological Lab.)

    1990-10-01

    The effect of chronic subcutaneous administration of lead acetate was studied in female rabbits. The low-dose group (15 animals) received three times a week 0.10-0.20 {mu}g/kg body weight and the high-dose group (15 animals) 0.80-1.20 {mu}g/kg. The control group received the vehicle only. Concentrations of lead in blood in the low-dose group increased to ca. 400 {mu}g/l after 70 days and in the high-dose group to ca. 900 {mu}g/l after 110 days. After 7.5 months eight animals of each group were sacrificed. The remaining rabbits were kept for an additional 4 months without treatment. Blood lead concentrations decreased with a half-time of 60-70 days. During exposure the gain in body weight was lower in the high-dose group than in the control group and the low-dose group. The high-dose group developed slight anaemia and low MCV, MCH and MCHC, and basophilic stipping of erythrocytes. These effects disappeared during recovery. ALAD activity in erythrocytes was very low during exposure in both exposed groups and did not reach control values during recovery. During exposure the concentrations of ZPP and ALA-U increased, but only ALA-U returned to normal during recovery. No other effects of lead on the composition of the urine were observed. No effects were observed on plasma urea and creatinine concentrations. In the high-dose group the concentration of ALAD in the liver decreased by 30%. During recovery this effect was no longer present. No effects were seen in cytochrome P-450 content or cytochrome P-450-dependent enzyme activities. Lead was mainly stored in bones, but some also in several soft tissues. After recovery the concentrations in soft tissues decreased to a variable degree. In the high-dose group the relative weights of heart and liver increased. These effects disappeared during recovery. At 400 {mu}g lead/l blood no adverse effects were observed that did occur at the high dose level. (orig.).

  4. Nicotine as a discriminative stimulus for ethanol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Brett C; Levy, Simon A; Lamb, R J

    2018-01-01

    Abused drugs reinforce behavior; i.e., they increase the probability of the behavior preceding their administration. Abused drugs can also act as discriminative stimuli; i.e., they can set the occasion for responding reinforced by another event. Thus, one abused drug could come to set the occasion for the use of another and this functional relationship may play a role in polysubstance abuse, where common patterns of use could result in this relationship. Here we establish nicotine (0.4mg/kg, ip 5-min pre-session) as a discriminative stimulus for behavior reinforced by ethanol (0.1ml 8% w/v po, versus food) and determine the ability of nicotine (0.02-0.4mg/kg), varenicline (0.1-3.0mg/kg), and ethanol (250 and 500mg/kg) to control responding for ethanol. We compare these results to those from rats where nicotine signaled food was available (and ethanol was not). Nicotine came to function as a discriminative stimulus. Nicotine and varenicline produced dose-dependent increases in responding on the nicotine-appropriate lever while ethanol produced responding on the vehicle-appropriate lever. Whether this responding occurred on the lever that produced ethanol or food access depended on the training condition. These results demonstrate that a drug can come to set the occasion for use of another and suggest that this behavioral mechanism could play an important role in the maintenance of and recovery from polysubstance abuse, depending on the pattern of use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of nicotine versus placebo e-cigarette use on symptom relief during initial tobacco abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kenneth A; Karelitz, Joshua L; Michael, Valerie C

    2017-08-01

    Because electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) containing nicotine may relieve smoking abstinence symptoms similar to nicotine replacement therapy medication, we used within-subjects designs to test these effects with a first-generation e-cig in nonquitting and quitting smokers. In Study 1, 28 nontreatment-seeking smokers abstained overnight prior to each of 3 sessions. Minnesota Nicotine Withdrawal Scale (MNWS) withdrawal (and craving item) relief was assessed following 4 exposures (each 10 puffs) over 2 hr to e-cigs that either did (36 mg/ml) or did not (i.e., placebo, 0 mg/ml) contain nicotine or after no e-cig. Relief was greater after nicotine versus placebo e-cig (p < .05) but not after placebo versus no e-cig, showing relief was due to nicotine per se and not simple e-cig use behavior. Using a crossover design in Study 2, smokers preparing to quit soon engaged in 2 experimental 4-day quit periods on separate weeks. In weeks 1 and 3, all received a nicotine or placebo e-cig on Monday to use ad libitum while trying to abstain from smoking on Tuesday through Friday. (Week 2 involved resumption of ad libitum smoking.) MNWS and Questionnaire of Smoking Urges (QSU) craving were assessed at daily visits following 24-hr abstinence. Of 17 enrolled, 12 quit for ≥24 hr at least once, allowing test of relief because of e-cig use on quit days. Withdrawal and craving were reduced because of nicotine versus placebo e-cig use (both p < .05). In sum, compared with placebo e-cigs, nicotine e-cigs can relieve smoking abstinence symptoms, perhaps in a manner similar to Food and Drug Administration-approved nicotine replacement therapy products, although much more research with larger samples is needed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Enduring effects of perinatal nicotine exposure on murine sleep in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Don, Reuben F; Zhang, Ning; Boyd, R Thomas; Nelson, Randy J

    2017-09-01

    The long-term consequences of early life nicotine exposure are poorly defined. Approximately 8-10% of women report smoking during pregnancy, and this may promote aberrant development in the offspring. To this end, we investigated potential enduring effects of perinatal nicotine exposure on murine sleep and affective behaviors in adulthood (~13-15 wk of age) in C57Bl6j mice. Mothers received a water bottle containing 200 µg/ml nicotine bitartrate dihydrate in 2% wt/vol saccharin or pH-matched 2% saccharin with 0.2% (vol/vol) tartaric acid throughout pregnancy and before weaning. Upon reaching adulthood, offspring were tested in the open field and elevated plus maze, as well as the forced swim and sucrose anhedonia tests. Nicotine-exposed male (but not female) mice had reduced mobility in the open field, but no differences were observed in anxiety-like or depressive-like responses. Upon observing this male-specific phenotype, we further assessed sleep-wake states via wireless EEG/EMG telemetry. Following baseline recording, we assessed whether mice exposed to nicotine altered their homeostatic response to 5 h of total sleep deprivation and whether nicotine influenced responses to a powerful somnogen [i.e., lipopolysaccharides (LPS)]. Males exposed to perinatal nicotine decreased the percent time spent awake and increased time in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, without changes to REM sleep. Nicotine-exposed males also displayed exaggerated responses (increased time asleep and NREM spectral power) to sleep deprivation. Nicotine-exposed animals additionally had blunted EEG slow-wave responses to LPS administration. Together, our data suggest that perinatal nicotine exposure has long-lasting effects on normal sleep and homeostatic sleep processes into adulthood. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Nicotine improves obesity and hepatic steatosis and ER stress in diet-induced obese male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane-Collazo, Patricia; Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    Nicotine, the main addictive component of tobacco, promotes body weight reduction in humans and rodents. Recent evidence has suggested that nicotine acts in the central nervous system to modulate energy balance. Specifically, nicotine modulates hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase to decrease feeding and to increase brown adipose tissue thermogenesis through the sympathetic nervous system, leading to weight loss. Of note, most of this evidence has been obtained in animal models fed with normal diet or low-fat diet (LFD). However, its effectiveness in obese models remains elusive. Because obesity causes resistance towards many factors involved in energy homeostasis, the aim of this study has been to compare the effect of nicotine in a diet-induced obese (DIO) model, namely rats fed a high-fat diet, with rats fed a LFD. Our data show that chronic peripheral nicotine treatment reduced body weight by decreasing food intake and increasing brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in both LFD and DIO rats. This overall negative energy balance was associated to decreased activation of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in both models. Furthermore, nicotine improved serum lipid profile, decreased insulin serum levels, as well as reduced steatosis, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in the liver of DIO rats but not in LFD rats. Overall, this evidence suggests that nicotine diminishes body weight and improves metabolic disorders linked to DIO and might offer a clear-cut strategy to develop new therapeutic approaches against obesity and its metabolic complications.

  8. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Key Facts Infographic

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Explore the Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Key Facts Infographic which outlines key facts related to electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), including...

  9. A new animal model of (chronic) depression induced by repeated and intermittent lipopolysaccharide administration for 4 months

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubera, M.; Curzytek, K.; Duda, W.; Leskiewicz, M.; Basta-Kaim, A.; Budziszewska, B.; Roman, A.; Zajícová, Alena; Holáň, Vladimír; Szczesny, E.; Lason, W.; Maes, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, July (2013), s. 96-104 ISSN 0889-1591 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : chronic depression * inflammation * cytokines Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 6.128, year: 2013

  10. Long-Term Effects of Chronic Oral Ritalin Administration on Cognitive and Neural Development in Adolescent Wistar Kyoto Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Cornish

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD often results in chronic treatment with psychostimulants such as methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin®. With increases in misdiagnosis of ADHD, children may be inappropriately exposed to chronic psychostimulant treatment during development. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chronic Ritalin treatment on cognitive and neural development in misdiagnosed “normal” (Wistar Kyoto, WKY rats and in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR, a model of ADHD. Adolescent male animals were treated for four weeks with oral Ritalin® (2 × 2 mg/kg/day or distilled water (dH2O. The effect of chronic treatment on delayed reinforcement tasks (DRT and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity (TH-ir in the prefrontal cortex was assessed. Two weeks following chronic treatment, WKY rats previously exposed to MPH chose the delayed reinforcer significantly less than the dH2O treated controls in both the DRT and extinction task. MPH treatment did not significantly alter cognitive performance in the SHR. TH-ir in the infralimbic cortex was significantly altered by age and behavioural experience in WKY and SHR, however this effect was not evident in WKY rats treated with MPH. These results suggest that chronic treatment with MPH throughout adolescence in “normal” WKY rats increased impulsive choice and altered catecholamine development when compared to vehicle controls.

  11. Electronic cigarettes and nicotine clinical pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Megan J; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-05-01

    To review the available literature evaluating electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) nicotine clinical pharmacology in order to understand the potential impact of e-cigarettes on individual users, nicotine dependence and public health. Literature searches were conducted between 1 October 2012 and 30 September 2013 using key terms in five electronic databases. Studies were included in the review if they were in English and publicly available; non-clinical studies, conference abstracts and studies exclusively measuring nicotine content in e-cigarette cartridges were excluded from the review. Nicotine yields from automated smoking machines suggest that e-cigarettes deliver less nicotine per puff than traditional cigarettes, and clinical studies indicate that e-cigarettes deliver only modest nicotine concentrations to the inexperienced e-cigarette user. However, current e-cigarette smokers are able to achieve systemic nicotine and/or cotinine concentrations similar to those produced from traditional cigarettes. Therefore, user experience is critically important for nicotine exposure, and may contribute to the products' ability to support and maintain nicotine dependence. Knowledge about e-cigarette nicotine pharmacology remains limited. Because a user's e-cigarette experience may significantly impact nicotine delivery, future nicotine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies should be conducted in experienced users to accurately assess the products' impact on public health.

  12. Electronic cigarettes and nicotine clinical pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Megan J; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available literature evaluating electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) nicotine clinical pharmacology in order to understand the potential impact of e-cigarettes on individual users, nicotine dependence and public health. Methods Literature searches were conducted between 1 October 2012 and 30 September 2013 using key terms in five electronic databases. Studies were included in the review if they were in English and publicly available; non-clinical studies, conference abstracts and studies exclusively measuring nicotine content in e-cigarette cartridges were excluded from the review. Results Nicotine yields from automated smoking machines suggest that e-cigarettes deliver less nicotine per puff than traditional cigarettes, and clinical studies indicate that e-cigarettes deliver only modest nicotine concentrations to the inexperienced e-cigarette user. However, current e-cigarette smokers are able to achieve systemic nicotine and/or cotinine concentrations similar to those produced from traditional cigarettes. Therefore, user experience is critically important for nicotine exposure, and may contribute to the products’ ability to support and maintain nicotine dependence. Conclusions Knowledge about e-cigarette nicotine pharmacology remains limited. Because a user's e-cigarette experience may significantly impact nicotine delivery, future nicotine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies should be conducted in experienced users to accurately assess the products’ impact on public health. PMID:24732160

  13. Nicotine affects hydrogen sulfide concentrations in mouse kidney and heart but not in brain and liver tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiliński, Jerzy; Wiliński, Bogdan; Somogyi, Eugeniusz; Piotrowska, Joanna; Kameczura, Tomasz; Zygmunt, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine, a potent parasympathomimetic alkaloid with stimulant effects, is contributing to addictive properties of tobacco smoking and is though used in the smoking cessation therapy. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in physiology and pathophysiology of various systems in mammals. The interactions between nicotine and H2S are not fully recognized. The aim of the study is to assess the influence of nicotine on the H2S tissue concentrations in different mouse organs. Adult CBA male mice were administered intraperitoneally 1.5 mg/kg b.w. per day of nicotine (group D1, n = 10) or 3 mg/ kg b.w. per day of nicotine (group D2, n = 10). The control group (n = 10) received physiological saline. The measurements of the free and acid-labile H2S tissue concentrations were performed with the Siegel spectrophotometric modi ed method. ere was a significant increase in H2S concentrations in both nicotine doses groups in the kidney (D1 by 54.2%, D2 by 40.0%). In the heart the higher nicotine dose caused a marked decrease in H2S tissue level (by 65.4%), while the lower dose did not affect H2S content. Nicotine administration had no effect on H2S concentrations in the brain and liver. In conclusion, nicotine affects H2S tissue concentrations in kidney and heart but not in the liver and brain tissues.

  14. Examination of the effects of varenicline, bupropion, lorcaserin, or naltrexone on responding for conditioned reinforcement in nicotine-exposed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Elizabeth G; Fisher, Daniel C; Higgins, Guy A; Fletcher, Paul J

    2014-12-01

    Smoking tobacco remains one of the leading causes of preventable deaths in North America. Nicotine reinforces smoking behavior, in part, by enhancing the reinforcing properties of reward-related stimuli, or conditioned stimuli (CSs), associated with tobacco intake. To investigate how pharmaceutical interventions may affect this property of nicotine, we examined the effect of four US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs on the ability of nicotine to enhance operant responding for a CS as a conditioned reinforcer. Thirsty rats were exposed to 13 Pavlovian sessions where a CS was paired with water delivery. Nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) injections were administered before each Pavlovian session. Then, in separate groups of rats, the effects of varenicline (1 mg/kg), bupropion (10 and 30 mg/kg), lorcaserin (0.6 mg/kg), and naltrexone (2 mg/kg), and their interaction with nicotine on responding for conditioned reinforcement were examined. Varenicline and lorcaserin each reduced nicotine-enhanced responding for conditioned reinforcement, whereas naltrexone had a modest effect of reducing response enhancements by nicotine. In contrast, bupropion enhanced the effect of nicotine on this measure. The results of these studies may inform how pharmaceutical interventions can affect smoking cessation attempts and relapse through diverse mechanisms, either substituting for, or interacting with, the reinforcement-enhancing properties of nicotine.

  15. Pre-adolescent and adolescent mice are less sensitive to the effects of acute nicotine on extinction and spontaneous recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Zeid, Dana; Tumolo, Jessica M; Gould, Thomas J

    2018-04-01

    Adolescence is a period of high risk for the initiation of nicotine product usage and exposure to traumatic events. In parallel, nicotine exposure has been found to age-dependently modulate acquisition of contextual fear memories; however, it is unknown if adolescent nicotine exposure alters extinction of fear related memories. Age-related differences in sensitivity to the effects of nicotine on fear extinction could increase or decrease susceptibility to anxiety disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of acute nicotine administration on extinction and spontaneous recovery of contextual fear memories in pre-adolescent (PND 23), late adolescent (PND 38), and adult (PND 53) C57B6/J mice. Mice were first trained in a background contextual fear conditioning paradigm and given an intraperitoneal injection of one of four doses of nicotine (0.045, 0.09, 0.18, or 0.36mg/kg, freebase) prior to subsequent extinction or spontaneous recovery sessions. Results indicated that all acute nicotine doses impaired extinction of contextual fear in adult mice. Late adolescent mice exhibited impaired extinction of contextual fear only following higher doses of acute nicotine, and extinction of contextual fear was unaffected by acute nicotine exposure in pre-adolescent mice. Finally, acute nicotine exposure enhanced spontaneous recovery of fear memory, but only in adult mice. Overall, our results suggest that younger mice were less sensitive to nicotine's impairing effects on extinction of contextual fear and to nicotine's enhancing effects on spontaneous recovery of contextual fear memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nicotine dose-concentration relationship and pregnancy outcomes in rat: Biologic plausibility and implications for future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, Jabeen; Farkas, Svetlana; MacKinnon, Yolanda; Ariano, Robert E.; Sitar, Daniel S.; Hasan, Shabih U.

    2007-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure during pregnancy can lead to profound adverse effects on fetal development. Although CS contains several thousand chemicals, nicotine has been widely used as its surrogate as well as in its own right as a neuroteratogen. The justification for the route and dose of nicotine administration is largely based on inferential data suggesting that nicotine 6 mg/kg/day infused continuously via osmotic mini pumps (OMP) would mimic maternal CS exposure. We provide evidence that 6 mg/kg/day nicotine dose as commonly administered to pregnant rats leads to plasma nicotine concentrations that are 3-10-fold higher than those observed in moderate to heavy smokers and pregnant mothers, respectively. Furthermore, the cumulative daily nicotine dose exceeds by several hundred fold the amount consumed by human heavy smokers. Our study does not support the widely accepted notion that regardless of the nicotine dose, a linear nicotine dose-concentration relationship exists in a steady-state OMP model. We also show that total nicotine clearance increases with advancing pregnancy but no significant change is observed between the 2nd and 3rd trimester. Furthermore, nicotine infusion even at this extremely high dose has little effect on a number of maternal and fetal biologic variables and pregnancy outcome suggesting that CS constituents other than nicotine mediate the fetal growth restriction in infants born to smoking mothers. Our current study has major implications for translational research in developmental toxicology and pharmacotherapy using nicotine replacement treatment as an aid to cessation of cigarette smoking in pregnant mothers

  17. Induction of Severe Chronic Hyperplastic Candidiasis in Rat by Opportunistic Infection of C. albicans through Combination of Diabetes and Intermittent Prednisolone Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terayama, Yui; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Ozaki, Kiyokazu

    2017-08-01

    Chronic hyperplastic candidiasis progresses from squamous cell hyperplasia to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); however, the oncogenic mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we attempted to induce opportunistic Candida albicans infection and establish chronic hyperplastic candidiasis in rats by combining diabetic condition and prednisolone administration, followed by analysis of the inflammatory cells involved in the disease progression. Female Wistar Bunn/Kobori (WBN/Kob) rats were divided into 3 groups: alloxan-induced diabetic rats (A group) along with diabetic (AP group) and nondiabetic (P group) rats intermittently treated with prednisolone. Animals were euthanized at 42 weeks of age. Squamous cell hyperplasia following C. albicans infection in the forestomach was observed in almost all AP and A group rats. The lesions in the AP group were significantly more severe than those in the A group. In addition, SCC was detected in 1 AP group animal. Cluster of differentiation (CD)4-positive T cell and CD68-positive macrophage infiltration in the AP group was significantly stronger than that in the A group. These findings suggest that the combination of diabetes and intermittent prednisolone administration could induce chronic hyperplastic candidiasis without direct C. albicans inoculation and that CD4-positive T cells and CD68-positive macrophages may be highly involved in the pathogenesis of these hyperplastic lesions.

  18. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Laskin, Julia

    2013-01-15

    Imaging mass spectrometry offers simultaneous detection of drugs, drug metabolites and endogenous substances in a single experiment. This is important when evaluating effects of a drug on a complex organ system such as the brain, where there is a need to understand how regional drug distribution impacts function. Nicotine is an addictive drug and its action in the brain is of high interest. Here we use nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, nano-DESI, imaging to discover the localization of nicotine in rat brain tissue after in vivo administration of nicotine. Nano-DESI is a new ambient technique that enables spatially-resolved analysis of tissue samples without special sample pretreatment. We demonstrate high sensitivity of nano-DESI imaging that enables detection of only 0.7 fmole nicotine per pixel in the complex brain matrix. Furthermore, by adding deuterated nicotine to the solvent, we examined how matrix effects, ion suppression, and normalization affect the observed nicotine distribution. Finally, we provide preliminary results suggesting that nicotine localizes to the hippocampal substructure called dentate gyrus.

  19. Endogenous fatty acid ethanolamides suppress nicotine-induced activation of mesolimbic dopamine neurons through nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Miriam; Pillolla, Giuliano; Luchicchi, Antonio; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Yasar, Sevil; Goldberg, Steven R; Pistis, Marco

    2008-12-17

    Nicotine stimulates the activity of mesolimbic dopamine neurons, which is believed to mediate the rewarding and addictive properties of tobacco use. Accumulating evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system might play a major role in neuronal mechanisms underlying the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. Here, we investigated the modulation of nicotine effects by the endocannabinoid system on dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area with electrophysiological techniques in vivo and in vitro. We discovered that pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme that catabolizes fatty acid ethanolamides, among which the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is the best known, suppressed nicotine-induced excitation of dopamine cells. Importantly, this effect was mimicked by the administration of the FAAH substrates oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), but not methanandamide, the hydrolysis resistant analog of AEA. OEA and PEA are naturally occurring lipid signaling molecules structurally related to AEA, but devoid of affinity for cannabinoid receptors. They blocked the effects of nicotine by activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha), a nuclear receptor transcription factor involved in several aspects of lipid metabolism and energy balance. Activation of PPAR-alpha triggered a nongenomic stimulation of tyrosine kinases, which might lead to phosphorylation and negative regulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These data indicate for the first time that the anorexic lipids OEA and PEA possess neuromodulatory properties as endogenous ligands of PPAR-alpha in the brain and provide a potential new target for the treatment of nicotine addiction.

  20. Kefir protective effects against nicotine cessation-induced anxiety and cognition impairments in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Negin; Bangash, Mohammad Yasan; Motaghinejad, Majid; Hosseini, Pantea; Noudoost, Behshad

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine as one of the potent psychostimulant drugs is characterized by its parasympathomimetic activity. Upon the abrupt discontinuation of nicotine intake, a number of symptoms such as anxiety, depression and cognition impairment develop. Kefir as a food supplement is rich in tryptophan. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of Kefir on nicotine cessation-induced anxiety, depression and cognition impairment. Forty adult male rats were divided into four groups. All the groups received 6 mg/kg/day of nicotine for 17 days and then the negative control groups got 5 mg/kg/day of normal saline. The positive control groups were given 40 mg/kg/day of Sertraline HCl for 7 days. The group treated with Cow Milk Kefir (CMK) and Soy Milk Kefir (SMK) received 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days. On the 25(th) day, Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), Open Field Test (OFT) and Forced Swim Test (FST) were used to investigate anxiety and depression. In addition, Moris Water Maze was applied to evaluate learning and memory in the animals between the 20(th) and 25(th) days. The results showed that administration of CMK, SMK and Sertraline had higher anti-depression and anxiolytic effects on nicotine withdrawal-induced depression and anxiety in rats (P Kefir had a potential effect on the treatment of nicotine cessation-induced depression, anxiety and cognition impairment in the animal model. Kefir may be useful for adjunct therapy for nicotine abandonment treatment protocols.

  1. Nicotine and ethanol co-use in Long-Evans rats: Stimulatory effects of perinatal exposure to a fat-rich diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatayev, Olga; Lukatskaya, Olga; Moon, Sang-Ho; Guo, Wei-Ran; Chen, Dan; Algava, Diane; Abedi, Susan; Leibowitz, Sarah F.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate frequent co-existence of nicotine and alcohol abuse and suggest that this may result, in part, from the ready access to and intake of fat-rich diets. Whereas animal studies show that high-fat diet intake in adults can enhance the consumption of either nicotine or ethanol and that maternal consumption of a fat-rich diet during pregnancy increases operant responding for nicotine in offspring, little is known about the impact of dietary fat on the co-abuse of these two drugs. The goal of this study was to test in Long-Evans rats the effects of perinatal exposure to fat on the co-use of nicotine and ethanol, using a novel paradigm that involves simultaneous intravenous (IV) self-administration of these two drugs. Fat- vs. chow-exposed offspring were characterized and compared, first in terms of their nicotine self-administration behavior, then in terms of their nicotine/ethanol self-administration behavior, and lastly in terms of their self-administration of ethanol in the absence of nicotine. The results demonstrate that maternal consumption of fat compared to low-fat chow during gestation and lactation significantly stimulates nicotine self-administration during fixed-ratio testing. It also increases nicotine/ethanol self-administration during fixed-ratio and dose-response testing, with BEC elevated to 120 mg/dL, and causes an increase in breakpoint during progressive ratio testing. Of particular note is the finding that rats perinatally exposed to fat self-administer significantly more of the nicotine/ethanol mixture as compared to nicotine alone, an effect not evident in the chow-control rats. After removal of nicotine from the nicotine/ethanol mixture, this difference between the fat- and chow-exposed rats was lost, with both groups failing to acquire the self-administration of ethanol alone. Together, these findings suggest that perinatal exposure to a fat-rich diet, in addition to stimulating self-administration of nicotine, causes

  2. Successful treatment of dry eye in two patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease with systemic administration of FK506 and corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Y; Okamoto, S; Kuwana, M; Mori, T; Watanabe, R; Nakajima, T; Yamada, M; Mashima, Y; Tsubota, K; Oguchi, Y

    2001-05-01

    We present two cases of severe dry eye in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (CGVHD) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) who were successfully treated by the systemic administration of FK506 and corticosteroids. A 29-year-old man with chronic myelogenous leukemia underwent SCT. Oral and lung CGVHD developed on approximately day 130, and dry eye associated with CGVHD was diagnosed on day 168. The patient began receiving cyclosporin A (150 mg/d) for the treatment of oral and lung CGVHD. Treatment with prednisolone (1 mg/kg/d) began on approximately day 300. Oral and lung GVHD improved slightly, but worsened again although systemic administration of cyclosporin A and prednisolone were continued. Cyclosporin A was discontinued, and systemic administration of FK506 was started on day 376. Forty-four days later, marked improvement in the ocular surface and other organs was observed. However, the dry eye worsened while tapering FK506, with no flare of other affected organs. A 43-year-old woman with myelodysplastic syndrome underwent SCT. She received FK506 for prophylaxis of CGVHD. She had mild dry eye before SCT. Oral and intestinal CGVHD developed, and the dry eye worsened significantly on approximately day 150 while tapering FK506. Treatment with prednisolone (1 mg/kg/d) began, and the dose of FK506 was increased. By day 240, the symptoms of dry eye and the findings of the ocular surface markedly improved, and CGVHD in other organs was completely resolved. However, the improvement in the dry eye was lost when FK506 was tapered for the second time. Systemic administration of FK506 with corticosteroids is an effective treatment of severe dry eye in patients with CGVHD, but long-term administration may be required to achieve a lasting response. These cases also suggest that further investigation into the use of topical FK506 and prednisolone as a maintenance therapy should be pursued.

  3. Chronic administration of thiamine pyrophosphate decreases age-related histological atrophic testicular changes and improves sexual behavior in male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Montiel, H L; Vásquez López, C M; González-Loyola, J G; Vega-Anaya, G C; Villagrán-Herrera, M E; Gallegos-Corona, M A; Saldaña, C; Ramos Gómez, M; García Horshman, P; García Solís, P; Solís-S, J C; Robles-Osorio, M L; Ávila Morales, J; Varela-Echavarría, A; Paredes Guerrero, R

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a multifactorial universal process and constitutes the most important risk factor for chronic-degenerative diseases. Although it is a natural process, pathological aging arises when these changes occur quickly and the body is not able to adapt. This is often associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammation, and a decrease in the endogenous antioxidant systems, constituting a physiopathological state commonly found in chronic-degenerative diseases. At the testicular level, aging is associated with tissue atrophy, decreased steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis, and sexual behavior disorders. This situation, in addition to the elevated generation of ROS in the testicular steroidogenesis, provides a critical cellular environment causing oxidative damage at diverse cellular levels. To assess the effects of a reduction in the levels of ROS, thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) was chronically administered in senile Wistar rats. TPP causes an activation of intermediate metabolism routes, enhancing cellular respiration and decreasing the generation of ROS. Our results show an overall decrease of atrophic histological changes linked to aging, with higher levels of serum testosterone, sexual activity, and an increase in the levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes in TPP-treated animals. These results suggest that TPP chronic administration decreases the progression of age-related atrophic changes by improving the intermediate metabolism, and by increasing the levels of antioxidant enzymes.

  4. Nicotine adsorption on single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girao, Eduardo C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Fagan, Solange B.; Zanella, Ivana [Area de Ciencias Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario Franciscano - UNIFRA, 97010-032 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Filho, Antonio G. Souza, E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    This work reports a theoretical study of nicotine molecules interacting with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through ab initio calculations within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Different adsorption sites for nicotine on the surface of pristine and defective (8,0) SWCNTs were analyzed and the total energy curves, as a function of molecular position relative to the SWCNT surface, were evaluated. The nicotine adsorption process is found to be energetically favorable and the molecule-nanotube interaction is intermediated by the tri-coordinated nitrogen atom from the nicotine. It is also predicted the possibility of a chemical bonding between nicotine and SWCNT through the di-coordinated nitrogen.

  5. Testing environment shape differentially modulates baseline and nicotine-induced changes in behavior: Sex differences, hypoactivity, and behavioral sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illenberger, J M; Mactutus, C F; Booze, R M; Harrod, S B

    2018-02-01

    In those who use nicotine, the likelihood of dependence, negative health consequences, and failed treatment outcomes differ as a function of gender. Women may be more sensitive to learning processes driven by repeated nicotine exposure that influence conditioned approach and craving. Sex differences in nicotine's influence over overt behaviors (i.e. hypoactivity or behavioral sensitization) can be examined using passive drug administration models in male and female rats. Following repeated intravenous (IV) nicotine injections, behavioral sensitization is enhanced in female rats compared to males. Nonetheless, characteristics of the testing environment also mediate rodent behavior following drug administration. The current experiment used a within-subjects design to determine if nicotine-induced changes in horizontal activity, center entries, and rearing displayed by male and female rats is detected when behavior was recorded in round vs. square chambers. Behaviors were recorded from each group (males-round: n=19; males-square: n=18; females-square: n=19; and females-round: n=19) immediately following IV injection of saline, acute nicotine, and repeated nicotine (0.05mg/kg/injection). Prior to nicotine treatment, sex differences were apparent only in round chambers. Following nicotine administration, the order of magnitude for the chamber that provided enhanced detection of hypoactivity or sensitization was contingent upon both the dependent measure under examination and the animal's biological sex. As such, round and square testing chambers provide different, and sometimes contradictory, accounts of how male and female rats respond to nicotine treatment. It is possible that a central mechanism such as stress or cue sensitivity is impacted by both drug exposure and environment to drive the sex differences observed in the current experiment. Until these complex relations are better understood, experiments considering sex differences in drug responses should balance

  6. Chronic disease prevalence from Italian administrative databases in the VALORE project: a validation through comparison of population estimates with general practice databases and national survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Administrative databases are widely available and have been extensively used to provide estimates of chronic disease prevalence for the purpose of surveillance of both geographical and temporal trends. There are, however, other sources of data available, such as medical records from primary care and national surveys. In this paper we compare disease prevalence estimates obtained from these three different data sources. Methods Data from general practitioners (GP) and administrative transactions for health services were collected from five Italian regions (Veneto, Emilia Romagna, Tuscany, Marche and Sicily) belonging to all the three macroareas of the country (North, Center, South). Crude prevalence estimates were calculated by data source and region for diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). For diabetes and COPD, prevalence estimates were also obtained from a national health survey. When necessary, estimates were adjusted for completeness of data ascertainment. Results Crude prevalence estimates of diabetes in administrative databases (range: from 4.8% to 7.1%) were lower than corresponding GP (6.2%-8.5%) and survey-based estimates (5.1%-7.5%). Geographical trends were similar in the three sources and estimates based on treatment were the same, while estimates adjusted for completeness of ascertainment (6.1%-8.8%) were slightly higher. For ischaemic heart disease administrative and GP data sources were fairly consistent, with prevalence ranging from 3.7% to 4.7% and from 3.3% to 4.9%, respectively. In the case of heart failure administrative estimates were consistently higher than GPs’ estimates in all five regions, the highest difference being 1.4% vs 1.1%. For COPD the estimates from administrative data, ranging from 3.1% to 5.2%, fell into the confidence interval of the Survey estimates in four regions, but failed to detect the higher prevalence in the most Southern region (4.0% in

  7. Chronic administration of the selective P2X3, P2X2/3 receptor antagonist, A-317491, transiently attenuates cancer-induced bone pain in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Rie; Nasser, Arafat; Falk, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The purinergic P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors are in the peripheral nervous system almost exclusively confined to afferent sensory neurons, where they are found both at peripheral and central synapses. The P2X3 receptor is implicated in both neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, the role of the ......X3 receptor in chronic cancer-induced bone pain is less known. Here we investigated the effect of systemic acute and chronic administration of the selective P2X3, P2X2/3 receptor antagonist (5-[[[(3-Phenoxyphenyl)methyl][(1S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]-1...

  8. Effects of the nicotinic agonist varenicline, nicotinic antagonist r-bPiDI, and DAT inhibitor (R)-modafinil on co-use of ethanol and nicotine in female P rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Sarah E; Saunders, Meredith A; Baxter, Thomas A; Nixon, Kimberly; Prendergast, Mark A; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter; Dwoskin, Linda P; Slack, Rachel D; Newman, Amy H; Bell, Richard L; Bardo, Michael T

    2018-05-01

    Co-users of alcohol and nicotine are the largest group of polysubstance users worldwide. Commonalities in mechanisms of action for ethanol (EtOH) and nicotine proposes the possibility of developing a single pharmacotherapeutic to treat co-use. Toward developing a preclinical model of co-use, female alcohol-preferring (P) rats were trained for voluntary EtOH drinking and i.v. nicotine self-administration in three phases: (1) EtOH alone (0 vs. 15%, two-bottle choice), (2) nicotine alone (0.03 mg/kg/infusion, active vs. inactive lever), and (3) concurrent access to both EtOH and nicotine. Using this model, we examined the effects of (1) varenicline, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist with high affinity for the α4β2* subtype; (2) r-bPiDI, a subtype-selective antagonist at α6β2* nAChRs; and (3) (R)-modafinil, an atypical inhibitor of the dopamine transporter (DAT). In phases 1 and 2, pharmacologically relevant intake of EtOH and nicotine was achieved. In the concurrent access phase (phase 3), EtOH consumption decreased while nicotine intake increased relative to phases 1 and 2. For drug pretreatments, in the EtOH access phase (phase 1), (R)-modafinil (100 mg/kg) decreased EtOH consumption, with no effect on water consumption. In the concurrent access phase, varenicline (3 mg/kg), r-bPiDI (20 mg/kg), and (R)-modafinil (100 mg/kg) decreased nicotine self-administration but did not alter EtOH consumption, water consumption, or inactive lever pressing. These results indicate that therapeutics which may be useful for smoking cessation via selective inhibition of α4β2* or α6β2* nAChRs, or DAT inhibition, may not be sufficient to treat EtOH and nicotine co-use.

  9. Regulation of hippocampal cannabinoid CB1 receptor actions by adenosine A1 receptors and chronic caffeine administration: implications for the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Vasco C; Assaife-Lopes, Natália; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Pratt, Judith A; Brett, Ros R; Sebastião, Ana M

    2011-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB(1) receptor-mediated modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons is important for the integrity of hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Although adenosine A(1) receptors have a central role in fine-tuning excitatory transmission in the hippocampus, A(1) receptors localized in GABAergic cells do not directly influence GABA release. CB(1) and A(1) receptors are the main targets for the effects of two of the most heavily consumed psychoactive substances worldwide: Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, a CB(1) receptor agonist) and caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist). We first tested the hypothesis that an A(1)-CB(1) interaction influences GABA and glutamate release in the hippocampus. We found that A(1) receptor activation attenuated the CB(1)-mediated inhibition of GABA and glutamate release and this interaction was manifested at the level of G-protein activation. Using in vivo and in vitro approaches, we then investigated the functional implications of the adenosine-cannabinoid interplay that may arise following chronic caffeine consumption. Chronic administration of caffeine in mice (intraperitoneally, 3 mg/kg/day, for 15 days, >12 h before trials) led to an A(1)-mediated enhancement of the CB(1)-dependent acute disruptive effects of THC on a short-term spatial memory task, despite inducing a reduction in cortical and hippocampal CB(1) receptor number and an attenuation of CB(1) coupling with G protein. A(1) receptor levels were increased following chronic caffeine administration. This study shows that A(1) receptors exert a negative modulatory effect on CB(1)-mediated inhibition of GABA and glutamate release, and provides the first evidence of chronic caffeine-induced alterations on the cannabinoid system in the cortex and hippocampus, with functional implications in spatial memory.

  10. Chronic administration of recombinant IL-6 upregulates lipogenic enzyme expression and aggravates high-fat-diet-induced steatosis in IL-6-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Vida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 has emerged as an important mediator of fatty acid metabolism with paradoxical effects in the liver. Administration of IL-6 has been reported to confer protection against steatosis, but plasma and tissue IL-6 concentrations are elevated in chronic liver diseases, including fatty liver diseases associated with obesity and alcoholic ingestion. In this study, we further investigated the role of IL-6 on steatosis induced through a high-fat diet (HFD in wild-type (WT and IL-6-deficient (IL-6−/− mice. Additionally, HFD-fed IL-6−/− mice were also chronically treated with recombinant IL-6 (rIL-6. Obesity in WT mice fed a HFD associated with elevated serum IL-6 levels, fatty liver, upregulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3, increased AMP kinase phosphorylation (p-AMPK, and downregulation of the hepatic lipogenic enzymes fatty acid synthase (FAS and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1. The HFD-fed IL-6−/− mice showed severe steatosis, no changes in CPT1 levels or AMPK activity, no increase in STAT3 amounts, inactivated STAT3, and marked downregulation of the expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCα/β, FAS and SCD1. The IL-6 chronic replacement in HFD-fed IL-6−/− mice restored hepatic STAT3 and AMPK activation but also increased the expression of the lipogenic enzymes ACCα/β, FAS and SCD1. Furthermore, rIL-6 administration was associated with aggravated steatosis and elevated fat content in the liver. We conclude that, in the context of HFD-induced obesity, the administration of rIL-6 might contribute to the aggravation of fatty liver disease through increasing lipogenesis.

  11. Enriched environment palliates nicotine-induced addiction and associated neurobehavioral deficits in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Amber; Batool, Zehra; Ahmed, Saara; Tabassum, Saiqa; Khaliq, Saima; Mehdi, Bushra Jabeen; Sajid, Irfan; Ahmad, Shoaib; Saleem, Sadia; Naqvi, Fizza; Naqvi, Faizan; Haider, Saida

    2017-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of enriched environment in preventing and/or reducing the neurobehavioral deficits produced after nicotine administration in albino Wistar rats. Equal numbers of rat in two groups were either placed in social environment (control group) or social along with physically enriched environment for four weeks before the administration of nicotine. Exposure to different environmental conditions was followed by the intraperitoneal injection of nicotine at the dose of 0.6 mg/kg for seven consecutive days during which addictive behavior was monitored using conditioned placed preference paradigm. Behavioral responses to locomotor activity, anxiety and retention of short term memory were investigated in control and nicotine injected groups exposed to different environments. Results of this study showed that the rats pre-exposed to physical along with social enrichment exhibited a decrease in drug seeking behavior, hyper locomotion, anxiogenic effects along with improvement of working memory as compared to control and nicotine injected groups that were kept in social environment alone. This behavioral study suggests that the exposure to physical enrichment along with socialization in young age can later reduce the chances of compulsive dependence on nicotine and related neurobehavioral deficits.

  12. Smoking, nicotine and the kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agarwal, Pramod Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Terwijl roken schadelijk is voor de nieren, lijkt nicotine juist een beschermend effect op deze organen te hebben. Matige alcoholconsumptie lijkt positieve effecten te hebben na niertransplantatie: het vermindert het risico op overlijden en het ontstaan van diabetes. Dat blijkt uit onderzoek van

  13. [Functional respiratory and blood gas analytical studies of the effects of fenspiride, in oral and intramuscular administration, in chronic bronchopneumopathic subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, D; Raffi, G B; Caudarella, R; Gennari, P; Caprara, C; Cipolla, C

    1979-12-01

    A group of 20 chronic bronchopneumopathics was treated for 15 days with fenspiride orally and i.m. The behaviour of a set of functional respiratory and haemogasanalytic parameters was monitored at various times (basic, 5th, 10th and 15th days). Progressive, significant improvements in VC, FEV1, RV and in related parameters were observed. These were attributed to the drug's anti-inflammatory effect in the respiratory ways as well as to its direct antibronchospastic action. Stress is laid on the excellent clinical tolerance of fenspiride following its oral and i.m. administration.

  14. Nicotine And The Risk Of Exposure To The Organophosphorus Insecticide Cyolane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanin M, M.; Bahig Mervat, E.

    1999-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to show the effect of repeated oral doses of nicotine (0.5 mg/kg) on rats pretreated or during treatment with cyolane (0.5 mg/kg 1/20 LD 5 0). The results revealed that exposure of smokers to organophosphorus pesticides exerted slight changes in GOT and GPT. Alkaline phosphatase was significantly increased to reach maximal (228.54 and 148.64%) after nicotine + cyolane and/or nicotine were given for a week to rats pretreated with cyolane for 2 weeks. Total protein, albumin and Albumin/Globulin (A/G) ratio were also affected. Administration of nicotine along with cyolane to rats showed a significant increase in cholesterol content compared to that of cyolane treated rats. Values of thyroxine (T 4 ) and triiodothyronine (T 3 ) also fluctuated

  15. Racial differences in the relationship between rate of nicotine metabolism and nicotine intake from cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathryn C; Gubner, Noah R; Tyndale, Rachel F; Hawk, Larry W; Lerman, Caryn; George, Tony P; Cinciripini, Paul; Schnoll, Robert A; Benowitz, Neal L

    2016-09-01

    Rate of nicotine metabolism has been identified as an important factor influencing nicotine intake and can be estimated using the nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR), a validated biomarker of CYP2A6 enzyme activity. Individuals who metabolize nicotine faster (higher NMR) may alter their smoking behavior to titrate their nicotine intake in order to maintain similar levels of nicotine in the body compared to slower nicotine metabolizers. There are known racial differences in the rate of nicotine metabolism with African Americans on average having a slower rate of nicotine metabolism compared to Whites. The goal of this study was to determine if there are racial differences in the relationship between rate of nicotine metabolism and measures of nicotine intake assessed using multiple biomarkers of nicotine and tobacco smoke exposure. Using secondary analyses of the screening data collected in a recently completed clinical trial, treatment-seeking African American and White daily smokers (10 or more cigarettes per day) were grouped into NMR quartiles so that the races could be compared at the same NMR, even though the distribution of NMR within race differed. The results indicated that rate of nicotine metabolism was a more important factor influencing nicotine intake in White smokers. Specifically, Whites were more likely to titrate their nicotine intake based on the rate at which they metabolize nicotine. However, this relationship was not found in African Americans. Overall there was a greater step-down, linear type relationship between NMR groups and cotinine or cotinine/cigarette in African Americans, which is consistent with the idea that differences in blood cotinine levels between the African American NMR groups were primarily due to differences in CYP2A6 enzyme activity without titration of nicotine intake among faster nicotine metabolizers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene expression signatures affected by ethanol and/or nicotine in normal human normal oral keratinocytes (NHOKs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J. Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that nicotine/alcohol alters epigenetic control and leads to abrogated DNA methylation and histone modifications, which could subsequently perturb transcriptional regulation critically important in cellular transformation. The aim of this study is to determine the molecular mechanisms of nicotine/alcohol-induced epigenetic alterations and their mechanistic roles in transcriptional regulation in human adult stem cells. We hypothesized that nicotine/alcohol induces deregulation of epigenetic machinery and leads to epigenetic alterations, which subsequently affect transcriptional regulation in oral epithelial stem cells. As an initiating step we have profiled transcriptomic alterations induced by the combinatory administration of EtOH and nicotine in primary normal human oral keratinocytes. Here we provide detailed experimental methods, analysis and information associated with our data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO under GSE57634. Our data provide comprehensive transcriptomic map describing molecular changes induced by EtOH and nicotine on normal human oral keratinocytes.

  17. Effect of wheel-running during abstinence on subsequent nicotine-seeking in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Victoria; Moore, Catherine F; Brunzell, Darlene H; Lynch, Wendy J

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Exercise appears to be a promising non-pharmacological treatment for nicotine addiction that may be useful for the vulnerable adolescent population. Objectives To determine if wheel running, an animal model of aerobic exercise, during an abstinence period would decrease subsequent nicotine-seeking in rats that had extended access to nicotine self-administration during adolescence. Methods Male adolescent rats (n = 55) were trained to self-administer saline or nicotine infusions (5 or 10 μg/kg) under a fixed ratio 1 schedule with a maximum of 20 infusions/day beginning on postnatal day 30. After 5 days, access was extended to 23-hr/day with unlimited infusions for a total of 10 days. After the last self-administration session, rats were moved to polycarbonate cages for a 10-day abstinence period where they either had access to a locked or unlocked running wheel for 2-hr/day. Nicotine-seeking was examined following the 10th day of abstinence under a within-session extinction/cue-induced reinstatement paradigm. Results Intake was higher at the 10 μg/kg dose as compared to the 5 μg/kg dose; however, intake did not differ within doses prior to wheel assignment. Compared to saline controls, rats that self-administered nicotine at either dose showed a significant increase in drug-seeking during extinction, and consistent with our hypothesis, exercise during abstinence attenuated this effect. Nicotine led to modest, but significant levels of cue-induced reinstatement; however, in this adolescent-onset model, levels were variable and not affected by exercise. Conclusions Exercise may effectively reduce relapse vulnerability for adolescent-onset nicotine addiction. PMID:23371488

  18. Nicotine protects kidney from renal ischemia/reperfusion injury through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Sadis

    Full Text Available Kidney ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R is characterized by renal dysfunction and tubular damages resulting from an early activation of innate immunity. Recently, nicotine administration has been shown to be a powerful inhibitor of a variety of innate immune responses, including LPS-induced toxaemia. This cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway acts via the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR. Herein, we tested the potential protective effect of nicotine administration in a mouse model of renal I/R injury induced by bilateral clamping of kidney arteries. Renal function, tubular damages and inflammatory response were compared between control animals and mice receiving nicotine at the time of ischemia. Nicotine pretreatment protected mice from renal dysfunction in a dose-dependent manner and through the alpha7nAChR, as attested by the absence of protection in alpha7nAChR-deficient mice. Additionally, nicotine significantly reduced tubular damages, prevented neutrophil infiltration and decreased productions of the CXC-chemokine KC, TNF-alpha and the proinflammatory high-mobility group box 1 protein. Reduced tubular damage in nicotine pre-treated mice was associated with a decrease in tubular cell apoptosis and proliferative response as attested by the reduction of caspase-3 and Ki67 positive cells, respectively. All together, these data highlight that nicotine exerts a protective anti-inflammatory effect during kidney I/R through the cholinergic alpha7nAChR pathway. In addition, this could provide an opportunity to overcome the effect of surgical cholinergic denervation during kidney transplantation.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine in obesity and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirchgessner Annette

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoke is a major risk factor for a number of diseases including lung cancer and respiratory infections. Paradoxically, it also contains nicotine, an anti-inflammatory alkaloid. There is increasing evidence that smokers have a lower incidence of some inflammatory diseases, including ulcerative colitis, and the protective effect involves the activation of a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway that requires the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR on immune cells. Obesity is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation, which contributes to insulin resistance. Nicotine significantly improves glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in genetically obese and diet-induced obese mice, which is associated with suppressed adipose tissue inflammation. Inflammation that results in disruption of the epithelial barrier is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease, and nicotine is protective in ulcerative colitis. This article summarizes current evidence for the anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine in obesity and ulcerative colitis. Selective agonists for the α7nAChR could represent a promising pharmacological strategy for the treatment of inflammation in obesity and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, we should keep in mind that the anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine could be mediated via the expression of several nAChRs on a particular target cell.

  20. Nicotine enhances proliferation, migration, and radioresistance of human malignant glioma cells through EGFR activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, A.A.; Jameson, M.J.; Broaddus, W.C.; Lin, P.S.; Chung, T.D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that continued tobacco use during radiation therapy contributes to maintenance of neoplastic growth despite treatment with radiation. Nicotine is a cigarette component that is an established risk factor for many diseases, neoplastic and otherwise. The hypothesis of this work is that nicotine promotes the proliferation, migration, and radioresistance of human malignant glioma cells. The effect of nicotine on cellular proliferation, migration, signaling, and radiation sensitivity were evaluated for malignant glioma U87 and GBM12 cells by use of the AlamarBlue, scratch healing, and clonogenic survival assays. Signal transduction was assessed by immunoblotting for activated EGFR, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), and AKT. At concentrations comparable with those found in chronic smokers, nicotine induced malignant glioma cell migration, growth, colony formation, and radioresistance. Nicotine increased phosphorylation of EGFR tyr992 , AKT ser473 , and ERK. These molecular effects were reduced by pharmacological inhibitors of EGFR, PI3K, and MEK. It was therefore concluded that nicotine stimulates the malignant behavior of glioma cells in vitro by activation of the EGFR and downstream AKT and ERK pathways. (author)

  1. Double dissociation of working memory and attentional processes in smokers and non-smokers with and without nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundey, Jessica; Amu, Rosa; Ambrus, Géza Gergely; Batsikadze, Georgi; Paulus, Walter; Nitsche, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Nicotine has been shown to affect cortical excitability measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation in smoking and non-smoking subjects in different ways. In tobacco-deprived smokers, administration of nicotine restores compromised cortical facilitation while in non-smokers, it enhances cortical inhibition. As cortical excitability and activity are closely linked to cognitive processes, we aimed to explore whether nicotine-induced physiological alterations in non-smokers and smokers are associated with cognitive changes. Specifically, we assessed the impact of nicotine on working memory performance (n-back letter task) and on attentional processes (Stroop interference test) in healthy smokers and non-smokers. Both tasks have been shown to rely on prefrontal areas, and nicotinic receptors are relevantly involved in prefrontal function. Sixteen smoking and 16 non-smoking subjects participated in the 3-back letter task and 21 smoking and 21 non-smoking subjects in the Stroop test after the respective application of placebo or nicotine patches. The results show that working memory and attentional processes are compromised in nicotine-deprived smokers compared to non-smoking individuals. After administration of nicotine, working memory performance in smokers improved, while non-smoking subjects displayed decreased accuracy with increased number of errors. The effects have been shown to be more apparent for working memory performance than attentional processes. In summary, cognitive functions can be restored by nicotine in deprived smokers, whereas non-smokers do not gain additional benefit. The respective changes are in accordance with related effects of nicotine on cortical excitability in both groups.

  2. The estrogen-dependent baroreflex dysfunction caused by nicotine in female rats is mediated via NOS/HO inhibition: Role of sGC/PI3K/MAPK{sub ERK}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouda, Mohamed A.; El-Gowelli, Hanan M.; El-Gowilly, Sahar M.; El-Mas, Mahmoud M., E-mail: mahelm@hotmail.com

    2015-12-15

    We have previously reported that estrogen (E2) exacerbates the depressant effect of chronic nicotine on arterial baroreceptor activity in female rats. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this nicotine effect is modulated by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and/or heme oxygenase (HO) and their downstream soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling. We investigated the effects of (i) inhibition or facilitation of NOS or HO on the interaction of nicotine (2 mg/kg/day i.p., 2 weeks) with reflex bradycardic responses to phenylephrine in ovariectomized (OVX) rats treated with E2 or vehicle, and (ii) central pharmacologic inhibition of sGC, PI3K, or MAPKs on the interaction. The data showed that the attenuation by nicotine of reflex bradycardia in OVXE2 rats was abolished after treatment with hemin (HO inducer) or L-arginine (NOS substrate). The hemin or L-arginine effect disappeared after inhibition of NOS (Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, L-NAME) and HO (zinc protoporphyrin IX, ZnPP), respectively, denoting the interaction between the two enzymatic pathways. E2-receptor blockade (ICI 182,780) reduced baroreflexes in OVXE2 rats but had no effect on baroreflex improvement induced by hemin or L-arginine. Moreover, baroreflex enhancement by hemin was eliminated following intracisternal (i.c.) administration of wortmannin, ODQ, or PD98059 (inhibitors of PI3K, sGC, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases, MAPK{sub ERK}, respectively). In contrast, the hemin effect was preserved after inhibition of MAPK{sub p38} (SB203580) or MAPK{sub JNK} (SP600125). Overall, NOS/HO interruption underlies baroreflex dysfunction caused by nicotine in female rats and the facilitation of NOS/HO-coupled sGC/PI3K/MAPK{sub ERK} signaling might rectify the nicotine effect. - Highlights: • Hemin or L-arginine blunts baroreflex dysfunction caused by nicotine in OVXE2 rats. • NO/CO crosstalk mediates

  3. Self-administered nicotine differentially impacts body weight gain in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprecht, Laura E; Smith, Tracy T; Donny, Eric C; Sved, Alan F

    2017-07-01

    Obesity and tobacco smoking represent the largest challenges to public health, but the causal relationship between nicotine and obesity is poorly understood. Nicotine suppresses body weight gain, a factor impacting smoking initiation and the failure to quit, particularly among obese smokers. The impact of nicotine on body weight regulation in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant populations consuming densely caloric diets is unknown. In the current experiment, body weight gain of adult male rats maintained on a high energy diet (31.8% kcal from fat) distributed into obesity-prone (OP), obesity-resistant (OR) and an intermediate group, which was placed on standard rodent chow (Chow). These rats were surgically implanted with intravenous catheters and allowed to self-administer nicotine (0 or 60μg/kg/infusion, a standard self-administration dose) in 1-h sessions for 20 consecutive days. Self-administered nicotine significantly suppressed body weight gain but not food intake in OP and Chow rats. Self-administered nicotine had no effect on body weight gain in OR rats. These data suggest that: 1) OR rats are also resistant to nicotine-induced suppression of body weight gain; and 2) nicotine may reduce levels of obesity in a subset of smokers prone to obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. NREM sleep hypersomnia and reduced sleep/wake continuity in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression based on chronic corticosterone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Dantec, Y; Hache, G; Guilloux, J P; Guiard, B P; David, D J; Adrien, J; Escourrou, P

    2014-08-22

    Sleep/wake disorders are frequently associated with anxiety and depression and to elevated levels of cortisol. Even though these alterations are increasingly sought in animal models, no study has investigated the specific effects of chronic corticosterone (CORT) administration on sleep. We characterized sleep/wake disorders in a neuroendocrine mouse model of anxiety/depression, based on chronic CORT administration in the drinking water (35 μg/ml for 4 weeks, "CORT model"). The CORT model was markedly affected during the dark phase by non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) increase without consistent alteration of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Total sleep duration (SD) and sleep efficiency (SE) increased concomitantly during both the 24h and the dark phase, due to the increase in the number of NREM sleep episodes without a change in their mean duration. Conversely, the total duration of wake decreased due to a decrease in the mean duration of wake episodes despite an increase in their number. These results reflect hypersomnia by intrusion of NREM sleep during the active period as well as a decrease in sleep/wake continuity. In addition, NREM sleep was lighter, with an increased electroencephalogram (EEG) theta activity. With regard to REM sleep, the number and the duration of episodes decreased, specifically during the first part of the light period. REM and NREM sleep changes correlated respectively with the anxiety and the anxiety/depressive-like phenotypes, supporting the notion that studying sleep could be of predictive value for altered emotional behavior. The chronic CORT model in mice that displays hallmark characteristics of anxiety and depression provides an insight into understanding the changes in overall sleep architecture that occur under pathological conditions. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

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    Lingjun Zuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4. These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  6. Will chronic e-cigarette use cause lung disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Rowell, Temperance R.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the lung, tobacco smoking increases the risk of lung cancer, and also causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which encompasses both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. E-cigarettes (E-Cigs), or electronic nicotine delivery systems, were developed over a decade ago and are designed to deliver nicotine without combusting tobacco. Although tobacco smoking has declined since the 1950s, E-Cig ...

  7. Effects of chronic systemic administration of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen on food intake and body weight in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunit M; Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2010-06-10

    The effects of daily administration of physiological saline of baclofen (1 and 4mg/kg, i.p.) for 27 days were investigated on food intake and body weight in non-deprived rats in Experiment 1. Baclofen (1 and 4mg/kg) significantly increased daily short-term food intake when measured at 30min (F((2,15))=11.011, P<0.01) and 90min (F((2,15))=7.3801, P<0.01) over the 27 day experimental period.. Tolerance did not develop to the short-term hyperphagic effects of baclofen. Baclofen (1mg/kg) had no significant effects on body weight gain of the rats compared with controls. By contrast, baclofen (4mg/kg) significantly (P<0.05) decreased the body weight gain of the animals. In Experiment 2, the effect of daily administration of baclofen (4mg/kg, i.p.) for 24 days was investigated on 24h food intake in rats measured after the first, eight, fifteenth and twenty second injections. The 24h food intake of the animals was not significantly different from those of control rats on any of the measurement days (F((1,14))=1.602, ns). However, the body weight gain of the rats chronically treated with baclofen (4mg/kg) was significantly reduced. (F((1,14))=14.011, P<0.01). The observations that chronic administration of baclofen (4mg/kg) stimulates short-term food intake without affecting long term (24h) feeding, but decreases body weight gain, suggest that baclofen may act through different mechanisms to influence food intake and body weight.

  8. Behavioral, Thermal and Neurochemical Effects Of Acute And Chronic 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (“Ecstasy”) Self-Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Reveron, Maria Elena; Maier, Esther Y.; Duvauchelle, Christine L.

    2009-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a popular methamphetamine derivative associated with young adults and all-night dance parties. However, the enduring effects of MDMA at voluntary intake levels have not been extensively investigated. In this study, MDMA-influenced behaviors and core temperatures were assessed over the course of 20 daily MDMA self-administration sessions in rats. In vivo microdialysis techniques were used in a subsequent MDMA challenge test session to determine extra...

  9. Nicotine Dependence and Urinary Nicotine, Cotinine and Hydroxycotinine Levels in Daily Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Van Overmeire, Ilse P. I.; De Smedt, Tom; Dendale, Paul; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Vanacker, Hilde; Vanoeteren, Jan F. A.; Van Laethem, Danny M. G.; Van Loco, Joris; De Cremer, Koen A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine dependence and smoking frequency are critical factors for smoking cessation. The aims of this study are (1) to determine if nicotine dependence Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) scores are associated with urinary levels of nicotine metabolites, (2) to assess the relationship of hydroxycotinine/cotinine ratio with FTND score and cigarettes smoked per day (CPD), and (3) to identify significant predictors of cigarettes per day among biomarker concentrations and individual F...

  10. Nicotine Impairs Macrophage Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiyuan; Stitzel, Jerry A; Bai, An; Zambrano, Cristian A; Phillips, Matthew; Marrack, Philippa; Chan, Edward D

    2017-09-01

    Pure nicotine impairs macrophage killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), but it is not known whether the nicotine component in cigarette smoke (CS) plays a role. Moreover, the mechanisms by which nicotine impairs macrophage immunity against MTB have not been explored. To neutralize the effects of nicotine in CS extract, we used a competitive inhibitor to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mecamylamine-as well as macrophages derived from mice with genetic disruption of specific subunits of nAChR. We also determined whether nicotine impaired macrophage autophagy and whether nicotine-exposed T regulatory cells (Tregs) could subvert macrophage anti-MTB immunity. Mecamylamine reduced the CS extract increase in MTB burden by 43%. CS extract increase in MTB was also significantly attenuated in macrophages from mice with genetic disruption of either the α7, β2, or β4 subunit of nAChR. Nicotine inhibited autophagosome formation in MTB-infected THP-1 cells and primary murine alveolar macrophages, as well as increased the intracellular MTB burden. Nicotine increased migration of THP-1 cells, consistent with the increased number of macrophages found in the lungs of smokers. Nicotine induced Tregs to produce transforming growth factor-β. Naive mouse macrophages co-cultured with nicotine-exposed Tregs had significantly greater numbers of viable MTB recovered with increased IL-10 production and urea production, but no difference in secreted nitric oxide as compared with macrophages cocultured with unexposed Tregs. We conclude that nicotine in CS plays an important role in subverting macrophage control of MTB infection.

  11. Short-term glucocorticoid administration in patients with protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Part 2 — comparison of different medication forms efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Fedorova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare efficacy of different glucocorticoid (GC medication forms in protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Material and methods. 59 pts with tophaceous gout (crystal-verified diagnosis and arthritis of three and more joints lasting more than a months in spite of treatment with sufficient doses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were included. Median age of pts was 56 [48;63], median disease duration — 15,2 years [7,4;20], median swollen joint count at the examination — 8 [5; 11]. The patients were randomized into 2 groups. Methylprednisolone (MP 500 mg/day iv during 2 days and placebo im once was administered in one of them, betamethasone (BM 7 mg im once and placebo iv twice — in the other. Results. Number of pts with full resolution of arthritis, recurrent exacerbation, insufficient arthritis resolution or clinically insignificant response was comparable in both groups. More rapid decrease of pain at moving was achieved during the first 2-3 days after GC administration in pts with full resolution of arthritis (p=0,03 in group receiving MP in comparison with BM. At day 14 joint damage measures did not differ between groups. Conclusion. Efficacy of short-term glucocorticoid administration does not depend on mode of administration and GC medication form (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day iv during 2 days or betamethasone 7 mg im once.

  12. Agmatine protects rat liver from nicotine-induced hepatic damage via antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and antifibrotic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherbeeny, Nagla A; Nader, Manar A; Attia, Ghalia M; Ateyya, Hayam

    2016-12-01

    Tobacco smoking with its various forms is a global problem with proved hazardous effects to human health. The present work was planned to study the defending role of agmatine (AGM) on hepatic oxidative stress and damage induced by nicotine in rats. Thirty-two rats divided into four groups were employed: control group, nicotine-only group, AGM group, and AGM-nicotine group. Measurements of serum hepatic biochemical markers, lipid profile, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were done. In addition, malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH) activity, and nitrate/nitrite (NOx) levels were estimated in the liver homogenates. Immunohistochemistry for Bax and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) and histopathology of the liver were also included. Data of the study demonstrated that nicotine administration exhibited marked liver deterioration, an increase in liver enzymes, changes in lipid profile, and an elevation in MDA with a decline in levels of SOD, GSH, and NOx (nitrate/nitrite). Also, levels of proapoptotic Bax and profibrotic TGF-β1 showed marked elevation in the liver. AGM treatment to rats in nicotine-only group ameliorated all the previous changes. These findings indicate that AGM could successfully overcome the nicotine-evoked hepatic oxidative stress and tissue injury, apoptosis, and fibrosis.

  13. Protective effects of quercetin on nicotine induced oxidative stress in 'HepG2 cells'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarahmadi, Amir; Zal, Fatemeh; Bolouki, Ayeh

    2017-10-01

    Nicotine is a natural component of tobacco plants and is responsible for the addictive properties of tobacco. Nicotine has been recognized to result in oxidative stress by inducing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The purpose of this work was to estimate the hepatotoxicity effect of nicotine on viability and on antioxidant defense system in cultures of HepG2 cell line and the other hand, ameliorative effect of quercetin (Q) as an antioxidant was analyzed. Nicotine induced concentration dependent loss in HepG2 cell line viability. The results indicated that nicotine decreased activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR) and increased activities of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione (GSH) content in the HepG2 cells. Q significantly increased activity of SOD, GR and GSH content and decreased activity of GPX in nicotine + Q groups. Our data demonstrate that Q plays a protective role against the imbalance elicited by nicotine between the production of free radicals and antioxidant defense systems, and suggest that administration of this antioxidant may find clinical application where cellular damage is a consequence of ROS.

  14. Renal transport and metabolism of nicotinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuette, S.; Rose, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Renal metabolism and brush-border transport of nicotinic acid were studied in renal cortical slices and brush-border membrane vesicles exposed to a physiological concentration of vitamin (2.2-3.5 microM). Vesicle transport of [ 3 H]nicotinic acid was found to be Na+ dependent and concentrative. The presence of a Na+ gradient resulted in a fivefold increase in the rate of nicotinic acid uptake over that observed with mannitol and caused a transient nicotinic acid accumulation two- to fourfold above the equilibrium value. The effects of membrane potential, pH, and elimination of Na+-H+ exchange were also studied. Cortical slices and isolated tubules exposed to 2.2 microM [ 14 C]nicotinic acid took up vitamin and rapidly metabolized most of it to intermediates in the Preiss-Handler pathway for NAD biosynthesis; little free nicotinic acid was detectable intracellularly. The replacement of Na+ with Li+ in the bathing medium reduced total accumulation of 14 C label primarily as a result of reduced nicotinic acid uptake. Cortical tissue concentrated free nicotinic acid only when the involved metabolic pathways were saturated by levels of nicotinic acid far in excess of what occurs in vivo

  15. The potential anti-inflammatory effect of tetrahydrobiopterin administration in renal mass reduction-induced chronic renal failure in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korish, Aida A.; Arafah, Maha M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the impact of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) supplementation on the markers of inflammation and on the histological picture of the kidney in chronic renal failure C-reactive protein (CRF) induced in rats by subtotal nephrectomy (SNx). This study was performed at the Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during the period from December 2005 to January 2007. Chronic renal failure was induced by 5/6 SNx in 20 male Wister rats and another 10 rats were sham operated by flank incision and served as controls. Ten SNx rats received 10 mg/kg-1 BH4 intraperitoneally daily for 4 weeks. Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), interlukin-6 (IL-6), malondialdehyde (MDA) and kidney functions were measured in all rats. Histopathological examination of kidney tissues was also performed. Untreated CRF rats showed significant elevation of plasma CRP, IL-6 and MDA levels and significant decrease in plasma albumin and total protein levels, tubuloglomerular fibrosis and interstitial tubular infiltration with inflammatory cells in comparison with the sham-operated rats. Tetrahydrobiopterin treatment decreased CRP, IL-6, MDA levels and decreased tubuloglomerular fibrosis and interstitial inflammation in treated CRF rats. Supplementation with exogenous BH4 decreased markers of inflammation and protected the kidney against post-renal mass reduction histological damage. Restoration of intracellular BH4 balance could normalize nitrous oxide production. Therefore, BH4 might be a promising strategy in attenuating inflammation in CRF. This may decrease endothelial dysfunction and limit the associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of this disease. (author)

  16. Evidence for the involvement of NMDA receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of nicotine in mouse forced swimming and tail suspension tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Amiri, Shayan; Faizi, Mehrdad; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2015-10-01

    The antidepressant action of acute nicotine administration in clinical and animal studies is well recognized. But the underlying mechanism for this effect has not been carefully discovered. We attempted to evaluate the possible role of N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of nicotine. After the assessment of locomotor activity in the open-field test, forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) were used to evaluate the antidepressant-like effect of nicotine in mice. We performed intraperitoneal administration of nicotine at different doses and periods before the tests. To assess the possible involvement of NMDA receptors, non-effective doses of NMDA antagonists and an NMDA agonist were obtained and were administered simultaneously with the non-effective and effective doses of nicotine, respectively. Nicotine (0.2 mg/kg, 30 min before FST/TST) significantly reduced the immobility time of mice similar to fluoxetine (20 mg/kg). Nicotine did not affect the locomotor behavior of mice in open-field test. Co-administration of non-effective doses of NMDA receptor antagonists, ketamine (1 or 0.3 mg/kg), MK-801 (0.05 or 0.005 mg/kg), and magnesium sulfate (10 or 5 mg/kg) with nicotine (0.1 or 0.03 mg/kg) had remarkable synergistic antidepressant effect in both FST and TST. Also, non-effective NMDA (75 or 30 mg/kg) reversed the anti-immobility effect of nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) on mouse FST and TST. Our study has for the first time confirmed that the antidepressant-like effect of nicotine on mice is NMDA-mediated, and nicotine presumably exerts this effect by antagonizing the glutamatergic NMDA receptors.

  17. Immunolocalization of androgen and oestrogen receptors in the ventral lobe of rat (Rattus norvegicus) prostate after long-term treatment with ethanol and nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fávaro, W J; Cagnon, V H A

    2008-12-01

    Nicotine and alcohol adversely affect prostate gland function. In this work, immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the immunoreactivity and distribution of androgen and alpha, beta-oestrogen receptors following chronic treatment with alcohol, nicotine or a combination of both substances, as well as to relate these results to the development of possible prostatic pathologies. Forty male rats were divided into four groups: the Control group received tap water; the Alcoholic group received diluted 10% Gay Lussac ethanol; the Nicotine group received a 0.125 mg/100 g body weight dose of nicotine injected subcutaneously on a daily basis (Sigma Chemical Company, St. Louis, MO, USA); the Nicotine-Alcohol group received simultaneous alcohol and nicotine treatment. After 90 days of treatment, samples of the ventral lobe of the prostate were collected and processed for immunohistochemistry, light microscopy and the quantification of serum hormonal concentrations. The results showed significantly decreased serum testosterone levels and increased serum oestrogen levels in the animals from the nicotine-alcohol, the alcoholic and the nicotine groups, as well as their hormonal receptor levels. Then, it was concluded that ethanol and nicotine compromised the prostatic hormonal balance, which is a crucial factor to maintain the morphological and physiological features of this organ.

  18. Wheel running exercise attenuates vulnerability to self-administer nicotine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Victoria; Lycas, Matthew D; Lynch, Wendy J; Brunzell, Darlene H

    2015-11-01

    Preventing or postponing tobacco use initiation could greatly reduce the number of tobacco-related deaths. While evidence suggests that exercise is a promising treatment for tobacco addiction, it is not clear whether exercise could prevent initial vulnerability to tobacco use. Thus, using an animal model, we examined whether exercise attenuates vulnerability to the use and reinforcing effects of nicotine, the primary addictive chemical in tobacco. Initial vulnerability was assessed using an acquisition procedure wherein exercising (unlocked running wheel, n=10) and sedentary (locked or no wheel, n=12) male adolescent rats had access to nicotine infusions (0.01-mg/kg) during daily 21.5-h sessions beginning on postnatal day 30. Exercise/sedentary sessions (2-h/day) were conducted prior to each of the acquisition sessions. The effects of exercise on nicotine's reinforcing effects were further assessed in separate groups of exercising (unlocked wheel, n=7) and sedentary (no wheel, n=5) rats responding for nicotine under a progressive-ratio schedule with exercise/sedentary sessions (2-h/day) conducted before the daily progressive-ratio sessions. While high rates of acquisition of nicotine self-administration were observed among both groups of sedentary controls, acquisition was robustly attenuated in the exercise group with only 20% of exercising rats meeting the acquisition criterion within the 16-day testing period as compared to 67% of the sedentary controls. Exercise also decreased progressive-ratio responding for nicotine as compared to baseline and to sedentary controls. Exercise may effectively prevent the initiation of nicotine use in adolescents by reducing the reinforcing effects of nicotine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oral contraceptive therapy for polycystic ovary disease after chronic gonadotropin-releasing agonist administration. Predictors of continued ovarian suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind-Hirsch, K E; Anania, C; Malinak, R

    1996-09-01

    To study the beneficial effects of oral contraceptive (OC) therapy following gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) administration in women with polycystic ovary disease (PCOD). Twenty-three hyperandrogenic women (aged 15-39) were randomized into two groups; GnRH-a (depot every 28 days) for six months or combination therapy (GnRH-a plus OC "addback") for six months. Following six months of treatment with either therapy, all patients received OC therapy for at least six months. The hormonal state was evaluated at three-month intervals. Hormone levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone (T) and free T remained suppressed within the normal range in 11 of 17 patients (65%) during the six months of OC only therapy, while the other six patients showed "escape" from suppression, with the LH, T and free T concentrations rising to pre-GnRH-a treatment levels. Use of OC addback therapy did not potentiate the long-acting therapeutic effect of GnRH-a pretreatment; three of six patients in the escape group were pretreated with combination therapy and three with GnRH-a only. In the majority of women with PCOD, OC therapy following GnRH-a administration was effective in maintaining ovarian androgen suppression. Failure to maintain ovarian suppression in this patient population was associated with higher elevations of baseline free T concentrations.

  20. Effects of chronic isoproterenol administration of β1-adrenoceptors and growth of pancreas of young and adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneyer, C.A.; Humphreys-Beher, M.

    1988-01-01

    [ 3 H]Dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding of membranes of adult pancreas differed from that of pancreas of young rats, and the DHA binding in the presence of atenolol or butoxamine also was different in the two age groups. The adult pancreas had 93% β 2 - and 7% β 1 -adrenoceptors and did not exhibit an increased incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) following 2 days of DL-isoproterenol (ISO) administration; in contrast, pancreas of the 20-day-old rat had 71% β 2 -adrenoceptors and 27% β 1 -adrenoceptors and exhibited a 34-fold increase over that of adult, and a 6-fold increase over that of the control 20-day-old pancreas. Acinar cell differentiation was also accelerated by a 7-day regimen of ISO administration from 13 to 20 days of age. These growth responses to ISO appear to be β 1 mediated. The lack of β 1 -adrenoceptors in the adult may account for the failure of the adult pancreas to exhibit a growth response to ISO

  1. CHRNA3 genotype, nicotine dependence, lung function and disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bojesen, Stig E

    2012-01-01

    The CHRNA3 rs1051730 polymorphism has been associated to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer and nicotine dependence in case-control studies with high smoking exposure; however, its influence on lung function and COPD severity in the general population is largely unknown. We...... genotyped 57,657 adult individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study, of whom 34,592 were ever-smokers. Information on spirometry, hospital admissions, smoking behaviour and use of nicotinic replacement therapy was recorded. In homozygous (11%), heterozygous (44%) and noncarrier (45%) ever...

  2. The Influence of Puff Characteristics, Nicotine Dependence, and Rate of Nicotine Metabolism on Daily Nicotine Exposure in African American Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathryn C; Dempsey, Delia A; St Helen, Gideon; Delucchi, Kevin; Benowitz, Neal L

    2016-06-01

    African American (AA) smokers experience greater tobacco-related disease burden than Whites, despite smoking fewer cigarettes per day (CPD). Understanding factors that influence daily nicotine intake in AA smokers is an important step toward decreasing tobacco-related health disparities. One factor of interest is smoking topography, or the study of puffing behavior. (i) to create a model using puff characteristics, nicotine dependence, and nicotine metabolism to predict daily nicotine exposure, and (ii) to compare puff characteristics and nicotine intake from two cigarettes smoked at different times to ensure the reliability of the puff characteristics included in our model. Sixty AA smokers smoked their preferred brand of cigarette at two time points through a topography device. Plasma nicotine, expired CO, and changes in subjective measures were measured before and after each cigarette. Total nicotine equivalents (TNE) was measured from 24-hour urine collected during ad libitum smoking. In a model predicting daily nicotine exposure, total puff volume, CPD, sex, and menthol status were significant predictors (R(2) = 0.44, P smokers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(6); 936-43. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Hippocampal nicotinic receptors have a modulatory role for ethanol and MDMA interaction in memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Maryam; Rezayof, Ameneh; Alijanpour, Sakineh; Sharifi, Khadijeh Alsadat

    2017-08-15

    The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of dorsal hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) activation on the functional interaction between ethanol and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) in memory retrieval. The dorsal hippocampal CA1 regions of adult male NMRI mice were bilaterally cannulated and memory retrieval was measured in a step-down type passive avoidance apparatus. Post-training or pre-test systemic administration of ethanol (1g/kg, i.p.) induced amnesia. Pre-test administration of ethanol reversed pre-training ethanol-induced amnesia, suggesting ethanol state-dependent learning. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of different doses of MDMA (0.25-1µg/mouse) with an ineffective dose of ethanol (0.25g/kg, i.p.) also induced amnesia. Interestingly, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of MDMA (0.25-1µg/mouse) potentiated ethanol state-dependent learning. On the other hand, the activation of the dorsal hippocampal nAChRs by pre-test microinjection of nicotine (0.1-1µg/mouse, intra-CA1) improved amnesia induced by the co-administration of MDMD and ethanol. It is important to note that intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of MDMA or nicotine could not affect memory formation by itself. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (0.3-0.9µg/mouse) could not reverse amnesia induced by pre-training administration of ethanol while this treatment enhanced MDMA response on ethanol state-dependent learning. Thus, it can be concluded that there may be functional interactions among ethanol, MDMA and nicotine via the dorsal hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor mechanism in memory retrieval and drug state-dependent learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of the histamine H₃ receptor antagonist ABT-239 on cognition and nicotine-induced memory enhancement in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Marta; Miszkiel, Joanna; McCreary, Andrew C; Przegaliński, Edmund; Filip, Małgorzata; Biała, Grażyna

    2012-01-01

    The strong correlation between central histaminergic and cholinergic pathways on cognitive processes has been reported extensively. However, the role of histamine H(3) receptor mechanisms interacting with nicotinic mechanisms has not previously been extensively investigated. The current study was conducted to determine the interactions of nicotinic and histamine H(3) receptor systems with regard to learning and memory function using a modified elevated plus-maze test in mice. In this test, the latency for mice to move from the open arm to the enclosed arm (i.e., transfer latency) was used as an index of memory. We tested whether ABT-239 (4-(2-{2-[(2R)-2-methylpyrrolidinyl]ethyl}-benzofuran-5-yl), an H(3) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, had influence on two different stages of memory, i.e., memory acquisition and consolidation (administered prior to or immediately after the first trial, respectively) and whether ABT-239 influenced nicotine-induced memory enhancement. Our results revealed that the acute administration of nicotine (0.035 and 0.175 mg/kg), but not of ABT-239 (0.1-3 mg/kg) reduced transfer latency in the acquisition and consolidation phases. In combination studies, concomitant administration of either ABT-239 (1 and 3 mg/kg) and nicotine (0.035 mg/kg), or ABT-239 (0.1 mg/kg) and nicotine (0.0175 mg/kg) further increased nicotine-induced improvement in both memory acquisition and consolidation. The present data confirm an important role for H(3) receptors in regulating nicotine-induced mnemonic effects since inhibition of H(3) receptors augmented nicotine-induced memory enhancement in mice.

  5. Attenuating Nicotine Reinforcement and Relapse by Enhancing Endogenous Brain Levels of Kynurenic Acid in Rats and Squirrel Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secci, Maria E; Auber, Alessia; Panlilio, Leigh V; Redhi, Godfrey H; Thorndike, Eric B; Schindler, Charles W; Schwarcz, Robert; Goldberg, Steven R; Justinova, Zuzana

    2017-07-01

    The currently available antismoking medications have limited efficacy and often fail to prevent relapse. Thus, there is a pressing need for newer, more effective treatment strategies. Recently, we demonstrated that enhancing endogenous levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA, a neuroinhibitory product of tryptophan metabolism) counteracts the rewarding effects of cannabinoids by acting as a negative allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic receptors (α7nAChRs). As the effects of KYNA on cannabinoid reward involve nicotinic receptors, in the present study we used rat and squirrel monkey models of reward and relapse to examine the possibility that enhancing KYNA can counteract the effects of nicotine. To assess specificity, we also examined models of cocaine reward and relapse in monkeys. KYNA levels were enhanced by administering the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) inhibitor, Ro 61-8048. Treatment with Ro 61-8048 decreased nicotine self-administration in rats and monkeys, but did not affect cocaine self-administration. In rats, Ro 61-8048 reduced the ability of nicotine to induce dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell, a brain area believed to underlie nicotine reward. Perhaps most importantly, Ro 61-8048 prevented relapse-like behavior when abstinent rats or monkeys were reexposed to nicotine and/or cues that had previously been associated with nicotine. Ro 61-8048 was also effective in monkey models of cocaine relapse. All of these effects of Ro 61-8048 in monkeys, but not in rats, were reversed by pretreatment with a positive allosteric modulator of α7nAChRs. These findings suggest that KMO inhibition may be a promising new approach for the treatment of nicotine addiction.

  6. Chronic administration of the HNO donor Angeli's salt does not lead to tolerance, cross-tolerance, or endothelial dysfunction: comparison with GTN and DEA/NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Jennifer C; Kemp-Harper, Barbara K; Widdop, Robert E

    2011-05-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO) displays distinct pharmacology to its redox congener nitric oxide (NO(•)) with therapeutic potential in the treatment of heart failure. It remains unknown if HNO donors are resistant to tolerance development following chronic in vivo administration. Wistar-Kyoto rats received a 3-day subcutaneous infusion of one of the NO(•) donors, glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) or diethylamine/NONOate (DEA/NO), or the HNO donor Angeli's salt (AS). GTN infusion (10 μg/kg/min) resulted in significantly blunted depressor responses to intravenous bolus doses of GTN, demonstrating tolerance development. By contrast, infusion with AS (20 μg/kg/min) or DEA/NO (2 μg/kg/min) did not alter their subsequent depressor responses. Similarly, ex vivo vasorelaxation responses in isolated aortae revealed that GTN infusion elicited a significant 6-fold decrease in the sensitivity to GTN and reduction in the maximum response to acetylcholine (ACh). Chronic infusion of AS or DEA/NO had no effect on subsequent vasorelaxation responses to themselves or to ACh. No functional cross-tolerance between nitrovasodilators was evident, either in vivo or ex vivo, although an impaired ability of a nitrovasodilator to increase tissue cGMP content was not necessarily indicative of a reduced functional response. In conclusion, HNO donors may represent novel therapies for cardiovascular disease with therapeutic potential over clinically used organic nitrates.

  7. Reversing gastric mucosal alterations during ethanol-induced chronic gastritis in rats by oral administration of Opuntia ficus-indica mucilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Ramírez, Ricardo; Olguín-Martínez, Marisela; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of mucilage obtained from cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae) on the healing of ethanol-induced gastritis in rats. METHODS: Chronic gastric mucosa injury was treated with mucilage (5 mg/kg per day) after it was induced by ethanol. Lipid composition, activity of 5’-nucleotidase (a membrane-associated ectoenzyme) and cytosolic activities of lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases in the plasma membrane of gastric mucosa were determined. Histological studies of gastric samples from the experimental groups were included. RESULTS: Ethanol elicited the histological profile of gastritis characterized by loss of the surface epithelium and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased and cholesterol content increased in plasma membranes of the gastric mucosa. In addition, cytosolic activity increased while the activity of alcohol dehydrogenases decreased. The administration of mucilage promptly corrected these enzymatic changes. In fact, mucilage readily accelerated restoration of the ethanol-induced histological alterations and the disturbances in plasma membranes of gastric mucosa, showing a univocal anti-inflammatory effect. The activity of 5’-nucleotidase correlated with the changes in lipid composition and the fluidity of gastric mucosal plasma membranes. CONCLUSION: The beneficial action of mucilage seems correlated with stabilization of plasma membranes of damaged gastric mucosa. Molecular interactions between mucilage monosaccharides and membrane phospholipids, mainly PC and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), may be the relevant features responsible for changing activities of membrane-attached proteins during the healing process after chronic gastric mucosal damage. PMID:16865772

  8. Reversing gastric mucosal alterations during ethanol-induced chronic gastritis in rats by oral administration of Opuntia ficus-indica mucilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Ramírez, Ricardo; Olguín-Martínez, Marisela; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2006-07-21

    To study the effect of mucilage obtained from cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae) on the healing of ethanol-induced gastritis in rats. Chronic gastric mucosa injury was treated with mucilage (5 mg/kg per day) after it was induced by ethanol. Lipid composition, activity of 5'-nucleotidase (a membrane-associated ectoenzyme) and cytosolic activities of lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases in the plasma membrane of gastric mucosa were determined. Histological studies of gastric samples from the experimental groups were included. Ethanol elicited the histological profile of gastritis characterized by loss of the surface epithelium and infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased and cholesterol content increased in plasma membranes of the gastric mucosa. In addition, cytosolic activity increased while the activity of alcohol dehydrogenases decreased. The administration of mucilage promptly corrected these enzymatic changes. In fact, mucilage readily accelerated restoration of the ethanol-induced histological alterations and the disturbances in plasma membranes of gastric mucosa, showing a univocal anti-inflammatory effect. The activity of 5'-nucleotidase correlated with the changes in lipid composition and the fluidity of gastric mucosal plasma membranes. The beneficial action of mucilage seems correlated with stabilization of plasma membranes of damaged gastric mucosa. Molecular interactions between mucilage monosaccharides and membrane phospholipids, mainly PC and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), may be the relevant features responsible for changing activities of membrane-attached proteins during the healing process after chronic gastric mucosal damage.

  9. Evidence and possible mechanism for the permanent decline in tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic neuronal activity after chronic estradiol administration in Fischer 233 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschall, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to determine if the decline in tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) neuronal function observed during chronic estradiol-17-β (E 2 ) administration persisted after E 2 was removed. Ovariectomized (OVX) Fischer 344 rats were implanted with an E 2 -containing Silastic capsule for 4 weeks. Anterior pituitary (AP) weight and serum prolactin was greatly increased at the end of the E 2 treatment, that persisted 4 and 26 weeks after E 2 was withdrawn. Ag the end of E 2 treatment and 4 weeks after E 2 was withdrawn, TIDA function, as evaluated by electrical stimulation of median eminence tissue in vitro after allowing for uptake of 3 H-DA, was decreased compared to OVX controls. In an attempt to elucidate the mechanism by which E 2 results in a permanent decline in TIDA function, F344 rats were given daily bromocryptine injections in addition to a 30-day E 2 treatment. TIDA neuronal release was reduced in both E 2 and E 2 and bromocryptine treated groups. However, by 30 days after discontinuing treatment only rats given E 2 alone showed a persistent decline in TIDA function. Since permanent damage to hypothalamic neurons by an enlarged AP was speculated to be the result of E 2 treatment, neurons which regulate other AP hormones may also be damaged. To evaluate this possibility, pulsatile release of prolactin, growth hormone (GH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was evaluated in OVX control rats, chronically E 2 -treated rats, and rats 120 days after chronic E 2 treatment. Only the frequency of prolactin pulses, but not the frequency of GH and LH pulses, was reduced in rats 120 days after E 2 treatment. This suggests selectivity in the hypothalamic damage produced by the enlarged AP

  10. Nicotine-Induced Effects on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors (nAChRs), Ca2+ and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in STC-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jie; Mummalaneni, Shobha K; Alkahtani, Reem M; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S; Grider, John R; Lyall, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the T2R bitter taste receptors, neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have recently been shown to be involved in the bitter taste transduction of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol. However, at present it is not clear if nAChRs are expressed in enteroendocrine cells other than beta cells of the pancreas and enterochromaffin cells, and if they play a role in the synthesis and release of neurohumoral peptides. Accordingly, we investigated the expression and functional role of nAChRs in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells. Our studies using RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemical and Western blotting techniques demonstrate that STC-1 cells express several α and β nAChR subunits. Exposing STC-1 cells to nicotine acutely (24h) or chronically (4 days) induced a differential increase in the expression of nAChR subunit mRNA and protein in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Mecamylamine, a non-selective antagonist of nAChRs, inhibited the nicotine-induced increase in mRNA expression of nAChRs. Exposing STC-1 cells to nicotine increased intracellular Ca2+ in a dose-dependent manner that was inhibited in the presence of mecamylamine or dihydro-β-erythroidine, a α4β2 nAChR antagonist. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein were detected in STC-1 cells using RT-PCR, specific BDNF antibody, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Acute nicotine exposure (30 min) decreased the cellular content of BDNF in STC-1 cells. The nicotine-induced decrease in BDNF was inhibited in the presence of mecamylamine. We also detected α3 and β4 mRNA in intestinal mucosal cells and α3 protein expression in intestinal enteroendocrine cells. We conclude that STC-1 cells and intestinal enteroendocrine cells express nAChRs. In STC-1 cells nAChR expression is modulated by exposure to nicotine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Nicotine interacts with nAChRs and inhibits BDNF expression in STC-1 cells.

  11. Effects of nicotine and nicotine expectancy on attentional bias for emotional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sally; Attwood, Angela S; Munafò, Marcus R

    2015-06-01

    Nicotine's effects on mood are thought to enhance its addictive potential. However, the mechanisms underlying the effects of nicotine on affect regulation have not been reliably demonstrated in human laboratory studies. We investigated the effects of nicotine abstinence (Experiment 1), and nicotine challenge and expectancy (Experiment 2) on attentional bias towards facial emotional stimuli differing in emotional valence. In Experiment 1, 46 nicotine-deprived smokers were randomized to either continue to abstain from smoking or to smoke immediately before testing. In Experiment 2, 96 nicotine-deprived smokers were randomized to smoke a nicotinized or denicotinized cigarette and to be told that the cigarette did or did not contain nicotine. In both experiments participants completed a visual probe task, where positively valenced (happy) and negatively valenced (sad) facial expressions were presented, together with neutral facial expressions. In Experiment 1, there was evidence of an interaction between probe location and abstinence on reaction time, indicating that abstinent smokers showed an attentional bias for neutral stimuli. In Experiment 2, there was evidence of an interaction between probe location, nicotine challenge and expectation on reaction time, indicating that smokers receiving nicotine, but told that they did not receive nicotine, showed an attentional bias for emotional stimuli. Our data suggest that nicotine abstinence appears to disrupt attentional bias towards emotional facial stimuli. These data provide support for nicotine's modulation of attentional bias as a central mechanism for maintaining affect regulation in cigarette smoking. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Measurement of nicotine in household dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungroul; Aung, Ther; Berkeley, Emily; Diette, Gregory B.; Breysse, Patrick N.

    2008-01-01

    An analytical method of measuring nicotine in house dust was optimized and associations among three secondhand smoking exposure markers were evaluated, i.e., nicotine concentrations of both house dust and indoor air, and the self-reported number of cigarettes smoked daily in a household. We obtained seven house dust samples from self-reported nonsmoking homes and 30 samples from smoking homes along with the information on indoor air nicotine concentrations and the number of cigarettes smoked daily from an asthma cohort study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment. House dust nicotine was analyzed by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Using our optimized method, the median concentration of nicotine in the dust of self-reported nonsmoking homes was 11.7 ng/mg while that of smoking homes was 43.4 ng/mg. We found a substantially positive association (r=0.67, P<0.0001) between house dust nicotine concentrations and the numbers of cigarettes smoked daily. Optimized analytical methods showed a feasibility to detect nicotine in house dust. Our results indicated that the measurement of nicotine in house dust can be used potentially as a marker of longer term SHS exposure

  13. Influence of Methionine Supplementation on Nicotine Teratogenicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human and animal studies have shown that maternal tobacco smoking during pregnancy adversely affects pre and postnatal growth and increases the risk of fetal mortality. The aim of the present study was to determine the toxicity of nicotine and protective effect of methionine on the toxic effects of nicotine. Pregnant ...

  14. VOLTAMMETRIC DETERMINATION OF NICOTINE IN CIGARETTE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    determination of nicotine in two brands of commercial cigarettes and ... to disruption of arteries and cardiovascular risk factors [8, 9]. Smoking .... e d. Figure 2. Cyclic voltammetric response (scan rate of 100 mV/s) of 1.0 mM nicotine at AGCE in.

  15. Interaction between Harmane and Nicotinic in the Passive Avoidance Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Piri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: A number of β-carboline alkaloids such as harmane are naturally present in the human food chain. Furthermore, some plants which contain β-carboline have behavioral effects such as hallucination. In the present study, the effect of intra-dorsal hippocampus injection of nicotinic receptor agonist on memory impairment induced by harmane was examined in mice. Materials & Methods: This study was conducted at Shahid Beheshti University in 2009. Two hundred and forty mice were anesthetized with intra-peritoneal injection of ketamine hydrochloride, plus xylazine which afterwards were placed in a stereotaxic apparatus. Two cannuale were placed in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus. All animals were allowed to recover for a total week before beginning of the behavioral testing. After that, the animals were trained in a step-down type inhibitory avoidance task and tested 24 hours after training to measure step-down latency as a scale of memory. Results: Pre-training and post-training, intra-peritoneal injection of harmane impairs inhibitory avoidance memory, but pre-testing injection of harmane did not alter memory retrieval. Pre-testing administration of high dose of nicotine (0.5 µg/mice, intra-CA1 decreased memory retrieval. On the other hand, pre-test intra-CA1 injection of ineffective doses of nicotine (0.1 and 2.5 µg/mice fully reversed harmane induced impairment of memory. Conclusion: The present results indicated that complex interaction exists between nicotinic receptor of dorsal hippocampus and the impairment of inhibitory avoidance memory induced by harmane.

  16. Effect of acute and chronic MK-801 administration on extracellular glutamate and ascorbic acid release in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving mice on line with open-field behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Dai-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Hong; Cao, Yue; Wu, Chun-Fu; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Wu, Ying-Liang

    2006-04-04

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of acute and chronic administration of MK-801 (0.6 mg/kg), a noncompetitive NMDA-receptor antagonist on extracellular glutamate (Glu) and ascorbic acid (AA) release in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of freely moving mice using in vivo microdialysis with open-field behavior. In line with earlier studies, acute administration of MK-801 induced an increase of Glu in the PFC. We also observed single MK-801 treatment increased AA release in the PFC. In addition, our results indicated that the basal AA levels in the PFC after MK-801 administration for 7 consecutive days were significantly decreased, and basal Glu levels also had a decreased tendency. After chronic administration (0.6 mg/kg, 7 days), MK-801 (0.6 mg/kg) challenge significantly decreased dialysate levels of AA and Glu. Our study also found that both acute and chronic administration of MK-801 induced hyperactivity in mice, but the intensity of acute administration was more than that of chronic administration. Furthermore, in all acute treatment mice, individual changes in Glu dialysate concentrations and the numbers of locomotion were positively correlated. In conclusion, this study may provide new evidence that a single MK-801 administration induces increases of dialysate AA and Glu concentrations in the PFC of freely moving mice, which are opposite to those induced by repeated MK-801 administration, with an unknown mechanism. Our results suggested that redox-response might play an important role in the model of schizophrenic symptoms induced by MK-801.

  17. Nicotine Contamination in Particulate Matter Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Garshick

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We have addressed potential contamination of PM2.5 filter samples by nicotine from cigarette smoke. We collected two nicotine samples – one nicotine sampling filter was placed in-line after the collection of PM2.5 and the other stood alone. The overall correlation between the two nicotine filter levels was 0.99. The nicotine collected on the “stand-alone” filter was slightly greater than that on the “in-line” filter (mean difference = 1.10 μg/m3, but the difference was statistically significant only when PM2.5 was low (≤ 50 μg/m3. It is therefore important to account for personal and secondhand smoke exposure while assessing occupational and environmental PM.

  18. alpha(7) Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation prevents behavioral and molecular changes induced by repeated phencyclidine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Christensen, Ditte Z; Hansen, Henrik H

    2009-01-01

    in a modified Y-maze test. Polymorphisms in the alpha(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) gene have been linked to schizophrenia. Here we demonstrate that acute administration of the selective alpha(7) nAChR partial agonist SSR180711 dose-dependently reversed the behavioral impairment induced by PCP...

  19. The Effect of Chronic Oral Administration of Withania Somnifera Root on Learning and Memory in Diabetic Rats Using Passive Avoidance Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Roghani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diabetes mellitus (especially type I is accompanied with disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills in the human society and experimental animals. Considering the potential anti-diabetic effect of the medicinal plant Withania somnifera (ashwagandha and the augmenting effect of its consumption on the memory and mental health, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of chronic oral administration of ashwagandha root on learning and memory in diabetic rats using passive avoidance test. Materials & Methods: For this purpose, male Wistar diabetic rats were randomly divided into control, ashwagandha-treated control, diabetic, and ashwagandha-treated diabetic groups. Ashwagandha treatment continued for 1 to 2 months. For induction of diabetes, streptozotocin was injected i.p. at a single dose of 60 mg/kg. Serum glucose level was determined before the study and at 4th and 8th weeks after the experiment. In addition, for evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency (IL and step-through latency (STL were determined after 1 and 2 months using passive avoidance test. Results: It was found that one- and two-month administration of ashwagandha root at a weight ratio of 1/15 has not any significant hypoglycemic effect in treated control and diabetic groups. Furthermore, there was a significant increase (p<0.05 in IL in diabetic and ashwagandha-treated diabetic groups after two months compared to control group. In this respect, there was no significant difference between diabetic and ashwagandha-treated diabetic groups. In addition, STL significantly increased in ashwagandha-treated control group after 1 (p<0.01 and 2 (p<0.05 month in comparison to control group. On the other hand, STL significantly decreased (p<0.05 in diabetic group and significantly increased (p<0.05 in ashwagandha-treated diabetic group as compared to control group after two months. Conclusion: In summary, chronic oral administration of

  20. Impact of a chronic disease self-management program on health care utilization in rural communities: a retrospective cohort study using linked administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglal, Susan B; Guilcher, Sara J T; Hawker, Gillian; Lou, Wendy; Salbach, Nancy M; Manno, Michael; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2014-05-01

    Internationally, chronic disease self-management programs (CDSMPs) have been widely promoted with the assumption that confident, knowledgeable patients practicing self-management behavior will experience improved health and utilize fewer healthcare resources. However, there is a paucity of published data supporting this claim and the majority of the evidence is based on self-report. We used a retrospective cohort study using linked administrative health data. Data from 104 tele-CDSMP participants from 13 rural and remote communities in the province of Ontario, Canada were linked to administrative databases containing emergency department (ED) and physician visits and hospitalizations. Patterns of health care utilization prior to and after participation in the tele-CDSMP were compared. Poisson Generalized Estimating Equations regression was used to examine the impact of the tele-CDSMP on health care utilization after adjusting for covariates. There were no differences in patterns of health care utilization before and after participating in the tele-CDSMP. Among participants ≤ 66 years, however, there was a 34% increase in physician visits in the 12 months following the program (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.61) and a trend for decreased ED visits in those >66 years (OR = 0.59, 95% CI 0.33-1.06). This is the first study to examine health care use following participation in the CDSMP in a Canadian population and to use administrative data to measure health care utilization. Similar to other studies that used self-report measures to evaluate health care use we found no differences in health care utilization before and after participation in the CDSMP. Future research needs to confirm our findings and examine the impact of the CDSMP on health care utilization in different age groups to help to determine whether these interventions are more effective with select population groups.

  1. Increased serum bile acid concentration following low-dose chronic administration of thioacetamide in rats, as evidenced by metabolomic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Gabin; Shin, Ho Jung [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics Research Center, Inje University, College of Medicine, Bokjiro 75, Busanjin-Gu, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Se-Myo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Yong-Bum; Moon, Kyoung-Sik [Korea Institute of Toxicology, 141 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyung-Kyoon [College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jayoung [Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Osong-eup, Heungdeok-gu, Cheongju-si, Chungcheongbuk-do 361-951 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae-Gook [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics Research Center, Inje University, College of Medicine, Bokjiro 75, Busanjin-Gu, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hyun, E-mail: dhkim@inje.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics Research Center, Inje University, College of Medicine, Bokjiro 75, Busanjin-Gu, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS)-based metabolomics approach was employed to identify endogenous metabolites as potential biomarkers for thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver injury. TAA (10 and 30 mg/kg), a well-known hepatotoxic agent, was administered daily to male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats for 28 days. We then conducted untargeted analyses of endogenous serum and liver metabolites. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed on serum and liver samples to evaluate metabolites associated with TAA-induced perturbation. TAA administration resulted in altered levels of bile acids, acyl carnitines, and phospholipids in serum and in the liver. We subsequently demonstrated and confirmed the occurrence of compromised bile acid homeostasis. TAA treatment significantly increased serum levels of conjugated bile acids in a dose-dependent manner, which correlated well with toxicity. However, hepatic levels of these metabolites were not substantially changed. Gene expression profiling showed that the hepatic mRNA levels of Ntcp, Bsep, and Oatp1b2 were significantly suppressed, whereas those of basolateral Mrp3 and Mrp4 were increased. Decreased levels of Ntcp, Oatp1b2, and Ostα proteins in the liver were confirmed by western blot analysis. These results suggest that serum bile acids might be increased due to the inhibition of bile acid enterohepatic circulation rather than increased endogenous bile acid synthesis. Moreover, serum bile acids are a good indicator of TAA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • Endogenous metabolic profiles were assessed in rat after treatment of thioacetamide. • It significantly increased the levels of bile acids in serum but not in the liver. • Expression of the genes related to bile acid secretion and reuptake was decreased. • Increased serum bile acids result from block of enterohepatic circulation of bile acids.

  2. Increased serum bile acid concentration following low-dose chronic administration of thioacetamide in rats, as evidenced by metabolomic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Gabin; Shin, Ho Jung; Park, Se-Myo; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Yong-Bum; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Jeong, Jayoung; Shin, Jae-Gook; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS)-based metabolomics approach was employed to identify endogenous metabolites as potential biomarkers for thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver injury. TAA (10 and 30 mg/kg), a well-known hepatotoxic agent, was administered daily to male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats for 28 days. We then conducted untargeted analyses of endogenous serum and liver metabolites. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was performed on serum and liver samples to evaluate metabolites associated with TAA-induced perturbation. TAA administration resulted in altered levels of bile acids, acyl carnitines, and phospholipids in serum and in the liver. We subsequently demonstrated and confirmed the occurrence of compromised bile acid homeostasis. TAA treatment significantly increased serum levels of conjugated bile acids in a dose-dependent manner, which correlated well with toxicity. However, hepatic levels of these metabolites were not substantially changed. Gene expression profiling showed that the hepatic mRNA levels of Ntcp, Bsep, and Oatp1b2 were significantly suppressed, whereas those of basolateral Mrp3 and Mrp4 were increased. Decreased levels of Ntcp, Oatp1b2, and Ostα proteins in the liver were confirmed by western blot analysis. These results suggest that serum bile acids might be increased due to the inhibition of bile acid enterohepatic circulation rather than increased endogenous bile acid synthesis. Moreover, serum bile acids are a good indicator of TAA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • Endogenous metabolic profiles were assessed in rat after treatment of thioacetamide. • It significantly increased the levels of bile acids in serum but not in the liver. • Expression of the genes related to bile acid secretion and reuptake was decreased. • Increased serum bile acids result from block of enterohepatic circulation of bile acids.

  3. Differential expression and function of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in subdivisions of medial habenula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Pei-Yu; Engle, Staci E; Oh, Gyeon; Deshpande, Purnima; Puskar, Nyssa L; Lester, Henry A; Drenan, Ryan M

    2014-07-16

    Neuronal nAChRs in the medial habenula (MHb) to the interpeduncular nucleus (IPN) pathway are key mediators of nicotine's aversive properties. In this paper, we report new details regarding nAChR anatomical localization and function in MHb and IPN. A new group of knock-in mice were created that each expresses a single nAChR subunit fused to GFP, allowing high-resolution mapping. We find that α3 and β4 nAChR subunit levels are strong throughout the ventral MHb (MHbV). In contrast, α6, β2, β3, and α4 subunits are selectively found in some, but not all, areas of MHbV. All subunits were found in both ChAT-positive and ChAT-negative cells in MHbV. Next, we examined functional properties of neurons in the lateral and central part of MHbV (MHbVL and MHbVC) using brain slice patch-clamp recordings. MHbVL neurons were more excitable than MHbVC neurons, and they also responded more strongly to puffs of nicotine. In addition, we studied firing responses of MHbVL and MHbVC neurons in response to bath-applied nicotine. Cells in MHbVL, but not those in MHbVC, increased their firing substantially in response to 1 μm nicotine. Additionally, MHbVL neurons from mice that underwent withdrawal from chronic nicotine were less responsive to nicotine application compared with mice withdrawn from chronic saline. Last, we characterized rostral and dorsomedial IPN neurons that receive input from MHbVL axons. Together, our data provide new details regarding neurophysiology and nAChR localization and function in cells within the MHbV. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349789-14$15.00/0.

  4. Nicotinic acid receptor abnormalities in human skin cancer: implications for a role in epidermal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yira Bermudez

    Full Text Available Chronic UV skin exposure leads to epidermal differentiation defects in humans that can be largely restored by pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid. Nicotinic acid has been identified as a ligand for the human G-protein-coupled receptors GPR109A and GPR109B that signal through G(i-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. We have examined the expression, cellular distribution, and functionality of GPR109A/B in human skin and skin derived epidermal cells.Nicotinic acid increases epidermal differentiation in photodamaged human skin as judged by the terminal differentiation markers caspase 14 and filaggrin. Both GPR109A and GPR109B genes are transcribed in human skin and in epidermal keratinocytes, but expression in dermal fibroblasts is below limits of detection. Receptor transcripts are greatly over-expressed in squamous cell cancers. Receptor protein in normal skin is prominent from the basal through granular layers of the epidermis, with cellular localization more dispersive in the basal layer but predominantly localized at the plasma membrane in more differentiated epidermal layers. In normal human primary and immortalized keratinocytes, nicotinic acid receptors show plasma membrane localization and functional G(i-mediated signaling. In contrast, in a squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line, receptor protein shows a more diffuse cellular localization and the receptors are nearly non-functional.The results of these studies justify future genetic and pharmacological intervention studies to define possible specific role(s of nicotinic acid receptors in human skin homeostasis.

  5. Nicotine concentration of e-cigarettes used by adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Meghan E; Kong, Grace; Cavallo, Dana A; Camenga, Deepa R; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2016-10-01

    E-cigarettes are popular among youth, but little is known about the nicotine concentrations of e-liquids used by adolescents. In Spring, 2014, we conducted cross-sectional surveys in four Connecticut high schools and two middle schools. Among past-30-day e-cigarette users (n=513, 45% female, mean age 15.9 [SD=1.4]), we examined what nicotine concentration adolescents typically used in their e-cigarettes (range 0-30mg/mL and "I don't know"). We first examined whether age, sex, smoking status, e-cigarette use frequency, and/or e-cigarette acquisition source were associated with using nicotine-free e-liquid, nicotine e-liquid, or not knowing the e-liquid nicotine concentration. Among nicotine users (n=185), we then examined whether the aforementioned variables were associated with using higher nicotine concentrations. Adolescents reported using nicotine-free e-liquid (28.5%), nicotine e-liquid (37.4%), or not knowing their e-liquid nicotine concentration (34.1%). Nicotine users comprised more smokers and heavier e-cigarette users compared to nicotine-free e-liquid users and those who did not know their nicotine concentration. Nicotine users also comprised more males and were more likely to purchase e-cigarettes online or from tobacco shops compared to those who did not know their nicotine concentration. Among nicotine users, cigarette smoking, male sex, and purchasing e-cigarettes from tobacco shops predicted using higher nicotine concentrations. Adolescents reported using e-liquids with variable nicotine concentrations. Smokers, males, and those who purchased their own e-cigarettes reported using the highest nicotine levels. Of concern, many adolescents were unaware of the nicotine concentration in their e-liquid, raising concerns about inadvertent nicotine exposure among youth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor polymorphisms exhibit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Smoking behavior is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Nicotine is the major addictive substance in cigarettes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are thought to play an important role in nicotine addiction of smokers. One of the genes, α-4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ...

  7. Cholinergic modulation of dopamine pathways through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kloet, S.F.; Mansvelder, H.D.; de Vries, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine addiction is highly prevalent in current society and is often comorbid with other diseases. In the central nervous system, nicotine acts as an agonist for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and its effects depend on location and receptor composition. Although nicotinic receptors are

  8. PI3K/Akt-independent NOS/HO activation accounts for the facilitatory effect of nicotine on acetylcholine renal vasodilations: modulation by ovarian hormones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Y Gohar

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of chronic nicotine on cholinergically-mediated renal vasodilations in female rats and its modulation by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS/heme oxygenase (HO pathways. Dose-vasodilatory response curves of acetylcholine (0.01-2.43 nmol were established in isolated phenylephrine-preconstricted perfused kidneys obtained from rats treated with or without nicotine (0.5-4.0 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks. Acetylcholine vasodilations were potentiated by low nicotine doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg/day in contrast to no effect for higher doses (2 and 4 mg/kg/day. The facilitatory effect of nicotine was acetylcholine specific because it was not observed with other vasodilators such as 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, adenosine receptor agonist or papaverine. Increases in NOS and HO-1 activities appear to mediate the nicotine-evoked enhancement of acetylcholine vasodilation because the latter was compromised after pharmacologic inhibition of NOS (L-NAME or HO-1 (zinc protoporphyrin, ZnPP. The renal protein expression of phosphorylated Akt was not affected by nicotine. We also show that the presence of the two ovarian hormones is necessary for the nicotine augmentation of acetylcholine vasodilations to manifest because nicotine facilitation was lost in kidneys of ovariectomized (OVX and restored after combined, but not individual, supplementation with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA and estrogen (E2. Together, the data suggests that chronic nicotine potentiates acetylcholine renal vasodilation in female rats via, at least partly, Akt-independent HO-1 upregulation. The facilitatory effect of nicotine is dose dependent and requires the presence of the two ovarian hormones.

  9. Chronic administration of mitochondrion-targeted peptide SS-31 prevents atherosclerotic development in ApoE knockout mice fed Western diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhang

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammatory factors are deeply involved in progression of atherosclerosis. Mitochondrion-targeted peptide SS-31, selectively targeting to mitochondrial inner membrane reacting with cardiolipin, has been reported to inhibit ROS generation and mitigate inflammation. The present study was designed to investigate whether SS-31 could suppress the development of atherosclerosis in vivo.Male ApoE-/- mice (8 weeks old fed with Western diet were treated with normal saline or SS-31 (1 mg/kg/d or 3 mg/kg/d through subcutaneous injection for 12 weeks. Oil Red O staining was performed to evaluate area and sizes of the plaques. DHE staining and immunohistochemical staining of 8-OHDG was performed to assess the oxidative stress. The aorta ATP contents were assessed by the ATP bioluminescence assay kit. Immunohistochemical staining of CD68 and α-SMA and Masson's trichrome staining were performed to evaluate the composition of atherosclerotic plaque. Biochemical assays were performed to determine the protein level and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD. The levels of CD36, LOX-1 and ABCA1 were immunohistochemically and biochemically determined to evaluate the cholesterol transport in aorta and peritoneal macrophages. Inflammatory factors, including ICAM-1, MCP-1, IL-6 and CRP in serum, were detected through ELISA.SS-31 administration reduced the area and sizes of western diet-induced atherosclerotic plaques and changed the composition of the plaques in ApoE-/- mice. Oxidative stress was suppressed, as evidenced by the reduced DHE stain, down-regulated 8-OHDG expression, and increased SOD activity after chronic SS-31 administration. Moreover, systemic inflammation was ameliorated as seen by decreasing serum ICAM-1, MCP-1, and IL-6 levels. Most importantly, SS-31 administration inhibited cholesterol influx by down-regulating expression of CD36 and LOX-1 to prevent lipid accumulation to further suppress the foam cell formation and

  10. In vivo human buccal permeability of nicotine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adrian, Charlotte L; Olin, Helle B D; Dalhoff, Kim

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to examine the in vivo buccal pH-dependent permeability of nicotine in humans and furthermore compare the in vivo permeability of nicotine to previous in vitro permeability data. The buccal permeability of nicotine was examined in a three-way cross-over study in eight healthy non......-smokers using a buccal perfusion cell. The disappearance of nicotine from perfusion solutions with pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1 was studied for 3h. The apparent permeability of nicotine (P(app)) was determined at each pH value. Parotid saliva was collected in an attempt to assess systemic levels of nicotine....... The disappearance rate of nicotine increased significantly as the pH increased, which resulted in P(app) values of 0.57+/-0.55 x 10(-4), 2.10+/-0.23 x 10(-4), and 3.96+/-0.54 x 10(-4)cms(-1) (mean+/-S.D.) at pH 6.0, 7.4, and 8.1, respectively. A linear relationship (R(2)=0.993) was obtained between the P...

  11. Bioelectronic sniffer for nicotine using enzyme inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsubayashi, Kohji; Nakayama, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Midori; Saito, Hirokazu; Otsuka, Kimio; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2006-07-28

    A novel bioelectronic sniffer for nicotine in the gas phase was developed with enzyme inhibition principle to butyrylcholinesterase activity. The bioelectronic devices for nicotine in the gas and liquid phases were constructed using a Clark-type dissolved oxygen electrode and a membrane immobilized butyrylcholinesterase and choline oxidase. After the assessment of the sensor performances to choline and butyrylcholine as pre-examinations, the characteristics of the biosensor and bio-sniffer for nicotine were evaluated in the liquid and gas phases, respectively. The sensor signal of the bio-devices with 300 micromol l(-1) of butyrylcholine decreased quickly following application of nicotine and reached to the steady-state current, thus relating the concentration of nicotine in the liquid and gas phases. The biosensor was used to measure nicotine solution from 10 to 300 micromol l(-1). In the gas-phase experiment, the current signal of the bio-sniffer was also found to be linearly to the nicotine concentration over the range of 10.0-1000 ppb including 75.0 ppb as threshold limit value (TLV) by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH).

  12. The acute effects of nicotine on the subjective and behavioural responses to denicotinized tobacco in dependent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Sean P; Darredeau, Christine

    2012-06-01

    Both nicotine and various non-nicotine smoking factors are believed to contribute to tobacco addiction but their relative roles remain incompletely understood. This study aimed to help clarify these roles by examining acute interactions between nicotine and denicotinized tobacco (DT). During two randomized blinded sessions, the effects of a quick-release 4 mg nicotine lozenge (NL) versus placebo lozenge (PL) on the subjective and behavioural responses to DT were examined in 27 (14 men) dependent, daily smokers. Participants were administered NL or PL for 30 min before receiving one initial DT cigarette. Participants could then earn additional DT cigarette puffs over the following 60 min. Subjective state was assessed using the Questionnaire of Smoking Urges-Brief and visual analogue scales at baseline, postlozenge and postinitial DT cigarette. Relative to PL, NL was associated with increased alertness as well as with reduced levels of DT self-administration (Pwomen (P<0.01). Moreover, DT administration was associated with increased ratings of 'pleasant', 'satisfied', 'stimulated' and 'relaxed', as well as with decreased ratings of 'anxious' (P's<0.01), independent of lozenge condition. The findings suggest that both nicotine and non-nicotine smoking factors may make important contributions towards the addictive properties of tobacco.

  13. Impact of e-cigarette refill liquid with or without nicotine on liver function in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Golli, Narges; Jrad-Lamine, Aicha; Neffati, Hajira; Rahali, Dalila; Dallagi, Yosra; Dkhili, Houssem; Ba, Nathalie; El May, Michele V; El Fazaa, Saloua

    2016-07-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of e-cigarette refill liquid administration alone or with nicotine on the antioxidant defense status, functional and histopathological changes in adult rat liver tissue. For this purpose, 32 rats were treated for 28 days as follows: control group was injected intra-peritoneally with physiological saline; e-cigarette 0% treated group received an intra-peritoneal injection of e-liquid without nicotine diluted in physiological saline, e-cigarette-treated group received an intra-peritoneal injection of e-liquid containing 0.5 mg of nicotine/kg of body weight/day diluted in physiological saline and nicotine-treated group received an intra-peritoneal injection of 0.5 mg of nicotine/kg of body weight/day diluted in physiological saline. In e-liquid without nicotine-exposed group, activities of the liver biomarkers aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase increase. Interestingly, oxidative stress indicators showed decreased total protein content, associated with a reduction in the antioxidant enzymes activities superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase, and an elevation in malondialdehyde content, highlighting the promotion of lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. Histological studies identified inflammatory cells infiltration and cell death. Thus, e-liquid seems to promote oxidative tissue injuries, which in turn lead to the observed histopathological finding. In comparison, nicotine alone induced less oxidative stress and less histopathological disorders, whereas e-liquid with nicotine gave rise to more histopathological injuries. Thereby, e-liquid, per se, is able to induce hepatotoxicity and supplementation with nicotine worsens this state.

  14. Chronic treatment with extended release methylphenidate does not alter dopamine systems or increase vulnerability for cocaine self-administration: a study in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kathryn E; Pierre, Peter J; Daunais, James; Bennett, Allyson J; Martelle, Susan; Gage, H Donald; Swanson, James M; Nader, Michael A; Porrino, Linda J

    2012-11-01

    Despite the widespread use of stimulant medications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, few studies have addressed their long-term effects on the developing brain or susceptibility to drug use in adolescence. Here, we determined the effects of chronic methylphenidate (MPH) treatment on brain dopamine (DA) systems, developmental milestones, and later vulnerability to substance abuse in juvenile nonhuman primates. Male rhesus monkeys (approximately 30 months old) were treated daily with either a sustained release formulation of MPH or placebo (N=8 per group). Doses were titrated to achieve initial drug blood serum levels within the therapeutic range in children and adjusted throughout the study to maintain target levels. Growth, including measures of crown-rump length and weight, was assessed before and after 1 year of treatment and after 3-5 months washout. In addition, positron emission tomography scans were performed to quantify binding availability of D2/D3 receptors and dopamine transporters (DATs). Distribution volume ratios were calculated to quantify binding of [¹⁸F]fluoroclebopride (DA D2/D3) and [¹⁸F]-(+)-N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-2β-propanoyl-3β-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane (DAT). Chronic MPH did not differentially alter the course of weight gain or other measures of growth, nor did it influence DAT or D2/D3 receptor availability after 1 year of treatment. However, after washout, the D2/D3 receptor availability of MPH-treated animals did not continue to decline at the same rate as control animals. Acquisition of intravenous cocaine self-administration was examined by first substituting saline for food reinforcement and then cocaine doses (0.001-0.1 mg/kg per injection) in ascending order. Each dose was available for at least five consecutive sessions. The lowest dose of cocaine that maintained response rates significantly higher than saline-contingent rates was operationally defined as acquisition of cocaine reinforcement. There

  15. Osteotoxicity after chronic dietary administration of 13-CIS-retinoic acid, retinyl palmitate or selenium in mice exposed to tumor initiation and promotion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, K.S.; Gensler, H.L.; Watson, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the clinical trials of retinoids as therapeutic agents for premalignant skin lesions, a radiographic study was undertaken to measure skeletal toxicities after chronic dietary administration of retinoids in mice exposed to tumor initiation and promotion. CD-1 mice were initiated with 0.15 moles of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and promoted twice daily with 8 nmoles of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate for 23 weeks. Diets were supplemented with 60 IU, 200 IU, or 700 IU or retinyl palmitate (RP) per g diet. After 5 weeks, the 700 IU of RP/g diet was lowered to 350 IU/g diet. Administration of these diets to mice during the 23 weeks of tumor promotion results in a 0-fold, 2-fold, or 10-fold increase in bone fractures, respectively. Osteoporotic bone lesions identified on radiographs rose 0-fold, 0-fold, and 10-fold at the respective doses, whereas metaphyseal flares increased O-fold, 1.4-fold, and 3.6-fold. Bone deformities was augmented O-fold, 1.8-fold and 2.9-fold at the respective doses. Addition of selenium did not alter the bone toxicity of RP. 13-cis-retionic acid (CRA) was less toxic at 700 IU/g diet than was RP at that dose, as evidence by the death of 12 of 70 mice by the 6th week of dietary RP and no deaths in the 35 mice fed 700 IU CRA/g diet for 23 weeks. CRA at 700 IU/g diet resulted in 3/4 as many osteoporotic bones, 1/3 as many bone fractures, 4/5 as many metaphyseal flares, and a similar number of bone deformities as mice fed 700/350 IU/g diet. At the dose of 200 IU/g food, osterotoxicities were similar in the mice fed diets supplemented with RP and CRA

  16. The effect of chronic phenytoin administration on single prolonged stress induced extinction retention deficits and glucocorticoid upregulation in the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sophie A; Rodriguez-Santiago, Mariana; Riley, John; Rodriguez, Elizabeth; Liberzon, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder. Only two pharmacological agents are approved for PTSD treatment, and they often do not address the full range of symptoms nor are they equally effective in all cases. Animal models of PTSD are critical for understanding the neurobiology involved and for identification of novel therapeutic targets. Using the rodent PTSD model, single prolonged stress (SPS), we have implicated aberrant excitatory neural transmission and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) upregulation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HPC) in fear memory abnormalities associated with PTSD. The objective of this study is to examine the potential protective effect of antiepileptic phenytoin (PHE) administration on SPS-induced extinction retention deficits and GR expression. Forty-eight SPS-treated male Sprague Dawley rats or controls were administered PHE (40, 20 mg/kg, vehicle) for 7 days following SPS stressors; then, fear conditioning, extinction, and extinction retention were tested. Fear conditioning and extinction were unaffected by SPS or PHE, but SPS impaired extinction retention, and both doses of PHE rescued this impairment. Similarly, SPS increased GR expression in the mPFC and dorsal HPC, and PHE prevented SPS-induced GR upregulation in the mPFC. These data demonstrate that PHE administration can prevent the development of extinction retention deficits and upregulation of GR. PHE exerts inhibitory effects on voltage-gated sodium channels and decreases excitatory neural transmission via glutamate antagonism. If glutamate hyperactivity in the days following SPS contributes to SPS-induced deficits, then these data may suggest that the glutamatergic system constitutes a target for secondary prevention.

  17. A preclinical study on the rescue of normal tissue by nicotinic acid in high-dose treatment with APO866, a specific nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Uffe Høgh; Thougaard, Annemette V; Jensen, Peter Buhl

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase APO866 is a promising cancer drug currently in phase II clinical trials in oncology. Here, we present a strategy for increasing the therapeutic potential of APO866 through the rescue of normal tissues by coadministration of nicotinic acid (Vitamin...... B(3)). We examined the toxicity profile of APO866 in B6D2F1 mice and the effect of oral administration of nicotinic acid on tissue toxicity. Nicotinic acid (50 mg/kg) protects mice from death and severe toxicity from an APO866 dose (60 mg/kg) four times the monotherapy maximum tolerated dose (15 mg....../kg). In a panel of six cancer cell lines, we find that three (including ML-2 cells) are protected by nicotinic acid in vitro, whereas the cytotoxicity of APO866 remains unaffected in the remaining three (including A2780 cells). A selective biomarker for the protection by nicotinic acid was subsequently identified...

  18. The experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis disease course is modulated by nicotine and other cigarette smoke components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Gao

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have reported that cigarette smoking increases the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS and accelerates its progression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects remain unsettled. We have investigated here the effects of the nicotine and the non-nicotine components in cigarette smoke on MS using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model, and have explored their underlying mechanism of action. Our results show that nicotine ameliorates the severity of EAE, as shown by reduced demyelination, increased body weight, and attenuated microglial activation. Nicotine administration after the development of EAE symptoms prevented further disease exacerbation, suggesting that it might be useful as an EAE/MS therapeutic. In contrast, the remaining components of cigarette smoke, delivered as cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, accelerated and increased adverse clinical symptoms during the early stages of EAE, and we identify a particular cigarette smoke compound, acrolein, as one of the potential mediators. We also show that the mechanisms underlying the opposing effects of nicotine and CSC on EAE are likely due to distinct effects on microglial viability, activation, and function.

  19. [Assessment of anti-tremorogenic drugs--nicotine-induced tail-tremor model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemaru, K; Kawasaki, H; Gomita, Y

    1997-06-01

    The repeated administration of nicotine at small doses, which do not produce whole body tremor or convulsion, causes tremor only in the tail (tail-tremor) of rats. The tremor is accompanied by locomotor hyperactivity without rigidity and immobility of the whole body, suggesting that the nicotine-induced tail-tremor model is useful for studying the mechanism underlying tremor associated with movement. The tail-tremor induced by nicotine was suppressed by mecamylamine, a nicotinic antagonist, but not by atropine or scopolamine, muscalinic antagonists. Moreover, the tail-tremor was suppressed by the beta-blockers propranolol and pindolol, as well as the benzodiazepines diazepam and clonazepam. Tremor at rest is observed only in Parkinson's disease, which is improved with anti-muscalinic drugs. Essential tremor is one of the typical tremors connected with movement (postural and kinetic tremor) and is improved with beta-blocker. These findings and results suggest that nicotine-induced tail-tremor is useful for the study of essential tremor in animal models.

  20. Phenobarbital increases monkey in vivo nicotine disposition and induces liver and brain CYP2B6 protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anna M; Miksys, Sharon; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2006-01-01

    CYP2B6 is a drug-metabolizing enzyme expressed in the liver and brain that can metabolize bupropion (Zyban®, a smoking cessation drug), activate tobacco-smoke nitrosamines, and inactivate nicotine. Hepatic CYP2B6 is induced by phenobarbital and induction may affect in vivo nicotine disposition, while brain CYP2B6 induction may affect local levels of centrally acting substrates. We investigated the effect of chronic phenobarbital treatment on induction of in vivo nicotine disposition and CYP2B6 expression in the liver and brain of African Green (Vervet) monkeys. Monkeys were split into two groups (n=6 each) and given oral saccharin daily for 22 days; one group was supplemented with 20 mg kg−1 phenobarbital. Monkeys were given a 0.1 mg kg−1 nicotine dose subcutaneously before and after treatment. Phenobarbital treatment resulted in a significant, 56%, decrease (P=0.04) in the maximum nicotine plasma concentration and a 46% decrease (P=0.003) in the area under the concentration–time curve. Phenobarbital also increased hepatic CYP2B6 protein expression. In monkey brain, significant induction (Pphenobarbital treatment in monkeys resulted in increased in vivo nicotine disposition, and induced hepatic and brain CYP2B6 protein levels and cellular expression. This induction may alter the metabolism of CYP2B6 substrates including peripherally acting drugs such as cyclophosphamide and centrally acting drugs such as bupropion, ecstasy and phencyclidine. PMID:16751792

  1. Nicotinic activation of laterodorsal tegmental neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Leonard, Christopher S; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2009-01-01

    Identifying the neurological mechanisms underlying nicotine reinforcement is a healthcare imperative, if society is to effectively combat tobacco addiction. The majority of studies of the neurobiology of addiction have focused on dopamine (DA)-containing neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA......). However, recent data suggest that neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) nucleus, which sends cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic-containing projections to DA-containing neurons of the VTA, are critical to gating normal functioning of this nucleus. The actions of nicotine on LDT neurons...... are unknown. We addressed this issue by examining the effects of nicotine on identified cholinergic and non-cholinergic LDT neurons using whole-cell patch clamp and Ca(2+)-imaging methods in brain slices from mice (P12-P45). Nicotine applied by puffer pipette or bath superfusion elicited membrane...

  2. Tribute to: Self-administered nicotine activates the mesolimbic dopamine system through the ventral tegmental area [William Corrigall, Kathleen Coen and Laurel Adamson, Brain Res. 653 (1994) 278-284].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leri, Francesco; Vaccarino, Franco J

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, Dr. Corrigall and collaborators described elegant experiments designed to elucidate the neurobiology of nicotine reinforcement. The nicotinic receptor antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) was infused in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or nucleus accumbens (NAC) of rats trained to self-administer nicotine intravenously. Additionally, DHβE was infused in the VTA of rats trained to self-administer food or cocaine, and nicotine self-administration was assessed in rats with lesions to the peduculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT). A number of key themes emerged from this fundamental study that remain relevant today. The primary finding was that infusions of DHβE in the VTA, but not in the NAC, lowered nicotine self-administration, suggesting that nicotinic receptors in VTA are involved in the reinforcing action of nicotine. This conclusion has been confirmed by subsequent findings, and the nature of the nicotinic receptors has also been elucidated. The authors also reported that DHβE in the VTA had no effect on food or cocaine self-administration, and that lesions to the PPT did not alter nicotine self-administration. Since this initial investigation, the question of whether nicotinic receptors in the VTA are necessary for the reinforcing action of other stimuli, and by which mechanisms, has been extensively explored. Similarly, many groups have further investigated the role of mesopontine cholinergic nuclei in reinforcement. This paper not only contributed in important ways to our understanding of the neurochemical basis of nicotine reinforcement, but was also a key catalyst that gave rise to several research themes central to the neuropharmacology of substance abuse. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the nicotine-evoked attenuation of reflex cardiac sympathetic control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; El-gowilly, Sahar M.; Fouda, Mohamed A.; Saad, Evan I.

    2011-01-01

    Baroreflex dysfunction contributes to increased cardiovascular risk in cigarette smokers. Given the importance of adenosinergic pathways in baroreflex control, the hypothesis was tested that defective central adenosinergic modulation of cardiac autonomic activity mediates the nicotine-baroreflex interaction. Baroreflex curves relating changes in heart rate (HR) to increases or decreases in blood pressure (BP) evoked by i.v. doses (1-16 μg/kg) of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), respectively, were constructed in conscious rats; slopes of the curves were taken as measures of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Nicotine (25 and 100 μg/kg i.v.) dose-dependently reduced BRS SNP in contrast to no effect on BRS PE . BRS SNP was also attenuated after intracisternal (i.c.) administration of nicotine. Similar reductions in BRS SNP were observed in rats pretreated with atropine or propranolol. The combined treatment with nicotine and atropine produced additive inhibitory effects on BRS, an effect that was not demonstrated upon concurrent exposure to nicotine and propranolol. BRS SNP was reduced in preparations treated with i.c. 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT, nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist), 8-(3-Chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC, A 2A antagonist), or VUF5574 (A 3 antagonist). In contrast, BRS SNP was preserved after blockade of A 1 (DPCPX) or A 2B (alloxazine) receptors or inhibition of adenosine uptake by dipyridamole. CSC or 8-PT abrogated the BRS SNP depressant effect of nicotine whereas other adenosinergic antagonists were without effect. Together, nicotine preferentially impairs reflex tachycardia via disruption of adenosine A 2A receptor-mediated facilitation of reflex cardiac sympathoexcitation. Clinically, the attenuation by nicotine of compensatory sympathoexcitation may be detrimental in conditions such as hypothalamic defense response, posture changes, and ventricular rhythms. - Research highlights: → The role of central adenosinergic sites in

  4. Slower nicotine metabolism among postmenopausal Polish smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmider, Leon; Delijewski, Marcin; Koszowski, Bartosz; Sobczak, Andrzej; Benowitz, Neal L; Goniewicz, Maciej L

    2018-06-01

    A non-invasive phenotypic indicator of the rate of nicotine metabolism is nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) defined as a ratio of two major metabolites of nicotine - trans-3'-hydroxycotinine/cotinine. The rate of nicotine metabolism has important clinical implications for the likelihood of successful quitting with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). We conducted a study to measure NMR among Polish smokers. In a cross-sectional study of 180 daily cigarette smokers (42% men; average age 34.6±13.0), we collected spot urine samples and measured trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (3-HC) and cotinine levels with LC-MS/MS method. We calculated NMR (molar ratio) and analyzed variations in NMR among groups of smokers. In the whole study group, an average NMR was 4.8 (IQR 3.4-7.3). The group of women below 51 years had significantly greater NMR compared to the rest of the population (6.4; IQR 4.1-8.8 vs. 4.3; IQR 2.8-6.4). No differences were found among group ages of male smokers. This is a first study to describe variations in nicotine metabolism among Polish smokers. Our findings indicate that young women metabolize nicotine faster than the rest of population. This finding is consistent with the known effects of estrogen to induce CYP2A6 activity. Young women may require higher doses of NRT or non-nicotine medications for most effective smoking cessation treatment. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electronic cigarettes and nicotine clinical pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Megan J; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available literature evaluating electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) nicotine clinical pharmacology in order to understand the potential impact of e-cigarettes on individual users, nicotine dependence and public health. Methods Literature searches were conducted between 1 October 2012 and 30 September 2013 using key terms in five electronic databases. Studies were included in the review if they were in English and publicly available; non-clinical studies, conference abst...

  6. Effect of nicotine on negative affect among more impulsive smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Neal; McChargue, Dennis; Spring, Bonnie; VanderVeen, Joe; Cook, Jessica Werth; Richmond, Malia

    2006-08-01

    In the present study, the authors tested the hypothesis that nicotine would provide greater relief from negative affect for more impulsive smokers than for less impulsive smokers. Euthymic adult smokers (N=70) participated in 2 laboratory sessions, during which they underwent a negative mood induction (music + autobiographical memory), then smoked either a nicotinized or de-nicotinized cigarette. Mixed-effects regression yielded a significant Impulsivity x Condition (nicotinized vs. de-nicotinized) x Time interaction. Simple effects analyses showed that heightened impulsivity predicted greater negative affect relief after smoking a nicotinized cigarette but not after smoking a de-nicotinized cigarette. These data suggest that nicotine may be a disproportionately powerful negative reinforcer for highly impulsive smokers, promoting higher levels of nicotine dependence and inhibiting smoking cessation.

  7. Layer-specific interference with cholinergic signaling in the prefrontal cortex by smoking concentrations of nicotine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, R.B.; Bloem, B.R.; Verhoog, M.B.; Mansvelder, H.D.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a period in which the developing prefrontal cortex (PFC) is sensitive to maladaptive changes when exposed to nicotine. Nicotine affects PFC function and repeated exposure to nicotine during adolescence impairs attention performance and impulse control during adulthood. Nicotine

  8. Betaxolol, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, diminishes anxiety-like behavior during early withdrawal from chronic cocaine administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudoy, C A; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2007-06-30

    Anxiety has been indicated as one of the main symptoms of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome in human addicts and severe anxiety during withdrawal may potentially contribute to relapse. As alterations in noradrenergic transmission in limbic areas underlie withdrawal symptomatology for many drugs of abuse, the present study sought to determine the effect of cocaine withdrawal on beta-adrenergic receptor (beta(1) and beta(2)) expression in the amygdala. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg) once daily for 14 days. Two days following the last cocaine injection, amygdala brain regions were micro-dissected and processed for Western blot analysis. Results showed that beta(1)-adrenergic receptor, but not beta(2)-adrenergic receptor expression was significantly increased in amygdala extracts of cocaine-withdrawn animals as compared to controls. This finding motivated further studies aimed at determining whether treatment with betaxolol, a highly selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, could ameliorate cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety. In these studies, betaxolol (5 mg/kg via i.p. injection) was administered at 24 and then 44 h following the final chronic cocaine administration. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test approximately 2 h following the last betaxolol injection. Following behavioral testing, betaxolol effects on beta(1)-adrenergic receptor protein expression were examined by Western blotting in amygdala extracts from rats undergoing cocaine withdrawal. Animals treated with betaxolol during cocaine withdrawal exhibited a significant attenuation of anxiety-like behavior characterized by increased time spent in the open arms and increased entries into the open arms compared to animals treated with only saline during cocaine withdrawal. In contrast, betaxolol did not produce anxiolytic-like effects in control animals treated chronically with saline. Furthermore

  9. Betaxolol, a selective β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, diminishes anxiety-like behavior during early withdrawal from chronic cocaine administration in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudoy, C.A.; Van Bockstaele, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Anxiety has been indicated as one of the main symptoms of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome in human addicts and severe anxiety during withdrawal may potentially contribute to relapse. As alterations in noradrenergic transmission in limbic areas underlie withdrawal symptomatology for many drugs of abuse, the present study sought to determine the effect of cocaine withdrawal on β-adrenergic receptor (β1 and β2) expression in the amygdala. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg) once daily for 14 days. Two days following the last cocaine injection, amygdala brain regions were micro-dissected and processed for Western blot analysis. Results showed that β1–adrenergic receptor, but not β2–adrenergic receptor expression was significantly increased in amygdala extracts of cocaine-withdrawn animals as compared to controls. This finding motivated further studies aimed at determining whether treatment with betaxolol, a highly selective β1–adrenergic receptor antagonist, could ameliorate cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety. In these studies, betaxolol (5 mg/kg via i.p. injection) was administered at 24 and then 44 hours following the final chronic cocaine administration. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test approximately 2 hours following the last betaxolol injection. Following behavioral testing, betaxolol effects on β1-adrenergic receptor protein expression were examined by Western blotting in amygdala extracts from rats undergoing cocaine withdrawal. Results Animals treated with betaxolol during cocaine withdrawal exhibited a significant attenuation of anxiety-like behavior characterized by increased time spent in the open arms and increased entries into the open arms compared to animals treated with only saline during cocaine withdrawal. In contrast, betaxolol did not produce anxiolytic-like effects in control animals treated chronically with saline

  10. Tying up Nicotine: New Selective Competitive Antagonist of the Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    Conformational restriction of the pyrrolidine nitrogen in nicotine by the introduction of an ethylene bridge provided a potent and selective antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Resolution by chiral SFC, pharmacological characterization of the two enantiomers...

  11. The effects of Nicotinic Acid and Xanthinol Nicotinate on human memory in different categories of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loriaux, S.M.; Deijen, J.B.; Orlebeke, J.F.; de Swart, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The treatment effect of nicotinic acid and xanthinol nicotinate on human memory was compared with placebo in 96 healthy subjects. Forty-three subjects were young (35-45 years), 30 subjects middle aged (55-65 years) and 23 subjects were old aged (75-85 years). Pre- and post-treatment scores were

  12. Opname van nicotine door kippen en overdracht naar eieren bij toepassing van nicotine tegen bloedluis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traag, W.A.; Rijk, de T.C.; Zomer, P.; Vos Van Avezathe, A.; Kan, C.A.; Zeilmaker, M.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Uit onderzoek van de AID blijkt nicotine gebruikt te worden voor de bestrijding van bloedluis bij kippen. Dit levert mogelijk gezondheidsrisico's op voor de consument van het kippenvlees of de eieren. Omdat niet duidelijk is of het nicotine na de bestrijding van bloedluis in het vlees of eieren

  13. NICOTINE EFFECTS ON THE ACTIVITY OF MICE EXPOSED PRENATALLY TO THE NICOTINIC AGONIST ANATOXIN-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considerable research has shown long-lasting effects of early exposure in experimental animals to nicotine. Anatoxin-a is produced by cyanobacteria and has been shown to be a potent nicotinic agonist. This experiment evaluated the motor activity of adult mice, and their respons...

  14. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  15. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI; Roskams, Tania; Oben, Jude A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. ► Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). ► Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. ► Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. ► Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine – which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed – RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-α2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type (α1, β1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type (α3, α6, α7, β2 and β4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, α3, α7, β1 and ε were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-α2 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by mecamylamine. α1 and α3-nAChR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in NASH fibrosis compared to normal livers. Conclusion: Nicotine at levels in smokers’ blood is pro-fibrogenic, through

  16. Immunomodulatory Role of Ocimum gratissimum and Ascorbic Acid against Nicotine-Induced Murine Peritoneal Macrophages In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Kar Mahapatra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this present study was to evaluate the immune functions and immune responses in nicotine-induced (10 mM macrophages and concurrently establish the immunomodulatory role of aqueous extract of Ocimum gratissimum (Ae-Og and ascorbic acid. In this study, nitrite generations and some phenotype functions by macrophages were studied. Beside that, release of Th1 cytokines (TNF-α, IL-12 and Th2 cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β was measured by ELISA, and the expression of these cytokines at mRNA level was analyzed by real-time PCR. Ae-Og, at a dose of 10 μg/mL, significantly reduced the nicotine-induced NO generation and iNOSII expression. Similar kinds of response were observed with supplementation of ascorbic acid (0.01 mM. The administration of Ae-Og and ascorbic acid increased the decreased adherence, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and intracellular killing of bacteria in nicotine-treated macrophages. Ae-Og and ascorbic acid were found to protect the murine peritoneal macrophages through downregulation of Th1 cytokines i