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Sample records for chronic myeloid leukemia

  1. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... their treatment is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  2. Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase Treatment options for people ... a stem cell donor with matching tissue type. Chronic phase The standard treatment for chronic phase CML ...

  3. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  4. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  5. Dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly G Aguilera

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dolly G Aguilera1, Apostolia M Tsimberidou21Department of Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Children’s Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas USAAbstract: Deregulated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TK activity is the molecular marker for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, which provides an identifiable target for developing therapeutic agents. Imatinib mesylate, a BCR-ABL TK inhibitor, is the frontline therapy for CML. Despite the stunning efficacy of this agent, a small number of patients develop a suboptimal response or resistance to imatinib. In newly diagnosed patients with chronic phase CML, the rate of resistance to imatinib at 4 years was up to 20%, increasing to 70% to 90% for patients in the accelerated/blastic phase. Resistance to imatinib led to the development of novel TK inhibitors such as dasatinib. Several clinical trials have reported more durable complete hematologic and cytogenetic responses with this agent in patients who are resistant or intolerant to imatinib. Dasatinib is well tolerated and has broad efficacy, resulting in durable responses in patients with any BCR-ABL mutation except for T3151 and mutations in codon 317 – most commonly F317L – including mutations that were highly resistant to imatinib, such as L248, Y253, E255, F359, and H396. Dasatinib is recommended for CML in chronic, blastic or accelerated phase that is resistant or intolerant to imatinib. Dasatinib was approved by the FDA at 100 mg once daily as the starting dose in patients with chronic phase CML and at 70 mg twice daily in patients with accelerated or blastic phase CML. Various clinical trial results provided evidence that resistance to one TK inhibitor can be reversed with the use of a different TK inhibitor (TKI. Other second-generation TKIs with activity in CML include nilotinib, bosutinib and

  6. Chronic myeloid leukemia data from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Bansal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to collaborate the data of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patient from all over India,meeting was conceived by ICON ( Indian Cooperative Oncology Network in 2010. This article presents the summarized picture of the data presented in the meeting. In the meeting 8115 patients data was presented and 18 centres submitted their manuscripts comprising of 6677 patients. This data represents large series of patients from all over the country treated on day to day clinical practice and presents the actual outcomes of CML patients in India. The compilation of data confirms the younger age at presentation, increased incidence of resistance and poor outcomes in patients with late chronic phase. It also addresses the issues like Glivec versus Generic drug outcomes, safety of Imatinib during pregnancy and mutational analysis among resistant patients. It concludes that survival and quality of life of CML patients in India has improved over the years especially when treated in early chronic phase. The generic drug is a good option where original is unable to reach the patient due to various reasons. Hopefully, this effort will provide a platform to conduct systematic studies in learning the best treatment options among CML patients in Indian settings.

  7. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... Chronic myelogenous leukemia is grouped into phases: Chronic Accelerated Blast crisis The chronic phase can last for ...

  8. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Nilotinib versus imatinib for newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saglio, Giuseppe; Kim, Dong-Wook; Issaragrisil, Surapol;

    2010-01-01

    Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase.......Nilotinib has been shown to be a more potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL than imatinib. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of nilotinib, as compared with imatinib, in patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase....

  10. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  11. Interferon alpha for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Bjerrum, Ole Weis;

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with interferon-alpha (IFN-α) was introduced in the early 1980s. Several clinical trials showed a survival advantage for patients treated with IFN-α compared to conventional chemotherapy. Some patients achieved longstanding complete cytogenetic remissions...

  12. Interferon alpha for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Bjerrum, Ole Weis;

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with interferon-alpha (IFN-a) was introduced in the early 1980s. Several clinical trials showed a survival advantage for patients treated with IFN-a compared to conventional chemotherapy. Some patients achieved longstanding complete cytogenetic remissions...

  13. Dasatinib-induced chylothorax in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Shabber Agha; Bhatti, Hammad; Braver, Yvonne; Ali, Sayed K.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary adverse events are common abnormalities associated with the use of dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. We present a case of a 69-year-old man who suddenly developed a rare chylothorax pulmonary adverse event following 10 months of dasatinib treatment.

  14. [Transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to atypical chronic myeloid leukemia in a female patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsaev, S V; Kostroma, I I; Zapreeva, I M; Shmidt, A V; Tiranova, S A; Balashova, V A; Martynkevich, I S; Chubukina, Zh V; Semenova, N Yu; Chechetkin, A V

    Secondary myeloid neoplasia may be a complication of intensive cytostatic therapy. The most common types of secondary neoplasias are acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The development of secondary atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) is an extremely rare phenomenon. The paper describes transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to aCML 6 months after its diagnosis. The development of aCML was accompanied by additional chromosomal aberration as monosomy of chromosome 17. No mutations in the JAK2, MPL, and CalR genes were detected. It is concluded that the clinical course of secondary myeloid neoplasias is variable.

  15. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. An uneventful pregnancy and delivery in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The concomitant occurrence of chronic myeloid leukemia and pregnancy is uncommon and projected to be one in 75000-100000 pregnancies annually. We present a case of 28 years old lady with 36 weeks of gestation diagnosed as chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. Her pregnancy was uneventful and she delivered a healthy male baby. She breast fed the baby for 3 weeks before initiating treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia. Close vigilance and relevant investigations are of paramount importanc...

  17. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Karyotypic findings in chronic myeloid leukemia cases undergoing treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Anupam Kaur; Simran Preet Kaur; Amarjit Singh; Jai Rup Singh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative expansion of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells. Materials and Methods: In the present study, CML samples were collected from various hospitals in Amritsar, Jalandhar and Ludhiana. Results: Chromosomal alterations seen in peripheral blood lymphocytes of these treated and untreated cases of CML were satellite associations, double minutes, random loss, gain of C group chromosomes and presence of marker chr...

  19. [Chronic myeloid leukemia: "archetype" of the impact of targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, R; Bazarbachi, A

    2012-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a chronic blood disorder characterized by a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22, leading to the creation of a chimeric gene encoding the BCR-ABL fusion protein with a constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. Although long known as a disease with an inexorable progression to acute leukemia, CML history has been significantly improved by the use of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of CML by transforming it from an invariably fatal disease to a chronic but manageable condition. In fact, the discovery of this class of targeted therapy had an impact not only on the survival of CML patients but also on other scientific and medical fields. This review illustrates the impact of imatinib, the first example of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the treatment of CML, on the treatment of other cancers, the impact on health systems and on the scientific research in general.

  20. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia In a Pregnant Woman: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytekin Tokmak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a rare disease in pregnancy. Our aim is to present a 37 weeks of pregnant woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia. A 27 Years in multigravi (gravida 5, parity: 4, at 37 weeks gestation was admitted with the diagnosis of painful pregnancy and CML. Physical examination findings were normal, complete blood count and peripheral blood smear results were consistent with CML. The patient was diagnosed CML in the 30th week of pregnancy and were treated with hydroxyurea and interferon. Treatment depends on the mother and the fetus did not develop any side effects. Our patient with CML is interesting due to lack of perinatal effects and take the diagnosis at an early age. CML diagnosed during pregnancy requires a multidisciplinary approach and hydroxyurea and interferon treatment on the mother and fetus are at low risk of inducing adverse effects. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 811-813

  1. Karyotypic findings in chronic myeloid leukemia cases undergoing treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a clonal myeloproliferative expansion of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells. Materials and Methods: In the present study, CML samples were collected from various hospitals in Amritsar, Jalandhar and Ludhiana. Results: Chromosomal alterations seen in peripheral blood lymphocytes of these treated and untreated cases of CML were satellite associations, double minutes, random loss, gain of C group chromosomes and presence of marker chromosome. No aberrations were observed in control samples. Karyotypic abnormalities have also been noted in the Ph-negative cells of some patients in disease remission. Conclusion: This is a novel phenomenon whose prognostic implications require thorough and systematic evaluation.

  2. Current trends in molecular diagnostics of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinhas, Raquel; Cordeiro, Milton; Pedrosa, Pedro; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro V

    2017-08-01

    Nearly 1.5 million people worldwide suffer from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), characterized by the genetic translocation t(9;22)(q34;q11.2), involving the fusion of the Abelson oncogene (ABL1) with the breakpoint cluster region (BCR) gene. Early onset diagnosis coupled to current therapeutics allow for a treatment success rate of 90, which has focused research on the development of novel diagnostics approaches. In this review, we present a critical perspective on current strategies for CML diagnostics, comparing to gold standard methodologies and with an eye on the future trends on nanotheranostics.

  3. Preliminary comparison of efficacy and safety of dasatinib and imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周励

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of dasatinib and imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia(CML-CP).Methods37CML-CP patients were randomized to receive

  4. An uneventful pregnancy and delivery in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathima S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The concomitant occurrence of chronic myeloid leukemia and pregnancy is uncommon and projected to be one in 75000-100000 pregnancies annually. We present a case of 28 years old lady with 36 weeks of gestation diagnosed as chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. Her pregnancy was uneventful and she delivered a healthy male baby. She breast fed the baby for 3 weeks before initiating treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia. Close vigilance and relevant investigations are of paramount importance in recognizing this extremely rare disease during pregnancy.

  5. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced immune thrombocytopenia in chronic myeloid leukemia?

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    Avital F. Barak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The outcome and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients has remarkably changed with the treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Currently, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is considered mainly as a third line salvage therapy in cases of TKIs resistance or intolerance. Here we describe a patient with chronic phase CML who developed both resistance and late occurrence of s severe thrombocytopenia on first and second generation TKIs and eventually underwent HSCT. Although the mechanism of the myelosuppression is not fully understood, we showed for the first time the development of dose dependent platelet antibodies in the presence of TKIs, suggesting the possibility of TKIs induced thrombocytopenia. Our case emphasizes that late development of severe myelosuppression during imatinib treatment is probably an important indication for consideration of early HSCT.

  6. Chronic myeloid leukemia in case of Klinefelter syndrome

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    Vasundhara Chennuri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome (KS is a sex chromosome disorder and has been reported to be associated with increased risk for malignancies. We report a 22-year-old male patient who was diagnosed to have chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. Bone marrow cytogenetic examination revealed karyotype 47, XXY, t (9; 22(q34, q11 suggestive of KS with presence of Philadelphia chromosome. The patient was treated with oral imatinib mesylate (400 mg/day. Complete hematological response was achieved after 2 months of therapy. The bcr-abl/abl transcript percentage measured from peripheral blood at baseline, 1 and 2 years after imatinib were 97%, 1.99%, 0.007%, respectively. He remains in complete hematological and major molecular remission after 2 years of continued imatinib therapy.

  7. Management of chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saußele, S; Silver, Richard T

    2015-04-01

    Due to the high efficacy of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibition (TKI) in chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the frequency of blast crisis (BC) is greatly reduced compared to the pre-TKI era. However, TKI treatment of BC has only marginally improved the number of favorable responses, including remissions, which for the most part have only been transitory. Occasionally, they provide a therapeutic window to perform an allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). The challenge remains to improve management of BC with the limited options available. We review and summarize articles pertaining to the treatment of BC CML published after 2002. Additionally, we will discuss whether there is a need for a new definition of BC and/or treatment failure.

  8. Mathematical modeling of genesis and treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Matthias; Loeffler, Markus; Roeder, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematopoietic disorder induced by translocation of chromosomes 9 and 22, resulting in an overproduction of myeloid blood cells. CML-specific characteristics include a latency time of several years, a period of coexistence of malignant and normal cells and an eventual dominance of the malignant clone. Different drug therapies are available, most notably imatinib, which inhibits the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase. Although the chromosomal aberration causing CML is well known, the resulting dynamic effects on the system behavior are not sufficiently understood yet. Here, we apply an already established mathematical model of hematopoietic stem cell organization. Based on parameter estimates for normal hematopoiesis, we systematically explore the changes in these parameters necessary to reproduce CML-specific characteristics regarding emergence and course of disease as well as a variety of qualitative and quantitative clinical data on CML treatment. Our results indicate that 1 or more of the following mechanisms are compatible with the induction of a dominant clone in the proposed model: a retarded differentiation process, a reduced turnover time or a defective cell-microenvironment interaction of the neoplastic cells. However, in order to explain the massive overproduction of malignant cells, an unregulated and abnormal activation of leukemia stem cells into cycle has to be assumed additionally. Based on our simulation results we conclude that CML dynamics can most appropriately be explained by a modulation of the cell-microenvironment interactions of leukemia stem cells, including both the process of stem cell silencing and activation into cycle.

  9. Gene Expression Pattern of Signal Transduction in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Huiyu; JIE Shenghua; GUO Tiannan; HUANG Shi'ang

    2006-01-01

    To explore the transcriptional gene expression profiles of signaling pathway in Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a series of cDNA microarray chips were tested. The results showed that differentially expressed genes related to singal transduction in CML were screened out and the genes involved in Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K), Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and other signaling pathway genes simultaneously. The results also showed that most of these genes were up-expression genes , which suggested that signal transduction be overactivated in CML. Further analysis of these differentially expressed signal transduction genes will be helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of CML and find new targets of treatment.

  10. Diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia from acute intracerebral hemorrhage: A case report

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    Chakroun-Walha Olfa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is frequent pathology in emergency departments. Coagulopathies leading to ICH are rare. We describe here the case of diagnosis of a chronic myeloid leukemia from ICH in emergencies.

  11. Diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia from acute intracerebral hemorrhage:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chakroun-Walha Olfa; Rejeb Imen; Kammoun Leila; Ksibi Hichem; Ayadi Adnane; Chaari Mourad; Chaari Adel; Kallel Choumous; Rekik Noureddine

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is frequent pathology in emergency departments. Coagulopathies leading to ICH are rare. We describe here the case of diagnosis of a chronic myeloid leukemia from ICH in emergencies.

  12. RhoA: A therapeutic target for chronic myeloid leukemia

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    Molli Poonam R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is a malignant pluripotent stem cells disorder of myeloid cells. In CML patients, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL the terminally differentiated cells of myeloid series exhibit defects in several actin dependent functions such as adhesion, motility, chemotaxis, agglutination, phagocytosis and microbicidal activities. A definite and global abnormality was observed in stimulation of actin polymerization in CML PMNL. Signalling molecules ras and rhoGTPases regulate spatial and temporal polymerization of actin and thus, a broad range of physiological processes. Therefore, status of these GTPases as well as actin was studied in resting and fMLP stimulated normal and CML PMNL. Methods To study expression of GTPases and actin, Western blotting and flow cytometry analysis were done, while spatial expression and colocalization of these proteins were studied by using laser confocal microscopy. To study effect of inhibitors on cell proliferation CCK-8 assay was done. Significance of differences in expression of proteins within the samples and between normal and CML was tested by using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Mann-Whitney test, respectively. Bivariate and partial correlation analyses were done to study relationship between all the parameters. Results In CML PMNL, actin expression and its architecture were altered and stimulation of actin polymerization was absent. Differences were also observed in expression, organization or stimulation of all the three GTPases in normal and CML PMNL. In normal PMNL, ras was the critical GTPase regulating expression of rhoGTPases and actin and actin polymerization. But in CML PMNL, rhoA took a central place. In accordance with these, treatment with rho/ROCK pathway inhibitors resulted in specific growth inhibition of CML cell lines. Conclusions RhoA has emerged as the key molecule responsible for functional defects in CML PMNL and therefore can be used as a

  13. Treatments for chronic myeloid leukemia: a qualitative systematic review

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    Ferdin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Roxanne Ferdinand,1 Stephen A Mitchell,2 Sarah Batson,2 Indra Tumur11Pfizer, Tadworth, UK; 2Abacus International, Bicester, UKBackground: Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative disorder of blood stem cells. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI imatinib was the first targeted therapy licensed for patients with chronic-phase CML, and its introduction was associated with substantial improvements in response and survival compared with previous therapies. Clinical trial data are now available for the second-generation TKIs (nilotinib, dasatinib, and bosutinib in the first-, second-, and third-line settings. A qualitative systematic review was conducted to qualitatively compare the clinical effectiveness, safety, and effect on quality of life of TKIs for the management of chronic-, accelerated-, or blast-phase CML patients.Methods: Included studies were identified through a search of electronic databases in September 2011, relevant conference proceedings and the grey literature.Results: In the first-line setting, the long-term efficacy (up to 8 years of imatinib has been confirmed in a single randomized controlled trial (International Randomized Study of Interferon [IRIS]. All second-generation TKIs reported lower rates of transformation, and comparable or superior complete cytogenetic response (CCyR, major molecular response (MMR, and complete molecular response rates compared with imatinib by 2-year follow-up. Each of the second-generation TKIs was associated with a distinct adverse-event profile. Bosutinib was the only second-generation TKI to report quality-of-life data (no significant difference compared with imatinib treatment. Data in the second- and third-line setting confirmed the efficacy of the second-generation TKIs in either imatinib-resistant or -intolerant patients, as measured by CCyR and MMR rates.Conclusion: Data from first-line randomized controlled trials reporting up to 2-year follow-up indicate superior response

  14. Chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia: Not always a reassuring diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Primary resistance to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is quite uncommon in chronic-phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and related to still poorly understood mechanisms, as ABL mutations are rarely detected in primary resistant patients. We report the challenging case of a CML patient who was resistant to multiple TKIs because of different emerging ABL mutations and became pregnant while on Nilotinib therapy despite repeated and clear discouragement to conceive. She decided to continue wit...

  15. The expression of PML in chronic myeloid leukemia and effect on cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴洁

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether PML is expressed differently in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients and healthy controls,then explore the effect of PML on proliferation in leukemia cell lines K562.Methods Realtime PCR was used to detect the PML expression in

  16. Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e suspender el medicamento nilotinib (Tasigna) en la leucemia mieloide crónica (LMC) de los pacientes que ti...ic form of leukemia, called chronic myeloid leukemia Forma específica de leucemia, llamada leucemia mieloide

  17. Advances in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

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    Morley Kimberly

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although imatinib is firmly established as an effective therapy for newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, the field continues to advance on several fronts. In this minireview we cover recent results of second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in newly diagnosed patients, investigate the state of strategies to discontinue therapy and report on new small molecule inhibitors to tackle resistant disease, focusing on agents that target the T315I mutant of BCR-ABL. As a result of these advances, standard of care in frontline therapy has started to gravitate toward dasatinib and nilotinib, although more observation is needed to fully support this. Stopping therapy altogether remains a matter of clinical trials, and more must be learned about the mechanisms underlying the persistence of leukemic cells with treatment. However, there is good news for patients with the T315I mutation, as effective drugs such as ponatinib are on their way to regulatory approval. Despite these promising data, accelerated or blastic phase disease remains a challenge, possibly due to BCR-ABL-independent resistance.

  18. Immunotherapy of chronic myeloid leukemia: present state and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonka, Vladimír

    2010-03-01

    In spite of the considerable successes that have been achieved in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), cure for the disease can only be obtained by the present means in a rather small minority of patients. During the past decade, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the immunology of CML, which has raised hopes that this disease may be curable by supplementing the current targeted chemotherapy with immunotherapeutic approaches. More than ten small-scale clinical trials have been carried out with experimental vaccines predominantly based on the p210bcr-abl fusion protein. Their results suggested beneficial effects in some patients. Recent data obtained in human patients as well as in animal models indicate that the p210bcr-abl protein does not carry the immunodominant epitope(s). These observations, combined with the recognition of an ever increasing number of other immunogenic proteins in CML cells, strongly support the concept that gene-modified, cell-based vaccines containing the full spectrum of tumor antigens might be the most effective immunotherapeutic approach. Recently created mathematical models have provided important leads for the timing of the combination of targeted drug therapy with vaccine administration. A strategy of how targeted drug therapy might be combined with vaccination is outlined.

  19. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  20. Chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia: Not always a reassuring diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Ester M; Elena, Chiara; Zibellini, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Primary resistance to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is quite uncommon in chronic-phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and related to still poorly understood mechanisms, as ABL mutations are rarely detected in primary resistant patients. We report the challenging case of a CML patient who was resistant to multiple TKIs because of different emerging ABL mutations and became pregnant while on Nilotinib therapy despite repeated and clear discouragement to conceive. She decided to continue with her pregnancy, showing an admirable and incredible perseverance in the pursuit of her personal aims.

  1. Chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia: Not always a reassuring diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester M. Orlandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary resistance to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs is quite uncommon in chronic-phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML and related to still poorly understood mechanisms, as ABL mutations are rarely detected in primary resistant patients. We report the challenging case of a CML patient who was resistant to multiple TKIs because of different emerging ABL mutations and became pregnant while on Nilotinib therapy despite repeated and clear discouragement to conceive. She decided to continue with her pregnancy, showing an admirable and incredible perseverance in the pursuit of her personal aims.

  2. Characterization of miRNomes in Acute and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Xiong; Jiangwei Yan; Songnian Hu; Xiangdong Fang; Yadong Yang; Hai Wang; Jie Li; Shaobin Wang; Yanming Li; Yaran Yang; Kan Cai; Xiuyan Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid leukemias are highly diverse diseases and have been shown to be associated with microRNA (miRNA) expression aberrations. The present study involved an in-depth miRNome analysis of two human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, HL-60 and THP-1, and one human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell line, K562, via massively parallel signature sequenc-ing. mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines that were established previously in our lab facil-itated an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression patterns. miRNA expression profiling followed by differential expression analysis and target prediction suggested numerous miRNA signatures in AML and CML cell lines. Some miRNAs may act as either tumor suppres-sors or oncomiRs in AML and CML by targeting key genes in AML and CML pathways. Expres-sion patterns of cell type-specific miRNAs could partially reflect the characteristics of K562, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, such as actin filament-based processes, responsiveness to stimulus and phag-ocytic activity. miRNAs may also regulate myeloid differentiation, since they usually suppress dif-ferentiation regulators. Our study provides a resource to further investigate the employment of miRNAs in human leukemia subtyping, leukemogenesis and myeloid development. In addition, the distinctive miRNA signatures may be potential candidates for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of myeloid leukemias.

  3. Vertigo as the First Sign of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Martín-Hernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute vestibular deficit as the first sign of leukemia is extremely rare. The literature shows some cases of sudden hearing loss accompanied by instability and associated with hyperviscosity syndrome. We present the case of a patient who presents a harmonic vestibular deficit of the right ear. The complementary studies revealed an abnormally high level of leukocytes. A peripheral blood cytogenetic analysis is performed due to a high suspicion of leukemia, and the results show BCR/ABL fusion gene with a cut point in the M-BCR region, which confirms the diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. In this case we detail the importance of taking hematological disorders into consideration in the differential diagnosis of patients with otoneurological symptoms, and we also review the etiopathogenic mechanisms, symptoms, diagnosis, and therapeutic options for chronic myeloid leukemia with sudden hearing loss and vertigo.

  4. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  5. Two consecutive twin and a singleton pregnancy in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, T A; Nabeel, N

    2014-01-01

    Consecutive multiple pregnancies with Chronic myeloid leukemia is a rare event and little is known about its prevalence and management with or without chemotherapy. We present a case of three consecutive pregnancies in a woman with CML, two of which were multiple pregnancies.

  6. Planned Pregnancy in a Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patient in Molecular Remission

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Excellent response rates and a good quality of life have been observed since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment. Consequently, some challenges began to appear in CML women in child-bearing age wishing to become pregnant. Currently, many women around the world are in stable major/complete molecular response MMR/CMR (MMR:

  7. Diversity of breakpoints of variant Philadelphia chromosomes in chronic myeloid leukemia in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Lopes Ferrari Chauffaille

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic myeloid leukemia is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the Philadelphia chromosome or t(9;22(q34.1;q11.2, resulting in the break-point cluster regionAbelson tyrosine kinase fusion gene, which encodes a constitutively active tyrosine kinase protein. The Philadelphia chromosome is detected by karyotyping in around 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but 5-10% may have variant types. Variant Philadelphia chromosomes are characterized by the involvement of another chromosome in addition to chromosome 9 or 22. It can be a simple type of variant when one other chromosome is involved, or complex, in which two or more chromosomes take part in the translocation. Few studies have reported the incidence of variant Philadelphia chromosomes or the breakpoints involved among Brazilian chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Objective: The aim of this report is to describe the diversity of the variant Philadelphia chromosomes found and highlight some interesting breakpoint candidates for further studies. Methods: the Cytogenetics Section Database was searched for all cases with diagnoses of chronic myeloid leukemia during a 12-year period and all the variant Philadelphia chromosomes were listed. Results: Fifty (5.17% cases out of 1071 Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia were variants. The most frequently involved chromosome was 17, followed by chromosomes: 1, 20, 6, 11, 2, 10, 12 and 15. Conclusion: Among all the breakpoints seen in this survey, six had previously been described: 11p15, 14q32, 15q11.2, 16p13.1, 17p13 and 17q21. The fact that some regions get more fre- quently involved in such rare rearrangements calls attention to possible predisposition that should be further studied. Nevertheless, the pathological implication of these variants remains unclear.

  8. MiRNA182 regulates percentage of myeloid and erythroid cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Deepak; Sachithanandan, Sasikala P; Ross, Cecil; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Li, Shang; Krishna, Sudhir

    2017-01-12

    The deregulation of lineage control programs is often associated with the progression of haematological malignancies. The molecular regulators of lineage choices in the context of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance remain poorly understood in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). To find a potential molecular regulator contributing to lineage distribution and TKI resistance, we undertook an RNA-sequencing approach for identifying microRNAs (miRNAs). Following an unbiased screen, elevated miRNA182-5p levels were detected in Bcr-Abl-inhibited K562 cells (CML blast crisis cell line) and in a panel of CML patients. Earlier, miRNA182-5p upregulation was reported in several solid tumours and haematological malignancies. We undertook a strategy involving transient modulation and CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats)-mediated knockout of the MIR182 locus in CML cells. The lineage contribution was assessed by methylcellulose colony formation assay. The transient modulation of miRNA182-5p revealed a biased phenotype. Strikingly, Δ182 cells (homozygous deletion of MIR182 locus) produced a marked shift in lineage distribution. The phenotype was rescued by ectopic expression of miRNA182-5p in Δ182 cells. A bioinformatic analysis and Hes1 modulation data suggested that Hes1 could be a putative target of miRNA182-5p. A reciprocal relationship between miRNA182-5p and Hes1 was seen in the context of TK inhibition. In conclusion, we reveal a key role for miRNA182-5p in restricting the myeloid development of leukemic cells. We propose that the Δ182 cell line will be valuable in designing experiments for next-generation pharmacological interventions.

  9. Chronic myeloid leukemia in pregnancy: an absolute contraindication to neuraxial anesthesia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsiak, J N; Bullough, A S

    2016-02-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is rare in pregnancy with an estimated incidence of 1:75000. It is a genetic myeloproliferative disorder marked by increased and unregulated growth of myeloid cells in the bone marrow. The terminal phase of chronic myeloid leukemia may develop into a blast crisis, defined as >30% myeloblasts in the circulation. A blast crisis resembles an acute leukemia and is associated with rapid clinical deterioration and short survival. Targeted gene therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is effective in treatment but when these agents are discontinued, as in pregnancy, the patient may relapse and blast cells may enter the circulation. Theoretically, a central nervous system blast crisis may be induced by inadvertent intrathecal seeding of circulating blast cells, and is associated with a high mortality rate and a median life expectancy of three months. We describe the anesthetic management of a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia and blast cells in the circulation who required cesarean delivery. After considering the potential anesthetic risks and benefits, general anesthesia was chosen. Although an iatrogenic central nervous system blast crisis is extremely rare, the high morbidity and mortality associated with such an event should be considered when formulating an anesthetic plan.

  10. Myeloid sarcoma presenting as a colon polyp and harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Rogers; Mark Ettel; Margaret Cho; Alexander Chan; Xiao-Jun Wu; Antonio G Neto

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma, also known as granulocytic sarcoma or chloroma is an unusual accumulation of malignant myeloid precursor cells in an extramedullary site, which disrupts the normal architecture of the involved tissue. It is known to occur more commonly in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and less commonly in those with myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia. The most common sites of involvement include bone, skin and lymph nodes. However, rare cases have been reported in the gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or breast. Most commonly, a neoplastic extramedullary proliferation of myeloid precursors in a patient would have systemic involvement of a myeloid neoplasm, including in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Infrequently, extramedullary disease may be the only site of involvement. It may also occur as a localized antecedent to more generalized disease or as a site of recurrence. Herein, we present the first case in the English literature of a patient presenting with an isolated site of myeloid sarcoma arising in the form of a colonic polyp which, after subsequent bone marrow biopsy, was found to be a harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  11. Myeloprolipherative disorder type chronic myeloid leukemia--eosinophilic form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnautovic-Custovic, Aida; Hasic, Samira; Kopic, Emina; Jahic, Azra; Jovic, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL) is a very rare form of leucemia in the western world. Adequate response is seldomly achieved after treatment with corticosteroids, interferon-alfa (INF-alfa) and medications containing hydroxi-urea (Litalir). The study presents a patient with CEL with no initial therapeutic response to the use of corticosteroids, INF-alfa and hydroxy-urea, and with neither clinical nor hematological response. After setting a diagnosis of CEL, patient was ordinated Imatinib (Glivec tabbletes) in a daily dose of 200 mg. Two days afterwards there was an evident withdrawal of subjective and clinical symptoms of disease, and the complete blood count showed significant amendment.

  12. Pharmaceutical care and home delivery of medication to patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña San José Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the implementation of a new model face to face and remote pharmaceutical care with home delivery of tyronsine kinase inhibitors medicines for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Methods: Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia were selected to start this new model of care. Four characteristics were taken into account for the choice: chronicity of the disease, frequency of doctor visits, pharmaceutical care value and conservation of tyronsine kinase inhibitors medicines at room temperature. Results: Out of 68 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia and treated with tyronsine kinase inhibitors, 42 were selected due to the frequency of their hematologist visits. An introductory letter and a questionnaire about their preferences were sent to these patients.Sixteen of them expressed their desire to participate. The legal department designed a confidentiality contract, as well as a model of informed consent. A logistic distribution model based on defined routes and timetables was established. Prior to inclusion, pharmaceutical care was performed in a face to face consultation and the communication way was established for the followings remote consultations. Home delivery had a monthly cost of 13.2 € (including VAT per patient. All the patients who started this program continue in it. To date, 5 deliveries per patient have been conducted Conclusions: It is possible to establish an alternative model of pharmaceutical care with home delivery of medication, keeping the pharmacist-patient relationship, avoiding travel, ensuring the confidentiality and rationalizing the stocks

  13. Chronic myeloid leukemia presenting with absence of basophils and marked dyspoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year old woman presented to us with fever, weakness and ecchymotic patches for one year. She had leucocytosis, anemia and thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood smear showed 62% neutrophils, 32% myelocytes and metamyelocytes, 2% promyelocytes, 1% blasts, 2% monocytes, 1% lymphocytes but no basophils and marked dyspoiesis. Bone marrow picture was essentially the same. A diagnosis of atypical chronic myeloid leukemia was suggested. The correct diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia - accelerated phase was, however, made on cytogenetic analysis which showed Philadelphia chromosome (Ph and isochromosome 17q [i(17q]. This case describes a rare and diagnostically difficult presentation of CML arising out of a combination of prominent dyspoiesis and near absence of peripheral blood basophils.

  14. Chronic myeloid leukemia in an adult ghanaian with sporadic neurofibromatosis 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edeghonghon E Olayemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, a common, progressive, autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disorder, are predisposed to malignancies. Several types of hematologic malignancies have been described in them. However, to date there has been no report to the best of our knowledge of a patient with NF1 developing chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. We present an adult Ghanaian with NF1, who subsequently developed CML. Relevance of the case report is discussed.

  15. Using 2 nd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in frontline management of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Jayakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Choices in medicine come with responsibility. With several TKI′s (Tyrosine kinase inhibitors available for front-line management of CML (Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, an astute clinician has to personalise, rationalise and take a pragmatic approach towards selection of the best drug for the ′patient in question′. Though it is hotly debated as to which TKI will triumph, the truth of this debate lies in individualising treatment rather than a general ′all size fits all′ approach with imatinib. I personally believe that the second generation TKI′s will suit most patient clinical profiles rather than prescribing imatinib to all and I have strived to make a strong case for them in front line treatment of CML. Though Imatinib may remain the first line choice for some patients, my efforts in this debate are mainly geared towards breaking the myth that imatinib is the sole ′block buster′ on the CML landscape

  16. Chronic meningitis by histoplasmosis: report of a child with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Pereira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis is a common evolution in progressive disseminated histoplasmosis in children, and is asymptomatic in many cases. In leukemia, the impaired of the T cells function can predispose to the disseminated form. The attributed mortality rate in this case is 20%-40% and the relapse rate is as high as 50%; therefore, prolonged treatment may be emphasized. We have described a child with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, that developed skin lesions and asymptomatic chronic meningitis, with a good evolution after prolonged treatment with amphotericin B deoxycholate followed by fluconazole.

  17. Obstetric Complications and Management in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohilla, Minakshi; Rai, Rakhi; Yanamandra, Uday; Chaudhary, Neelam; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Neelam; Jain, Vanita; Prasad, G R V; Kalra, Jasvinder; Varma, Subhash C

    2016-03-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is amongst the most common haematological malignancies encountered in adults. The younger age of onset and increased incidence of CML in Indians leads to higher chances of encountering it in pregnancy. Pregnancy in CML is a complex situation as first line therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), is fraught with multiple fetal safety issues. The fetal aspects have been elucidated in literature, but there is scarcity of information on the obstetric outcome per se in presence of CML, excluding the influence of TKI. Obstetric outcomes of 5 pregnancies in four patients with CML are being reported. Literature on interplay of CML and bleeding or thrombotic manifestations is reviewed. The major complications encountered were antepartum (APH) and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), preterm labour, intrauterine growth retardation and intrauterine fetal death. Patients in the reproductive age group with diagnosis of CML should be carefully counseled regarding the effect of disease and TKI on the maternal-fetal health. Bleeding complications, particularly APH and PPH may be encountered in CML patients. Close coordination of the obstetrician, haematologist, and neonatologist is required in managing these cases successfully. The need for absolute contraception till the remission of disease needs to be emphasized for further pregnancies.

  18. ELN 2013 response status criteria: relevance for de novo imatinib chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Gabriel; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Lascaux, Axelle; Schmitt, Anna; Bidet, Audrey; Fort, Marie-Pierre; Lippert, Eric; Bureau, Caroline; Adiko, Didier; Hayette, Sandrine; Reiffers, Josy; Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel; Mahon, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The response definitions proposed by the European Leukemia Net (ELN) have been recently modified. We evaluated the new criteria for de novo imatinib (400 mg/d) chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) patients. Response status according to the 2009 and 2013 criteria were determined in 180 unselected patients. Outcome of the subgroups of patients were then compared. The 180 patients were classified as optimal responders (OR2009; n = 113, 62.7%), suboptimal responders (SOR2009; n = 47, 26.1%) and failures (FAIL2009; n = 20, 11.1%) according to the 2009 ELN criteria and optimal responders (OR2013; n = 77, 42.7%), warnings (WAR2013; n = 59, 32.7%), and failures (FAIL2013; n = 44, 24.4%) according to the 2013 ELN criteria. No difference in terms of outcome was observed between OR2009 patients who became WAR2013 when compared with OR2013 patients. When compared with FAIL2009 patients, SOR2009 patients who became WAR2013 had better EFS, FFS, PFS, and OS. No difference was observed in PFS or OS in SOR2009 patients who became FAIL2013. The 2013 ELN response status criteria have improved patients classification in terms of response status. However, in our patient population this improvement is related to a better definition of failure rather than that of optimal response for CP-CML patients treated with IM frontline therapy.

  19. Combination of Rapamycin and Imatinib in Treating Refractory Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Myeloid Blast Crisis: a Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Xie; Xiang Zhang; Bao-zhi Fang; Guang-sheng He; Yun Zhao; De-pei Wu

    2013-01-01

    CHRONIC myeloid leukemia (CML) is character-ized by the presence of the BCR/ABL fusiongene, which is the resultof a reciprocal translo-cation betweenchromosomes 9 and 22, calledPhiladelphia (Ph) chromosome. Imatinib mesylate (imatinib), a specific small molecularinhibitor of BCR/ABL,couldimprove the prognosis of CML and is now the standard drugapplied in all phases of this disease.1 Despite the efficacy ofimatinib,the development of resistance and the persistence of minimal residual disease haveseriously impaired the efficiency of this medicine. Resistance may developthrough several differentmechanisms, such asmutations in the Abl kinase domain, BCR/ABL overexpression, or compensatory phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian targetof rapamycin (mTOR) activation.2,3Rapamycin, with mTOR asapotential therapeutic target, has been studied in patients with hematologic malignancies. Herewe report a case ofrefractory CML myeloid blast crisis successfully treated by the combination of rapamycin and imatinib.

  20. Platelet Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Does Imatinib Mesylate Improve It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Meltem Akay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of imatinib mesylate on platelet aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP release in chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Materials and Methods: Platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by 5.0 mM adenosine diphosphate, 0.5 mM arachidonic acid, 1.0 mg/ mL ristocetin, and 2 µg/mL collagen were studied by whole blood platelet lumi-aggregometer in 20 newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia patients before and after imatinib mesylate treatment. Results: At the time of diagnosis, 17/20 patients had abnormal platelet aggregation results; 8 (40% had hypoactivity, 6 (30% had hyperactivity, and 3 (15% had mixed hypo- and hyperactivity. Repeat platelet aggregation studies were performed after a mean of 19 months (min: 5 months-max: 35 months in all patients who received imatinib mesylate during this period. After therapy, 18/20 (90% patients had abnormal laboratory results; 12 (60% had hypoactive platelets, 4 (20% had mixed hypo- and hyperactive platelets, and 2 (10% had hyperactive platelets. Three of the 8 patients with initial hypoactivity remained hypoactive, while 2 developed a mixed picture, 2 became hyperactive, and 1 normalized. Of the 6 patients with initial hyperactivity, 4 became hypoactive and 2 developed a mixed pattern. All of the 3 patients with initial hypo- and hyperactivity became hypoactive. Finally, 2 of the 3 patients with initial normal platelets became hypoactive while 1 remained normal. There was a significant decrease in ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation after therapy (p0.05. Conclusion: These findings indicate that a significant proportion of chronic myeloid leukemia patients have different patterns of platelet function abnormalities and imatinib mesylate has no effect on these abnormalities, with a significant impairment in ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation.

  1. Dose-finding study of imatinib in combination with intravenous cytarabine: feasibility in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenik, W.; van der Holt, B.; Verhoef, G.E.G.; Smit, W.M.; Kersten, M.J.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke; Verdonck, L.F.; Ferrant, A.; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Janssen, J.J.W.M.; Sonneveld, P.; Kooy, M.V.; Wittebol, S.; Willemze, R.; Wijermans, P.W.; Westveer, P.H.M.; Beverloo, H.B.; Valk, P.; Lowenberg, B.; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Cornelissen, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    The HOVON cooperative study group performed a feasibility study of escalated imatinib and intravenous cytarabine in 165 patients with early chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Patients received 2 cycles of intravenous cytarabine (200 mg/m(2) or 1000 mg/m(2) days 1-7) in conjunction with im

  2. Successful Pregnancy and Delivery in a Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia while on Dasatinib Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the case of an 18-year-old woman with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who became pregnant while undergoing treatment with dasatinib. Before pregnancy, she received imatinib mesylate therapy but could not tolerate the treatment. The regimen was then changed to dasatinib at a dose of 70 mg b.i.d. While she was in hematological remission and on dasatinib therapy, she became pregnant. The unplanned pregnancy was identified after the patient had experienced four weeks of amenorrhea. ...

  3. Successful pregnancy in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia under treatment with imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Motohiro; Inaguma, Youko; Handa, Kousuke; Hasegawa, Akio; Yamamoto, Yukiya; Watanabe, Masato; Mizuta, Syuichi; Maruyama, Fumio; Okamoto, Masataka; Emi, Nobuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Contraception is recommended during imatinib therapy based on the teratogenicity data in rats. However, patients may become pregnant and here we describe a successful pregnancy and labor without any congenital anomaly in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) under treatment with imatinib. The patient had received imatinib for 53 months before she became pregnant, with a complete cytogenetic response achieved after 6 months of therapy and a major molecular response (MMR) after 28 months. CML was in MMR at discovery of pregnancy and the fetus had been exposed to imatinib for 5 weeks. Treatment was discontinued, but MMR persisted during gestation.

  4. Successful pregnancy involving a man with chronic myeloid leukemia on dasatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oweini, Houssam; Otrock, Zaher K; Mahfouz, Rami A R; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Dasatinib is a highly potent Bcr-Abl inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of imatinib-resistant or -intolerant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The potential effects of dasatinib on sperm counts, sperm function, and fertility have not been studied yet. There is only one report in the medical literature of successful pregnancies while patients were taking dasatinib, thus making our case the second report. Here, we present the case of a 38-year-old man who conceived a healthy baby while on dasatinib therapy.

  5. Pregnancies in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; You, Jian-Hua; Wu, Wen; Li, Jun-Min; Shen, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Ai-Hua

    2013-10-01

    We presented our experience in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients who conceived children and/or became pregnant while receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Among 7 male patients, 7 pregnancies resulted in the birth of 7 healthy babies. Among 18 female patients, 8 ended in elective abortion; 3 had spontaneous abortion, and 7 carried to term, resulting in the birth of 8 healthy babies. All children have normal growth and development. All patients remain in TKI therapy and in good response. It is suggested that female patients are advised to practice adequate contraception. No special precautions apply for male patients receiving TKI.

  6. Response to treatment in women with chronic myeloid leukemia during pregnancy and after delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamová, Hana; Marková, Markéta; Moravcová, Jana; Sisková, Magda; Cetkovský, Petr; Machová Poláková, Katerina

    2009-11-01

    Here we report response to treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) of five pregnant women during and after pregnancy. CML was diagnosed during pregnancy in three patients. Pregnancy was confirmed during CML in two patients: in one in the 21st week of pregnancy while on imatinib, in another in the 12th week during the interferon treatment. Interferon with leukapheresis when needed was applied in the 2nd and 3rd trimester. All patients except one achieved complete hematological response during pregnancy. After delivery four patients achieved partial cytogenetic response on imatinib and two patients achieved major molecular response after crossover to dasatinib.

  7. Massive splenic infarction and portal vein thrombosis in children with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Tekin; Erdem, Arzu Y; Fettah, Ali; Kaçar, Dilek; Avci, Zekai; Yarali, Nese; Tunc, Bahattin

    2014-10-01

    Massive splenic infarction and portal vein thrombosis (PVT) due to chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is extremely rare. We describe 2 children who were presented with massive splenic infarction and PVT in the course of CML. Massive splenic infarction and PVT treated with splenectomy in one and with medical treatment in another in whom PVT resolved by cytoreductive treatment, led to downsizing of spleen or splenectomy. Splenic infarct and PVT should be considered in CML patients with long-lasting severe abdominal pain despite appropriate medical attempts. Splenectomy should be spared for persistent symptoms and complications.

  8. Motivating medical students to learn basic science concepts using chronic myeloid leukemia as an integration theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Teresinha Olalla Saad

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report on the use of chronic myeloid leukemia as a theme of basic clinical integration for first year medical students to motivate and enable in-depth understanding of the basic sciences of the future physician. Methods: During the past thirteen years we have reviewed and updated the curriculum of the medical school of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas. The main objective of the new curriculum is to teach the students how to learn to learn. Since then, a case of chronic myeloid leukemia has been introduced to first year medical students and discussed in horizontal integration with all themes taught during a molecular and cell biology course. Cell structure and components, protein, chromosomes, gene organization, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, signaling and so on are all themes approached during this course. At the end of every topic approached, the students prepare in advance the corresponding topic of clinical cases chosen randomly during the class, which are then presented by them. During the final class, a paper regarding mutations in the abl gene that cause resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors is discussed. After each class, three tests are solved in an interactive evaluation. Results: The course has been successful since its beginning, 13 years ago. Great motivation of those who participated in the course was observed. There were less than 20% absences in the classes. At least three (and as many as nine students every year were interested in starting research training in the field of hematology. At the end of each class, an interactive evaluation was performed and more than 70% of the answers were correct in each evaluation. Moreover, for the final evaluation, the students summarized, in a written report, the molecular and therapeutic basis of chronic myeloid leukemia, with scores ranging from 0 to 10. Considering all 13 years, a median of 78% of the class scored above 5 (min 74%-max 85%, and a median of 67

  9. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Profile of bosutinib and its clinical potential in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller-von Amsberg G

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gunhild Keller-von Amsberg,1 Steffen Koschmieder21Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Cancer Center Hamburg, University Hospital Hamburg Eppendorf, 2Department of Medicine (Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center of Aachen and RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, GermanyAbstract: Bosutinib (SKI-606 is an orally available, once-daily, dual Src and Abl kinase inhibitor with promising clinical potential in first-, second-, and third-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Bosutinib effectively inhibits wild-type BCR-ABL and most imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutations except for V299L and T315I. Low hematologic toxicity is a remarkable characteristic of this novel second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and this has been ascribed to its minimal activity against the platelet-derived growth factor receptor and KIT. Low-grade, typically self-limiting diarrhea, which usually appears within the first few weeks after treatment initiation, represents the predominant toxicity of bosutinib. Other treatment-associated adverse events are mostly mild to moderate. Bosutinib has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of chronic, accelerated, or blast phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive CML in adult patients with resistance or intolerance to prior therapy. This review summarizes the main properties of bosutinib and the currently available data on its clinical potential in the treatment of CML.Keywords: bosutinib, chronic myeloid leukemia, BCR-ABL, Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, point mutation, imatinib resistance

  11. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitor, nabumetone, inhibits proliferation in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Filiz; Ozcan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsan, Güner Hayri; Ateş, Halil; Demirkan, Fatih; Pişkin, Ozden; Undar, Bülent

    2005-05-01

    The anti-tumor effect of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors has been documented in several studies. COX2 inhibitors have attracted more attention because of the fewer side-effects and the more prominent anti-tumor effects. However, experience with these drugs in hematological malignancies is limited. In our study, a potent COX2 inhibitor, nabumetone (NBT), was investigated for its anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in K-562 and Meg-01 chronic myeloid leukemia blastic cell lines as a single agent or in combination with adriamycin (ADR) and interferon alpha (IFN-a). In these cell lines, a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation was observed with NBT. We observed no significant apoptotic effect of NBT. However, NBT potentiated the apoptotic effect of ADR in the K-562 cell line. Bcl-2 expression was reduced by NBT (11% vs. 2%). The combination of NBT with IFN did not have any significant effect on the K-562 cell line. We suggest that NBT inhibits proliferation and potentiates the apoptotic effect of ADR in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines.

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside ... develops quickly. Both adults and children can get acute myeloid leukemia ( AML ). This article is about AML in children.

  14. Isolation and killing of candidate chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells by antibody targeting of IL-1 receptor accessory protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järås, Marcus; Johnels, Petra; Hansen, Nils Gunder;

    2010-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is genetically characterized by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, formed through a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 and giving rise to the constitutively active tyrosine kinase P210 BCR/ABL1. Therapeutic strategies aiming for a cure of CML will ...

  15. Chronic myeloid leukemia presenting late in pregnancy. Report of a case and a questionnaire reflecting diversity in management options

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia presenting late in pregnancy. Report of a case and a questionnaire reflecting diversity in management options phone: +46-8-51774198 (Bjorkholm, Magnus) (Bjorkholm, Magnus) Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Solna and Karolinska Institutet - Stockholm - SWEDEN (Bjorkholm, Magnus) Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital - 171 76 - Stockholm - ...

  16. Combined Population Dynamics and Entropy Modelling Supports Patient Stratification in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehme, Marc; Koschmieder, Steffen; Montazeri, Maryam; Copland, Mhairi; Oehler, Vivian G.; Radich, Jerald P.; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Schuppert, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Modelling the parameters of multistep carcinogenesis is key for a better understanding of cancer progression, biomarker identification and the design of individualized therapies. Using chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) as a paradigm for hierarchical disease evolution we show that combined population dynamic modelling and CML patient biopsy genomic analysis enables patient stratification at unprecedented resolution. Linking CD34+ similarity as a disease progression marker to patient-derived gene expression entropy separated established CML progression stages and uncovered additional heterogeneity within disease stages. Importantly, our patient data informed model enables quantitative approximation of individual patients’ disease history within chronic phase (CP) and significantly separates “early” from “late” CP. Our findings provide a novel rationale for personalized and genome-informed disease progression risk assessment that is independent and complementary to conventional measures of CML disease burden and prognosis.

  17. Planned pregnancy in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient in molecular remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovsky, Carolina; Giere, Isabel; Van Thillo, Germán

    2012-01-01

    Excellent response rates and a good quality of life have been observed since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment. Consequently, some challenges began to appear in CML women in child-bearing age wishing to become pregnant. Currently, many women around the world are in stable major/complete molecular response MMR/CMR (MMR: pregnancy. We describe the case of a 36-year-old female patient with CML in chronic phase who stopped imatinib after 2 years in major molecular response (MMR) to plan a pregnancy. Molecular monitoring by RQ-PCR was performed quarterly. She achieved a safe pregnancy and delivery maintaining an optimal molecular response throughout the pregnancy. Isolated literature reports have been described, but no formal advice has been described at present time.

  18. Two successful pregnancies in a woman with chronic myeloid leukemia exposed to nilotinib during the first trimester of her second pregnancy: case study

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The occurrence of chronic myeloid leukemia in pregnancy is rare and its management poses a clinical challenge for physicians treating these patients. We report a 30-year-old woman with chronic myeloid leukemia who became pregnant twice successfully. Philadelphia-positive CML in its chronic phase was diagnosed at 16 weeks of her first gestation. At that time, she received no treatment throughout her pregnancy. At 38 weeks of gestation, a normal infant was delivered by cesarean section...

  19. Nilotinib 300 mg twice daily: an academic single-arm study of newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnetti, Fausto; Breccia, Massimo; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Martino, Bruno; D’Adda, Mariella; Stagno, Fabio; Carella, Angelo Michele; Avanzini, Paolo; Tiribelli, Mario; Trabacchi, Elena; Visani, Giuseppe; Gobbi, Marco; Salvucci, Marzia; Levato, Luciano; Binotto, Gianni; Capalbo, Silvana Franca; Bochicchio, Maria Teresa; Soverini, Simona; Cavo, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni; Alimena, Giuliana; Pane, Fabrizio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Rosti, Gianantonio; Baccarani, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The introduction and the extended clinical use of nilotinib in the first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia have been based on company-sponsored trials. Independent confirmations are extremely important. We report an investigator-sponsored study of nilotinib 300 mg twice daily in 130 chronic myeloid leukemia patients in early chronic phase. A deep molecular response was achieved in 46% (MR4.0) and 17% (MR4.5) of patients at 2 years; 58% of the enrolled patients achieved a MR4.0 at least once, with a sustained MR4.0 in 52% of them. With a median observation of 29 months (range 24–37 months), 77% of patients were still on treatment with nilotinib. The reasons for permanent discontinuation were: 3% progression, 5% failure or suboptimal response, 8% adverse events, 1% treatment-free remission, and 5% other reasons. Thirteen thrombotic arterial events were reported in 12 patients. A prospective evaluation of metabolic effects showed an increase of fasting glucose without significant variations of glycated hemoglobin, an increase of total cholesterol (both low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein fractions) and a decrease of triglycerides. This study confirms a high and rapid efficacy of nilotinib 300 mg twice daily and provides detailed information on the type and incidence of non-hematologic and metabolic adverse events (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01535391). PMID:27470600

  20. THERAPY-RELATED MYELOID NEOPLASMS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA AND WALDENSTROM MICROGLOBULINEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ricci

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary myelodisplasia (MDS and acute myeloide leukaemia (AML are frequent long term complications in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL and Waldesntrom Macroglobulinemia (WM patients. Although disease-related immune-suppression plays a crucial role in leukemogenesis there is great concern that therapy may further increase the risk of developing these devastating complications. Nucleoside analogs (NA and alkilator agents are considered appropriate agents in the treatment of both CLL and WM patients. Prolonged immunosuppression related to nucleoside analogs therapy and the incorporation of these agents or their metabolites into DNA, with potentially mutagenic action, leads to speculation that their therapeutic use might be responsible for an increased incidence of second cancer especially when combined with other DNA damaging agents like alkylators. In this review the published studies considering the occurrence of secondary MDS and AML in CLL and WM patients are reported and the potential role of chemotherapeutic agents in leukemogenesis is discussed.

  1. [Modern therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia: an example for paradigma shift in hemato-oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, A A; Hehlmann, R

    2011-02-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is exceptional amongst neoplasias since its underlying pathomechanism has been elucidated, and potent well tolerated targeted drugs, the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), are available for treatment. They convincingly improve prognosis while retaining good quality of life. Aims of therapy are complete remissions as well as prolongation of life and cure. Imatinib 400 mg per day is current standard therapy. There are hints for a better outcome with a higher initial imatinib dose or with combination therapy. Even after achievement of complete molecular response continuous therapy might be necessary in most cases. In case of imatinib intolerance or failure, the second generation TKI dasatinib and nilotinib and allogeneic stem cell transplantation are available. The use of second generation TKI as first line treatment might further improve prognosis. The therapeutic response should be regularly monitored according to international recommendations.

  2. Successful pregnancy outcome in a patient of chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Singhal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy and cancer is a complex situation. The coincidence chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and pregnancy is an uncommon event, in part because CML occurs mostly in older age group. The management of CML, during pregnancy is a difficult problem because of potential effects of therapy on the mother and foetus. Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor induces dramatic hematologic and cytogenetic responses in CML, but it is not recommended for use in pregnancy or if the patient plans to conceive. In literature there are very few reports of successful outcome of pregnancy while on imatinib. In this report we describe a successful pregnancy and labor under treatment with imatinib in a known case of CML. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(3.000: 913-915

  3. Complex Variant t(9;22 Chromosome Translocations in Five Cases of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Valencia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia (Ph1 chromosome arising from the reciprocal t(9;22 translocation is found in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients and results in the formation of the chimeric fusion gene BCR-ABL. However, a small proportion of patients with CML have simple or complex variants of this translocation, involving various breakpoints in addition to 9q34 and 22q11. We report five CML cases carrying variant Ph translocations involving both chromosomes 9 and 22 as well as chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 8, or 10. G-banding showed a reciprocal three-way translocation involving 3q21, 5q31, 7q32, 8q24, and 10q22 bands. BCR-ABL fusion signal on der(22 was found in all of the cases by FISH.

  4. Eryptotic Phenotype in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Contribution of Neutrophilic Cathepsin G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rukmini Govekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In pathological conditions with concurrent neutrophilia, modifications of erythrocyte membrane proteins are reported. In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, a myeloproliferative disease wherein neutrophilia is accompanied by enhanced erythrophagocytosis, we report for the first time excessive cleavage of erythrocyte band 3. Distinct fragments of band 3 serve as senescent cell antigens leading to erythrophagocytosis. Using immunoproteomics, we report the identification of immunogenic 43 kDa fragment of band 3 in 68% of CML samples compared to their detection in only 38% of healthy individuals. Thus, excessive fragmentation of band 3 in CML, detected in our study, corroborated with the eryptotic phenotype. We demonstrate the role of neutrophilic cathepsin G, detected as an immunogen on erythrocyte membrane, in band 3 cleavage. Cathepsin G from serum adsorbs to the erythrocyte membrane to mediate cleavage of band 3 and therefore contribute to the eryptotic phenotype in CML.

  5. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Isolated central nervous system relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchs Mary

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This case report highlights the relevance of quantifying the BCR-ABL gene in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with suspected relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia in the central nervous system. Case presentation We report on a female patient with isolated central nervous system relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML during peripheral remission after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The patient showed a progressive cognitive decline as the main symptom. MRI revealed a hydrocephalus and an increase in cell count in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF with around 50% immature blasts in the differential count. A highly elevated BCR-ABL/ ABL ratio was detected in the CSF, whilst the ratio for peripheral blood and bone marrow was not altered. On treatment of the malresorptive hydrocephalus with shunt surgery, the patient showed an initial cognitive improvement, followed by a secondary deterioration. At this time, the cranial MRI showed leukemic infiltration of lateral ventricles walls. Hence, intrathecal administration of cytarabine, methotrexate, and dexamethasone was initiated, which caused a significant decrease of cells in the CSF. Soon after, the patient demonstrated significant cognitive improvement with a good participation in daily activities. At a later time point, after the patient had lost the major molecular response of CML, therapy with dasatinib was initiated. In a further follow-up, the patient was neurologically and hematologically stable. Conclusions In patients with treated CML, the rare case of an isolated CNS blast crisis has to be taken into account if neurological symptoms evolve. The analysis of BCR-ABL in the CSF is a further option for the reliable detection of primary isolated relapse of CML in these patients.

  7. Dasatinib or imatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia : 2-year follow-up from a randomized phase 3 trial (DASISION)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Shah, Neil P.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Baccarani, Michele; Agarwal, Mohan B.; Soledad Undurraga, Maria; Wang, Jianxiang; Kassack Ipina, Juan Julio; Kim, Dong-Wook; Ogura, Michinori; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Junghanss, Christian; Milone, Jorge H.; Nicolini, Franck E.; Robak, Tadeusz; Van Droogenbroeck, Jan; Vellenga, Edo; Bradley-Garelik, M. Brigid; Zhu, Chao; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Dasatinib is a highly potent BCR-ABL inhibitor with established efficacy and safety in imatinib-resistant/-intolerant patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In the phase 3 DASISION trial, patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase (CP) CML were randomized to receive dasatinib 100 mg (n = 259

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Mutant Subclones in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Comparison of Different Methodological Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuner, Sandra; Barna, Agnes; Frommlet, Florian; Czurda, Stefan; Konstantin, Byrgazov; Alikian, Mary; Machova Polakova, Katerina; Sacha, Tomasz; Richter, Johan; Lion, Thomas; Gabriel, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Identification and quantitative monitoring of mutant BCR-ABL1 subclones displaying resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have become important tasks in patients with Ph-positive leukemias. Different technologies have been established for patient screening. Various next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms facilitating sensitive detection and quantitative monitoring of mutations in the ABL1-kinase domain (KD) have been introduced recently, and are expected to become the preferred technology in the future. However, broad clinical implementation of NGS methods has been hampered by the limited accessibility at different centers and the current costs of analysis which may not be regarded as readily affordable for routine diagnostic monitoring. It is therefore of interest to determine whether NGS platforms can be adequately substituted by other methodological approaches. We have tested three different techniques including pyrosequencing, LD (ligation-dependent)-PCR and NGS in a series of peripheral blood specimens from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients carrying single or multiple mutations in the BCR-ABL1 KD. The proliferation kinetics of mutant subclones in serial specimens obtained during the course of TKI-treatment revealed similar profiles via all technical approaches, but individual specimens showed statistically significant differences between NGS and the other methods tested. The observations indicate that different approaches to detection and quantification of mutant subclones may be applicable for the monitoring of clonal kinetics, but careful calibration of each method is required for accurate size assessment of mutant subclones at individual time points.

  9. Expression and significance of Wnt5a gene and NPM1 gene in chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Tuo Wang; Xiang-Lan Zhang; Jian-Yu Situ; Yuan-Ying Huang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To detect Wnt5a gene expression and NPM1 gene in chronic myeloid leukemia bone marrow cells and to explore its relevance and significance.Methods:Sixty cases of chronic myeloid leukemia patients in our hospital were included in the experimental group, taking up 20 cases in the blastic phase, 20 cases in the accelerated phase, and 20 cases in the chronic phase; and 60 cases with benign hematologic disease were included in the control group. Cultured bone marrow cells were detected by RT-PCR methods to analyze the significance of Wnt5a and NPM1 gene expressions.Results:Wnt5a mRNA in the three sub-groups of the experimental group had low semi-quantitative mean values and positive rates compared with the control group. NPM1 mRNA positive rates and median expression levels were higher, and the difference was statistically significant. In the three subgroups of the experimental group, Wnt5a mRNA semi-quantitative mean values and positive rates in the blastic phase and accelerated phase were low, while NPM1 mRNA positive rates and median expression levels were higher; and the difference was statistically significant. Wnt5a and NPM1 expression levels in patients' white blood cell count were associated with bone marrow blast cells; and the difference was statistically significant. However, this was not associated with age, hemoglobin content and platelet count; and the difference was not statistically significant.Conclusion: There is a certain degree of correlation between Wnt5a and NPM1 genes and the occurrence and development of chronic myeloid leukemia. Wnt5a gene may inhibit its occurrence, while NPM1 gene positivity promotes its progression, which may be applied in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia, providing a new way of analyzing prognosis and a theoretical basis for clinical application.

  10. Dynamic Length Changes of Telomeres and Their Nuclear Organization in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samassekou, Oumar [Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, Cancer Care Manitoba, Department of Physiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada)

    2013-08-22

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by the t(9;22) translocation. As in most cancers, short telomeres are one of the features of CML cells, and telomere shortening accentuates as the disease progresses from the chronic phase to the blastic phase. Although most individual telomeres are short, some of them are lengthened, and long individual telomeres occur non-randomly and might be associated with clonal selection. Telomerase is the main mechanism used to maintain telomere lengths, and its activity increases when CML evolves toward advanced stages. ALT might be another mechanism employed by CML cells to sustain the homeostasis of their telomere lengths and this mechanism seems predominant at the early stage of leukemogenesis. Also, telomerase and ALT might jointly act to maintain telomere lengths at the chronic phase, and as CML progresses, telomerase becomes the major mechanism. Finally, CML cells display an altered nuclear organization of their telomeres which is characterized by the presence of high number of telomeric aggregates, a feature of genomic instability, and differential positioning of telomeres. CML represents a good model to study mechanisms responsible for dynamic changes of individual telomere lengths and the remodeling of telomeric nuclear organization throughout cancer progression.

  11. Expansion in vitro and cytotoxicity of dendritic cells from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lei; Xing, Pei-Ni; Wei, Xu-Cang; Wang, Tong; Li, Mei-Sheng; Zhang, Wang-Gang

    2005-04-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the extensive amplification and the cytotoxicity of dendritic cells (DC) derived from chronic myeloid leukemia cells. DC were cultured in two steps: firstly, extensive amplification in primary culture of CD34(+) or mononuclear cells isolated from CML patients' bone marrow and peripheral blood with rhFlt3-L and rhTPO for 7 days; secondly, inducing culture of DC with rhGM-CSF, rhTNF and rhIL-4 for 14 days. A system inducing DC directly were established for comparison. DC were identified by immunophenotype with flow cytometry, chromosome analysis by displaying G banding and electric microscopy analysis. The function of stimulating T cells proliferation and cytotoxicity of CML cells were confirmed through MTT assay. The results showed that after first extensive amplification in primary culture with rhFlt3-L and rhTPO for 7 days, CD34(+) cells had a total cell number with (77 +/- 5) fold expansion, and DC were (39 +/- 8)% of total cell respectively after induction culture of DC with rhGM-CSF, rhTNF and rhIL-4 for 14 days. Both the amplification of cell number and yield of DC were higher than the system without extensively culture (P < 0.01). Such DC could stimulate T cells to proliferate and kill leukemia cells finally. In conclusion, two-step culture method can obviously improve the cell number of DC required, that is better than inducing them directly. DC derived from CML cells induce the generation of anti-leukemia immunization.

  12. Epidemiologic study on survival of chronic myeloid leukemia and Ph(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck E; Mauro, Michael J; Martinelli, Giovanni;

    2009-01-01

    The BCR-ABL T315I mutation represents a major mechanism of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The objectives of this retrospective observational study were to estimate overall and progression-free survival for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic-phase (CP), accelerated-phase (AP......), or blastic-phase (BP) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph)(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with T315I mutation. Medical records of 222 patients from 9 countries were reviewed; data were analyzed using log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard models. Median age at T315I mutation...

  13. Increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activity reduces imatinib uptake and efficacy in chronic myeloid leukemia mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jueqiong; Lu, Liu; Kok, Chung H; Saunders, Verity A; Goyne, Jarrad M; Dang, Phuong; Leclercq, Tamara M; Hughes, Timothy P; White, Deborah L

    2017-02-02

    Imatinib is actively transported by OCT-1 influx transporter, and low OCT-1 activity in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia blood mononuclear cells is significantly associated with poor molecular response to imatinib. Here we report that, in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia mononuclear cells and BCR-ABL1+ cell lines, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (GW1929, rosiglitazone, pioglitazone) significantly decrease OCT-1 activity; conversely, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists (GW9662, T0070907) increase OCT-1 activity. Importantly, these effects can lead to corresponding changes in sensitivity to Bcr-Abl kinase inhibition. Results were confirmed in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-transduced K562 cells. Furthermore, we identified a strong negative correlation between OCT-1 activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma transcriptional activity in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia patients (n=84; preceptor gamma activation has a negative impact on the intracellular uptake of imatinib and consequent Bcr-Abl kinase inhibition. The inter-patient variability of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation likely accounts for the heterogeneity observed in patient OCT-1 activity at diagnosis. Recently, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist pioglitazone was reported to act synergistically with imatinib targeting the residual chronic myeloid leukemia stem cell pool. Our findings suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ligands have differential effects on circulating mononuclear cells compared to stem cells. Since the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation on imatinib uptake in mononuclear cells may counteract the clinical benefit of this activation in stem cells, caution should be applied when combining these therapies, especially in patients with high peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

  14. Growth Arrest Specific 2 Is Up-Regulated in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells and Required for Their Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Haixia Zhou; Yue Ge; Lili Sun; Wenjuan Ma; Jie Wu; Xiuyan Zhang; Xiaohui Hu; Eaves, Connie J; Depei Wu; Yun Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Although the generation of BCR-ABL is the molecular hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the comprehensive molecular mechanisms of the disease remain unclear yet. Growth arrest specific 2 (GAS2) regulates multiple cellular functions including cell cycle, apoptosis and calpain activities. In the present study, we found GAS2 was up-regulated in CML cells including CD34+ progenitor cells compared to their normal counterparts. We utilized RNAi and the expression of dominant negative form o...

  15. Pregnancy and Accelerated Phase of Myeloid Chronic Leukemia Treated with Imatinib: A Case Report from a Developing Country

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic myeloid leukemia is a hematological malignancy caused by expression of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase oncogene, product of the t(9;22) Philadelphia translocation. Accelerated phase of this disease marks the onset of advanced rapidly progressive disease unresponsive to many therapies. Pregnancy limits broad number of therapies on patients because of their potential teratogenic effects. We report the case of a pregnant 34-year-old patient on accelerated phase successively managed b...

  16. Pregnancy and Accelerated Phase of Myeloid Chronic Leukemia Treated with Imatinib: A Case Report from a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngolet, Lydie Ocini; Kocko, Innocent; Elira Dokekias, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic myeloid leukemia is a hematological malignancy caused by expression of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase oncogene, product of the t(9;22) Philadelphia translocation. Accelerated phase of this disease marks the onset of advanced rapidly progressive disease unresponsive to many therapies. Pregnancy limits broad number of therapies on patients because of their potential teratogenic effects. We report the case of a pregnant 34-year-old patient on accelerated phase successively managed by imatinib. She achieved a safe pregnancy and delivered at 39 weeks a healthy baby without congenital abnormalities. Our case is unusual because of the accelerated phase of the disease. Case Presentation. A 34-year-old African female with history of chronic phase of myeloid leukemia on imatinib, lost to follow-up for 4 months, presented to the hematological department for abdominal discomfort. Accelerated phase of chronic myeloid leukemia was diagnosed. Complete hematological response was achieved on high doses of imatinib. At the completion of 39 weeks, she delivered a healthy child without congenital anomalies. Conclusion. Despite its teratogenic and embryotoxic effects, front line imatinib is the only effective, well-tolerated treatment for patient on accelerated phase that can be offered to patients in sub-Saharan countries.

  17. Pregnancy and Accelerated Phase of Myeloid Chronic Leukemia Treated with Imatinib: A Case Report from a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydie Ocini Ngolet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic myeloid leukemia is a hematological malignancy caused by expression of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase oncogene, product of the t(9;22 Philadelphia translocation. Accelerated phase of this disease marks the onset of advanced rapidly progressive disease unresponsive to many therapies. Pregnancy limits broad number of therapies on patients because of their potential teratogenic effects. We report the case of a pregnant 34-year-old patient on accelerated phase successively managed by imatinib. She achieved a safe pregnancy and delivered at 39 weeks a healthy baby without congenital abnormalities. Our case is unusual because of the accelerated phase of the disease. Case Presentation. A 34-year-old African female with history of chronic phase of myeloid leukemia on imatinib, lost to follow-up for 4 months, presented to the hematological department for abdominal discomfort. Accelerated phase of chronic myeloid leukemia was diagnosed. Complete hematological response was achieved on high doses of imatinib. At the completion of 39 weeks, she delivered a healthy child without congenital anomalies. Conclusion. Despite its teratogenic and embryotoxic effects, front line imatinib is the only effective, well-tolerated treatment for patient on accelerated phase that can be offered to patients in sub-Saharan countries.

  18. Planned Pregnancy in a Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patient in Molecular Remission

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    Carolina Pavlovsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Excellent response rates and a good quality of life have been observed since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML treatment. Consequently, some challenges began to appear in CML women in child-bearing age wishing to become pregnant. Currently, many women around the world are in stable major/complete molecular response MMR/CMR (MMR: <0.1% BCR-ABL/ABL and CMR: undetectable BCR-ABL mRNA by RQ-PCR transcript levels on the international scale. The condition of stable MMR/CMR is linked to a long-term virtual absence of progression to the accelerated and blastic phase and to the possibility of stopping the TKI treatment with the maintenance of a condition of CMR in a proportion of cases. Imatinib teratogenic and prescribing information prohibits the use of it during pregnancy. We describe the case of a 36-year-old female patient with CML in chronic phase who stopped imatinib after 2 years in major molecular response (MMR to plan a pregnancy. Molecular monitoring by RQ-PCR was performed quarterly. She achieved a safe pregnancy and delivery maintaining an optimal molecular response throughout the pregnancy. Isolated literature reports have been described, but no formal advice has been described at present time.

  19. Managing inadequate responses to frontline treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: a case-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixby, Dale L

    2013-05-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib are the standard of care for treating patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Compared with interferon-based treatment, the previous standard of care, imatinib is associated with significantly higher cytogenetic response rates and prolonged overall survival. Nilotinib and dasatinib, both newer and more potent TKIs, significantly improve cytogenetic and molecular response rates compared with imatinib. Despite significant advances in CML treatment enabled by the TKIs, a fraction of patients who receive frontline treatment with a TKI demonstrate inadequate response. The reasons for this vary, but in many cases, inadequate response can be attributed to non-adherence to the treatment regimen, intolerance to the drug, intrinsic or acquired resistance to the drug, or a combination of reasons. More often than not, strategies to improve response necessitate a change in treatment plan, either a dose adjustment or a switch to an alternate drug, particularly in the case of drug intolerance or drug resistance. Improved physician-patient communication and patient education are effective strategies to address issues relating to adherence and intolerance. Because inadequate response to TKI treatment correlates with poor long-term outcomes, it is imperative that patients who experience intolerance or who fail to achieve appropriate responses are carefully evaluated so that appropriate treatment modifications can be made to maximize the likelihood of positive long-term outcome.

  20. First-line treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia: dasatinib, nilotinib, or imatinib

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    Rafiyath Shamudheen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI of BCR-ABL, was the standard first-line therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML for almost 10 years. Dasatinib and nilotinib, two newer drugs with higher potency than imatinib against BCR-ABL and activity against most imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutations, have each shown superior efficacy compared with imatinib for first-line treatment of chronic-phase CML in randomized phase 3 trials. With 14 months follow-up time, available data suggest no obvious differences in efficacy between dasatinib and nilotinib. Compared with imatinib, dasatinib is associated with higher rates of pleural effusion and thrombocytopenia, but lower rates of edema, gastrointestinal AEs, musculoskeletal AEs, and rash. Nilotinib is associated with higher rates of dermatologic toxicity, headache, and biochemical abnormalities associated with hepatic and pancreatic toxicity compared with imatinib, but lower rates of edema, gastrointestinal AEs, muscle spasm, and neutropenia. Several studies have shown that poor adherence to imatinib detrimentally affects responses and should be considered in patients with a suboptimal response. The different dosing requirements of dasatinib (once daily with or without food and nilotinib (twice daily with fasting may be an additional factor in selecting frontline agents. This review compares and contrasts the three FDA approved first line TKI agents.

  1. Influence of late treatment on how chronic myeloid leukemia responds to imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Costa Scerni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In Brazil, patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML in the chronic phase were not given first-line imatinib treatment until 2008. Therefore, there was a long period of time between diagnosis and the initiation of imatinib therapy for many patients. This study aims to compare the major molecular remission (MMR rates of early versus late imatinib therapy in chronic phase CML patients. METHODS: Between May 2002 and November 2007, 44 patients with chronic phase CML were treated with second-line imatinib therapy at the Hematology Unit of the Ophir Loyola Hospital (Belém, Pará, Brazil. BCR-ABL transcript levels were measured at approximately six-month intervals using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The early treatment group presented a 60% probability of achieving MMR, while the probability for those patients who received late treatment was 40%. The probability of either not achieving MMR within one year of the initiation of imatinib therapy or losing MMR was higher in patients who received late treatment (79%, compared with patients who received early treatment (21%, odds ratio=5.75, P=0.012. The probability of maintaining MMR at 30 months of treatment was 80% in the early treatment group and 44% in the late treatment group (P=0.0005. CONCLUSIONS: For CML patients in the chronic phase who were treated with second-line imatinib therapy, the probability of achieving and maintaining MMR was higher in patients who received early treatment compared with those patients for whom the time interval between diagnosis and initiation of imatinib therapy was longer than one year.

  2. Chronic FLT3-ITD Signaling in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Is Connected to a Specific Chromatin Signature

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    Pierre Cauchy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is characterized by recurrent mutations that affect the epigenetic regulatory machinery and signaling molecules, leading to a block in hematopoietic differentiation. Constitutive signaling from mutated growth factor receptors is a major driver of leukemic growth, but how aberrant signaling affects the epigenome in AML is less understood. Furthermore, AML cells undergo extensive clonal evolution, and the mutations in signaling genes are often secondary events. To elucidate how chronic growth factor signaling alters the transcriptional network in AML, we performed a system-wide multi-omics study of primary cells from patients suffering from AML with internal tandem duplications in the FLT3 transmembrane domain (FLT3-ITD. This strategy revealed cooperation between the MAP kinase (MAPK inducible transcription factor AP-1 and RUNX1 as a major driver of a common, FLT3-ITD-specific gene expression and chromatin signature, demonstrating a major impact of MAPK signaling pathways in shaping the epigenome of FLT3-ITD AML.

  3. Inverse regulation of bridging integrator 1 and BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trino, Stefania; De Luca, Luciana; Simeon, Vittorio; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Morano, Annalisa; Caivano, Antonella; La Rocca, Francesco; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Bianchino, Gabriella; Grieco, Vitina; Signorino, Elisabetta; Fragasso, Alberto; Bochicchio, Maria Teresa; Venturi, Claudia; Rosti, Gianantonio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Cilloni, Daniela; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis is the major regulator process of tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) functional activities. Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) is a key protein involved in RTK intracellular trafficking. Here, we report, by studying 34 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) at diagnosis, that BIN1 gene is downregulated in CML as compared to healthy controls, suggesting an altered endocytosis of RTKs. Rab interactor 1 (RIN1), an activator of BIN1, displayed a similar behavior. Treatment of 57 patients by tyrosine kinase inhibitors caused, along with BCR-ABL1 inactivation, an increase of BIN1 and RIN1 expression, potentially restoring endocytosis. There was a significant inverse correlation between BIN1-RIN1 and BCR-ABL1 expression. In vitro experiments on both CML and nontumorigenic cell lines treated with Imatinib confirmed these results. In order to provide another proof in favor of BIN1 and RIN1 endocytosis function in CML, we demonstrated that Imatinib induced, in K562 cell line, BIN1-RIN1 upregulation accompanied by a parallel AXL receptor internalization into cytoplasmic compartment. This study shows a novel deregulated mechanism in CML patients, indicating BIN1 and RIN1 as players in the maintenance of the abnormal RTK signaling in this hematological disease.

  4. Anxiolytic Effect of Citrus aurantium L. on Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Flávia Cristina Fernandes; Alves, Mateus Feitosa; Pimenta, Martina Bragante Fernandes; Melo, Silvia Adelaide Linhares; de Almeida, Anna Alice Figueirêdo; Leite, José Roberto; Pordeus, Liana Clébia de Morais; Diniz, Margareth de Fátima Formiga Melo; de Almeida, Reinaldo Nóbrega

    2016-04-01

    The bone marrow aspiration procedure is used in hematological diseases and consists of a painful, invasive procedure causing anxiety-associated symptoms. The present study assessed the effect of Citrus aurantium L. essential oil on the treatment of anxiety, in the moment that precedes the collection of medullary material in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Volunteers from both sexes were divided into groups receiving either the C. aurantium essential oil through inhalation, diazepam (10 mg), or the placebo. The evaluation was performed through psychometric scales [State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)] and physiological measurements (blood pressure and cardiac and respiratory frequency). Inhalation of C. aurantium was associated with a decrease in the STAI-S scores, suggesting an anxiolytic effect. In support of these results, a change in all the physiological measurements was observed in the group exposed to C. aurantium. In the diazepam group, only the diastolic pressure decreased, and no effect was observed in the placebo group. Therefore, the results showed that C. aurantium exhibits an anxiolytic effect and reduces the signs and symptoms associated with anxiety in patients with CML.

  5. The Impact of Variant Philadelphia Chromosome Translocations on the Clinical Course of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyüpoğlu, Damla; Bozkurt, Süreyya; Haznedaroğlu, İbrahim; Büyükaşık, Yahya; Güven, Deniz

    2016-03-05

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is genetically characterized by the presence of the reciprocal translocation t(9;22) with the formation of Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. Sometimes, the Ph translocation is generated by variant rearrangements. The prognostic impact of the variant translocations is still controversial. Among the 180 patients with Ph-positive CML who were treated in Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine Division of Hematology, variant translocations were detected, and retrospectively clinical and prognostic features were described. Also we performed a comprehensive literature review on the prognosis of such variant cases before and after tyrosine kinase inhibitor era. Five patients (2.7%) had variant Ph chromosomes, involved in the rearrangements were chromosomes 2 (2 cases), 11, 14 and 15. Patients were treated with imatinib or dasatinib. All patients reached a stable major molecular response suggesting a prognosis not worse than standard translocation individuals. Our present data were compatible with the data of previous studies indicating no difference in the prognosis between standard and variant translocations in tyrosine kinase inhibitors era of CML.

  6. Philadelphia chromosome detection in chronic myeloid leukemia: Utility of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood culture

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    Man Updesh Singh Sachdeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The conventional cytogenetic approach to demonstrate Philadelphia (Ph chromosome at times does not yield enough number of metaphases or are of suboptimal quality. Further, the rapid molecular tests have completely pushed this simple technique into disrepute. Aims: This study aimed to evaluate usefulness of phytohemagglutinin (PHA-stimulated peripheral blood culture for detection of Ph chromosome in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six patients, including 11 newly diagnosed cases of CML and 45 patients of CML on imatinib therapy showing the presence of Ph chromosome in unstimulated samples, were included in the study. Cytogenetic analysis was done on unstimulated samples, i.e. bone marrow aspirate, 24- and 48-h peripheral blood culture, and compared with PHA-stimulated 72-h peripheral blood culture. Results: The preparations from PHA-stimulated peripheral blood culture samples in all 56 patients yielded high number of good-quality metaphases. All the 11 (100% newly diagnosed patients and 39/45 (87% of the patients on imatinib therapy showed the presence of Ph chromosome in PHA-stimulated samples. Addition of PHA-stimulated 72-h peripheral blood culture preparation can be of use for increasing the diagnostic yield in cases of CML with suboptimal results on conventional cytogenetics from bone marrow aspirate sample.

  7. Intermittent targeted therapies and stochastic evolution in patients affected by chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, N.; Persano Adorno, D.; Valenti, D.; Spagnolo, B.

    2016-05-01

    Front line therapy for the treatment of patients affected by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is based on the administration of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, namely imatinib or, more recently, axitinib. Although imatinib is highly effective and represents an example of a successful molecular targeted therapy, the appearance of resistance is observed in a proportion of patients, especially those in advanced stages. In this work, we investigate the appearance of resistance in patients affected by CML, by modeling the evolutionary dynamics of cancerous cell populations in a simulated patient treated by an intermittent targeted therapy. We simulate, with the Monte Carlo method, the stochastic evolution of initially healthy cells to leukemic clones, due to genetic mutations and changes in their reproductive behavior. We first present the model and its validation with experimental data by considering a continuous therapy. Then, we investigate how fluctuations in the number of leukemic cells affect patient response to the therapy when the drug is administered with an intermittent time scheduling. Here we show that an intermittent therapy (IT) represents a valid choice in patients with high risk of toxicity, despite an associated delay to the complete restoration of healthy cells. Moreover, a suitably tuned IT can reduce the probability of developing resistance.

  8. KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia [KEGG

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PATHWAY: map05221 Entry map05221Pathway Name Acute myeloid leukemia Description Acute...Class Human Diseases; Cancers Pathwaymap map05221Acute myeloid leukemia Disease H00003Acute myeloid leukemia...inkDB DBGET integrated database retrieval system KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia ...

  9. Twin pregnancy in a patient of chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, V; Jijina, Farah; Shrikande, Mitu; Madkaikar, Manisha; Ghosh, K

    2008-10-01

    Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and is now used regularly in chronic myeloid leukaemia therapy in chronic phase with great success. This drug due its very nature of action is suspected to be teratogenic hence the patients are counseled not to get pregnant while on this drug. However in world literature few normal pregnancies have been reported in patients on Imatinib therapy, though no twin pregnancy has been reported on this medication. We report here the birth of normal mono-ovular mono-chorionic twin while the patient is on imatinib during conception and early pregnancy for chronic myeloid leukaemia.

  10. Serum concentrations of nitrite and malondialdehyde as markers of oxidative stress in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Juracy Petrola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by clonal expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells resulting from the (9:22(q34,11 translocation. The tyrosine kinase abl fusion protein,the initial leukemogenic event in chronic myeloid leukemia, is constitutively activated thus inducing the production of reactive oxygen species. Of particular relevance is the fact that an increase in reactive oxygen species can facilitate genomic instability and may contribute to disease progression. OBJETIVE: To evaluate oxidative stress by determining the levels of malondialdehyde and nitrite in chronic myeloid leukemia patients under treatment with 1st and 2nd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors monitored at a referral hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed of 64 male and female adults. Patients were stratified according to treatment. The levels of malondialdehyde and nitrite were determined by spectrophotometry. Statistical differences between groups were observed using the Student t-test and Fisher's exact test. The results are expressed as mean ± standard error of mean. The significance level was set for a p-value < 0.05 in all analyses. RESULTS: The results show significantly higher mean concentrations of nitrite and malondialdehyde in chronic myeloid leukemia patients using second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors compared to patients on imatinib. Conclusion: It follows that chronic myeloid leukemia patients present higher oxidative activity and that the increases in oxidative damage markers can indicate resistance to 1st generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  11. Bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) from unrelated and sibling donors: single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparelli, T; Van Lint, M T; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Barbanti, M; Sacchi, N; Ficai, G; Ghinatti, C; Ferrara, G B; Delfino, L; Pozzi, S; Morabito, A; Zikos, P; Vitale, V; Corvo, R; Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A

    1997-12-01

    This is a report on 60 consecutive patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who received an allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) in this Unit. Donors were HLA-identical siblings (SIB) (n = 36) or unrelated donors (MUD) (n = 24) matched by serology for HLA A and B and by molecular biology for HLA DR. All patients were prepared with cyclophosphamide 120 mg/kg and fractionated total body irradiation 10-12 Gy. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporin A (CsA) starting on day -7 and short-course methotrexate. Bone marrow was unmanipulated in all cases. Cytomegalovirus prophylaxis consisted of acyclovir for SIBs and foscarnet for MUDs. When compared to SIB transplants, MUD patients were younger (29 vs 36 years; P = 0.002), had younger donors (31 vs 39; P = 0.001), had a longer interval between diagnosis and BMT (1459 vs 263 days; P < 0.001) and received a smaller number of nucleated cells at transplant (3.3 vs 4.4 x 10(8)/kg; P = 0.003). More MUDs had advanced disease (50 vs 17%, P = 0.005). The median day to 0.5 x 10(9)/l neutrophils was similar in both groups (18 days for SIBs vs 17 days for MUDs; P = 0.06); the median platelet count on days +30, +50, +100 was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in SIB than in MUD patients (122 vs 38, 113 vs 50 and 97 vs 45 x 10(9)/l, respectively). Acute GVHD was scored as absent-mild, moderate, or severe, in 36, 58 and 6% of SIBs vs 25, 42 and 33% in MUD patients (P = 0.01). Chronic GVHD was comparable (P = 0.1). The actuarial risk of CMV antigenemia at 1 year was 60% in both groups. There were six deaths in SIB patients (two leukemia, two infections, one GVHD, one pneumonitis) and four deaths in MUD patients (three acute GVHD and one infection). Fifty patients survive with a median follow-up of 656 days for SIBs and 485 for MUDs. The actuarial 3-year transplant-related mortality is 12% in SIBs and 17% in MUDs (P = 0.5); the actuarial relapse is 18% in SIBs vs 6% in MUDs (P = 0.4) and 3-year survival 78% in SIBs vs 82% in MUDs (P

  12. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Chronic myeloid leukemia with pregnancy: Successful management of pregnancy and delivery with hydroxyurea and imatinib continued till delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concomitant occurrence of pregnancy and chronic myeloid leukemia is uncommon. We describe the successful management of a 30-year-old G3 P0, A2 woman who was diagnosed to have chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML in the third trimester of her pregnancy with intra-uterine growth retardation and oligohydroamnios. She was started on hydroxyurea and imatinib, and was continued till delivery and beyond. The use of imatinib did not have any adverse effects on the fetus, except for low birth weight and low APGAR at birth, but the later progress of the child was normal. We conclude that imatinib and hydroxyurea can be continued even at the third trimester in a pregnant lady with CML, if necessary.

  14. Chronic myeloid leukemia with pregnancy: Successful management of pregnancy and delivery with hydroxyurea and imatinib continued till delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Usha; Solanki, Sohan Lal; Yadav, Rupesh

    2013-01-01

    The concomitant occurrence of pregnancy and chronic myeloid leukemia is uncommon. We describe the successful management of a 30-year-old G3 P0, A2 woman who was diagnosed to have chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in the third trimester of her pregnancy with intra-uterine growth retardation and oligohydroamnios. She was started on hydroxyurea and imatinib, and was continued till delivery and beyond. The use of imatinib did not have any adverse effects on the fetus, except for low birth weight and low APGAR at birth, but the later progress of the child was normal. We conclude that imatinib and hydroxyurea can be continued even at the third trimester in a pregnant lady with CML, if necessary.

  15. Regulatory network analysis of microRNAs and genes in imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ismael; Gharbi, Hanen; Hassine, Islem Ben; Bouguerra, Ghada; Douzi, Kais; Teber, Mouheb; Abbes, Salem; Menif, Samia

    2016-09-16

    Targeted therapy in the form of selective breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR/ABL) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (imatinib mesylate) has successfully been introduced in the treatment of the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, acquired resistance against imatinib mesylate (IM) has been reported in nearly half of patients and has been recognized as major issue in clinical practice. Multiple resistance genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) are thought to be involved in the IM resistance process. These resistance genes and miRNAs tend to interact with each other through a regulatory network. Therefore, it is crucial to study the impact of these interactions in the IM resistance process. The present study focused on miRNA and gene network analysis in order to elucidate the role of interacting elements and to understand their functional contribution in therapeutic failure. Unlike previous studies which were centered only on genes or miRNAs, the prime focus of the present study was on relationships. To this end, three regulatory networks including differentially expressed, related, and global networks were constructed and analyzed in search of similarities and differences. Regulatory associations between miRNAs and their target genes, transcription factors and miRNAs, as well as miRNAs and their host genes were also macroscopically investigated. Certain key pathways in the three networks, especially in the differentially expressed network, were featured. The differentially expressed network emerged as a fault map of IM-resistant CML. Theoretically, the IM resistance process could be prevented by correcting the included errors. The present network-based approach to study resistance miRNAs and genes might help in understanding the molecular mechanisms of IM resistance in CML as well as in the improvement of CML therapy.

  16. THERAPY-RELATED MYELOID NEOPLASMS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA AND WALDENSTROM MICROGLOBULINEMIA

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    Alessandra Tedeschi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Secondary myelodisplasia (MDS and acute myeloide leukaemia (AML are frequent long term complications in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL and Waldesntrom Macroglobulinemia (WM patients. Although disease-related immune-suppression plays a crucial role in leukemogenesis there is great concern that therapy may further increase the risk of developing these devastating complications.

    Nucleoside analogs (NA and alkilator agents are considered appropriate agents in the treatment of both CLL and WM patients. Prolonged immunosuppression related to nucleoside analogs therapy and the incorporation of these agents or their metabolites into DNA, with potentially mutagenic action, leads to speculation that their therapeutic use might be responsible for an increased incidence of second cancer especially when combined with other DNA damaging agents like alkylators. In this review the published studies considering the occurrence of secondary MDS and AML in CLL and WM patients are reported and the potential role of chemotherapeutic agents in leukemogenesis is discussed.

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC Regulate Activation of Granulocyte-Like Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (G-MDSC in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

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    Cesarina Giallongo

    Full Text Available It is well known that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have a role in promotion of tumor growth, survival and drug-resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Recent reports indicated that a subpopulation of myeloid cells, defined as granulocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC is increased in these patients. So far, the role of MSC in MDSC expansion and activation into the BM microenvironment remains unexplored. To address this question, here we use a specific experimental model in vitro, co-culturing MSC with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC from normal individuals, in order to generate MSC-educated G-MDSC. Although MSC of healthy donors (HD and CML patients were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability on autologous T lymphocytes. In addition, compared with HD-MSC, CML-MSC over-expressed some immunomodulatory factors including TGFβ, IL6 and IL10, that could be involved in MDSC activation. CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC expressed higher levels of ARG1, TNFα, IL1β, COX2 and IL6 than G-MDSC isolated from co-culture with HD-MSC. Our data provide evidence that CML-MSC may play a critical role in tumor microenvironment by orchestrating G-MDSC activation and regulating T lymphocytes-mediated leukemia surveillance, thus contributing to CML immune escape.

  18. Combination of pegylated IFN-α2b with imatinib increases molecular response rates in patients with low- or intermediate-risk chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Markevärn, Berit;

    2011-01-01

    Biologic and clinical observations suggest that combining imatinib with IFN-a may improve treatment outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We randomized newly diagnosed chronic-phase CML patients with a low or intermediate Sokal risk score and in imatinib-induced complete hematologic remission...

  19. Combination of pegylated IFN-α2b with imatinib increases molecular response rates in patients with low- or intermediate-risk chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsson, Bengt; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Markevärn, Berit;

    2011-01-01

    Biologic and clinical observations suggest that combining imatinib with IFN-α may improve treatment outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We randomized newly diagnosed chronic-phase CML patients with a low or intermediate Sokal risk score and in imatinib-induced complete hematologic remission...

  20. A simple strategy for breakpoint fragment determination in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, A M; Shaker, H M; GadAllah, F H; Hamza, M R; Mansour, O; El Hattab, O H; Moussa, H S

    2000-10-15

    Molecular characterization is considered a part of the routine work-up of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cases. Southern blot analysis using the universal BCR (UBCR) probe on BglII-digested DNA samples is the most commonly used technique, while employing the human 3' bcr probe (PR-1) is usually considered a complementary tool. In this study, we tried to develop a simple and economic strategy for molecular characterization of CML using the 3' probe as it has been shown to be the one capable of locating the breakpoint site. Seventy-eight cases of CML were studied. Molecular analysis was performed using the Southern blot technique. DNA was digested with Bam HI, BglII, EcoRI, and XbaI. Hybridization was performed using the human 3' bcr (PR-1) probe. BamHI and BglII could differentiate fragment 1 (F1) showing rearrangement (R) with Bam HI and germline configuration (G) with BglII; F2/3 showing R with both, and F4 showing R with BamHI and G with BglII. F2/3 cases were further divided by HindIII enzyme into F2 showing (G) and F3 showing (R). Fragment 0 showed G with both, but R with EcoRI and/or XbaI, while 3' deletion gave G with all four enzymes. Our results showed a relative incidence of 6.4% for F0, 20.5% for F1, 32.1% for F2, 19.2% for F3, 15.4% for F4, and 6.4% for 3' deletion. Sixty cases were evaluated clinically and hematologically and were followed up for disease evolution and survival. They included 32 cases in early chronic phase, 24 in late chronic phase, two in acceleration, and two in blastic crisis. No significant correlation was encountered between the breakpoint site and any of the clinical and hematological data except those patients with 3' deletion who showed a very short survival. The study emphasizes Southern blotting as the method of choice for molecular characterization of CML and offers a simple and economic strategy for diagnosis and determination of breakpoint fragment.

  1. An uneventful pregnancy and delivery, in a case with chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The concomitant occurrence of pregnancy and chronic myelogenous leukemia is uncommon. We describe the successful management of a 24-year-old woman in the first trimester of her pregnancy with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase, who was on treatment with imatinib, which was stopped by 10 th week of pregnancy. Until, she completed full term of pregnancy she was on hydroxyurea. The use of imatinib did not have adverse effects on the fetus. The patient had a normal vaginal de...

  2. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Molecular measurement of BCR-ABL transcript variations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients in cytogenetic remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Juliana

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The monitoring of BCR-ABL transcript levels by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR has become important to assess minimal residual disease (MRD and standard of care in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. In this study, we performed a prospective, sequential analysis using RT-qPCR monitoring of BCR-ABL gene rearrangements in blood samples from 91 CML patients in chronic phase (CP who achieved complete cytogenetic remission (CCyR and major molecular remission (MMR throughout imatinib treatment. Methods The absolute level of BCR-ABL transcript from peripheral blood was serially measured every 4 to 12 weeks by RT-qPCR. Only level variations > 0.5%, according to the international scale, was considered positive. Sequential cytogenetic analysis was also performed in bone marrow samples from all patients using standard protocols. Results Based on sequential analysis of BCR-ABL transcripts, the 91 patients were divided into three categories: (A 57 (62.6% had no variation on sequential analysis; (B 30 (32.9% had a single positive variation result obtained in a single sample; and (C 4 (4.39% had variations of BCR-ABL transcripts in at least two consecutive samples. Of the 34 patients who had elevated levels of transcripts (group B and C, 19 (55.8% had a BCR-ABL/BCR ratio, 13 (38.2% patients had a 1% to 10% increase and 2 patients had a >10% increase of RT-qPCR. The last two patients had lost a CCyR, and none of them showed mutations in the ABL gene. Transient cytogenetic alterations in Ph-negative cells were observed in five (5.5% patients, and none of whom lost CCyR. Conclusions Despite an increase levels of BCR-ABL/BCR ratio variations by RT-qPCR, the majority of CML patients with MMR remained in CCyR. Thus, such single variations should neither be considered predictive of subsequent failure and nor an indication for altering imatinib dose or switching to second generation therapy. Changing of

  4. [Role of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Resistance of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors -Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Wan, Qian; Fang, Li-Jun; Li, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a disease originated from malignant hematopoietic stem cell disorder. In CML, mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) have been changed in the bone marrow microenvironment, which can protect the leukemia cells from apoptosis induced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and lead to the resistance to TKI by the secretion of soluble factors, involvement in cell-cell adhesion, and so on. This review mainly focuses on the changes of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in CML, as well as the role and mechanism of MSC in the CML resistance of TKI. The concrete probrems dicussing in this review are role of MSC in bone marrow microenviroment, characteristics of MSC in CML, the related mechanisms of MSC in drug resistance and so on.

  5. Pilot study of Bortezomib for Patients with Imatinib-Refractory Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic or Accelerated Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fabio P S; Kantarjian, Hagop; McConkey, David; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stefan; Borthakur, Gautam; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Wright, John; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background Proteasome inhibitors are anticancer compounds that disrupt the proteolytic activity of the proteasome and lead to tumor cell growth arrest and apoptosis. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor that is currently approved for use in multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. It induces apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells in vitro, but the activity of bortezomib in patients with imatinib-resistant CML is unknown. Methods We conducted a pilot trial to evaluate the activity of single agent bortezomib in CML. Seven patients with imatinib-refractory CML were treated with bortezomib at a dose of 1.5 mg/m2 on days 1, 4, 8 and 11 every 3 weeks. Results The median number of cycles received was 2. No patient had a hematologic or cytogenetic response. Three patients had a temporary decrease in basophil counts associated with therapy with bortezomib. Six patients developed grade 3-4 nonhematological toxicities. Conclusion Bortezomib had minimal efficacy and considerable toxicity in patients with imatinib-refractory CML. Further studies should focus on alternative approaches to employ proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of CML, such as in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or as a strategy to eradicate leukemic stem cells. PMID:21816374

  6. Variant Philadelphia translocations with different breakpoints in six chronic myeloid leukemia patients

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    Dilhan Kuru

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Philadelphia (Ph chromosome, consisting of the t(9;22(q34;q11 translocation, is observed in ~90% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Variant Ph translocations are observed in 5%-10% of CML patients. In variant translocations 3 and possibly more chromosomes are involved. Herein we report 6 CML patients with variant Ph translocations.Materials and Methods: Bone marrow samples were examined using conventional cytogenetic meth ods. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with whole-chromosome paints and BCR-ABL 1D probes were used to confirm and/or complement the findings, and identify rearrangements beyond the resolution of conventional cytogenetic methods. Results: Variant Ph translocations in the 6 patients were as follows: t(7;22(p22;q11, t(9;22;15(q34;q11;q22, t(15;22(p11;q11, t(1;9;22;3(q24;q34;q11;q21, t(12;22(p13;q11, and t(4;8;9;22(q11;q13;q34;q11.Conclusion: Among the patients, 3 had simple and 3 had complex variant Ph translocations. Two of the presented cases had variant Ph chromosomes not previously described, 1 of which had a new complex Ph translocation involving chromosomes 1, 3, 9, 22, and t(1;9;22;3(q24;q34;q11;q21 apart from a clone with a classical Ph, and the other case had variant Ph translocation with chromosomes 4, 8, 9, and 22, and t(4;8;9;22(q11;q13;q34;q11 full complex translocation. Number of studies reported that some patients with variant Ph translocation were poor responders to imatinib. All of our patients with variant Ph translocations had suboptimal responses to imatinib, denoting a poor prognosis also. Variant Ph translocations may be important as they are associated with prognosis and therapy for CML patients.

  7. Double minute chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia are associated with micronuclei, MYC or MLL amplification, and complex karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yang O; Tang, Guilin; Talwalkar, Sameer S; Khoury, Joseph D; Ohanian, Maro; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Abruzzo, Lynne V

    2016-01-01

    Double minute chromosomes (dmin) are small, paired chromatin bodies that lack a centromere and represent a form of extrachromosomal gene amplification. Dmin are rare in myeloid neoplasms and are generally associated with a poor prognosis. Most studies of dmin in myeloid neoplasms are case reports or small series. In the current study, we present the clinicopathologic and cytogenetic features of 22 patients with myeloid neoplasms harboring dmin. These neoplasms included acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 18), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 3), and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) (n = 1). The AML cases consisted of AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (n = 13) and therapy-related AML (n = 5). Dmin were detected in initial pre-therapy samples in 14 patients with AML or CMML; they were acquired during the disease course in 8 patients who had AML or MDS. The presence of dmin was associated with micronuclei (18/18; 100%), complex karyotype (17/22; 77.3%), and amplification of MYC (12/16; 75%) or MLL (4/16; 25%). Immunohistochemical staining for MYC performed on bone marrow core biopsy or clot sections revealed increased MYC protein in all 19 cases tested. Except for one patient, most patients failed to respond to risk-adapted chemotherapies. At last follow up, all patients had died of disease after a median of 5 months following dmin detection. In conclusion, dmin in myeloid neoplasms commonly harbor MYC or MLL gene amplification and manifest as micronuclei within leukemic blasts. Dmin are often associated with myelodysplasia or therapy-related disease, and complex karyotypes.

  8. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym AML - Acute... myeloblastic leukaemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemias; Acute... Myelocytic Leukemia; Acute Myelocytic Leukemias; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myelogenous Leukemias; Acute... granulocytic leukaemia; Acute myeloblastic leukemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia - category; Acute... myeloid leukaemia, disease; Acute myeloid leukemia; Acute myelo

  10. An uneventful pregnancy and delivery, in a case with chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jovita; Ramesh, Anita; Devadasan, Lalitha; Palaniappan; Martin, Jude J

    2011-04-01

    The concomitant occurrence of pregnancy and chronic myelogenous leukemia is uncommon. We describe the successful management of a 24-year-old woman in the first trimester of her pregnancy with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in the chronic phase, who was on treatment with imatinib, which was stopped by 10(th) week of pregnancy. Until, she completed full term of pregnancy she was on hydroxyurea. The use of imatinib did not have adverse effects on the fetus. The patient had a normal vaginal delivery and gave birth to a healthy 2500 g girl at 37 weeks of gestation. We conclude that imatinib in the first trimester of pregnant lady with CML, though has particular concern regarding the potential teratogenic and other adverse effects, has shown evidences of safe conception, pregnancy and delivery in ladies with CML.

  11. An uneventful pregnancy and delivery, in a case with chronic myeloid leukemia on imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovita Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concomitant occurrence of pregnancy and chronic myelogenous leukemia is uncommon. We describe the successful management of a 24-year-old woman in the first trimester of her pregnancy with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML in the chronic phase, who was on treatment with imatinib, which was stopped by 10 th week of pregnancy. Until, she completed full term of pregnancy she was on hydroxyurea. The use of imatinib did not have adverse effects on the fetus. The patient had a normal vaginal delivery and gave birth to a healthy 2500 g girl at 37 weeks of gestation. We conclude that imatinib in the first trimester of pregnant lady with CML, though has particular concern regarding the potential teratogenic and other adverse effects, has shown evidences of safe conception, pregnancy and delivery in ladies with CML.

  12. Randomized study on hydroxyurea alone versus hydroxyurea combined with low-dose interferon-alpha 2b for chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin-Nelemans, JC; Delannoy, A; Louwagie, A; Le Cessie, S; Hermans, J; van der Burgh, JF; Hagemeijer, AM; Van den Berghe, H

    1998-01-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) is considered the standard therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients not suitable for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. From 1987 through 1992, 195 patients in the Benelux with recent untreated CML were randomized between low-dose IFN-alpha 2b (3 MIU, 5 day

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  14. Isolation of Salmonella enterica serotype Worthington from a splenic abscess in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia

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    Ghadage D.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic abscesses are caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus and bacteria belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. We report a case of splenic abscess caused by an unusual serotype of Salmonella. A 55 year old man was admitted with complaints of fever and abdominal pain. On the basis of clinical findings and laboratory reports, a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia was made. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a single large cystic lesion in the spleen. Percutaneous drainage of the abscess was carried out. Salmonella enterica serotype Worthington was isolated from a pus sample taken from the abscess. The isolate was resistant to ampicillin, gentamicin, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol and tetracycline, and sensitive to amikacin and norfloxacin. Serotype Worthington is an emerging pathogen. This is the first report of isolation of this serotype from a splenic abscess. In seriously ill patients, such infections should be treated with a combination of antibiotics to circumvent problems with multidrug resistance.

  15. Imatinib-induced decompensated heart failure in an elderly patient with chronic myeloid leukemia: case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Hong Ran; Ran Zhang; Xue-Chun Lu; Bo Yang; Hui Fan; Hong-Li Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Because it is safe and well tolerated, imatinib is a standard first-line therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Although there have been sporadic reports of imatinib-induced cardiotoxicity, including left ventricle (LV) dysfunction and heart failure, the evidence for it is contradictory. Here, we reported a case of an 88-year-old male patient with CML developed decompensated heart failure following imatinib therapy. Four days after the initiation of imatinib, the patient developed orthopnea, edema and a pleural effusion accompanied by abdominal distension, nausea and vomiting. The chest X-ray film showed an enlarged cardiac profile. The echocardiogram demonstrated a decreased LV ejection fraction and enlarged left-side cardiac chambers. B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations were markedly increased. The patient recovered soon after the withdrawal of imatinib and introduction of comprehensive therapy for heart failure. Imatinib-induced cardiotoxicity in elderly patients is a potentially serious complication that merits further evaluation.

  16. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH for BCR/ABL in chronic myeloid leukemia after bone marrow transplantation

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    Maria de Lourdes Lopes Ferrari Chauffaille

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Identification of Philadelphia chromosome or BCR/ABL gene rearrangement in chronic myeloid leukemia is important at diagnosis as well as after treatment. OBJECTIVE: To compare the results of karyotyping using fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH upon diagnosis and 1 year after bone marrow transplantation in 12 patients. TYPE OF STUDY: Diagnostic test and residual disease detection. SETTING: Hematology and Hemotherapy Department, Federal University of São Paulo/Escola Paulista de Medicina, São Paulo, Brazil. SAMPLE: 12 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia at diagnosis and 1 year after bone marrow transplantation. DIAGNOSTIC TEST: Karyotyping was done in the usual way and the BCR/ABL gene-specific probe was used for FISH. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Disease at diagnosis and residual. RESULTS: At diagnosis, 10 patients presented t(9;22(q34.1;q11 as well as positive FISH. Two cases did not have metaphases but FISH was positive. After bone marrow transplantation, 8 patients presented normal karyotype, 1 had persistence of identifiable Philadelphia chromosome and 3 had no metaphases. Two cases showed complete chimera and 2 had donor and host cells simultaneously. FISH was possible in all cases after bone marrow transplantation and confirmed the persistence of identifiable Philadelphia chromosome clone in one patient, and identified another that did not present metaphases for analysis. Cases that showed mixed chimera in karyotype were negative for BCR/ABL by FISH. CONCLUSION: The applicability of FISH is clear, particularly for residual disease detection. Classical and molecular cytogenetics are complementary methods.

  17. Lack of Association of Multidrug Resistance Gene-1 Polymorphisms with Treatment Outcome in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients Treated with Imatinib

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    Yaya Kassogue

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the impressive results obtained with imatinib, inadequate response or resistance are observed in certain patients. It is known that imatinib is a substrate of a multidrug resistance gene (MDR1. Thus, interindividual genetic differences linked to single nucleotide polymorphisms in MDR1 may influence the metabolism of imatinib. The present study has aimed to examine the impact of MDR1 polymorphisms on the hematologic and cytogenetic responses in 70 chronic myeloid leukemia patients who received imatinib. Methods: We used a polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism to identify different profiles of 1236C>T, 2677G>T and 3435C>T in MDR1. Results: The distribution of the three SNPs in responders and poor responders did not show any particular trend (P>0.05. The T allele was slightly higher in responders, but not significantly regardless of the type of SNP (40.3% vs. 33.8% for 1236C>T; 25% vs. 14.7% for 2677G>T and 33.3% vs. 22% for 3435C>T. The dominant model showed a similar trend (P>0.05. Diplotypes composed by the T allele in different exons were frequent in responders. Haplotype analysis showed that 1236C-2677G-3435C was slightly higher in poor responders (60.02% compared to responders (50.42%. However, 1236T-2677T-3435T was frequent in responders (16.98% compared to poor responders (13.1%. Overall, none of the haplotypes were associated with IM response in our cohort (global haplotype association test, P=0.39. Conclusion: The identification of 1236C>T, 2677G>T and 3435C>T polymorphisms may not be advantageous to predict imatinib response for our chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

  18. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are increased and exert immunosuppressive activity together with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

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    Cesarina Giallongo

    Full Text Available Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell population, including myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, able to inhibit T cells activity. We identified a significantly expanded MDSCs population in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients at diagnosis that decreased to normal levels after imatinib therapy. In addition, expression of arginase 1 (Arg1 that depletes microenvironment of arginine, an essential aminoacid for T cell function, resulted in an increase in patients at diagnosis. Purified CML CD11b+CD33+CD14-HLADR- cells markedly suppressed normal donor T cell proliferation in vitro. Comparing CML Gr-MDSCs to autologous polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs we observed a higher Arg1 expression and activity in PMNs, together with an inhibitory effect on T cells in vitro. Our data indicate that CML cells create an immuno-tolerant environment associated to MDSCs expansion with immunosuppressive capacity mediated by Arg1. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time also an immunosuppressive activity of CML PMNs, suggesting a strong potential immune escape mechanism created by CML cells, which control the anti-tumor reactive T cells. MDSCs should be monitored in imatinib discontinuation trials to understand their importance in relapsing patients.

  20. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. A phase I trial of the aurora kinase inhibitor, ENMD-2076, in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Karen W L; Chen, Hsiao-Wei T; Hedley, David W; Chow, Sue; Brandwein, Joseph; Schuh, Andre C; Schimmer, Aaron D; Gupta, Vikas; Sanfelice, Deborah; Johnson, Tara; Le, Lisa W; Arnott, Jamie; Bray, Mark R; Sidor, Carolyn; Minden, Mark D

    2016-10-01

    ENMD-2076 is a novel, orally-active molecule that inhibits Aurora A kinase, as well as c-Kit, FLT3 and VEGFR2. A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and toxicities of ENMD-2076 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Patients received escalating doses of ENMD-2076 administered orally daily [225 mg (n = 7), 375 mg (n = 6), 325 mg (n = 9), or 275 mg (n = 5)]. Twenty-seven patients were treated (26 AML; 1 CMML-2). The most common non-hematological toxicities of any grade, regardless of association with drug, were fatigue, diarrhea, dysphonia, dyspnea, hypertension, constipation, and abdominal pain. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) consisted of grade 3 fatigue, grade 3 typhilitis, grade 3 syncope and grade 3 QTc prolongation). Of the 16 evaluable patients, one patient achieved a complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), three experienced a morphologic leukemia-free state (MLFS) with a major hematologic improvement in platelets (HI-P), and 5 other patients had a reduction in marrow blast percentage (i.e. 11-65 %). The RP2D in this patient population is 225 mg orally once daily.

  2. In vitro effects of imatinib on CD34(+) cells of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the megakaryocytic crisis phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fankai; Zeng, Wen; Huang, Lifang; Qin, Shuang; Miao, Ningning; Sun, Hanying; Li, Chunrui

    2014-03-01

    Imatinib is a tailored drug for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and has substantial activity and a favorable safety profile when used as a single agent in patients with CML in myeloid blast crisis. The megakaryocytic blast crisis in CML occurs rarely and carries a poor prognosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of imatinib on cluster of differentiation (CD)34(+) cells from patients with CML in the megakaryocytic crisis phase. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs) were isolated from patients with CML in the megakaryocytic crisis phase. CD34(+) cells were selected from BMNCs by positive immunomagnetic column separation. Imatinib significantly induced G1 arrest, reduced the phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and retinoblastoma proteins and inhibited the proliferation of CD34(+) cells from patients with CML in the megakaryocytic crisis phase. Annexin V/propidium iodide and caspase-3 activity showed that imatinib induced apoptosis. Western blot analysis and protein tyrosine kinase activity assays showed that imatinib inhibited BCR-ABL protein tyrosine kinase activity. The in vitro data thus markedly indicate a potential clinical application of imatinib for patients with CML in the megakaryocytic crisis phase.

  3. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Long noncoding RNA HULC promotes cell proliferation by regulating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yinghao; Li, Yan; Chai, Xiao; Kang, Qian; Zhao, Peng; Xiong, Jie; Wang, Jishi

    2017-04-05

    Aberrant expression of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HULC is associated with various human cancers. However, the role of HULC in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. In this study, we found that HULC was remarkably overexpressed in both leukemia cell lines and primary hematopoietic cells derived from CML patients. The increase in HULC expression was positively correlated with clinical stages in CML. Moreover, the knockdown of HULC significantly inhibited CML cell proliferation and induced apoptosis by repressing c-Myc and Bcl-2. Furthermore, inhibition of HULC enhanced imatinib-induced apoptosis of CML cells. Further experiments demonstrated that HULC silencing markedly suppressed the phosphorylation of PI3K and AKT, indicating that enhancement of imatinib-induced apoptosis by HULC inhibition is related with the reduction of c-Myc expression and inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway activity. Furthermore, HULC could modulate c-Myc and Bcl-2 by miR-200a as an endogenous sponge. Taken together, these results reveal that HULC promotes oncogenesis in CML and suggest a potential strategy for the CML treatment.

  5. Two successful pregnancies in a woman with chronic myeloid leukemia exposed to nilotinib during the first trimester of her second pregnancy: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpa Mariana

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The occurrence of chronic myeloid leukemia in pregnancy is rare and its management poses a clinical challenge for physicians treating these patients. We report a 30-year-old woman with chronic myeloid leukemia who became pregnant twice successfully. Philadelphia-positive CML in its chronic phase was diagnosed at 16 weeks of her first gestation. At that time, she received no treatment throughout her pregnancy. At 38 weeks of gestation, a normal infant was delivered by cesarean section. At six weeks postpartum, the patient underwent imatinib mesylate therapy but she could not tolerate the treatment. The treatment was then changed to nilotinib at 400 mg orally b.i.d. Two years later, she became pregnant again while she was on nilotinib 200 mg b.i.d. The unplanned pregnancy was identified during her 7.4 weeks of gestation. Because the patient elected to continue her pregnancy, nilotinib was stopped immediately, and no further treatment was given until delivery. Neither obstetrical complications nor structural malformations in neonates in both pregnancies were observed. Both babies' growth and development have been normal. Although this experience is limited to a single patient, the success of this patient demonstrates that the management of chronic myeloid leukemia in pregnant women may be individualized based on the relative risks and benefits of the patient and fetus.

  6. Two successful pregnancies in a woman with chronic myeloid leukemia exposed to nilotinib during the first trimester of her second pregnancy: case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchon, Monika; Sanabani, Sabri S; Bendit, Israel; Santos, Fernanda Maria; Serpa, Mariana; Dorliac-Llacer, Pedro Enrique

    2009-10-06

    The occurrence of chronic myeloid leukemia in pregnancy is rare and its management poses a clinical challenge for physicians treating these patients. We report a 30-year-old woman with chronic myeloid leukemia who became pregnant twice successfully. Philadelphia-positive CML in its chronic phase was diagnosed at 16 weeks of her first gestation. At that time, she received no treatment throughout her pregnancy. At 38 weeks of gestation, a normal infant was delivered by cesarean section. At six weeks postpartum, the patient underwent imatinib mesylate therapy but she could not tolerate the treatment. The treatment was then changed to nilotinib at 400 mg orally b.i.d. Two years later, she became pregnant again while she was on nilotinib 200 mg b.i.d. The unplanned pregnancy was identified during her 7.4 weeks of gestation. Because the patient elected to continue her pregnancy, nilotinib was stopped immediately, and no further treatment was given until delivery. Neither obstetrical complications nor structural malformations in neonates in both pregnancies were observed. Both babies' growth and development have been normal. Although this experience is limited to a single patient, the success of this patient demonstrates that the management of chronic myeloid leukemia in pregnant women may be individualized based on the relative risks and benefits of the patient and fetus.

  7. Accelerated phase chronic myeloid leukemia: evaluation of clinical criteria as predictors of survival, major cytogenetic response and progression to blast phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Fiorini Furtado

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Published criteria defining the accelerated phase in chronic myeloid leukemia are heterogeneous and little is known about predictors of poor outcome.METHODS: This is a retrospective study of 139 subjects in the accelerated phase of chronic myeloid leukemia treated with imatinib at a single center in Brazil. The objective was to identify risk factors for survival, major cytogenetic response and progression to blast phase in this population. The factors analyzed were: blasts 10-29%, basophils ≥ 20%, platelets > 1 × 106/µL or 1 × 105/µL in the peripheral blood, as well as clonal evolution, splenomegaly, hemoglobin 12 months (p-value = 0.030.CONCLUSION: These data indicate that patients with the above risk factors have a worse prognosis. This information can guide the therapy to be used.

  8. Adherence to treatment with imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia: a study of the first decade of responses obtained at a Brazilian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Roosevelt Campos dos Reis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: The aim of this study was to identify the reasons for failure in adherence to imatinib mesylate treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 100 non-electronic records of patients with Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia treated with imatinib mesylate. The study period was from January 2001 to January2011. Data were analyzed by Chi-Square and Correspondence analysis using the Statistical Analysis System software package. Results: At the beginning of treatment 41% of patients were in advanced stages of the disease. The unavailability of the drug (44.8% and myelotoxicity (25.7% were the most frequent reasons for interruption. The adherence rate was 95% induced complete cytogenetic response, major cytogenetic response and major molecular response. Conclusion: The population of this study obtained lower-than-expected therapeutic responses compared to other studies.

  9. Dose-finding study of imatinib in combination with intravenous cytarabine: feasibility in newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deenik, Wendy; van der Holt, Bronno; Verhoef, Gregor E G; Smit, Willem M; Kersten, Marie J; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Verdonck, Leo F; Ferrant, Augustin; Schattenberg, Anton V M B; Janssen, Jeroen J W M; Sonneveld, Pieter; van Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Wittebol, Shulamit; Willemze, Roelof; Wijermans, Pierre W; Westveer, Petra H M; Beverloo, H Berna; Valk, Peter; Löwenberg, Bob; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2008-03-01

    The HOVON cooperative study group performed a feasibility study of escalated imatinib and intravenous cytarabine in 165 patients with early chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Patients received 2 cycles of intravenous cytarabine (200 mg/m(2) or 1000 mg/m(2) days 1-7) in conjunction with imatinib (200 mg, 400 mg, 600 mg, or 800 mg), according to predefined, successive dose levels. All dose levels proved feasible. Seven dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were observed in 302 cycles of chemotherapy, which were caused by streptococcal bacteremia in 5 cases. Intermediate-dose cytarabine (1000 mg/m(2)) prolonged time to neutrophil recovery and platelet recovery compared with a standard dose (200 mg/m(2)). High-dose imatinib (600 mg or 800 mg) extended the time to platelet recovery compared with a standard dose (400 mg). More infectious complications common toxicity criteria (CTC) grade 3 or 4 were observed after intermediate-dose cytarabine compared with a standard-dose of cytarabine. Early response data after combination therapy included a complete cytogenetic response in 48% and a major molecular response in 30% of patients, which increased to 46% major molecular responses at 1 year, including 13% complete molecular responses. We conclude that combination therapy of escalating dosages of imatinib and cytarabine is feasible. This study was registered at www.kankerbestrijding.nl as no. CKTO-2001-03.

  10. [Standardization of quantitative detection of BCR-ABL gene expression by RQ-PCR in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in cooperation with European Leukemia Net].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, Tomasz; Zawada, Magdalena; Czekalska, Sylwia; Florek, Izabela; Mueller, Martin; Gniot, Michał; Jaźwiec, Bozena; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira; Leszczyńska, Aleksandra; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Matiakowska, Karolina; Solarska, Iwona; Stokłosa, Tomasz; Skotnicki, Aleksander B

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of chronic myeloid leukemia treatment efficacy requires very sensitive methods of BCR-ABL gene detection based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lack of comparability of BCR-ABL mRNA quantification results generated by various methodologies in different laboratories was the cause of an international multicenter trial initiation with the participation of 133 laboratories in 24 European countries cooperating within the "EUTOS for CML" project. Pracownia Diagnostyki Molekularnej Kliniki Hematologii is taking part in standardisation rounds organised since 2005. The compatibility of methodology used in Pracownia with European Leukemia Net (ELN) standards was confirmed, and correction factor for the expression of RQ-PCR results in an international scale was calculated. Pracownia was charge by ELN with a task of conducting the standardisation in polish molecular biology laboratories. Test probes were prepared and sent to eight cooperating laboratories. The results obtained in six laboratories were concordant with results from laboratory in Krakow after conversion to international scale, therefore it was possible to calculate individual correction factors. The participation of polish laboratories in international standardization process created the opportunity for unification of BCR-ABL quantification methodologies with recommendations of international experts, and showed that the quality of analyses performed in majority of them was satisfactory enough to calculate correction factor and to express the RQ-PCR results in widely accepted international scale.

  11. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Is Adherence to Imatinib Mesylate Treatment Among Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Associated with Better Clinical Outcomes in Qatar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dewik, Nader I.; Morsi, Hisham M.; Samara, Muthanna M.; Ghasoub, Rola S.; Gnanam, Cinquea C.; Bhaskaran, Subi K.; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J.; Al-Jurf, Rana M.; Ismail, Mohamed A.; AlSharshani, Mohammed M.; AlSayab, Ali A.; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg I.; Khatib, Rani B.; Yassin, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite the revolutionary success of introducing tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib mesylate (IM), for treating chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a substantial proportion of patients’ treatments fail. AIM This study investigates the correlation between patient adherence and failure of TKIs’ treatment in a follow-up study. METHODS This is a follow-up study of a new cohort of CML patients. Adherence to IM is assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS 6 TrackCap, AARDEX Ltd). The 9-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, medication possession ratio (MPR) calculation, and the electronic medical records are used for identifying potential factors that influence adherence. Clinical outcomes are assessed according to the European Leukemia Net 2013 guidelines via reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction measurement of the level of BCR-ABL1 transcripts in peripheral blood. Response is classified at the hematological, cytogenetic, and molecular levels into optimal, suboptimal, or failure. RESULTS A total of 36 CML patients (5 citizens and 31 noncitizen residents) consented to participate in the study. The overall mean MEMS score was 89. Of the 36 patients, 22 (61%) were classified as adherent (mean: 95) and 14 (39%) were classified as nonadherent (mean: 80.2). Adherent patients were significantly more likely to obtain optimal response (95%) compared to the nonadherent group (14.3%; P health-care teams, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and patients are essential components for maximizing the benefits of TKI therapy and could rectify this problem. The preliminary results show that patients’ response to treatment may be directly linked to patients’ adherence to treatment. However, further in-depth and specific analysis may be necessary in a larger cohort. PMID:27721664

  13. Transferred BCR/ABL DNA from K562 extracellular vesicles causes chronic myeloid leukemia in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Cai

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that besides mRNAs and microRNAs, there are DNA fragments within extracellular vesicles (EVs. The BCR/ABL hybrid gene, involved in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, could be transferred from K562 EVs to neutrophils and decrease their phagocytic activity in vitro. Our present study provides evidence that BCR/ABL DNAs transferred from EVs have pathophysiological significance in vivo. Two months after injection of K562 EVs into the tail vein of Sprague-Dawley (SD rats, they showed some characteristics of CML, e.g., feeble, febrile, and thin, with splenomegaly and neutrophilia but with reduced neutrophil phagocytic activity. These findings were also observed in immunodeficient NOD/SCID mice treated with K562 EVs; BCR/ABL mRNA and protein were found in their neutrophils. The administration of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of de novo mRNA synthesis, prevented the abnormalities caused by K562 EVs in NOD/SCID mice related to CML, including neutrophilia and bone marrow hyperplasia. As a specific inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, imatinib blocked the activity of tyrosine kinases and the expression of phospho-Crkl, induced by the de novo BCR/ABL protein caused by K562 EVs bearing BCR/ABL DNA. Our current study shows the pathophysiological significance of transferred tumor gene from EVs in vivo, which may represent an important mechanism for tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis.

  14. [Guidelines for molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia patients by RT-qPCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larripa, Irene; Ruiz, María Sol; Gutiérrez, Marina; Bianchini, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Current clinical guidelines for managing chronic myeloid leukemia include molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL1 transcript quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Despite the proven prognostic significance of molecular response, it is not widely appreciated that quantitative reverse-transcription PCR potentially produces highly variable data, which may affect the validity of results, making comparability between different laboratories difficult. Therefore, standardized reporting of BCR-ABL1 measurements is needed for optimal clinical management. An approach to achieve comparable BCR-ABL1 values is the use of an international reporting scale. Conversion to the international scale is achieved by the application of laboratory specific conversion factor that is obtained by using validated secondary reference calibrators. Moreover, with the aim to mitigate the interlaboratory imprecision of quantitative BCR-ABL1 measurements and to facilitate local laboratory results interpretation and reporting, we decide to prepare laboratory guidelines that will further facilitate interlaboratory comparative studies and independent quality-assessment programs, which are of paramount importance for worldwide standardization of BCR-ABL1 monitoring results, in particular for those most isolated laboratories, with not easy access to commercial kits or sample interchange programs.

  15. Guidelines for molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia patients by RT-qPCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Larripa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Current clinical guidelines for managing chronic myeloid leukemia include molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL1 transcript quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Despite the proven prognostic significance of molecular response, it is not widely appreciated that quantitative reverse-transcription PCR potentially produces highly variable data, which may affect the validity of results, making comparability between different laboratories difficult. Therefore, standardized reporting of BCR-ABL1 measurements is needed for optimal clinical management. An approach to achieve comparable BCR-ABL1 values is the use of an international reporting scale. Conversion to the international scale is achieved by the application of laboratory specific conversion factor that is obtained by using validated secondary reference calibrators. Moreover, with the aim to mitigate the interlaboratory imprecision of quantitative BCR-ABL1 measurements and to facilitate local laboratory results interpretation and reporting, we decide to prepare laboratory guidelines that will further facilitate interlaboratory comparative studies and independent quality-assessment programs, which are of paramount importance for worldwide standardization of BCR-ABL1 monitoring results, in particular for those most isolated laboratories, with not easy access to commercial kits or sample interchange programs

  16. Targeting Hedgehog signaling pathway and autophagy overcomes drug resistance of BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian; Zhao, Hui; Li, Yubin; Fan, Jiajun; Sun, Yun; Wang, Shaofei; Wang, Ziyu; Song, Ping; Ju, Dianwen

    2015-01-01

    The frontline tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, drug resistance is the major clinical challenge in the treatment of CML. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and autophagy are both related to tumorigenesis, cancer therapy, and drug resistance. This study was conducted to explore whether the Hh pathway could regulate autophagy in CML cells and whether simultaneously regulating the Hh pathway and autophagy could induce cell death of drug-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) CML cells. Our results indicated that pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Hh pathway could markedly induce autophagy in BCR-ABL(+) CML cells. Autophagic inhibitors or ATG5 and ATG7 silencing could significantly enhance CML cell death induced by Hh pathway suppression. Based on the above findings, our study demonstrated that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy could markedly reduce cell viability and induce apoptosis of imatinib-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) cells. Moreover, this combination had little cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Furthermore, this combined strategy was related to PARP cleavage, CASP3 and CASP9 cleavage, and inhibition of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein. In conclusion, this study indicated that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy could potently kill imatinib-sensitive or -resistant BCR-ABL(+) cells, providing a novel concept that simultaneously inhibiting the Hh pathway and autophagy might be a potent new strategy to overcome CML drug resistance.

  17. Pregnancy outcomes in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia treated with imatinib mesylate: short report from a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Javaid; Ali, Zafar; Khan, Aruj-Un-Nisa; Aziz, Zeba

    2014-09-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is challenging in patients who want to conceive. We followed 809 patients with CML treated with imatinib mesylate (IM). We observed outcomes in 90 pregnancies from 61 patients (21 females, 40 males) who conceived while on IM. Information was obtained on duration of exposure to IM, pregnancy termination and congenital abnormalities. Hematologic and cytogenetic responses were also recorded. Twenty-eight pregnancies occurred among females, while 62 were reported from male patients. Among female patients, 19 (67.9%) pregnancies were uneventful while six (21.4%) ended in adverse events. Only 12 (57%) females reported their pregnancies. Three (4.4%) adverse events were reported from male patients. Pregnancy is an important part of life in our young patients due to cultural and societal pressures. It is paramount to counsel pregnant patients to switch to drugs with no adverse effect on the developing fetus. However, lack of communication is a major factor preventing physicians from counseling patients about conception.

  18. Identification and functional characterization of the miRNA-gene regulatory network in chronic myeloid leukemia lineage negative cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatheeswaran, S.; Pattnayak, N. C.; Chakraborty, S.

    2016-09-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is maintained by leukemic stem cells (LSCs) which are resistant to the existing TKI therapy. Hence a better understanding of the CML LSCs is necessary to eradicate these cells and achieve complete cure. Using the miRNA-gene interaction networks from the CML lin(-) cells we identified a set of up/down-regulated miRNAs and corresponding target genes. Association studies (Pearson correlation) from the miRNA and gene expression data showed that miR-1469 and miR-1972 have significantly higher number of target genes, 75 and 50 respectively. We observed that miR-1972 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest and miR-1469 moderately arrested G1 cell cycle when overexpressed in KCL22 cells. We have earlier shown that a combination of imatinib and JAK inhibitor I can significantly bring down the proliferation of CML lineage negative cells. Here we observed that imatinib and JAK inhibitor I combination restored the expression pattern of the down-regulated miRNAs in primary CML lin(-) cells. Thus effective manipulation of the deregulated miRNAs can restore the miRNA-mRNA networks that can efficiently inhibit CML stem and progenitor cells and alleviate the disease.

  19. MicroRNA-320a acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xishan, Zhu; Ziying, Lin; Jing, Du; Gang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidences demonstrated that the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression, metastasis and relapse in cancers, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We found that miR-320a expression was reduced in K562 and in CML cancer stem cells. Moreover, we found that miR-320a inhibited K562 cell migration, invasion, proliferation and promoted apoptosis by targeting BCR/ABL oncogene. As an upstream regulator of BCR/ABL, miR-320a directly targets BCR/ABL. The enhanced expression of miR-320a inhibited the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and NF-κB; however, the expression of phosphorylated PI3K, AKT and NF-κB were restored by the overexpression of BCR/ABL. In K562, infected with miR-320a or transfected with SiBCR/ABL, the protein levels of fibronectin, vimentin, and N-cadherin were decreased, but the expression of E-cadherin was increased. The expression of mesenchymal markers in miR-320a-expressing cells was restored to normal levels by the restoration of BCR/ABL expression. Generally speaking, miR-320a acts as a novel tumor suppressor gene in CML and miR-320a can decrease migratory, invasive, proliferative and apoptotic behaviors, as well as CML EMT, by attenuating the expression of BCR/ABL oncogene.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 was involved in the immuno-modulatory defect of mesenchymal stem cell from chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xi-shan; SHI Wei; AN Guang-yu; ZHANG Hong-mei; SONG Yu-guang; LI You-bin

    2011-01-01

    Background Overwhelming evidences on chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) indicate that patients harbor quiescent CML stem cells that are responsible for blast crisis. While the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) origin of CML was first suggested over 30 years ago, recently CML-initiating cells beyond HSCs are also being investigated.Methods We have previously isolated fetal liver kinase-1-positive (Flk1+) cells carrying the BCR/ABL fusion gene from the bone marrow of Ph+ patients with hemangioblast property. In this study, we isolated CML patient-derived regulation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS),enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay, mixed lymphocyte reaction assays; then we compared these characters with those of the healthy donors.lymphocyte activation and proliferation was impaired in vitro.Conclusions CML patient-derived MSCs have impaired immuno-modulatory functions, suggesting that the dysregulation of hematopoiesis and immune response may originate from MSCs rather than hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). MSCs might be a potential target for developing efficacious treatment for CML.

  1. IDH mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Konoplev, Sergej; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Chen, Weina

    2012-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous group of diseases. Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes represent a novel class of point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. These mutations prevent oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate and confer novel enzymatic activity, facilitating the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate, a putative oncometabolite. IDH1/IDH2 mutations are heterozygous, and their combined frequency is approximately 17% in unselected acute myeloid leukemia cases, 27% in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cases, and up to 67% in acute myeloid leukemia cases with cuplike nuclei. These mutations are largely mutually exclusive. Despite many similarities of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations, it is possible that they represent distinct molecular or clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia. All known mutations involve arginine (R), in codon 132 of IDH1 or codon 140 or 172 of IDH2. IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R140) mutations are frequently accompanied by normal cytogenetics and NPM1 mutation, whereas IDH2(R172) is frequently the only mutation detected in acute myeloid leukemia. There is increasing evidence that the prognostic impact of IDH1/2 mutations varies according to the specific mutation and also depends on the context of concurrent mutations of other genes. IDH1(R132) mutation may predict poor outcome in a subset of patients with molecular low-risk acute myeloid leukemia, whereas IDH2(R172) mutations confer a poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Expression of IDH1/2 mutants induces an increase in global DNA hypermethylation and inhibits TET2-induced cytosine 5-hydroxymethylation, DNA demethylation. These data suggest that IDH1/2 mutations constitute a distinct mutational class in acute myeloid leukemia, which affects the epigenetic state, an important consideration for the development of therapeutic agents.

  2. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  3. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Switching to nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase with molecular suboptimal response to frontline imatinib: SENSOR final results and BIM polymorphism substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamura, Koichi; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Kimura, Shinya; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Itaru; Hata, Tomoko; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Saito, Shigeki; Hino, Masayuki; Tadokoro, Seiji; Meguro, Kuniaki; Hyodo, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masahide; Kubo, Kohmei; Tsukada, Junichi; Kondo, Midori; Aoki, Makoto; Okada, Hikaru; Yanada, Masamitsu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2016-12-01

    Optimal management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase with suboptimal molecular response (MR) to frontline imatinib is undefined. We report final results from SENSOR, which evaluated efficacy/safety of nilotinib in this setting. A substudy assessed whether BIM polymorphisms impacted response to nilotinib. In this single-arm, multicenter study, Japanese patients with suboptimal MR per European LeukemiaNet 2009 criteria (complete cytogenetic response, but not major MR [MMR]) after ≥18 months of frontline imatinib received nilotinib 400mg twice daily for 24 months. MR, BCR-ABL1 mutations/variants, and BIM polymorphisms were evaluated in a central laboratory. Primary endpoint was the MMR rate at 12 months (null hypothesis of 40%). Of 45 patients (median exposure, 22.08 months), 39 completed the study and six discontinued. At 12 and 24 months, 51.1% (95% CI, 35.8%-66.3%) and 66.7% (95% CI, 51.0%-80.0%) achieved MMR, respectively. Cumulative MMR incidence by 24 months was 75.6%. Of 40 patients analyzed, 10 of 12 (83.3%) with and 17 of 28 (60.7%) without BIM polymorphisms achieved MMR at 24 months. The safety profile was manageable with dose reductions and interruptions. Nilotinib provided clinical benefit for patients with suboptimal response to imatinib, and BIM polymorphisms did not influence MMR achievement. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01043874.

  5. The role of peptide and DNA vaccines in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While chemotherapy and targeted therapy are successful in inducing the remission of myeloid leukemia as acute myeloid leukemia (AML and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, the disease remains largely incurable. This observation is likely due to the drug resistance of leukemic cells, which are responsible for disease relapse. Myeloid leukemia vaccines may most likely be beneficial for eradicating minimal residual disease after treatment with chemotherapy or targeted therapy. Several targeted immunotherapies using leukemia vaccines have been heavily investigated in clinical and preclinical trials. This review will focus on peptides and DNA vaccines in the context of myeloid leukemias, and optimal strategies for enhancing the efficacy of vaccines based on myeloid leukemia immunization are also summarized.

  6. Frontline Dasatinib Treatment in a “Real-Life” Cohort of Patients Older than 65 Years with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Latagliata

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dasatinib (DAS has been licensed for the frontline treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. However, very few data are available regarding its efficacy and toxicity in elderly patients with CML outside clinical trials. To address this issue, we set out a “real-life” cohort of 65 chronic phase CML patients older than 65 years (median age 75.1 years treated frontline with DAS in 26 Italian centers from June 2012 to June 2015, focusing our attention on toxicity and efficacy data. One third of patients (20/65: 30.7% had 3 or more comorbidities and required concomitant therapies; according to Sokal classification, 3 patients (4.6% were low risk, 39 (60.0% intermediate risk, and 20 (30.8% high risk, whereas 3 (4.6% were not classifiable. DAS starting dose was 100 mg once a day in 54 patients (83.0%, whereas 11 patients (17.0% received less than 100 mg/day. Grade 3/4 hematologic and extrahematologic toxicities were reported in 8 (12.3% and 12 (18.5% patients, respectively. Overall, 10 patients (15.4% permanently discontinued DAS because of toxicities. Pleural effusions (all WHO grades occurred in 12 patients (18.5% and in 5 of them occurred during the first 3 months. DAS treatment induced in 60/65 patients (92.3% a complete cytogenetic response and in 50/65 (76.9% also a major molecular response. These findings show that DAS might play an important role in the frontline treatment of CML patients >65 years old, proving efficacy and having a favorable safety profile also in elderly subjects with comorbidities.

  7. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  9. Induction of apoptosis by Cordyceps militaris fraction in human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells involved with mitochondrial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Song, Liyan; Zheng, Qin; Hu, Xianjing; Yu, Rongmin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cordyceps militaris is widely used for various ethno medical conditions including cancer and inflammation complications in traditional Chinese medicine. Objective: To investigate the in vitro antitumor activity of Cordyceps militaris fraction (CMF) and the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptosis it induces in human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells. Materials and Methods: CMF was prepared according to our previous report. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. The rate of apoptosis, distribution of cell cycle and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were measured by flow cytometry. Caspase activities were analyzed by Western blot and oxygen consumption rate was recorded using the Oxytherm system. Results: The results demonstrated that CMF triggered growth inhibition in K562 cells with only minor toxicity on a normal human cell line and inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with IC50 value of 34.1 ± 2.0 μg/ml after 48 h incubation. This most likely resulted from cell cycle arrest at the S phase and the induction of apoptosis. In addition, CMF induced activation of caspase-3 and subsequent cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). The caspase signals may originate from mitochondrial dysfunction, which was supported by the finding of decreased mitochondria transmembrance potential and the lower oxygen consumption rate. Conclusion: CMF possessed the in vitro antitumor effect on K562 cells and CMF-induced apoptosis might be involved by the mitochondrial dysfunction and valuable to research and develop as a potential antitumor agency. PMID:25210321

  10. Distinct Dasatinib-Induced Mechanisms of Apoptotic Response and Exosome Release in Imatinib-Resistant Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although dasatinib is effective in most imatinib mesylate (IMT-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients, the underlying mechanism of its effectiveness in eliminating imatinib-resistant cells is only partially understood. This study investigated the effects of dasatinib on signaling mechanisms driving-resistance in imatinib-resistant CML cell line K562 (K562RIMT. Compared with K562 control cells, exsomal release, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling and autophagic activity were increased significantly in K562RIMT cells and mTOR-independent beclin-1/Vps34 signaling was shown to be involved in exosomal release in these cells. We found that Notch1 activation-mediated reduction of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN was responsible for the increased Akt/mTOR activities in K562RIMT cells and treatment with Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor prevented activation of Akt/mTOR. In addition, suppression of mTOR activity by rapamycin decreased the level of activity of p70S6K, induced upregulation of p53 and caspase 3, and led to increase of apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. Inhibition of autophagy by spautin-1 or beclin-1 knockdown decreased exosomal release, but did not affect apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. In summary, in K562RIMT cells dasatinib promoted apoptosis through downregulation of Akt/mTOR activities, while preventing exosomal release and inhibiting autophagy by downregulating expression of beclin-1 and Vps34. Our findings reveal distinct dasatinib-induced mechanisms of apoptotic response and exosomal release in imatinib-resistant CML cells.

  11. European LeukemiaNet recommendations for the management and avoidance of adverse events of treatment in chronic myeloid leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegmann, J L; Baccarani, M; Breccia, M; Casado, L F; García-Gutiérrez, V; Hochhaus, A; Kim, D-W; Kim, T D; Khoury, H J; Le Coutre, P; Mayer, J; Milojkovic, D; Porkka, K; Rea, D; Rosti, G; Saussele, S; Hehlmann, R; Clark, R E

    2016-01-01

    Most reports on chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) focus on efficacy, particularly on molecular response and outcome. In contrast, adverse events (AEs) are often reported as infrequent, minor, tolerable and manageable, but they are increasingly important as therapy is potentially lifelong and multiple TKIs are available. For this reason, the European LeukemiaNet panel for CML management recommendations presents an exhaustive and critical summary of AEs emerging during CML treatment, to assist their understanding, management and prevention. There are five major conclusions. First, the main purpose of CML treatment is the antileukemic effect. Suboptimal management of AEs must not compromise this first objective. Second, most patients will have AEs, usually early, mostly mild to moderate, and which will resolve spontaneously or are easily controlled by simple means. Third, reduction or interruption of treatment must only be done if optimal management of the AE cannot be accomplished in other ways, and frequent monitoring is needed to detect resolution of the AE as early as possible. Fourth, attention must be given to comorbidities and drug interactions, and to new events unrelated to TKIs that are inevitable during such a prolonged treatment. Fifth, some TKI-related AEs have emerged which were not predicted or detected in earlier studies, maybe because of suboptimal attention to or absence from the preclinical data. Overall, imatinib has demonstrated a good long-term safety profile, though recent findings suggest underestimation of symptom severity by physicians. Second and third generation TKIs have shown higher response rates, but have been associated with unexpected problems, some of which could be irreversible. We hope these recommendations will help to minimise adverse events, and we believe that an optimal management of them will be rewarded by better TKI compliance and thus better CML outcomes, together with better

  12. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... body, including the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  13. Effects of Imatinib Mesylate in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia%甲磺酸伊马替尼治疗慢性粒细胞白血病的循征评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿素霞; 杜欣

    2007-01-01

    @@ 1 文献类型 治疗. 2 证据水平 1b. 3 文献来源 ① O'Brien SG, Guilhot F, Larson RA, et al.Imatinib compared with interferon and low-dose Cytarabine for newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia [J]. N Engl J Med, 2003,348:994-1004.

  14. Early Complete Molecular Response to First-Line Nilotinib in Two Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Carrying the p230 Transcript

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Greco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML with the rare fusion gene e19a2, encoding a p230 protein, has been described in patients with typical or rather aggressive clinical course. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs induce a substantial cytogenetic and molecular response in all phases of CML, a minority of p230 positive patients have been treated with TKIs. We report two cases of CML patients carrying the p230 transcript, who achieved fast and deep complete molecular response (CMR after frontline treatment with nilotinib. Our results suggest the use of nilotinib as frontline agent for the treatment of this CML variant.

  15. Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference [Genetics Home Reference (Conditions)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Conditions > Acute Myeloid...te myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA Fanconi anemia You may also search Genetics Home Reference for Acut...e Myeloid Leukemia for additional information. Published : October 27, 2014 Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute ... bleeding and forming blood clots. Smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation may affect the risk ...

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  18. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Nair, Sreejith G.; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea.

  19. Rationally designed aberrant kinase-targeted endogenous protein nanomedicine against oncogene mutated/amplified refractory chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnakumari, Archana P; Hanumanthu, Prasanna Lakshmi; Malarvizhi, Giridharan L; Prabhu, Raghuveer; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Thampi, Madhavan V; Menon, Deepthy; Mony, Ullas; Menon, Krishnakumar; Keechilat, Pavithran; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2012-11-05

    Deregulated protein kinases play a very critical role in tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance of cancer. Although molecularly targeted small molecule kinase inhibitors (SMI) are effective against many types of cancer, point mutations in the kinase domain impart drug resistance, a major challenge in the clinic. A classic example is chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) caused by BCR-ABL fusion protein, wherein a BCR-ABL kinase inhibitor, imatinib (IM), was highly successful in the early chronic phase of the disease, but failed in the advanced stages due to amplification of oncogene or point mutations in the drug-binding site of kinase domain. Here, by identifying critical molecular pathways responsible for the drug-resistance in refractory CML patient samples and a model cell line, we have rationally designed an endogenous protein nanomedicine targeted to both cell surface receptors and aberrantly activated secondary kinase in the oncogenic network. Molecular diagnosis revealed that, in addition to point mutations and amplification of oncogenic BCR-ABL kinase, relapsed/refractory patients exhibited significant activation of STAT5 signaling with correlative overexpression of transferrin receptors (TfR) on the cell membrane. Accordingly, we have developed a human serum albumin (HSA) based nanomedicine, loaded with STAT5 inhibitor (sorafenib), and surface conjugated the same with holo-transferrin (Tf) ligands for TfR specific delivery. This dual-targeted "transferrin conjugated albumin bound sorafenib" nanomedicine (Tf-nAlb-Soraf), prepared using aqueous nanoprecipitation method, displayed uniform spherical morphology with average size of ∼150 nm and drug encapsulation efficiency of ∼74%. TfR specific uptake and enhanced antileukemic activity of the nanomedicine was found maximum in the most drug resistant patient sample having the highest level of STAT5 and TfR expression, thereby confirming the accuracy of our rational design and potential of dual

  20. Prediction of outcomes in patients with Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase treated with nilotinib after imatinib resistance/intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias; le Coutre, Philipp D.; Cortes, Jorge; Giles, Francis; Bhalla, Kapil N.; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Larson, Richard A.; Gattermann, Norbert; Ottmann, Oliver G.; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hughes, Timothy P.; Saglio, Giuseppe; Radich, Jerald P.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Martinelli, Giovanni; Reynolds, John; Woodman, Richard C.; Baccarani, Michele; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to assess predictive factors for outcome in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CML-CP) treated with nilotinib after imatinib failure. Imatinib-resistant and -intolerant patients with CML-CP (n = 321) were treated with nilotinib 400 mg twice daily. Of 19 baseline patient and disease characteristics and two response end points analyzed, 10 independent prognostic factors were associated with progression-free survival (PFS). In the multivariate analysis, major cytogenetic response (MCyR) within 12 months, baseline hemoglobin ≥120 g/l, baseline basophils <4%, and absence of baseline mutations with low sensitivity to nilotinib were associated with PFS. A prognostic score was created to stratify patients into five groups (best group: 0 of 3 unfavorable risk factors and MCyR by 12 months; worst group: 3 of 3 unfavorable risk factors and no MCyR by 12 months). Estimated 24-month PFS rates were 90%, 79%, 67% and 37% for patients with prognostic scores of 0, 1, 2 and 3, respectively (no patients with score of 4). Even in the presence of poor disease characteristics, nilotinib provided significant clinical benefit in patients with imatinib-resistant or -intolerant CML. This system may yield insight on the prognosis of patients. PMID:23174881

  1. The long-term clinical implications of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Choi, Soo Young; Bang, Ju-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jang, Eun-Jung; Byeun, Ji-Young; Park, Jin Eok; Jeon, Hye-Rim; Oh, Yun Jeong; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical significance of an additional chromosomal abnormality (ACA), variant Philadelphia chromosome (vPh) at diagnosis, and newly developed other chromosomal abnormalities (OCA) in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) on imatinib (IM) therapy. Sequential cytogenetic data from 281 consecutive new chronic phase CML patients were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 78.6 months, the 22 patients with vPh (P = 0.034) or ACA (P = 0.034) at diagnosis had more events of IM failure than did the patients with a standard Ph. The 5-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and failure-free survival (FFS) rates for patients with vPh at diagnosis were 77.8%, 75.0%, and 53.3%, respectively; for patients with ACA at diagnosis, 100%, 66.3%, and 52.1%, respectively; and for patients with a standard Ph, 96.0%, 91.3%, and 83.7%, respectively. During IM therapy, eight patients developed an OCA, which had no impact on outcomes as a time-dependent covariate in our Cox proportional hazards regression models. This study showed that vPh was associated with poor OS and FFS and that ACA had adverse effects on EFS and FFS. In addition, no OCA, except monosomy 7, had any prognostic impact, suggesting that the development of OCA may not require a change in treatment strategy.

  2. Long-term safety and efficacy of dasatinib in the treatment of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant or intolerant to imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoumariyeh K

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Khalid Shoumariyeh, Nikolas von BubnoffDepartment of Hematology, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany Abstract: Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML has undergone dramatic changes in the last decade. Dissecting the molecular pathways that lead to the development of this disease resulted in the development of targeted therapy against the molecular driver of CML, namely the aberrantly activated tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL1. By introducing the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib to the treatment repertoire, the natural course of the disease has been dramatically altered and overall survival of patients with CML prolonged substantially. Nevertheless, a significant number of patients are primarily resistant, acquire resistance during the course of their disease, or do not tolerate the intake of imatinib due to adverse effects. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors were developed in an attempt to overcome these problems. Dasatinib is a potent oral kinase inhibitor that was originally developed as an Src-kinase inhibitor but exhibited promising potency against BCR-ABL1 as well. Phase I and II trials demonstrated efficacy in patients failing imatinib, and thus dasatanib was approved in 2006 for the treatment of imatinib-resistant or -intolerant patients with chronic-phase CML harboring the BCR-ABL1 fusion protein. It has since shown promising efficacy and good overall tolerability in subsequent clinical trials, including the Phase III first-line DASISION trial that led to the extension of its approval for first-line treatment of chronic-phase CML. The following review summarizes the available data on the long-term efficacy and safety of dasatinib as a second-line therapy in chronic-phase CML. Keywords: BCR-ABL1, TKI, CML-CP, second-line treatment

  3. Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma development in chronic myeloid leukemia cases at remission phase under maintenance therapy, management strategy - a series with literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheja Amol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH is common squeal of trauma and rarely associated with anticoagulant therapy, antiplatelet, chemotherapeutic drugs, arteriovenous malformation, aneurysms and post-craniotomy. However its occurrence is very unusual with systemic haematological malignancy and mostly reported with acute myeloid leukemia; however incidence of SDH occurrence in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is very rare. CML is a haematological malignancy characterized by chromosomal alteration, pathologically represents increased proliferation of the granulocytic cell line without loss of capacity to differentiate. CML has three phases - remission phase, accelerated phase and blast crisis. About 85 % of patients present in remission phase of disease and carries a favorable prognosis. As intracranial, subdural hematoma usually occur in the accelerated phase or blast crisis phase or extremely uncommon during chronic remission phase, although only those affected, who are neglecting therapeutic medication or discontinued therapy or rarely as an adverse effect of medications. However, important role of neurosurgeon lies in early detection and correction of platelet count and associated hematological abnormality as quite sizeable proportion of cases may not need surgical intervention instead can be managed conservatively under regular supervision in association with oncologist colleague, but few cases may need urgent surgical intervention. So, selecting a subgroup of CML cases in the remission phase requiring surgical intervention, presenting with CSDH is not only challenging, as failure to make an informed and timely precise decision can lead to catastrophic worse outcome and even mortality. So, purpose of current article is to formulate the management therapeutic plan. Authors report three cases of CML in chronic remission phase, receiving treatment under guidance of Haemto-oncologist at our institute presented with spontaneous chronic SDH. The mean

  4. Growth arrest specific 2 is up-regulated in chronic myeloid leukemia cells and required for their growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixia Zhou

    Full Text Available Although the generation of BCR-ABL is the molecular hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, the comprehensive molecular mechanisms of the disease remain unclear yet. Growth arrest specific 2 (GAS2 regulates multiple cellular functions including cell cycle, apoptosis and calpain activities. In the present study, we found GAS2 was up-regulated in CML cells including CD34+ progenitor cells compared to their normal counterparts. We utilized RNAi and the expression of dominant negative form of GAS2 (GAS2DN to target GAS2, which resulted in calpain activity enhancement and growth inhibition of both K562 and MEG-01 cells. Targeting GAS2 also sensitized K562 cells to Imatinib mesylate (IM. GAS2DN suppressed the tumorigenic ability of MEG-01 cells and impaired the tumour growth as well. Moreover, the CD34+ cells from CML patients and healthy donors were transduced with control and GAS2DN lentiviral vectors, and the CD34+ transduced (YFP+ progeny cells (CD34+YFP+ were plated for colony-forming cell (CFC assay. The results showed that GAS2DN inhibited the CFC production of CML cells by 57±3% (n = 3, while affected those of normal hematopoietic cells by 31±1% (n = 2. Next, we found the inhibition of CML cells by GAS2DN was dependent on calpain activity but not the degradation of beta-catenin. Lastly, we generated microarray data to identify the differentially expressed genes upon GAS2DN and validated that the expression of HNRPDL, PTK7 and UCHL5 was suppressed by GAS2DN. These 3 genes were up-regulated in CML cells compared to normal control cells and the growth of K562 cells was inhibited upon HNRPDL silence. Taken together, we have demonstrated that GAS2 is up-regulated in CML cells and the inhibition of GAS2 impairs the growth of CML cells, which indicates GAS2 is a novel regulator of CML cells and a potential therapeutic target of this disease.

  5. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Evaluation of the Safety of Imatinib Mesylate in 200 Iraqi Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the Chronic Phase: Single-Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam Francis Matti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Imatinib mesylate, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is presently the drug of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. During therapy, a few patients may develop hematological and non-hematological adverse effects. METHODS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of imatinib therapy in patients with CML. Between December 2007 and October 2009 two hundred patients with CML in chronic phase were included in the study. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients prior to the start of the study. Imatinib was started at 400 mg orally daily. Patients were monitored carefully for any adverse effects. Complete blood count, liver, and renal function tests were done once in 2 weeks during the first month and on a monthly basis during follow-up. Toxicities that encountered were graded as per the National Cancer Institute common toxicity criteria version 2. Both hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities were managed with short interruptions of treatment and supportive measures, but the daily dose of imatinib was not reduced below 300 mg/day. RESULTS: Two hundred CML patients in chronic phase were included in this study; the male: female ratio was 0.7: 1 with mean age 39.06±13.21 years (ranged from 15-81 years. The study showed that the commonest hematological side effects were grade 2 anemia (12.5% followed by leukopenia (8% and thrombocytopenia (4%, while the most common non-hematological adverse effects were superficial edema and weight gain (51.5%, followed by musculoskeletal pain (35.5%, then gastro-intestinal symptoms (vomiting, diarrhea (19%. Fluid retention was the commonest side effect, which responded to low-dose diuretics. The drug was safe and well tolerated. There were no deaths due to toxicity. CONCLUSION: Imatinib mesylate a well-tolerated drug, and all undesirable effects could be ameliorated easily. The most common hematological and non-hematological side effects were anemia and fluid retention, respectively.

  9. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Randomized comparison of low-dose versus high-dose interferon-alfa in chronic myeloid leukemia: prospective collaboration of 3 joint trials by the MRC and HOVON groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.; Buck, G.; Cessie, S. le; Richards, S.; Beverloo, H.B.; Falkenburg, J.H.F.; Littlewood, T.; Muus, P.; Bareford, D.; Lelie, H. van der; Green, A.R.; Roozendaal, K.J.; Milne, A.E.; Chapman, C.S.; Shepherd, P.

    2004-01-01

    The optimal dose of interferon-alfa (IFN) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. Retrospective analyses suggest that low doses are as effective as high doses, with less toxicity and fewer patients abandoning the drug. The Dutch Hemato-Oncology Association (HOVON) and British Medical Research

  11. Autologous stem cell transplantation in chronic myeloid leukemia: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigneux, A; Faberes, C; Boiron, J M; Mahon, F X; Cony-Makhoul, P; Agape, P; Lounici, A; Bernard, P; Bilhou-Nabera, C; Bouzgarrou, R; Marit, G; Reiffers, J

    1999-08-01

    Between 1980 and 1996, we transplanted 72 patients with CML using blood stem cells collected at diagnosis before treatment and without any mobilization. The median age of patients at diagnosis was 47.5 years (range 20.5-59.5). The median numbers of nucleated cells and CFU-GM transplanted were 10 x 10(8)/kg and 97 x 10(4)/kg, respectively. The median duration to reach more than 0.5 x 10(9)/l neutrophils and 50 x 10(9)/l platelets was 12 (range 5-19) and 11 days (range 0-79), respectively. Twenty patients (group I) were transplanted in chronic phase either for resistance to IFN (14 patients) (group IA) or because the Sokal index was more than 1.2 (six patients) (group IB). All those patients had preparative regimen with busulfan (4 mg/kg/day x 4) and melphalan (140 mg/m2). They were treated with recombinant alpha-interferon (IFN) after transplant. The cumulative incidence of major cytogenetic response (MCR) at 12 months was 25 +/- 21% (95% CI), the 5-year survival was 75 +/- 42% (95% CI). These results (observed in patients with bad prognosis factors) are similar to those usually observed in CML patients treated by IFN, whatever the Sokal risk. Thus autologous transplantation is able to reproduce for poor prognosis patients the results observed in standard risk patients treated with IFN. This suggests that it could prolong survival. Fifty-two other patients (group II) were transplanted for CML in transformation (accelerated phase = 32; blast crisis = 20) after a preparative regimen containing either total body irradiation (TBI) or busulfan. The median survival was short (10.4 months) and only 21 patients survived more than 1 year. The survival was longer for patients transplanted in accelerated phase (vs blast crisis), those who were due to receive a double transplant (vs single) (34 patients), those who were treated with IFN after transplant (vs hydroxyurea) and for the patients who obtained a complete hematologic response.

  12. Microsatellite instability and cytogenetic survey in myeloid leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M.S.F. Ribeiro

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites are short tandem repeat sequences dispersed throughout the genome. Their instability at multiple genetic loci may result from mismatch repair errors and it occurs in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. This instability is also found in many sporadic cancers. In order to evaluate the importance of this process in myeloid leukemias, we studied five loci in different chromosomes of 43 patients, 22 with chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML in the chronic phase, 7 with CML in blast crisis, and 14 with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, by comparing leukemic DNA extracted from bone marrow and constitutional DNA obtained from buccal epithelial cells. Only one of the 43 patients (2.1%, with relapsed AML, showed an alteration in the allele length at a single locus. Cytogenetic analysis was performed in order to improve the characterization of leukemic subtypes and to determine if specific chromosome aberrations were associated with the presence of microsatellite instability. Several chromosome aberrations were observed, most of them detected at diagnosis and during follow-up of the patients, according to current literature. These findings suggest that microsatellite instability is an infrequent genetic event in myeloid leukemias, adding support to the current view that the mechanisms of genomic instability in solid tumors differ from those observed in leukemias, where specific chromosome aberrations seem to play a major role.

  13. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood is composed of plasma and cells. Plasma. Plasma is largely made up of water in which many chemicals are dissolved. These chemicals ... some blood cancers, or those who have received treatment (such as chemotherapy) for cancer, often have low neutrophil counts. People with low neutrophil counts are ...

  14. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Comparison of outcomes of allogeneic transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia with cyclophosphamide in combination with intravenous busulfan, oral busulfan, or total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copelan, Edward A; Avalos, Belinda R; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Zhu, Xiaochun; Gale, Robert Peter; Grunwald, Michael R; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hamilton, Betty K; Hale, Gregory A; Marks, David I; Waller, Edmund K; Savani, Bipin N; Costa, Luciano J; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Khoury, H Jean; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kamble, Rammurti T; Schouten, Harry C; Wirk, Baldeep; Litzow, Mark R; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; van Besien, Koen W; Ustun, Celalettin; Bolwell, Brian J; Bredeson, Christopher N; Fasan, Omotayo; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Horowitz, Mary M; Arora, Mukta; Szer, Jeffrey; Loren, Alison W; Alyea, Edwin P; Cortes, Jorge; Maziarz, Richard T; Kalaycio, Matt E; Saber, Wael

    2015-03-01

    Cyclophosphamide (Cy) in combination with busulfan (Bu) or total body irradiation (TBI) is the most commonly used myeloablative conditioning regimen in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We used data from the Center for International Bone Marrow Transplantation Research to compare outcomes in adults who underwent hematopoietic cell transplantation for CML in first chronic phase after myeloablative conditioning with Cy in combination with TBI, oral Bu, or intravenous (i.v.) Bu. Four hundred thirty-eight adults received human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling grafts and 235 received well-matched grafts from unrelated donors (URD) from 2000 through 2006. Important differences existed between the groups in distribution of donor relation, exposure to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and year of transplantation. In multivariate analysis, relapse occurred less frequently among patients receiving i.v. Bu compared with TBI (relative risk [RR], .36; P = .022) or oral Bu (RR, .39; P = .028), but nonrelapse mortality and survival were similar. A significant interaction was detected between donor relation and the main effect in leukemia-free survival (LFS). Among recipients of HLA-identical sibling grafts, but not URD grafts, LFS was better in patients receiving i.v. Bu (RR, .53; P = .025) or oral Bu (RR, .64; P = .017) compared with TBI. In CML in first chronic phase, Cy in combination with i.v. Bu was associated with less relapse than TBI or oral Bu. LFS was better after i.v. or oral Bu compared with TBI.

  16. Potent, transient inhibition of BCR-ABL with dasatinib 100 mg daily achieves rapid and durable cytogenetic responses and high transformation-free survival rates in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance, suboptimal response or intolerance to imatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neil P.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kantarjian, Hagop; Rousselot, Philippe; Llacer, Pedro Enrique Dorlhiac; Enrico, Alicia; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Silver, Richard T.; Khoury, Hanna Jean; Müller, Martin C.; Lambert, Alexandre; Matloub, Yousif; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Background Dasatinib 100 mg once daily achieves intermittent BCR-ABL kinase inhibition and is approved for chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant or intolerant to imatinib. To better assess durability of response to and tolerability of dasatinib, data from a 2-year minimum follow-up for a dose-optimization study in chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia are reported here. Design and Methods In a phase 3 study, 670 chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance, intolerance, or suboptimal response to imatinib were randomized to dasatinib 100 mg once-daily, 50 mg twice-daily, 140 mg once-daily, or 70 mg twice-daily. Results Data from a 2-year minimum follow-up demonstrate that dasatinib 100 mg once daily achieves major cytogenetic response and complete cytogenetic response rates comparable to those in the other treatment arms, and reduces the frequency of key side effects. Comparable 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were observed (80% and 91%, respectively, for 100 mg once daily, and 75%–76% and 88%–94%, respectively, in other arms). Complete cytogenetic responses were achieved rapidly, typically by 6 months. In patients treated with dasatinib 100 mg once daily for 6 months without complete cytogenetic response, the likelihood of achieving such a response by 2 years was 50% for patients who had achieved a partial cytogenetic response, and only 8% or less for patients with minor, minimal, or no cytogenetic response. Less than 3% of patients suffered disease transformation to accelerated or blast phase. Conclusions Intermittent kinase inhibition can achieve rapid and durable responses, indistinguishable from those achieved with more continuous inhibition. PMID:20139391

  17. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  18. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  19. Inibidores de tirosino quinase na leucemia mieloide crônica Tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nei R. Lopes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A leucemia mieloide crônica (LMC é uma neoplasia da medula óssea originada da translocação entre os cromossomos 9 e 22 t(9:22(q34;11 e forma o gene híbrido BCR-ABL, que possui intensa atividade tirosino quinase, sendo responsável pela proliferação das células tumorais. Um grande avanço no tratamento da LMC foi conquistado com o surgimento dos inibidores da tirosino quinase, entre eles o imatinibe, que vem demonstrando ser efetivo na maior parte dos pacientes com LMC por apresentar respostas duradouras. Entretanto, há pacientes resistentes ou que desenvolvem resistência durante o tratamento com esta droga; sendo assim, inibidores de tirosino quinase de segunda geração, como o dasatinibe e o nilotinibe, foram desenvolvidos apresentando maior potência com a finalidade de diminuir a chance de desenvolvimento de resistência. O bosutinibe e o INNO-406 estão sendo estudados para atender pacientes resistentes às drogas anteriormente citadas e também com a finalidade de diminuir efeitos colaterais das mesmas; entretanto, eles ainda estão em fase clínica de estudo. Há ainda outras drogas inibidoras da tirosino quinase que estão em desenvolvimento na fase clínica ou pré-clínica. A partir do desenvolvimento destas novas drogas, múltiplas opções de tratamento para os pacientes com LMC poderão ser propostas, podendo, desta forma, individualizar o tratamento de acordo com o que cada paciente necessita. Este estudo visa descrever as drogas antineoplásicas que têm como mecanismo de ação a inibição da enzima tirosino quinase na LMC.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a neoplastic transformation of the hematopoietic system resulting from a t(9;22(q34;q11 translocation forming a BCR-ABL hybrid gene which has intense enzyme tyrosine kinase activity responsible for the proliferation of tumor cells. A dramatic positive response was achieved in CML patients with imatinib. This drug is effective in most patients because it presents long

  20. Over-expression of heme oxygenase-1 in peripheral blood predicts the progression and relapse risk of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Sixi; Wang Yating; Chai Qixiang; Fang Qin; Zhang Yaming; Lu Yinghao; Wang Jishi

    2014-01-01

    Background There are limited eligible clinical markers at present to monitor the progress of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1),as one of the most important oxidation-regulating enzymes in vivo,suggests the onset and progression of cancer when highly expressed.Furthermore,HO-1 level is related with the occurrence and development of hematological diseases.But the relationship between HO-1 expression and progression/relapse of CML has seldom been studied hitherto.This study aimed to investigate the relationship between them to find out a new molecular marker for prediction.Methods A total of 60 peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM) samples from 25 CML patients in different phases were collected respectively to detect the expressions of HO-1 and bcr/abl using real-time PCR.Routine blood test was performed to detect the changes of leukocyte and platelet counts.The proportion of primitive cells in BM was detected by flow cytometry.The relationship between high HO-1 expression and CML progression and relapse was explored by the analysis of variance by Wilcoxon test and linear regression analysis.The diagnostic accuracy and cutoff values were determined by receiver operating characteristic curve.Results Relative expression of HO-1 mRNA in CML patients peripheral blood was significantly higher than that of donors (P <0.0001),which were 0.57±3.78 and (1.417±1.125)×10-6,respectively.HO-1 expression level in CML patients was 0.061 5±0.062 4,which decreased to 0.009 4±0.006 7 upon CMoR,and remained remarkably higher 0.016 3±0.017 5 than that of normal donors (1.417±1.125)× 10-6,P <0.001.When relapse occurred,HO-1 expression significantly increased from 0.020 6±0.021 0 to 3.852±10.285 in CMoR stage and undergoing relapse.According to progression of CML,HO-1 expression level in CML patients increased from CP (0.009 5±0.017 6) to AP (0.028 0±0.055 7) and then to BP (0.276 7± 0.447 0).And there was a linear correlation between HO-1 expression

  1. Leucemia Mielóide Crônica: novas drogas em desenvolvimento Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: development of new drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cármino A. de Souza

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A LMC é um modelo de investigação biológica e clinica que deve ser seguido nesta nova fase da oncologia moderna. A resposta terapêutica ao uso do imatinibe como droga de primeira linha mudou os conceitos e paradigmas e criou uma expectativa que drogas mais potentes possam ser desenvolvidas no futuro. Infelizmente nem todos conseguem atingir essa situação ideal. Por esta razão, Baccarani M sugeriu que a falência de resposta subótima, precaução ou alerta fossem estudadas no sentido de serem desenvolvidas intervenções terapêuticas diferenciadas mais precoces. A resistência ao imatinibe existe e depende de vários mecanismos. Tanto mais tardia a introdução do imatinibe e mais avançada for a fase evolutiva da doença maior a freqüência de resistência. Do ponto de vista biológico, a superexpressão do BCR-ABL, os defeitos genéticos adicionais e as mutações que podem atingir várias regiões da molécula - a alça de fosfato, a alça de ativação, o domínio da quinase são os mais importantes fatores associados à resistência ao imatinibe. Por esta razão, são necessárias outras opções terapêuticas e hoje há o desenvolvimento de um grande número de drogas para um número maior de alvos. Inicialmente temos o dasatinibe, já aprovado nos EUA, na Europa e também no Brasil; o nilotinibe, em fase avançada de estudos clínicos (inclusive de fase III, e também já aprovado para uso nos EUA; o bosutinibe, o INNO - 406 bem como outras drogas que atuam em alvos como as aurora-quinases ou inibidores de histona-deacetilases.Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is a model of clinical and biological investigation that may be useful for other neoplastic diseases. The therapeutic response to imatinib as the front line therapy has changed concepts and procedures in CML and has created hope concerning new more potent drugs for this and other oncological diseases that have a similar mechanism of action. However, not all patients achieve

  2. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, III, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim; (OHSU- Cancer Instit.); (ARIAD)

    2010-09-07

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABL{sup T315I} mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and preclinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multitargeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABL{sup T315I}-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML.

  4. Advances in the biology and therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML): Proceedings from the 6th Post-ASH International CML and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Etten, Richard A.; Mauro, Michael; Radich, Jerald P.; Goldman, John M.; Saglio, Giuseppe; Jamieson, Catriona; Soverini, Simona; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Martinelli, Giovanni; Perrotti, Danilo; Scadden, David T.; Skorski, Tomasz; Tefferi, Ayalew; Mughal, Tariq I.

    2012-01-01

    Following the 53rd annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Diego in December 2011, a group of clinical and laboratory investigators convened for the 6th post-ASH International Workshop on chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). The workshop took place on the 13th–14th December at the Estancia, La Jolla, California, USA. This report summarizes the most recent advances in the biology and therapy of CML that were presented at ASH and discussed at the Workshop. Preclinical studies focused on the CML stem cell and its niche, and on early results of deep sequencing of CML genomes. Clinical advances include updates on 2nd and 3rd generation TKIs, molecular monitoring, TKI discontinuation studies, and new therapeutic agents. A report summarizing the pertinent advances in MPN has been published separately. PMID:23121619

  5. Successful completion of pregnancy in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia without active intervention: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Suzanne; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ault, Patricia; Cortés, Jorge E

    2009-08-01

    The management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) during pregnancy is a matter of continued debate. We present a 21-year-old woman in whom CML was diagnosed during early pregnancy. Because the patient was asymptomatic and desired to carry the pregnancy to term while minimizing fetal exposure to medication, she was observed with no therapy for the duration of her pregnancy. The white blood cell count showed a slow downward trend throughout her pregnancy. She delivered a healthy baby and breast fed for a time before initiating therapy for CML. We reviewed the published case reports of women who had a pregnancy occur in the setting of treatment with imatinib. Given the adverse effects of fetal exposure to imatinib as treatment for the mother with CML, close observation might be an option for selected patients who are diagnosed with CML while pregnant and who have minimal clinical manifestations of CML.

  6. Whole-exome sequencing reveals potential molecular predictors of relapse after discontinuation of the targeted therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnikhina, Svetlana A; Lavrov, Alexander V; Chelysheva, Ekaterina Yu; Adilgereeva, Elmira P; Shukhov, Oleg A; Turkina, Anna; Kutsev, Sergey I

    2016-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease well treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The aim was to identify genes with a predictive value for relapse-free survival after TKI cessation in CML patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing of DNA from six CML patients in long-lasting deep molecular remission. Patients were divided into two groups with relapse (n = 3) and without relapse (n = 3) after TKI discontinuation. We found variants in genes CYP1B1, ALPK2, and IRF1 in group of patients with relapse and one variant in gene PARP9 in group of patients without relapse. We verified prognostic value of the found markers in a small group of patients with TKI discontinuation and demonstrated their high sensitivity (77%), specificity (86%), positive (85%), and negative (79%) predictive values. Thus we revealed genetic variants, which are potential markers of outcome prediction in CML patients after TKI discontinuation.

  7. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant Engl

  8. Cytarabine dose for acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Löwenberg (Bob); T. Pabst (Thomas); E. Vellenga (Edo); W. van Putten; H.C. Schouten (Harry); C. Graux (Carlos); A. Ferrant (Augustin); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); B.J. Biemond (Bart); A. Gratwohl (Alois); G.E. de Greef (Georgine); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); M.R. Schaafsma (Martijn); M. Gregor (Michael); M. Theobald; U. Schanz (Urs); J. Maertens (Johan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 m

  9. Cytarabine Dose for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, Bob; Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Graux, Carlos; Ferrant, Augustin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Biemond, Bart J.; Gratwohl, Alois; de Greef, Georgine E.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Schaafsma, Martijn R.; Gregor, Michael; Theobald, Matthias; Schanz, Urs; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 mg per square

  10. The content of elements in rainwater and its relation to the frequency of hospitalization for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia in Opole Voivodship, Poland, during 2000-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyguła, Renata; Bunio, Andrzej; Tubek, Sławomir

    2011-06-01

    Environmental factors play an essential role in the etiology of diseases of the hematopoietic system. Such factors include soil and water pollution and the presence of metals and toxic compounds in the air. Measuring the content of metallic elements in rainwater has become an accepted procedure for environmental pollution monitoring. In accordance with the above, it was decided to study relations between the content of selected elements in rainwater and hospitalization frequency due to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, C91 on ICD-10) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, C92 on ICD-10). It can be assumed that hospitalization frequency is a reliable indicator of exacerbations of these diseases. The annual average of hospitalizations due to a given disease during the years 2000-2002 was correlated with the annual average content of a given element in rainwater using the Spearman's correlation indicator to describe the relationship between the element content and the disease that is possibly a consequence of the element's presence in rainwater. In cases of CLL for all the subjected population and for men, no statistically significant correlations were found. For women, statistically significant correlations were found for chromium (r = 0.66), lead (r = 0.58), copper (r = 0.58), and cadmium (r = 0.51). For CML in all the studied population significant, negative correlations were found for magnesium (r = -0.6) and zinc (r = -0.52). In men, significant negative correlations were seen for magnesium (r = -0.69 and zinc (r = -0.55). No significant correlations were found in women. These results indicate the need of taking into account the environmental and gender factors in research connected with these diseases, which can be probably of help in improvements of therapy efficiency.

  11. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  12. High abundance of circulating megakaryocytic cells in chronic myeloid leukemia in Indian patients. Revisiting George Minot to re-interpret megakaryocytic maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Mona; Hazarika, Biswadip; Kumar, Lalit; Kumar, Rajive; Chopra, Anita

    2016-09-01

    Circulating megakaryocytic cells abound in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) seen in India and uniquely provide a setting for observing megakaryocytic maturation in the peripheral blood, a milieu not native to megakaryocytes. Peripheral blood megakaryocytic cells were studied in 324 cases of CML (235 chronic, 65 accelerated and 24 blastic phases). Two maturation themes were evident. Megakaryocytic blasts, especially in some cases of blast crisis, precociously make a foray into platelet formation and end up producing huge agranular or poorly granular cytoplasmic lobulated masses, that break off and come to lie in the circulation. This evidence of unsuccessful effort may exist, in a considerably attenuated form in chronic phase, alongside of the second major theme of megakaryocytic maturation centered around the familiar micromegakaryocyte, characteristic of the chronic phase. This cell is regarded as dysplastic, but produces morphologically normal platelets. The possibility that this occurs via a hitherto unstudied alternative path of platelet maturation that plays out in the peripheral blood, and the contrasting disorderly premature attempt of blasts to form platelets, represent exciting maturation processes that need further study. Our observations fortuitously constitute a revisit of the insightful exposition on the subject by George Minot nearly a century ago.

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia in the pregnant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mostly occurs in older patients, it could be seen in women of childbearing age. It is therefore not surprising that in some patients, the management of AML will be complicated by a coexistent pregnancy. However, the association of leukemia and pregnancy is uncommon. Its incidence is estimated to be 1 in 75,000-100,000 pregnancies. During pregnancy, most leukemias are acute: two-thirds are myeloid and one-third are lymphoblastic. There is no standard approach for this clinical dilemma, in part because of variables such as the type of AML, the seriousness of the symptoms, and the patient's personal beliefs. In many cases, the diagnostic workup has to be altered because of the pregnancy, and often available treatments have varying risks to the fetus. While chemotherapy is reported to have some risks during the first trimester, it is admitted that it can be administered safely during the second and the third trimesters.

  14. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. DC generation from peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: Influence of interferons on DC yield and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flörcken, Anne; Kopp, Joachim; Kölsch, Uwe; Meisel, Christian; Dörken, Bernd; Pezzutto, Antonio; Westermann, Jörg

    2016-05-03

    In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML), standard treatment consists of modern tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI). Nevertheless, there is evidence that immune responses against leukemia-associated antigens (LAA) may play an important role in disease control. Dendritic cell (DC)- based immunotherapy is able to induce T cell responses against LAA and might therefore pose an interesting therapeutic option in CML, especially in the setting of minimal residual disease (MRD). GMP production of DC for clinical vaccination remains a time- and cost- intensive procedure and standardized DC generation is warranted. We asked whether maturation-induction with IFN-γ and IFN-α has an influence on functional properties of DC derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in CML patients. Monocyte-derived DC from healthy donors and from patients with CML were analyzed after maturation-induction with our TNF-α-containing standard cytokine cocktail with or without addition of IFN-α and/or IFN-γ. Our results confirm that the addition of IFN-γ leads to enhanced IL-12 secretion in healthy donors. In contrast, in CML patients, IFN-γ was not able to increase IL-12 secretion, possibly due to a higher degree of cell adherence and lower cell yield during the cell culture. Our data suggest, that- in contrast to healthy donors-, additional interferons are not beneficial for maturation induction during large-scale DC production in patients with CML.

  16. Influence of different chromosomal abnormalities in Ph-positive bone marrow cells on the chronic myeloid leukemia course during tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Vinogradova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The additional molecular and chromosomal abnormalities (ACA in Phositive cells usually considered as a genetic marker of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML progression. 457 patients in different CML phases received tyrosine kinase inhibitors (1st and 2nd generation were studied. During therapy 50 cases with additional chromosomal abnormalities in Ph+ clone (22 of them in chronic CML phase were revealed (median follow-up from CML diagnosis – 117 months, median imatinib therapy – 62 months. 86 % of patients in chronic phase with Ph+- cell abnormalities were cytogenetic resistance, and their 5-years overall survival was 80 % which was significantly lower than in patients without ACA (p < 0.005. The treatment results depend on chromosomal abnormalities detected. In patients with additional chromosome 8 imatinib therapy is effective, although complete cytogenetic response (CCR is achieved only in the later therapy stages. In patients with additional translocations CCR also achieved with imatinib or 2nd generation TKI. Only a third of patients with additional Ph-chromosome or BCR/ABL amplification achieved complete suppression of Ph+ clone using 2nd generation TKI. The presence of additional chromosome 7 abnormalities and complex karyotype disorders involving isochromosome i(17(q10 are poor prognostic factors of TKI treatment failures.

  17. Influence of different chromosomal abnormalities in Ph-positive bone marrow cells on the chronic myeloid leukemia course during tyrosine kinase inhibitors therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Vinogradova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The additional molecular and chromosomal abnormalities (ACA in Phositive cells usually considered as a genetic marker of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML progression. 457 patients in different CML phases received tyrosine kinase inhibitors (1st and 2nd generation were studied. During therapy 50 cases with additional chromosomal abnormalities in Ph+ clone (22 of them in chronic CML phase were revealed (median follow-up from CML diagnosis – 117 months, median imatinib therapy – 62 months. 86 % of patients in chronic phase with Ph+- cell abnormalities were cytogenetic resistance, and their 5-years overall survival was 80 % which was significantly lower than in patients without ACA (p < 0.005. The treatment results depend on chromosomal abnormalities detected. In patients with additional chromosome 8 imatinib therapy is effective, although complete cytogenetic response (CCR is achieved only in the later therapy stages. In patients with additional translocations CCR also achieved with imatinib or 2nd generation TKI. Only a third of patients with additional Ph-chromosome or BCR/ABL amplification achieved complete suppression of Ph+ clone using 2nd generation TKI. The presence of additional chromosome 7 abnormalities and complex karyotype disorders involving isochromosome i(17(q10 are poor prognostic factors of TKI treatment failures.

  18. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  20. Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia with Trisomy 13: a Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-yu Hu; Chao-hui Yuan; Kui Tan; Zhen-zhen Chen

    2011-01-01

    ATYPICAL chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML),which shows both myeloproliferative and myeIodysplastic features,is a type of myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disease as defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification of the myeloid neoplasms.1 Because of the presence of neutrophilic leukocytosis,aCML may resemble chronic myeIogenous leukemia (CML).However,in contrast with CML,aCML does not have the Philadelphia chromosome or the bcr/abl fusion gene.

  1. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid mm9 RNA polymerase Blood Leukemia, Myeloid http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. Myeloid Leukemia while on Dasatinib Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Conchon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the case of an 18-year-old woman with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML who became pregnant while undergoing treatment with dasatinib. Before pregnancy, she received imatinib mesylate therapy but could not tolerate the treatment. The regimen was then changed to dasatinib at a dose of 70 mg b.i.d. While she was in hematological remission and on dasatinib therapy, she became pregnant. The unplanned pregnancy was identified after the patient had experienced four weeks of amenorrhea. Because the patient elected to continue the pregnancy to term, dasatinib was stopped immediately. Meanwhile, CML hematological relapse occurred and then she was treated with interferon- (IFN- (9 million IU/day throughout the pregnancy without a complete hematological response. She successfully gave birth to a male baby at 33 weeks by cesarean section delivery with no sequelae or malformations. Although this experience is limited to a single patient, it provides a useful contribution for counselling patients inadvertently exposed to dasatinib during pregnancy.

  11. SIRT1 inhibition impairs non-homologous end joining DNA damage repair by increasing Ku70 acetylation in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wu, Haixia; Yang, Meng; Ye, Shiguang; Li, Liang; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Jiong; Wang, Xuguang; Xu, Jun; Liang, Aibin

    2016-03-22

    Most chemotherapeutic agents for leukemia are DNA damaging agents. However, DNA lesions can be repaired by activities of DNA repair systems. Increasing evidence have shown that enhanced DNA damage repair capacity contributes to chemotherapy resistance in leukemia cells. Thus, targeting DNA repair mechanisms is a promising strategy for novel leukemia treatment. SIRT1 expressions were downregulated by lentivirus-delivered SIRT1 shRNA in myeloid leukemia cells. SIRT1 mRNA and protein levels were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Flow cytometry was carried out to analyze cell cycle progression, apoptosis and DNA damage repair efficiency. DNA damage levels were assessed by alkaline comet assay, and H2AX phosphorylation was analyzed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. A mouse leukemia model was established by transplanting lentivirus-infected K562 cells containing SIRT1 shRNA into sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice, and tumorigenesis was evaluated by detecting tumor weights and mice survival. SIRT1 expressions were upregulated in myeloid leukemic patients. Downregulation of SIRT1 by RNAi promoted etoposide-induced DNA damage in myeloid leukemia cells accompanied by reduced NHEJ activity, and increased Ku70 acetylation. Furthermore, SIRT1 knockdown resulted in cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and reduction of K562 cell proliferation accompanied by enhanced p53 and FOXO1 acetylation in K562 cells after etoposide treatment. Importantly, SIRT1 downregulation reduced the tumorigenesis ability of K562 cells in mouse xenografts following chemotherapy treatment. These results revealed that SIRT1 promotes the NHEJ repair pathway by deacetylating Ku70 in K562 cells, suggesting that SIRT1 is a novel therapeutic target for treating myeloid leukemia.

  12. Three-way complex variant translocation involving short arm chromosome (1;9;22)(p36;q34;q11) in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASIF, MUHAMMAD; HUSSAIN, ABRAR; MALIK, ARIF; RASOOL, MAHMOOD

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a disease of the clonal hematopoietic stem cells caused by a balanced translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 9 and 22. Overall, 90–95% of CML patients present with a Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation and in addition, variant complex translocations, involving a third chromosome, are observed in 5–8% of CML patients. Cytogenic testing using bone marrow sample was performed and the FISH test was used for the detection of BCR-ABL fusion gene and complete blood analysis of CML patient was also performed. Results of hematological analysis showed the induced values of white blood cells (168,5000/mm3) and platelets (300,000/mm3) and FISH analysis test showed that 98% cells were positive for BCR/ABL gene translocation. The present study describes a three-way (1;9;22)(p36;q34;q11) Ph chromosome translocation in a 24-year-old female with CML. The patient, who was in the chronic phase of the disease, was treated with daily dose of 400 mg/dl with imatinib mesylateand was monitored constantly at various intervals over a 6-month period. Many studies reported that certain CML patents with variant translocation responded poorly to imatinib. In the current case report, the CML patient exhibited a suboptimal response to imatinib, denoting a poor prognosis. PMID:26622740

  13. Busulfan, Etoposide, and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Myeloid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  14. Azacitidine and Sonidegib or Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myeloid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Downregulated microRNA-148b in circulating PBMCs in chronic myeloid leukemia patients with undetectable minimal residual disease: a possible biomarker to discontinue imatinib safely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohyashiki JH

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Junko H Ohyashiki,1 Kazushige Ohtsuki,1 Izuru Mizoguchi,2 Takayuki Yoshimoto,2 Seiichiro Katagiri,3 Tomohiro Umezu,1,4 Kazuma Ohyashiki3,4 1Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, 2Department of Immunoregulation, Institute of Medical Science, 3Department of Hematology, 4Department of Molecular Science, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan Background: A subset of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML can sustain a complete molecular response after discontinuing imatinib mesylate (IM. We focused on microRNAs (miRNAs, with the aim of finding a molecular biomarker to discriminate which patients can safely and successfully discontinue IM use. Methods: To identify miRNAs that showed altered expression in patients who had discontinued IM (STOP-IM group, we first screened miRNA expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by using a TaqMan miRNA array on samples from five unselected patients from the STOP-IM group, seven CML patients receiving IM (IM group, and five healthy volunteers. We then performed miRNA quantification in 49 CML patients with deep molecular response. Mann–Whitney U and chi-square tests were used to determine statistical significance for comparisons between the control (healthy volunteers and test groups (STOP-IM and IM groups. Multiple groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance. Results: Downregulation of miR-148b was noted in patients in the STOP-IM group and in a subset of the IM group. We then subdivided the IM patients into two groups: one with downregulated miR-148b expression (IM-1; less than the cut-off value and the other without downregulated miR-148b expression (IM-2; greater than the cut-off value. The number of patients who had a sustained stable molecular response was significantly lower in IM-2 group. This group also had a significantly lower percentage of natural killer cells. Conclusion: Downregulated miR-148 may contribute to immune surveillance in STOP-IM patients

  16. Report of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, from hematology clinic, Ahmedabad, Gujarat 2000-2010 at 1st myelostone meeting: Indian evidence of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Uday R Deotare; Urmish Chudgar; Eva Bhagat

    2013-01-01

    The data of 156 patients was presented from Hematology clinic, Ahmedabad. This hematology clinic caters large number of the population from Gujarat as well as from neighboring states such as Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. Out of 156 patients, 146 (94%) patients were in chronic phase. Complete hematological response was seen in 90% of patients and overall survival was 82% at 5 years.

  17. Management of acute myeloid leukemia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avivi, Irit; Brenner, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of acute leukemia during pregnancy presents significant medical challenges. Pancytopenia, caused by bone marrow substitution with leukemic cells, impairs maternal and fetal health. Chemotherapeutic agents required to be immediately used to save the mother's life are likely to adversely affect fetal development and outcome, especially if administered at an early gestational stage. Patients diagnosed with acute leukemia during the first trimester are, therefore, recommended to undergo pregnancy termination. At later gestational stages, antileukemic therapy can be administered, although in this case, fetal outcome is still associated with increased incidence of growth restriction and loss. Special attention to the issue of future reproduction, adopting a personalized fertility preservation approach, is required. This article addresses these subjects, presenting women diagnosed with acute myeloid and acute promyelocytic leukemia in pregnancy. The rarity of this event, resulting in insufficient data, emphasizes the need for collaborative efforts to optimize management of this complicated clinical condition.

  18. Characterization of miRNomes in Acute and Chronic Myeloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xiong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid leukemias are highly diverse diseases and have been shown to be associated with microRNA (miRNA expression aberrations. The present study involved an in-depth miRNome analysis of two human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cell lines, HL-60 and THP-1, and one human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML cell line, K562, via massively parallel signature sequencing. mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines that were established previously in our lab facilitated an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression patterns. miRNA expression profiling followed by differential expression analysis and target prediction suggested numerous miRNA signatures in AML and CML cell lines. Some miRNAs may act as either tumor suppressors or oncomiRs in AML and CML by targeting key genes in AML and CML pathways. Expression patterns of cell type-specific miRNAs could partially reflect the characteristics of K562, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, such as actin filament-based processes, responsiveness to stimulus and phagocytic activity. miRNAs may also regulate myeloid differentiation, since they usually suppress differentiation regulators. Our study provides a resource to further investigate the employment of miRNAs in human leukemia subtyping, leukemogenesis and myeloid development. In addition, the distinctive miRNA signatures may be potential candidates for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of myeloid leukemias.

  19. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Anna; Österroos, Albin; Hassan, Sadia Bashir; Gullbo, Joachim; Rickardson, Linda; Jarvius, Malin; Nygren, Peter; Fryknäs, Mårten; Höglund, Martin; Larsson, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 mu M drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low...

  20. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. The BIM deletion polymorphism: A paradigm of a permissive interaction between germline and acquired TKI resistance factors in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Tun Kiat; Chin, Hui San; Chuah, Charles T H; Huang, John W J; Ng, King-Pan; Khaw, Seong Lin; Huang, David C S; Ong, S Tiong

    2016-01-19

    Both germline polymorphisms and tumor-specific genetic alterations can determine the response of a cancer to a given therapy. We previously reported a germline deletion polymorphism in the BIM gene that was sufficient to mediate intrinsic resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), as well as other cancers [1]. The deletion polymorphism favored the generation of BIM splice forms lacking the pro-apoptotic BH3 domain, conferring a relative resistance to the TKI imatinib (IM). However, CML patients with the BIM deletion polymorphism developed both partial and complete IM resistance. To understand the mechanisms underlying the latter, we grew CML cells either with or without the BIM deletion polymorphism in increasing IM concentrations. Under these conditions, the BIM deletion polymorphism enhanced the emergence of populations with complete IM resistance, mimicking the situation in patients. Importantly, the combined use of TKIs with the BH3 mimetic ABT-737 overcame the BCR-ABL1-dependent and -independent resistance mechanisms found in these cells. Our results illustrate the interplay between germline and acquired genetic factors in confering TKI resistance, and suggest a therapeutic strategy for patients with complete TKI resistance associated with the BIM deletion polymorphism.

  2. The HDAC inhibitor SB939 overcomes resistance to BCR-ABL kinase Inhibitors conferred by the BIM deletion polymorphism in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzan, Muhammad; Chuah, Charles T H; Ko, Tun Kiat; Ong, S Tiong

    2017-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment has been improved by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate (IM) but various factors can cause TKI resistance in patients with CML. One factor which contributes to TKI resistance is a germline intronic deletion polymorphism in the BCL2-like 11 (BIM) gene which impairs the expression of pro-apoptotic splice isoforms of BIM. SB939 (pracinostat) is a hydroxamic acid based HDAC inhibitor with favorable pharmacokinetic, physicochemical and pharmaceutical properties, and we investigated if this drug could overcome BIM deletion polymorphism-induced TKI resistance. We found that SB939 corrects BIM pre-mRNA splicing in CML cells with the BIM deletion polymorphism, and induces apoptotic cell death in CML cell lines and primary cells with the BIM deletion polymorphism. More importantly, SB939 both decreases the viability of CML cell lines and primary CML progenitors with the BIM deletion and restores TKI-sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that SB939 overcomes BIM deletion polymorphism-induced TKI resistance, and suggest that SB939 may be useful in treating CML patients with BIM deletion-associated TKI resistance.

  3. Isolated Ocular Manifestation of Relapsed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Presenting as Myeloid Blast Crisis in a Patient on Imatinib Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Gulati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blast phase in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML has rarely been reported to involve extramedullary sites like skin, lymph nodes, and central nervous system. Clinical history, characteristic hematologic findings (elevated leukocyte counts, myelocytic predominance, and basophilia, and Philadelphia chromosome are of high diagnostic significance especially in isolated extramedullary presentations. We describe a unique case of CML relapse with blast phase involving the eye. A 66-year-old man with a known diagnosis of CML on imatinib and in molecular remission for 3 years presented with a painful blind eye. Histologic examination revealed diffuse involvement of choroid, iris, vitreous humor, and the optic nerve by blast cells. The blasts expressed CD34, aberrant TdT, and a myeloid phenotype (CD13, CD33, and CD117. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of vitreous fluid detected BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangement. Additionally, trisomy 8 and gains of 9 and 22 were seen which were not present in the initial diagnostic marrow study 3 years ago. At relapse, the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and the cerebrospinal fluid were not involved by CML. Patient received induction chemotherapy and single dose prophylactic intrathecal methotrexate and was maintained on antityrosine kinase therapy and eventually underwent allogenic stem cell transplantation.

  4. A single-tube allele specific-polymerase chain reaction to detect T315I resistant mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auewarakul Chirayu U

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD mutation is the major mechanism contributing to suboptimal response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI in BCR-ABL-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients. T315I mutation, as one of the most frequent KD mutations, has been shown to be strongly associated with TKI resistance and subsequent therapeutic failure. A simple and sensitive method is thus required to detect T315I mutation at the earliest stage. Methods A single-tube allele specific-polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR method was developed to detect T315I mutation in a mixture of normal and mutant alleles of varying dilutions. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC and direct sequencing were performed as a comparison to AS-PCR. Results T315I mutant bands were observed in the mixtures containing as low as 0.5-1% of mutant alleles by AS-PCR. The detection sensitivity of DHPLC was around 1.5-3% dilution whereas sequencing analysis was unable to detect below 6.25% dilution. Conclusion A single-tube AS-PCR is a rapid and sensitive screening method for T315I mutation. Detection of the most resistant leukemic clone in CML patients undergoing TKI therapy should be feasible with this simple and inexpensive method.

  5. The HDAC inhibitor SB939 overcomes resistance to BCR-ABL kinase Inhibitors conferred by the BIM deletion polymorphism in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzan, Muhammad; Chuah, Charles T. H.; Ko, Tun Kiat; Ong, S. Tiong

    2017-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment has been improved by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate (IM) but various factors can cause TKI resistance in patients with CML. One factor which contributes to TKI resistance is a germline intronic deletion polymorphism in the BCL2-like 11 (BIM) gene which impairs the expression of pro-apoptotic splice isoforms of BIM. SB939 (pracinostat) is a hydroxamic acid based HDAC inhibitor with favorable pharmacokinetic, physicochemical and pharmaceutical properties, and we investigated if this drug could overcome BIM deletion polymorphism-induced TKI resistance. We found that SB939 corrects BIM pre-mRNA splicing in CML cells with the BIM deletion polymorphism, and induces apoptotic cell death in CML cell lines and primary cells with the BIM deletion polymorphism. More importantly, SB939 both decreases the viability of CML cell lines and primary CML progenitors with the BIM deletion and restores TKI-sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that SB939 overcomes BIM deletion polymorphism-induced TKI resistance, and suggest that SB939 may be useful in treating CML patients with BIM deletion-associated TKI resistance. PMID:28301600

  6. A Multi-centric Bioequivalence Trial in Ph+ Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients to Assess Bioequivalence and Safety Evaluation of Generic Imatinib Mesylate 400 mg Tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Rachna; Sharma, Manju; Monif, Tausif; Iyer, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to characterize the pharmacokinetic profile and to assess bioequivalence of the sponsor’s test formulation (imatinib mesylate 400 mg tablets) with an innovator product (Gleevec 400 mg tablets, Novartis Pharmaceuticals) under fed conditions, in adult patients of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia (Ph+ CML) stabilized on imatinib mesylate 400 mg. In addition, the aim of this study was to monitor the safety profile of investigational medicinal products (IMPs). Materials and Methods A multicenter, randomized, open label, two-period, crossover, single dose bioequivalence study was designed for conduct under fed conditions in 42 adult Ph+ CML patients already stabilized on imatinib 400 mg tablets. Pharmacokinetic parameters Tmax, Cmax, and AUC0-24 were calculated using a non-compartmental model on validated WinNonlin software. Validated SAS software was used for statistical evaluation of data. The safety profile of investigational products was monitored during the course of study by applying a clinical process for recording observed untoward effects postadministration of investigational products. Results The 90% confidence intervals for the test/reference mean ratios of the ln-transformed PK variables Cmax (99.0%) and AUC0-24 (99.2%) were within an acceptable range of 80%-125%, as per bioequivalence assumptions. Both formulations were well tolerated after oral administration of IMPs. Conclusion The test product was found to be bioequivalent and safe, and thus can be used interchangeably in clinical practice. PMID:26875198

  7. DNA Repair—A Double-Edged Sword in the Genomic Stability of Cancer Cells—The Case of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Pawlowska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability is a common feature of cancer cells, which can result from aberrant DNA damage reaction (DDR. We and others showed that the well-known BCR-ABL1 fusion oncogene, the cause of chronic myeloid leukemia, induced an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and conferred therapeutic drug resistance by suppression of apoptotic signaling, prolonged G2/M arrest and stimulation of several pathways of DNA repair. However, to protect from apoptosis, cancer cells may tolerate some DNA lesions, which may increase genomic instability. Moreover, BCR/ABL1-stimulated DNA repair might be faulty, especially non-homologous end joining in its alternative forms. Normal DNA repair can remove DNA damage and prevent mutations, reducing genome instability, but on the other hand, due to its imprecise nature, it may increase genomic instability by increasing the ratio of mutagenic DNA lesions. The example of BCR-ABL1-expressing cells shows that DNA repair can both increase and decrease genomic instability of cancer cells and understanding the mechanism of the regulation of these opposite effects would be helpful in anticancer strategies.

  8. p53 modulates the effect of ribosomal protein S6 kinase1 (S6K1) on cisplatin toxicity in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ling-Yi; Kan, Wai-Ming

    2017-03-14

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by the expression of the oncoprotein, BCR-ABL. BCR-ABL inhibitors revolutionized CML chemotherapy while blast crisis (BC) CML patients are less responsive. Since suppression of ribosomal protein S6 kinase1 (S6K1) phosphorylation reverses the resistance to BCR-ABL inhibitor in CML cells and S6K1 inhibitors augment cisplatin toxicity in lung cancer cells, we speculated that combination of S6K1 inhibitor and cisplatin may be beneficial for eliminating BC CML cells. To our surprise, S6K1 inhibition decreased cisplatin-induced DNA damage and cell death only in p53(-/-) BC CML cells but not in p53(+/+) BC CML cells. During the progression of CML, p53 expression either decreases or mutates. Moreover, the expression of p53 affects drug response of CML cells. Our results confirmed that S6K1 inhibition reversed cisplatin toxicity is dependent on p53 expression in CML cells. Moreover, p53 attenuated the phosphorylation and localization of S6K1 via attenuating 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) phosphorylation. Furthermore, S6K1 acts via DNA-PKcs to regulate H2AX phosphorylation and PARP cleavage, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that p53/PDK1/S6K1 is a novel pathway regulating cisplatin toxicity in BC CML cells.

  9. [A female chronic myeloid leukemia patient who gave birth after stopping imatinib intentionally but who maintained a major molecular response with interferon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Takeshi; Yasuda, Masahiro; Umeda, Michi; Nagaya, Katsuhiro; Tachi, Tomoya; Goto, Hideko; Kasahara, Senji; Teramachi, Hitomi; Goto, Chitoshi

    2015-04-01

    Imatinib was administrated to a 38-year-old woman with chronic myeloid leukemia(CML). A major molecular response (MMR)(≤5 copies/0.5 μgRNA in Amp-CML detected using the transcription mediated amplification/hybridization protection assay(TMA/HPA)method)was achieved in 18 months. She maintained MMR for 10 months, and wished to become pregnant. Imatinib was stopped intentionally because she wished to plan a pregnancy, but we prescribed interferon alpha (IFN-a)due to the likelihood of the CML recurring after pregnancy. The nausea caused by IFN-a was improved by administrating it during the night, and she gave birth to a healthy baby by a normal delivery, whilst maintaining MMR. In this case, IFN-a treatment gave good clinical results, the patient's prognosis was improved, and she could maintain a good quality of life. We consider this to be an informative example of IFN-a therapy for CML during pregnancy.

  10. Splenic irradiation before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia: long-term follow-up of a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratwohl, Alois; Iacobelli, Simona; Bootsman, Natalia; van Biezen, Anja; Baldomero, Helen; Arcese, William; Arnold, Renate; Bron, Dominique; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ernst, Peter; Ferrant, Augustin; Frassoni, Francesco; Gahrton, Gösta; Richard, Carlos; Kolb, Hans Jochem; Link, Hartmut; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ruutu, Tapani; Schattenberg, Anton; Schmitz, Norbert; Torres-Gomez, Antonio; Zwaan, Ferry; Apperley, Jane; Olavarria, Eduardo; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-05-01

    In the context of discussions on the reproducibility of clinical studies, we reanalyzed a prospective randomized study on the role of splenic irradiation as adjunct to the conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Between 1986 and 1989, a total of 229 patients with CML were randomized; of these, 225 (98 %; 112 with, 113 without splenic irradiation) could be identified in the database and their survival updated. Results confirmed the early findings with no significant differences in all measured endpoints (overall survival at 25 years: 42.7 %, 32.0-52.4 % vs 52.9 %, 43.2-62.6 %; p = 0.355, log rank test). Additional splenic irradiation failed to reduce relapse incidence. It did not increase non-relapse mortality nor the risk of late secondary malignancies. Comforting are the long-term results from this predefined consecutive cohort of patients: more than 60 % were alive at plus 25 years when they were transplanted with a low European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) risk sore. This needs to be considered today when treatment options are discussed for patients who failed initial tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and have an available low risk HLA-identical donor.

  11. Follow-up of the tumor load in patients with de novo chronic myeloid leukemia and in complete cytogenetic remission treated with imatinib in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guevara, Gonzalo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the hematological, cytogenetic, and molecular responses in Colombian patients with CML chronic myeloid leukemia (CML treated with imatinib.Methods: Two groups of patients, one with the novo diagnostic and another in state of complete cytogenetic remission were followed for 12 months with quantitative PCR evaluations every three months and with chromosomal analysis every 6 months.Results: The group with the novo diagnosis showed 50% of complete cytogenetic remission at 12 months while the other 50% were considered to have primary resistance. Respect the molecular analysis, 10.5% of the patients reached undetectable BCR-ABL transcripts at 12 months. In the complete cytogenetic remission group, 10.6% lost the state of complete cytogenetic remission at 12 months, 50% reached undetectable BCR-ABL transcripts but 10% showed levels higher than 10%, which in our standardization was equal to no molecular response. Conclusions: Despite having received the conventional dosages of 400 mg/day of imatinib, the cytogenetic and molecular responses obtained in our group of Colombian patients with CML, were lower than those in other international studies

  12. Up-regulation of WRN and DNA ligase IIIalpha in chronic myeloid leukemia: consequences for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallmyr, Annahita; Tomkinson, Alan E; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2008-08-15

    Expression of oncogenic BCR-ABL in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) results in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) that in turn cause increased DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We have previously shown increased error-prone repair of DSBs by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) in CML cells. Recent reports have identified alternative NHEJ pathways that are highly error prone, prompting us to examine the role of the alternative NHEJ pathways in BCR-ABL-positive CML. Importantly, we show that key proteins in the major NHEJ pathway, Artemis and DNA ligase IV, are down-regulated, whereas DNA ligase IIIalpha, and the protein deleted in Werner syndrome, WRN, are up-regulated. DNA ligase IIIalpha and WRN form a complex that is recruited to DSBs in CML cells. Furthermore, "knockdown" of either DNA ligase IIIalpha or WRN leads to increased accumulation of unrepaired DSBs, demonstrating that they contribute to the repair of DSBs. These results indicate that altered DSB repair in CML cells is caused by the increased activity of an alternative NHEJ repair pathway, involving DNA ligase IIIalpha and WRN. We suggest that, although the repair of ROS-induced DSBs by this pathway contributes to the survival of CML cells, the resultant genomic instability drives disease progression.

  13. Clinical reagents of GM-CSF and IFN-α induce the generation of functional chronic myeloid leukemia dendritic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Kaizhi; Xie, Xiaobao; Qiu, Guoqiang; Gu, Weiying

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been successfully induced in vitro from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells, which may provide a promising immunotherapeutic protocol for CML. To facilitate the optimization of DCs-based vaccination protocols, we investigated the efficiency of in vitro generation of DCs from bone marrow mononuclear cells of CML patients by clinical reagents of GM-CSF and IFN-α. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were isolated from eight CML patients and CML-DCs were generated in the presence of different cytokines (Group A: GM-CSF for research and IL-4 for research; Group B: GM-CSF for injection and IFN-α for injection) in RMPI-1640 medium containing 10% human AB serum. After 8 days, the morphologic features of CML-DCs were observed and their immunophenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. The activity of CML-DCs was determined by evaluating their ability to stimulate allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (allo-MLR) and anti-leukemic cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The culture protocols were successful in generating functional CML-DCs from all the CML patients as evidenced by the significant upregulation of CD80, CD86, CD83 HLA-DR and CD1a compared to pre-cultured (p cell stimulating proliferation capacity (p protocols for CML patients.

  14. Betanin a betacyanin pigment purified from fruits of Opuntia ficus-indica induces apoptosis in human chronic myeloid leukemia Cell line-K562.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekanth, Devalraju; Arunasree, M K; Roy, Karnati R; Chandramohan Reddy, T; Reddy, Gorla V; Reddanna, Pallu

    2007-11-01

    Betalains are water-soluble nitrogenous vacuolar pigments present in flowers and fruits of many caryophyllales with potent antioxidant properties. In the present study the antiproliferative effects of betanin, a principle betacyanin pigment, isolated from the fruits of Opuntia ficus-indica, was evaluated on human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line (K562). The results show dose and time dependent decrease in the proliferation of K562 cells treated with betanin with an IC(50) of 40 microM. Further studies involving scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed the apoptotic characteristics such as chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing. Agarose electrophoresis of genomic DNA of cells treated with betanin showed fragmentation pattern typical for apoptotic cells. Flow cytometric analysis of cells treated with 40 microM betanin showed 28.4% of cells in sub G0/G1 phase. Betanin treatment to the cells also induced the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage, down regulation Bcl-2, and reduction in the membrane potentials. Confocal microscopic studies on the cells treated with betanin suggest the entry of betanin into the cells. These studies thus demonstrate that betanin induces apoptosis in K562 cells through the intrinsic pathway and is mediated by the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, and PARP cleavage. The antiproliferative effects of betanin add further value to the nutritional characteristics of the fruits of O. ficus-indica.

  15. Real-life comparison of severe vascular events and other non-hematological complications in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia undergoing second-line nilotinib or dasatinib treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora-Tybor, Joanna; Medras, Ewa; Calbecka, Malgorzata; Kolkowska-Leśniak, Agnieszka; Ponikowska-Szyba, Edyta; Robak, Tadeusz; Jamroziak, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the rates of significant non-hematological adverse events (AEs) in 105 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treated with second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKIs) dasatinib or nilotinib used as second-line therapy in Polish tertiary care centers. Our analysis revealed that in a "real life setting," nearly half of patients with CML on second-generation TKIs suffer from therapy complications. Grade 2-5 non-hematological AEs were observed in 40% of patients treated with nilotinib and in 42% treated with dasatinib (p=0.83). Severe vascular events including peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) occurred in 11% of patients on nilotinib and 4% on dasatinib (p=0.16). Pleural effusion occurred more often in the dasatinib group (26%) than in the nilotinib group (2%) (p=0.003). Importantly, most AEs occurred late, after more than 1 year of treatment. Since AEs are most often the reason for poor therapy compliance, careful monitoring of tolerability is crucial for an optimal treatment response in CML.

  16. Leucemia mieloide crônica e outras doenças mieloproliferativas crônicas Chronic myeloid leukemia and other chronic myeloproliferative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaneuza M. Funke

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A leucemia mieloide crônica (LMC é uma doença clonal da medula óssea caracterizada pela presença do cromossomo Philadelphia (Ph, resultante da translocação entre os cromossomos 9 e 22. O gene híbrido assim formado, BCR-ABL codifica proteínas com atividade de tirosinoquinases que regulam o crescimento celular. A partir da década de 80, o transplante alogênico de células-tronco hematopoéticas (TCTH se tornou tratamento de escolha para pacientes com idade menor que 55 anos de idade e doador compatível. Não obstante, a partir do advento dos inibidores de tirosinoquinases, drogas de alta eficácia e baixa toxicidade, houve uma mudança no algoritmo de tratamento da LMC. As indicações do TCTH foram restritas em decorrência da mortalidade relacionada a este procedimento e o mesilato de imatinibe tornou-se o novo tratamento de escolha para esta enfermidade. No Brasil e possivelmente em outros países em desenvolvimento, as condições socioeconômicas fazem com que o TCTH ainda seja considerado como primeira linha de tratamento em algumas situações. O TCTH permanece indicado nas doenças (ou neoplasias mieloproliferativas, como a mielofibrose primária em situações de alto risco e pacientes portadores de policitemia vera ou trombocitose essencial que tenham evoluído para mielofibrose com características de alto risco.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a clonal disease of the bone marrow characterized by the presence of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph which results from translocation between chromosome nine and 22. The hybrid gene, BCR-ABL, encodes proteins with tyrosine kinase activity that regulate cell growth. From the 80´s allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT has become the treatment of choice for patients younger than 55 years of age and donor. However, from the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, drugs of high efficacy and low toxicity, there was a change in the treatment algorithm of CML. The indications of

  17. Characterization of the CDR3 structure of the Vβ21 T cell clone in patients with P210(BCR-ABL)-positive chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Xianfeng; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Li, Bo; Chen, Yu; Yan, Xiaojuan; Li, Yangqiu

    2011-10-01

    The clonally expanded T cells identified in most cancer patients that respond to tumor-associated antigen such as P210(BCR-ABL) protein have definite, specific antitumor cytotoxicity. T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ CDR3 repertoire diversity was analyzed in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and BCR-ABL(+) B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) by GeneScan. A high frequency of oligoclonal expansion of the TCR Vβ21 subfamily was observed in the peripheral blood of CML and B-ALL patients. These clonally expanded Vβ21 T cells were correlated with the pathophysiologic process of CML. A conserved amino acid motif (SLxxV) was observed within the CDR3 region in only 3 patients with CML. Preferential usage of the Jβ segments was also observed in a minority of patients. The 3-dimensional structures of the CDR3 region containing the same motif or using the same Jβ segment displayed low similarity; on the contrary, the conformation of the CDR3 region containing no conserved motif in some T cell clones was highly similar. In conclusion, our findings indicate a high frequency of TCR Vβ21 subfamily expansion in p210(BCR-ABL)-positive CML and B-ALL patients. The characterization of the CDR3 structure was complex. Regrettably, at this time it was not possible to confirm that the Vβ21 T cell clones were derived from the stimulation of p210(BCR-ABL) protein.

  18. Recurrent DNMT3A R882 Mutations in Chinese Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Somatic mutations of DNMT3A gene have recently been reported in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We examined the entire coding sequences of DNMT3A gene by high-resolution melting analysis and sequencing in Chinese patients with myeloid malignancies. R882 mutations were found in 12/182 AML and in 4/51 MDS, but not in either 79 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), or 57 myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), or 4 chronic monomyelocytic leukemia. No other DNMT3A mutation...

  19. Precision Medicine for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints. PMID:26514194

  20. Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes of 51 Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treated with a Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor at a Single Institution from 2002 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Noriaki; Yoshida, Shuro; Kawano, Sayaka; Kuriyama, Takuro; Yamashita, Kiyoshi; Ochiai, Hidenobu; Shimoda, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Ueda, Akira; Kikuchi, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Although clinical trials of first- and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been shown to improve the prognosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), there is still uncertainty about the clinical features, treatment outcomes, adverse effects, and other possible problems of their use in the clinical setting. We retrospectively analyzed 51 CML patients treated with TKIs at a single institution between 2002 and 2014. The patients (median age: 53.8 years) were classified as having chronic (n = 48), accelerated (n = 2), or blastic phase (n = 1) CML. Our treatments included both 1st generation TKIs (60.8%) and 2nd generation TKIs (39.2%). We found that the overall response rates of complete cytogenetic response (CCyR), major molecular response (MMR), and MR4 (molecular response 4) were 90.2%, 78.4%, and 64.7%, respectively. Second line 2nd generation TKIs had response rates equivalent to those of 1st line 1st generation TKIs. Moreover, 1st line 2nd generation TKIs tended to achieve an early response rate. Overall survival (OS) at 5 years was 93.2%. Sudden blastic crisis (BC) occurred in 2 CML patients receiving TKI with CCyR status. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed for BC (n = 1) and sudden BC (n = 2). Side effects of all grades (1-3) and grade 3 alone were 64.7% and 11.8%, respectively. Dose reduction, replacement with another TKI, or low dose TKI treatment may be useful methods to control side effects. Further reasons of TKI discontinuation were economic problems (n = 3) and pregnancy (n = 1). Consequently, our treatment strategy for CML demonstrated good response rate and OS. Currently, treatment discontinuation due to intolerance, resistance, economic problems, pregnancy, and sudden BC remains a concern in clinical practice.

  1. Liver Involvement with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Mathews

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver involvement with acute myeloid leukemia (AML is rarely reported. The majority of published cases suggest a cholestatic picture and obstructive jaundice at presentation. On the contrary, our patient presented with transaminitis without cholestasis. Elevated liver function tests persisted in our patient despite cholecystectomy; however, they normalized with chemotherapy administration, suggesting that AML was the causative effect of the hepatitis-like picture. Our review of the literature revealed that most reported cases of AML with liver involvement had short-lived remissions and an overall ominous prognosis. In our opinion, patients who have liver involvement with AML should be offered alternative investigational therapies with a low hepatic toxicity profile.

  2. Blood group change in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prakash, N. P.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood group antigens are either sugars or proteins found attached to the red blood cell membrane. ABO blood group antigens are the most clinically important antigens because they are the most immunogenic. As red blood cell antigens are inherited traits, they are usually not altered throughout the life of an individual. There have been occasional case reports of ABO blood group antigen change in malignant conditions. We report two such cases of ABO antigen alteration associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These patients had suppression of their blood group antigens during their leukemic phase, and the antigens were reexpressed when the patients attained remission.

  3. Effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on spermatogenesis and pituitary gonadal axis in males with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassin MA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The introduction of several classes of targeted therapeutics for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML raises the question of whether male fertility is affected and the degree of this affection, if any, among the different generations of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. Additionally, when two drugs are equally effective, the drug with less toxic effect on fertility is favourable. Our aims were to evaluate semen parameters and pituitary gonadal function before and four months after starting TKIs namely, dasatinib, nilotinib, and imatinib in patients with CML. Design: Prospective study. Setting, patients and interventions: We studied the effect of TKIs' first generation (imatinib and second generation (dasatinib and nilotinib on semen parameters and endocrine functions in 20 eugonadal male patients with CML, aged between 35 to 51 years. They were receiving imatinib (400 mg once daily, dasatinib (100 mg once daily or nilotinib (300 mg twice daily as upfront therapy. We assessed the serum gonadotropins (LH and FSH and testosterone (T secretion and sperm parameters before and after four months of using these TKIs. Results: Four months after starting TKIs, serum testosterone, LH and FSH concentrations decreased significantly. The total sperm count (SC, total and rapid progressive sperm motility, and % sperms with normal morphology decreased significantly versus pre-treatment. After 4 months of therapy, dasatinib had comparatively the least deleterious effects on SC, ejaculate volume (SV, sperm motility and % of sperms with normal morphology (%NM compared to imatinib and nilotinib. Significant correlations were found between serum T concentrations and semen parameters before and after TKIs therapy including SC (r = 0.658 and r = 0.73 respectively, p < 0.001, rapid progressive motility (r = 0.675 and r = 0.758, respectively; p < 0.001, and the % NM (r = 0.752 and r = 0.834, respectively; p < 0.001. After TKIs therapy, LH were

  4. Histamine revisited: Role in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine dihydrochloride (HDC is derived from biogenic amine histamine. It suppresses the production of reactive oxygen species which inhibits the stimulation of T cells and natural killer (NK cells. Co-administration of the cytokine interleukin (IL-2 and HDC assists the activation of T cells and NK cells by IL-2, causing in the destruction of cancer cells, including those of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. A significantly longer leukemia-free survival (LFS; primary endpoint was demonstrated in a phase III trial in adult patients with AML in first or subsequent remission, in those who received subcutaneous HDC and concomitant subcutaneous IL-2 as maintenance therapy compared to that of patients receiving no treatment. However, the difference in overall survival (OS between the two groups was not significant. Patients had acceptable levels of adverse effects. Thus, HDC in addition to IL-2 appears to be a useful maintenance therapy option for adult patients with AML in remission.

  5. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Prolonged T1 relaxation of the hemopoietic bone marrow in patients with chronic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Sørensen, P G; Thomsen, C;

    1990-01-01

    Eleven patients with chronic leukemia (7 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and 4 with chronic myeloid leukemia) were evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T1 relaxation time measurements by use of a 1.5 tesla whole body MR scanner. Bone marrow biopsies were obtained from the posterior...

  7. A retrospective comparison of autologous and unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation in myelodysplastic syndrome and secondary acute myeloid leukemia: a report on behalf of the Chronic Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Ali, H.K.; Brand, R.; Biezen, A. van; Finke, J.; Boogaerts, M.; Fauser, A.A.; Egeler, M.; Cahn, J.Y.; Arnold, R.; Biersack, H.; Niederwieser, D.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2007-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an effective treatment for myelodysplasia (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). In this study, outcome of 593 patients with MDS/sAML after autologous and allogeneic HCT from a matched unrelated donor (MUD) were compared. A total of 167 (28%) p

  8. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  9. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Differential contributions of STAT5A and STAT5B to stress protection and tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance of chronic myeloid leukemia stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casetti, Luana; Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Najjar, Imen; Plo, Isabelle; Augé, Sylvie; Roy, Lydia; Chomel, Jean-Claude; Lauret, Evelyne; Turhan, Ali G; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    STAT5 fulfills essential roles in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a prototypical stem cell malignancy. However, the specific contributions of the two related genes STAT5A and STAT5B have not been determined. In this study, we used a RNAi-based strategy to establish participation of these genes to CML disease and persistence following targeted therapy. We showed that STAT5A/STAT5B double-knockdown triggers CML cell apoptosis and suppresses both normal and CML HSC long-term clonogenic potential. STAT5A and STAT5B exhibited similar prosurvival activity, but STAT5A attenuation alone was ineffective at impairing growth of normal and CML CD34(+) cells isolated at diagnosis. In contrast, STAT5A attenuation was sufficient to enhance basal oxidative stress and DNA damage of normal CD34(+) and CML cells. Furthermore, it weakened the ability to manage exogenous oxidative stress, increased p53 (TRP53)/CHK-2 (CHEK2) stress pathway activation, and enhanced prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD)-3 (EGLN3) mRNA expression. Only STAT5A and its transactivation domain-deficient mutant STAT5AΔ749 specifically rescued these activities. STAT5A attenuation was also active at inhibiting growth of CML CD34(+) cells from patients with acquired resistance to imatinib. Our findings show that STAT5A has a selective role in contributing to stress resistance through unconventional mechanisms, offering new opportunities to eradicate the most primitive and tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant CML cells with an additional potential to eradicate persistent stem cell populations.

  11. Patan hospital experience in treating philadelphia chromosome/BCR-ABL1 positive chronic myeloid leukemia patients with gleevec (imatinib mesylate; the first generation specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerman Mark

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is caused by the abnormal fusion protein BCR-ABL1, a constitutively active tyrosine kinase and product of the Philadelphia chromosome. Gleevec (Imatinib mesylate is a selective inhibitor of this kinase. Treatment with this agent is known to result in hematologic, cytogenetic, and molecular responses. Patan hospital (Patan, Nepal is one of the Gleevec International Patient Assistance Program (GIPAP centers for patients with CML. Methods A total of 106 Philadelphia positive CML patients were enrolled in our center between Feb 2003 and Jun 2008, and 103 of them were eligible for cytogenetic and/or hematologic response analyses. Results Out of 103 patients, 27% patients underwent cytogenetic analysis. Imatinib induced major cytogenetic responses in 89% and complete hematologic responses in almost 100% of the patients with confirmed CML. After a mean follow up of 27 months, an estimated 90% of the patients on imatinib remained in hematologic remission and more than 90% of the patients are still alive. About 30% of patients developed some form of manageable myelosuppression. A few patients developed non-hematologic toxic side effects such as edema and hepatotoxicity. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that imatinib is safe to use in a developing country. Furthermore, we demonstrate that imatinib is very effective and induced long lasting responses in a high proportion of patients with Ph chromosome/BCR-ABL1 positive CML. Imatinib is well tolerated by our patients. The lack of cytogenetic analysis in the majority of our patients hindered our ability to detect inadequate responses to imatinib and adjust therapy appropriately.

  12. Blockade of Y177 and Nuclear Translocation of Bcr-Abl Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianyin; Huang, Zhenglan; Gao, Miao; Cao, Weixi; Xiao, Qin; Luo, Hongwei; Feng, Wenli

    2017-03-02

    The gradual emerging of resistance to imatinib urgently calls for the development of new therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The fusion protein Bcr-Abl, which promotes the malignant transformation of CML cells, is mainly located in the cytoplasm, while the c-Abl protein which is expressed in the nucleus can induce apoptosis. Based on the hetero-dimerization of FKBP (the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein) and FRB (the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of the protein kinase, mTOR) mediated by AP21967, we constructed a nuclear transport system to induce cytoplasmic Bcr-Abl into nuclear. In this study, we reported the construction of the nuclear transport system, and we demonstrated that FN3R (three nuclear localization signals were fused to FRBT2098L with a FLAG tag), HF2S (two FKBP domains were in tandem and fused to the SH2 domain of Grb2 with an HA tag) and Bcr-Abl form a complexus upon AP21967. Bcr-Abl was imported into the nucleus successfully by the nuclear transport system. The nuclear transport system inhibited CML cell proliferation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathways mainly by HF2S. It was proven that nuclear located Bcr-Abl induced CML cell (including imatinib-resistant K562G01 cells) apoptosis by activation of p73 and its downstream molecules. In summary, our study provides a new targeted therapy for the CML patients even with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI)-resistance.

  13. Leukemic stem cell persistence in chronic myeloid leukemia patients in deep molecular response induced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the impact of therapy discontinuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Jean Claude; Bonnet, Marie Laure; Sorel, Nathalie; Sloma, Ivan; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Rea, Delphine; Legros, Laurence; Marfaing-Koka, Anne; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Ame, Shanti; Guerci-Bresler, Agnès; Rousselot, Philippe; Turhan, Ali G.

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy has modified the natural history of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) allowing an increase of the overall and disease-free survival, especially in patients in whom molecular residual disease becomes undetectable. However, it has been demonstrated that BCR-ABL1- expressing leukemic stem cells (LSCs) persist in patients in deep molecular response. It has also been shown that the discontinuation of Imatinib leads to a molecular relapse in the majority of cases. To determine a possible relationship between these two phenomena, we have evaluated by clonogenic and long-term culture initiating cell (LTC-IC) assays, the presence of BCR-ABL1-expressing LSCs in marrow samples from 21 patients in deep molecular response for three years after TKI therapy (mean duration seven years). LSCs were detected in 4/21 patients. Discontinuation of TKI therapy in 13/21 patients led to a rapid molecular relapse in five patients (4 without detectable LSCs and one with detectable LSCs). No relapse occurred in the eight patients still on TKI therapy, whether LSCs were detectable or not. Thus, this study demonstrates for the first time the in vivo efficiency of TKIs, both in the progenitor and the LSC compartments. It also confirms the persistence of leukemic stem cells in patients in deep molecular response, certainly at the origin of relapses. Finally, it emphasizes the difficulty of detecting residual LSCs due to their rarity and their low BCR-ABL1 mRNA expression. PMID:27167108

  14. Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Sequential Treatment of Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the United States: A Decision Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Rochau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently several tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs are approved for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Our goal was to identify the optimal sequential treatment strategy in terms of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness for CML patients within the US health care context. We evaluated 18 treatment strategies regarding survival, quality-adjusted survival, and costs. For model parameters, the literature data, expert surveys, registry data, and economic databases were used. Evaluated strategies included imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib, ponatinib, stem-cell transplantation (SCT, and chemotherapy. We developed a Markov state-transition model, which was analyzed as a cohort simulation over a lifelong time horizon with a third-party payer perspective and discount rate of 3%. Remaining life expectancies ranged from 5.4 years (3.9 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs for chemotherapy treatment without TKI to 14.4 years (11.1 QALYs for nilotinib→dasatinib→chemotherapy/SCT. In the economic evaluation, imatinib→chemotherapy/SCT resulted in an incremental cost-utility ratio (ICUR of $171,700/QALY compared to chemotherapy without TKI. Imatinib→nilotinib→chemotherapy/SCT yielded an ICUR of $253,500/QALY compared to imatinib→chemotherapy/SCT. Nilotinib→dasatinib→chemotherapy/SCT yielded an ICUR of $445,100/QALY compared to imatinib→nilotinib→chemotherapy/SCT. All remaining strategies were excluded due to dominance of the clinically superior strategies. Based on our analysis and current treatment guidelines, imatinib→nilotinib→chemotherapy/SCT and nilotinib→dasatinib→chemotherapy/SCT can be considered cost-effective for patients with CML, depending on willingness-to-pay.

  15. Determination of serum levels of imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: validation and application of a new analytical method to monitor treatment compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Marcondes Rezende

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to monitor imatinib mesylate therapeutically in the Tumor Biology Laboratory, Department of Hematology and Hemotherapy, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (USP. A simple and sensitive method to quantify imatinib and its metabolite (CGP74588 in human serum was developed and fully validated in order to monitor treatment compliance. METHODS: The method used to quantify these compounds in serum included protein precipitation extraction followed by instrumental analysis using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The method was validated for several parameters, including selectivity, precision, accuracy, recovery and linearity. RESULTS: The parameters evaluated during the validation stage exhibited satisfactory results based on the Food and Drug Administration and the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA guidelines for validating bioanalytical methods. These parameters also showed a linear correlation greater than 0.99 for the concentration range between 0.500 µg/mL and 10.0 µg/mL and a total analysis time of 13 minutes per sample. This study includes results (imatinib serum concentrations for 308 samples from patients being treated with imatinib mesylate. CONCLUSION: The method developed in this study was successfully validated and is being efficiently used to measure imatinib concentrations in samples from chronic myeloid leukemia patients to check treatment compliance. The imatinib serum levels of patients achieving a major molecular response were significantly higher than those of patients who did not achieve this result. These results are thus consistent with published reports concerning other populations.

  16. Blockade of Y177 and Nuclear Translocation of Bcr-Abl Inhibits Proliferation and Promotes Apoptosis in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

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    Qianyin Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The gradual emerging of resistance to imatinib urgently calls for the development of new therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. The fusion protein Bcr-Abl, which promotes the malignant transformation of CML cells, is mainly located in the cytoplasm, while the c-Abl protein which is expressed in the nucleus can induce apoptosis. Based on the hetero-dimerization of FKBP (the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein and FRB (the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain of the protein kinase, mTOR mediated by AP21967, we constructed a nuclear transport system to induce cytoplasmic Bcr-Abl into nuclear. In this study, we reported the construction of the nuclear transport system, and we demonstrated that FN3R (three nuclear localization signals were fused to FRBT2098L with a FLAG tag, HF2S (two FKBP domains were in tandem and fused to the SH2 domain of Grb2 with an HA tag and Bcr-Abl form a complexus upon AP21967. Bcr-Abl was imported into the nucleus successfully by the nuclear transport system. The nuclear transport system inhibited CML cell proliferation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5 pathways mainly by HF2S. It was proven that nuclear located Bcr-Abl induced CML cell (including imatinib-resistant K562G01 cells apoptosis by activation of p73 and its downstream molecules. In summary, our study provides a new targeted therapy for the CML patients even with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI-resistance.

  17. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. KEGG DISEASE / Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) [KEGG DISEASE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE: H00003 Entry H00003Disease Name Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Description Acute.... Category Cancer Brite Human diseases [BR:br08402] Cancers Cancers of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues H00003Acute...atopoietic and related tissue C92Myeloid leukaemia H00003Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Cancer-accociated carb...ohydrates [br08441.html] H00003 Pathway hsa05221Acute myeloid leukemiahsa05202Transcriptional misregulation ... or t(16; 16)(p13, q22), (CBF-beta/MYH11) ICD-O: 9866/3, Tumor type: Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (AML with

  20. MicroRNAs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Blood Disorders

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    Yao Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Common blood disorders include hematopoietic cell malignancies or leukemias and plasma cell dyscrasia, all of which have associated microRNA abnormalities. In this paper, we discuss several leukemias including acute myeloid leukemia (AML and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and identify altered microRNAs and their targets. Immune disorders with altered blood levels of antibodies include autoimmune disorders, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with associated anti-self-autoantibodies and immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN also have related microRNA abnormalities. The alterations in microRNAs may serve as therapeutic targets in these blood disorders.

  1. Sensitive detection of pre-existing BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells of newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients is associated with imatinib resistance: implications in the post-imatinib era.

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    Zafar Iqbal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations are infrequently detected in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients. Recent studies indicate the presence of pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations in a higher percentage of CML patients when CD34+ stem/progenitor cells are investigated using sensitive techniques, and these mutations are associated with imatinib resistance and disease progression. However, such studies were limited to smaller number of patients. METHODS: We investigated BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in CD34+ cells from 100 chronic-phase CML patients by multiplex allele-specific PCR and sequencing at diagnosis. Mutations were re-investigated upon manifestation of imatinib resistance using allele-specific PCR and direct sequencing of BCR-ABL kinase domain. RESULTS: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations were detected in 32/100 patients and included F311L, M351T, and T315I. After a median follow-up of 30 months (range 8-48, all patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations exhibited imatinib resistance. Of the 68 patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, 24 developed imatinib resistance; allele-specific PCR and BCR-ABL kinase domain sequencing detected mutations in 22 of these patients. All 32 patients with pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations had the same mutations after manifestation of imatinib-resistance. In imatinib-resistant patients without pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations, we detected F311L, M351T, Y253F, and T315I mutations. All imatinib-resistant patients except T315I and Y253F mutations responded to imatinib dose escalation. CONCLUSION: Pre-existing BCR-ABL mutations can be detected in a substantial number of chronic-phase CML patients by sensitive allele-specific PCR technique using CD34+ cells. These mutations are associated with imatinib resistance if affecting drug binding directly or indirectly. After the recent approval of nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib and ponatinib for treatment of chronic myeloid

  2. Evolution of T-cell clonality in a patient with Ph-negative acute lymphocytic leukemia occurring after interferon and imatinib therapy for Ph-positive chronic myeloid leukemia

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    Yang Lijian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The development of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph negative acute leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS in patients with Ph-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is very rare. The features of restrictive usage and absence of partial T cell clones have been found in patients with CML. However, the T-cell clonal evolution of Ph-negative malignancies during treatment for CML is still unknown. Objective To investigate the dynamic change of clonal proliferation of T cell receptor (TCR Vα and Vβ subfamilies in one CML patient who developed Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL after interferon and imatinib therapy. Methods The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC samples were collected at the 3 time points (diagnosis of Ph-positive chronic phase (CP CML, developing Ph-negative ALL and post inductive chemotherapy (CT for Ph-negative ALL, respectively. The CDR3 size of TCR Vα and Vβ repertoire were detected by RT-PCR. The PCR products were further analyzed by genescan to identify T cell clonality. Results The CML patient who achieved complete cytogenetic remission (CCR after 5 years of IFN-α therapy suddenly developed Ph-negative ALL 6 months following switch to imatinib therapy. The expression pattern and clonality of TCR Vα/Vβ T cells changed in different disease stages. The restrictive expression of Vα/Vβ subfamilies could be found in all three stages, and partial subfamily of T cells showed clonal proliferation. Additionally, there have been obvious differences in Vα/Vβ subfamily of T cells between the stages of Ph-positive CML-CP and Ph-negative ALL. The Vα10 and Vβ3 T cells evolved from oligoclonality to polyclonality, the Vβ13 T cells changed from bioclonality to polyclonality, when Ph-negative ALL developed. Conclusions Restrictive usage and clonal proliferation of different Vα/Vβ subfamily T cells between the stages of Ph-positive CP and Ph-negative ALL were detected in one patient. These changes

  3. The research on the immuno-modulatory defect of Mesenchymal Stem Cell from Chronic Myeloid Leukemia patients

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    Yuguang Song

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Overwhelming evidence from leukemia research has shown that the clonal population of neoplastic cells exhibits marked heterogeneity with respect to proliferation and differentiation. There are rare stem cells within the leukemic population that possess extensive proliferation and self-renewal capacity not found in the majority of the leukemic cells. These leukemic stem cells are necessary and sufficient to maintain the leukemia. While the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC origin of CML was first suggested over 30 years ago, recently CML-initiating cells beyond HSCs are also being investigated. We have previously isolated fetal liver kinase-1-positive (Flk1+ cells carrying the BCR/ABL fusion gene from the bone marrow of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+ patients with hemangioblast property. Here, we showed that CML patient-derived Flk1+CD31-CD34-MSCs had normal morphology, phenotype and karyotype but appeared impaired in immuno-modulatory function. The capacity of patient Flk1+CD31-CD34- MSCs to inhibit T lymphocyte activation and proliferation was impaired in vitro. CML patient-derived MSCs have impaired immuno-modulatory functions, suggesting that the dysregulation of hematopoiesis and immune response may originate from MSCs rather than HSCs. MSCs might be a potential target for developing efficacious cures for CML.

  4. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  5. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Fernando P. G.; Almeida, Ines; Morolli, Bruno; Brouwer-Mandema, Geeske; Wessels, Hans; Vossen, Rolf; Vrieling, Harry; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2009-01-01

    Background Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when other criteri

  6. Importance of genetics in acute myeloid leukemia

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    R. Pippa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML comprises a biologically and clinically heterogeneous group of aggressive disorders that occur as a consequence of a wide variety of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in hematopoietic progenitors. Despite significant advances in the understanding of the biology of AML, most patients will die from relapsed disease. Whole-genome studies have identified novel recurrent gene mutations with prognostic impact in AML; furthermore, it is likely that in the near future genome-wide sequencing will become a routine for newly diagnosed patients with AML. Therefore, future clinical trials should aim to identify genetically defined high-risk patients, and further research is necessary to identify effective agents and develop new individualized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this deadly disease.

  7. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Li-na; ZHOU Jin; Jan Jacob Schuringa; Edo Vellenga

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials.Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant English articles published from 1991 to 2009.Study selection Articles regarding the risk stratification and therapeutic options of AML, as well as the characteristics of leukemic stem cells were selected.Results AML is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcome dependent on several prognostic factors,including age, cytogenetics and molecular markers. The advances in the understanding of AML pathogenesis and development will generate potential novel agents that might improve the treatment results of standard chemotherapy.Conclusion Deeper insight into the multiple transforming events of AML may aid us in designing combinations of small molecule inhibitors based on the individual patient characteristics.

  8. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Leukemia Associated Antigens: Their Dual Role as Biomarkers and Immunotherapeutic Targets for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Michael Schmitt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX and mass spectrometry (MS. In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease.Abbreviations: AML: acute myeloid leukemia; APL: acute promyelocytic leukemia; ATRA: all-trans-retinoic acid; B-CLL: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; CT: cancer-testis; CTL: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte; FAB: French-American-British; HI: hypusination inhibitors; HSP: heat shock protein; ITD: internal tandem duplication; LAA: leukemia associated antigen; MDS: myelodysplastic syndrome; MGEA6: meningioma antigen 6; MPD: myeloproliferative disease; MS: mass spectrometry; NK: natural killer; PRAME: preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma; PRTN3: proteinase 3; RAGE-1: renal antigen 1; RHAMM: receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility; RQ-PCR: real-time PCR; SAGE: serial analysis of gene expression; SCT: stem cell transplant; SEREX: serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries; SNPs: single nucleotide polymorphisms; UPD

  10. Report of chronic myeloid leukemia from Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center, 2002-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Pritanjali

    2013-07-01

    Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center was established in 1993. It's one of the main Health-Care Institution in the state of Bihar. The data of 205 patients was presented in the ICON meeting and 98% of patients were diagnosed in chronic phase. Complete hematological response was seen in 91% of patients in 3 months. A total of 197 (96%) patients were alive at the time of analysis of which 179 (87%) were still in chronic phase with hematological remission.

  11. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Leucemia Mielóide Crônica em pediatria: perspectivas atuais Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in pediatrics patients: current approach

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    Maria Lucia M. Lee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A Leucemia Mielóide Crônica (LMC constitui evento raro na infância, representando menos de 5% das leucemias nesta faixa etária. Caracteriza-se pela presença de um marcador citogenético específico, cromossomo Ph+, que é responsável por grande parte da etiopatogenia da doença. Possui, portanto, características clínicas e evolutivas que não diferem dos pacientes adultos. Sua abordagem terapêutica em pediatria é baseada principalmente na experiência obtida com os estudos em adultos. Tem no TMO sua única opção de tratamento curativo, sendo este mais efetivo em pacientes com doador aparentado compatível, realizado durante a fase crônica inicial da doença. A grande eficácia antileucêmica observada com o mesilato de imatinibe fez com que a droga fosse aprovada para uso pediátrico em pacientes intolerantes ou refratários ao interferon a, ou recidivados pós-transplante de medula óssea. Seu uso em pacientes pediátricos com LMC de diagnóstico recente, com doador disponível, tornou-se um grande dilema, não existindo até o momento um consenso em relação à melhor forma de se utilizar a droga ou, mesmo, se esta irá em algum momento substituir o TMO. Estudos mais concretos com um seguimento maior ainda necessitam ser realizados.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a rare event in childhood, comprising of less than 5% of all leukemia cases in this age group. CML is characterized by the presence of a specific molecular marker, the Ph+ chromosome, which is responsible for almost all etiopathogenesis, hence, it has clinical and course characteristics that do not differ from the adult population. In pediatrics the therapeutic approach is based mainly on the experience obtained with adult protocols. With bone marrow transplantation (BMT being the only cure option, this procedure is more effective in patients with compatible related donors and performed during the initial chronic phase of the disease. The great anti-leukemic efficacy

  13. Leucemia Mielóide Crônica: história natural e classificação Chronic Myeloide Leukemia: natural history and classification

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    Teresa Cristina Bortolheiro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A Leucemia Mielóide Crônica (LMC, cuja incidência é de um a dois casos para cada 100 mil habitantes por ano, corresponde de 15% a 20% das leucemias. É uma doença mieloproliferativa crônica clonal, caracterizada por leucocitose com desvio à esquerda, esplenomegalia e pela presença do cromossomo Philadelphia (Ph, que resulta da translocação recíproca e equilibrada entre os braços longos dos cromossomos 9q34 e 22q11, gerando a proteína híbrida BCR-ABL, com atividade aumentada de tirosino quinase. A proteína BCR-ABL está presente em todos os pacientes com LMC, e sua hiperatividade desencadeia liberação de efetores da proliferação celular e inibidores da apoptose, sendo sua atividade responsável pela oncogênese inicial da LMC. A doença evolui em três fases: crônica, acelerada e aguda. Na fase crônica (FC ocorre proliferação clonal maciça das células granulocíticas, mantendo estas a capacidade de diferenciação. Posteriormente, num período de tempo variável, o clone leucêmico perde a capacidade de diferenciação e a doença passa a ser de difícil controle (fase acelerada - FA e progride para uma leucemia aguda (crise blástica - CB. Nesse artigo discutimos a história natural e as definições das fases da doença, de acordo com os critérios mais utilizados.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is estimated at approximately 1 to 2 cases per 100,000 individuals and accounts for approximately 15% to 20% of all patients with leukemia. CML is a clonal disease characterized by balanced translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 (Philadelphia chromosome. The resulting BCR-ABL gene has abnormal tyrosine kinase activity which stimulates cell growth and is responsible for the transformed phenotype of CML cells. The disease is characterized by a triphasic course that includes a chronic phase (CP, an accelerated phase (AP and an acute or blastic phase (BP. Unless the disease is controlled or eliminated, patients progress to AP and

  14. Molecular Genetic Markers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Sophia Yohe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetics play an increasingly important role in the risk stratification and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients. Traditionally, AML classification and risk stratification relied on cytogenetic studies; however, molecular detection of gene mutations is playing an increasingly important role in classification, risk stratification, and management of AML. Molecular testing does not take the place of cytogenetic testing results, but plays a complementary role to help refine prognosis, especially within specific AML subgroups. With the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML therapy is not targeted but the intensity of therapy is driven by the prognostic subgroup. Many prognostic scoring systems classify patients into favorable, poor, or intermediate prognostic subgroups based on clinical and genetic features. Current standard of care combines cytogenetic results with targeted testing for mutations in FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and KIT to determine the prognostic subgroup. Other gene mutations have also been demonstrated to predict prognosis and may play a role in future risk stratification, although some of these have not been confirmed in multiple studies or established as standard of care. This paper will review the contribution of cytogenetic results to prognosis in AML and then will focus on molecular mutations that have a prognostic or possible therapeutic impact.

  15. Cytogenetics of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manola, Kalliopi N

    2009-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease accounting for 15-20% of all childhood acute leukemias, while it is responsible for more than half of the leukemic deaths in these patients. This article focuses on the significance of cytogenetic analysis in pediatric AML supporting the importance of cytogenetic analysis in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, follow-up and treatment selection in childhood AML. It reviews in detail the types and frequencies of most common chromosomal aberrations, their molecular background, their correlation with French American British (FAB) subtypes and age distribution and their prognostic relevance. It also summarizes some less frequent or rare chromosome aberrations in which the prognostic classification has not been determined yet owning to the small number of patients and the variable treatment modalities used in different study groups. Furthermore, it discusses the association of specific chromosome rearrangements with prenatal exposure to carcinogenic agents or therapeutic agents and highlights the ongoing and future research on pediatric AML in the evolving field of Cytogenetics.

  16. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

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    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  17. Targeting the acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Alexandre; Luciana, M; Krause, Fontanari; Rego, Eduardo M

    2010-02-01

    The idea that within the bulk of leukemic cells there are immature progenitors which are intrinsically resistant to chemotherapy and able to repopulate the tumor after treatment is not recent. Nevertheless, the term leukemia stem cells (LSCs) has been adopted recently to describe these immature progenitors based on the fact that they share the most relevant features of the normal hematopoetic stem cells (HSCs), i.e. the self-renewal potential and quiescent status. LSCs differ from their normal counterparts and from the more differentiated leukemic cells regarding the default status of pathways regulating apoptosis, cell cycle, telomere maintenance and transport pumps activity. In addition, unique features regarding the interaction of these cells with the microenvironment have been characterized. Therapeutic strategies targeting these unique features are at different stages of development but the reported results are promising. The aim of this review is, by taking acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as a bona fide example, to discuss some of the mechanisms used by the LSCs to survive and the strategies which could be used to eradicate these cells.

  18. Association of The Common CYP1A1*2C Variant (Ile462Val Polymorphism with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML in Patients Undergoing Imatinib Therapy

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    Samyuktha Lakkireddy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cytochrome P450 is one of the major drug metabolizing enzyme families and its role in metabolism of cancer drugs cannot be less emphasized. The association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in CYP1A1 and pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML has been investigated in several studies, but the results observed vary based on varied risk factors. The objective of this study was to investigate the risk factors associated with the CYP1A1*2C [rs1048943: A>G] polymorphism in CML patients and its role in therapeutic response to imatinib mesylate (IM affecting clinico-pathological parameters, in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, CYP1A1*2C was analysed in CML patients. After obtaining approval from the Ethics Committee of oncology hospital, we collected blood samples from 132 CML patients and 140 matched controls. Genomic DNA was extracted and all the samples were analysed for the presence of the CYP1A1*2C polymorphism using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, and we examined the relationship of genotypes with risk factors such as gender, age, phase of the disease and other clinical parameters. Results: We observed a significant difference in the frequency distribution of CYP1A1*2C genotypes AA (38 vs. 16%, P=0.0001, AG (57 vs. 78%, P=0.0002 and GG (5 vs. 6%, P=0.6635 between patients and controls. In terms of response to IM therapy, significant variation was observed in the frequencies of AA vs AG in major (33 vs 67% and poor (62 vs 31% hematological responders, and AA vs AG in major (34 vs. 65% and poor (78 vs. 22% cytogenetic responders. However, the patients with the GG homozygous genotype did not show any significant therapeutic outcome. Conclusion: The higher frequency of AG in controls indicates that AG may play a protective role against developing CML. We also found that patients with the AG genotype showed favorable treatment response towards imatinib therapy, indicating

  19. The Hypothesis of the Human iNKT/Innate CD8(+) T-Cell Axis Applied to Cancer: Evidence for a Deficiency in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomet, Florence; Cayssials, Emilie; Barbarin, Alice; Desmier, Deborah; Basbous, Sara; Lefèvre, Lucie; Levescot, Anaïs; Robin, Aurélie; Piccirilli, Nathalie; Giraud, Christine; Guilhot, François; Roy, Lydia; Herbelin, André; Gombert, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    We recently identified a new human subset of NK-like [KIR/NKG2A(+)] CD8(+) T cells with a marked/memory phenotype, high Eomesodermin expression, potent antigen-independent cytotoxic activity, and the capacity to generate IFN-γ rapidly after exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines. These features support the hypothesis that this new member of the innate T cell family in humans, hereafter referred to as innate CD8(+) T cells, has a role in cancer immune surveillance analogous to invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Here, we report the first quantitative and functional analysis of innate CD8(+) T cells in a physiopathological context in humans, namely chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a well-characterized myeloproliferative disorder. We have chosen CML based on our previous report that IL-4 production by iNKT cells was deficient in CML patients at diagnosis and considering the recent evidence in mice that IL-4 promotes the generation/differentiation of innate CD8(+) T cells. We found that the pool of innate CD8(+) T cells was severely reduced in the blood of CML patients at diagnosis. Moreover, like iNKT and NK cells, innate CD8(+) T cells were functionally impaired, as attested by their loss of antigen-independent cytotoxic activity and IFN-γ production in response to innate-like stimulation with IL-12 + IL-18. Remarkably, as previously reported for IL-4 production by iNKT cells, both quantitative and functional deficiencies of innate CD8(+) T cells were at least partially corrected in patients having achieved complete cytogenetic remission following tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Finally, direct correlation between the functional potential of innate CD8(+) T and iNKT cells was found when considering all healthy donors and CML patients in diagnosis and remission, in accordance with the iNKT cell-dependent generation of innate CD8(+) T cells reported in mice. All in all, our data demonstrate that CML is associated with deficiencies of innate CD8(+) T cells

  20. siRNA-cell-penetrating peptides complexes as a combinatorial therapy against chronic myeloid leukemia using BV173 cell line as model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, João Miguel; Rego de Figueiredo, Inês; Valle, Javier; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Andreu, David; Enguita, Francisco J; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2017-01-10

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder caused by a single gene mutation, a reciprocal translocation that originates the Bcr-Abl gene with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. As a monogenic disease, it is an optimum target for RNA silencing therapy. We developed a siRNA-based therapeutic approach in which the siRNA is delivered by pepM or pepR, two cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) derived from the dengue virus capsid protein. These peptides have a dual role: siRNA delivery into cells and direct action as bioportides, i.e. intracellularly bioactive CPPs, targetting cancer-related signaling processes. Both pepM and pepR penetrate the positive Bcr-Abl(+) Cell Line (BV173). Five in silico designed anti-Bcr-Abl siRNA were selected for in vitro analysis after thorough screening. The Bcr-Abl downregulation kinetics (48h to 168h) was followed by quantitative PCR. The bioportide action of the peptide vectors was evaluated by genome-wide microarray analysis and further validated by testing BV173 cell cycle and cell proliferation monitoring different genes involved in housekeeping/cell stress (RPL13A, HPRT1), cell proliferation (ki67), cell apoptosis (Caspase 3 and Caspase 9) and cell cycle steps (CDK2, CCDN2, CDKN1A). Assays with a commercial transfection agent were carried out for comparison purposes. Maximal Bcr-Abl gene knockdown was observed for one of the siRNA when delivered by pepM at 120h. Both pepM and pepR showed downregulation effects on proliferative CML-related signaling pathways having direct impact on BV173 cell cycle and proliferation, thus reinforcing the siRNA effect by acting as anticancer molecules. With this work we show the therapeutic potential of a CPP shuttle that combines intrinsic anticancer properties with the ability to deliver functional siRNA into CML cell models. By such combination, the pepM-siRNA conjugates lowered Bcr-Abl gene expression levels more extensively than conventional siRNA delivery technologies and

  1. Determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and Bcr-Abl transcript in the follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v32i2.6408 Determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and Bcr-Abl transcript in the follow-up of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v32i2.6408

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Cezar Fujita

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant myeloproliferative disorder that originates from a pluripotent stem cell characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. The vast majority of patients with CML present Bcr-Abl transcripts. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH is considered a biochemical marker common for tumor growth, anaerobic glycolysis and has been considered a poor prognostic factor for acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the concentration of LDH in plasma and the detection of the Bcr-Abl transcripts in patients with CML and healthy donors. We analyzed 22 patients demonstrably diagnosed with CML and 56 healthy donors. LDH concentration in plasma was higher in patients with CML. All patients with CML in this study were under treatment, but even so four patients had the Bcr-Abl (b3a2 transcript in peripheral blood. Two out of the four patients with b3a2 showed higher LDH (486 U L-1 and 589 U L-1. Thus, although the study was conducted with small numbers of samples, it is possible to suggest therapy alteration for two patients who presented transcript b3a2 in the peripheral blood samples and whose LDH concentration was high, in order to improve the disease.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a malignant myeloproliferative disorder that originates from a pluripotent stem cell characterized by abnormal release of the expanded, malignant stem cell clone from the bone marrow into the bloodstream. The vast majority of patients with CML present Bcr-Abl transcripts. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH is considered a biochemical marker common for tumor growth, anaerobic glycolysis and has been considered a poor prognostic factor for acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the concentration of LDH in plasma and the detection of the Bcr-Abl transcripts in patients with CML and healthy donors. We analyzed 22 patients demonstrably diagnosed

  2. Long-term response to imatinib is not affected by the initial dose in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: final update from the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Optimization and Selectivity (TOPS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccarani, Michele; Druker, Brian J; Branford, Susan; Kim, Dong-Wook; Pane, Fabrizio; Mongay, Lidia; Mone, Manisha; Ortmann, Christine-Elke; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Radich, Jerald P; Hughes, Timothy P; Cortes, Jorge E; Guilhot, François

    2014-01-01

    The TOPS trial evaluated high- (800 mg/day; n = 319) versus standard-dose (400 mg/day; n = 157) imatinib in patients newly diagnosed with Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. Patients had a minimum follow-up of 42 months or discontinued early. Major molecular response (MMR) rates were similar between arms at (51.6 vs 50.2 % for 400 and 800 mg/day, respectively; P = 0.77) and by (75.8 vs 79.0 %; P = 0.4807) 42 months. There were no differences in event-free survival (EFS), progression-free survival(PFS), or overall survival (OS) between arms. The estimated rates of PFS on treatment and OS at 42 months were significantly higher in patients with MMR at 6, 12, and 18 months compared with those without MMR.Adverse events were more frequent with high-dose imatinib. Patients with B1 treatment interruption (vs [1) and those able to maintain imatinib C600 mg/day (vs\\600 mg/day) in the first year of treatment had faster and higher response rates, but no improvement in EFS or PFS. Adherence to prescribed dose without interruption may be more important than initiation of therapy with higher doses of imatinib. Achievement of MMR correlated with longterm clinical outcomes.

  3. Which method better evaluates the molecular response in newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with imatinib treatment, BCR-ABL(IS) or log reduction from the baseline level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ya-Zhen; Jiang, Qian; Jiang, Hao; Li, Jin-Lan; Li, Ling-Di; Zhu, Hong-Hu; Lai, Yue-Yun; Lu, Xi-Jing; Liu, Yan-Rong; Jiang, Bin; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2013-09-01

    The molecular response of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients to tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment can be evaluated either by BCR-ABL mRNA levels on international scale (IS) or by log reduction from the baseline level of the laboratory. Both methods were compared in 248 newly diagnosed chronic phase CML patients treated with imatinib. The major molecular responses (MMR) obtained by both methods predict progression-free survival (PFS, all Plog reduction method, had the same PFS as MMR patients identified by both methods. The molecular responses of patients at 3 and 6 months, as evaluated by the two methods, have similar predictive values on their cytogenetic responses at 12 months and on their molecular responses at 18 months. Both ≤ 10%(IS) and ≥ 1 log reduction at 3 months and ≤ 1%(IS) at 6 months were significantly associated with PFS (P=0.0011, 0.0090, and 0.0064). The percentages of patients with BCR-ABL(IS) of ≤ 1%, >1-10%, and of >10% at 3 months and 6 months in the German CML Study IV were similar with those with corresponding BCR-ABL(IS) in our center, but was significantly different with those evaluated by the log reduction method. Therefore, the molecular response evaluated by BCR-ABL(IS) has similar trends in PFS and in response prediction, but can better differentiate patients than that by the log reduction method. Furthermore, the IS method allows comparison among molecular response results from different laboratories.

  4. [Cytogenetic abnormalities and gene mutations in myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoko; Kitamura, Toshio

    2009-10-01

    Myeloid leukemia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. Cytogenetic studies have revealed specific chromosomal abnormalities, such as translocations, and inversions. Fusion proteins derived from these abnormalities were identified in various subtypes of leukemia. Because most of these fusion proteins were not sufficient to induce leukemia by themselves in mouse models, additional oncogenic events have been thought to be necessary for leukemogenesis. Recently, a hypothesis called "two-hit model" for leukemia has been proposed. Two broad classes of mutations that proliferative or survival advantage of hematopoietic progenitors and impaired differentiation are required for inducing leukemia. In this article, we summarize some typical chromosomal abnormalities or gene mutations associated with myeloid leukemia on the basis of this hypothesis.

  5. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma: natural history and biology of an uncommon manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, M Yadira; Ghahramani, Grant K; Frisch, Stephanie; Armbrecht, Eric S; Lind, Anne C; Nguyen, Tudung T; Hassan, Anjum; Kreisel, Friederike H; Frater, John L

    2013-05-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of patients with cutaneous myeloid sarcoma, from 2 tertiary care institutions. Eighty-three patients presented, with a mean age of 52 years. Diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma in the skin was difficult due to the low frequency of myeloperoxidase and/or CD34+ cases (56% and 19% of tested cases, respectively). Seventy-one of the 83 patients (86%) had ≥ 1 bone marrow biopsy. Twenty-eight (39%) had acute myeloid leukemia with monocytic differentiation. Twenty-three had other de novo acute myeloid leukemia subtypes. Thirteen patients had other myeloid neoplasms, of which 4 ultimately progressed to an acute myeloid leukemia. Seven had no bone marrow malignancy. Ninety-eight percent of the patients received chemotherapy, and approximately 89% died of causes related to their disease. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma in most cases represents an aggressive manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Diagnosis can be challenging due to lack of myeloblast-associated antigen expression in many cases, and difficulty in distinguishing monocyte-lineage blasts from neoplastic and non-neoplastic mature monocytes.

  6. Role of autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Ping Zhang; Yu-Na Niu; Na Yuan; Ai-Hong Zhang; Dan Chao; Qiu-Ping Xu; Li-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Despite its dual role in determining cell fate in a wide array of solid cancer cell lines,autophagy has been robustly shown to suppress or kill acute myeloid leukemia cells via degradation of the oncogenic fusion protein that drives leukemogenesis.However,autophagy also induces the demise of acute leukemia cells that do not express the known fusion protein,though the molecular mechanism remains elusive.Nevertheless,since it can induce cooperation with apoptosis and differentiation in response to autophagic signals,autophagy can be manipulated for a better therapy on acute myeloid leukemia.

  7. Successful Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Collection in Imatinib Pretreated and Nilotinib-Treated Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Vokurka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a successful mobilization and harvest of the peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs in imatinib-pretreated and nilotinib treated 52-year-old woman diagnosed with Philadelphia chromosome-positive and BCR-ABL (b2a2 positive chronic phase CML in 2/2002. She failed interferon-alfa and imatinib treatment. She achieved her first complete molecular remission after 16 months of nilotinib treatment and later on was mobilized with filgrastim at a dose of 10 ug/kg/day applied subcutaneously once daily. The total number of 2.98×106 CD34+ cells/kg was harvested on the fourth day of the mobilization. The autologous graft of the stem cells was cryopreserved and tested for the residual disease: the FISH revealed negative results and the RT-PCR was positive (BCR-ABL/ABL ratio 0,0017 in RQ-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful PBSC harvest in a patient significantly pretreated with imatinib and nilotinib.

  8. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Mannose-exposing myeloid leukemia cells detected by the sCAR-PPA fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gong Chu; Li, Na; Zhang, Yan Hong; Li, Xin; Wang, Yi Gang; Liu, Xin Yuan; Qian, Wen Bin; Liu, Xiao Chuan

    2009-06-01

    Altered glycosylation may be a hallmark of malignant transformation and cancer progression. In the work described, a specific mannose-binding lectin, Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin (PPA), was genetically fused with the extracellular domain of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) to generate the soluble CAR (sCAR)-PPA fusion protein. The adenoviral transduction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines Kasumi-1 and HL-60 was increased by sCAR-PPA, indicating that a fraction of AML cells exposing mannose residues was detected by PPA. However, sCAR-PPA did not increase the adenoviral infection of KG-1 cells, suggesting the mannose exposure of AML cells may be cell type specific. Furthermore, the infectious efficiency of Ad-EGFP in chronic myeloid leukemia cell line K562 was significantly increased by sCAR-PPA as well. We, herein, report that PPA recognized a fraction of myeloid leukemia cells showing mannose-exposing phenotype. The sCAR-PPA fusion protein combined with the adenoviral vector system may provide a useful tool for investigating myeloid leukemia cells exposing mannose residues and further elucidating the role of these cells in the leukemia development.

  10. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but this may be restricted to the case of double mutations in CEBPA in adult acute myeloid leukemia. In pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, data on the impact of these mutations are limited to one series, ...

  11. Assessment of fibrosis and vascularization of bone marrow stroma of chronic myeloid Leukemia patients treated with imatinib mesylate and their relationship with the cytogenetic response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Regina de Jesus

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative disease characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22, resulting in the formation of the hybrid BCR-ABL protein. Currently, the treatment of CML patients is performed with imatinib mesylate (IM, which promotes the elimination of leukemic cells by inhibiting the kinase activity of BCR-ABL. This study evaluated the effectiveness of IM by monitoring 22 CML patients in a chronic phase treated at the CEPON/SC with IM for a minimum follow-up period of two years. Cytogenetic Response (CR and bone marrow biopsies (BMB were evaluated before and after IM treatment. BMB were evaluated by detection of reticulin degree and vascularization. The results were correlated to the CR. Mean time to achieve CR was 9 months and was attained by 77.27% of the patients. The results from the initial BMB analysis showed that 59.09% presented reticulin of between 2+ and 4+ whereas after treatment, only 27.17% presented this degree. With regard to vascularization of the initial sample, 90.91% were graded between II and IV, whereas after treatment, 40.91% had this degree. The results suggest a positive correlation of degree of reticulin and vascularization with CR.A Leucemia Mielóide Crônica (LMC é uma doença mieloproliferativa caracterizada pela presença do cromossomo Filadélfia (translocação entre os cromossomos 9 e 22, que resulta na formação da proteína híbrida BCR-ABL. Atualmente o tratamento de pacientes com LMC é realizado com mesilato de imatinibe (MI, o qual promove a eliminação das células leucêmicas pela inibição da atividade quinase de BCR-ABL. O presente estudo avaliou a eficácia do MI por meio do acompanhamento de pacientes portadores de LMC em fase crônica, atendidos no CEPON/SC tratados com MI pelo tempo mínimo de dois anos. Foram avaliadas a Resposta Citogenética (RC e as biópsias de medula óssea (BMO antes e após o

  12. Novel therapeutic options in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Medinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a biologically complex and molecularly and clinically heterogeneous disease, and its incidence is increasing as the population ages. Cytogenetic anomalies and mutation testing remain important prognostic tools for tailoring treatment after induction therapy. Despite major advances in understanding the genetic landscape of AML and its impact on the pathophysiology and biology of the disease, as well as the rapid development of new drugs, standard treatment options have not experienced major changes during the past three decades. Especially for patients with intermediate or high-risk AML, which often show relapse. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains the best chance for cure. Here we review the state of the art therapy of AML, with special focus on new developments in immunotherapies and cellular therapies including HSCT and particularly discuss the impact of new conditioning and haplo-identical donor regimens for HSCT, post-transplant strategies for preventing and treating relapse, and emerging novel therapeutic options.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Leukemia,_Myeloid [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. An evolutionary perspective on chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzykson, R; Solary, E

    2013-07-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) shares with other myeloid diseases a number of somatic gene mutations. These mutations can now be integrated within the framework of evolution theory to address the mechanisms of the disease. Several evidences indicate that the disease emerges in adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) through the age-dependent accumulation of DNA damage, leading stochastically to a driver mutation that confers a competitive advantage to the cell. A mutation in TET2 gene could be one of these driver mutations provoking the emergence of clonality. After a long latency, secondary lesions, such as mutations in the SRSF2 gene, contribute to progression to full-blown malignancy, with abnormal differentiation. Additional mutations accumulate and branching arising mostly through mitotic recombination generates clonal heterogeneity. Modifications in the microenvironment probably affect this clonal dynamics, whereas epigenetic alterations, such as hypermethylation of the TIF1γ gene promoter, may generate phenotypic diversification of otherwise clonal populations. The preserved although deregulated myeloid differentiation that characterizes CMML, with granulomonocyte expansion and various cytopenias, may depend on early clonal dominance in the hematopietic cell hierarchy. Progression to acute myeloid leukemia observed in 25-30% of the patients may arise from the massive expansion of a clone with novel genetic lesions, providing a high fitness to previously minor subclones when in chronic phase of the disease. This review discusses the various models of disease emergence and progression and how this recent knowledge could drive rational therapeutic strategies.

  1. Obinutuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    Obinutuzumab is the second next-generation monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody (after ofatumumab) to enter clinical practice in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Its superiority in association with chlorambucil as compared with chlorambucil alone has led to its approval as a first-line treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, for patients who are not candidates for a more intensive treatment.

  2. Occupation and leukemia in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Kautiainen, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar

    2012-01-01

    We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries.......We studied occupational variation of the risk of acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and other leukemia in Nordic countries....

  3. Outcome of 3 pregnancies in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia who received 3 types of tyrosine kinase inhibitors each in different pregnancy: follow-up of the case with a review of published reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Hussain; Jaafar, Hassan; Kajtár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) during pregnancy remains a matter of continuous debate. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have become the standard of care in managing patients with CML. These drugs have a good safety profile, but animal studies have shown that they are potentially teratogenic. Therefore, these drugs are not recommended for use during pregnancy or if a female patient plans to conceive. Despite the extensive clinical experience with TKIs, the available information about the effects of TKIs on fertility, pregnancy, and outcome of babies who were exposed to TKIs during pregnancy and lactation is limited. We reported on 1 female CML patient who conceived 3 times while being on different types of TKIs in each pregnancy. All 3 pregnancies were uneventful, and only 1 of the babies was diagnosed with a minor cardiac malformation at the age of 30 months, which was corrected surgically.

  4. MDM2 promoter polymorphism and p53 codon 72 polymorphism in chronic myeloid leukemia: the association between MDM2 promoter genotype and disease susceptibility, age of onset, and blast-free survival in chronic phase patients receiving imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Chang; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Yang, Wen-Chi; Liu, Ta-Chih; Chang, Chao-Sung; Yang, Ming-Yu; Lin, Pai-Mei; Hsu, Jui-Feng; Lee, Ching-Ping; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2014-12-01

    The genetic or functional inactivation of the p53 pathway plays an important role with regards to disease progression from the chronic phase (CP) to blast phase (BP) and imatinib treatment response in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), p53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309, are associated with alternation of p53 activity, however the association regarding CML susceptibility and BP transformation under imatinib treatment is unclear. The MDM2 SNP309 genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and confirmed by direct sequencing from 116 CML patients, including 104 in the CP at diagnosis, and 162 healthy Taiwanese controls. The p53 R72P polymorphism was examined in all CML patients. The SNP309 G/G genotype was associated with an increased risk of CML susceptibility (OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.03-3.22, P = 0.037), and an earlier age of disease onset (log-rank P = 0.005) compared with the T/T + T/G genotypes. Higher MDM2 mRNA expression was found in G/G genotype compared with T/T (P = 0.034) and T/T + T/G (P = 0.056) genotypes. No associations were found between the p53 R72P genotypes and clinical parameters and survival outcomes. Among 62 CP patients receiving imatinib as first-line therapy, the G/G genotype was associated with a shorter blast-free survival (log-rank P = 0.048) and more clonal evolution compared with the T/T + T/G genotypes. In patients with advanced diseases at diagnosis, the G/G genotype was associated with a poor overall survival (log-rank P = 0.006). Closely monitoring CML patients harboring the G/G genotype and further large-scale studies are warranted.

  5. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  6. Collaborative efforts driving progress in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Zwaan (Michel); E.A. Kolb (Edward A.); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); J. Abrahamsson; S. Adachi (Susumu); R. Aplenc (Richard); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); B. Gibson (Brenda); H. Hasle (Henrik); G. Leverger (Guy); F. Locatelli (Franco); C. Ragu (Christine); R.C. Ribeiro (Raul C.); C. Rizzari (Carmelo); J.E. Rubnitz (Jeffrey); O.P. Smith (Owen Patrick); L. Sung (Lillian); D. Tomizawa (Daisuke); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); U. Creutzig; G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDiagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, nati

  7. Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostgård, L S G; Nørgaard, J M; Sengeløv, H

    2015-01-01

    As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and WHO Performance Status (PS) on achievement...

  8. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E. S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and int

  9. Occupational exposure to solvents and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Lehtinen-Jacks, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to assess the relation between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). METHODS: Altogether, this study comprises 15 332 incident cases of AML diagnosed in Finland, Norway, Sweden and Iceland from 1961-2005 and 76...

  10. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  12. Azacitidine in Combination With Mitoxantrone, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Matrine suppresses cell growth of human chronic myeloid leukemia cells via its inhibition of the interleukin-6/Janus activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lingdi; Zhu, Zhichao; Jiang, Lijia; Sun, Xiao; Lu, Xuzhang; Zhou, Min; Qian, Sixuan; Jianyong, Li

    2015-01-01

    Matrine, alkaloid isolated from Sophora flavescens, is known to be pleiotropic by exerting anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidation, as well as anti-cancer effects. However, the precise molecular targets or pathways responsible for its activities still remain unclear. The present study aimed to determine the underlying mechanisms of matrine in inhibiting the chronic myeloid leukemia cells (CML). It was observed that matrine treatment significantly suppressed CML cells proliferation, induced apoptosis and resulted in the accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase, accompanied by a significant decrease in Bcl-xL, Cyclin D1, and c-Myc expression. Western blot analyses revealed that matrine treatment resulted in the down-regulation in phospho-STAT3 and phospho-JAK2 without significantly effects on STAT3 and JAK2 protein levels. Matrine significantly reduced the expression of IL-6, a potent upstream activating factor of STAT3. These results strongly suggested the IL-6/JAK/STAT3 pathway play an important role in matrine's anti-leukemia effects in K562 cells.

  14. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Detection of p190BCR-ABL AND p210BCR-ABL fusion transcripts in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML using qualitative RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Bonilla, Carlos Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph, resulting from the balanced reciprocal translocation t(9;22(q34;q11. This marker chromosome is found less frequently in patients suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Objective: To determine the frequency of BCR-ABL gene fusions encoding the p210BCR-ABL y p190 BCR-ABL transcripts in Colombian patients diagnosed with CML in different stages of the disease and/or its treatment. Materials and methods: Cross sectional, descriptive study of thirty one CML patients (aged 15-78. Analysis was carried out through qualitative nested PCR for the isoforms P210 BCR-ABL (b3a2 e b2a2 and P190 BCR-ABL (e1a2, and based on peripheral blood samples. Results: In 29 of the 31 patients (93.6% transcript p210BCR-ABL was detected; b2a2 and b3a2 gene fusions and the coexpression b3a2 y b2a2 were identified in 55.2% (16/29, 34.5% (10/29 and 10.3% (3/29 of the cases, respectively. Conclusion: b2a2 gene fusion was the most frequent in this CML population.

  16. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  17. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  18. A Novel Four-Way Complex Variant Translocation Involving Chromosome 46,XY,t(4;9;19;22)(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2) in a Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Jamal, Mohammad Sarwar; Khan, Abdul Rehman; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Hussain, Abrar; Choudhry, Hani; Malik, Arif; Khan, Shahida Aziz; Mahmoud, Maged Mostafa; Ali, Ashraf; Iram, Saima; Kamran, Kashif; Iqbal, Asim; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome (9;22)(q34;q11) is well established in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, and the remaining 5–8% of CML patients show variant and complex translocations, with the involvement of third, fourth, or fifth chromosome other than 9;22. However, in very rare cases, the fourth chromosome is involved. Here, we found a novel case of four-way Ph+ chromosome translocation involving 46,XY,t(4;9;19;22)(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2) with CML in the chronic phase. Complete blood cell count of the CML patient was carried out to obtain total leukocytes count, hemoglobin, and platelets. Fluorescence in situ hybridization technique was used for the identification of BCR–ABL fusion gene, and cytogenetic test for the confirmation of Ph (9;22)(q34;q11) and the mechanism of variant translocation in the bone marrow. The patient is successfully treated with a dose of 400 mg/day imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). We observed a significant decrease in white blood cell count of 11.7 × 109/L after 48-month follow-up. Patient started feeling better generally. There was a reduction in the swelling of the body, fatigue, and anxiety. PMID:27303656

  19. A Novel four-way complex variant translocation involving chromosome 46, XY, t(4;9; 19;22(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2 in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad eAsif

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Philadelphia (Ph chromosome (9; 22(q34;q11 is well established in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients and the remaining 5-8% CML patients show variant and complex translocations, with the involvement of third, fourth or fifth chromosome other then 9;22. However, in very rare cases the fourth chromosome is involved. Here, we find a novel case of four way Ph+ chromosome translocation involving 46,XY, t(4;9;19;22(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2 with CML in the chronic phase. Complete blood cell count of CML patient was carried out to obtain total leukocytes count, hemoglobin and platelets. Fluorescence In situ hybridization technique was used for the identification of BCR-ABL fusion gene and cryptogenic test for the confirmation of Ph (9; 22(q34;q11 and the mechanism of variant translocation in the bone marrow. The patient is successfully treated with Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec with 400mg/day dose. We observed a significant decrease in WBC count after 48 months follow up 11.7 x109/L. Patient started feeling better generally. There was a reduction in the swelling of the body, fatigue and anxiety.

  20. Philadelphia chromosome positive leukemia including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia and accelerate phase myeloid leukemia. | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available udio in aperto di fase II per determinare la tollerabilita` e l`efficacia antileucemica di STI571 in pazienti adulti con leucemia... Ph+ incluse la leucemia linfoblastica acuta, la leucemia mieloide acuta e la leucemia ...e phase myeloid leukemia. leucemia Ph+ incluse la leucemia linfoblastica acuta, la leucemia... mieloide acuta e la leucemia mieloide cronica in fase accelerata. E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Disease

  1. Alantolactone selectively ablates acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor outcomes for patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are largely attributed to leukemia stem cells (LSCs which are difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and responsible for relapse. Thus, new therapeutic strategies which could selectively target LSCs in clinical leukemia treatment and avoid drug resistance are urgently needed. However, only a few small molecules have been reported to show anti-LSCs activity. Methods The aim of the present study was to identify alantolactone as novel agent that can ablate acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells from AML patient specimens and evaluate the anticancer activity of alantolactone in vitro and in vivo. Results The present study is the first to demonstrate that alantolactone, a prominent eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, could specifically ablate LSCs from AML patient specimens. Furthermore, in comparison to the conventional chemotherapy drug, cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, alantolactone showed superior effects of leukemia cytotoxicity while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Alantolactone induced apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner by suppression of NF-kB and its downstream target proteins. DMA-alantolactone, a water-soluble prodrug of alantolactone, could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Based on these results, we propose that alantolactone may represent a novel LSCs-targeted therapy and eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones offer a new scaffold for drug discovery towards anti-LSCs agents.

  2. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. Ploidy and clinical characteristics of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large series (n = 596) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) focusing on modal numbers (MN) from the population-based NOPHO-AML trials. Abnormal karyotypes were present in 452 cases (76%) and numerical aberrations were present in 40% (n = 237) of all pediatric AML. Among...... with early onset (median age 2 years), female sex (57%), and a dominance of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) (29%). Hypodiploidy constituted 8% of all AML and was associated with older age (median age 9 years), male predominance (60%), FAB M2 (56%), and t(8;21)(q22;q22) (56%) with loss of sex...

  4. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lopes, Roberto Iglesias [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant' Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall' Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel [Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associated with right hydronephrosis. Due to the risk of germ-cell tumor in undescended testicle, the patient underwent radical right orchiectomy. The pathological examination showed recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in the testis. He was referred to oncology for adjuvant therapy. Our literature review found no similar cases described.

  5. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  6. The Danish National Chronic Myeloid Neoplasia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Marie; Ibfelt, Else Helene; Stauffer Larsen, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish National Chronic Myeloid Neoplasia Registry (DCMR) is a population-based clinical quality database, introduced to evaluate diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic myeloid malignancies. The aim is to monitor the clinical quality at the national, regional, and hospital...... of follow-up. The forms include variables that describe clinical/paraclinical assessments, treatment, disease progression, and survival - disease-specific variables - as well as variables that are identical for all chronic myeloid malignancies. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: By the end of 2014, the DCMR contained data...... on 2,690 patients with an inclusion rate of ∼500 patients each year. Since the registry was established, annual reports have shown consistently high national coverage and data completeness, ≥90% and ≥88%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The DCMR is a national database used for monitoring the quality...

  7. Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Treatment of relapsed/refractory leukemia with intravenous administration of Dacarbazine Trattamento della leucemia...tment of relapsed/refractory leukemia with intravenous administration of Dacarbazine Trattamento della leucemia...on(s) being investigated Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients Pazienti affetti da leucemia... language Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients Pazienti affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide re...arbazina nei pazienti affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide recidivata/refrattaria i cui blasti esprimono bassi

  8. O tratamento da Leucemia Mielóide Crônica com mesilato de imatinibe Therapy of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia with imatinib mesylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaneuza M. Funke

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O mesilato de imatinibe é atualmente o tratamento de escolha para pacientes com Leucemia mielóide Crônica (LMC recém-diagnosticados. Desde os primeiros estudos clínicos em 1998 até o estudo IRIS, que comparou o uso em primeira linha de imatinibe com interferon + ara-C, esta droga vem se consolidando em segurança e eficácia. Ainda há, entretanto questionamentos sobre a melhor dose inicial, a identificação dos pacientes que mais se beneficiariam e a melhor abordagem frente a respostas sub-ótimas e resistência. Os principais estudos clínicos publicados com mesilato de imatinibe são revisados no presente artigo, e discutidos sob a perspectiva da realidade brasileira.Imatinib mesylate is currently the gold-standard therapy for patients with newly diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia. From the clinical trials in 1998 to the IRIS study, which compared first line imatinib treatment with interferon and low dose ara-C, this drug has been consolidated in regards to its safety and efficacy. There are still some questions to answer. Which would be the best initial dose? Are there any patients who benefit more than others? What is the best approach to suboptimal response and resistance? The most important published clinical studies are reviewed in the current article and discussed from a Brazilian perspective.

  9. 47,XYY karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanduz, S; Aktan, M; Ozturk, S; Tutkan, G; Cefle, K; Pekcelen, Y

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMoL; M4) with a 47,XYY karyotype is reported. This chromosome aneuploidy was found in both bone marrow cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The contribution of XYY chromosomal constitution in the pathogenesis of AMMoL is controversial.

  10. Novel transforming genes in murine myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.S. Joosten (Marieke)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractLeukemia is characterised by an accumulation in the bone marrow of non-functional blood cells arrested at a particular stage of differentiation. In the process of normal hematopoiesis, errors may occur as the result of mutations in the DNA of hematopoietic precursor cells. These genetic

  11. Establishment and characterization of A novel Philadelphia-chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia cell line, TCC-S, expressing P210 and P190 BCR/ABL transcripts but missing normal ABL gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Phan Nguyen Thanh; Xinh, Phan Thi; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sato, Yuko

    2005-03-01

    A novel Philadelphia-chromosome positive (Ph+) cell line, TCC-S, has been established from a patient with Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the blastic crisis. TCC-S cells were shown to express both P210 and P190 BCR/ABL transcripts by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), although quantitative-PCR revealed that TCC-S cells mainly expressed P210 BCR/ABL transcript. Karyotype analysis revealed several triploid clones which constantly harbored two der(9)del(9) (p12)t(9;22) (q34;qll)s and two del(9) (q21)s. The der(9)del(9) (p12)t(9;22) (q34;q11) is rarely found in other CML cell lines. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, del(9) (q21) resulting in missing of a restrict region including normal ABL gene has not been found among CML cell lines previously described. Thus, TCC-S cells with only BCR/ABL gene and no normal ABL gene may be a useful tool for functional study of ABL in Ph+ CML.

  12. Randomized comparison of low-dose versus high-dose interferon-alfa in chronic myeloid leukemia: prospective collaboration of 3 joint trials by the MRC and HOVON groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Buck, Georgina; le Cessie, Saskia; Richards, Sue; Beverloo, H Berna; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Littlewood, Tim; Muus, Petra; Bareford, David; van der Lelie, Hans; Green, Anthony R; Roozendaal, Klaas J; Milne, Alison E; Chapman, Claire S; Shepherd, Patricia

    2004-06-15

    The optimal dose of interferon-alfa (IFN) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. Retrospective analyses suggest that low doses are as effective as high doses, with less toxicity and fewer patients abandoning the drug. The Dutch Hemato-Oncology Association (HOVON) and British Medical Research Council (MRC) cooperative groups jointly performed randomized trials in newly diagnosed CML patients, comparing high-dose IFN (5 MIU/m(2) daily) with low-dose (3 MIU, 5 times a week). Both arms allowed additional hydroxyurea to keep the white blood cell count lower than 5 x 10(9)/L. Quality of life data were collected in a subset of patients. Between 1993 and 2001, 407 patients were randomized. At a median follow-up of 53 months, there were no significant differences in overall survival (odds ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.46), progression-free survival, and complete hematologic or major cytogenetic responses. Fewer patients in the low-dose group abandoned IFN for reasons other than transplant or progressive disease (P =.002, 58% vs 72% at 5 years). Quality of life data showed comparable results in both arms for most factors. There is no evidence of benefit for high-dose IFN compared with low-dose for the treatment of CML. Therefore, when IFN is combined with other drugs, low-dose IFN is advised, to minimize toxicity and costs.

  13. Switching to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor improves the response and outcome of frontline imatinib-treated patients with chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 10% of BCR-ABL/ABL ratio at 3 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Luis-Felipe; García-Gutiérrez, José-Valentín; Massagué, Isabel; Giraldo, Pilar; Pérez-Encinas, Manuel; de Paz, Raquel; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Bautista, Guiomar; Osorio, Santiago; Requena, María-José; Palomera, Luis; Peñarrubia, María-Jesús; Calle, Carmen; Hernández-Rivas, José-Ángel; Burgaleta, Carmen; Maestro, Begoña; García-Ormeña, Nuria; Steegmann, Juan-Luis

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia patients display heterogeneous responses to imatinib. Survival depends on baseline clinical characteristics (including prognostic scoring systems) and on early response (such as >10% BCR-ABL/ABL ratio at 3 months of therapy). The results of switching to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (2GTKIs) may contain a bias since, in the majority of these studies, patients who switch treatment due to intolerance or failure are censored or excluded. We analyzed the Spanish Registry data on switching in an intention-to-treat analysis of patients in standard clinical practice. Switching to 2GTKIs improves responses from 45% to 75% of complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) and from 15% to 45% of major molecular response (MMR) in the group without molecular response 1 (MR1) at 3 months and from 70% to 87% in CCyR and from 52% to 87% in MMR in the group with MR1. The final response rate is poorer in the group with no MR1 at 3 months. Nevertheless, the differences in the rates of response were not translated into differences in major events (transformations or deaths), and the final progression-free survival and overall survival were similar. PMID:25756742

  14. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. A rare case of a three way complex variant positive Philadelphia translocation involving chromosome (9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11) in chronic myeloid leukemia: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Abrar; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation is present in 90–95% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Variant complex translocations have been observed in 5–8% of CML patients, in which a third chromosome other than (9;22) is involved. Imatinib mesylate is the first line breakpoint cluster region-Abelson gene (BCR/ABL)-targeted oral therapy for CML, and may produce a complete response in 70–80% of CML patients in the chronic phase. In the present study, a bone marrow sample was used for conventional cytogenetic analysis, and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test was used for BCR/ABL gene detection. A hematological analysis was also performed to determine the white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin levels, packed and mean cell volumes, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and platelet values of the patient. The hematological analysis of the patient indicated the increased WBC of 186.5×103 cells/µl, and decreased hemoglobin levels of 11.1 g/dl. The FISH test revealed that 67% cells demonstrated BCR/ABL gene translocation. The patient was treated with 400 mg imatinib mesylate daily, and was monitored at various intervals over a 6-month period. The present study reports the rare case of a patient that demonstrates a three-way Philadelphia chromosome-positive translocation involving 46XY,t(9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11)[10], alongside CML in the chronic phase. The translocation was analyzed using cytogenetic and FISH tests. PMID:27602125

  16. Expression of ETV6 rearrangement in a subject with acute myeloid leukemia-M4Eo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Na; LI Zhi-hong; DING Bu-tong; CHEN Yun; WANG Yun-shan; QIAO Ying; GUO Nong-jian

    2008-01-01

    @@ Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) M4Eo type is a hematological malignancy with abnormal eosinophilia,which is often accompanied by inv(16).The Ets variant gene 6 (ETV6),mapped to 12p13,is an ETS family transcription factor that is essential for hematopoietic processes,1 The ETV6 gene-involved chromosomal translocations have been found in many hematological malignancies characterized by fusing to a number of different partner genes;mainly coding for tyrosine kinases or transcription factors which are important for the initiation,progress and prognosis of disease.2 In particular,the ETV6 gene has been reported to be fused to ABL in acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALL),3 and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).4 However,there have been few domestic reports of ETV6 fusion genes,especially in cases of acute leukemia.We investigated 3 cases of AML-M4Eo patients using Split-signal Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and found one case with a translocation between 12p13 and 1q25 co-occurring with an inv(16).The ETV6/ARG (ABL-related gene) fusion transcript was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).This is the report of ARG involvement in a translocation in a human malignancy.

  17. Case report of isochromosome 17q in acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes after treatment with a hypomethylating agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, J C; Germano, R T; Castro, C C M; Magalhaes, S M M; Pinheiro, R F

    2012-08-06

    Isochromosome 17q is a relatively common karyotypic abnormality in medulloblastoma, gastric, bladder, and breast cancers. In myeloid disorders, it is observed during disease progression and evolution to acute myeloid leukemia in Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia. It has been reported in rare cases of myelodysplastic syndrome, with an incidence of 0.4-1.57%. Two new agents have been approved for treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome/chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. These are the hypomethylating agents, 5-azacytidine and decitabine, recommended by consensus guidelines for high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients not eligible for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We present a case of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia with normal cytogenetics at diagnosis treated with decitabine (with good response); however, the patient evolved to acute myeloid leukemia with i(17q) shortly after suspending treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes with i(17q) after the use of a hypomethylating agent.

  18. Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; O'Brien, Susan M

    2004-04-01

    Treatment options for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia have changed over the past two decades. This article reviews the experience accumulated with the use of alkylating agents alone and in combination; purine analogues alone and in combination and monoclonal antibodies such as rituximab, and alemtuzumab alone and in combination. The results obtained with different treatment strategies are summarized, compared, and reviewed.

  19. 小儿慢性粒细胞白血病12例临床分析%Clinical features of 12 children with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘兆娥; 宋惠霄; 陈力军

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical and laboratory characteristics and treatments in children with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Methods Respective analyze of the clinical and laboratory data of twelve pediatric patients with CML from December 1994 to October 2009 was performed. Results The disease predominately affected children from 5 to 9 years old (50 % of the patients), with a higher prevalence in boys than girls (gender ratio: 5:1). The duration before the diagnosis was different from three days to one year. The main presenting symptoms were fever, bleeding,asthenia, and complaints related to splenomegaly.Some cases were diagnosed incidentally. Markedly raised leukocyte and platelet counts were common.Conclusion CML in children is rare, and average level of WBC count seems to be much higher than adult.%目的 探讨儿童慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)的临床、实验室特点及其治疗.方法 回顾性分析1994年12月至2009年10月收治的12例CML患儿临床及实验室资料.结果 CML多见于5~9岁的患儿,男女之比为5∶1.出现症状或体征至明确诊断的时间为3 d~1年.常见症状为发热、出血、乏力;部分因体检发现血象异常或脾大而就诊.白细胞及血小板数量明显增多.结论 CML小儿少见,症状不典型,其白细胞数与成年人相比有显著差别.

  20. Response-guided induction therapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with excellent remission rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Heldrup, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course.......To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course....

  1. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollink, Iris H. I. M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. C. J. M.; Zimmermann, Martin; Peeters, Justine K.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Balgobind, Brian V.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Trka, Jan; Baruchel, Andre; Creutzig, Ursula; Pieters, Rob; Reinhardt, Dirk; Zwaan, C. Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but this m

  2. Prediction of molecular subtypes in acute myeloid leukemia based on gene expression profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.W. Verhaak (Roel); B.J. Wouters (Bas); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); S. Abbas (Saman); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); S. Lugthart (Sanne); B. Löwenberg (Bob); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe examined the gene expression profiles of two independent cohorts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia [n=247 and n=214 (younger than or equal to 60 years)] to study the applicability of gene expression profiling as a single assay in prediction of acute myeloid leukemia-specific mol

  3. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H.I.M. Hollink (Iris); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); S.T.C.J.M. Arentsen-Peters (Susan); M. Zimmermann (Martin); J. Peeters (Justine); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); B.V. Balgobind (Brian); E. Sonneveld (Edwin); G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); J. Trka (Jan); A. Baruchel (André); U. Creutzig (Ursula); R. Pieters (Rob); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); C.M. Zwaan (Michel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but th

  4. Effect of age and body weight on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhmann, Ditte J A; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is very toxic and the association between outcome and age and Body Mass Index is unclear. We investigated effect of age and Body Mass Index on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. We studied all patients who completed first indu...

  5. A BCR-ABL1 cutoff of 1.5% at 3 months, determined by the GeneXpert system, predicts an optimal response in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gutiérrez, Valentín; Gómez-Casares, María T.; Puerta, José M.; Alonso-Domínguez, Juan M.; Osorio, Santiago; Hernández-Boluda, Juan C.; Collado, Rosa; Ramírez, María J.; Ibáñez, Fátima; Martín, María L.; Rodríguez-Gambarte, Juan D.; Martínez-Laperche, Carolina; Gómez, Montse; Fiallo, Dolly V.; Redondo, Sara; Rodríguez, Alicia; Ruiz-Nuño, Concepción; Steegmann, Juan L.

    2017-01-01

    In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, 3-month BCR-ABL1 levels have consistently been correlated with further outcomes. Monitoring molecular responses in CML using the GeneXpert (Cepheid) platform has shown an optimal correlation with standardized RQ-PCR (IS) when measuring BCR-ABL1 levels lower than 10%, as it is not accurate for values over 10%. The aim of the present study was to determine the predictive molecular value at three months on different outcome variables using the Xpert BCR-ABL1 MonitorTM assay (Xpert BCR-ABL1). We monitored 125 newly diagnosed consecutive CML patients in the chronic phase (CML-CP) using an automated method: Xpert BCR-ABL1. Only 5% of patients did not achieve an optimal response at 3 months, and the 10% BCR-ABL1 cutoff defined by RQ-PCR (IS) methods was unable to identify significant differences in the probabilities of achieving a complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) (50% vs. 87%, p = 0.1) or a major molecular response (MMR) (60% vs. 80%, p = 0.29) by 12 months. In contrast, a cutoff of 1.5% more accurately identified differences in the probabilities of achieving CCyR (98% vs. 54%, p<0.001) and MMR (88% vs. 56%, p<0.001) by 12 months, as well as probabilities of treatment changes (p = 0.005). Therefore, when using the Xpert BCR-ABL1 assay, a cutoff of 1.5% at 3 months could with high probability identify patients able to achieve an optimal response at 12 months. PMID:28278193

  6. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  7. Acquired mutations in ASXL1 in acute myeloid leukemia: prevalence and prognostic value

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene have been described in various types of myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia. Analysis of novel markers, such as ASXL1 mutations, in independent clinical trials is indispensable before considering them for clinical decision-making. We analyzed 882 well-characterized acute myeloid leukemia cases to determine the prevalence and prognostic impact of ASXL1 exon12 mutations. Truncating ASXL1 mutations were present i...

  8. Genital Infection as a First Sign of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oiso

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fournier’s gangrene is a life-threatening disorder caused by aerobic and anaerobic bacterial infection. We report a case of genital infection as the initial warning sign of acute myeloid leukemia. We were able to prevent progression to Fournier’s gangrene in our patient by immediate intensive therapy with incision, blood transfusions and intravenous administration of antibiotics. This case suggests that hematologists and dermatologists should keep in mind that genital infection can be a first sign of hematologic malignancy.

  9. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  10. Acute myeloid leukemia: conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and moleculocentric methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Bagg, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex group of hematologic neoplasms characterized by distinctive morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic abnormalities. However, it has become evident that genetic aberrations are central to the genesis of AML and have assumed an increasingly relevant role in the classification of AML. Here we discuss hallmark recurrent translocations that define specific World Health Organization (WHO) entities and other frequently encountered genetic aberrations that do not (yet) define specific entities. Additionally, we discuss emerging technologies and their application to the discovery of new abnormalities and to their potential role in the future diagnosis and classification of AML.

  11. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  12. Complexity on Acute Myeloid Leukemia mRNA Transcript Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sequence analysis of acute myeloid leukemia mRNA. Six transcript variants of mlf1 mRNA, with more than 2000 bps, are analyzed by focusing on the autocorrelation of each distribution. Through the correlation matrix, some patches and similarities are singled out and commented, with respect to similar distributions. The comparison of Kolmogorov fractal dimension will be also given in order to classify the six variants. The existence of a fractal shape, patterns, and symmetries are discussed as well.

  13. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syn...

  15. Detection of FLT3 Oncogene Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Conformation Sensitive Gel Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    FLT3 (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase class III that is expressed on by early hematopoietic progenitor cells and plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. FLT3 is also expressed on leukemia blasts in most cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In order to determine the frequency of FLT3 oncogene mutations, we analyzed genomic DNA of adult de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and...

  16. Papel da P190 BCR-ABL como parâmetro de recaída na leucemia mielóide crônica P190 BCR-ABL role in myeloid chronic leukemia relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela V. Andrade

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A leucemia mielóide crônica (LMC é uma desordem hematológica mieloproloferativa clonal causada por uma mutação em uma célula-tronco pluripotente, resultando na proliferação e acúmulo de células mielóides e seus progenitores. O cromossomo Philadelphia é o resultado de uma translocação recíproca de material genético entre os genes abl (Abelson murine leukemia no cromossomo 9, e o bcr (breakpoint cluster region no cromossomo 22, resultando na formação do gene quimérico BCR-ABL. Neste trabalho, 45 pacientes foram acompanhados de forma seqüencial, de acordo com as avaliações periódicas individuais, e 360 amostras foram selecionadas e analisadas pela técnica da reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR através da técnica qualitativa para as isoformas características da P210BCR-ABL (b3a2 e b2a2 e P190BCR-ABL (e1a2. No nosso estudo no pré-TMO, observou-se uma prevalência das isoformas características da LMC (b3a2 e/ou b2a2, fato imprescindível para que o paciente fosse acompanhado dentro do protocolo da LMC. A isoforma e1a2, característica da LLA, foi detectada em 11 pacientes em conjunto com essas isoformas. A detecção do transcrito e1a2 foi avaliada quanto ao seu provável papel na LMC, e foi um dos parâmetros de avaliação deste estudo.Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative clonal disorder caused by a mutation in a stem cell, resulting in the proliferation and accumulation of myeloid cells and their progenitors. The Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1 is a result of a mutual translocation of genetic material between the abl gene (Abelson murine leukemia in chromosome 9 and bcr gene (breakpoint cluster region in chromosome 22, resulting in the formation of the chimerical gene, BCR-ABL. In this work 45 patients were sequentially followed up in individual periodic evaluations, and 360 samples were selected and analyzed by PCR using the qualitative technique for isoforms characteristic of P210CR-ABL (b3a2 and b2a2

  17. INCIDENCE OF ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA AFTER BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Giovanna Valentini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women and the leading cause of death among middle-aged women. Early detection by mammography screening and improvement of therapeutic options have increased breast cancer survival rates, with the consequence that late side effects of cancer treatment become increasingly important. In particular, patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, commonly including alkylating agents and anthracyclines, are at increased risk of developing leukemia, further enhanced by the use of radiotherapy. In the last few years also the use of growth factors seems to increase the risk of secondary leukemia. The purpose of this review is to update epidemiology of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms occurring in breast cancer patients

  18. Angiogenesis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Opportunities for Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Trujillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML arises from neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and relapsed disease remains one of the greater challenges in treating this hematologic malignancy. This paper focuses on angiogenic aspects of AML including the significance and prognostic value of bone marrow microvessel density and circulating cytokine levels. We show three general mechanisms whereby AML exploits angiogenic pathways, including direct induction of angiogenesis, paracrine regulation, and autocrine stimulation. We also present early evidence that leukemia cells contribute directly to vascular endothelia. Novel treatment strategies are proposed, and a review of relevant antiangiogenic clinical trials is presented. By understanding how blood vessels can serve as a reservoir for refractory and relapsed AML, new diagnostics and promising treatment strategies can be developed.

  19. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia “myelodysplastic type’’ in transformation to acute myeloid leukemia – diagnostic and therapeutic options: case report and literature review / Leucemie mielomonocitară cronică forma mielodisplazică în transformare spre leucemie acută mieloidă – diagnostic și opțiuni terapeutice: prezentare de caz și revizuirea literaturii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cîrstea Mihaela

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder that is characterized by the presence of an absolute monocytosis (1 × 10^ 9/l in the peripheral blood, the overlap of myelodisplastic aspects and myeloproliferative aspects in the bone marrow and tendency to transform into acute myeloid leukemia. CMML is considered to be the most aggressive chronic myeloid leukemia. We present the case of a 48 years old woman who was hospitalized in March 2013 in the Center of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation for anemia related symptoms. Initial investigations showed anemia, relative monocytosis (10% monocytes of the WBC differential with an increasing absolute number of monocytes (> 1,000/μl in the following months. Initial exploration of the bone marrow (aspirate and bone marrow biopsy and immunohistochemistry IHC tests revealed elements of trilinear dysplasia and an increased percentage of myeloblasts (11-14%. In the next four months myeloblasts percentage remained below 20% (8-14% and it has been observed a gradually increasing of monocytoid elements (> 20%. Immunophenotyping in the bone marrow aspirate identified a monocytic proliferation with high percentage (8% of immature cells. The karyotype reported the presence of clones with t (1;3. Initially diagnosed as RAEB-2 (WHO the case was recomitted in CMML-type 2 with a progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT has been performed after getting the best possible therapeutic response with AML chemotherapy type (complete remission. Allo-HSCT was performed using myeloablative conditioning, 12 months after diagnosis. The patient is now in complete remission, 24 months after allo-HSCT.

  20. CMV reactivation after allogeneic HCT and relapse risk: evidence for early protection in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Margaret L; Leisenring, Wendy M; Xie, Hu; Walter, Roland B; Mielcarek, Marco; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Riddell, Stanley R; Boeckh, Michael

    2013-08-15

    The association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and relapse was evaluated in a large cohort of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 761), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 322), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (n = 646), lymphoma (n = 254), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 371) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) between 1995 and 2005. In multivariable models, CMV pp65 antigenemia was associated with a decreased risk of relapse by day 100 among patients with AML (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.9) but not in patients with ALL, lymphoma, CML, or MDS. The effect appeared to be independent of CMV viral load, acute graft-versus-host disease, or ganciclovir-associated neutropenia. At 1 year after HCT, early CMV reactivation was associated with reduced risk of relapse in all patients, but this did not reach significance for any disease subgroup. Furthermore, CMV reactivation was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (HR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6) and no difference in overall mortality (HR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.9-1.3). This report demonstrates a modest reduction in early relapse risk after HCT associated with CMV reactivation in a large cohort of patients without a benefit in overall survival.

  1. Acta Medica Indonesiana - The Indonesian Journal of Internal Medicine 153 Malignant Pleural Effusion in Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Hepatitis B Virus Infection

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    C Suharti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions can be the first presentation of a hematologic malignancy. The most common disorders with pleural effusion are Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a frequency of 20 to 30%, especially if mediastinal involvement. Acute and chronic leukemia are rarely accompanied by pleural involvement. We describe a 46-year-old female with history of progressive dyspnoea. Physical examination was revealed massive left pleural effusion. Complete blood count revealed anemia, trombositopenia and normal leucocyte count. Viral serology test shown positive of HBsAg and total antiHBc. Chest X-ray revealed left pleural effusion. Pleural fluid cytology was myeloblast consistent with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Bone marrow aspiration smear, bone marrow biopsy smear, and flow cytometry analysis were consistent with acute myeloid leukemia without maturation (AML M0-FAB classification. Key words: Acute myeloid leukemia, pleural effusion, infection.

  2. Molecular genetics in chronic myeloid leukemia with variant Ph translocation%伴变异型Ph易位的慢性髓细胞白血病的分子遗传学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴炜; 李建勇; 朱雨; 仇海荣; 潘金兰; 徐卫; 陈丽娟; 沈云峰; 薛永权

    2007-01-01

    目的 探讨荧光原位杂交(fluorescence in situ hybridization,FISH)及多重荧光原位杂交(multiplex FISH, M-FISH)技术在检测伴变异型Ph易位(variant philadelphia translocation, vPh)的慢性髓细胞白血病(chronic myeloid leukemia, CML)中遗传学改变的意义.方法 对10例常规R显带显示伴vPh的CML以双色双融合FISH技术检测其染色体标本.对于间期细胞中仅有单个融合信号的标本,观察其中期细胞,以确定是否为衍生9号染色体[der(9)]缺失.同时对这10例CML进行M-FISH技术检测.结果 FISH技术在10例伴vPh的CML中检测到5例存在der(9)缺失.M-FISH检测到除22号染色体外,1、3、5、6、8、10、11和17号染色体也参与vPh,发现了常规细胞遗传学未发现的异常,包括2种未见报道的异常.结论 对伴vPh的CML联合使用常规细胞遗传学、FISH、M-FISH技术可使遗传学诊断更加完善.

  3. Os desafios no tratamento da Leucemia mielóide crônica na era do mesilato de imatinibe Challenges in current chronic myeloid leukemia therapy of imatinib era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cármino Antônio de Souza

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Um progresso dramático no tratamento da LMC foi conquistado com o surgimento do inibidor da tirosina quinase BCR/ABL mesilato de imatinib. O imatinib induz altas taxas de resposta citogenética e molecular. A mobilização e coleta de células progenitoras periféricas para transplante autólogo após terapia com imatinib é possível e recentemente houve ressurgimento do interesse neste procedimento. Os autores discutem o atual e futuro papel do transplante autólogo no tratamento da LMC e as aplicações clínicas deste método. Provavelmente esse procedimento inicialmente será restrito aos pacientes que falharem na terapia com imatinib. Estudos clínicos serão necessários para definir a melhor aplicação desse método.A dramatic progress in treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML has been achieved with the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase imatinib. Imatinib induces high rates of cytogenetic and even molecular remissions in CML patients. The collection of Ph negative progenitor blood stem cells (PBSC for autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT after imatinib treatment is possible and the interest of this procedure has emerged. The authors discuss the current and future role of autologous transplantation in CML therapy and the clinical applications of this method. Methods for additional purging of the graft are also discussed. It is likely that this procedure will be limited initially to patients who have failed imatinib therapy. Clinical trials are necessary to define the best application of this method.

  4. Monitoração molecular da Leucemia Mielóide Crônica na era do imatinibe Molecular monitoring of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the imatinib era

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    Israel Bendit

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos dez anos, o tratamento da leucemia mielóide crônica (LMC passou por uma grande mudança com a introdução da terapia alvo, onde o mesilato de imatinibe (MI atua inibindo a atividade tirosina quinase do transcrito BCR-ABL produto este do cromossomo Filadélfia (Ph. Esta revolução terapêutica obrigou que técnicas moleculares, até então de uso restrito na oncohematologia, como a reação em cadeia da polimerase em tempo real (RQ-PCR, fossem necessárias para monitorar o sucesso terapêutico ou a detecção precoce da perda de resposta ao MI. Nesta revisão estão delineados, de forma resumida, os principais procedimentos quanto à monitoração dos pacientes com LMC em tratamento com o MI segundo o Consenso Brasileiro de LMC.Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML has changed since the introduction of imatinib mesylate (IM 10 years ago. IM acts as a target therapy against the BCR-ABL gene by inhibiting its tyrosine kinase activity. This revolution in treating CML compels the introduction of molecular techniques, such as real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR to monitor the response to IM by providing an accurate measurement of the degree to which the BCR-ABL transcript is reduced or an early detection of loss of response identified by a rising level of BCR-ABL. In this review, we summarize the Brazilian CML consensus regarding the main procedures used to monitor CML patients treated with IM.

  5. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  6. Recurrent DNMT3A R882 mutations in Chinese patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

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    Jiang Lin

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of DNMT3A gene have recently been reported in acute myeloid leukemia (AML and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. We examined the entire coding sequences of DNMT3A gene by high-resolution melting analysis and sequencing in Chinese patients with myeloid malignancies. R882 mutations were found in 12/182 AML and in 4/51 MDS, but not in either 79 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, or 57 myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs, or 4 chronic monomyelocytic leukemia. No other DNMT3A mutations were detected in all patients. R882 mutations were associated with old age and more frequently present in monoblastic leukemia (M4 and M5, 7/52 compared to other subtypes (5/130. Furthermore, 14/16 (86.6% R882 mutations were observed in patients with normal karyotypes. The overall survival of mutated MDS patients was shorter than those without mutation (median 9 and 25 months, respectively. We conclude that DNMT3A R882 mutations are recurrent molecular aberrations in AML and MDS, and may be an adverse prognostic event in MDS.

  7. Transformation of myelodysplastic syndromes into acute myeloid leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施均; 邵宗鸿; 刘鸿; 白洁; 曹燕然; 何广胜; 凃梅峰; 王秀丽; 郝玉书; 杨天楹; 杨崇礼

    2004-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), also called preleukemias, are a group of myeloid hematopoietic malignant disorders. We studied the transformation of MDS into acute myeloid leukemia (AML).Methods Leukemic transformation in 151 patients with MDS was dynamically followed up. The clinical manifestation, peripheral blood and bone marrow condition, karyotypes, immunophenotypes, response to treatment, and prognosis of AML evolution from MDS (MDS-AML) were also observed.Results During the course of this study, over the past eight years and seven months, 21 (13.91%) of 151 MDS patients progressed to overt leukemia, with a median interval of 5 (1-23) months. There were no significant differences between rates of leukemic transformation in comparison with the refractory anemia (RA), RA with excess of blasts (RAEB), and RAEB in transformation (RAEB-t) patient groups. Transformation occurred either gradually or rapidly. There were five parameters positively correlated to leukemic transformation: under 40 years of age, pancytopenia of 3 lineages, more than 15% blasts in the bone marrow, at least two abnormal karyotypes, and treatment with combined chemotherapy. All of the 21 patients with leukemia suffered from MDS-AML, and most of them were M2, M4, or M5. Two (9.52%) MDS-AML patients developed extramedullary infiltration. Leukopenia was found in 47.62% of these patients. Two thirds of these patients, whose bone marrows were generally hypercellular, suffered from neutropenia. After developing AML, 8 (47.06%) patients developed abnormal karyotypes. High expression of immature myeloid antigens, including CD33 [(49.83±24.50)%], CD13 [(36.38±33.84)%], monocytic antigen CD14 [(38.50±24.60)%], and stem cell marker CD34 [(34.67±30.59)%], were found on bone marrow mononuclear cells from MDS-AML patients after leukemic transformation. In some cases, lymphoid antigens, such as CD5, CD7, CD9, and CD19, coexisted with myeloid antigens. A low complete remission rate (31

  8. Conventional chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia: a Brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Borgia Barbosa Pagnano

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Young patients affected by acute myeloid leukemia (AML achieve complete remission (CR using conventional chemotherapy in about 55-85%. However, 30% of patients fail to achieve CR and the remission duration is often only about 12 months. More intensive treatment after CR seems to be necessary in order to maintain CR and obtain a definitive cure. In Brazil, few reports have been published on this important subject. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe a Brazilian experience in the treatment of "de novo" acute myeloid leukemia (AML in younger adult patients (age < 60 years. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: University Hospital, Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, State University of Campinas, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: Newly diagnosed cases of "de novo" AML in the period from January 1994 to December 1998 were evaluated retrospectively, in relation to response to treatment, overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. Cases with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL were also included in this analysis. RESULTS: On the basis of an intention to treat, 78 cases of AML, including 17 cases of APL, were evaluated. The overall median follow-up was 272 days. The complete remission (CR rate was 63.6% in the AML group (excluding APL and 78% in the APL group. The 5-year estimated disease-free survival (DFS was 80% for the APL group and 34% for the AML group (P = 0.02. The 5-year estimated overall survival (OS was 52% for the APL group and 20.5% for the AML group, respectively (P = NS. Relapse was observed in 12/39 (30.7% patients with AML and 1/11 (9% with APL. CONCLUSIONS: These results are similar to those reported in the literature. However, relapse and mortality rates remain high, and a search for more aggressive strategies in order to prevent relapse is recommended.

  9. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  10. Preliminary Establishment of Transplanted Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Model in Nude Mice%移植性慢性髓系白血病裸鼠模型的初步建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李先敏; 丁昕; 章龙珍; 岑建农; 陈子兴

    2011-01-01

    慢性髓系白血病(chronic myeloid leukemia,CML)是一种起源于造血干细胞的恶性克隆性疾病,CML干细胞被认为是导致疾病发生、发展并最终急变的根源,目前尚缺乏稳定的动物模型证明CML干细胞的存在.本研究旨在通过建立CML裸鼠模型,探讨人CML细胞在BABL/c裸小鼠体内的生物学行为,并使CML干细胞在裸鼠体内富集成为可能.对4至6周龄的BALB/c裸鼠进行切脾(splenectomy,S),环磷酰胺腹腔注射(cytoxan intraperitoneal injection,c)及全身亚致死剂量照射(sublethal irradiation,I)等预处理(SCI)后,经尾静脉接种(5 -8)×107个人CML慢性期患者单个核细胞.对4至6周龄的BALB/c裸鼠进行全身致死剂量照射(lethal irradiation)后,经尾静脉接种5×106同源裸鼠骨髓细胞和(5 -8)×107个人CML慢性期患者单个核细胞.应用RT-PCR、塑胶包埋病理切片以及流式细胞术等检测裸鼠各脏器及骨髓中人CML细胞浸润情况,并比较两种建模方法的优劣.结果表明,CML细胞能浸润至经SCI预处理的裸鼠骨髓体内,但目前成功率还很低,仅为通过BABL/c裸鼠建立人CML动物模型的一个开端.而经致死剂量预处理裸鼠,CML细胞未能浸润至骨髓.结论:人CML慢性期白血病细胞能在经SCI预处理的裸鼠体内形成白血病,为建立CML动物模型寻找到新的方向.%Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a malignant clonal disease derived from hematopoietic stem cells. CML stem cells were thought to be the root which could lead disease development and ultimately rapid change. However, a stable animal model for studying the characteristics of CML stem cells is currently lacking. This study was aimed to establish a transplanted human CML nude-mice model to further explore the biological behavior of CML stem cells in vivo, and to enrich CML stem cells in nude mice by series transplantation. The 4-6 weeks old BALB /c nude mice pretreated by splenectomy (S), cytoxan intraperitoneal

  11. Intracranial CNS Manifestations of Myeloid Sarcoma in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Review of the Literature and Three Case Reports from the Author’s Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo M. Cervantes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma (MS of the central nervous system (CNS is a rare presentation of leukemic mass infiltration outside of the bone marrow. It may involve the subperiosteum and dura mater and, on rare occasions, can also invade the brain parenchyma. The disease is most commonly seen in children or young adults; however, it has been described in multiple age groups. MS can be seen in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders. This entity has the potential to be underdiagnosed if the MS appearance precedes the first diagnosis of leukemia. The main reason is that their appearance on CT and MRI has a broad differential diagnosis, and proper diagnosis of MS can only be made if the imaging findings are correlated with the clinical history and laboratory findings. Herein, we describe the intracranial CNS manifestations of MS in patients with AML on CT and MRI involving the brain and/or meninges. This study is based on a systematic review of the literature. In addition, three case reports from the author’s institution with AML and intracranial involvement of MS are included. Our aim is to enhance the awareness of this entity among both clinicians and radiologists.

  12. Polymorphisms in the glutathione S-transferase theta and mu genes and susceptibility to myeloid leukemia in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lima Souza

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The null genotype for glutathione S-transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18 gene polymorphisms is considered a risk factor for leukemia in different populations. In this work we investigated the GSTT1 and GSTM1 polymorphisms using multiplex PCR in 53 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, 23 with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL and 304 apparently healthy controls. In this association study we found that the GSTT1null genotype was more frequent in our group of APL patients than in the control group [OR = 2.75 (95% CI = 1.10-6.88], providing evidence that a deletion in the GSTT1 gene could be a risk factor for this type of leukemia.

  13. ST-elevation myocardial infarction and myelodysplastic syndrome with acute myeloid leukemia transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Geoffrey T; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W; Sane, David C

    2014-04-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach--balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents--might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days.

  14. BMI1 gene expression and significance in chronic myeloid leukemia%慢性粒细胞白血病BMI1基因表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛熙; 赵枰

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To detect the expressions of BMI1 mRNA in chronic myeloid leukemia(CML)and explore their clinical significance.Methods:Using real-time PCR technique,expression of BMI1 mRNA was detected in 41 CML patients and 10 healthy adults.Results: A positive rate of BMI1 in the patients was 68.3%,significantly higher than that of the controls(P<0.01). BMI1 expression was much higher in accelerated phase and acute transfomation phase than in chronic phase(t=3.421、4.231, P<0.01).Conclusions:The BMI1 gene is closely related to the advancement and prognosis of CML,which is valuable molecular markers to be used for monitoring the disease.%目的:检测慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)病人BMI1 mRNA的表达情况,以探讨其在CML病情进展及预后中的意义。方法:应用定量实时荧光PCR(real-time PCR)技术检测4l例CML病人和10例健康者上述基因的表达。结果:BMI1 mRNA在CML病人的阳性表达率为68.3%,明显高于正常对照组10.0%(P<0.01),在CML的加速期、急变期的表达水平明显高于慢性期(t =3.421、4.231,P<0.01)。结论:BMI1基因与CML的病情进展密切相关,是监测CML病情进展及判断预后的有价值的分子标记物。

  15. BCR-ABL DERIVED PEPTIDE VACCINES FOR CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKAEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bocchia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative pluripotent stem cell disorder characterized by the presence of a cytogenetic hallmark, the Philadelphia (Ph chromosome, and accounts for 15% of adult leukemias. The disease progresses from a chronic phase through an accelerated phase to a blast phase and its natural course accounts for a median 4 years survival1. The Ph chromosome is derived by a reciprocal translocation termed t(9;22 in which the c-abl oncogene has moved from chromosome 9 into the breakpoint cluster region (bcr, within the bcr gene on chromosome 22, resulting in a chimeric bcr-abl fusion gene that encodes a 210 KD protein (p210 with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. Two major alternative chimeric p210 can result from this fusion gene: p210-b2a2 where the junction occurs between bcr exon 2 (b2 and abl exon 2 (a2 and p210-b3a2 where the the junction occurs between bcr exon 3 (b3 and abl exon 2 (a2. About 40% of CML patients harbor the p210-b2a2 and about 60% of them show the p210-b3a2.

  16. Cardiac function in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarfelt, Marianne; Andersen, Niels Holmark; Glosli, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We report cardiac function of patients treated for Childhood acute myeloid leukemia with chemotherapy only according to three consecutive Nordic protocols. METHODS: Ninety-eight of 138 eligible patients accepted examination with standardized echocardiography. Results were compared...

  17. Analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Susanne; Mead, Andrew; Malinovskis, Aleksandrs; Hardwick, Nicola R; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-11-01

    The use of peptide vaccines, enhanced by adjuvants, has shown some efficacy in clinical trials. However, responses are often short-lived and rarely induce notable memory responses. The reason is that self-antigens have already been presented to the immune system as the tumor develops, leading to tolerance or some degree of host tumor cell destruction. To try to break tolerance against self-antigens, one of the methods employed has been to modify peptides at the anchor residues to enhance their ability to bind major histocompatibility complex molecules, extending their exposure to the T-cell receptor. These modified or analogue peptides have been investigated as stimulators of the immune system in patients with different cancers with variable but sometimes notable success. In this review we describe the background and recent developments in the use of analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia describing knowledge useful for the application of analogue peptide treatments for other malignancies.

  18. Sapacitabine in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Maxim; Richards, Ashley I

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains poor and new treatment approaches are urgently needed. A novel nucleoside analog sapacitabine has recently emerged as a feasible agent because of its oral administration and acceptable toxicity profile. Clinical efficacy of sapacitabine, both as a single agent and in combination, has been evaluated in elderly AML patients or AML patients unfit for standard intensive chemotherapy. Response rates varied from 15 to 45% in phase II studies. Sapacitabine was overall well-tolerated with gastrointestinal and myelosuppression-related complications were the most common side effects. Unfortunately, in a phase III study sapacitabine showed no clinical superiority as compared to low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients with AML. Another large phase III study comparing the combination of sapacitabine with decitabine to decitabine alone is currently ongoing and is expected to be completed by the end of 2015 or by the first half of 2016.

  19. Clinical activity of alvocidib (flavopiridol) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Joshua F; Karp, Judith E

    2015-12-01

    There have been minimal therapeutic advancements in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) over the past 4 decades and outcomes remain unsatisfactory. Alvocidib (formerly flavopiridol) is a multi-serine threonine cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with demonstrable in vitro and clinical activity in AML when combined in a timed sequential chemotherapy regimen, FLAM (alvocidib followed by cytarabine continuous infusion and mitoxantrone). FLAM has been evaluated in sequential phase 1 and phase 2 studies in 149 and 256 relapsed/refractory and newly diagnosed non-favorable risk AML patients, respectively, with encouraging findings in both patient populations warranting further investigation. This review highlights the mechanism of action of alvocidib, pre-clinical studies of alvocidib in AML, and the clinical trials evaluating alvocidib alone and in combination with cytotoxic agents (FLAM) in AML.

  20. Current findings for recurring mutations in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Shinichiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a multistep process that requires at least two genetic abnormalities for the development of the disease. The identification of genetic mutations in AML has greatly advanced our understanding of leukemogenesis. Recently, the use of novel technologies, such as massively parallel DNA sequencing or high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays, has allowed the identification of several novel recurrent gene mutations in AML. The aim of this review is to summarize the current findings for the identification of these gene mutations (Dnmt, TET2, IDH1/2, NPM1, ASXL1, etc., most of which are frequently found in cytogenetically normal AML. The cooperative interactions of these molecular aberrations and their interactions with class I/II mutations are presented. The prognostic and predictive significances of these aberrations are also reviewed.

  1. Relapsing acute myeloid leukemia presenting as hypopyon uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna P Hegde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior segment infiltration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML presenting as hypopyon uveitis is very rare. We report this case as an uncommon presentation in a patient on remission after bone marrow transplant for AML. In addition to the hypopyon, the patient presented with "red eye" caused by ocular surface disease due to concurrent graft-versus-host disease and glaucoma. The classical manifestations of masquerade syndrome due to AML were altered by concurrent pathologies. Media opacities further confounded the differential diagnosis. We highlight the investigations used to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. In uveitis, there is a need to maintain a high index of clinical suspicion, as early diagnosis in ocular malignancy can save sight and life.

  2. Clinical impact of leukemic blast heterogeneity at diagnosis in cytogenetic intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Marianne Hutchings; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Boegsted, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact.......Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact....

  3. pediatric patient with acute myeloid leukemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available emia in children and adolescent protocollo per la leucemia acuta mieloide in età pediatrica A.3.2Name or abb...pediatric patient with acute myeloid leukemia pazienti in età pediatrica affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide ...te myeloid leukemia pazienti in età pediatrica affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Di

  4. Treatment and prognostic assessment of acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bannur Ramanna Nandeesh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a heterogeneous group of clonal malignant myeloid neoplasms. Malignant transformation of hematopoietic progenitor cell leads to clonal expansion and replacement of normal bone marrow cells with malignant cells leading to suppression of normal haematopoiesis. Advancements in our understanding of disease biology have allowed AML to be classified based on its gene expression profile, which includes previously identified cytogenetic subgroups, and distinct novel subgroups which have prognostic significance. Identification of mutations in DNMT3A and IDH 1 genes in cytogenetically normal AML (by gene sequencing helps to identify patients with poor prognosis. Redesigning the treatment regimen consisting of cytarabine and daunorubicin has improved the treatment outcomes without increase in the treatment-related mortality. Increasing the dose of daunorubicin to 90 mg/m2 improves complete remission rates without increasing treatment-related complications both in young and elderly patients. Cytarabine (200 mg/m2 in cycle I and 2 g/m2 in cycle 2 is shown to be as effective as high dose cytarabine (1000 mg/m2 twice daily in cycle 1and 2 g/m2 twice daily in cycle 2 and is associated with less treatment-related toxicities. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 579-586

  5. Multiplex high-throughput gene mutation analysis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Jennifer; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Neff, Tanaya; Fleming, William H; Loriaux, Marc; Heinrich, Michael C; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Kelemen, Katalin; Leeborg, Nicky; Gatter, Ken; Braziel, Rita M; Press, Richard; Corless, Christopher L; Fan, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Classification of acute myeloid leukemia increasingly depends on genetic analysis. However, the number of known mutations in acute myeloid leukemia is expanding rapidly. Therefore, we tested a high-throughput screening method for acute myeloid leukemia mutation analysis using a multiplex mass spectrometry-based approach. To our knowledge, this is the first reported application of this approach to genotype leukemias in a clinical setting. One hundred seven acute myeloid leukemia cases were screened for mutations using a panel that covers 344 point mutations across 31 genes known to be associated with leukemia. The analysis was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for mutations in genes of interest followed by primer extension reactions. Products were analyzed on a Sequenom MassARRAY system (San Diego, CA). The multiplex panel yielded mutations in 58% of acute myeloid leukemia cases with normal cytogenetics and 21% of cases with abnormal cytogenetics. Cytogenetics and routine polymerase chain reaction-based screening of NPM1, CEBPA, FLT3-ITD, and KIT was also performed on a subset of cases. When combined with the results of these standard polymerase chain reaction-based tests, the mutation frequency reached 78% in cases with normal cytogenetics. Of these, 42% harbored multiple mutations primarily involving NPM1 with NRAS, KRAS, CEBPA, PTPN11, IDH1, or FLT3. In contrast, cases with abnormal cytogenetics rarely harbored more than 1 mutation (1.5%), suggesting different underlying biology. This study demonstrates the feasibility and utility of broad-based mutation profiling of acute myeloid leukemia in a clinical setting. This approach will be helpful in defining prognostic subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia and contribute to the selection of patients for enrollment into trials with novel inhibitors.

  6. MicroRNA expression profiling in relation to the genetic heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jongen-Lavrencic (Mojca); S.M. Sun; M.K. Dijkstra; P.J.M. Valk (Peter); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly diverse disease characterized by various cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that show variable expression during myeloid differentiation. MicroRNA expression in marrow blasts in 215 cases of newly diagnosed

  7. Absence of mutations in the RET gene in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M; Hofstra, RMW; Stulp, RP; Wu, Y; Buys, CHCM; Willemze, R; Landegent, JE

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor RET has previously been detected in normal hematopoietic cells, and especially in cells of the myeloid lineage. Furthermore, RET was shown to be differentially expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a disease characterized by excessive cell growth and a

  8. Acquired mutations in ASXL1 in acute myeloid leukemia: Prevalence and prognostic value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pratcorona (Marta); S. Abbas (Saman); M.A. Sanders (Mathijs); J.E. Koenders (Jasper); F.G. Kavelaars (Francois); C.A.J. Erpelinck-Verschueren (C. A J); A. Zeilemakers (Annelieke); B. Löwenberg (Bob); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSomatic mutations in the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene have been described in various types of myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia. Analysis of novel markers, such as ASXL1 mutations, in independent clinical trials is indispensable before considering them for

  9. Prediction of molecular subtypes in acute myeloid leukemia based on gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaak, Roel G W; Wouters, Bas J; Erpelinck, Claudia A J; Abbas, Saman; Beverloo, H Berna; Lugthart, Sanne; Löwenberg, Bob; Delwel, Ruud; Valk, Peter J M

    2009-01-01

    We examined the gene expression profiles of two independent cohorts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia [n=247 and n=214 (younger than or equal to 60 years)] to study the applicability of gene expression profiling as a single assay in prediction of acute myeloid leukemia-specific molecular subtypes. The favorable cytogenetic acute myeloid leukemia subtypes, i.e., acute myeloid leukemia with t(8;21), t(15;17) or inv(16), were predicted with maximum accuracy (positive and negative predictive value: 100%). Mutations in NPM1 and CEBPA were predicted less accurately (positive predictive value: 66% and 100%, and negative predictive value: 99% and 97% respectively). Various other characteristic molecular acute myeloid leukemia subtypes, i.e., mutant FLT3 and RAS, abnormalities involving 11q23, -5/5q-, -7/7q-, abnormalities involving 3q (abn3q) and t(9;22), could not be correctly predicted using gene expression profiling. In conclusion, gene expression profiling allows accurate prediction of certain acute myeloid leukemia subtypes, e.g. those characterized by expression of chimeric transcription factors. However, detection of mutations affecting signaling molecules and numerical abnormalities still requires alternative molecular methods.

  10. Activated allogeneic NK cells preferentially kill poor prognosis B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA mismatched Natural Killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cell...

  11. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Chronic B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange Veterans who ... receive VA health care and disability compensation. About chronic B-cell leukemias Leukemia is a cancer of ...

  12. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Tasian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, primary chemorefractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic agents is not feasible given the potential for significant toxicity to normal tissues with conventional chemotherapy and the risk for long-term end-organ dysfunction. Significant emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML via phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remains a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who will otherwise fail standard therapy.

  13. FLT3 inhibitors: clinical potential in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospital, Marie-Anne; Green, Alexa S; Maciel, Thiago T; Moura, Ivan C; Leung, Anskar Y; Bouscary, Didier; Tamburini, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematopoietic malignancy that is cured in as few as 15%–40% of cases. Tremendous improvements in AML prognostication arose from a comprehensive analysis of leukemia cell genomes. Among normal karyotype AML cases, mutations in the FLT3 gene are the ones most commonly detected as having a deleterious prognostic impact. FLT3 is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, and alterations of the FLT3 gene such as internal tandem duplications (FLT3-ITD) deregulate FLT3 downstream signaling pathways in favor of increased cell proliferation and survival. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) emerged as a new therapeutic option in FLT3-ITD AML, and clinical trials are ongoing with a variety of TKI either alone, combined with chemotherapy, or even as maintenance after allogenic stem cell transplantation. However, a wide range of molecular resistance mechanisms are activated upon TKI therapy, thus limiting their clinical impact. Massive research efforts are now ongoing to develop more efficient FLT3 TKI and/or new therapies targeting these resistance mechanisms to improve the prognosis of FLT3-ITD AML patients in the future. PMID:28223820

  14. Effects of TET2 mutations on DNA methylation in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methyl-cytosine to 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine, possibly leading to loss of DNA methylation. TET2 mutations are common in myeloid leukemia and were proposed to contribute to leukemogenesis through DNA methylation. To expand on this concept, we studied chronic myelomonocyti...

  15. Chronic myelogenous leukemia: molecular monitoring in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Ryabchikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib has led to significant progress in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML treatment. To date, genetic monitoring is a mandatory attribute of therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The purpose of this study was to access the imatinib therapy efficacy in CML patients using complete molecular genetic monitoring by standard cytogenetics, realtime polymerase chain reaction and mutational analysis. Correlation between cytogenetic and molecular response was shown. Heterogeneity of molecular response in each patient group was revealed by expression of BCR-ABL. Kinase domain mutations were detected in 32 % of CML patients resistant to imatinib.

  16. Effectiveness of Different Regimes of Dasatinib for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia:A Meta-Analysis%达沙替尼不同治疗方案治疗慢性髓细胞白血病疗效的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭敏; 席亚明; 晁荣; 赵龙; 靳蕊蕊

    2012-01-01

    目的 系统评价达沙替尼140 mg,qd和70 mg,bid治疗慢性髓细胞白血病(chronic myeloid leukemia,CML)的疗效.方法 计算机检索EMbase(1974~2011.11)、PubMed(1966~2011.11)、Cochrane Library(2011年第11期)、CBM(1979~2011.11)、VIP(1989~2011.11)、CNKI(1994~2011.11)和WanFang Data(1997 ~ 2011.11)等数据库并手工检索相关领域的杂志,查找比较达沙替尼140 mg,qd和70 mg,bid治疗CML的随机对照试验.对符合纳入标准的RCT,由两位评价员按Cochrane系统评价的方法,独立进行资料提取、质量评价并交叉核对后,采用RevMan 5.1软件进行Meta分析.结果 共纳入4个研究(2个随机对照试验,不同随访时间),862例患者.Meta分析结果显示,达沙替尼140 mg,qd和70 mg,bid长期治疗CML时,两者完全血液学反应[RR=0.97,95%CI(0.88,1.07),P=0.58]、完全细胞遗传学反应[RR=0.94,95%CI(0.80,1.11),P=0.47]及主要细胞遗传学反应[RR=0.99,95%CI(0.86,1.13),P=0.86]差异均无统计学意义;短期治疗CML慢性期(CP-CML)时,完全血液学反应[RR=0.99,95%CI(0.90,1.07),P=0.73]、完全细胞遗传学反应[RR=0.99,95%CI(0.78,1.26),P=0.95]及主要细胞遗传学反应[RR=1.01,95%CI(0.83,1.22),P=0.95]的差异也均无统计学意义;对长期治疗CML慢性期及进展期进行亚组分析,结果显示其完全血液学反应、完全细胞遗传学反应及主要细胞遗传学反应的差异均无统计学意义.结论 达沙替尼140 mg单次和70mg双次用药治疗CML的疗效相似.但鉴于纳入研究的方法学质量存在中度选择性偏倚的可能性,可能影响结果真实性,因此上述结论还有待开展更多高质量大样本的随机双盲临床对照试验来验证.%Objective To systematically evaluate the effectiveness of dasatinib in doses of 140 mg once daily and 70 mg twice daily for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Methods The randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were retrieved from Embase (1974 to November 2011), Pubmed (1966

  17. Clinical relative factors analysis of imatinib on treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia%伊马替尼治疗慢性髓系白血病临床疗效的相关影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莹莹; 曾庆曙; 杨明珍; 王永庆; 夏海龙; 江慧敏; 安福润

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyse the relationship between the clinical efficacy of imatinib treatment on chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phaseand risk stratification. Methods 98 imatinib-treated patients were enrolled, and before taking imatinib Sokal and Hasford score were used to assess risk stratification to compare if it has statistical significance between different groups. Results In the 98 cases, 89 cases (97.8%) achieved complete hematologic remission(CHR),76 cases(86.4%) achieved partial cytogenetic remission(PCyR) after three months, 63 cases (82.9%) achieved complete cytogenetic response(CCyR) after six months and 24 cases(54.5%) achieved major molecular response ( MMR ) after twelve months. Risk stratification was assessed according to Sokal score. After three months the rate of groups at low, intermediate and high risk categories which achieved PCyR were 94.4%, 82.6% and 66.7%, respectively(P=0.104), after six months the rate of different groups which achieved CCyR were 88.2%,76.9% and 100%, respectively(P=0.319), and after twelve months the rate of different groups at low and intermediate risk categories which achieved MMR were 52.4% and 65.0%( P=0.412 ).According to the patients' condition, before taking imatinib,46 patients were stratified by Hasford, among which 21 at low risk cate-gorie,23 at intermediate risk categorie and 2 at high risk categorie.After three months the rate of groups at low, in-termediate and high risk categories which achieved PCyR were 90.5%, 91.3% and 50%, respectively ( P =0.191),after six months the rate of different groups which achieved CCyR were 83.3%,94.4% and 100%,respec-tively(P=0.528),and after twelve months the rate of different groups at low and intermediate risk categories which achieved MMR were 45.5% and 58.3% ( P=0.842 ) . Conclusion Imatinib mesylate treatment of chronic mye-loid leukemia is good. Patients belonged to low and intermediate risk groups are more likely to get better clinical ef-ficacy than the high

  18. Treatment Outcome in Older Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Jenkins, Laura; Dahl, Gary; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Campana, Dario; Inaba, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    Background Older age has historically been an adverse prognostic factor in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The impact of age relative to that of other prognostic factors on the outcome of patients treated in recent trials is unknown. Methods Clinical outcome and causes of treatment failure of 351 patients enrolled on three consecutive protocols for childhood AML between 1991 and 2008 were analyzed according to age and protocol. Results The more recent protocol (AML02) produced improved outcomes for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to 2 earlier studies (AML91 and 97), with 3-year rates of event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse (CIR) for this group similar to those of 0- to 9-year old patients: EFS, 58.3% ± 5.4% vs. 66.6% ± 4.9%, P=.20; OS, 68.9% ± 5.1% vs. 75.1% ± 4.5%, P=.36; cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse, 21.9% ± 4.4%; vs. 25.3% ± 4.1%, P=.59. EFS and OS estimates for 10–15-year-old patients overlapped those for 16–21-year-old patients. However, the cumulative incidence of toxic death was significantly higher for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to younger patients (13.2% ± 3.6 vs. 4.5% ± 2.0%, P=.028). Conclusion The survival rate for older children with AML has improved on our recent trial and is now similar to that of younger patients. However, deaths from toxicity remain a significant problem in the older age group. Future trials should focus on improving supportive care while striving to develop more effective antileukemic therapy. PMID:22674050

  19. [Abnormal reaction for anaesthetics in a critically ill child with acute myeloid leukemia--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujok, Grzegorz; Knapik, Piotr; Macioł, Zbigniew

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a case report of an abnormal reaction for anaesthetics correlated with cytostatic therapy in the course of preparation time for bone marrow transplantation due to acute myeloid leukemia. Problems of pharmacological interaction of ketamine and benzodiazepines are emphasized. Special attention was paid to the risk of abnormal drug reactions during general anaesthesia in children with leukemia.

  20. New treatment strategies in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia : Hypomethylating agents and proteasome inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, Lidia Henrieke

    2016-01-01

    New treatment strategies in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging, especially in the large group of patients older than 60 years. In these patients, results of standard chemotherapy are often disappointing

  1. Leukemia cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varuna Mallya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with leukemia may show involvement of the skin. This skin involvement can be due to infiltration of skin by leukemic cells or it may be a part of nonspecific cutaneous manifestations. Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leucocytes or their precursors into the skin resulting in extensive clinical manifestations. Described mostly in acute myeloid leukemia and acute myelocytic monocytic leukemia, it is rare in chronic myeloid leukemia and is seen mostly during the blast crises. Its presence signals poor prognosis.

  2. 应用遗传学和分子生物学分析评价伊马替尼和常规化疗治疗慢性粒细胞白血病的疗效%Efficiency evaluation of imatinib and traditional chemical therapy in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia by analysis of cytogenetics and molecular genetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉; 闫金松; 康志杰; 武克宇

    2012-01-01

    To compare the efficiency of imatinib mesylate (imatinib) and traditional chemical therapy in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase. [ Methods] Collecting 20 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase, 11 patients were treated with imatinib, while the other 9 were treated with traditional chemical therapy. Karyotypes were analyzed by chromosome G banding in 20 cases who were monitored the level of bcr - abl fusion gene by RT - PCR before and after administrating imatinib or traditional chemical therapy. Evaluate the rates of CHR, CyR, MoR. [Results] All the patients treated with imatinib got complete hematological response (CHR) , 9 of which had negative ph chromosome and bcr - abl fusion gene. The cytogenetic response ( CyR) response rate is 81%. To patients with traditional chemical therapy, CHR rate is 100% , but no one got CyR. [Conclusion] Imatinib significantly improves cytogenetic and molecular response rates of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, which is better than traditional chemical therapy.%[目的]比较伊马替尼和常规化疗治疗慢性粒细胞白血病的疗效.[方法]收集20例慢性粒细胞白血病患者,其中11例应用伊马替尼治疗,9例应用常规化疗.采用常规染色体显带技术和半定量RT - PCR技术对细胞遗传学及分子遗传学进行动态监测,评价两种不同治疗方法的血液学、遗传学、分子生物学缓解率.[结果]应用伊马替尼治疗的患者均达血液学缓解,其中9例患者Ph染色体和bcr - abl融合基因消失,遗传学缓解率为81%.应用常规化疗的患者均能达到血液学缓解,但无一例达遗传学缓解.[结论]伊马替尼治疗慢性粒细胞白血病能达到部分或完全细胞遗传学缓解及分子生物学水平的缓解,优于常规化学药物治疗.

  3. 甲磺酸伊马替尼治疗慢性粒细胞白血病疗效观察%Efficacy of imatinib in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄敬青

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨甲磺酸伊马替尼治疗慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)的体会.方法 40例CML患者接受甲磺酸伊马替尼治疗,其中慢性期(CP)20例,加速期(AP)8例,急变期(BC)12例.甲磺酸伊马替尼用法:CP患者400 mg/d,AP和BC患者600 mg/d,均为餐后1次顿服.治疗前全面查体,查血象、骨髓象、Ph染色体和(或)bcr/abl融合基因.治疗期间第1个月每周查血象2次,1个月后每周或2周1次.每2~4周查一次肝、肾功能.待血液学取得完全缓解(CR)后择期复查骨髓、Ph染色体和(或)bcr/abl基因.根据血象和患者对药物耐受情况及时调整药物剂量.结果 经中位时间20个月(12~24个月)随访,20例CML CP期患者均取得血液学CR,其中7例(35%)Ph染色体转阴,8例AP患者中6例(75%)回到CP,12例BC患者中4例(33.3%)回到CP.药物不良反应有造血功能抑制、眶周和下肢轻度水肿、全身肌肉关节酸痛和恶心、呕吐、低热(37.5~38.5℃)、皮疹、胆红素升高等.结论 甲磺酸伊马替尼对CML有较好疗效,药物不良反应可耐受.%Objective To explore the management experience of imatinib in the treatment of chronic myeloid leuke-mia (CML). Methods There were 40 CML. 20 patients in chronic phase(CP), 8 patients in accelerated phase(AP) and 12 patients in blast crisis(BC). The dosage of imatinib was 400 mg/d for CP patients and 600 mg/d for AP and BC patients. The prescribed dose was administrated orally, once daily after a meal with a large glass of water. Before starting the imatinib administration, all the patients had thorough physical examination as well as blood and bone marrow examination. Ph chromo-some and or the bcr/abl fusion- gene detection again when they achieved a hematological response(CR). Dose was adjusted from time to time according to the results of blood examination and the patients tolerance to the drug. Results After a median 20 - month period of follow - up, all the 20 CP patients achieved complete

  4. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: present status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat, E; Rozman, C

    1995-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the form of leukemia which occurs most frequently in Western countries. Its etiology is unknown, and no relationship with viruses or genes has been demonstrated. Epidemiological data suggest that genetic and ambiental factors might be of some significance. Clinical features of CLL are due to the accumulation of leukemic cells in bone marrow and lymphoid organs as well as the immune disturbances that accompany the disease. The prognosis of patients with CLL varies. Treatment is usually indicated by the risk of the individual patient, which is clearly reflected by the stage of the disease. In the early stage (Binet A, Rai O) it is reasonable to defer therapy until disease progression is observed. By contrast, because their median survival is less than five years, patients with more advanced stages require therapy. For almost 50 years, no major advances in the management of CLL, which has revolved around the use of alkylating agents, have been made. In recent years, the therapeutic approach in patients with CLL has changed as a result of the introduction of combination chemotherapy regimens and, in particular, purine analogues. The latter are already the treatment of choice for patients not responding to standard therapies, and their role as front-line therapy is being investigated. Bone marrow transplants are also being increasingly used. It is to be hoped that in years to come the outcome of patients with CLL will be improved by these advances.

  5. [Clinical and genetic background of familial myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, Péter Attila; Kállay, Krisztián; Marosvári, Dóra; Benyó, Gábor; Szőke, Anita; Csomor, Judit; Bödör, Csaba

    2016-02-21

    Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia are mainly sporadic diseases, however, rare familial cases exist. These disorders are considered rare, but are likely to be more common than currently appreciated, and are characterized by the autosomal dominant mutations of hematopoietic transcription factors. These syndromes have typical phenotypic features and are associated with an increased risk for developing overt malignancy. Currently, four recognized syndromes could be separated: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA, familial myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with mutated GATA2, familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy with RUNX1 mutations, and telomere biology disorders due to mutations of TERC or TERT. Furthermore, there are new, emerging syndromes associated with germline mutations in novel genes including ANKRD26, ETV6, SRP72 or DDX41. This review will discuss the current understanding of the genetic basis and clinical presentation of familial leukemia and myelodysplasia.

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia NOS | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abel Study of Sargramostim Among Patients Receiving Myelosuppressive Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelog...g Myelosuppressive Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia A.4.1Sponsor's protocol code number...r disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute ...Myeloid Leukemia NOS E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute Myeloid Leukemia NOS E.1.1...r investigation E.1.2Version 18.0 E.1.2Level PT E.1.2Classification code 10000880 E.1.2Term Acute

  7. Lenalidomide and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pilar González-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory drug used in multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndrome and most recently it has shown to be effective in the treatment of various lymphoproliferative disorders such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism of action of lenalidomide varies depending on the pathology, and in the case of CLL, it appears to primarily act by restoring the damaged mechanisms of tumour immunosurveillance. This review discusses the potential mechanism of action and efficacy of lenalidomide, alone or in combination, in treatment of CLL and its toxic effects such as tumor lysis syndrome (TLS and tumor flare reaction (TFR, that make its management different from other hematologic malignancies.

  8. SnapShot: chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Maria; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J; Calin, George A

    2014-11-10

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia among adults in western countries. This SnapShot depicts the origins and evolution of this B cell malignancy, describes prognostic factors and CLL animal models, and illustrates therapies in preclinical and clinical development against CLL.

  9. Fungal natural products targeting chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Tanja Thorskov; Kildgaard, Sara; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults from the western world. No curative treatments of CLL are presently known so the treatment strategy today is primarily to prolong patient survival,1 why we have initiated new activities towards discovery of novel compounds w...

  10. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Brendel

    Full Text Available RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML, generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1 in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16 and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies.

  11. Treatment of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia with 5-Azacytidine: Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rohon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic therapy with hypomethylating agent (5-azacytidine; AZA is common in the management of specific subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, but there are only few studies in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML patients. In this paper our experience with 3 CMML patients treated with AZA is described. In one patient transfusion independency was observed after 4 treatment cycles; in one case a partial response was recorded, but a progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML after 13 AZA cycles has appeared. In one patient, AZA in reduced dosage was administered as a bridging treatment before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT, but in the control bone marrow aspirate (before ASCT a progression to AML was recorded. Future studies are mandatory for evaluation of new molecular and clinical features which could predict the efficiency of hypomethylating agents in CMML therapy with respect to overall survival, event-free survival, quality-adjusted life year, and pharmacoeconomy.

  12. Modeling of C/EBPalpha mutant acute myeloid leukemia reveals a common expression signature of committed myeloid leukemia-initiating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Schuster, Mikkel B; Bereshchenko, Oksana;

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the CEBPA gene are present in 7%-10% of human patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no genetic models exist that demonstrate their etiological relevance. To mimic the most common mutations affecting CEBPA-that is, those leading to loss of the 42 kDa C/EBPalpha isoform ...

  13. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  14. Hematopoietic cell crisis: An early stage of evolving myeloid leukemia following radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Under select radiological conditions, chronic radiation exposure elicits a high incidence of myeloproliferative disease, principally myeloid leukemia (ML), in beagles. Previously we demonstrated that for full ML expression, a four-stage preclinical sequence is required, namely (1) suppression, (2) recovery, (3) accommodation, and (4) preleukemic transition. Within this pathological sequence, a critical early event has been identified as the acquisition of radioresistance by hematopoietic progenitors that serves to mediate a newfound regenerative hematopoietic capacity. As such, this event sets the stage'' for preleukemic progression by initiating progression from preclinical phase 1 to 2. Due to the nature of target cell suppression, the induction of crisis, and the outgrowth of progenitors with altered phenotypes, this preleukemic event resembles the immortalization'' step of the in vitro transformation sequence following induction with either physical and chemical carcinogens. The radiological, temporal, and biological dictates governing this event have been extensively evaluated and will be discussed in light of their role in the induction and progression of chronic radiation leukemia. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Identification and targeting leukemia stem cells: The path to the cure for acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbiao; Zhou; Wee-Joo; Chng

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence support the notion that acute myeloid leukemia(AML) is organized in a hierarchical system, originating from a special proportion of leukemia stem cells(LSC). Similar to their normal counterpart, hematopoietic stem cells(HSC), LSC possess selfrenewal capacity and are responsible for the continued growth and proliferation of the bulk of leukemia cells in the blood and bone marrow. It is believed that LSC are also the root cause for the treatment failure and relapse of AML because LSC are often resistant to chemotherapy. In the past decade, we have made significant advancement in identification and understanding the molecular biology of LSC, but it remains a daunting task to specifically targeting LSC, while sparing normalHSC. In this review, we will first provide a historical overview of the discovery of LSC, followed by a summary of identification and separation of LSC by either cell surface markers or functional assays. Next, the review will focus on the current, various strategies for eradicating LSC. Finally, we will highlight future directions and challenges ahead of our ultimate goal for the cure of AML by targeting LSC.

  16. A prototype nonpeptidyl, hydrazone class, thrombopoietin receptor agonist, SB-559457, is toxic to primary human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalota, Anna; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2010-01-07

    Biologic characterization of SB-559457 (SB), a nonpeptidyl hydrazone class of thrombopoietin receptor (Mpl) agonist, revealed toxicity toward human leukemia cells. Antiproliferative effects followed by significant, nonapoptotic, cell death within 72 hours occurred in 24 of 26 acute myeloid leukemia, 0 of 6 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and 3 of 6 chronic myeloid leukemia patient samples exposed to SB, but not recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTpo), in liquid suspension culture. Further investigation revealed increased phosphorylation of p70S6/S6 kinases in SB-, but not in rhTpo-, treated cells. Expression profiling of cells exposed to SB versus rhTpo revealed statistically significant, more than 2-fold changes in GAPDH and REDD1 gene expression, confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction. These genes, induced in energy or hypoxia stressed cells, have been implicated in cell death pathways, and may provide important clues to the mechanism of SB-induced, leukemic cell death. These results suggest that nonpeptidyl, hydrazone class Mpl agonists may be clinically useful antileukemic agents by virtue of their combined thrombopoietic and antileukemic effects.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this phase, including a massively enlarged spleen, bone pain, and weight loss. Serious infections and ... cells. This type of genetic change, called a somatic mutation, is not inherited. The function of the ...

  18. Definition of Cure in Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Inaba, Hiroto; Leung, Wing; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Campana, Dario; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Background A better understanding of when cure can be declared in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) would reduce anxiety and improve quality of life of AML survivors. We determined the likelihood of patients with AML to maintain long-term remission after completion of therapy. Patients and Methods The cumulative risk of relapse, time to relapse, event-free survival and overall survival were analyzed for 604 patients with AML enrolled in seven successive clinical trials, divided into 3 treatment eras (1976–1991, 1991–1997, 2002–2008). Results The median time to relapse did not change over time (0.93 years vs. 0.76 vs. 0.8 years for each consecutive era, P = .22) but the risk of relapse decreased significantly (5-year cumulative incidence of relapse 52.6% ± 3.1% vs. 31.5% ± 3.9% vs. 22.0% ± 3.0%, P < .001). Among patients who were in remission 4 years from diagnosis, the probabilities of relapse were 1.7%, 2.9%, and 0.9%, respectively. In the most recent era, all 44 relapses except one occurred within four years of diagnosis. Conclusion Children with AML who are treated with contemporary therapy and remain in remission four years from diagnosis are likely cured. Although late relapses and late deaths from other causes are rare, long-term follow up of survivors is necessary for timely management of late adverse effects. PMID:24798038

  19. TP53 mutations in older adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanada, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Yukiya; Iba, Sachiko; Okamoto, Akinao; Inaguma, Yoko; Tokuda, Masutaka; Morishima, Satoko; Kanie, Tadaharu; Mizuta, Shuichi; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Okamoto, Masataka; Emi, Nobuhiko

    2016-04-01

    The net benefits of induction therapy for older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain controversial. Because AML in older adults is a heterogeneous disease, it is important to identify those who are unlikely to benefit from induction therapy based on information available at the initial assessment. We used next-generation sequencing to analyze TP53 mutation status in AML patients aged 60 years or older, and evaluated its effects on outcomes. TP53 mutations were detected in 12 of 77 patients (16 %), and there was a significant association between TP53 mutations and monosomal karyotype. Patients with TP53 mutations had significantly worse survival than those without (P = 0.009), and multivariate analysis identified TP53 mutation status as the most significant prognostic factor for survival. Neverthelsess, TP53-mutated patients had a 42 % chance of complete remission and a median survival of 8.0 months, which compares favorably with those who did not undergo induction therapy, even in the short term. These results suggest that screening for TP53 mutations at diagnosis is useful for identifying older adults with AML who are least likely to respond to chemotherapy, although the presence of this mutation alone does not seem to justify rejecting induction therapy.

  20. Immunohistochemistry predicts nucleophosmin (NPM) mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falini, Brunangelo; Martelli, Maria Paola; Bolli, Niccolò; Bonasso, Rossella; Ghia, Emanuela; Pallotta, Maria Teresa; Diverio, Daniela; Nicoletti, Ildo; Pacini, Roberta; Tabarrini, Alessia; Galletti, Barbara Verducci; Mannucci, Roberta; Roti, Giovanni; Rosati, Roberto; Specchia, Giorgina; Liso, Arcangelo; Tiacci, Enrico; Alcalay, Myriam; Luzi, Lucilla; Volorio, Sara; Bernard, Loris; Guarini, Anna; Amadori, Sergio; Mandelli, Franco; Pane, Fabrizio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Saglio, Giuseppe; Pelicci, Pier-Giuseppe; Martelli, Massimo F; Mecucci, Cristina

    2006-09-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) exon-12 mutations occur in 50% to 60% of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with normal karyotype and are predictors of favorable prognosis. We evaluated bone marrow or peripheral blood samples from 450 adult patients with AML of the GIMEMA (Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche Maligne dell'Adulto)/AML12 EORTC (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) trial to (1) search for new exon-12 NPM mutations; (2) determine whether NPM immunostaining on paraffin-embedded biopsies predicts NPM mutations; and (3) investigate altered nucleocytoplasmic NPM traffic in primary AML cells. Fourteen NPM mutations, including 8 new variants, were identified. All 200 AML cases expressing cytoplasmic NPM (NPMc(+) AML) carried NPM mutations. None of the 250 cases with nucleus-restricted NPM (NPMc(-) AML) was mutated. At the C-terminus, NPM leukemic mutants carried mutations of only tryptophan 290 or of both tryptophans 288 and 290 and a new nuclear export signal (NES) motif, which appear to underlie their nuclear export. The specific Crm1/exportin-1 inhibitor leptomycin-B relocated NPM mutants from cytoplasm to nucleus of primary NPMc(+) AML cells, demonstrating that nuclear export is NES dependent. NPM mutants bound and recruited wild-type NPM into leukemic cell cytoplasm. Because alterations at C-terminus of leukemic NPM mutants are similar, immunohistochemistry detects all exon-12 NPM mutations and is a valuable, inexpensive tool in the diagnostic-prognostic work-up of patients with AML with normal karyotype.

  1. Acute myeloid leukemia with DNMT3A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Zhu, Baosheng

    2014-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a type of blood cancer, is characterized by an increase in the number of abnormal white blood cells in the bone marrow, frequently causing hematopoietic insufficiency. It is a heterogeneous disease featuring cytogenetic aberrations, recurrent somatic mutations and alterations in gene expression. DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 alpha (DNMT3A) is closely associated with epigenetic modifications in mammalian development and disease. More recent studies have identified recurrent somatic mutations in DNMT3A in AML, most of which are heterozygous. The DNMT3A R882 codon is a mutational hotspot. The frequency of DNMT3A mutations varies among different countries, but mutations have been found to be associated with cytogenetics, age, white blood cell (WBC) count, prognosis and response of patients to chemotherapy. The normal function of DNMT3A can be disrupted by these mutations, which subsequently results in an abnormality of epigenetic modification. These data suggest that mutations in the DNMT3A gene represent a novel class of mutations in AML with distinct biological and clinical features. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact molecular mechanism and function of DNMT3A mutations in leukemogenesis.

  2. Gene mutations of acute myeloid leukemia in the genome era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoe, Tomoki; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2013-02-01

    Ten years ago, gene mutations found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were conceptually grouped into class I mutation, which causes constitutive activation of intracellular signals that contribute to the growth and survival, and class II mutation, which blocks differentiation and/or enhance self-renewal by altered transcription factors. A cooperative model between two classes of mutations has been suggested by murine experiments and partly supported by epidemiological findings. In the last 5 years, comprehensive genomic analysis proceeded to find new gene mutations, which are found in the epigenome-associated enzymes and the molecules never noticed so far. These new mutations apparently increase the complexity and heterogeneity of AML. Although a long list of gene mutations might have been compiled, the entire picture of molecular pathogenesis in AML remains to be elucidated because gene rearrangement, gene copy number, DNA methylation and expression profiles are not fully studied in conjunction with gene mutations. Comprehensive genome research will deepen the understanding of AML to promote the development of new classification and treatment. This review focuses on gene mutations that were recently discovered by genome sequencing.

  3. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of dicentric chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarova, Iveta; Brezinova, Jana; Zemanova, Zuzana; Ransdorfova, Sarka; Izakova, Silvia; Svobodova, Karla; Pavlistova, Lenka; Berkova, Adela; Cermak, Jaroslav; Jonasova, Anna; Siskova, Magda; Michalova, Kyra

    2016-04-01

    Dicentric chromosomes (DCs) have been described in many hematological diseases, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). They are markers of cancer and induce chromosomal instability, leading to the formation of other chromosomal aberrations and the clonal evolution of pathological cells. Our knowledge of the roles and behavior of human DCs is often derived from studies of induced DCs and cell lines. It is difficult to identify all the DCs in the karyotypes of patients because of the limitations of metaphase cytogenetic methods. The aim of this study was to revise the karyotypes of 20 AML patients in whom DCs were found with conventional G-banding or multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) with (multi)centromeric probes and to characterize the DCs at the molecular cytogenetic level. FISH analyses confirmed 23 of the 29 expected DCs in 18 of 20 patients and identified 13 others that had not been detected cytogenetically. Fourteen DCs were altered by other chromosomal changes. In conclusion, karyotypes with DCs are usually very complex, and we have shown that they often contain more than one DC, which can be missed with conventional or mFISH methods. Our study indicates an association between number of DCs in karyotype and very short survival of patients.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole prophylaxis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiuzzi, Gloria; Yilmaz, Musa; Kantarjian, Hagop; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Jabbour, Elias; Brown, Yolanda; Pierce, Sherry; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis is routinely given to patients with hematologic malignancies at high risk for invasive fungal infections (IFI), yet breakthrough IFI may still occur. Posaconazole emerged as an excellent alternative for fungal prophylaxis in high-risk patients. There is limited data about pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of posaconazole when given as prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies. We recruited 20 adult patients for prospective, open label trial of posaconazole given as a prophylaxis in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing induction chemotherapy or first salvage therapy. The median age of all patients was 65 years and received prophylaxis for a median of 38 days (range: 5-42 days).Ten patients (50%) completed 42 days on posaconazole prophylaxis. Median plasma posaconazole levels showed no statistical difference across gender, body surface area, patients developing IFI, and patients acquiring grade 3 or 4 elevation of liver enzymes. However, there was an overall trend for higher trough concentrations among patients with no IFI than those with IFI. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole varies from patient to patient, and AML patients receiving induction chemotherapy who never develop IFI tend to have higher plasma concentrations after oral administration of posaconazole.

  5. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations - mutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation - is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (Pgene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia.

  6. A one-mutation mathematical model can explain the age incidence of acute myeloid leukemia with mutated nucleophosmin (NPM1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Liso (Arcangelo); F. Castiglione (Filippo); A. Cappuccio (Antonio); F. Stracci (Fabrizio); R.F. Schlenk (Richard); S. Amadori (Sergio); C. Thiede (Christian); S. Schnittger (Susanne); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); K. Döhner (Konstanze); M.F. Martelli (Massimo F.); M. Schaich (Markus); J. Krauter; A. Ganser (Arnold); N. Bolli (Niccolò); B. Löwenberg (Bob); T. Haferlach (Torsten); G. Ehninger (Gerhard); F. Mandelli (Franco); F. Michor (Franziska); B. Falini

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute myeloid leukemia with mutated NPM1 gene and aberrant cytoplasmic expression of nucleophosmin (NPMc+acute myeloid leukemia) shows distinctive biological and clinical features. Experimental evidence of the oncogenic potential of the nucleophosmin mutant is, however, still lacking, an

  7. Elevated frequencies of leukemic myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in acute myeloid leukemia with the FLT3 internal tandem duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Rickmann, Mareike; Krauter, Juergen; Stamer, Kathrin; Heuser, Michael; Salguero, Gustavo; Mischak-Weissinger, Eva; Ganser, Arnold; Stripecke, Renata

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Some 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients display an internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation in the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene. FLT3-ITDs are known to drive hematopoietic stem cells towards FLT3 ligand independent growth, but the effects on dendritic cell (DC) differentiation during leukemogenesis are not clear. We compared the frequency of cells with immunophenotype of myeloid DC (mDC: Lin?, HLA-DR+, CD11c+, CD86+) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC: Lin?, HL...

  8. Fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptidis, John; Aloizos, Stavros; Chlorokostas, Panagiotis; Gourgiotis, Stavros

    2014-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a hemopoietic myeloid stem cell neoplasm. It is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults,and its incidence increases with age. Acute myeloid leukemia is characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. As the leukemic cells keep filling the bone marrow, symptoms of the disease started to appear: fatigue, bleeding, increased frequency of infections, and shortness of breath. Cardiac tamponade or pericardial tamponade is an acute medical condition in which the accumulation of pericardial fluid prevents the function of the heart. Signs and symptoms include Beck triad (hypotension, distended neck veins, and muffled heart sounds), paradoxus pulses, tachycardia, tachypnea, and breathlessness. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade are rare and severe complications of leukemia; they often develop during the radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or infections in the course of leukemia. This study sought to assess the fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found no reports in the literature linking these 2 clinical entities. Although the patient had no signs or diagnosis of AML previously, this case was remarkable for the rapidly progressive symptoms and the fatal outcome. The pericardial effusion reaccumulated rapidly after its initial drainage; it is a possible explanation that the leukemic cells interfered with cardiac activity or that they decreased their contractility myocytes secreting a toxic essence.

  9. Cytobiologic and clinical aspects in a patient with chronic neutrophilic leukemia after thorotrast exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggs, D.R.; Kaplan, S.S.

    1986-11-01

    A patient with fairly typical chronic neutrophilic leukemia, as represented by some two dozen such reported cases, had been given Thorotrast more than 20 years before. Typical myeloblastic crisis developed with remarkable terminal leukocytosis. Mature blood neutrophils had normal function with respect to phagocytosis, bacterial killing, metabolic activation, and chemotactic response. The number of cells producing colonies of neutrophils and monocytes in in vitro semisolid cultures was normal in the blood and increased in marrow. Colony size was smaller than is usually observed in normal patients or in typical patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. Termination in blast crisis, also seen in a few other patients with chronic neutrophilic leukemia, indicates that this is indeed a form of leukemia and not a leukemoid reaction of obscure cause. The differential diagnosis of extreme neutrophilia is discussed.

  10. Methylation status of the SOCS 1 and JUNB genes in chronic myeloid leukemia patients Padrão de metilação dos genes SOCS 1 e JUNB em pacientes com leucemia mieloide crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Cristina R. Pena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the methylation status of genes may contribute to the progression of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML. In this study, the methylation status in exon2 of SOCS- 1 and promoter regions of both SOCS- 1 and JUNB were evaluated in CML patients. The methylation status of these genes was analyzed using methylation- specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MSP in 30 samples from CML patients, 30 samples from these same patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and 30 samples from healthy controls. The samples of CML patients presented methylation as follows: JUNB gene (3.3%, promoter region of the SOCS- 1 gene (6.6% and exon2 of the SOCS- 1 gene (46.6%. The samples of the healthy individuals presented methylation (10%, P = 0.002 only in exon 2 of the SOCS- 1 gene. After transplantation, patients presented alterations in the methylation status of the promoter region of the SOCS- 1 gene (6.6%, exon2 of SOCS- 1 (46.6% and the promoter region of the JUNB gene (16.6%. Methylation of the promoter regions of the SOCS- 1 gene and the JUNB gene is not a frequent event in CML. In contrast, SOCS- 1 gene methylation in exon2 is a frequent event, susceptible to alterations in status after HSCT with possible implications for the progression of this disease.Alteração no padrão de metilação gênica pode contribuir para a progressão da leucemia mielóide crônica (LMC. Neste estudo, o padrão de metilação no exon 2 do gene SOCS- 1 e região promotora de ambos SOCS- 1 e JUNB foram avaliadas em pacientes com LMC. O padrão de metilação desses genes foi analisado usando a técnica " methylation- specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP" em 30 amostras de pacientes com LMC, 30 amostras desses mesmos pacientes após transplante de medula óssea (TMO e 30 amostras controle de indivíduos saudáveis. As amostras de pacientes com LMC apresentaram o seguinte padrão de metilação: gene JUNB (3.3%, região promotora do gene SOCS- 1 (6.6% e exon2

  11. Clinical Observation of Domestic Imatinib Mesylate Tablet in the Treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia%国产甲磺酸伊马替尼片治疗慢性粒细胞白血病的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝文娟; 尹大伟; 李琚; 江娟

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To observe therapeutic efficacy and safety of domestic Imatinib mesylate tablet in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia(CML). METHODS:16 CML patients were selected,including 7 newly diagnosed CML patients and 9 patients diagnosed as CML more than 12 months. Imatinib mesylate tablet 400 mg,qd were used in all patients. Blood routine, bone marrow cytology,ph chromosome Evaluate efficacy,and observed peripheral blood fusion gene,Bcr-Abl/Abl gene mutation and ADR were all detected. RESULTS:After treatment,16 patients achieved complete hematologic remission (CHR);12 cases were pavtial cytogenetic response(MCyR),of which 2 cases achieved complete cytogenetic response(CCyR),2 cases were cyto-genelic remission. 15 patients'Bcr-Abl/Abl transcript levels were less than 10%,and only one case was more than 10%. No ADR difficult to tolerate was found in 16 patients. CONCLUSIONS:Domestic Imatinib mesylate tablet shows definite early therapeutic efficacy and high safety.%目的:观察国产甲磺酸伊马替尼片治疗慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)患者的疗效及安全性.方法:选取CML患者16例,其中初诊CML即给予甲磺酸IM治疗者7例,诊断CML超过12个月后再给予甲磺酸IM治疗者9例,所有患者均长期口服甲磺酸伊马替尼片400 mg,qd.治疗后3个月通过检测所有患者血常规、骨髓细胞学、费城染色体(Ph染色体)评估疗效,并观察外周血Bcr-Abl/Abl融合基因突变及不良反应发生情况.结果:治疗后,16例患者均达到完全血液学缓解(CHR);12例患者获得部分细胞遗传学缓解(PCyR),2例患者获得完全细胞遗传学缓解(CCyR),2例患者无细胞遗传学缓解;15例患者Bcr-Abl/Abl转录水平10%.16例患者均未出现难以耐受的不良反应.结论:国产甲磺酸伊马替尼片早期疗效确切,安全性高.

  12. Análise crítica das recomendações formuladas por um painel de experts para o cuidado clínico de pacientes com Leucemia Mielóide Crônica Critical analysis of the recommendations from an expert panel on the management of patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Spector

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available As recomendações sobre Leucemia Mielóide Crônica feitas em 2006 por um painel de experts, em nome do "European Leukemia Network", foram adotadas internacionalmente como um roteiro para a monitoração e tratamento da doença. Passados 18 meses de sua publicação, fazemos aqui um sumário dessas recomendações e em seguida apontamos diversas áreas em que as recomendações poderão ser aperfeiçoadas e atualizadas. Aspectos específicos relacionados à aplicação das recomendações no Brasil são também considerados.The recommendations about chronic myeloid leukemia by a panel of experts in 2006 on behalf of the "European Leukemia Network" have been internationally accepted as a guide for monitoring and treatment of this disease. Eighteen months after its publication, we present here a summary of these recommendations, and point to areas in which they might be improved and updated. Specific aspects of the application of these recommendations in Brazil are also considered.

  13. Concurrent acute myeloid leukemia and T lymphoblastic lymphoma in a patient with rearranged PDGFRB genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hung

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Concurrent hematologic malignancies are relatively rare. We encountered a case of concurrent acute myeloid leukemia (AML and T lymphoblastic lymphoma. The bone marrow chromosome analysis showed the karyotype 46, XY, t(5;12(q33;p13, which indicated presence of PDGFRB gene translocations. Therefore, this disease belongs to the new WHO category of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with abnormalities in PDGFRA, PDGFRB and FGFR1 genes. Although such genetic mutations are prone to multi-lineage differentiation, the present case is in fact the first report of concurrent AML and T lymphoblastic lymphoma involving PDGFRB mutations. The patient was treated with cytarabine and daunomycin in combination with high dose dexamethasone. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation was performed after successful remission induction for both entities. The patient eventually died of chronic graft-versus-host-disease related infection. Based on such an experience, we suggest the decision of stem cell transplantation should be weighed carefully against the risks, especially when tyrosine kinase inhibitors are safe and potentially effective in dealing with such entities.

  14. [Research Advances of IDH2 Gene Mutation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Shen, Xu-Liang

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a malignant clonal hematologic disease from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The isocitrate dehychogenase 2 (IDH2) gene mutation has been recently found, which may be associated with the course of AML. The incidence of IDH2 gene mutation in the patients with acute myeloid leukemia is high, especially in the AML patients with normal karyotype. Different subtypes of IDH2 mutation, or companing other molecular biology, will make different influence on clinical features and progress of patients with AML. IDH2 mutation is stable, which can be used as the test sign of AML and minimal residual disease (MRD), and for guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the progress. In this article, the research progress of IDH2 mutation in acute myeloid leukemia is reviewed.

  15. Obinutuzumab for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioufol, Catherine; Salles, Gilles

    2014-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a frequent hematological malignancy that is incurable using standard approaches. Two anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb), rituximab and ofatumumab, have been approved for CLL treatment. A new glycoengineered type II humanized anti-CD20 mAb, obinutuzumab (GA101), has been developed and demonstrates increased activity against B-cell malignancies by inducing direct cell death and better antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In a recent randomized Phase III study in patients with newly diagnosed CLL and coexisting conditions, obinutuzumab plus chlorambucil demonstrated significant improvement in progression-free survival and several other outcome parameters, in contrast to rituximab plus chlorambucil. Grade 3-4 infusion-related reactions and neutropenia occurred more frequently in patients who received obinutuzumab compared with those who received rituximab; however, the rate of serious infections was similar. Obinutuzumab represents a promising new option for patients with CLL and must be investigated with other chemotherapy regimens or with new targeted agents.

  16. 地西他滨联合BuCy预处理allo-HSCT治疗未缓解的伴T315I突变CML急髓变%Allo-HSCT with decitabine combined with BuCy as conditioning regimen for a patient with T315I mutation in myeloid blastic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴倩; 何广胜; 吴德沛; 孙爱宁; 陈峰; 胡晓慧; 金松; 张旭辉

    2013-01-01

    目的:伴T315I突变的难治性慢性髓系白血病(CML)急髓变,在未缓解状态下,直接进行地西他滨联合BuCy预处理的无关供体外周血造血干细胞移植(allo-HSCT).方法:对1例难治性CML急髓变行地西他滨联合BuCy预处理的无关供体allo-HSCT,并持续对其细胞形态学、遗传学及分子生物学进行监测.结果:患者伊马替尼治疗后出现Q252H突变、T315I突变、染色体复杂异常、急髓变,行地西他滨联合BuCy预处理的无关供体allo-HSCT,术后+12d粒系造血重建,+14 d骨髓形态缓解,BCR-ABL定量:<10 copies/10000 abl copies,后因肠道重度急性移植物抗宿主病(aGVHD)死亡.结论:allo-HSCT是治疗伴有T315I突变的CML患者的有效手段,对于未缓解的患者,行地西他滨联合BuCy预处理临床研究值得探索.%To report one patient with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)-blast crisis with T315I mutation directly undergoing unrelated donor peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) under conditioning regimen with decitabine and BuCy. Method:The patient with CML-BC who was refractory to imatinib, nilotinib and chemotherapy, directly performed allo-HSCT from a partially mismatched ( 9/10 HLA allele matched) unrelated donor with conditioning regimen consisting of decitabine and BuCy. The morphology, cytoge-netic and molecular biology of bone marrow were continuously monitored. Result:In chronic phase,the patient was diagnosed CML with Ph chromosome and BCR/ABL gene, with no mutation detected. Despite satisfactory hemato-logical remission,the patient failed to achieve complete cytogenetic remission after of 9 months treatment with imatinib. Moreover, the disease progressed rapidly to myeloid blastic phase accompanied by additional chromosomal translocation,Q252H mutation of BCR-ABL fusion and increas ed copies of BCR-ABL. And nilotinib combined with chemotherapy failed with newly appeared complex chromosome karyotype and T315I mutation

  17. Autografting of peripheral-blood progenitor cells early in chronic myeloid Leukemia Transplante autólogo de células progenitoras em fase crônica precoce da Leucemia mielóide crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo V. B. Carvalho

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of peripheral-blood progenitor cell (PBPC transplantation as a treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients remains uncertain. We presented herein 11 CML patients treated with autografting of PBPC in early chronic phase followed by interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha. Bone marrow samples obtained at diagnosis and during follow-up after autografting as well as leukapheresis products were analyzed by cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The median follow-up of patients after autografting was 22 months (range: 1-49. Two treatment-related deaths occurred in patients enrolled in the study. Eight out of 9 (88.9% and 7 out of 9 (77.8% patients achieved hematologic and cytogenetic responses, respectively. Molecular cytogenetic and molecular responses were seen in all 7 patients analyzed (100.0% and in one single patient (11.1%, respectively. The median percentages of Ph+ (78.0% metaphases obtained after 6 months of autografting was lower than those obtained at diagnosis (100.0%, P=0.04. The median percentages of FISH+ nuclei obtained at 3 (4.0%, 6 (7.3% and 9 (14.7% months after autografting were also lower than that obtained at diagnosis (82.5%; P=0.002; P=0.003; P=0.030, respectively. At the end of the study, 9 patients (81.8% were alive in chronic phase, 4 of them presenting hematologic, cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic responses. We conclude that autografting performed with PBPC in early chronic phase of CML followed by IFN-alpha results in lower numbers of Ph+ and FISH+ cells in bone marrow.O papel do transplante de célula progenitora periférica (CPP como tratamento de pacientes com leucemia mielóide crônica (LMC permanece incerto. Nós apresentamos neste estudo 11 pacientes com LMC tratados com o transplante autólogo (TMO-auto de CPP durante a fase crônica precoce, seguido de interferon-alfalfa (IFN-alfa. Amostras de medula óssea, obtidas ao diagn

  18. [Acute myeloid leukemia originating from the same leukemia clone after the complete remission of acute lymphoid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Isao; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Amaya, Hiroshi; Kiyosaki, Masanobu; Kawakami, Keiichiro; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Akihiro; Hino, Ken-ichiro; Tomoyasu, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    A 22-year-old female was diagnosed as having acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in February 1995, from the findings of peroxidase negative, CD10+, CD19+, TdT+ and rearrangement of IgH and TCR beta. AdVP (doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) therapy achieved a complete remission (CR). Bone marrow transplantation had to be abandoned because of the lack of an HLA-identical donor. Intensification therapy was thus carried out repeatedly. In June 1998, myeloblast with Auer rods, peroxidase positive, CD13+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+, appeared. The patient was diagnosed as having lineage switch acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from ALL. Though A-DMP (cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine) therapy was resistant, AdVP therapy led to a CR. The patient died of cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines in February 1999. From the results of the Ramasamy method using the clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain gene locus, the origin of the pathological cells of ALL and AML was indicated to be the same leukemia clone.

  19. Rare myeloid sarcoma/acute myeloid leukemia with adrenal mass after allogeneic mobilization peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Fei Wang; Qian Li; Wen-Gui Xu; Jian-Yu Xiao; Qing-Song Pang; Qing Yang; Yi-Zuo Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a rare hematological neoplasm that develops either de novo or concurrently with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This neoplasm can also be an initial manifestation of relapse in a previously treated AML that is in remission. A 44-year-old male patient was diagnosed with testis MS in a local hospital in August 2010. Atfer one month, bone marrow biopsy and aspiration conifrmed the diagnosis of AML. Allogeneic mobilization peripheral blood stem cell transplantation was performed, with the sister of the patient as donor, after complete remission (CR) was achieved by chemotherapy. Five months after treatment, an adrenal mass was detected by positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). Radiotherapy was performed for the localized mass after a multidisciplinary team (MDT) discussion. hTe patient is still alive as of May 2013, with no evidence of recurrent MS or leukemia.

  20. Pubertal development and fertility in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molgaard-Hansen, Lene; Skou, Anne-Sofie; Juul, Anders

    2013-01-01

    More than 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) become long-term survivors. Most are cured using chemotherapy without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report on pubertal development and compare self-reported parenthood among AML survivors and their siblings.......More than 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) become long-term survivors. Most are cured using chemotherapy without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report on pubertal development and compare self-reported parenthood among AML survivors and their siblings....