WorldWideScience

Sample records for chronic morphine-induced gliosis

  1. Contributions of spinal D-amino acid oxidase to chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuai; Li, Xin-Yan; Gong, Nian; Wang, Yong-Xiang

    2015-12-10

    Spinal D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) is an FAD-dependent peroxisomal flavoenzyme which mediates the conversion of neutral and polar D-amino acids (including D-serine) to the corresponding α-keto acids, and simultaneously produces hydrogen peroxide and ammonia. This study has aimed to explore the potential contributions of spinal DAAO and its mediated hydrogen peroxide/D-serine metabolism to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia. Bi-daily subcutaneous injections of morphine to mice over 7 days induced thermal hyperalgesia as measured by both the hot-plate and tail-immersion tests, and spinal astroglial activation with increased spinal gene expression of DAAO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). Subcutaneous injections of the potent DAAO inhibitor CBIO (5-chloro-benzo[D]isoxazol-3-ol) prevented and reversed the chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. CBIO also inhibited both astrocyte activation and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intrathecal injection of the hydrogen peroxide scavenger PBN (phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone) and of catalase completely reversed established morphine hyperalgesia, whereas subcutaneous injections of exogenous D-serine failed to alter chronic morphine-induced hyperalgesia. These results provided evidence that spinal DAAO and its subsequent production of hydrogen peroxide rather than the D-serine metabolism contributed to the development of morphine-induced hyperalgesia.

  2. Hormone replacement therapy in morphine-induced hypogonadic male chronic pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravaioli Laura

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In male patients suffering from chronic pain, opioid administration induces severe hypogonadism, leading to impaired physical and psychological conditions such as fatigue, anaemia and depression. Hormone replacement therapy is rarely considered for these hypogonadic patients, notwithstanding the various pharmacological solutions available. Methods To treat hypogonadism and to evaluate the consequent endocrine, physical and psychological changes in male chronic pain patients treated with morphine (epidural route, we tested the administration of testosterone via a gel formulation for one year. Hormonal (total testosterone, estradiol, free testosterone, DHT, cortisol, pain (VAS and other pain questionnaires, andrological (Ageing Males' Symptoms Scale - AMS and psychological (POMS, CES-D and SF-36 parameters were evaluated at baseline (T0 and after 3, 6 and 12 months (T3, T6, T12 respectively. Results The daily administration of testosterone increased total and free testosterone and DHT at T3, and the levels remained high until T12. Pain rating indexes (QUID progressively improved from T3 to T12 while the other pain parameters (VAS, Area% remained unchanged. The AMS sexual dimension and SF-36 Mental Index displayed a significant improvement over time. Conclusions In conclusion, our results suggest that a constant, long-term supply of testosterone can induce a general improvement of the male chronic pain patient's quality of life, an important clinical aspect of pain management.

  3. Is brain gliosis a characteristic of chronic methamphetamine use in the human?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junchao; Fitzmaurice, Paul; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Schmunk, Gregory A; Wickham, Dennis J; Ang, Lee-Cyn; Sherwin, Allan; McCluskey, Tina; Boileau, Isabelle; Kish, Stephen J

    2014-07-01

    Animal data show that high doses of the stimulant drug methamphetamine can damage brain dopamine neurones; however, it is still uncertain whether methamphetamine, at any dose, is neurotoxic to human brain. Since gliosis is typically associated with brain damage and is observed in animal models of methamphetamine exposure, we measured protein levels (intact protein and fragments, if any) of markers of microgliosis (glucose transporter-5, human leukocyte antigens HLA-DRα [TAL.1B5] and HLA-DR/DQ/DPβ [CR3/43]) and astrogliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and heat shock protein-27) in homogenates of autopsied brain of chronic methamphetamine users (n=20) and matched controls (n=23). Intact protein levels of all markers were, as expected, elevated (+28%-1270%, Phuman recreational methamphetamine users who used the drug chronically and shortly before death. However, a logistically more difficult quantitative histopathological study is needed to confirm whether glial changes occur or do not occur in brain of human methamphetamine (and amphetamine) users.

  4. Morphine induces Beclin 1- and ATG5-dependent autophagy in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lixia; Zhu, Yushan; Wang, Dongmei; Chen, Ming; Gao, Ping; Xiao, Weiming; Rao, Guanhua; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Haijing; Xu, Lin; Sui, Nan; Chen, Quan

    2010-04-01

    Chronic exposure to morphine can induce drug addiction and neural injury, but the exact mechanism is not fully understood. Here we show that morphine induces autophagy in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and in the rat hippocampus. Pharmacological approach shows that this effect appears to be mediated by PTX-sensitive G protein-coupled receptors signaling cascade. Morphine increases Beclin 1 expression and reduces the interaction between Beclin 1 and Bcl-2, thus releasing Beclin 1 for its pro-autophagic activity. Bcl-2 overexpression inhibits morphine-induced autophagy, whereas knockdown of Beclin 1 or knockout of ATG5 prevents morphine-induced autophagy. In addition, chronic treatment with morphine induces cell death, which is increased by autophagy inhibition through Beclin 1 RNAi. Our data are the first to reveal that Beclin 1 and ATG5 play key roles in morphine-induced autophagy, which may contribute to morphine-induced neuronal injury.

  5. "Interaction of different doses of Aspartame with Morphine-induced antinociception in the presence of MK-801, a NMDA antagonist "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the relative role of sweetness and comparative effects of different taste sensation of the non - caloric sweetener , aspartame on pain and its interaction with MK - 80] as a non - selective MMDA antagonist by formalin - test in mice. The formalin - test was chosen because it measures the response to a long - lasting nociceptive stimulus and closely resembles to the clinical pain. Morphine induced a dose dependent antinociception in the early and late phases of formalin test. Twelve days pretreatment of animals by aspartame ( 0.08% , 0.16% , 0.32% significantly potentiated morphine - induced (1.5-9 mg/kg analgesia in the early phase but significantly antagonized its analgesic effect in the late phase, dose dependently. Aspartame (0.16% alone showed a reduction in pain response . Naloxone (0.4 mg/kg significantly antagonized the antinociceptive effect of morphine in the presence of aspartame (0-0.32% in the early phase. Increasing the dose of aspartame decreased effects of naloxone. MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg as an N- Methyl - D - Aspartate (NMDA antagonist significantly potentiated the effect of aspartame on morphine - induced antinociception in the early phase. In the late phase, naloxone (0.4 mg/kg increased pain response but MK- 801 (0.1 mg/kg induced anti-inflammatory effect significantly. Treatment of animals with MK- 801 alone, significantly induced analgesia in both phases of formalin - test. This effect was potentiated with aspartame dose - dependently. Possible interaction of aspartame with NMDA receptors and its role to facilitate endogenous opioid system are proposed mechanisms of aspartame in modulating morphine - induced antinociception. Furthermore, the resulting association between morphine and aspartame chronic consumption may be explained as an interactive action rather than simple dose combination of both drugs.

  6. Calcium channel antagonists increase morphine-induced analgesia and antagonize morphine tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L; Amigo, M

    1988-04-13

    The influence of calcium channel blockers on morphine-induced analgesia and on tolerance to the chronic administration of the opiate was investigated in mice. The effects of a test dose of morphine were significantly increased by the administration of diltiazem, flunarizine, nicardipine and verapamil. In contrast, nifedipine induced an antagonistic effect. The calcium channel antagonists did not change the reaction time to thermal stimulation in mice (hot plate test). The administration of nifedipine, flunarizine and verapamil reduced the intensity of the tolerance induced by a single dose of morphine administered in a slow release preparation. Diltiazem induced a non-significant decrease of the process. The present results are in accordance with the known interaction of acute and chronic morphine administration with the intracellular calcium concentration in neurones of the central nervous system.

  7. Effects of Ondansetron on Morphine-induced Place Preference in Mice and Its Possible Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMei-Lin; YUJuan; CHENChong-Hong

    2004-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the effect of ondansetron (OND), a5-HT3 receptor antagonist, on the morphine-induced conditioned place preference in mice and its possible mechanism. METHODS Morphine - induced conditioned place preference model in mice was adopted in the present research. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and Nitric oxide (NO) output

  8. Quaternary naltrexone reverses radiogenic and morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Galbraith, J.A.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    The present study attempted to determine the relative role of the peripheral and central nervous system in the production of morphine-induced or radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the mouse. Toward this end, we used a quaternary derivative of an opiate antagonist (naltrexone methobromide), which presumably does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Quaternary naltrexone was used to challenge the stereotypic locomotor response observed in these mice after either an i.p. injection of morphine or exposure to 1500 rads /sup 60/Co. The quaternary derivative of naltrexone reversed the locomotor hyperactivity normally observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after an injection of morphine. It also significantly attenuated radiation-induced locomotion. The data reported here support the hypothesis of endorphin involvement in radiation-induced and radiogenic behaviors. However, these conclusions are contingent upon further research which more fully evaluates naltrexone methobromide's capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  9. Effects of acute and long-term typical or atypical neuroleptics on morphine-induced behavioural effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollais, André W; Patti, Camilla L; Zanin, Karina A; Fukushiro, Daniela F; Berro, Laís F; Carvalho, Rita C; Kameda, Sonia R; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    1. It has been suggested that the high prevalence of drug abuse in schizophrenics is related to chronic treatment with typical neuroleptics and dopaminergic supersensitivity that develops as a consequence. Within this context, atypical neuroleptics do not seem to induce this phenomenon. In the present study, we investigated the effects of acute administration or withdrawal from long-term administration of haloperidol and/or ziprasidone on morphine-induced open-field behaviour in mice. 2. In the first experiment, mice were given a single injection of haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or several doses of ziprasidone (2, 4 or 6 mg/kg, i.p.) and motor activity was quantified by the open-field test. The aim of the second experiment was to verify the effects of an acute injection of haloperidol (1 mg/kg) or ziprasidone (6 mg/kg) on 20 mg/kg morphine-induced behaviours in the open-field test. In the third experiment, mice were treated with 1 mg/kg haloperidol and/or 2, 4 or 6 mg/kg ziprasidone for 20 days. Seventy-two hours after the last injection, mice were injected with 20 mg/kg, i.p., morphine and then subjected to the open-field test. Acute haloperidol or ziprasidone decreased spontaneous general activity and abolished morphine-induced locomotor stimulation. 3. Withdrawal from haloperidol or ziprasidone did not modify morphine-elicited behaviours in the open-field test. The results suggest that withdrawal from neuroleptic treatments does not contribute to the acute effect of morphine in schizophrenic patients.

  10. Usefulness of the dopamine system-stabilizer aripiprazole for reducing morphine-induced emesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Mitsuru; Narita, Minoru; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Tadao; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2007-09-10

    In the management of pain, nausea and vomiting are some of the most distressing adverse effects induced by opioids. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the dopamine system-stabilizer aripiprazole on morphine-induced emesis. Morphine induced retching and vomiting in a dose-dependent manner in ferrets. The emetic effect of morphine was significantly suppressed by pretreatment with either the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol or aripiprazole. These results suggest that the co-administration of aripiprazole may be useful for reducing the severity of morphine-induced emesis.

  11. Role of phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ibudilast in morphine-induced hippocampal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Zhaleh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Background: Opioid drugs are used in the treatment of acute post-surgical pain and chronic pain, such as those associated with cancer. Opioid used is associated with complications such as analgesic tolerance, dependence and opioid abuse. The molecular mechanisms of unwanted opioid responses are varied but recent advances have highlighted elevations in pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-inflammatory glial following chronic administration of morphine. In this study we investigated the neurodegenerative effects of morphine through its effects on Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4 in the male rat hippocampus and evaluated the level of Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β. Then we compared the difference between inhibitory effects on mu opioid receptors (by β-Funaltrexamine, β-FNA and TLR4 (by Ibudilast. Subsequently, we assessed the amount of IL-1β and the number of granular cells in male rat hippocampus. Methods: Adult male rats (n=24 were treated with sucrose, morphine, Ibudilast (7.5 mg/kg and β-FNA (20 mg/kg for 30 days. Their brains were isolated and hemisected with one hippocampus for granular cell and the other used for IL-1 β immunoblotting. Results: Data showed that Ibudilast suppresses IL-1 β expression significantly more than β-FNA. The granular cell count displayed significant differences. Conclusions: Our results suggested that Ibudilast can be used for controlling and treatment of morphine-induced CNS inflammations or traumatic conditions.

  12. Differences in the morphine-induced inhibition of small and large intestinal transit: Involvement of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Umemoto, Hiroyuki; Mori, Tomohisa; Akatsu, Ryuya; Saito, Shinichiro; Tashima, Kimihito; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Kato, Shinichi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Horie, Syunji

    2016-01-15

    Constipation is the most common side effect of morphine. Morphine acts centrally and on peripheral sites within the enteric nervous system. There are a few comprehensive studies on morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine by the activation of central and peripheral μ-opioid receptors. We investigated the differences in the inhibition of the small and large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Morphine reduced the geometric center in the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran assay and prolonged the bead expulsion time in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of morphine were blocked by μ-opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine, but not by δ- and κ-opioid antagonists. The peripheral opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone methiodide, partially blocked morphine's effect in the small intestine and completely blocked its effect in the large intestine. The intracerebroventricular administration of naloxone significantly reversed the delay of small intestinal transit but did not affect morphine-induced inhibition of large intestinal transit. Naloxone methiodide completely reversed the inhibition of large intestinal transit in normal and morphine-tolerant mice. Naloxone methiodide partially reversed the morphine-induced inhibition of small intestinal transit in normal mice but completely reversed the effects of morphine in tolerant mice. Chronic treatment with morphine results in tolerance to its inhibitory effect on field-stimulated contraction in the isolated small intestine but not in the large intestine. These results suggest that peripheral and central opioid receptors are involved in morphine-induced constipation in the small and large intestine during the early stage of treatment, but the peripheral receptors mainly regulate constipation during long-term morphine treatment.

  13. Differential effects of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial products on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninkovic, Jana; Jana, Ninkovic; Anand, Vidhu; Vidhu, Anand; Dutta, Raini; Raini, Dutta; Zhang, Li; Saluja, Anuj; Meng, Jingjing; Koodie, Lisa; Lisa, Koodie; Banerjee, Santanu; Santanu, Banerjee; Roy, Sabita; Sabita, Roy

    2016-02-19

    Opioid drug abusers have a greater susceptibility to gram positive (Gram (+)) bacterial infections. However, the mechanism underlying opioid modulation of Gram (+) versus Gram (-) bacterial clearance has not been investigated. In this study, we show that opioid treatment resulted in reduced phagocytosis of Gram (+), when compared to Gram (-) bacteria. We further established that LPS priming of chronic morphine treated macrophages leads to potentiated phagocytosis and killing of both Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria in a P-38 MAP kinase dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, LTA priming lead to inhibition of both phagocytosis and bacterial killing. This study demonstrates for the first time the differential effects of TLR4 and TLR2 agonists on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis. Our results suggest that the incidence and severity of secondary infections with Gram (+) bacteria would be higher in opioid abusers.

  14. Effects of cholecystokinin-8 on morphine-induced spatial reference memory impairment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengchang; Wen, Di; Dong, Mei; Li, Dong; Sun, Donglei; Ma, Chunling; Cong, Bin

    2013-11-01

    Acute and chronic exposure to opiate drugs impaired various types of memory processes. To date, there is no preventive treatment for opiate-induced memory impairment and the related mechanism is still unclear. CCK-8 is the most potent endogenous anti-opioid peptide and has been shown to exert memory-enhancing effect, but the effect of CCK-8 on morphine-induced memory impairment has not been reported. By using Morris water maze, we found that escape latency to the hidden platform in navigation test was not influenced, but performance in the probe test was seriously poor in morphine dependency mice. Amnesia induced by chronic morphine treatment was significantly alleviated by pre-treatment with CCK-8 (0.01, 0.1 and 1 μg, i.c.v.), and CCK-8 (0.1 and 1 μg, i.c.v.) treatment alone could improve performance in either navigation or probe test. Furthermore, Golgi-Cox staining analysis revealed that pre-treatment with CCK-8 (1 μg, i.c.v.) reversed spine density decreased in CA1 region of hippocampus in morphine dependency mice, and CCK-8 (1 μg, i.c.v.) alone obviously increased spine density in CA1. Our findings conclude spine density change in CA1 region of hippocampus may be the structural plasticity mechanism which is responsible for enhancing effect of CCK-8 on spatial reference memory. Therefore, CCK-8 could effectively improve memory impairment in morphine dependency mice.

  15. Yohimbine prevents morphine-induced changes of glial fibrillary acidic protein in brainstem and alpha2-adrenoceptor gene expression in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Elba; Garrido, Elisa; Díez-Fernández, Carmen; Pérez-García, Carmen; Herradón, Gonzalo; Ezquerra, Laura; Deuel, Thomas F; Alguacil, Luis F

    2007-01-29

    The alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine is known to oppose to several pharmacological effects of opioid drugs, but the consequences and the mechanisms involved remain to be clearly established. In the present study we have checked the effects of yohimbine on morphine-induced alterations of the expression of key proteins (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP) and genes (alpha(2)-adrenoceptors) in rat brain areas known to be relevant in opioid dependence, addiction and individual vulnerability to drug abuse. Rats were treated with morphine in the presence or absence of yohimbine. The effects of the treatments on GFAP expression were studied by immunohistochemical staining in Locus Coeruleus (LC) and Nucleus of the Solitary Tract (NST), two important noradrenergic nuclei. In addition, drug effects on alpha(2)-adrenoceptor gene expression were determined by real time RT-PCR in the hippocampus, a brain area that receives noradrenergic input from the brainstem. Morphine administration increased GFAP expression both in LC and NST as it was previously reported in other brain areas. Yohimbine was found to efficiently prevent morphine-induced GFAP upregulation. Chronic (but not acute) morphine downregulated mRNA levels of alpha(2A)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors in the hippocampus, while simultaneously increased the expression of the alpha(2B)-adrenoceptor gene. Again, yohimbine was able to prevent morphine-induced changes in the levels of expression of the three alpha(2)-adrenoceptor genes. These results correlate the well-established reduction of opioid dependence and addiction by yohimbine and suggest that this drug could interfere with the neural plasticity induced by chronic morphine in central noradrenergic pathways.

  16. Proteome Analysis of Rat Hippocampus Following Morphine-induced Amnesia and State-dependent Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh; Darbandi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Morphine's effects on learning and memory processes are well known to depend on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in morphine-induced amnesia and state-dependent learning is established, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are poorly understood. The present study intended to investigate whether administration of morphine can change the expression level of rat hippocampal proteins during learning of a passive avoidance task. A step-through type passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. To identify the complex pattern of protein expression induced by morphine, we compared rat hippocampal proteome either in morphine-induced amnesia or in state-dependent learning by two-dimensional gel electerophoresis and combined mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS). Post-training administration of morphine decreased step-through latency. Pre-test administration of morphine induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine influence. In the hippocampus, a total of 18 proteins were identified whose MASCOT (Modular Approach to Software Construction Operation and Test) scores were inside 95% confidence level. Of these, five hippocampal proteins altered in morphine-induced amnesia and ten proteins were found to change in the hippocampus of animals that had received post-training and pre-test morphine. These proteins show known functions in cytoskeletal architecture, cell metabolism, neurotransmitter secretion and neuroprotection. The findings indicate that the effect of morphine on memory formation in passive avoidance learning has a morphological correlate on the hippocampal proteome level. In addition, our proteomicscreensuggests that morphine induces memory impairment and state-dependent learning through modulating neuronal plasticity.

  17. Effects of the histaminergic system on the morphine-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T; Takamori, K; Misawa, M; Onodera, K

    1995-03-27

    The effects of an H2 receptor antagonist, a histidine decarboxylase inhibitor and a histamine precursor on the morphine-induced place preference in mice were examined. Morphine (1-7 mg/kg) produced a place preference in a dose-dependent manner. This morphine-induced place preference was significantly antagonized by the dopamine (DA) D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. The histamine precursor, L-histidine, attenuated the morphine (7 mg/kg)-induced place preference. On the other hand, the histidine decarboxylase inhibitor, alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH), significantly potentiated the morphine (1 mg/kg)-induced place preference. This potentiation was antagonized by SCH 23390. The H2 receptor antagonist zolantidine (0.3 mg/kg) significantly potentiated the morphine-induced place preference. Surprisingly, zolantidine (1 mg/kg) alone also produced a significant place preference. The zolantidine-induced place preference was antagonized by SCH 23390. In addition, zolantidine (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg) significantly increased DA turnover (DA ratio) in the limbic forebrain (nucleus accumbens and olfactory tubercle), implying that zolantidine may activate the mesolimbic DA system. Moreover, co-administration of zolantidine dose-dependently increased morphine (10 mg/kg)-induced DA turnover in the limbic forebrain. These results suggest that the activation of histaminergic neurons may attenuate the rewarding effect of morphine, while the inhibition of histaminergic neurons may potentiate the rewarding effect of morphine. Furthermore, potentiation of the morphine-induced rewarding effect by inhibition of histaminergic neurons may be mediated by D1 receptors. We also demonstrated that the H2 receptor antagonist zolantidine may activate the mesolimbic DA system, and as a result, zolantidine itself produces a rewarding effect and potentiates the morphine-induced rewarding effect.

  18. The involvement of noradrenergic transmission in the morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity in mice withdrawn from repeated morphine treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Airio, Juha; Ahtee, Liisa

    1999-01-01

    Our previous studies suggest that in addition to the cerebral dopaminergic systems the noradrenergic ones have a crucial role in the morphine-induced behavioural sensitization in mice. Therefore the effects of α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, idazoxan (1 and 3 mg kg−1, i.p.) on morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity as well as on morphine-induced changes in cerebral noradrenaline (NA) and striatal dopamine (DA) metabolism were studied in mice withdrawn for 3 days from 5 day repeated morphine tre...

  19. Acute morphine induces matrix metalloproteinase-9 up-regulation in primary sensory neurons to mask opioid-induced analgesia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yen-Chin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite decades of intense research efforts, actions of acute opioids are not fully understood. Increasing evidence suggests that in addition to well-documented antinociceptive effects opioids also produce paradoxical hyperalgesic and excitatory effects on neurons. However, most studies focus on the pronociceptive actions of chronic opioid exposure. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 plays an important role in neuroinflammation and neuropathic pain development. We examined MMP-9 expression and localization in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs after acute morphine treatment and, furthermore, the role of MMP-9 in modulating acute morphine-induced analgesia and hyperalgesia in mice. Results Subcutaneous morphine induced a marked up-regulation of MMP-9 protein in DRGs but not spinal cords. Morphine also increased MMP-9 activity and mRNA expression in DRGs. MMP-9 up-regulation peaked at 2 h but returned to the baseline after 24 h. In DRG tissue sections, MMP-9 is expressed in small and medium-sized neurons that co-express mu opioid receptors (MOR. In DRG cultures, MOR agonists morphine, DAMGO, and remifentanil each increased MMP-9 expression in neurons, whereas the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone and the MOR-selective antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTAP suppressed morphine-induced MMP-9 expression. Notably, subcutaneous morphine-induced analgesia was enhanced and prolonged in Mmp9 knockout mice and also potentiated in wild-type mice receiving intrathecal injection of MMP-9 inhibitors. Consistently, intrathecal injection of specific siRNA targeting MMP-9 reduced MMP-9 expression in DRGs and enhanced and prolonged morphine analgesia. Subcutaneous morphine also produced heat hyperalgesia at 24 h, but this opioid-induced hyperalgesia was not enhanced after MMP-9 deletion or inhibition. Conclusions Transient MMP-9 up-regulation in DRG neurons can mask opioid analgesia, without modulating opioid-induced hyperalgesia

  20. Attenuation by dextromethorphan on the higher liability to morphine-induced reward, caused by prenatal exposure of morphine in rat offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Pao-Luh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Co-administration of dextromethorphan (DM with morphine during pregnancy and throughout lactation has been found to reduce morphine physical dependence and tolerance in rat offspring. No evidence was presented, however, for the effect of DM co-administered with morphine during pregnancy on morphine-induced reward and behavioral sensitization (possibly related to the potential to induce morphine addiction in morphine-exposed offspring. Conditioned place preference and locomotor activity tests revealed that the p60 male offspring of chronic morphine-treated female rats were more vulnerable to morphine-induced reward and behavioral sensitization. The administration of a low dose of morphine (1 mg/kg, i.p. in these male offspring also increased the dopamine and serotonin turnover rates in the nucleus accumbens, which implied that they were more sensitive to morphine. Co-administration of DM with morphine in the dams prevented this adverse effect of morphine in the offspring rats. Thus, DM may possibly have a great potential in the prevention of higher vulnerability to psychological dependence of morphine in the offspring of morphine-addicted mothers.

  1. Attenuation by dextromethorphan on the higher liability to morphine-induced reward, caused by prenatal exposure of morphine in rat offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Co-administration of dextromethorphan (DM) with morphine during pregnancy and throughout lactation has been found to reduce morphine physical dependence and tolerance in rat offspring. No evidence was presented, however, for the effect of DM co-administered with morphine during pregnancy on morphine-induced reward and behavioral sensitization (possibly related to the potential to induce morphine addiction) in morphine-exposed offspring. Conditioned place preference and locomotor activity tests revealed that the p60 male offspring of chronic morphine-treated female rats were more vulnerable to morphine-induced reward and behavioral sensitization. The administration of a low dose of morphine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) in these male offspring also increased the dopamine and serotonin turnover rates in the nucleus accumbens, which implied that they were more sensitive to morphine. Co-administration of DM with morphine in the dams prevented this adverse effect of morphine in the offspring rats. Thus, DM may possibly have a great potential in the prevention of higher vulnerability to psychological dependence of morphine in the offspring of morphine-addicted mothers. PMID:19930722

  2. Proteome Analysis of Rat Hippocampus Following Morphine-induced Amnesia and State-dependent Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh; Darbandi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Morphine’s effects on learning and memory processes are well known to depend on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in morphine-induced amnesia and state-dependent learning is established, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are poorly understood. The present study intended to investigate whether administration of morphine can change the expression level of rat hippocampal proteins during learning of a passive avoidance t...

  3. Enhanced morphine-induced antinociception in histamine H3 receptor gene knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarakeh, Jalal Izadi; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies have implicated a potential role for histamine H3 receptor in pain processing. There have been conflicting data, however, on the roles of H3 receptors in pain perception, and little information is available about the role of spinal histamine H3 receptors in morphine-induced antinociception. In the present study we examined the role of histamine H3 receptor in morphine-induced antinociception using histamine H3 receptor knockout mice and a histamine H3 receptor antagonist. Anitinociception was evaluated by assays for four nociceptive stimuli: hot-plate, tail-flick, paw-withdrawal, and formalin tests. Antinociception induced by morphine (0.125 nmol/5 microl, i.t.) was significantly augmented in histamine H3 receptor knockout (-/-) mice compared to the wild-type (+/+) mice in all four assays of pain. Furthermore, the effect of intrathecally administered morphine with thioperamide, a histamine H3 antagonist, was examined in C57BL/6J mice. A low dose of i.t. administered thioperamide (0.125 nmol/5 microl) alone had no significant effect on the nociceptive response. In contrast, the combination of morphine (0.125 nmol/5 microl, i.t.) with the same dose of thioperamide resulted in a significant reduction in the pain-related behaviors in all four nociceptive tests. These results suggest that histamine exerts inhibitory effects on morphine-induced antinociception through H3 receptors at the spinal level.

  4. Comparison of droperidol and ondansetron prophylactic effect on subarachnoid morphine-induced pruritus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Ferreira da Cunha Brião

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The prophylactic effect of ondansetron on subarachnoid morphine-induced pruritus is controversial, while evidence suggests that droperidol prevents pruritus. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of droperidol and ondansetron on subarachnoid morphine-induced pruritus.METHODS: 180 ASA I or II patients scheduled to undergo cesarean sections under subarachnoid anesthesia combined with morphine 0.2 mg were randomized to receive, after the child's birth, metoclopramide 10 mg (Group I - control, droperidol 2.5 mg (Group II or ondansetron 8 mg (Group III. Postoperatively, the patients were assessed for pruritus (absent, mild, moderate or severe or other side effects by blinded investigators. Patients were also blinded to their group allocation. The tendency to present more severe forms of pruritus was compared between groups. NNT was also determined.RESULTS: Patients assigned to receive droperidol [Proportional odds ratio: 0.45 (95% confidence interval 0.23-0.88] reported less pruritus than those who received metoclopramide. Ondansetron effect was similar to metoclopramide [Proportional odds ratio: 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.49-1.83]. The NNT for droperidol and ondansetron was 4.0 and 14.7, respectively.CONCLUSIONS: Ondansetron does not inhibit subarachnoid morphine-induced pruritus.

  5. Pavlovian conditioning of morphine-induced alterations of immune status: evidence for opioid receptor involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coussons-Read, M E; Dykstra, L A; Lysle, D T

    1994-12-01

    Prior work in our laboratory has shown that morphine's immunomodulatory effects can become conditioned to environmental stimuli that predict drug administration. These immune alterations include conditioned changes in natural killer cell activity, interleukin-2 production, and mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation. The present study examined the involvement of opioid receptor activity in the establishment and expression of conditioned morphine-induced alterations of immune status. During the training phase of the experiment, Lewis rats received two conditioning sessions during which a subcutaneous injection of 15 mg/kg morphine sulfate was paired with exposure to a distinctive environment. On the test day, animals were re-exposed to the distinctive environment alone prior to sacrifice. Saline or naltrexone (0.3, 1.0, 3.0 or 10.0 mg/kg) was administered during either the training or the test session. Administration of naltrexone prior to training antagonized the development of all of the conditioned alterations of immune status including changes in the mitogenic responsiveness of splenocytes, suppression of natural killer cell activity, and interleukin-2 production by splenocytes. Naltrexone administration prior to testing also was effective in antagonizing the expression of a subset of morphine-induced conditioned alterations in immune status. Taken together, these studies indicate that opioid receptor activity is involved in the establishment of conditioned morphine-induced immune alterations, as well as in the expression of a subset of these conditioned alterations of immune status.

  6. Relative efficacy of some prokinetic drugs in morphine-induced gastrointestinal transit delay in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AD Suchitra; SA Dkhar; DG Shewade; CH Shashindran

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the relative efficacy of cisapride,metoclopramide, domperidone, erythromycin and mosapride on gastric emptying (GE) and small intestinal transit (SIT)in morphine treated mice.METHODS: Phenol red marker meal was employed to estimate GE and SIT in Swiss albino mice of either sex. The groups included were control, morphine 1 mg/kg (s.c. 15min before test meal) alone or with (45 min before test meal p.o.) cisapride 10 mg/kg, metoclopramide 20 mg/kg,domperidone 20 mg/kg, erythromycin 6 mg/kg and mosapride 20 mg/kg.RESULTS: Cisapride, metoclopramide and mosapride were effective in enhancing gastric emptying significantly (P<0.001)whereas other prokinetic agents failed to do so in normal mice. Metoclopramide completely reversed morphine induced delay in gastric emptying followed by mosapride.Metoclopramide alone was effective when given to normal mice in increasing the SIT. Cisapride, though it did not show any significant effect on SIT in normal mice, was able to reverse morphine induced delay in SIT significantly (P<0.001)followed by metoclopramide and mosapride.CONCLUSION: Metoclopramide and cisapride are most effective in reversing morphine-induced delay in gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in mice respectively.

  7. Memory enhancement by administration of ginger (Zingiber officinale) extract on morphine-induced memory impairment in male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Gomar; Abdolkarim Hosseini; Naser Mirazi

    2014-01-01

    To study the chronic treatment with hydroethanolic extract of ginger(50,100 and200 mg/kg, p.o) would effect on the passive avoidance learning(PAL) and memory in rat.Methods:The rats were divided into eight groups.On the training trial, the mice received an electric shock when the animals were entered into the dark compartment.Twenty-four hours later,30 min after treatment, theSTL(step-through latency) andTDC(total time in dark compartments) was recorded and defined as the retention trial.Results:The time latency in morphine-treated group was lower than control(P<0.001).Treatment of the animals by100 and200 mg/kg of ginger extract before the training trial increased the time latency at24 hours after the training trial(P<0.01 andP<0.001). Administration of both100 and200 mg/kg doses of the extract in morphine received animal groups before retention trials also increased the time latency than the morphine-treated group groups(P<0.001).Conclusion:The results revealed that the ginger extract attenuated morphine-induced memory impairment.

  8. Assessment of morphine-induced hyperalgesia and analgesic tolerance in mice using thermal and mechanical nociceptive modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhabazi, Khadija; Ayachi, Safia; Ilien, Brigitte; Simonin, Frédéric

    2014-07-29

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance severely impact the clinical efficacy of opiates as pain relievers in animals and humans. The molecular mechanisms underlying both phenomena are not well understood and their elucidation should benefit from the study of animal models and from the design of appropriate experimental protocols. We describe here a methodological approach for inducing, recording and quantifying morphine-induced hyperalgesia as well as for evidencing analgesic tolerance, using the tail-immersion and tail pressure tests in wild-type mice. As shown in the video, the protocol is divided into five sequential steps. Handling and habituation phases allow a safe determination of the basal nociceptive response of the animals. Chronic morphine administration induces significant hyperalgesia as shown by an increase in both thermal and mechanical sensitivity, whereas the comparison of analgesia time-courses after acute or repeated morphine treatment clearly indicates the development of tolerance manifested by a decline in analgesic response amplitude. This protocol may be similarly adapted to genetically modified mice in order to evaluate the role of individual genes in the modulation of nociception and morphine analgesia. It also provides a model system to investigate the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents to improve opiate analgesic efficacy.

  9. Proliferative reactive gliosis is compatible with glial metabolic support and neuronal function

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The response of mammalian glial cells to chronic degeneration and trauma is hypothesized to be incompatible with support of neuronal function in the central nervous system (CNS) and retina. To test this hypothesis, we developed an inducible model of proliferative reactive gliosis in the absence of degenerative stimuli by genetically inactivating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 (p27 or Cdkn1b) in the adult mouse and determined the outcome on retinal structure ...

  10. Endogenous histamine inhibits the development of morphine-induced conditioned place preference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-xia GONG; Min LV; Yong-ping ZHU; Yuan-yuan ZHU; Er-qing WEI; Hong SHI; Qun-li ZENG; Zhong CHEN

    2007-01-01

    Aim:The conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm was used to investigate the effects of endogenous histamine on the processes leading to morphine-induced reward-seeking behavior in Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods: The model of CPP was used to assess the rewarding effect of morphine. The levels of histamine,glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine (DA) and 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-acetic acid (DOPAC) in rat brains were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography. Immunohistochemistry technique was used to observe the morphological changes of neurons. Results: Intraperitoneal injection of mor-phine (2, 5 or 10 mg/kg) induced the development of CPP in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, morphine administrations (10 mg/kg) decreased the hista-mine content and reduced the number and size of histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TM), as well as markedly increasing the DOPAC/DA ratios in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). Intra-peritoneal injection of histidine (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited the development of morphine-induced CPP. Bilateral lesions of the TM, which decreased the histamine levels in the VTA and NAc, potentiated the development of CPP induced by morphine (1 mg/kg, a dose that produced no appreciable effect when given alone) and increased the DOPAC/DA ratios in the VTA and NAc, but did not change the glutamate or GABA levels in these nuclei. Histidine reversed the effects of the TM lesions. Conclusion: These results indicate that endog-enous histamine plays a role in inhibiting the development of morphine-induced reward-seeking behavior, and the inhibition may involve the modulation of dopa-minergic activity.

  11. Abatement of morphine-induced slowing in gastrointestinal transit by Dai-kenchu-to, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomonori; Sakai, Akiko; Isogami, Issei; Noda, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Koichi; Yano, Shingo

    2002-02-01

    As a way of alleviating severe constipation in cancer patients taking morphine to relieve pain, effects of Dai-kenchu-to (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo medicine), on gastrointestinal transit in mice or on the isolated guinea pig ileum were studied in special reference to morphine. Without altering the anti-nociceptive effect of morphine, DKT was significantly effective against morphine-induced disorder of gastrointestinal transit in mice as assessed by the charcoal meal test for the intestine and measurement of transit time for the colon tract. The results of in vitro studies with guinea pig ileum suggest that abatement of morphine-induced disorder of transit by DKT is caused by both moderate contraction of morphine-treated longitudinal muscle and relaxation of morphine-induced tonic contraction of circular muscle.

  12. Prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) null mice have increased mu opioid receptor levels accompanied by altered morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfy, K; Parikh, D; Lee, D L; Liu, Y; Ferrini, M G; Hamid, A; Friedman, T C

    2016-08-04

    Chronic morphine treatment increases the levels of prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) in brain regions involved in nociception, tolerance and dependence. Thus, we tested if PC2 null mice exhibit altered morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. PC2 null mice and their wild-type controls were tested for baseline hot plate latency, injected with morphine (1.25-10mg/kg) and tested for antinociception 30min later. For tolerance studies, mice were tested in the hot plate test before and 30min following morphine (5mg/kg) on day 1. Mice then received an additional dose so that the final dose of morphine was 10mg/kg on this day. On days 2-4, mice received additional doses of morphine (20, 40 and 80mg/kg on days 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively). On day 5, mice were tested in the hot plate test before and 30min following morphine (5mg/kg). For withdrawal studies, mice were treated with the escalating doses of morphine (10, 20, 40 and 80mg/kg) for 4days, implanted with a morphine pellet on day 5 and 3 days later injected with naloxone (1mg/kg) and signs of withdrawal were recorded. Morphine dose-dependently induced antinociception and the magnitude of this response was greater in PC2 null mice. Tolerance to morphine was observed in wild-type mice and this phenomenon was blunted in PC2 null mice. Withdrawal signs were also reduced in PC2 null mice. Immunohistochemical studies showed up-regulation of the mu opioid receptor (MOP) protein expression in the periaqueductal gray area, ventral tegmental area, lateral hypothalamus, medial hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and somatosensory cortex in PC2 null mice. Likewise, naloxone specific binding was increased in the brains of these mice compared to their wild-type controls. The results suggest that the PC2-derived peptides may play a functional role in morphine-induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. Alternatively, lack of opioid peptides led to up-regulation of the MOP and altered morphine-induced

  13. A new buprenorphine analogy, thenorphine,inhibits morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-liZHAO; Ze-huiGONG; Jian-huiLIANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate effects of thenorphine, a new compound of partial agonist of μ-opioid receptor, on the locomotor activity and the behavioral sensitization to morphine in mice. METHODS: Locomotor activity was observed after administration of thenorphine or co-administration of thenorphine and morphine in mice. Mice were induced behavioral sensitization to morphine by intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg morphine once daily for 7 d. Thenorphine was co-administrated with morphine to observe the effects of thenorphine on the development, transfer and expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. RESULTS: A single dose of thenorphine (0.0625, 0.25, and 1.0 mg/kg) could dose-dependently inhibit the locomotor activity in mice (P<0.05), repeated administrations of thenorphine, however, were not able to induce locomotor sensitization, but induced tolerance. Pretreatment with thenorphine 30 min prior to morphine effectively inhibited the psychomotor effect of morphine in mice (P<0.01). Co-administration of thenorphine (0.0625, 0.25, and 1.0 mg/kg) could dose-dependently inhibit the development,transfer, and expression of behavioral sensitization to morphine in mice (P<0.05 or P<0.01). CONCLUSION:Thenorphine inhibited morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in mice, suggesting that thenorphine may be effective against the addiction of opioids.

  14. A new buprenorphine analogy,thenorphine,inhibits morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-li ZHAO; Ze-hui GONG; Jian-hui LIANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate effects of thenorphine, a new compound of partial agonist of μ-opioid receptor, on the locomotor activity and the behavioral sensitization to morphine in mice. METHODS: Locomotor activity was observed after administration of thenorphine or co-administration of thenorphine and morphine in mice. Mice were induced behavioral sensitization to morphine by intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg morphine once daily for 7 d. Thenorphine was co-administrated with morphine to observe the effects of thenorphine on the development, transfer and expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. RESULTS: A single dose of thenorphine (0.0625, 0.25, and 1.0mg/kg) could dose-dependently inhibit the locomotor activity in mice (P<0.05), repeated administrations of thenorphine, however, were not able to induce locomotor sensitization, but induced tolerance. Pretreatment with thenorphine 30 min prior to morphine effectively inhibited the psychomotor effect of morphine in mice (P<0.01).Co-administration of thenorphine (0.0625, 0.25, and 1.0 mg/kg) could dose-dependently inhibit the development,transfer, and expression of behavioral sensitization to morphine in mice (P<0.05 or P<0.01). CONCLUSION:Thenorphine inhibited morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in mice, suggesting that thenorphine may be effective against the addiction of opioids.

  15. Effect of Aqueous Extract of Crocus sativus L. on Morphine-Induced Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghibi, Sayede Maryam; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Khani, Fatemeh; Rahimi, Motahare; Vafaee, Farzaneh; Rakhshandeh, Hassan; Aghaie, Azita

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of aqueous extracts of saffron on morphine-induced memory impairment was investigated. On the training trial, the mice received an electric shock when the animals were entered into the dark compartment. Twenty-four and forty-eight hours later, the time latency for entering the dark compartment was recorded and defined as the retention trial. The mice were divided into (1) control, (2) morphine which received morphine before the training in the passive avoidance test, (3-5) three groups treated by 50, 150 and 450 mg/kg of saffron extract before the training trial, and (6 and 7) the two other groups received 150 and 450 mg/kg of saffron extract before the retention trial. The time latency in morphine-treated group was lower than control (P < 0.01). Treatment of the animals by 150 and 450 mg/kg of saffron extract before the training trial increased the time latency at 24 and 48 hours after the training trial (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). Administration of both 150 and 450 mg/kg doses of the extract before retention trials also increased the time latency (P < 0.01). The results revealed that the saffron extract attenuated morphine-induced memory impairment.

  16. Effect of Tetrandrine on Morphine Induced Hyperactivity and Reinforcement in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱毅; 薛春生; 周歧新

    2001-01-01

    To study the effect of tetrandrine on morphine induced hyperactivity and reinforcement in mice. Methods: After single administration of morphine and the motion activity was measured by ambulometer, conditioned place-preference paradigm was used to study the reinforcing effect of morphine, climbing behavior was used to evaluate the relation with Dopaminergic system and immediate early expression of c-fos gene in brain was shown by immunohistochemical method. Results: Single administration of morphine could induce hyperactivity, repeated treatment would produce a conditioned place-preference response, tetrandrine 30 or 60 mg/kg hypodermic injection could inhibit the morphine induced hyperactivity, 60 mg/kg could inhibit the conditioned place-preference response but no influence on climbing behavior in mice was found. Tetrandrine could inhibit the c-fos gene expression in nucleus accumbens, ventral tegmental and prefrontal cortex in place-preference model formed by morphine. Conclusion: Tetrandrine could inhibit the hyperactivity and conditioned place-preference response induced by morphine, it might relate to reduce the c-fos gene expression in special area of brain in mice.

  17. Effect of Aqueous Extract of Crocus sativus L. on Morphine-Induced Memory Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayede Maryam Naghibi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of aqueous extracts of saffron on morphine-induced memory impairment was investigated. On the training trial, the mice received an electric shock when the animals were entered into the dark compartment. Twenty-four and forty-eight hours later, the time latency for entering the dark compartment was recorded and defined as the retention trial. The mice were divided into (1 control, (2 morphine which received morphine before the training in the passive avoidance test, (3–5 three groups treated by 50, 150 and 450 mg/kg of saffron extract before the training trial, and (6 and 7 the two other groups received 150 and 450 mg/kg of saffron extract before the retention trial. The time latency in morphine-treated group was lower than control (P < 0.01. Treatment of the animals by 150 and 450 mg/kg of saffron extract before the training trial increased the time latency at 24 and 48 hours after the training trial (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01. Administration of both 150 and 450 mg/kg doses of the extract before retention trials also increased the time latency (P < 0.01. The results revealed that the saffron extract attenuated morphine-induced memory impairment.

  18. Modulation of opiate-related signaling molecules in morphine-dependent conditioned behavior: conditioned place preference to morphine induces CREB phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morón, José A; Gullapalli, Srinivas; Taylor, Chirisse; Gupta, Achla; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2010-03-01

    Opiate addiction is a chronic, relapsing behavioral disorder where learned associations that develop between the abused opiate and the environment in which it is consumed are brought about through Pavlovian (classical) conditioning processes. However, the signaling mechanisms/pathways regulating the mechanisms that underlie the responses to opiate-associated cues or the development of sensitization as a consequence of repeated context-independent administration of opiates are unknown. In this study we examined the phosphorylation levels of various classic signaling molecules in brain regions implicated in addictive behaviors after acute and repeated morphine administration. An unbiased place conditioning protocol was used to examine changes in phosphorylation that are associated with (1) the expression of the rewarding effects of morphine and (2) the sensitization that develops to this effect. We also examined the effects of a delta-receptor antagonist on morphine-induced conditioned behavior and on the phosphorylation of classic signaling molecules in view of data showing that blockade of delta-opioid receptor (deltaOR) prevents the development of sensitization to the rewarding effects of morphine. We find that CREB phosphorylation is specifically induced upon the expression of a sensitized response to morphine-induced conditioned behavior in brain areas related to memory consolidation, such as the hippocampus and cortex. A similar effect is also observed, albeit to a lesser extent, in the case of the GluR1 subunit of AMPA glutamate receptor. These increases in the phosphorylation levels of CREB and pGluR1 are significantly blocked by pretreatment with a deltaOR antagonist. These results indicate a critical role for phospho-CREB, AMPA, and deltaOR activities in mediating the expression of a sensitized response to morphine-dependent conditioned behavior.

  19. Intracerebroventricular administration of riluzole prevents morphine-induced apoptosis in the lumbar region of the rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Kambiz; Habibi-asl, Bohlool; Roshangar, Leila; Nemati, Mahboob; Ansarin, Masood; Farajnia, Safar

    2010-01-01

    Opiates are the most effective drugs for pain relief. However, the repeated use of opiates induces tolerance to their analgesic effects. It has been shown that this morphine-induced tolerance is associated with apoptosis in the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of riluzole, an anti-glutamatergic drug, on morphine-induced apoptosis in the lumbar region of the rat spinal cord. Animals were given daily injections of morphine and vehicle, morphine and riluzole, or riluzole alone. Nociception was assessed using a hot plate apparatus, and apoptosis was assessed using the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method. The levels of anti-apoptotic factors Bcl-2 and HSP 70 and the pro-apoptotic agent caspase-3 were evaluated using immunoblotting. The glutamate concentration in the lumbar spinal cord was measured with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results indicate that the i.c.v. administration of riluzole attenuated morphine tolerance and reduced the number of TUNEL positive cells. Immunoblotting revealed that the levels of the selected anti-apoptotic agents were greater in the treatment groups compared to the controls. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the administration of riluzole can attenuate the morphine-induced elevation of glutamate in the lumbar spinal cord. In conclusion, i.c.v. administration of riluzole attenuated morphine-induced tolerance to analgesia and apoptosis in addition to preventing the morphine-induced increase of glutamate in the lumbar spinal cord of rats.

  20. Morphine-Induced Constipation Develops With Increased Aquaporin-3 Expression in the Colon via Increased Serotonin Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Risako; Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Hayakawa, Akio; Haga, Yusuke; Fueki, Aika; Kusunoki, Yoshiki; Tajima, Masataka; Ochiai, Wataru; Machida, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is a water channel that is predominantly expressed in the colon, where it plays a critical role in the regulation of fecal water content. This study investigated the role of AQP3 in the colon in morphine-induced constipation. AQP3 expression levels in the colon were analyzed after oral morphine administration to rats. The degree of constipation was analyzed after the combined administration of HgCl(2) (AQP3 inhibitor) or fluoxetine (5-HT reuptake transporter [SERT] inhibitor) and morphine. The mechanism by which morphine increased AQP3 expression was examined in HT-29 cells. AQP3 expression levels in rat colon were increased during morphine-induced constipation. The combination of HgCl(2) and morphine improved morphine-induced constipation. Treatment with morphine in HT-29 cells did not change AQP3 expression. However, 5-HT treatment significantly increased the AQP3 expression level and the nuclear translocation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) 1 h after treatment. Pretreatment with fluoxetine significantly suppressed these increases. Fluoxetine pretreatment suppressed the development of morphine-induced constipation and the associated increase in AQP3 expression in the colon. The results suggest that morphine increases the AQP3 expression level in the colon, which promotes water absorption from the luminal side to the vascular side and causes constipation. This study also showed that morphine-induced 5-HT secreted from the colon was taken into cells by SERT and activated PPARγ, which subsequently increased AQP3 expression levels.

  1. Protective effect of bacoside-A against morphine-induced oxidative stress in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sumathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of bacoside-A the active principle isolated from the plant Bacopa monniera against oxidative damage induced by morphine in rat brain. Morphine intoxicated rats received 10-160 mg/kg b.w. of morphine hydrochloride intraperitoneally for 21 days. Bacoside-A pretreated rats were administered with bacoside-A (10 mg/kg b.w/day orally, 2 h before the injection of morphine for 21 days. Pretreatment with bacoside-A has shown to possess a significant protective role against morphine induced brain oxidative damage in the antioxidant status (total reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and lipid peroxidation and membrane bound ATP-ases(Na + /K + ATPase. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ ATPases activities in rat. The results of the present study indicate that bacoside-A protects the brain from oxidative stress induced by morphine.

  2. Protective Effect of Bacoside-A against Morphine-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, T; Nathiya, V C; Sakthikumar, M

    2011-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of bacoside-A the active principle isolated from the plant Bacopa monniera against oxidative damage induced by morphine in rat brain. Morphine intoxicated rats received 10-160 mg/kg b.w. of morphine hydrochloride intraperitoneally for 21 days. Bacoside-A pretreated rats were administered with bacoside-A (10 mg/kg b.w/day) orally, 2 h before the injection of morphine for 21 days. Pretreatment with bacoside-A has shown to possess a significant protective role against morphine induced brain oxidative damage in the antioxidant status (total reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and lipid peroxidation) and membrane bound ATP-ases(Na(+)/K(+)ATPase. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ATPases) activities in rat. The results of the present study indicate that bacoside-A protects the brain from oxidative stress induced by morphine.

  3. Neuromodulatory effects of the dorsal hippocampal endocannabinoid system in dextromethorphan/morphine-induced amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2017-01-05

    Dextromethorphan which is an active ingredient in many cough medicines has been previously shown to potentiate amnesic effect of morphine in rats. However, the effect of dextromethorphan, that is also a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, in combination with morphine on hippocampus-based long term memory has not been well characterized. The aim of the present study was to assess the possible role of endocannabinoid system of the dorsal hippocampus in dextromethorphan /morphine-induced amnesia. Our results showed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of morphine (5mg/kg) or dextromethorphan (5-15mg/kg) before testing the passive avoidance learning induced amnesia. Combination of ineffective doses of dextromethorphan (7.5mg/kg, i.p.) and morphine (2mg/kg, i.p.) also produced amnesia, suggesting the enhancing effects of the drugs. To assess the effect of the activation or inhibition of the dorsal hippocampal cannabinoid CB1 receptors on this amnesia, ACPA or AM251 as selective receptor agonists or antagonists were respectively injected into the CA1 regions before systemic injection of dextromethorphan and morphine. Interestingly, intra-CA1 microinjection of ACPA (0.5-1ng/rat) improved the amnesic effect of dextromethorphan /morphine combination. The microinjection of AM251 into the CA1 region enhanced the response of the combination of dextromethorphan /morphine in inducing amnesia. Moreover, Intra-CA1 microinjection of AM251 inhibited the improving effect of ACPA on dextromethorphan /morphine-induced amnesia. It is important to note that intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of the agonist or antagonist by itself had no effects on memory formation. Thus, it can be concluded that the dorsal hippocampal endocannabinoid system, via CB1 receptor-dependent mechanism, may be involved in morphine/dextromethorphan -induced amnesia.

  4. Cholecystokinin-octapeptide restored morphine-induced hippocampal long-term potentiation impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Di; Zang, Guoqing; Sun, DongLei; Yu, Feng; Mei, Dong; Ma, Chunling; Cong, Bin

    2014-01-24

    Cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8), which is a typical brain-gut peptide, exerts a wide range of biological activities on the central nervous system. We have previously reported that CCK-8 significantly alleviated morphine-induced amnesia and reversed spine density decreases in the CA1 region of the hippocampus in morphine-treated animals. Here, we investigated the effects of CCK-8 on long-term potentiation (LTP) in the lateral perforant path (LPP)-granule cell synapse of rat dentate gyrus (DG) in acute saline or morphine-treated rats. Population spikes (PS), which were evoked by stimulation of the LPP, were recorded in the DG region. Acute morphine (30mg/kg, s.c.) treatment significantly attenuated hippocampal LTP and CCK-8 (1μg, i.c.v.) restored the amplitude of PS that was attenuated by morphine injection. Furthermore, microinjection of CCK-8 (0.1 and 1μg, i.c.v.) also significantly augmented hippocampal LTP in saline-treated (1ml/kg, s.c.) rats. Pre-treatment of the CCK2 receptor antagonist L-365,260 (10μg, i.c.v) reversed the effects of CCK-8, but the CCK1 receptor antagonist L-364,718 (10μg, i.c.v) did not. The present results demonstrate that CCK-8 attenuates the effect of morphine on hippocampal LTP through CCK2 receptors and suggest an ameliorative function of CCK-8 on morphine-induced memory impairment.

  5. Repeated administration of dopaminergic agents in the dorsal hippocampus and morphine-induced place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, M-R; Nasehi, M; Rostami, P; Rezayof, A; Fazli-Tabaei, S

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the present experiments was to investigate whether repeated intra-hippocampal CA1 (intra-CA1) administration of dopaminergic agents can affect morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). Effects of repeated intra-CA1 injections of dopamine (DA) receptor agonists and antagonists on morphine-induced CPP in rats were investigated using an unbiased 3-day schedule of place conditioning. Animals receiving once-daily subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of morphine (1-9 mg/kg) or saline (1.0 ml/kg, s.c.) showed a significant place preference in a dose-dependent manner: the maximum response was observed with 3 mg/kg morphine. Three days' intra-CA1 injections of apomorphine (0.25-1 microg/rat) followed by 5 days free of the drug, significantly decreased morphine CPP (1 and 3 mg/kg, s.c.). Moreover, pre-treatment with the highest dose of apomorphine (1 microg/rat) altered the effect of morphine to an aversive response. The morphine (1 and 3 mg/kg) CPP was also significantly decreased in animals that previously received three intra-CA1 injections of SKF 38393 (2-9 microg/rat), quinpirole (1-3 microg/rat) or sulpiride (1-3 microg/rat), and significantly increased in animals that had previously received three intra-CA1 injections of SCH 23390 (0.02 microg/rat). The 3-day pre-treatment with apomorphine, SKF 38393 or quinpirole reduced locomotor activity in the test session, while SCH 23390 and sulpiride did not have any influence on locomotor activity. It is concluded that repeated injections of DA receptor agents in the dorsal hippocampus, followed by 5 days free of the drugs, can affect morphine reward.

  6. Midazolam exacerbates morphine tolerance and morphine-induced hyperactive behaviors in young rats with burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Wang, Shuxing; Zuo, Yunxia; Chen, Lucy; Martyn, Jeevendra A; Mao, Jianren

    2014-05-20

    Midazolam and morphine are often used in pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) for analgesia and sedation. However, how these two drugs interact behaviorally remains unclear. Here, we examined whether (1) co-administration of midazolam with morphine would exacerbate morphine tolerance and morphine-induced hyperactive behaviors, and (2) protein kinase C (PKC) would contribute to these behavioral changes. Male rats of 3-4 weeks old were exposed to a hindpaw burn injury. In Experiment 1, burn-injured young rats received once daily saline or morphine (10mg/kg, subcutaneous, s.c.), followed 30min later by either saline or midazolam (2mg/kg, intraperitoneal, i.p.), for 14 days beginning 3 days after burn injury. In Experiment 2, young rats with burn injury were administered with morphine (10mg/kg, s.c.), midazolam (2mg/kg, i.p.), and chelerythrine chloride (a non-specific PKC inhibitor, 10nmol, intrathecal) for 14 days. For both experiments, cumulative morphine anti-nociceptive dose-response (ED50) was tested and hyperactive behaviors such as jumping and scratching were recorded. Following 2 weeks of each treatment, ED50 dose was significantly increased in rats receiving morphine alone as compared with rats receiving saline or midazolam alone. The ED50 dose was further increased in rats receiving both morphine and midazolam. Co-administration of morphine and midazolam also exacerbated morphine-induced hyperactive behaviors. Expression of the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and PKCγ in the spinal cord dorsal horn (immunohistochemistry; Western blot) was upregulated in burn-injured young rats receiving morphine alone or in combination with midazolam, and chelerythrine prevented the development of morphine tolerance. These results indicate that midazolam exacerbated morphine tolerance through a spinal NMDA/PKC-mediated mechanism.

  7. Massive retinal gliosis: An unusual case with immunohistochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay D Deshmukh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive retinal gliosis (MRG is a rare, benign intraocular condition that results from the proliferation of well-differentiated glial cells. Immunohistochemically, these cells show positivity for glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP, neuron specific enolase (NSE, and S-100 protein. We encountered a case of a 45-year-old female with loss of vision in the left eye. She had a history of trauma to that eye two years ago. Enucleation was carried out, because malignancy was suspected due to retinal calcification. On the basis of light microscopy and immunohistochemistry (IHC performed on the enucleated eye, it was diagnosed as massive retinal gliosis.

  8. Drug-seeking behavior in an invertebrate system: evidence of morphine-induced reward, extinction and reinstatement in crayfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathaniel, Thomas I; Panksepp, Jaak; Huber, Robert

    2009-02-11

    Several lines of evidence suggest that exploring the neurochemical basis of reward in invertebrate species may provide clues for the fundamental behavioral and neurobiology underpinnings of drug addiction. How the presence of drug-sensitive reward relates to a decrease in drug-seeking behavior and reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior in invertebrate systems is not known. The present study of a conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) explores morphine-induced reward, extinction and reinstatement. Repeated intra-circulatory infusions of 2.5 microg/g, 5.0 microg/g and 10.0 microg/g doses of morphine over 5 days serve as a reward when paired with a distinct visual or tactile environment. Morphine-induced CPP was extinguished after repeated saline injections for 5 days in the previously morphine-paired compartment. After the previously established CPP had been eliminated during the extinction phase, morphine-experienced crayfish were challenged with 2.5 microg/g, 5.0 microg/g and 10.0 microg/g, respectively. The priming injections of morphine reinstated CPP in all training doses, suggesting that morphine-induced CPP is unrelenting, and that with time, it can be reinstated by morphine following extinction in an invertebrate model just like in mammals. Together with other recent studies, this work demonstrates the advantage of using crayfish as an invertebrate animal model to investigate the basic biological processes that underline exposure to mammalian drugs of abuse.

  9. Pavlovian conditioning of morphine-induced alterations of immune status: evidence for peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coussons-Read, M E; Dykstra, L A; Lysle, D T

    1994-09-01

    The present studies examined the involvement of peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor activity in the establishment and expression of conditioned morphine-induced alterations of immune status. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that morphine's immunomodulatory effects can become conditioned to environmental stimuli which predict drug administration. These immune alterations include conditioned changes in natural killer cell activity, interleukin-2 production, and mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation. During the training phase of these experiments, Lewis rats received two conditioning sessions during which a subcutaneous injection of 15 mg/kg morphine sulfate was paired with exposure to a distinctive environment. On the test day, rats were reexposed to the conditioned stimulus prior to sacrifice. Saline or nadolol (0.002, 0.02, 0.2, or 2.0 mg/kg) was administered either prior to the training sessions or prior to the test session. Administration of nadolol prior to training did not affect the development of conditioned alterations of immune status. Conversely, nadolol administration prior to testing completely attenuated the expression of a subset of the conditioned morphine-induced changes in immune status. Taken together, these studies suggest that whereas peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor activity is not required for the establishment of conditioned morphine-induced alterations of immune status, it is involved in the expression of a subset of these conditioned immunomodulatory effects.

  10. Behavioral cross-sensitization between morphine-induced locomotion and sodium depletion-induced salt appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Elisa S; Morris, Michael J; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2009-10-01

    In general terms, sensitization refers to the capacity of a repetitive stimulus of fixed strength to produce a progressive increase in the magnitude of a response with each stimulation. In the addiction literature cross-sensitization is the capacity of an agent with abuse potential to sensitize a behavioral response induced by another stimulus. In the present experiments we examined the effects of morphine pretreatment on furosemide-induced saline intake and conversely sodium appetite induction on morphine-induced locomotion. In an initial experiment rats were pretreated with morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) or vehicle for 5 days. The rats were then sodium or sham depleted and 24 h later given a sodium appetite test. Sodium depleted rats pretreated with morphine increased saline intake compared to depleted rats initially pretreated with vehicle. In a second experiment rats that were previously depleted and repleted of sodium as compared to sham depleted animals showed enhanced locomotor activity in an open field test when challenged with morphine (1 mg/kg, s.c.). These studies demonstrate that the behavioral responses induced by sodium deficiency and morphine treatment cross-sensitize with one another and suggest that common neural substrates underlie the sensitization of behaviors associated with states induced by morphine and sodium appetite.

  11. Proliferative reactive gliosis is compatible with glial metabolic support and neuronal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fero Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The response of mammalian glial cells to chronic degeneration and trauma is hypothesized to be incompatible with support of neuronal function in the central nervous system (CNS and retina. To test this hypothesis, we developed an inducible model of proliferative reactive gliosis in the absence of degenerative stimuli by genetically inactivating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 (p27 or Cdkn1b in the adult mouse and determined the outcome on retinal structure and function. Results p27-deficient Müller glia reentered the cell cycle, underwent aberrant migration, and enhanced their expression of intermediate filament proteins, all of which are characteristics of Müller glia in a reactive state. Surprisingly, neuroglial interactions, retinal electrophysiology, and visual acuity were normal. Conclusion The benign outcome of proliferative reactive Müller gliosis suggests that reactive glia display context-dependent, graded and dynamic phenotypes and that reactivity in itself is not necessarily detrimental to neuronal function.

  12. Blockade of dorsal hippocampal orexin-1 receptors impaired morphine-induced state-dependent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Kadivar, Mehdi; Rastipisheh, Sareh

    2016-12-01

    Behavioral abnormalities associated with opiate addiction include memory and learning deficits, which are the result of some alterations in the neuromodulatory systems. Recently, orexin has shown to influence drug addiction neural circuitry, specifically in mediating reward-related perception and memory. To explore the possible interaction of orexinergic and opioidergic system on modulation of learning and memory, we have investigated the effects of intra-dorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) administration of orexin-1 receptor agonist and the competitive orexin-1 antagonist, SB-334867, on morphine-induced memory impairment by using step-down passive avoidance task in mice. Pre-training injection of morphine (5mg/kg, i.p.) impaired memory, which was restored when 24h later the same dose of the drug was administered. Pre-test administration of orexin-1 (0.5, 5 and 50pmol, intra-CA1) had not a significant effect on the retention latency compared to the saline-treated animals, but it restored the memory impairment induced by pre-training morphine (5mg/kg, i.p.). Pre-test administration of SB-334867 (10, 20 and 40nmol, intra-CA1) by itself decreased the retention latencies of passive avoidance task. Co-administration of orexin-1 (0.5, 5 and 50pmol, intra-CA1) and morphine (1mg/kg, i.p.) on the test day induced morphine state-dependent memory. Conversely, pre-test injection of SB-334867 (10, 20 and 40nmol, intra-CA1) inhibited the orexin-1-induced potentiation of morphine state-dependent learning on the test day. It is concluded that dorsal hippocampal orexin-1 receptors may be involved, at least in part, in morphine state-dependent learning in mice.

  13. Modulating effect of the nootropic drug, piracetam on stress- and subsequent morphine-induced prolactin secretion in male rats.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of the nootropic drug, piracetam on stress- and subsequent morphine-induced prolactin (PRL) secretion was investigated in vivo in male rats, by use of a stress-free blood sampling and drug administration method by means of a permanent indwelling catheter in the right jugular vein. 2. Four doses of piracetam were tested (20, 100, 200 and 400 mg kg-1), being given intraperitoneally 1 h before blood sampling; control rats received saline instead. After a first blood sample, rats we...

  14. Morphine-induced sensitization of locomotor activity in mice: effect of social isolation on plasma corticosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francès, H; Graulet, A; Debray, M; Coudereau, J P; Guéris, J; Bourre, J M

    2000-03-31

    This study examined the influence of social isolation on behavioural sensitization to the locomotor effect of morphine and the link between this behaviour and plasma corticosterone concentrations. Four weeks isolation induced an increase in the locomotor effect of morphine. In social and isolated mice, repeated administrations (6) of morphine (one injection every 3 or 4 days) followed by 3 h in an actimeter induced behavioural sensitization to the locomotor effect of morphine. No interaction was observed between social isolation and behavioural sensitization to morphine. Resocializing previously isolated mice for 3 weeks reduced the morphine-induced locomotor effect without altering the behavioural sensitization. Corticosterone plasma levels were more increased (416%) in mice isolated 5 weeks than in mice isolated for 2 weeks (243%) and they return to the control levels following 3 weeks of resocialization. Since there was no interaction between the increase in morphine locomotor effect induced by social isolation and the morphine-induced behavioural sensitization, it is suggested that each of these two events acts independently. Whether or not a common mechanism (plasma corticosterone levels?) partly underlies both effects, the result resembles a simple additive effect.

  15. Saffron (Crocus sativus) ethanolic extract and its constituent, safranal, inhibits morphine-induced place preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshooni, H; Daryaafzoon, M; Sadeghi-Gharjehdagi, S; Zardooz, H; Sahraei, H; Tehrani, S P; Noroozzadeh, A; Bahrami-Shenasfandi, F; Kaka, G H; Sadraei, S H

    2011-10-15

    The effects of saffron ethanolic extract and its constituent, safranal, on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced place preference (CPP) in male Swiss Webster mice (20-25 g) were investigated in the present study. An unbiased place conditioning method was applied for assessment of morphine reward properties. The saffron extract and safranal were administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) during (acquisition) or after induction (expression) of morphine CPP. In a pilot study, the extract and safranal were alone administered to the animals to assess if they have any reward properties. Subcutaneous (s.c.) of morphine (4 and 8 mg kg(-1)) and extract (50 mg kg(-1); i.p.) induced CPP. Extract (10, 50 and 100 mg kg(-1); i.p.) reduced the acquisition and expression of morphine CPP. The same results were obtained when safranal (1, 5 and 10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) was used. It may be concluded that both ethanolic saffron extract and safranal can inhibit the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced CPP in the mice.

  16. α-Terpineol attenuates morphine-induced physical dependence and tolerance in mice: role of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvardeh, Siavash; Moghimi, Mahsa; Eslami, Pegah; Masoudi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Dependence and tolerance to opioid analgesics are major problems limiting their clinical application. α-Terpineol is a monoterpenoid alcohol with neuroprotective effects which is found in several medicinal plants such as Myrtus communis, Laurus nobilis, and Stachys byzantina. It has been shown that some of these medicinal plants such as S. byzantina attenuate dependence and tolerance to morphine. Since α-terpineol is one of the bioactive phytochemical constituent of these medicinal plants, the present study was conducted to investigate the effects of α-terpineol on morphine-induced dependence and tolerance in mice. Materials and Methods: The mice were rendered dependent or tolerant to morphine by a 3-day administration schedule. The hot-plate test and naloxone-induced withdrawal syndrome were used to evaluate tolerance and dependence on morphine, respectively. To investigate a possible role for nitric oxide (NO) in the protective effect of α-terpineol, the NO synthase inhibitor, L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and NO precursor, L-arginine, were used. Results: Administration of α-terpineol (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, IP) significantly decreased the number of jumps in morphine dependent animals. Moreover, α-terpineol (20 and 40 mg/kg, IP) attenuated tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine. The inhibitory effects of α-terpineol on morphine-induced dependence and tolerance were enhanced by pretreatment with L-NAME (10 mg/kg, IP). However, L-arginine (300 mg/kg, IP) antagonized the protective effects of α-terpineol on dependence and tolerance to morphine. Conclusion: These findings indicate that α-terpineol prevents the development of dependence and tolerance to morphine probably through the influence on NO production. PMID:27081466

  17. Intracerebroventricular effects of histaminergic agents on morphine-induced anxiolysis in the elevated plus-maze in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Rostami, Parvin; Zarei, Morteza; Roohbakhsh, Ali

    2005-11-01

    Some reports indicate that morphine can induce anxiolytic effects both in animal and in man. It has also been reported that histaminergic system can interfere with some pharmacological effects of morphine. The effects of histaminergic agents on morphine-induced anxiolysis in rats, using elevated plus-maze were investigated in the present study. Intraperitoneal injection of morphine (3, 6 and 9 mg/kg) induced antianxiety effects. Intracerebroventricular administration of histamine at the doses of (5, 10 and 20 microg/rat) also increased anxiety-related behaviours. Intracerebroventricular injection of pyrilamine, a H1 receptor antagonist (25, 50 and 100 microg/rat), increased anxiety whereas injection of ranitidine, a H2 receptor antagonist (5, 10 and 20 microg/rat) at the same site, decreased anxiety. Therefore, it seems that histamine induces anxiogenic response through activation of H2 receptors, while the response of H1 blocker may be due to release of histamine. We also evaluated the interactions between morphine and histaminergic agents. Our data show that histamine (10 microg/rat), pyrilamine (50 microg/rat) and ranitidine (5 microg/rat) did not alter the response induced by different doses of morphine (3, 6 and 9 mg/kg). Similarly, a single dose of morphine did not alter the response induced by different doses of histamine (5, 10 and 20 microg/rat), pyrilamine (25, 50 and 100 microg/rat) or ranitidine (5, 10 and 20 microg/rat). In conclusion, the histaminergic system plays an important role in the modulation of anxiety, although in our experiments, no interaction was found between the effects of histaminergic agents and morphine on anxiety-related indices in the elevated plus-maze. This may imply that morphine-induced anxiolysis probably is independent of the histaminergic system.

  18. Sex differences in ibogaine antagonism of morphine-induced locomotor activity and in ibogaine brain levels and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, S M; Hough, L B; Boyd, D L; Glick, S D

    1997-08-01

    The present study demonstrates that the putative antiaddictive agent ibogaine produces more robust behavioral effects in female than in male rats and that these behavioral differences correlate with higher levels of ibogaine in the brain and plasma of female rats. There were no differences in basal locomotor activity between the sexes, and the response of rats to ibogaine differed between the sexes even in the absence of morphine. Five h after receiving ibogaine (40 mg/kg, i.p.). antagonism of morphine-induced locomotor activity was evident in female but not in male rats. Either 19 h after administration of ibogaine (10-60 mg/kg, i.p.), or one h after administration of noribogaine (5-40 mg/kg, i.p.), a suspected metabolite, antagonism of morphine was significantly greater in female than in male rats. Brain and plasma levels of ibogaine (1 h) and noribogaine (5 h), measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were greater in females as compared with males receiving the same dose of ibogaine. Levels of both ibogaine and noribogaine were substantially lower at 19 h than at earlier times after ibogaine administration, contrary to a previous study in humans. For both sexes, subcutaneous administration of ibogaine (40 mg/kg, i.p., 19 h) produced greater antagonism of morphine-induced locomotor activity than did a comparable intraperitoneal injection, consistent with previous studies from this laboratory demonstrating that the former route of administration produces higher levels of ibogaine in the brain. These data show that there are sex differences in the effects of ibogaine and that this may be due to decreased bioavailability of ibogaine in males as compared to females.

  19. Changes in the antitumour effect of some cytostatic agents applied under conditions of morphine-induced hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovtcharov, R; Mircheva, Y; Yakimova, K; Stoichkov, Y

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the cytostatic agents bleomycetin, vincristine and methotrexate on the growth of the Lewis lung carcinoma was investigated under conditions of normothermia and morphine-induced hyperthermia. Morphine was administered 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 days after the tumour transplantation (in a single of 20 mg/kg), 75 min prior to the administration of bleomycetin (in a single dose of 2 mg/kg), vincristine (in a single dose of 0.3 mg/kg) and methotrexate (in a single dose of 5 mg/kg). The therapeutic effect was assessed on the 24th hour after the end of the treatment through determining the tumour growth inhibition. The administration of morphine to mice was found to be accompanied by the development of a hyperthermal reaction, with a maximum between the 90th and 120th min after the treatment, the change in the rectal temperature of the animals being of the order of 2.2 +/- 0.14 degrees C. Hyperthermia potentiates the effect of the antitumour antibiotic bleomycetin which, unlike bleomycin, does not manifest a threshold effect of interaction with the hyperthermia. Temperatures of the order of 40 degrees C are found to result in sensitization of the relatively resistant cells of the Lewis lung carcinoma to the antitumour effect of vincristine. Hyperthermia did not affect the activity of methotrexate. The analysis of the data obtained suggests that morphine-induced hyperthermia is a convenient model in mice for testing the behaviour of the cytostatic agents under conditions of increased temperature.

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 regulates reactive gliosis in retinal astrocytes and Müller glia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The focus of this study was to determine whether bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) trigger reactive gliosis in retinal astrocytes and/or Müller glial cells. Methods Retinal astrocytes and the Müller glial cell line MIO-M1 were treated with vehicle, BMP7, or BMP4. Samples from the treated cells were analyzed for changes in gliosis markers using reverse transcriptase – quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and western blotting. To determine potential similarities and differences in gliosis states...

  1. Morphine-induced anxiolytic-like effect in morphine-sensitized mice: involvement of ventral hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezayof, Ameneh; Assadpour, Sara; Alijanpour, Sakineh

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of repeated intra-ventral hippocampal (intra-VH) microinjections of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist or antagonist on morphine-induced anxiolytic-like behavior were investigated in morphine-sensitized mice using elevated plus-maze. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of different doses of morphine (5, 7.5 and 10mg/kg) increased the percentage of open arm time (%OAT), open arm entries (%OAE), but not locomotor activity, indicating an anxiolytic-like response to morphine. The maximum response was obtained by 7.5mg/kg of the opioid. The anxiety-like behavior which was induced by a lower dose of morphine (5mg/kg) was significantly increased in mice that had previously received once daily injections of morphine (10 and 20mg/kg, i.p.) for 3 days. It should be considered that this treatment also increased locomotor activity in morphine-sensitized mice. Furthermore, the response to an ineffective dose of morphine (5mg/kg, i.p.) in the EPM was significantly increased in the animals that had previously received nicotine for 3 days (0.1, 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 μg/mouse; intra-VH), 5 min prior to the injections of morphine (5mg/kg/day × 3 days; i.p.). On the other hand, the increase of morphine-induced anxiolytic-like effect in animals that had previously received the 3-day morphine (20mg/kg) was dose dependently suppressed by once daily injections of mecamylamine (0.5, 1 and 2 μg/mouse/day × 3 days; intra-VH). It is important to note that repeated intra-VH administrations of the same doses of nicotine or mecamylamine alone caused no significant change in morphine (5mg/kg)-induced anxiety-like parameters in the EPM. In conclusion, it seems that morphine sensitization affects the anxiety-like behavior in the EPM and the cholinergic system in the ventral hippocampus, via nicotinic receptors, may play an important role in this effect.

  2. Anti-apoptotic effect of morphine-induced delayed preconditioning on pulmonary artery endothelial cells with anoxia/reoxygenation injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Weng-ang; ZHOU Hua-cheng; CUI Xiao-guang; LI Wen-zhi; GUO Yue-ping; ZHANG Bing; LIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    Background Opioid preconditioning (PC) reduces anoxiaJreoxygenation (NR) injury to various cells. However, it remains unclear whether opioid-induced delayed PC would show anti-apoptotic effects on pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) suffering from A/R injury. The present study was conducted to elucidate this issue and to investigate the potential mechanism of opioid-induced delayed PC.Methods Cultured porcine PAECs underwent 16-hour anoxia followed by 1-hour reoxygenation 24 hours after pretreatment with saline (NaCI; 0.9%) or morphine (1 μmol/L). To determine the underlying mechanism, a non-selective KATP channel inhibitor glibenclamide (Glib; 10 μmol/L), a nitric oxide (NO) synthase blocker NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 μmol/L), and an opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (Nal; 10 pmol/L) were given 30 minutes before the A/R load. The percentage of apoptotic cells was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, eNOS mRNA level was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). NO content of PAECs supernatants was measured with the Griess reagent.Results Compared to the A/R PAECs, morphine-induced delayed PC significantly reduced PAECs apoptosis ((18.1±1.9)% vs (5.5±0.3)%; P <0.05), increased NO release ((11.4±1.3) μmol/L vs (20.5±2.1) μmol/L, P <0.05), and up-regulated eNOS gene expression nearly 9 times (P<0.05). The anti-apoptosis effect of morphine was abolished by pretreatment with Glib, L-NAME and Nal, but the three agent-selves did not aggravate the A/R injury. Furthermore, L-NAME and Nal offset the enhanced release of NO caused by pretreatment with morphine.Conclusions Morphine-induced delayed PC prevents A/R injury of PAECs. This effect may be mediated by activation of KATP channel via opioid receptor and NO signaling pathways.

  3. Changes of CREB in rat hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens during three phases of morphine induced conditioned place preference in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Lian-fang; ZHU Yong-ping

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes in CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) in hippocampus, PFC(prefrontal cortex) and NAc (nucleus accumbens) during three phases of morphine induced CPP (conditioned place preference) in rats, and to elucidate the role of CREB during the progress of conditioned place preference. Methods: Morphine induced CPP acquisition, extinction and drug primed reinstatement model was established, and CREB expression in each brain area was measured by Western Blot methods. Results: Eight alternating injections of morphine (10 mg/kg) induced CPP, and 8 d saline extinction training that extinguished CPP. CPP was reinstated following a priming injection of morphine (2.5 mg/kg). During the phases of CPP acquisition and reinstatement, the level of CREB expression was significantly changed in different brain areas.Conclusion: It was proved that CPP model can be used as an effective tool to investigate the mechanisms underlying drug-induced reinstatement of drug seeking after extinction, and that morphine induced CPP and drug primed reinstatement may involve activation of the transcription factor CREB in several brain areas, suggesting that the CREB and its target gene regulation pathway may mediate the basic mechanism underlying opioid dependence and its drug seeking behavior.

  4. Effects of the fruit essential oil of Cuminum cyminum L. on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Ali; Haghparast, Abbas; Shams, Jamal; Dianati, Elham; Komaki, Alireza; Kamalinejad, Mohammad

    2008-12-19

    Rewarding properties of opioids are now accepted and widely discussed. These properties can lead to long-term usage of these substances. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Cuminum cyminum fruit essential oil (FEO) on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in mice. CPP was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of morphine (5mg/kg) in 3 days conditioning schedule. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of Cumin FEO (0.001%, 0.01%, 0.1%, 0.5%, 1% and 2%; 5 ml/kg) or Tween-80 (0.5%; 5 ml/kg) did not show any conditioning effects. Administration of Cumin FEO (0.001-2%; 5 ml/kg; i.p.), 60 min before test on day 5 (expression) decreased the conditioning scores at the doses of 1% and 2% while i.p. injection of Cumin FEO (0.001-2%; 5 ml/kg), 60 min before morphine injection (5mg/kg; s.c.) during 3 days of conditioning session (acquisition) significantly resulted in decrement of rewarding properties of morphine at the doses of 0.1%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% in dose-dependent manner. Tween-80 as a vehicle did not suppress the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced CPP. The results showed that the C. cyminum fruit essential oil reduces the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

  5. Combined action of MK-801 and ceftriaxone impairs the acquisition and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference,and delays morphine extinction in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaodong Fan; Haichen Niu; Joshua D.Rizak; Ling Li; Guimei Wang; Liqi Xu; He Ren; Hao Lei; Hualin Yu

    2012-01-01

    Objective It is well established that glutamate and its receptors,particularly the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR),play a significant role in addiction and that the inhibition of glutamatergic hyperfunction reduces addictive behaviors in experimental animals.Specifically,NMDAR antagonists such as MK-801,and an inducer of the expression of glutamate transporter subtype-1 (GLT-1) (cefiriaxone) are known to inhibit addictive behavior.The purpose of this study was to determine whether the combined action of a low dose of MK-801 and a low dose of ceftriaxone provides better inhibition of the acquisition,extinction,and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) than either compound alone.Methods A morphine-paired CPP experiment was used to study the effects of low doses of MK-801,ceftriaxone and a combination of both on reward-related memory (acquisition,extinction,and reinstatement of morphine preference) in rats.Results A low dose of neither MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg,i.p.) nor ceftriaxone (25 mg/kg,i.p.) alone effectively impaired CPP behaviors.However,when applied in combination,they reduced the acquisition of morphine-induced CPP and completely prevented morphine reinstatement.Their combination also notably impaired the extinction of morphine-induced CPP.Conclusion The combined action of a low dose of an NMDAR antagonist (MK-801)and GLT-1 activation by ceftriaxone effectively changed different phases of CPP behavior.

  6. Inhibition of Spinal Oxidative Stress by Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction Attenuates the Development of Morphine Induced Tolerance and Hyperalgesia in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Lauro

    Full Text Available Citrus Bergamia Risso, commonly known as Bergamot, is a fruit whose Essential Oil and Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction have numerous medicinal properties. It is also an excellent antioxidant and in this study, for the first time, its potential effect on morphine induced tolerance in mice has been investigated. Our studies revealed that development of antinociceptive tolerance to repeated doses of morphine in mice is consistently associated with increased formation of superoxide, malondialdehyde and tyrosine-nitrated proteins in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord such as the enzyme glutamine synthase. Nitration of this protein is intimately linked to inactivation of its biological function and resulting increase of glutamate levels in the spinal cord. Administration of Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction (5-50 mg/kg attenuated tolerance development. This effect was accompanied by reduction of superoxide and malondialdehyde production, prevention of GS nitration, re-establishment of its activity and of glutamate levels. Our studies confirmed the main role of free radicals during the cascade of events induced by prolonged morphine treatment and the co-administration of natural derivatives antioxidant such as Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction can be an important therapeutic approach to restore opioids analgesic efficacy.

  7. Inhibition of Spinal Oxidative Stress by Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction Attenuates the Development of Morphine Induced Tolerance and Hyperalgesia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, Filomena; Giancotti, Luigino Antonio; Ilari, Sara; Dagostino, Concetta; Gliozzi, Micaela; Morabito, Chiara; Malafoglia, Valentina; Raffaeli, William; Muraca, Maurizio; Goffredo, Bianca M; Mollace, Vincenzo; Muscoli, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Citrus Bergamia Risso, commonly known as Bergamot, is a fruit whose Essential Oil and Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction have numerous medicinal properties. It is also an excellent antioxidant and in this study, for the first time, its potential effect on morphine induced tolerance in mice has been investigated. Our studies revealed that development of antinociceptive tolerance to repeated doses of morphine in mice is consistently associated with increased formation of superoxide, malondialdehyde and tyrosine-nitrated proteins in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord such as the enzyme glutamine synthase. Nitration of this protein is intimately linked to inactivation of its biological function and resulting increase of glutamate levels in the spinal cord. Administration of Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction (5-50 mg/kg) attenuated tolerance development. This effect was accompanied by reduction of superoxide and malondialdehyde production, prevention of GS nitration, re-establishment of its activity and of glutamate levels. Our studies confirmed the main role of free radicals during the cascade of events induced by prolonged morphine treatment and the co-administration of natural derivatives antioxidant such as Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction can be an important therapeutic approach to restore opioids analgesic efficacy.

  8. Morphine induces bacterial translocation in mice by compromising intestinal barrier function in a TLR-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Meng

    Full Text Available Opiates are among the most prescribed drugs for pain management. However, morphine use or abuse results in significant gut bacterial translocation and predisposes patients to serious infections with gut origin. The mechanism underlying this defect is still unknown. In this report, we investigated the mechanisms underlying compromised gut immune function and bacterial translocation following morphine treatment. We demonstrate significant bacterial translocation to mesenteric lymph node (MLN and liver following morphine treatment in wild-type (WT animals that was dramatically and significantly attenuated in Toll-like receptor (TLR2 and 4 knockout mice. We further observed significant disruption of tight junction protein organization only in the ileum but not in the colon of morphine treated WT animals. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK blocked the effects of both morphine and TLR ligands, suggesting the role of MLCK in tight junction modulation by TLR. This study conclusively demonstrates that morphine induced gut epithelial barrier dysfunction and subsequent bacteria translocation are mediated by TLR signaling and thus TLRs can be exploited as potential therapeutic targets for alleviating infections and even sepsis in morphine-using or abusing populations.

  9. Toll-like Receptor 4 Mediates Morphine-Induced Neuroinflammation and Tolerance via Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidson, Lori N; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Young, Larry J; Tansey, Malu G; Murphy, Anne Z

    2017-02-01

    Opioid tolerance and the potential for addiction is a significant burden associated with pain management, yet its precise underlying mechanism and prevention remain elusive. Immune signaling contributes to the decreased efficacy of opioids, and we recently demonstrated that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated neuroinflammation in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) drives tolerance. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a product of TLR4 signaling, promotes inflammation and facilitates glutamatergic signaling, key components of opioid tolerance. Therefore, we hypothesize that TLR4-mediated opioid tolerance requires TNF signaling. By expression of a dominant-negative TNF peptide via lentiviral vector injection in rat PAG to sequester soluble TNF (solTNF), we demonstrate that solTNF mediates morphine tolerance induced by TLR4 signaling, stimulates neuroinflammation (increased IL-1β and TLR4 mRNA), and disrupts glutamate reuptake (decreased GLT-1 and GLAST mRNA). We further demonstrate the efficacy of the brain-permeant PEGylated version of the anti-solTNF peptide, XPro1595, injected systemically, to normalize morphine-induced CNS neuroinflammation and morphine- and endotoxin-induced changes in glutamate transport, effectively preserving the efficacy of morphine analgesia and eliminating tolerance. Our findings provide a novel pharmacological target for the prevention of opioid-induced immune signaling, tolerance, and addiction.

  10. Thalidomide Promotes Morphine Efficacy and Prevents Morphine-Induced Tolerance in Rats with Diabetic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhui; Wang, Hong; Song, Tieying; Yang, Yunliang; Gu, Kunfeng; Ma, Pengyu; Zhang, Zaiwang; Shen, Limin; Liu, Jiabao; Wang, Wenli

    2016-12-01

    Opioid analgesics have less efficacy in diabetic neuropathy treatment, and tolerance often occurs after chronic usage. Given that thalidomide can potentiate the morphine efficacy in diabetic neuropathy treatment, we investigated the effects of intrathecal administrations of thalidomide on morphine tolerance during the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. We found that intrathecal administrations of thalidomide (25 mg/kg/ml) potentiated the analgesic effects of morphine on mechanical hyperalgesia and prevented the development of morphine tolerance. While this treatment regimen did not alter the protein levels of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) in the spinal cord of diabetic rats, chronic morphine treatment robustly increased MOR binding density in the synaptic plasma membranes fraction, but decreased it in the microsomal fraction. Furthermore, thalidomide was able to reverse the distribution of MOR altered by chronic morphine treatment. Finally, STZ-induced diabetes promoted PKC activation and enhanced TNFα level in the spinal cord, which were attenuated by intrathecal administrations of thalidomide. Taken together, these results suggested that thalidomide may potentiate morphine efficacy on diabetic neuropathy and prevent the development of morphine tolerance by suppressing PKC activation and TNFα level in the spinal cord.

  11. Neuroplastic alteration of TTX-resistant sodium channel with visceral pain and morphine-induced hyperalgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jinghong Chen,1,2,4 Ze-hui Gong,4 Hao Yan,2 Zhijun Qiao,3 Bo-yi Qin41Department of Internal Medicine, Neuroscience Program, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA; 2The Divisions of Pharmacy, Pharmacology core lab, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX, USA; 4Beijing Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Beijing, China Abstract: The discovery of the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R Na+ channel in nociceptive neurons has provided a special target for analgesic intervention. In a previous study we found that both morphine tolerance and persistent visceral inflammation resulted in visceral hyperalgesia. It has also been suggested that hyperexcitability of sensory neurons due to altered TTX-R Na+ channel properties and expression contributes to hyperalgesia; however, we do not know if some TTX-R Na+ channel property changes can be triggered by visceral hyperalgesia and morphine tolerance, or whether there are similar molecular or channel mechanisms in both situations. To evaluate the effects of morphine tolerance and visceral inflammation on the channel, we investigated the dorsal root ganglia (DRG neuronal change following these chronic treatments. Using whole-cell patch clamp recording, we recorded TTX-R Na+ currents in isolated adult rat lumbar and sacral (L6-S2 DRG neurons from normal and pathologic rats with colon inflammatory pain or chronic morphine treatment. We found that the amplitudes of TTX-R Na+ currents were signiflcantly increased in small-diameter DRG neurons with either morphine tolerance or visceral inflammatory pain. Meanwhile, the result also showed that those treatments altered the kinetics properties of the electrical current (ie, the activating and inactivating speed of the channel was accelerated. Our current results suggested that in both models, visceral chronic inflammatory pain and morphine tolerance causes electrophysiological changes in voltage

  12. Role of hippocampal and prefrontal cortical signaling pathways in dextromethorphan effect on morphine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2016-02-01

    Evidence suggests that dextromethorphan (DM), an NMDA receptor antagonist, induces memory impairment. Considering that DM is widely used in cough-treating medications, and the co-abuse of DM with morphine has recently been reported, the aims of the present study was (1) to investigate whether there is a functional interaction between morphine and DM in passive avoidance learning and (2) to assess the possible role of the hippocampal and prefrontal cortical (PFC) signaling pathways in the effects of the drugs on memory formation. Our findings indicated that post-training or pre-test administration of morphine (2 and 6 mg/kg) or DM (10-30 mg/kg) impaired memory consolidation and retrieval which was associated with the attenuation of the levels of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (p-CAMKII) and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the targeted sites. Moreover, the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of morphine was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of morphine or DM (30 mg/kg), indicating state-dependent learning (SDL) and a cross-SDL between the drugs. It is important to note that the levels of p-CAMKII/CAMKII and p-CREB/CREB in the hippocampus and the PFC increased in drugs-induced SDL. In addition, DM administration potentiated morphine-induced SDL which was related to the enhanced levels of hippocampal and PFC CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways. It can be concluded that there is a relationship between the hippocampus and the PFC in the effect of DM and/or morphine on memory retrieval. Moreover, a cross SDL can be induced between the co-administration of DM and morphine. Interestingly, CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways also mediate the drugs-induced SDL.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C; Osborne, Andrew; Martin, Keith R

    2015-10-01

    A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long-term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft-induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM-MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis-mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin-2 (Lcn-2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft-induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM-MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM-MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell-induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation-based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve.

  14. NMDA receptors of dorsal hippocampus are involved in the acquisition, but not in the expression of morphine-induced place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Lashgari, Reza; Rezayof, Ameneh; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Nazari-Serenjeh, Farzaneh

    2007-07-30

    In the present study, involvement of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors of the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) in the acquisition or expression of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in rats was studied. Male Wistar rats were used in these experiments. NMDA-receptor agonist (NMDA) and antagonist (MK-801) were injected into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) and morphine was injected subcutaneously. An unbiased conditioned place preference paradigm was used to study the effect of these agents. In the first set of experiments, the drugs were used during the development of conditioned place preference by morphine or they were used alone in order to see if they induce conditioned place preference or conditioned place aversion. Our data showed that subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of morphine sulphate (2.5-10 mg/kg) induced conditioned place preference in rat. NMDA (0.1-1 microg/rat) or MK-801 (1-4 microg/rat) did not induce conditioned place preference or conditioned place aversion. Intra-CA1 administration of different doses of NMDA (0.1-1 microg/rat) increased, while MK-801 (1-4 microg/rat) decreased morphine-induced place preference. MK-801 reversed the effect of NMDA on morphine response. In the second set of experiments, when the drugs were used before testing on Day 5, in order to test their effects on the expression of morphine (7.5 mg/kg)-induced place preference, intra-CA1 administration of NMDA or MK-801 did not alter the morphine response. None of the drugs influenced locomotion. It is concluded that NMDA receptor of the CA1 region of hippocampus are involved in the acquisition but not expression of morphine-induced place preference.

  15. Rapid reversal by naloxone of the chronic effects of morphine on rat liver and brain tryptophan metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Badawy, A. A.; Evans, M.

    1981-01-01

    The chronic morphine-induced inhibition of rat liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity and the resultant increases in tryptophan availability to the brain and brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) synthesis are reversed within 10 min after naloxone administration. The possible involvement of hepatic tryptophan metabolism in morphine dependence is briefly discussed.

  16. Dopamine D₄ receptor counteracts morphine-induced changes in µ opioid receptor signaling in the striosomes of the rat caudate putamen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Boomgaard, Diana; Gago, Belén; Valderrama-Carvajal, Alejandra; Roales-Buján, Ruth; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Duchou, Jolien; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Medina-Luque, José; de la Calle, Adelaida; Fuxe, Kjell; Rivera, Alicia

    2014-01-21

    The mu opioid receptor (MOR) is critical in mediating morphine analgesia. However, prolonged exposure to morphine induces adaptive changes in this receptor leading to the development of tolerance and addiction. In the present work we have studied whether the continuous administration of morphine induces changes in MOR protein levels, its pharmacological profile, and MOR-mediated G-protein activation in the striosomal compartment of the rat CPu, by using immunohistochemistry and receptor and DAMGO-stimulated [35S]GTPγS autoradiography. MOR immunoreactivity, agonist binding density and its coupling to G proteins are up-regulated in the striosomes by continuous morphine treatment in the absence of changes in enkephalin and dynorphin mRNA levels. In addition, co-treatment of morphine with the dopamine D4 receptor (D4R) agonist PD168,077 fully counteracts these adaptive changes in MOR, in spite of the fact that continuous PD168,077 treatment increases the [3H]DAMGO Bmax values to the same degree as seen after continuous morphine treatment. Thus, in spite of the fact that both receptors can be coupled to Gi/0 protein, the present results give support for the existence of antagonistic functional D4R-MOR receptor-receptor interactions in the adaptive changes occurring in MOR of striosomes on continuous administration of morphine.

  17. Involvement of AMPA/Kainate Glutamate Receptor in the Extinction and Reinstatement of Morphine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference: A Behavioral and Molecular Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahposht-Khachaki, Ali; Fatahi, Zahra; Yans, Asal; Khodagholi, Fariba; Haghparast, Abbas

    2017-03-01

    Glutamate receptors in mesolimbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, ventral tegmental area, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus (HIP) are a component of the mechanisms of drug-induced reward and can modulate the firing pattern of dopaminergic neurons in the reward system. In addition, several lines of study have indicated that cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-fos have important role in morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by drugs of abuse, such as morphine, cocaine, nicotine, and alcohol. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the changes in phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) and c-fos induction within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), HIP, and PFC after intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of different doses of CNQX or vehicle during extinction period or reinstatement of morphine-induced CPP. In all groups, the CPP procedure was done; afterward, the conditioning scores were recorded by Ethovision software. After behavioral test recording, we dissected out the NAc, HIP, and PFC regions and measured the p-CREB/CREB ratio and c-fos level by Western blot analysis. Our results showed that administration of CNQX significantly shortened the extinction of morphine CPP. Besides, ICV microinjection of CNQX following extinction period decreased the reinstatement of morphine CPP in extinguished rats. In molecular section, in treatment group, all mentioned factors were dose-dependently decreased in comparison with vehicle group (DMSO) after ICV microinjection of different doses of CNQX but not in pre-extinction microinjection. These findings suggested that antagonism of AMPA receptor decreased p-CREB/CREB ratio and c-fos level in the PFC, NAc, and HIP. Modulation of the drug memory reconsolidation may be useful for faster extinction of drug-induced reward and attenuation of drug-seeking behavior.

  18. Withaferin A Targets Intermediate Filaments Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Vimentin in a Model of Retinal Gliosis*

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Gliosis is a biological process that occurs during injury repair in the central nervous system and is characterized by the overexpression of the intermediate filaments (IFs) glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin. A common thread in many retinal diseases is reactive Müller cell gliosis, an untreatable condition that leads to tissue scarring and even blindness. Here, we demonstrate that the vimentin-targeting small molecule withaferin A (WFA) is a novel chemical probe of GFAP. Usi...

  19. Ser⁄ Thr residues at α3⁄β5 loop of Gαs are important in morphine-induced adenylyl cyclase sensitization but not mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedabadi, Mohammad; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Albert, Paul R.; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Rahimian, Reza; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Ghahremani, Mohammad H.

    2015-01-01

    The signaling switch of β2-adrenergic and μ1-opioid receptors from stimulatory G-protein (Gαs) to inhibitory G-protein (Gαi) (and vice versa) influences adenylyl cyclase (AC) and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1 ⁄ 2 activation. Post-translational modifications, including dephosphorylation of Gαs, enhance opioid receptor coupling to Gαs. In the present study, we substituted the Ser ⁄ Thr residues of Gαs at the α3 ⁄ β5 and α4 ⁄ β6 loops aiming to study the role of Gαs lacking Ser ⁄ Thr phosphorylation with respect to AC sensitization and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Isoproterenol increased the cAMP concentration (EC50 = 22.8 ± 3.4 μM) in Gαs-transfected S49 cyc– cells but not in nontransfected cells. However, there was no significant difference between the Gαs-wild-type (wt) and mutants. Morphine (10 μM) inhibited AC activity more efficiently in cyc– compared to Gαs-wt introduced cells (P < 0.05); however, we did not find a notable difference between Gαs-wt and mutants. Interestingly, Gαs-wt transfected cells showed more sensitization with respect to AC after chronic morphine compared to nontransfected cells (101 ± 12% versus 34 ± 6%; P < 0.001); μ1-opioid receptor interacted with Gαs, and both co-immunoprecipitated after chronic morphine exposure. Furthermore, mutation of T270A and S272A (P < 0.01), as well as T270A, S272A and S261A (P < 0.05), in α3 ⁄ β5, resulted in a higher level of AC supersensitization. ERK1⁄ 2 phosphorylation was rapidly induced by isoproterenol (by 9.5 ± 2.4-fold) and morphine (22 ± 2.2-fold) in Gαs-transfected cells; mutations of α3 ⁄ β5 and α4 ⁄ β6 did not affect the pattern or extent of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. The findings of the present study show that Gαs interacts with the μ1-opioid receptor, and the Ser ⁄ Thr mutation to Ala at the α3 ⁄ β5 loop of Gαs enhances morphine-induced AC sensitization. In addition, Gαs was required for

  20. The role of nitric oxide in the effects of cumin (Cuminum Cyminum L.) fruit essential oil on the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in adult male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, Mojtaba; Azizi, Pegah; Haghparast, Abbas

    2012-01-12

    OBJECTIVE: Nitric oxide is a neural messenger molecule in the central nervous system that is generated from L-arginine via the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and is involved in many important oplold-induced effects. In Iranian ancient medicine, Cuminum cyminum L (green seed) has been used for the treatment of some diseases. In the present study, the effect of intraperitoneal (ip) administration of different doses of cumin fruit essential oil (FEO) on the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (GPP) in L-arginine-treated mice was investigated. METHODS: A total of 213 adult male albino Wistar mice were used in these experiments. The CPP paradigm was carried out in 5 continuous days, pre-conditioning, conditioning and post-conditioning. Animals were randomly assigned to one of the two groups for place conditioning. CPP was induced by subcutaneous (sc) injection of morphine (5 mg/kg) in 3 days conditioning schedule. On the test day, conditioning scores and locomotor activity were recorded by Ethovision software. RESULTS: Sole administration of different doses of cumin FEO (0.01%, 0.1%, 0.5%, 1% and 2%; lp) or L-arginine (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg; lp) during the CPP protocol could not induce CPP. Nonetheless, morphine-induced CPP was decreased by different doses of cumin FEO (0.01%-2%), whereas it was increased by L-arginine (50-200 mg/kg) when they were injected before morphine (5 rug/kg) during a 3-day conditioning phase (acquisition period). Additionally, cumin FEO could interestingly attenuate the raising effect of L-arginine on morphine-induced CPP in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that some components of the Cuminum cyminum L. seed attenuate the excessive effect of L-arginine on morphine-induced CPP through the NOS inhibitory mechanism. It seems that cumin FEO possibly acts as a NOS inhibitor.

  1. A robust model for simultaneously inducing corneal neovascularization and retinal gliosis in the mouse eye

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop an animal model for simultaneously eliciting corneal angiogenesis and retinal gliosis that will enable the assessment of inhibitor efficacy on these two pathological processes in separate anatomic sites of the ocular globe. Methods Four to six week-old mice in a C57BL/6J background were anesthetized and 0.15 N NaOH was applied to the cornea, followed by mechanical scraping of the epithelium from limbus and central cornea. After this injury, mice were treated with vehicle or...

  2. Ontogenetic studies of tolerance development: effects of chronic morphine on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, P J; Kuhn, C M

    1995-11-01

    Endogenous opiates are important regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in rats. Tolerance clearly develops to morphine-induced stimulation of the HPA axis in adult rats (Ignar and Kuhn 1990). The goal of the present study was to determine whether tolerance to morphine-induced stimulation of the HPA axis developed in neonatal and weanling rats treated chronically with morphine. Rats were injected with morphine or saline between days 4-8 postnatal (pups) or days 21-25 (weanlings) and tolerance assessed by determining dose-response curves for ACTH and corticosterone secretion following an acute morphine challenge. Weanlings displayed marked tolerance to the stimulation of ACTH and corticosterone secretion by morphine. Tolerance was also observed in pups to morphine-stimulated ACTH and corticosterone release. These findings suggest that the relative adaptability of the HPA axis to chronic morphine in neonatal and weanling rats is similar.

  3. Gliosis after traumatic brain injury in conditional ephrinB2-knockout mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ling; CHEN Xiao-lin; YANG Jian-kai; REN Ze-guang; WANG Shuo

    2012-01-01

    Background In response to the injury of the central nervous system (CNS),the astrocytes upregulate the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP),which largely contributes to the reactive gliosis after brain injury.The regulatory mechanism of this process is still not clear.In this study,we aimed to compare the ephrin-B2 deficient mice with the wild type ones with regard to gliosis after traumatic brain injury.Methods We generated ephrin-B2 knockout mice specifically in CNS astrocytes.Twelve mice from this gene-knockout strain were randomly selected along with twelve mice from the wild type littermates.In both groups,a modified controlled cortical impact injury model was applied to create a closed traumatic brain injury.Twenty-eight days after the injury,Nissl staining and GFAP immunofluorescence staining were used to compare the brain atrophy and GFAP immunoreactivity between the two groups.All the data were analyzed by t-test for between-group comparison.Results We successfully set up the conditional ephrin-B2 knockout mice strain,which was confirmed by genotyping and ephrin-B2/GFAP double staining.These mice developed normally without apparent abnormality in general appearance.Twenty-eight days following brain injury,histopathology revealed by immunohistochemistry showed different degrees of cerebral injuries in both groups.Compared with wild-type group,the ephrin-B2 knockout group exhibited less brain atrophy ratio for the injured hemispheres (P=0.005) and hippocampus (P=0.027).Also the wild-type group demonstrated greater GFAP immunoreactivity increment within hippocampal regions (P=0.008).Conclusions The establishment of conditional ephrin-B2 knockout mice provides us with a new way to explore the role of ephrin-B2 in astrocytes.Our findings revealed less atrophy and GFAP immunoreactivity in the knockout mice strain after traumatic brain injury,which implied ephrin-B2 could be one of the promoters to upregulate gliosis following brain injury.

  4. Gabapentin administration reduces reactive gliosis and neurodegeneration after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Raquel Rossi

    Full Text Available The lithium-pilocarpine model of epilepsy reproduces in rodents several features of human temporal lobe epilepsy, by inducing an acute status epilepticus (SE followed by a latency period. It has been proposed that the neuronal network reorganization that occurs during latency determines the subsequent appearance of spontaneous recurrent seizures. The aim of this study was to evaluate neuronal and glial responses during the latency period that follows SE. Given the potential role of astrocytes in the post-SE network reorganization, through the secretion of synaptogenic molecules such as thrombospondins, we also studied the effect of treatment with the α2δ1 thrombospondin receptor antagonist gabapentin. Adult male Wistar rats received 3 mEq/kg LiCl, and 20 h later 30 mg/kg pilocarpine. Once SE was achieved, seizures were stopped with 20 mg/kg diazepam. Animals then received 400 mg/kg/day gabapentin or saline for either 4 or 14 days. In vitro experiments were performed in dissociated mixed hippocampal cell culture exposed to glutamate, and subsequently treated with gabapentin or vehicle. During the latency period, the hippocampus and pyriform cortex of SE-animals presented a profuse reactive astrogliosis, with increased GFAP and nestin expression. Gliosis intensity was dependent on the Racine stage attained by the animals and peaked 15 days after SE. Microglia was also reactive after SE, and followed the same pattern. Neuronal degeneration was present in SE-animals, and also depended on the Racine stage and the SE duration. Polysialic-acid NCAM (PSA-NCAM expression was increased in hippocampal CA-1 and dentate gyrus of SE-animals. Gabapentin treatment was able to reduce reactive gliosis, decrease neuronal loss and normalize PSA-NCAM staining in hippocampal CA-1. In vitro, gabapentin treatment partially prevented the dendritic loss and reactive gliosis caused by glutamate excitotoxicity. Our results show that gabapentin treatment during the

  5. Morphine-induced apoptosis in the ventral tegmental area and hippocampus after the development but not extinction of reward-related behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Yasaman; Alamdary, Shabnam Zeighamy; Katebi, Seyedeh-Najmeh; Khodagholi, Fariba; Haghparast, Abbas

    2014-03-01

    Some data suggest that morphine induces apoptosis in neurons, while other evidences show that morphine could have protective effects against cell death. In this study, we suggested that there is a parallel role of morphine in reward circuitry and apoptosis processing. Therefore, we investigated the effect of morphine on modifications of apoptotic factors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and hippocampus (HPC) which are involved in the reward circuitry after the acquisition and extinction periods of conditioned place preference (CPP). In behavioral experiments, different doses of morphine (0.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg) and saline were examined in the CPP paradigm. Conditioning score and locomotor activity were recorded by Ethovision software after acquisition on the post-conditioning day, and days 4 and 8 of extinction periods. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms in each group, we then dissected the brains and measured the expression of apoptotic factors in the VTA and HPC by western blotting analysis. All of the morphine-treated groups showed an increase of apoptotic factors in these regions during acquisition but not in extinction period. In the HPC, morphine significantly increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, caspases-3, and PARP by the lowest dose (0.5 mg/kg), but, in the VTA, a considerable increase was seen in the dose of 5 mg/kg; promotion of apoptotic factors in the HPC and VTA insinuates that morphine can affect the molecular mechanisms that interfere with apoptosis through different receptors. Our findings suggest that a specific opioid receptor involves in modification of apoptotic factors expression in these areas. It seems that the reduction of cell death in response to high dose of morphine in the VTA and HPC may be due to activation of low affinity opioid receptors which are involved in neuroprotective features of morphine.

  6. Involvement of GABA(B) receptors of the dorsal hippocampus on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced place preference in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Massoudi, Roohollah; Sepehri, Houri; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2006-01-30

    In the present study, effects of intra-hippocampal CA1 (intra-CA1) injections of GABA(B) receptor agonist and antagonist on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced place preference in male Wistar rats have been investigated. Subcutaneous administration of different doses of morphine sulphate (0.5-6 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent conditioned place preference (CPP). Using a 3-day schedule of conditioning, it was found that the GABA(B) receptor agonist, baclofen (0.5-2 microg/rat; intra-CA1), or the GABA(B) receptor antagonist, phaclofen (1-3 microg/rat; intra-CA1), did not produce a significant place preference or place aversion. Intra-CA1 administration of baclofen (1 and 2 microg/rat; intra-CA1) decreased the acquisition of CPP induced by morphine (3 mg/kg; s.c.). On the other hand, intra-CA1 injection of phaclofen (1 and 2 microg/rat; intra-CA1) in combination with a lower dose of morphine (1 mg/kg) elicited a significant CPP. The response of baclofen (2 microg/rat; intra-CA1) was reversed by phaclofen (4 and 6 microg/rat; intra-CA1). Furthermore, intra-CA1 administration of baclofen but not phaclofen before testing significantly decreased the expression of morphine (3 mg/kg; s.c.)-induced place preference. Baclofen or phaclofen injections had no effects on locomotor activity on the testing sessions. It is concluded that the GABA(B) receptors in dorsal hippocampus may play an active role in morphine reward.

  7. S100B Inhibitor Pentamidine Attenuates Reactive Gliosis and Reduces Neuronal Loss in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Carla; Capoccia, Elena; Iuvone, Teresa; Cuomo, Rosario; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Steardo, Luca; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Among the different signaling molecules released during reactive gliosis occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the astrocyte-derived S100B protein plays a key role in neuroinflammation, one of the hallmarks of the disease. The use of pharmacological tools targeting S100B may be crucial to embank its effects and some of the pathological features of AD. The antiprotozoal drug pentamidine is a good candidate since it directly blocks S100B activity by inhibiting its interaction with the tumor suppressor p53. We used a mouse model of amyloid beta- (Aβ-) induced AD, which is characterized by reactive gliosis and neuroinflammation in the brain, and we evaluated the effect of pentamidine on the main S100B-mediated events. Pentamidine caused the reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein, S100B, and RAGE protein expression, which are signs of reactive gliosis, and induced p53 expression in astrocytes. Pentamidine also reduced the expression of proinflammatory mediators and markers, thus reducing neuroinflammation in AD brain. In parallel, we observed a significant neuroprotection exerted by pentamidine on CA1 pyramidal neurons. We demonstrated that pentamidine inhibits Aβ-induced gliosis and neuroinflammation in an animal model of AD, thus playing a role in slowing down the course of the disease.

  8. Farnesol quells oxidative stress, reactive gliosis and inflammation during acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity: Behavioral and biochemical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanasabapathy, R; Vasudevan, S; Anupriya, K; Pabitha, R; Sudhandiran, G

    2015-11-12

    Acrylamide (ACR) is an industrial pollutant, to which humans are exposed through chemicals associated with day to day human life and contributes to neurological disorders. The role of reactive gliosis upon toxic insults remains paradoxical, and the immunomodulatory events during ACR intoxication remain obscure. In view of this, the present study investigated ACR-induced (20mg/kgb.wt for 4weeks) neurodegeneration in the context of oxidative stress and associated inflammatory events and the ability of farnesol, a sesquiterpene, to mitigate reactive gliosis in the brain of Swiss albino mice. Farnesol supplementation (100mg/kgb.wt.) showed a marked improvement in gait performance, neuromuscular function and fine motor coordination and attenuated ACR-induced diminution in glutathione (GSH) with parallel reduction in lipid peroxidation (LPO), protein carbonyls, hydroxide, hydroperoxide and nitrite levels. Farnesol treatment significantly ameliorated ACR-mediated histological aberrations and reactive gliosis by downregulating Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Ionizsed calcium-binding adapter molecule-1 ​(Iba-1) in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Further, ACR stimulated increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were considerably decreased by farnesol. In conclusion, our findings indicate that farnesol exerts neuroprotective efficacy during ACR-induced neuropathology by suppressing reactive gliosis and associated inflammatory events.

  9. Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt-mammalian target of Rapamycin signaling pathway in the hippocampus is essential for the acquisition of morphine-induced place preference in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Zhang, X Q; Cui, Y; Xin, W J; Jing, J; Liu, X G

    2010-11-24

    Hippocampus is a critical structure for the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), which is a usual learning paradigm for assessing drug reward. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets, including Akt, mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) and 70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), are critical molecules implicated in learning and memory. Here, we tested the role of PI3K/Akt-mTOR-p70S6K signaling pathway in morphine-induced CPP in the hippocampus. Our results showed that the acquisition of morphine CPP increased phosphorylation of Akt in the hippocampal CA3, but not in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or the CA1. Moreover, the phosphorylated Akt exclusively expressed in the CA3 neurons. Likewise, levels of phosphorylated mTOR and p70S6K were significantly enhanced in the CA3 following morphine CPP. The alterations of these phosphorylated proteins are positively correlated with the acquisition of morphine CPP. More importantly, microinjection of PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) or mTOR inhibitor (Rapamycin) into the CA3 prevented the acquisition of CPP and inhibited the activation of PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. In addition, pre-infusion of β-FNA (β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride), a selective irreversible μ opioid receptor antagonist, into CA3 significantly prevented the acquisition of CPP and impaired Akt phosphorylation. All these results strongly implied that the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway activated by μ opioid receptor in hippocampal CA3 plays an important role in acquisition of morphine-induced CPP.

  10. Inhibition of the reinstatement of morphine-induced place preference in rats by high-frequency stimulation of the bilateral nucleus accumbens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yu; CHEN Ning; WANG Hui-min; Meng Fan-gang; ZHANG Jian-guo

    2013-01-01

    Background Opiate addiction remains intractable in a large percentage of patients,and relapse is the biggest hurdle to recovery.Many studies have identified a central role of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in addiction.Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has the advantages of being reversible,adjustable,and minimally invasive,and it has become a potential neurobiological intervention for addiction.The purpose of our study was to investigate whether high-frequency DBS in the NAc effectively attenuates the reinstatement of morphine seeking in morphine-primed rats.Methods A morphine-dependent group of rats was given increasing doses of morphine during conditioned place preference training.A control group of rats was given equal volumes of saline.After the establishment of this model,withdrawal syndromes were precipitated in these two groups by administering naloxone,and the differences in withdrawal symptoms between the groups were analyzed.Electrodes for DBS were implanted in the bilateral shell of the NAc in the experimental group.The rats were stimulated daily in the NAc for 5 hours per day over 30 days.Changes in the conditioned place preference test and withdrawal symptoms in the rats were investigated and place navigation studies were performed using the Morris water maze.The data were assessed statistically with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's tests for multiple post hoc comparisons.Results High-frequency stimulation of the bilateral NAc prevented the morphine-induced reinstatement of morphine seeking in the conditioned place preference test.The time spent in the white compartment by rats following 30 days of DBS ((268.25±25.07) seconds) was not significantly different compared with the time spent in the white compartment after relapse was induced by morphine administration ((303.29±34.22) seconds).High-frequency stimulation of the bilateral NAc accelerated the innate decay of drug craving in morphine-dependent rats without significantly

  11. Reducing endocannabinoid metabolism with the fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, fails to modify reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned floor preference and naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal-induced conditioned floor avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Amanda L; Limebeer, Cheryl L; Parker, Linda A

    2010-10-01

    The potential of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor, URB597, to modify drug prime-induced reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned floor preference or naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal-induced conditioned floor avoidance was evaluated. In Experiment 1, morphine-induced conditioned floor preference was established across 4 conditioning trials. Following extinction training (4 trials), rats were pretreated with URB597 or vehicle prior to a morphine prime or a saline prime. Morphine reinstated the previously extinguished floor preference, but URB597 did not modify the strength of the reinstated preference. In Experiment 2, naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal-induced conditioned floor avoidance was established across 2 conditioning trials. Following extinction training (14 trials), rats were pretreated with URB597 or vehicle prior to a saline prime or a morphine withdrawal prime. The morphine withdrawal prime reinstated the previously extinguished floor avoidance, but URB597 did not modify the strength of reinstated avoidance. These results suggest that under the conditions in which URB597 promotes extinction (e.g., Manwell et al. (2009)) it does not interfere with drug-induced reinstatement of either conditioned floor preference or avoidance. That is, although activation of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system promotes extinction of aversive learning, it may not prevent reinstatement of that aversion by re-exposure to the aversive treatment.

  12. The association atorvastatin-meloxicam reduces brain damage, attenuating reactive gliosis subsequent to arterial embolism = La asociación atorvastatina-meloxicam reduce el daño cerebral, atenuando la gliosis reactiva consecuente a embolismo arterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Hernández Torres

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The association atorvastatin-meloxicam reduces brain damage, attenuating reactive gliosis subsequent to arterial embolism Introduction: Stroke is the leading cause of disability and the third of death in Colombia and in the world and it is associated with neurodegenerative and mental diseases. Objective: To determine the effects of the atorvastatin- meloxicam association on reactive gliosis in a model of cerebral ischemia produced by arterial embolization. Materials and methods: 56 adult male Wistar rats were used, divided into four ischemic and four control groups, plus 10 additional animals to determine the distribution and extent of infarction by injury in six of them and simulation (sham in the remaining four. The treatments were: placebo, atorvastatin (ATV, meloxicam (MELOX and ATV + MELOX in ischemic and simulated animals. 24 hours post-ischemia mitochondrial enzymatic activity was evaluated with triphenyl- tetrazolium (TTC, and at 120 hours astrocytic reactivity (anti-GFAP was analyzed by conventional immunohistochemistry. Results: The association ATV + MELOX favored the modulation of the response of protoplasmatic and fibrous astrocytes in both the hippocampus and the paraventricular zone by reducing their hypereactivity. Conclusion: Atorvastatin and meloxicam, either individually or associated, reduce cerebral damage by lessening the reactive gliosis produced by arterial embolization; this suggests new mechanisms of neuroprotection against thromboembolic cerebral ischemia, and opens new perspectives in its early treatment.

  13. Sirtuin modulators control reactive gliosis in an in vitro model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina eScuderi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Among neurodegenerative disorders, Alzheimer’s disease (AD represents the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Several genetic and environmental factors have been identified, however aging represents the most important risk factor in the development of AD. To date, no effective treatments to prevent or slow this dementia are available. Sirtuins (SIRTs are a family of NAD+-dependent enzymes, implicated in the control of a variety of biological processes that have the potential to modulate neurodegeneration. Here we tested the hypothesis that activation of SIRT1 or inhibition of SIRT2 would prevent reactive gliosis which is considered one of the most important hallmark of AD. Primary rat astrocytes were activated with beta amyloid 1-42 (Aβ 1-42 and treated with resveratrol (RSV or AGK-2, a SIRT1 activator and a SIRT2-selective inhibitor, respectively. Results showed that both RSV and AGK-2 were able to reduce astrocyte activation as well as the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. These data disclose novel findings about the therapeutic potential of SIRT modulators, and suggest novel strategies for AD treatment.

  14. EPO reduces reactive gliosis and stimulates neurotrophin expression in Muller cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liu-Mei; Luo, Yan; Zhang, Jingfa; Lei, Xia; Shen, Jianfeng; Wu, Yalan; Qin, Mei; Unver, Yaprak Banu; Zhong, Yong; Xu, Guo-Tong; Li, Weiye

    2011-06-01

    To characterize Müller cell-mediated neuroprotective and neurotrophic functions of the erythropoietin (EPO)/EPO receptor (EpoR) system in diabetic rat retina. A single intravitreal injection of EPO (8 mU/eye) was administered in rats 4 or 24 weeks after diabetes onset. The results showed that intravitreal EPO ameliorated the up-regulation of GFAP and vimentin in the diabetic retina evaluated by immunofluorescence and Western blotting; but up-regulated BDNF and CNTF expressions, quantified by real-time PCR and ELISA, in the 24-week diabetic rat retinas. In vitro, BDNF and CNTF expressions were stimulated by EPO through both extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt pathways. The neuro-regenerative function of EPO, as indicated by promotion of neurite outgrowth, was corroborated in vitro. BDNF was involved in EPO-induced neurite outgrowth of primary rat retinal neurons. Exogenous EPO exerts neuroprotective and neurotrophic functions by attenuating reactive gliosis and promoting neurotrophic factors in Muller cells in diabetic retina. Signaling pathways that are responsible for these Muller cell-mediated EPO/EpoR functions may be therapeutic targets for diabetic retinopathy.

  15. 眼镜蛇毒粗毒毒素Ⅳ对小鼠吗啡行为敏化的影响%The effects of cobravenom cytotoxin IV on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仲维高; 崔跃; 孔天翰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of cobravenom cytotoxin IV on morphine-induced sensitization in mice. Methods Locomotor activity was measured every 5 minutes for 1 hour immediately after administration with cobravenom cytotoxin IV in mice. The morphine-induced sensitization models were established in mice by subcutaneous injection with morphine 10mg/kg,once a day,for 7 days,and the mice were treated with the combination of morphine ( sc) with cytotoxin IV ( ip) to observe the effects of cytotoxin IV on the behavioral sensitization to morphine in mice. Results After treated with different doses of cytotoxin IV ( 0. 027,0. 04, 0. 08mg/kg,respectively), the locomotor activity of the mice was reduced, hyperactivity was inhibited, and the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization was blocked, in which the effects of middle and high-dose of cytotoxin IV were more significant. Conclusion The cobravenom cytotoxin IV has inhibitory effects on central nervous system and can prohibit the formation of morphine addictive behavior, which suggests that cobravenom cytotoxin IV may have intervention effect on psychological dependence to morphine.%目的 探讨眼镜蛇毒毒素Ⅳ对吗啡行为敏化的影响.方法 测定小鼠自主活动,观察毒素Ⅳ对小鼠自主活动影响.昆明种小鼠慢性吗啡处理,建立吗啡诱导行为敏化模型,观察毒素Ⅳ对吗啡行为敏化影响.结果 毒素Ⅳ(0.027、0.04、0.08 mg/kg)腹腔注射后,均能减少小鼠自主活动,降低吗啡诱导的高活动性,抑制小鼠吗啡行为敏化的获得,阻断小鼠吗啡行为敏化表达,其中中、高剂量毒素Ⅳ作用较显著.结论 毒素Ⅳ对中枢神经系统具有抑制作用,可以阻止吗啡成瘾行为形成,对吗啡诱导的敏化行为具有抑制作用,提示毒素Ⅳ对吗啡精神依赖性可能具有干预作用.

  16. Blockade of Cannabinoid CB1 receptor attenuates the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference along with a downregulation of ERK, CREB phosphorylation, and BDNF expression in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo; Wang, Na; Chen, Bo; Wang, Yi'nan; He, Jing; Cai, Xintong; Zhang, Hongbo; Wei, Shuguang; Li, Shengbin

    2016-09-06

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) is highly expressed in the mesocorticolimbic system and associated with drug craving and relapse. Clinical trials suggest that CB1R antagonists may represent new therapies for drug addiction. However, the downstream signaling of CB1R is not fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between CB1R and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus in morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), which is used to assess the morphine-induced reward memory. The protein level of CB1R, ERK, CREB, and BDNF were detected by western blotting. Additionally, a CB1R antagonist, AM251, was used to study whether blockade of CB1R altered the CPP and above-mentioned molecules. We found an increase of CB1R expression in the NAc and hippocampus of the mice following morphine CPP, but not those after repeated morphine in home cage without context exposure (NO-CPP). Both morphine CPP and NO-CPP induced an upregulation of ERK, CREB phosphorylation and BDNF expression. Furthermore, pretreatment with AM251 before morphine attenuated the CPP acquisition and CB1R expression as well as the activation of ERK-CREB-BDNF cascade. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that (1) Repeated morphine with context exposures but not merely the pharmacological effects of morphine increased CB1R expression both in the NAc and hippocampus. (2) CB1R antagonist mediated blockade of ERK-CREB-BDNF signaling activation in the NAc and hippocampus may be an important mechanism underlying the attenuation of morphine CPP.

  17. Activation of Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) C receptors enhances morphine-induced analgesia through modulation of coupling of μ-opioid receptor to Gi-protein in rat spinal dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Chen, T; Zhou, X; Couture, R; Hong, Y

    2013-12-03

    Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) G protein-coupled receptors are exclusively expressed in small-sized neurons in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in mammals. The present study investigated the effect of MrgC receptor activation on morphine analgesic potency and addressed its possible mechanisms. Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the specific MrgC receptor agonist bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 (BAM8-22, 3 nmol) increased morphine-induced analgesia and shifted the morphine dose-response curve to the left in rats. Acute morphine (5 μg) reduced the coupling of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) to Gi-, but not Gs-, protein in the spinal dorsal horn. The i.t. BAM8-22 (3 nmol) prevented this change of G-protein repertoire while the inactive MrgC receptor agonist BAM8-18 (3 nmol, i.t.) failed to do so. A double labeling study showed the co-localization of MrgC and MORs in DRG neurons. The i.t. BAM8-22 also increased the coupling of MORs to Gi-protein and recruited Gi-protein from cytoplasm to the cell membrane in the spinal dorsal horn. Application of BAM8-22 (10nM) in the cultured ganglion explants for 30 min increased Gi-protein mRNA, but not Gs-protein mRNA. The present study demonstrated that acute administration of morphine inhibited the repertoire of MOR/Gi-protein coupling in the spinal dorsal horn in vivo. The findings highlight a novel mechanism by which the activation of MrgC receptors can modulate the coupling of MORs with Gi-protein to enhance morphine-induced analgesia. Hence, adjunct treatment of MrgC agonist BAM8-22 may be of therapeutic value to relieve pain.

  18. Differences in basal and morphine-induced FosB/DeltaFosB and pCREB immunoreactivities in dopaminergic brain regions of alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaste, Kristiina; Kivinummi, Tanja; Piepponen, T Petteri; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Ahtee, Liisa

    2009-06-01

    Besides alcohol, alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rats differ also with respect to other abused drugs. To study the molecular basis of these differences, we examined the expression of two transcription factors implicated in addiction, DeltaFosB and pCREB, in brain dopaminergic regions of AA and ANA rats. The effects of morphine and nicotine were studied to relate the behavioral and molecular changes induced by these drugs. Baseline FosB/DeltaFosB immunoreactivity (IR) in the nucleus accumbens core and pCREB IR in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were elevated in AA rats. Morphine increased DeltaFosB-like IR more readily in the caudate-putamen of AA rats than in ANA rats. In the PFC morphine decreased pCREB IR in AA rats, but increased it in ANA rats. In addition to enhanced locomotor response, the development of place preference to morphine was enhanced in AA rats. The enhanced nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization found in AA compared with ANA rats seems to depend in addition to dopamine and DeltaFosB on other mechanisms. These findings suggest that enhanced sensitivity of AA rats to morphine is related to augmented morphine-induced expression of FosB/DeltaFosB and morphine-induced reduction of pCREB levels. Moreover, altered innate expression of FosB/DeltaFosB and pCREB in AA rats is likely to affect the sensitivity of these rats to abused drugs.

  19. PSAPP mice exhibit regionally selective reductions in gliosis and plaque deposition in response to S100B ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Keith A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies have reported that increased expression of S100B, an intracellular Ca2+ receptor protein and secreted neuropeptide, exacerbates Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. However, the ability of S100B inhibitors to prevent/reverse AD histopathology remains controversial. This study examines the effect of S100B ablation on in vivo plaque load, gliosis and dystrophic neurons. Methods Because S100B-specific inhibitors are not available, genetic ablation was used to inhibit S100B function in the PSAPP AD mouse model. The PSAPP/S100B-/- line was generated by crossing PSAPP double transgenic males with S100B-/- females and maintained as PSAPP/S100B+/- crosses. Congo red staining was used to quantify plaque load, plaque number and plaque size in 6 month old PSAPP and PSAPP/S100B-/- littermates. The microglial marker Iba1 and astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP were used to quantify gliosis. Dystrophic neurons were detected with the phospho-tau antibody AT8. S100B immunohistochemistry was used to assess the spatial distribution of S100B in the PSAPP line. Results PSAPP/S100B-/- mice exhibited a regionally selective decrease in cortical but not hippocampal plaque load when compared to PSAPP littermates. This regionally selective reduction in plaque load was accompanied by decreases in plaque number, GFAP-positive astrocytes, Iba1-positive microglia and phospho-tau positive dystrophic neurons. These effects were not attributable to regional variability in the distribution of S100B. Hippocampal and cortical S100B immunoreactivity in PSAPP mice was associated with plaques and co-localized with astrocytes and microglia. Conclusions Collectively, these data support S100B inhibition as a novel strategy for reducing cortical plaque load, gliosis and neuronal dysfunction in AD and suggest that both extracellular as well as intracellular S100B contribute to AD histopathology.

  20. Attenuation of reactive gliosis does not affect infarct volume in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Järlestedt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Astroglial cells are activated following injury and up-regulate the expression of the intermediate filament proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and vimentin. Adult mice lacking the intermediate filament proteins GFAP and vimentin (GFAP(-/-Vim(-/- show attenuated reactive gliosis, reduced glial scar formation and improved regeneration of neuronal synapses after neurotrauma. GFAP(-/-Vim(-/- mice exhibit larger brain infarcts after middle cerebral artery occlusion suggesting protective role of reactive gliosis after adult focal brain ischemia. However, the role of astrocyte activation and reactive gliosis in the injured developing brain is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We subjected GFAP(-/-Vim(-/- and wild-type mice to unilateral hypoxia-ischemia (HI at postnatal day 9 (P9. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU; 25 mg/kg was injected intraperitoneally twice daily from P9 to P12. On P12 and P31, the animals were perfused intracardially. Immunohistochemistry with MAP-2, BrdU, NeuN, and S100 antibodies was performed on coronal sections. We found no difference in the hemisphere or infarct volume between GFAP(-/-Vim(-/- and wild-type mice at P12 and P31, i.e. 3 and 22 days after HI. At P31, the number of NeuN(+ neurons in the ischemic and contralateral hemisphere was comparable between GFAP(-/-Vim(-/- and wild-type mice. In wild-type mice, the number of S100(+ astrocytes was lower in the ipsilateral compared to contralateral hemisphere (65.0+/-50.1 vs. 85.6+/-34.0, p<0.05. In the GFAP(-/-Vim(-/- mice, the number of S100(+ astrocytes did not differ between the ischemic and contralateral hemisphere at P31. At P31, GFAP(-/-Vim(-/- mice showed an increase in NeuN(+BrdU(+ (surviving newly born neurons in the ischemic cortex compared to wild-type mice (6.7+/-7.7; n = 29 versus 2.9+/-3.6; n = 28, respectively, p<0.05, but a comparable number of S100(+BrdU(+ (surviving newly born astrocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that

  1. Purinergic 2Y1 receptor stimulation decreases cerebral edema and reactive gliosis in a traumatic brain injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley Watts, Lora; Sprague, Shane; Zheng, Wei; Garling, R Justin; Jimenez, David; Digicaylioglu, Murat; Lechleiter, James

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children and young adults. Neuroprotective agents that may promote repair or counteract damage after injury do not currently exist. We recently reported that stimulation of the purinergic receptor subtype P2Y(1)R using 2-methylthioladenosine 5' diphosphate (2MeSADP) significantly reduced cytotoxic edema induced by photothrombosis. Here, we tested whether P2Y(1)R stimulation was neuroprotective after TBI. A controlled closed head injury model was established for mice using a pneumatic impact device. Brains were harvested at 1, 3, or 7 days post-injury and assayed for morphological changes by immunocytochemistry, Western blot analysis, and wet/dry weight. Cerebral edema and expression of both aquaporin type 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were increased at all time points examined. Immunocytochemical measurements in both cortical and hippocampal slices also revealed significant neuronal swelling and reactive gliosis. Treatment of mice with 2MeSADP (100 μM) or MRS2365 (100 μM) 30 min after trauma significantly reduced all post-injury symptoms of TBI including edema, neuronal swelling, reactive gliosis, and AQ4 expression. The neuroprotective effect was lost in IP(3)R2-/- mice treated with 2MeSADP. Immunocytochemical labeling of brain slices confirmed that P2Y(1)R expression was defined to cortical and hippocampal astrocytes, but not neurons. Taken together, the data show that stimulation of astrocytic P2Y(1)Rs significantly reduces brain injury after acute trauma and is mediated by the IP(3)-signaling pathway. We suggest that enhancing astrocyte mitochondrial metabolism offers a promising neuroprotective strategy for a broad range of brain injuries.

  2. S100B Inhibitor Pentamidine Attenuates Reactive Gliosis and Reduces Neuronal Loss in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cirillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the different signaling molecules released during reactive gliosis occurring in Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the astrocyte-derived S100B protein plays a key role in neuroinflammation, one of the hallmarks of the disease. The use of pharmacological tools targeting S100B may be crucial to embank its effects and some of the pathological features of AD. The antiprotozoal drug pentamidine is a good candidate since it directly blocks S100B activity by inhibiting its interaction with the tumor suppressor p53. We used a mouse model of amyloid beta- (Aβ- induced AD, which is characterized by reactive gliosis and neuroinflammation in the brain, and we evaluated the effect of pentamidine on the main S100B-mediated events. Pentamidine caused the reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein, S100B, and RAGE protein expression, which are signs of reactive gliosis, and induced p53 expression in astrocytes. Pentamidine also reduced the expression of proinflammatory mediators and markers, thus reducing neuroinflammation in AD brain. In parallel, we observed a significant neuroprotection exerted by pentamidine on CA1 pyramidal neurons. We demonstrated that pentamidine inhibits Aβ-induced gliosis and neuroinflammation in an animal model of AD, thus playing a role in slowing down the course of the disease.

  3. Deletion of Hemojuvelin, an Iron-Regulatory Protein, in Mice Results in Abnormal Angiogenesis and Vasculogenesis in Retina Along With Reactive Gliosis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of Hemojuvelin (HJV) in mice is associated with excessive iron accumulation and morphologic changes in the retina. In this study, we find that HJV knockout mice have abnormal retinal angiogenesis and vasculogenesis along with robust reactive gliosis involving Müller cells and microglia.

  4. Morphine-induced conditioned place preference and the alterations of p-ERK, p-CREB and c-fos levels in hypothalamus and hippocampus: the effects of physical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevani, P; Fatahi, Z; Moradi, M; Haghparast, A

    2014-12-08

    The hypothalamus and hippocampus are important areas involved in stress responses and reward processing. In addition, ERK/CREB pathway plays a critical role in the control of cellular responses to stress and reward. In the current study, effects of acute and subchronic stress on the alteration of p-ERK, p-CREB and c-fos levels in the hypothalamus and hippocampus of saline- or morphine-treated animals during morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure were investigated. Male Wistar rats were divided into two saline- and morphine-treated supergroups. Each supergroup includes of control, acute stress and subchronic stress groups. In all of groups, the CPP procedure was done, afterward the alternation of p-ERK/ERK ratio, p-CREB/CREB ratio and c-fos level in the hypothalamus and hippocampus were estimated by Western blot analysis. The results indicated that in saline- or morphine-treated animals, p-ERK/ERK ratio, p-CREB/CREB ratio and c-fos level increased after application of acute and subchronic stress (except for p-ERK/ERK ratio in morphine-control group). Our findings revealed that in saline- or morphine-treated animals, acute and subcronic stress increased the p-ERK/ERK ratio, p-CREB/CREB ratio and c-fos level in the hypothalamus and hippocampus and this enhancement in morphine-treated animals, was more considerable than that in saline-treated animals.

  5. Intrathecal PLC(β3) oligodeoxynucleotides antisense potentiates acute morphine efficacy and attenuates chronic morphine tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanhong, Zhou; Ying, Xue; Moxi, Chen; Tao, Xu; Jing, Wang; Xin, Zhang; Li, Wang; Derong, Cui; Xiaoli, Zhang; Wei, Jiang

    2012-09-07

    Morphine is a mainstay for chronic pain treatment, but its efficacy has been hampered by physical tolerance. The underlying mechanism for chronic morphine induced tolerance is complicated and not well understood. PLC(β3) is regarded as an important factor in the morphine tolerance signal pathway. In this study, we determined intrathecal (i.t.) administration of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) of PLC(β3) could quicken the on-set antinociceptive efficacy of acute morphine treatment and prolong the maximum effect up to 4h. The antisense could also attenuate the development of morphine-induced tolerance and left shift the ED50 after 7 day of coadministration with morphine. These results probably were contributed by the PLC(β3) antisense ODN as they successfully knocked down protein expression levels and reduced activity of PLC(β3) in spinal cord in rats. The mismatch group had no such effects. The results confirmed the important involvement of PLC(β3) in both acute morphine efficacy and chronic morphine tolerance at spinal level in rats. This study may provide an idea for producing a novel adjuvant for morphine treatment.

  6. Involvement of neuropeptide FF receptors in neuroadaptive responses to acute and chronic opiate treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhabazi, K; Trigo, J M; Mollereau, C; Moulédous, L; Zajac, J-M; Bihel, F; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, J J; Meziane, H; Petit-demoulière, B; Bockel, F; Maldonado, R; Simonin, F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Opiates remain the most effective compounds for alleviating severe pain across a wide range of conditions. However, their use is associated with significant side effects. Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors have been implicated in several opiate-induced neuroadaptive changes including the development of tolerance. In this study, we investigated the consequences of NPFF receptor blockade on acute and chronic stimulation of opioid receptors in mice by using RF9, a potent and selective antagonist of NPFF receptors that can be administered systemically. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of RF9 were investigated on opioid pharmacological responses including locomotor activity, antinociception, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, rewarding properties and physical dependence. KEY RESULTS RF9 had no effect on morphine-induced horizontal hyperlocomotion and slightly attenuated the decrease induced in vertical activity. Furthermore, RF9 dose-dependently blocked the long-lasting hyperalgesia produced by either acute fentanyl or chronic morphine administration. RF9 also potentiated opiate early analgesic effects and prevented the development of morphine tolerance. Finally, RF9 increased morphine-induced conditioned place preference without producing any rewarding effect by itself and decreased naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome following chronic morphine treatment. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The NPFF system is involved in the development of two major undesirable effects: tolerance and dependence, which are clinically associated with prolonged exposure to opiates. Our findings suggest that NPFF receptors are interesting therapeutic targets to improve the analgesic efficacy of opiates by limiting the development of tolerance, and for the treatment of opioid dependence.

  7. The proinflammatory RAGE/NF-κB pathway is involved in neuronal damage and reactive gliosis in a model of sleep apnea by intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Maria Florencia; Aguirre, Alejandra; Avilés Reyes, Rolando X; Villarreal, Alejandro; Lukin, Jerónimo; Melendez, Matías; Vanasco, Virginia; Barker, Phil; Alvarez, Silvia; Epstein, Alberto; Jerusalinsky, Diana; Ramos, Alberto Javier

    2014-01-01

    Sleep apnea (SA) causes long-lasting changes in neuronal circuitry, which persist even in patients successfully treated for the acute effects of the disease. Evidence obtained from the intermittent hypoxia (IH) experimental model of SA has shown neuronal death, impairment in learning and memory and reactive gliosis that may account for cognitive and structural alterations observed in human patients. However, little is known about the mechanism controlling these deleterious effects that may be useful as therapeutic targets in SA. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) and its downstream effector Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB) have been related to neuronal death and astroglial conversion to the pro-inflammatory neurodegenerative phenotype. RAGE expression and its ligand S100B were shown to be increased in experimental models of SA. We here used dissociated mixed hippocampal cell cultures and male Wistar rats exposed to IH cycles and observed that NF-κB is activated in glial cells and neurons after IH. To disclose the relative contribution of the S100B/RAGE/NF-κB pathway to neuronal damage and reactive gliosis after IH we performed sequential loss of function studies using RAGE or S100B neutralizing antibodies, a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-derived amplicon vector that induces the expression of RAGEΔcyto (dominant negative RAGE) and a chemical blocker of NF-κB. Our results show that NF-κB activation peaks 3 days after IH exposure, and that RAGE or NF-κB blockage during this critical period significantly improves neuronal survival and reduces reactive gliosis. Both in vitro and in vivo, S100B blockage altered reactive gliosis but did not have significant effects on neuronal survival. We conclude that both RAGE and downstream NF-κB signaling are centrally involved in the neuronal alterations found in SA models, and that blockage of these pathways is a tempting strategy for preventing neuronal degeneration and reactive gliosis in SA.

  8. MicroRNAs are involved in the development of morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and regulate functionally relevant changes in Serpini1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenica D. Tapocik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term opioid treatment results in reduced therapeutic efficacy and in turn leads to an increase in the dose required to produce equivalent pain relief and alleviate break-through or insurmountable pain. Altered gene expression is a likely means for inducing long-term neuroadaptations responsible for tolerance. Studies conducted by our laboratory (Tapocik et al., 2009 revealed a network of gene expression changes occurring in canonical pathways involved in neuroplasticity, and uncovered miRNA processing as a potential mechanism. In particular, the mRNA coding the protein responsible for processing miRNAs, Dicer1, was positively correlated with the development of analgesic tolerance. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that miRNAs play a significant role in the development of analgesic tolerance as measured by thermal nociception. Dicer1 knockdown, miRNA profiling, bioinformatics and confirmation of high value targets were used to test the proposition.Regionally targeted Dicer1 knockdown (via shRNA had the anticipated consequence of eliminating the development of tolerance in C57BL/6J (B6 mice, thus supporting the involvement of miRNAs in the development of tolerance. MiRNA expression profiling identified a core set of chronic morphine-regulated miRNAs (miR’s 27a, 9, 483, 505, 146b, 202. Bioinformatics approaches were implemented to identify and prioritize their predicted target mRNAs. We focused our attention on miR27a and its predicted target serpin peptidase inhibitor clade I (Serpini1 mRNA, a transcript known to be intricately involved in dendritic spine density regulation in a manner consistent with chronic morphine’s consequences and previously found to be correlated with the development of analgesic tolerance. In vitro reporter assay confirmed the targeting of the Serpini1 3’-untranslated region by miR27a. Interestingly miR27a was found to positively regulate Serpini1 mRNA and protein levels in multiple

  9. The role of galanin system in modulating depression, anxiety, and addiction-like behaviors after chronic restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Seese, R R; Yun, K; Peng, T; Wang, Z

    2013-08-29

    There is high comorbidity between stress-related psychiatric disorders and addiction, suggesting they may share one or more common neurobiological mechanisms. Because of its role in both depressive and addictive behaviors, the galanin system is a strong candidate for such a mechanism. In this study, we tested if galanin and its receptors are involved in stress-associated behaviors and drug addiction. Mice were exposed to 21 days of chronic restraint stress (CRS); subsequently, mRNA levels of galanin, galanin receptors (GalRs), the rate-limiting enzymes for the synthesis of monoamines, and monoamine autoreceptors were measured in the nucleus accumbens by a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Moreover, we tested the effects of this stress on morphine-induced addictive behaviors. We found that CRS induced anxiety and depression-like behaviors, impaired the formation and facilitated the extinction process in morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), and also blocked morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. These behavioral results were accompanied by a CRS-dependent increase in the mRNA expression of galanin, GalR1, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), tryptophan hydroxylase 2, and 5-HT1B receptor. Interestingly, treatment with a commonly used antidepressant, fluoxetine, normalized the CRS-induced behavioral changes based on reversing the higher expression of galanin and TH while increasing the expression of GalR2 and α2A-adrenceptor. These results indicate that activating the galanin system, with corresponding changes to noradrenergic systems, following chronic stress may modulate stress-associated behaviors and opiate addiction. Our findings suggest that galanin and GalRs are worthy of further exploration as potential therapeutic targets to treat stress-related disorders and drug addiction.

  10. Reduced occurrence of programmed cell death and gliosis in the retinas of juvenile rabbits after shortterm treatment with intravitreous bevacizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Fusco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Bevacizumab has been widely used as a vascular endothelial growth factor antagonist in the treatment of retinal vasoproliferative disorders in adults and, more recently, in infants with retinopathy of prematurity. Recently, it has been proposed that vascular endothelial growth factor acts as a protective factor for neurons and glial cells, particularly in developing nervous tissue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of bevacizumab on the developing retinas of juvenile rabbits. METHODS: Juvenile rabbits received bevacizumab intravitreously in one eye; the other eye acted as an untreated control. Slit-lamp and fundoscopic examinations were performed both prior to and seven days after treatment. At the same time, retina samples were analyzed using immunohistochemistry to detect autophagy and apoptosis as well as proliferation and glial reactivity. Morphometric analyses were performed, and the data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: No clinical abnormalities were observed in either treated or untreated eyes. However, immunohistochemical analyses revealed a reduction in the occurrence of programmed cell death and increases in both proliferation and reactivity in the bevacizumab-treated group compared with the untreated group. CONCLUSIONS: Bevacizumab appears to alter programmed cell death patterns and promote gliosis in the developing retinas of rabbits; therefore, it should be used with caution in developing eyes

  11. Pharmacological Administration of the Isoflavone Daidzein Enhances Cell Proliferation and Reduces High Fat Diet-Induced Apoptosis and Gliosis in the Rat Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Rivera; Margarita Pérez-Martín; Pavón, Francisco J; Antonia Serrano; Ana Crespillo; Manuel Cifuentes; María-Dolores López-Ávalos; Grondona, Jesús M.; Margarita Vida; Pedro Fernández-Llebrez; Fernando Rodríguez de Fonseca; Juan Suárez

    2013-01-01

    Soy extracts have been claimed to be neuroprotective against brain insults, an effect related to the estrogenic properties of isoflavones. However, the effects of individual isoflavones on obesity-induced disruption of adult neurogenesis have not yet been analyzed. In the present study we explore the effects of pharmacological administration of daidzein, a main soy isoflavone, in cell proliferation, cell apoptosis and gliosis in the adult hippocampus of animals exposed to a very high-fat diet...

  12. The proinflammatory RAGE/NF-κB pathway is involved in neuronal damage and reactive gliosis in a model of sleep apnea by intermittent hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Florencia Angelo

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea (SA causes long-lasting changes in neuronal circuitry, which persist even in patients successfully treated for the acute effects of the disease. Evidence obtained from the intermittent hypoxia (IH experimental model of SA has shown neuronal death, impairment in learning and memory and reactive gliosis that may account for cognitive and structural alterations observed in human patients. However, little is known about the mechanism controlling these deleterious effects that may be useful as therapeutic targets in SA. The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE and its downstream effector Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB have been related to neuronal death and astroglial conversion to the pro-inflammatory neurodegenerative phenotype. RAGE expression and its ligand S100B were shown to be increased in experimental models of SA. We here used dissociated mixed hippocampal cell cultures and male Wistar rats exposed to IH cycles and observed that NF-κB is activated in glial cells and neurons after IH. To disclose the relative contribution of the S100B/RAGE/NF-κB pathway to neuronal damage and reactive gliosis after IH we performed sequential loss of function studies using RAGE or S100B neutralizing antibodies, a herpes simplex virus (HSV-derived amplicon vector that induces the expression of RAGEΔcyto (dominant negative RAGE and a chemical blocker of NF-κB. Our results show that NF-κB activation peaks 3 days after IH exposure, and that RAGE or NF-κB blockage during this critical period significantly improves neuronal survival and reduces reactive gliosis. Both in vitro and in vivo, S100B blockage altered reactive gliosis but did not have significant effects on neuronal survival. We conclude that both RAGE and downstream NF-κB signaling are centrally involved in the neuronal alterations found in SA models, and that blockage of these pathways is a tempting strategy for preventing neuronal degeneration and reactive gliosis in SA.

  13. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) Inhibitors Reduce Reactive Gliosis and Improve Angiostatin Levels in Retina of Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzyk, Mykhailo M; Tykhomyrov, Artem A; Nedzvetsky, Victor S; Prischepa, Irina V; Grinenko, Tatiana V; Yanitska, Lesya V; Kuchmerovska, Tamara M

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a multifactorial disease characterized by reactive gliosis and disbalance of angiogenesis regulators, contributing to endothelial dysfunction and microvascular complications. This study was organized to elucidate whether poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition could attenuate diabetes-induced damage to macroglia and correct angiogenic disbalance in diabetic rat retina. After 8 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, Wistar male rats were treated with PARP-1 inhibitors, nicotinamide (NAm) or 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) (100 and 30 mg/kg/daily i.p., respectively), for 14 days. After the 10-weeks experiment period, retinas were undergone an immunohistochemical staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), while western blots were performed to evaluate effects of PAPR-1 inhibitors on the levels of PARP-1, poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins (PARs), GFAP, and angiostatin isoforms. Diabetes induced significant up-regulation and activation of retinal PARP-1, reactive gliosis development, and GFAP overexpression compared to non-diabetic control. Moreover, extensive fragmentation of both PARP-1 and GFAP (hallmarks of apoptosis and macroglia reactivation, respectively) in diabetic retina was also observed. Levels of angiostatin isoforms were dramatically decreased in diabetic retina, sustaining aberrant pro-angiogenic condition. Both NAm and 3-AB markedly attenuated damage to macroglia, evidenced by down-regulation of PARP-1, PARs and total GFAP compared to diabetic non-treated group. PARP-1-inhibitory therapy prevented formation of PARP-1 and GFAP cleavage-derived products. In retinas of anti-PARP-treated diabetic animals, partial restoration of angiostatin's levels was shown. Therefore, PARP-1 inhibitors counteract diabetes-induced injuries and manifest retinoprotective effects, including attenuation of reactive gliosis and improvement of angiogenic status, thus, such agents could be considered as promising candidates for DR

  14. Injury-independent induction of reactive gliosis in retina by loss of function of the LIM homeodomain transcription factor Lhx2

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Müller glia are the primary glial subtype in the retina and perform a wide range of physiological tasks in support of retinal function, but little is known about the transcriptional network that maintains these cells in their differentiated state. We report that selective deletion of the LIM homeodomain transcription factor Lhx2 from mature Müller glia leads to the induction of reactive retinal gliosis in the absence of injury. Furthermore, Lhx2 expression is also down-regulated in Prph2Rd2/R...

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration in chronic neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Teunissen, Charlotte; Süssmuth, Sigurd; Otto, Markus; Ludolph, Albert C; Brettschneider, Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Chronic neurological diseases (CND) like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), dementia or multiple sclerosis (MS) share a chronic progressive course of disease that frequently leads to the common pathological pathway of neurodegeneration, including neuroaxonal damage, apoptosis and gliosis. There is an ongoing search for biomarkers that could support early diagnosis of CND and help to identify responders to interventions in therapeutic treatment trials. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a promising source of biomarkers in CND, since the CSF compartment is in close anatomical contact with the brain interstitial fluid, where biochemical changes related to CND are reflected. We review recent advances in CSF biomarkers research in CND and thereby focus on markers associated with neurodegeneration.

  16. 不同剂量纳洛酮对吗啡致大鼠胃肠功能紊乱的影响%Effects of different doses of naloxone on morphine-induced gastro-intestinal dysfunction in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高明龙; 刘永哲; 孙永海; 张宏

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨不同剂量纳洛酮对吗啡致大鼠胃肠功能紊乱的影响.方法 雄性SD大鼠84只,体重200~250 g,随机分为7组(n=12),生理盐水对照组(NS组)单次皮下注射生理盐水4ml/kg;吗啡组(M组)单次皮下注射吗啡6 mg/kg(混合于Ns中,容积同NS组);不同剂量纳洛酮(1 μg/kg、100 ng/kg、10 ng/kg、1 ng/kg和0.1 ng,kg)混合吗啡(6 mg/kg)组(MNI组、MN2组、MN3组、MN4组和MN5组):分别单次皮下注射混合药液4 ml/kg(按照设定浓度将吗啡和纳洛酮混合于NS中).各组随机取6只大鼠,于给药前、给药后30 min、2、4、24 h时测定血浆胃动素浓度.各组取6只大鼠,自由饮水、进食(饲料中混有高岭土),于进食后12、24 h时测定高岭土摄入量和粪量.结果 与NS组比较,其余各组血浆胃动素浓度升高,高岭土摄入量增多,粪量减少(P<0.01);与M组比较,MN1组、MN2组和MN3组血浆胃动素浓度降低,高岭土摄人量减少,粪量增多(P<0.01);与MN1组和MN2组比较,MN4组和MN5组血浆胃动素浓度升高,高岭土摄入量增多,粪量减少(P<0.01).结论 单次皮下注射纳洛酮1 μg/kg、100 ng/kg、10 ng/kg可减轻吗啡致大鼠胃肠功能紊乱.%Objective To investigate the effects of different doses of naloxone on morphine-induced gastro-intestinal dysfunction.Methods Eighty-four male SD rats weighing 200-250 g were randomly divided into 7 groups(n=12 each):Ⅰ control group received subcutaneous normal saline(NS)4 ml/kg;Ⅱ morphine group (M)received morphine 6 mg/kg S.C.;group Ⅲ-Ⅳ received a mixture of naloxone(1/ μg/kg,100 ng/kg,10 ng/kg,1 ng/kg,0.1 ng/kg)+ morphine 6 mg/kg(MN1-5).Blood samples were taken from 6 animals in each group before and at 30 min,2,4 and 24 h after drug administration for determination of plasma motilin concentration.Six animals in each group Were housed in a metabolism cage for 1 week with food and water available ad libitum for one week.The food contained kaolin.The kaolin intake

  17. Effects of alpha-adrenoceptor agonists in chronic morphine administered DSP4-treated rats: evidence for functional cross-sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, T; Fredriksson, A

    2001-10-01

    Five experiments were performed to study the effects of the Alpha-adrenoceptor agonists, clonidine and guanfacine, upon spontaneous motor activity in chronically morphine administered DSP4-treated and control rats. DSP4 (2 x 50 mg/kg, with a 10-day interval between injections) and vehicle (distilled water) were injected i.p., on each occasion 30 min after zimeldine (20 mg/kg). Morphine dosages were raised incrementally from 5 mg/kg (Days 1-3), through 10 mg/kg (Days 4-7) and 20 mg/kg (Days 8-14), to 30 mg/kg (Days 15-20). Motor activity testing occurred on Day 21, Day 22 as well as in Experiments II-V, (from 1st morphine injection). DSP4 pretreatment and chronic morphine injections each reduced motor activity during the first 30 min of testing; combined DSP4 and morphine treatment potentiated the hypoactivity. Habituation quotients indicated deficits in habituation to the novel test environment by the Vehicle-morphine (Quoteint2 only) and DSP4-morphine groups. Acute clonidine treatment (0.04 mg/kg s.c.) reduced motor activity during the first 30 min of testing but attenuated or blocked the morphine-induced hypoactivity in DSP4-treated and control rats. During the 60-90 min test period, clonidine, but not guanfacine (0.08 mg/kg), potentiated morphine-induced hyperactivity in control rats; acute clonidine enhanced this effect, whereas acute guanfacine reduced it, in the DSP4-treated rats. The enhanced hyperactivity of morphine-clonidine suggest a cross-sensitivity effect. Naloxone (0.1 mg/kg s.c.), injected after the 1st 30-min of testing, potentiated markely the clonidine-induced elevations of motor activity in morphine-administered control rats; in the DSP4-treated rats, these effects were dramatically potentiated, underlining the cross-sensitivity effect. Acute guanfacine treatment reduced motor activity during the first 30 min of testing but did not attenuate reliably morphine-induced hypoactivity in control or DSP4 rats. Naloxone did not potentiate the

  18. Implication of DOP2 but not DOP1 in development of morphine analgesic tolerance in a rat model of chronic inflammatory pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudry, H.; Gendron, L.; Morón, Jose A.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids are well known for their robust analgesic effects. Chronic activation of mu opioid receptors (MOPs) is however accompanied by various unwanted effects such as analgesic tolerance. Among other mechanisms, interactions between MOP and delta opioid receptor (DOP) are thought to play an important role in morphine-induced behavioral adaptations. Interestingly, certain conditions such as inflammation enhance the function of the DOP through a MOP-dependent mechanism. Here, we investigated the role of DOP during the development of morphine-tolerance in an animal model of chronic inflammatory pain. Using behavioral approaches we first established that repeated systemic morphine treatment induces morphine analgesic tolerance in rats coping with chronic inflammatory pain. We then observed that blockade of DOP with subcutaneous naltrindole (NTI), a selective DOP antagonist, significantly attenuates the development of morphine tolerance in a dose-dependent manner. We confirmed that this effect was DOP-mediated by showing that an acute injection of NTI had no effect on morphine-induced analgesia in naïve animals. Previous pharmacological characterizations revealed the existence of DOP1 and DOP2 subtypes. As opposed to NTI, 7-benzylidenenaltrexone (BNTX) and naltriben (NTB) were reported to be selective DOP1 and DOP2 antagonists, respectively. Interestingly, NTB but not BNTX was able to attenuate the development of morphine analgesic tolerance in inflamed rats. Altogether, our results suggest that targeting of DOP2 with antagonists provides a valuable strategy to attenuate the analgesic tolerance that develops after repeated morphine administration in the setting of chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:25639561

  19. AF64A诱导的大鼠大缝际核胆碱能神经损伤改变吗啡的镇痛作用%Effect of morphine-induced antinociception is altered by AF64A-induced lesions on cholinergic neurons in rat nucleus raphe magnus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenji ABE; Kota ISHIDA; Masatoshi KATO; Toshiro SHIGENAGA; Kyoji TAGUCHI; Tadashi MIYATAKE

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To examine the role of cholinergic neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) in noxious heat stimulationand in the effects of morphine-induced antinociception by rats. METHODS: After the cholinergic neuron selectivetoxin, AF64A, was microinjected into the NRM, we examined changes in the antinociceptive threshold and effectsof morphine (5 mg/kg, ip) using the hot-plate (HP) and tail-flick (TF) tests. RESULTS: Systemic administration ofmorphine inhibited HP and TF responses in control rats. Microinjection of AF64A (2 nmol/site) into the NRMsignificantly decreased the threshold of HP response after 14 d, whereas the TF response was not affected. Mor-phine-induced antinociception was significantly attenuated in rats administered AF64A. Extracellular acetylcholinewas attenuated after 14 d to below detectable levels in rats given AF64A. Naloxone (1 μg/site) microinjected intocontrol rat NRM also antagonized the antinociceptive effect of systemic morphine. CONCLUSION: These find-ings suggest that cbolinergic neuron activation in the NRM modulates the antinociceptive effect of morphine simul-taneously with the opiate system.

  20. Blockage of glucocorticoid receptors during memory acquisition,retrieval and reconsolidation prevents the expression of morphine-induced conditioned place preferences in mice%Blockage of glucocorticoid receptors during memory acquisition,retrieval and reconsolidation prevents the expression of morphineinduced conditioned place preferences in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao-Dong FAN; Hai-Chen NIU; Tanzeel Huma; Ling LI; Gui-Mei WANG; Li-Qi XU; He REN

    2013-01-01

    Association between the reward caused by consuming drugs and the context in which they are consumed is essential in the formation of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP).Glucocorticoid receptor (GRs) activation in different regions of the brain affects reward-based reinforcement and memory processing.A wide array of studies have demonstrated that blockage of GRs in some brain areas can have an effect on reward-related memory; however,to date there have been no systematic studies about the involvement of glucocorticoids (GCs) in morphine-related reward memory.Here,we used the GR antagonist RU38486 to investigate how GRs blockage affects the sensitization and CPP behavior during different phases of reward memory included acquisition,retrieval and reconsolidation.Interestingly,our results showed RU38486 has the ability to impair the acquisition,retrieval and reconsolidation of reward-based memory in CPP and sensitization behavior.But RU38486 by itself cannot induce CPP or conditioned place aversion (CPA) behavior.Our data provide a much more complete picture of the potential effects that glucocorticoids have on the reward memory of different phases and inhibit the sensitization behavior.

  1. Rosiglitazone prevents gliosis, oxidative/nitrative stress and memory deficits induced by intracere-broventricular injection of streptozotocin in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Chang-han; ZHANG Rui-xue; WU Ji-liang; CAI Fei

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the preventive effect of rosiglitazone glial activation, oxidative/nitrative stress and spatial memory deficits induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of streptozotocin (STZ) in rats Methods 24 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham operated group, model group and rosiglitazone group. The model of ALzheimer's was induced by injection with ICV 10 % STZ bilaterally, on day 1 and 3 (3 Mg·kg-1). The rats were treated with rosiglitazone (2 Mg·kg-1, p. o. ) for a consecutive 21 days, once a day, beginning 7 days prior to STZ injection. The learning and memory behavior was assessed using Morris water maze task and Y-maze 21 d after ICV STZ injection. Malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH) levels and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in brain were estimated as parameters of oxidative/nitrative stress. Brain acetyl cholinesterase (AchE) activity was measured by Ell-Mann's method and activated miCroglia and astrocytes were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results ICV STZ injection resulted in a severe deficit in spatial learning and memory associated with increased MDA level (+69.5 % ) and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity ( + 23.7 % ), decreased SOD activity ( - 29.2 % ) and GSH (- 25.1% ) in brain. It also showed the activated mieroglia and astrocytes in the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region and a significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase activity ( - 40.2 % ). Compared with model group, chronic administration of rosiglitazone significantly shorten the escape latency time from the third day in place navigation test, increase the number of passing through primary flat place in spatial probe test in Morris water maze test, and decrease the error times in Y-maze test (P<0.05 or P<0.01). In addition, it also prevented the glial changes, decreased the elevated MDA and nitrite levels and restored the depleted GSH and acetylcholinesterase activity in cortex (P<0.05), but had no effect on SOD activity in cortex

  2. Chemically induced neuronal damage and gliosis: enhanced expression of the proinflammatory chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, without a corresponding increase in proinflammatory cytokines(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, A R; Benkovic, S A; Miller, D B; O'Callaghan, J P

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines has long been linked to neuronal and glial responses to brain injury. Indeed, inflammation in the brain has been associated with damage that stems from conditions as diverse as infection, multiple sclerosis, trauma, and excitotoxicity. In many of these brain injuries, disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may allow entry of blood-borne factors that contribute to, or serve as the basis of, brain inflammatory responses. Administration of trimethyltin (TMT) to the rat results in loss of hippocampal neurons and an ensuing gliosis without BBB compromise. We used the TMT damage model to discover the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines that are expressed in response to neuronal injury. TMT caused pyramidal cell damage within 3 days and a substantial loss of these neurons by 21 days post dosing. Marked microglial activation and astrogliosis were evident over the same time period. The BBB remained intact despite the presence of multiple indicators of TMT-induced neuropathology. TMT caused large increases in whole hippocampal-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 mRNA (1,000%) by day 3 and in MCP-1 (300%) by day 7. The mRNA levels for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6, cytokines normally expressed during the earliest stage of inflammation, were not increased up to 21 days post dosing. Lipopolysaccharide, used as a positive control, caused large inductions of cytokine mRNA in liver, as well as an increase in IL-1beta in hippocampus, but it did not result in the induction of astrogliosis. The data suggest that enhanced expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-6, is not required for neuronal and glial responses to injury and that MCP-1 may serve a signaling function in the damaged CNS that is distinct from its role in proinflammatory events.

  3. A functional progesterone receptor is required for immunomodulation, reduction of reactive gliosis and survival of oligodendrocyte precursors in the injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labombarda, Florencia; Jure, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Susana; Lima, Analia; Roig, Paulina; Guennoun, Rachida; Schumacher, Michael; De Nicola, Alejandro F

    2015-11-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of progesterone have been increasingly recognized in several neuropathological models, including spinal cord inflammation. In the present investigation, we explored the regulation of proinflammatory factors and enzymes by progesterone at several time points after spinal cord injury (SCI) in male rats. We also demonstrated the role of the progesterone receptor (PR) in inhibiting inflammation and reactive gliosis, and in enhancing the survival of oligodendrocyte progenitors cells (OPC) in injured PR knockout (PRKO) mice receiving progesterone. First, after SCI in rats, progesterone greatly attenuated the injury-induced hyperexpression of the mRNAs of interleukin 1β (IL1β), IL6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), all involved in oligodendrocyte damage. Second, the role of the PR was investigated in PRKO mice after SCI, in which progesterone failed to reduce the high expression of IL1β, IL6, TNFα and IκB-α mRNAs, the latter being considered an index of reduced NF-κB transactivation. These effects occurred in a time framework coincident with a reduction in the astrocyte and microglial responses. In contrast to wild-type mice, progesterone did not increase the density of OPC and did not prevent apoptotic death of these cells in PRKO mice. Our results support a role of PR in: (a) the anti-inflammatory effects of progesterone; (b) the modulation of astrocyte and microglial responses and (c) the prevention of OPC apoptosis, a mechanism that would enhance the commitment of progenitors to the remyelination pathway in the injured spinal cord.

  4. Pharmacological blockade of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) alters neural proliferation, apoptosis and gliosis in the rat hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum in a negative energy context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Patricia; Bindila, Laura; Pastor, Antoni; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; de la Torre, Rafael; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids participate in the control of neurogenesis, neural cell death and gliosis. The pharmacological effect of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which limits the endocannabinoid degradation, was investigated in the present study. Cell proliferation (phospho-H3(+) or BrdU(+) cells) of the main adult neurogenic zones as well as apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3(+)), astroglia (GFAP(+)), and microglia (Iba1(+) cells) were analyzed in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum of rats intraperitoneally treated with URB597 (0.3 mg/kg/day) at one dose/4-days resting or 5 doses (1 dose/day). Repeated URB597 treatment increased the plasma levels of the N-acylethanolamines oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide and arachidonoylethanolamine, reduced the plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, and induced a transitory body weight decrease. The hippocampi of repeated URB597-treated rats showed a reduced number of phospho-H3(+) and BrdU(+) subgranular cells as well as GFAP(+), Iba1(+) and cleaved caspase-3(+) cells, which was accompanied with decreased hippocampal expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene Cnr1 and Faah. In the hypothalami of these rats, the number of phospho-H3(+), GFAP(+) and 3-weeks-old BrdU(+) cells was specifically decreased. The reduced striatal expression of CB1 receptor in repeated URB597-treated rats was only associated with a reduced apoptosis. In contrast, the striatum of acute URB597-treated rats showed an increased number of subventricular proliferative, astroglial and apoptotic cells, which was accompanied with increased Faah expression. Main results indicated that FAAH inhibitor URB597 decreased neural proliferation, glia and apoptosis in a brain region-dependent manner, which were coupled to local changes in Faah and/or Cnr1 expression and a negative energy context.

  5. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... alcohol abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute ... chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be a factor in some cases. ...

  6. 吗啡诱导CPP建立和消退大鼠海马CA1区超微结构变化的研究%Ultrastructural Changes in Hippocampal CAI during Morphine Induced Conditioned Place Preference Establishment and Extinction in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵晓霞; 赵永娜; 李树清; 赵嵩月; 李晓红; 方正梅

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the ultrastructural changes in hippocampal CA1 during morphine induced conditioned place preference establishment and extinction in rats, and to elucidate the relation between the ultrastructural changes and the progress of conditioned place preference. Methods Morphine was administered via subcutaneous injection at constant dose (10 mg/kg) for 8 d to establish morphine CPP. The rats were given 10 d saline extinction training to extinguish CPP. The changes of ultrastructures in hippocampus during morphine induced conditioned place preference establishment and extinction in rats were observed dynamically by using transimission electron microscope. Results Injecting morphine (10 mg/kg) for 8 d succeeded to produce CPP. After 10 days training with saline, CPP failed to be induced. Ultrastructure of CPP establishment displayed degeneration and necrosis mainly, such as endochylema swelling, rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER)extension, mitochondria swelling and solution, cell pyknosis and so on. Ultra.structure of CPP extinction reflected necrosis and apoptosis mainly, such as karyopyknosis, endechylema swelling and electro-dense raised up,organelle and cell membrane solution, endoplasmie reticulum cisterua formation, karyon euchromatin thickening and margination, perinuclear cistema augmentation and so on. Concltusion The inreversible damage have taken place in hippovampal CA1 neurons, and this change may be related to morphine psychological dependence.%目的 比较吗啡(morphine,mor)诱导的条件性位置偏爱(conditioned place preference,CPP)建立和消退阶段大鼠海马CA1区超微结构的变化,揭示海马CA1区超微结构的变化与CPP建立和消退过程的关系.方法 恒量法(10 mg/kg)连续颈背部皮下注射(subcutaneous,SC)吗啡8 d建立吗啡依赖大鼠CPP模型;用生理盐水替代吗啡训练大鼠10 d,使形成的CPP逐渐消退.应用透射电镜动态观测吗啡CPP建立和消退大鼠海马CA1

  7. 不同消退方法对吗啡诱导的小鼠条件性位置偏爱行为的影响%Effect of different extinction methods on morphine-induced conditioned place preference in mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢关伊; 吴宁; 李锦

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of extinction using different methods and the subsequent reinstatement of morphine-primed on morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP). Methods Mouse received morphine(10 mg/kg, sc) or saline (10 mg/kg, sc) injections alternately for 8 days to establish CPP. Different methods were used for extinction. Program 1, withdrawal group. Extinction sessions were conducted 21 days after the CPP test at 7 days interval; Program 2, extinction test group. Extinction sessions were carried out once a day from the second day after the CPP test; Program 3, extinction training group. Extinction sessions began one day after the CPP test. Mice were treated alternately two trials daily, in compartments where they received saline instead of morphine. A test for reinstatement was performed on the 2nd or 7th day after all groups completed extinction by 5 mg/kg morphine-primed. Results Morphine injections induce strong CPP. In withdrawal group, CPP extinguished on the 35th day and maintained for at least 28 days. Six trials extinction tests and 4 trials extinction training caused morphine induced CPP extinction. The three programs mentioned above were all primed by 5mg/kg morphine. Conclusion Morphine induced mouse CPP model can maintain at least 28 days, both extinction test and training can accelerate the extinction of CPP, and reinstatement by 5 mg/kg morphine.%目的:比较采用不同的消退方法对吗啡诱导条件性位置偏爱(CPP)的消退及随后小剂量药物诱发点燃的影响。方法小鼠采用交替隔日皮下注射吗啡(10 mg/kg)或等容量生理盐水后在伴药箱或非伴药箱训练共8 d,即接受吗啡和生理盐水训练共4个轮次,使小鼠形成CPP。采用不同的消退方法使小鼠CPP熄灭。方案1:自然消退。小鼠吗啡CPP形成后不做任何处理,待21 d后,每隔7 d进行1次测试,观察其消退程度。方案2:测试消退。小鼠吗啡CPP形成第2

  8. 外周电刺激抑制大鼠吗啡条件性位置偏爱的复发及海洛因成瘾者的心瘾%Inhibition by peripheral electric stimulation of the reinstatement of morphine-induced place preference in rats and drug-craving in heroin addicts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玢; 张本国; 葛学采; 罗非; 韩济生

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective:To test the hypothesis that peripheral electric stimulation (PES) may suppress the reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats as well as the drug craving of detoxified heroin addicts in a frequency-dependent manner.Methods:CPP model of the rat was constructed with two compartment automatic CPP apparatus, and the craving of the heroin addicts was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results:(1) PES of low frequency could prevent the drug priming- or foot shock-induced reinstatement of morphine CPP; (2) this effect was naloxone-reversible, suggesting a possible involvement of endogenous opioid mechanisms; and (3) PES of low frequency could also accelerate the rate of natural decay of drug craving in heroin addicts after successful abstinence. Conclusion:PES might serve as a therapeutic measure for the treatment of heroin addiction.%目的:探讨外周电刺激(PES)是否能频率依赖性地抑制吗啡条件性位置偏爱(CPP)的复发和抑制海洛因成瘾者脱毒后的心瘾.方法:用二室自动CPP箱记录大鼠条件性CPP,用视觉模拟尺测量海洛因成瘾者的"心瘾(渴求)".结果:(1)低频PES能抑制大鼠小剂量吗啡点燃、或脚底电刺激诱发的吗啡CPP;(2)上述效应可被小剂量吗啡受体拮抗剂纳洛酮(1 mg*kg-1)翻转,提示有内源性阿片机制参与;(3)低频PES还能使海洛因成瘾者脱毒后对毒品"心瘾"的自然消退过程加速.结论:外周神经电刺激可能是治疗海洛因成瘾的一种有效方法.

  9. Effects of total alkaloids of Aconitum sungpanens Hand-Mazz on morphine-induced behavioral senitization and withdrawal sympotoms of morphine-dependence%松潘乌头总碱对吗啡行为敏化及其依赖戒断症状的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏; 王建治; 刘秀花; 焦海胜

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究松潘乌头总碱(TAA)对吗啡行为敏化及其依赖戒断症状的影响.方法 小鼠皮下注射吗啡10 mg/(kg.d),连续7d,建立吗啡诱导的小鼠行为敏化模型,观察TAA对行为敏化形成和表达的影响,恒量法和剂量递增法建立小鼠及大鼠吗啡依赖模型,观察TAA对吗啡依赖动物戒断症状的影响.结果 TAA(1.5~3.0 mg/kg)可抑制小鼠吗啡行为敏化的形成和表达过程;对吗啡依赖动物戒断评分值、体重下降均有明显抑制作用.结论 TAA可阻止吗啡成瘾行为的形成,可改善吗啡依赖动物的戒断症状,TAA对吗啡依赖可能有一定的干预作用.%Objective To study the effects of total alkaloids of Aconitum sungpanens Hand-Mazz (TAA) on morphine-induced behavioral sensitizations in mice and its effects on the withdrawal symptoms of morphine-dependence in mice and rats. Methods Mice were made behavioral sensi-tization to morphine by subcutaneous injection of 10 mg/(kg·d) morphine for 7 days, and treated with combination of morphine and TAA to investigate the effects of TAA on the sensitization to morphine. Morphine-dependent models were administrated by a constant and a gradual increasing dosage in mice and rats, and followed by the treatment of TAA. The withdrawal syndromes were scored spontaneous withdrawal after stop administration of morphine and after naloxone precipitation. Results TAA obviously blocked the development and expression of behavioral sensitization to morphine in mice. It also could inhibit the withdrawal syndromes and body weight loss in morphine-dependent mice and rats. Conclusion TAA can inhibit the development of morphine addiction behavior and morphine-withdrawal syndromes.

  10. Chronic morphine administration induces over-expression of aldolase C with reduction of CREB phosphorylation in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai-Yu; Pu, Xiao-Ping

    2009-05-01

    In recent studies, alterations in the activity and expression of metabolic enzymes, such as those involved in glycolysis, have been detected in morphine-dependent patients and animals. Increasing evidence demonstrates that the hippocampus is an important brain region associated with morphine dependence, but the molecular events occurring in the hippocampus following chronic exposure to morphine are poorly understood. Aldolase C is the brain-specific isoform of fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase which is a glycolytic enzyme catalyzing reactions in the glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and fructose metabolic pathways. Using Western blot and immunofluorescence assays, we found the expression of aldolase C was markedly increased in the mouse hippocampus following chronic morphine treatment. Naloxone pretreatment before morphine administration suppressed withdrawal jumping, weight loss, and overexpression of aldolase C. CREB is a transcription factor regulated through phosphorylation on Ser133, which is known to play a key role in the mechanism of morphine dependence. When detecting the expression of phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in the mouse hippocampus using Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we found CREB phosphorylation was clearly decreased following chronic morphine treatment. Interestingly, laser-confocal microscopy showed that overexpression of aldolase C in mouse hippocampal neurons was concomitant with the decreased immunoreactivity of p-CREB. The results suggest potential links between the morphine-induced alteration of aldolase C and the regulation of CREB phosphorylation, a possible mechanism of morphine dependence.

  11. Modulation of morphine-induced antinociception by ibogaine and noribogaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagal, A A; Hough, L B; Nalwalk, J W; Glick, S D

    1996-11-25

    The potential modulation of morphine antinociception by the putative anti-addictive agent ibogaine and its active metabolite (noribogaine) was investigated in rats with the radiant heat tail-flick test. Ibogaine pretreatment (40 mg/kg, i.p., 19 h) significantly decreased morphine (4 mg/kg, s.c.) antinociception, with no effects in the absence of morphine. However, co-administration of ibogaine (1-40 mg/kg, i.p.) and morphine (4 mg/kg, s.c.) exhibited a dose-dependent enhancement of morphine antinociception. Co-administration of noribogaine (40 mg/kg, i.p.) and morphine also resulted in an increase in morphine antinociception, while noribogaine pretreatment (19 h) had no effect on morphine antinociception. The results show that ibogaine acutely potentiates morphine antinociception and that noribogaine could be the active metabolite responsible for this effect. However, the inhibitory effects of a 19 h ibogaine pretreatment, which resemble ibogaine-induced inhibition of morphine's stimulant properties, cannot be accounted for by noribogaine.

  12. Expression changes of hippocampal energy metabolism enzymes contribute to behavioural abnormalities during chronic morphine treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Lan Chen; Jing-Gen Liu; Gang Lu; Ying-Xia Gong; Liang-Cai Zhao; Jie Chen; Zhi-Qiang Chi; Yi-Ming Yang; Zhong Chen; Qing-lin Li

    2007-01-01

    Dependence and impairment of learning and memory are two well-established features caused by abused drugs such as opioids. The hippocampus is an important region associated with both drug dependence and learning and memory. However, the molecular events in hippocampus following exposure to abused drugs such as opioids are not well understood. Here we examined the effect of chronic morphine treatment on hippocampal protein expression by proteomic analyses. We found that chronic exposure of mice to morphine for 10 days produced robust morphine withdrawal jumping and memory impairment, and also resulted in a significant downregulation of hippocampal protein levels of three metabolic enzymes, including Fe-S protein 1 of NADH dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase or E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and lactate dehydrogenase 2. Further real-time quantitative PCR analyses confirmed that the levels of the corresponding mRNAs were also remarkably reduced. Consistent with these findings, lower ATP levels and an impaired ability to convert glucose into ATP were also observed in the hippocampus of chronically treated mice. Opioid antagonist naltrexone administrated concomitantly with morphine significantly suppressed morphine withdrawal jumping and reversed the downregulation of these proteins. Acute exposure to morphine also produced robust morphine withdrawal jumping and significant memory impairment, but failed to decrease the expression of these three proteins. Intrahippocampal injection of D-glucose before morphine administration significantly enhanced ATP levels and suppressed morphine withdrawal jumping and memory impairment in acute morphine-treated but not in chronic morphine-treated mice. Intraperitoneal injection of high dose of D-glucose shows a similar effect on morphine-induced withdrawal jumping as the central treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that reduced expression of the three metabolic enzymes in the hippocampus as

  13. 侧脑室注射Conantokin-G类似物拮抗吗啡诱导小鼠奖赏效应的研究%EFFECTS OF CONANTOKIN-G ANALOGUE INJECTION INTO LATERAL VENTRICLE ON MORPHINE-INDUCED REWARDING IN MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江敏; 李鹏飞; 朱永平

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effects of Glu-Con-G、Glu-Con-G[1-11] and Glu-Con-G[S16Y] on morphine dependence,providing a direction to design the structure of Conantokin-G analogues.Methods:Male Kunming mice (18-20 g) were used in this experiment.Conditioned place preference model was used for assessing the effects of Glu-Con-G、Glu-Con-G[1-11] and Glu-Con-G[S16Y] on morphine dependence.Results:Glu-Con-G (120,240,480,960 pmol),Glu-Con-G[1-11] (120,240,480 pmol) and Glu-Con-G[S16Y] (480,960 pmol) inhibited the expression and reinstatement of morphine-induced CPP by single intracerebroventricular administration,with no significant behavioral disorders under the experimental conditions.Conclusion:These results indicate that three Conantokin-G analogues can inhibit morphine dependence.They are expected to become potential anti-addictive drugs.%目的:探究Glu-Con-G、Glu-Con-G[1-11]和Glu-Con-G[S16Y]抗吗啡精神依赖的药效,为进一步设计、筛选抗吗啡依赖的芋螺毒素类似物提供理论和实验依据.方法:采用清洁级♂昆明种小鼠,用条件性位置偏爱(conditioned place preference,CPP)模型检测侧脑室给予3种芋螺毒素类似物对小鼠吗啡精神依赖效应及行为学的影响.结果:120、240、480、960 pmol Glu-Con-G,120、240、480 pmol Glu-Con-G[1-11]和480、960 pmol Glu-Con-G[S16Y]对吗啡诱导小鼠CPP的表达和复燃有抑制作用,且在最高受试剂量时均不影响小鼠的运动活性及探索行为.结论:Glu-Con-G、Glu-Con-G[1-11]、Glu-Con-G[S16Y]可拮抗吗啡诱导小鼠CPP的表达和复燃,具有抗吗啡依赖作用,且不影响其运动活性和探索行为,有望成为抗吗啡依赖的潜在药物.

  14. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... Chronic myelogenous leukemia is grouped into phases: Chronic Accelerated Blast crisis The chronic phase can last for ...

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrese, James C.; Aceros, Juan; Donoghue, John P.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Signal attenuation is a major problem facing intracortical sensors for chronic neuroprosthetic applications. Many studies suggest that failure is due to gliosis around the electrode tips, however, mechanical and material causes of failure are often overlooked. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors contributing to progressive signal decline by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to visualize structural changes in chronically implanted arrays and histology to examine the tissue response at corresponding implant sites. Approach. We examined eight chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) explanted from non-human primates at times ranging from 37 to 1051 days post-implant. We used SEM, in vivo neural recordings, and histology (GFAP, Iba-1, NeuN). Three MEAs that were never implanted were also imaged as controls. Main results. SEM revealed progressive corrosion of the platinum electrode tips and changes to the underlying silicon. The parylene insulation was prone to cracking and delamination, and in some instances the silicone elastomer also delaminated from the edges of the MEA. Substantial tissue encapsulation was observed and was often seen growing into defects in the platinum and parylene. These material defects became more common as the time in vivo increased. Histology at 37 and 1051 days post-implant showed gliosis, disruption of normal cortical architecture with minimal neuronal loss, and high Iba-1 reactivity, especially within the arachnoid and dura. Electrode tracts were either absent or barely visible in the cortex at 1051 days, but were seen in the fibrotic encapsulation material suggesting that the MEAs were lifted out of the brain. Neural recordings showed a progressive drop in impedance, signal amplitude, and viable channels over time. Significance. These results provide evidence that signal loss in MEAs is truly multifactorial. Gliosis occurs in the first few months after implantation but does

  16. Chronic cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholecystitis - chronic ... Most of the time, chronic cholecystitis is caused by repeated attacks of acute (sudden) cholecystitis. Most of these attacks are caused by gallstones in the gallbladder. These ...

  17. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. × ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. ...

  18. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis ...

  19. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Brian; Schaeffer, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  20. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Bradley A.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Le, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome, CP/CPPS). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  1. [Chronicity, chronicization, systematization of delusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapet, P; Fernandez, C; Galtier, M C; Gisselmann, A

    1984-05-01

    Chronicity in psychopathology is indicative of a term, a decay. Chronicization only leads the way to this term. Here, chronicization is taken literally as an inscription in the time course of delusions. The mechanism of systematization seems to be a central mark in the approach to chronic delusions. It is not an alienation or an irreversible closing but an attempted accommodation with reality in the life of psychotic subjects, irrespective of the delusional structure. The role of therapy and drug treatment as a follow-up may in that case assume another meaning.

  2. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  3. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  4. Rational Basis for the Use of Bergamot Essential Oil in Complementary Medicine to Treat Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombolà, L; Amantea, D; Russo, R; Adornetto, A; Berliocchi, L; Tridico, L; Corasaniti, M T; Sakurada, S; Sakurada, T; Bagetta, G; Morrone, L A

    2016-01-01

    In complementary medicine, aromatherapy uses essential oils to improve agitation and aggression observed in dementia, mood, depression, anxiety and chronic pain. Preclinical research studies have reported that the essential oil obtained from bergamot (BEO) fruit (Citrus bergamia, Risso) modifies normal and pathological synaptic plasticity implicated, for instance, in nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Interestingly, recent results indicated that BEO modulates sensitive perception of pain in different models of nociceptive, inflammatory and neuropathic pain modulating endogenous systems. Thus, local administration of BEO inhibited the nociceptive behavioral effect induced by intraplantar injection of capsaicin or formalin in mice. Similar effects were observed with linalool and linalyl acetate, major volatile components of the phytocomplex, Pharmacological studies showed that the latter effects are reversed by local or systemic pretreatment with the opioid antagonist naloxone hydrochloride alike with naloxone methiodide, high affinity peripheral μ-opioid receptor antagonist. These results and the synergistic effect observed following systemic or intrathecal injection of an inactive dose of morphine with BEO or linalool indicated an activation of peripheral opioid system. Recently, in neuropathic pain models systemic or local administration of BEO or linalool induced antiallodynic effects. In particular, in partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) model, intraplantar injection of the phytocomplex or linalool in the ipsilateral hindpaw, but not in the contralateral, reduced PSNL-induced extracellularsignal- regulated kinase (ERK) activation and mechanical allodynia. In neuropathic pain high doses of morphine are needed to reduce pain. Interestingly, combination of inactive doses of BEO or linalool with a low dose of morphine induced antiallodynic effects in mice. Peripheral cannabinoid and opioid systems appear to be involved in the antinociception produced by

  5. An implantable device for neuropsychiatric rehabilitation by chronic deep brain stimulation in freely moving rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenguang; Zhang, Fuqiang; Jia, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Successful practice of clinical deep brain stimulation (DBS) calls for basic research on the mechanisms and explorations of new indications in animals. In the article, a new implantable, single-channel, low-power miniature device is proposed, which may transmit pulses chronically into the brain nucleus of freely moving rats. The DBS system consists of an implantable pulse generator (IPG), a bipolar electrode, and an external programmer. The IPG circuit module is assembled as a 20-mm diameter circular board and fixed on a rat’s skull together with an electrode and battery. The rigid electrode may make its fabrication and implantation more easy. The external programmer is designed for bidirectional communication with the IPG by a telecontrol transceiver and adjusts stimulation parameters. A biological validation was performed in which the effects of electrical stimulation in brain nucleus accumbens were detected. The programmed parameters were accurate, implant steady, and power sufficient to allow stimulation for more than 3 months. The larger area of the electrode tip provided a moderate current or charge density and minimized the damage from electrochemistry and pyroelectricity. The rats implanted with the device showed a reduction in morphine-induced conditioned place preference after high-frequency stimulation. In conclusion, the DBS device is based on the criteria of simple technology, minimal invasion, low cost, small in size, light-weight, and wireless controlled. This shows that our DBS device is appropriate and can be used for preclinical studies, indicating its potential utility in the therapy and rehabilitation of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28121810

  6. Ear infection - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when fluid or an infection ...

  7. Frontoparietal cortical atrophy with gliosis in the gray matter of cerebral cortex: case report Atrofia cortical frontoparietal com gliose na substância cinzenta do córtex cerebral: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto de Brito-Marques

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The case of a patient who suffered from progressive amnesia, depressive humor, language and visuospatial disturbances, and hallucination episodies with interference at the daily living activities is reported. She had moderate neuropsichological diffuse deficits at the first examination, especially at the executive and visuo-constructive functions. Her cerebrospinal fluid test presented high total protein. Magnetic resonance image showed slight white matter increase in periventricular, semi-oval center bilateral and left external capsule regions, besides light frontal and parietal lobe atrophy, bilaterally. Brain single photon emission computerized tomography revealed both a bilateral moderate frontal and a severe parietal lobe hypoperfusion, especially on the left side. Macroscopic examination showed cortical atrophy, severe on the frontal, moderate on the parietal and mild on the posterior third temporal lobes, bilaterally. There was a slight atrophy on the neostriatum in the basal ganglia. The histopathological findings of the autopsy showed severe neuronal loss with intensive gemioscytic gliosis and variable degrees of status spongiosus in cortical layer. Hematoxylin-eosin and Bielschowsky staining did not show neuronal swelling (balooned cell, argyrophilic inclusion (Pick's bodies, neurofibrillary tangles nor senile plaques. Immunohistochemical staining for anti-ubiquitin, anti-tau, anti-beta-amyloide, and anti-prion protein were tested negative.É descrito o caso de uma paciente que apresentava amnésia, humor deprimido, distúrbio de linguagem e visoespacial, e alucinação visual com evolução progressiva, interferindo nas atividades de vida diária. Na primeira avaliação neuropsicológica havia déficit difuso de intensidade moderada, especialmente nas funções executivas e viso-construtivas. O exame de líquido céfalo-raqueano mostrou a taxa de proteína elevada. Ressonância magnética evidenciou leve hiperintensidade de sinal na

  8. [Chronic hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Barrios, R

    1995-01-01

    Medical literature about chronic hepatitis is reviewed. This unresolving disease caused by viruses, drugs or unknown factors may progress to in cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. A classification based on liver biopsy histology into chronic persistent and chronic active types has been largely abandoned and emphasis is placed on recognizing the etiology of the various types. One is associated with continuing hepatitis B virus infection; another is related to chronic hepatitis C virus infection and the third is termed autoinmune, because of the association with positive serum autoantibodies. A fourth type with similar clinical functional and morphologic features is found with some drug reactions. Long term corticoesteroid therapy is usually successful in autoinmune type. Associations between antibodies to liver-kidney microsomes and the hepatitis C virus can cause diagnostic difficulties. Antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis B and C with interpheron alfa is employed, controlling symptoms and abnormal biochemistry and the progression to cirrhosis and liver cancer in 30 to 40% patients. Alternative therapies or combinations with interpheron are being evaluated waiting for final results.

  9. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitija Garde

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation, currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative on-dependent multi-electrode arrays of open design allow the early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. .

  10. Effect of a chronic GSM 900 MHz exposure on glia in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Mohamed; Brillaud, Elsa; Gamez, Christelle; Lecomte, Anthony; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; de Seze, René

    2008-01-01

    Extension of the mobile phone technology raises concern about the health effects of 900 MHz microwaves on the central nervous system (CNS). In this study we measured GFAP expression using immunocytochemistry method, to evaluate glial evolution 10 days after a chronic exposure (5 days a week for 24 weeks) to GSM signal for 45 min/day at a brain-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR)=1.5 W/kg and for 15 min/day at a SAR=6 W/kg in the following rat brain areas: prefrontal cortex (PfCx), caudate putamen (Cpu), lateral globus pallidus of striatum (LGP), dentate gyrus of hippocampus (DG) and cerebellum cortex (CCx). In comparison to sham or cage control animals, rats exposed to chronic GSM signal at 6 W/kg have increased GFAP stained surface areas in the brain (pGSM at 1.5 W/kg did not increase GFAP expression. Our results indicated that chronic exposure to GSM 900 MHz microwaves (SAR=6 W/kg) may induce persistent astroglia activation in the rat brain (sign of a potential gliosis).

  11. Chronic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines.

  12. Chronic Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathing. You may also have other tests. Chronic bronchitis is a long-term condition that keeps coming back or never goes away completely. If you smoke, it is important to quit. Treatment can help with your symptoms. It often includes ...

  13. Chronic exercise ameliorates the neuroinflammation in mice carrying NSE/htau23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leem, Yea-Hyun, E-mail: leemyy@empas.com [Exercise Biochemistry Laboratory, Korea National Sport University, Seoul 138-763 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-Ik, E-mail: lee0ik@hanmail.net [Department of Oriental Sports Medicine, Daegu Hanny University, Daegu 712-715 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hee-Jeong, E-mail: son1106@paran.com [Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Korea National Sport University, Seoul 138-763 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Ho, E-mail: run2025@hanmail.net [Department of Sports for All, Kangnam University, Yongin 446-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} The progress of neurodegeration are directly linked to the neuroinflammatory response. {yields} We investigate whether exercise improves the neuroinflammation using T{sub g}-NSE/htau23 mice. {yields} This provides insights that exercise may beneficial effects on the neuroinflammatory disorders. -- Abstract: The objective of the present study was to investigate whether chronic endurance exercise attenuates the neuroinflammation in the brain of mice with NSE/htau23. In this study, the tau-transgenic (Tg) mouse, Tg-NSE/htau23, which over expresses human Tau23 in its brain, was subjected to chronic exercise for 3 months, from 16 months of age. The brains of Tg mice exhibited increased immunoreactivity and active morphological changes in GFAP (astrocyte marker) and MAC-1 (microglia marker) expression in an age-dependent manner. To identify the effects of chronic exercise on gliosis, the exercised Tg mice groups were treadmill run at a speed of 12 m/min (intermediate exercise group) or 19 m/min (high exercise group) for 1 h/day and 5 days/week during the 3 month period. The neuroinflammatory response characterized by activated astroglia and microglia was significantly repressed in the exercised Tg mice in an exercise intensity-dependent manner. In parallel, chronic exercise in Tg mice reduced the increased expression of TNF-{alpha}, IL-6, IL-1{beta}, COX-2, and iNOS. Consistently with these changes, the levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-ERK were markedly downregulated in the brain of Tg mice after exercise. In addition, nuclear NF-{kappa}B activity was profoundly reduced after chronic exercise in an exercise intensity-dependent manner. These findings suggest that chronic endurance exercise may alleviate neuroinflammation in the Tau pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information > Children/Pediatric > Chronic Pancreatitis in Children test Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child ... pancreatitis will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are ...

  15. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Chronic Beryllium Disease Chronic Beryllium Disease Make an Appointment Find a Doctor ... MD, MSPH, FCCP (February 01, 2016) What is chronic beryllium disease (CBD)? Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is ...

  16. Chronic motor tic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  17. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Chronic Pelvic Pain Home For Patients Search FAQs Chronic Pelvic Pain ... Pelvic Pain FAQ099, August 2011 PDF Format Chronic Pelvic Pain Gynecologic Problems What is chronic pelvic pain? What ...

  18. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto thyroiditis; Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis; Autoimmune thyroiditis; Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis; Lymphadenoid goiter - Hashimoto; Hypothyroidism - Hashimoto; Type 2 polyglandular autoimmune ...

  19. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyneuropathy - chronic inflammatory; CIDP; Chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy; Guillain-Barré - CIDP ... Health care providers also consider CIDP as the chronic form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The specific triggers ...

  20. Dealing with chronic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000933.htm Dealing with chronic cancer To use the sharing features on this ... be controlled for a period of time. Controlling Chronic Cancer When you have a chronic cancer, the ...

  1. Aging aggravates ischemic stroke-induced brain damage in mice with chronic peripheral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Denes, Adam; Valonen, Piia; Wojciechowski, Sara; Magga, Johanna; Savchenko, Ekaterina; Humphreys, Neil; Grencis, Richard; Rothwell, Nancy; Koistinaho, Jari

    2013-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is confounded by conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and infection, all of which alter peripheral inflammatory processes with concomitant impact on stroke outcome. The majority of the stroke patients are elderly, but the impact of interactions between aging and inflammation on stroke remains unknown. We thus investigated the influence of age on the outcome of stroke in animals predisposed to systemic chronic infection. Th1-polarized chronic systemic infection was induced in 18-22 month and 4-month-old C57BL/6j mice by administration of Trichuris muris (gut parasite). One month after infection, mice underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and infarct size, brain gliosis, and brain and plasma cytokine profiles were analyzed. Chronic infection increased the infarct size in aged but not in young mice at 24 h. Aged, ischemic mice showed altered plasma and brain cytokine responses, while the lesion size correlated with plasma prestroke levels of RANTES. Moreover, the old, infected mice exhibited significantly increased neutrophil recruitment and upregulation of both plasma interleukin-17α and tumor necrosis factor-α levels. Neither age nor infection status alone or in combination altered the ischemia-induced brain microgliosis. Our results show that chronic peripheral infection in aged animals renders the brain more vulnerable to ischemic insults, possibly by increasing the invasion of neutrophils and altering the inflammation status in the blood and brain. Understanding the interactions between age and infections is crucial for developing a better therapeutic regimen for ischemic stroke and when modeling it as a disease of the elderly.

  2. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, L; Thomsen, S F; Sylvan Ingebrigtsen, Truls;

    2010-01-01

    Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is a common condition in patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Little is known about the incidence, prevalence and determinants of CMH in younger individuals....

  3. Chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sachdeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic urticaria (CU is a disturbing allergic condition of the skin. Although frequently benign, it may sometimes be a red flag sign of a serious internal disease. A multitude of etiologies have been implicated in the causation of CU, including physical, infective, vasculitic, psychological and idiopathic. An autoimmune basis of most of the ′idiopathic′ forms is now hypothesized. Histamine released from mast cells is the major effector in pathogenesis and it is clinically characterized by wheals that have a tendency to recur. Laboratory investigations aimed at a specific etiology are not always conclusive, though may be suggestive of an underlying condition. A clinical search for associated systemic disease is strongly advocated under appropriate circumstances. The mainstay of treatment remains H1 antihistaminics. These may be combined with complementary pharmacopeia in the form of H2 blockers, doxepin, nifedipine and leukotriene inhibitors. More radical therapy in the form of immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide may be required for recalcitrant cases. Autologous transfusion and alternative remedies like acupuncture have prospects for future. A stepwise management results in favorable outcomes. An update on CU based on our experience with patients at a tertiary care centre is presented.

  4. Chronic pain after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsborg, B.; Nikolajsen, L.; Kehlet, H.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a well-known adverse effect of surgery, but the risk of chronic pain after gynaecological surgery is less established. METHOD: This review summarizes studies on chronic pain following hysterectomy. The underlying mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic...... post-hysterectomy pain are discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Chronic pain is reported by 5-32% of women after hysterectomy. A guideline is proposed for future prospective studies Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  5. Chronic pain after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsborg, B; Nikolajsen, L; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a well-known adverse effect of surgery, but the risk of chronic pain after gynaecological surgery is less established. METHOD: This review summarizes studies on chronic pain following hysterectomy. The underlying mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic...... post-hysterectomy pain are discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Chronic pain is reported by 5-32% of women after hysterectomy. A guideline is proposed for future prospective studies. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar...

  6. Role of fosaprepitant, a neurokinin Type 1 receptor antagonist, in morphine-induced antinociception in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Prasoon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The results show that fosaprepitant attenuates the development of tolerance to morphine and thereby, increases the antinociceptive effect. This is likely linked to decreased release of SP from presynaptic terminals.

  7. Effects of ketamine and midazolam on morphine induced dependence and tolerance in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bohlul Habibi Asl Kambiz Hassanzadeh

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ketamine and midazolam on prevention of the development of morphine tolerance and dependence in mice. Different groups of mice received morphine (50 mg/kg, sc), morphine (50 mg/kg, sc) + ketamine (25,50,75 mg/kg, ip), morphine (50 mg/kg, sc) + midazolam (0.5,1,2 mg/kg, ip) , morphine (50 mg/kg , sc) + ketamine (50 mg/kg, ip) + midazolam (1 mg/kg, ip) once a day for four days. Tolerance was assessed by administration of morphine (9 mg/kg,...

  8. Effects of ketamine and midazolam on morphine induced dependence and tolerance in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohlul Habibi Asl Kambiz Hassanzadeh

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ketamine and midazolam on prevention of the development of morphine tolerance and dependence in mice. Different groups of mice received morphine (50 mg/kg, sc, morphine (50 mg/kg, sc + ketamine (25,50,75 mg/kg, ip, morphine (50 mg/kg, sc + midazolam (0.5,1,2 mg/kg, ip , morphine (50 mg/kg , sc + ketamine (50 mg/kg, ip + midazolam (1 mg/kg, ip once a day for four days. Tolerance was assessed by administration of morphine (9 mg/kg, ip on fifth day. Withdrawal symptoms were assessed by administration of naloxane (4 mg/kg, ip two hours after co-administration of morphine with either ketamine or midazolam. It was found that pretreatment with ketamine or midazolam decreased the degree of tolerance and withdrawal symptoms. Additionally co-administration of ketamine and midazolam before morphine therapy decreased the tolerance and dependence significantly. From these results it may concluded that administration of ketamine and midazolam alone or in combination could prevent the development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. These effects can be related to the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist behavior of ketamine and GABA-receptor agonist behavior of midazolam.

  9. Effects of ketamine and magnesium on morphine induced tolerance and dependence in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohlul Habibi Asl

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of ketamine and magnesium on prevention of development of morphine tolerance and dependence in mice. In this study different groups of mice received morphine (50 mg/kg, sc + (saline 10ml/kg, morphine (50 mg/kg, sc + ketamine (25,50 or 75mg/kg, ip, morphine (50 mg/kg, sc + magnesium (10,20 or 40 mg/kg, ip, morphine (50 mg/kg, sc +ketamine (25 mg/kg, ip + magnesium (10 mg/kg, ip] once a day for four days. Tolerance was assessed by administration of morphine (9 mg/kg, ip and using hot plate test on fifth day. Withdrawal symptoms were assessed by administration of naloxone (4 mg/kg, ip two hours after co-administration of morphine with either ketamine or magnesium. It was found that pretreatment with ketamine or magnesium decreased the degree of tolerance and dependence. Additionally, co-administration of ketamine and magnesium before morphine administration decreased the tolerance and dependence significantly. From these results it may be concluded that administration of ketamine or magnesium alone or together could prevent the development of tolerance and dependence to the analgesic effects of morphine. These effects may be related to the N-Methyl-DAspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist behavior of ketamine and the ability of magnesium to block the Ca channel of NMDA receptors.

  10. [Chronic otitis mediaChronic Otitis Media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohles, N; Schulz, T; Eßer, D

    2015-11-01

    There are 2 different kinds of chronic otitis media: Otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and otitis media chronica epitympanalis (cholesteatoma). The incidence of chronic otitis media as reported in literature differs in a wide range. The incidence rates vary between 0.45 and 46%. Both, otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and cholesteatoma, lead to eardrum perforation due to lengthy and recurring inflammations. Furthermore, chronic otitis media is characterized by frequently recurring otorrhea and conductive hearing loss.

  11. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  12. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002442.htm Diet - chronic kidney disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... make changes to your diet when you have chronic kidney disease. These changes may include limiting fluids, eating a ...

  13. Chronic granulomatous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGD; Fatal granulomatosis of childhood; Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood; Progressive septic granulomatosis ... In chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), immune system cells called phagocytes are unable to kill some types of bacteria and ...

  14. Chronic mucus hypersecretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Nepper-Christensen, Steen;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults.......To investigate if chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) can be used as a marker of asthma in young adults....

  15. Chronic tophaceous gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thappa D

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of chronic tophaceous gout, in a 27-year-old female on diuretics for chronic congestive cardiac failure with characteristic histopathological and radiological changes is reported.

  16. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maintaining good health. Can chronic pancreatitis give my child cancer? If your child has chronic pancreatitis, he or she will be at an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared to the general population. The degree of ...

  17. People Experiencing Chronic Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Goals Ending Chronic Homelessness Share This: Ending Chronic Homelessness Last updated on January 19, 2017 We can ... the USICH newsletter. We know how to end homelessness. Let's do it, together. Sign up for our ...

  18. Ascending central canal dilation and progressive ependymal disruption in a contusion model of rodent chronic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keirstead Hans S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI can lead to an insidious decline in motor and sensory function in individuals even years after the initial injury and is accompanied by a slow and progressive cytoarchitectural destruction. At present, no pathological mechanisms satisfactorily explain the ongoing degeneration. Methods Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized laminectomized at T10 and received spinal cord contusion injuries with a force of 250 kilodynes using an Infinite Horizon Impactor. Animals were randomly distributed into 5 groups and killed 1 (n = 4, 28 (n = 4, 120 (n = 4, 450 (n = 5, or 540 (n = 5 days after injury. Morphometric and immunohistochemical studies were then performed on 1 mm block sections, 6 mm cranial and 6 mm caudal to the lesion epicenter. The SPSS 11.5 t test was used to determine differences between quantitative measures. Results Here, we document the first report of an ascending central canal dilation and progressive ependymal disruption cranial to the epicenter of injury in a contusion model of chronic SCI, which was characterized by extensive dural fibrosis and intraparenchymal cystic cavitation. Expansion of the central canal lumen beyond a critical diameter corresponded with ependymal cell ciliary loss, an empirically predictable thinning of the ependymal region, and a decrease in cell proliferation in the ependymal region. Large, aneurysmal dilations of the central canal were accompanied by disruptions in the ependymal layer, periependymal edema and gliosis, and destruction of the adjacent neuropil. Conclusion Cells of the ependymal region play an important role in CSF homeostasis, cellular signaling and wound repair in the spinal cord. The possible effects of this ascending pathology on ependymal function are discussed. Our studies suggest central canal dilation and ependymal region disruption as steps in the pathogenesis of chronic SCI, identify central canal dilation as a marker of

  19. Approaching chronic sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarber, Kathleen M; Dion, Gregory Robert; Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, Kevin C

    2013-11-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a common disease that encompasses a number of syndromes that are characterized by sinonasal mucosal inflammation. Chronic sinusitis can be defined as two or more of the following symptoms lasting for more than 12 consecutive weeks: discolored rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, nasal obstruction, facial pressure or pain, or decreased sense of smell. Chronic sinusitis is further classified as chronic sinusitis with polyposis, chronic sinusitis without polyposis, or allergic fungal sinusitis using physical examination, and histologic and radiographic findings. Treatment methods for chronic sinusitis are based upon categorization of the disease and include oral and inhaled corticosteroids, nasal saline irrigations, and antibiotics in selected patients. Understanding the various forms of chronic sinusitis and managing and ruling out comorbidities are key to successful management of this common disorder.

  20. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds.

  1. Chronic Inflammatory Polyneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen children with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy monitored between 1975 and 2005 are reported from Centre hospitalier universitaire Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Canada.

  2. Effect of Topiramate on brain hippocampus reactive gliosis in pentylenetetrazol induced chronic epilepsia rats%托吡酯对戊四氮点燃慢性癫(癎)大鼠脑海马胶质细胞增生的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐惠琴; 朱遂强; 郑荣远; 王开颜; 李安乐; 杨学志

    2006-01-01

    目的:探讨脑海马胶质细胞增生在癫(癎)发生、发展中的作用及托吡酯对其的影响.方法:采用戊四氮制备慢性癫(癎)模型,利用托吡酯干扰,选取不同时间点,观察大鼠行为学变化及胶质纤维酸性蛋白在海马回中的表达(免疫组织化学染色).结果:托吡酯组点燃率在27 d明显低于模型组;模型组及托吡酯组胶质纤维酸性蛋白表达增加,并随时间延长更加明显;而不同时间点该表达的增加程度,托吡酯组均低于模型组.结论:胶质纤维酸性蛋白表达的增加,说明出现了胶质细胞活化及脑可塑性变化,而托吡酯明显地抑制了该表达的增加.

  3. Persistent gliosis interferes with neurogenesis in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes eGerlach

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has become an intensively investigated research topic, as it is essential for proper hippocampal function and considered to bear therapeutic potential for the replacement of pathologically lost neurons. On the other hand, neurogenesis itself is frequently affected by CNS insults. To identify processes leading to the disturbance of neurogenesis, we made use of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC, which, for unknown reasons, lose their neurogenic potential during cultivation. In the present study, we show by BrdU/Prox1 double-immunostaining that the generation of new granule cells drops by 90% during the first week of cultivation. Monitoring neurogenesis dynamically in OHSC from POMC-eGFP mice, in which immature granule cells are endogenously labeled, revealed a gradual decay of the eGFP signal, reaching 10% of initial values within seven days of cultivation. Accordingly, RT-qPCR analysis showed the downregulation of the neurogenesis-related genes doublecortin and Hes5, a crucial target of the stem cell-maintaining Notch signaling pathway. In parallel, we demonstrate a strong and long-lasting activation of astrocytes and microglial cells, both, morphologically and on the level of gene expression. Enhancement of astroglial activation by treating OHSC with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF accelerated the loss of neurogenesis, whereas treatment with indomethacin or an antagonist of the purinergic P2Y12 receptor exhibited potent protective effects on the neurogenic outcome. Therefore, we conclude that OHSC rapidly lose their neurogenic capacity due to persistent inflammatory processes taking place after the slice preparation. As inflammation is also considered to affect neurogenesis in many CNS pathologies, OHSC appear as a useful tool to study this interplay and its molecular basis. Furthermore, we propose that modification of glial activation might bear the therapeutic potential of enabling neurogenesis under neuropathological conditions.

  4. Persistent Gliosis Interferes with Neurogenesis in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Johannes; Donkels, Catharina; Münzner, Gert; Haas, Carola A

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus has become an intensively investigated research topic, as it is essential for proper hippocampal function and considered to bear therapeutic potential for the replacement of pathologically lost neurons. On the other hand, neurogenesis itself is frequently affected by CNS insults. To identify processes leading to the disturbance of neurogenesis, we made use of organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC), which, for unknown reasons, lose their neurogenic potential during cultivation. In the present study, we show by BrdU/Prox1 double-immunostaining that the generation of new granule cells drops by 90% during the first week of cultivation. Monitoring neurogenesis dynamically in OHSC from POMC-eGFP mice, in which immature granule cells are endogenously labeled, revealed a gradual decay of the eGFP signal, reaching 10% of initial values within 7 days of cultivation. Accordingly, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed the downregulation of the neurogenesis-related genes doublecortin and Hes5, a crucial target of the stem cell-maintaining Notch signaling pathway. In parallel, we demonstrate a strong and long-lasting activation of astrocytes and microglial cells, both, morphologically and on the level of gene expression. Enhancement of astroglial activation by treating OHSC with ciliary neurotrophic factor accelerated the loss of neurogenesis, whereas treatment with indomethacin or an antagonist of the purinergic P2Y12 receptor exhibited potent protective effects on the neurogenic outcome. Therefore, we conclude that OHSC rapidly lose their neurogenic capacity due to persistent inflammatory processes taking place after the slice preparation. As inflammation is also considered to affect neurogenesis in many CNS pathologies, OHSC appear as a useful tool to study this interplay and its molecular basis. Furthermore, we propose that modification of glial activation might bear the therapeutic potential of enabling neurogenesis under neuropathological conditions.

  5. Coping with Chronic Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Having a long-term, or chronic, illness can disrupt your life in many ways. You may often be tired and in pain. Your illness might affect your ... able to work, causing financial problems. For children, chronic illnesses can be frightening, because they may not ...

  6. Chronic Postoperative Roseomonas Endophthalmitis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Kuan-Jen; Lai, Chi-Chun; Kuo, Ya-Hui; WU, WEI-CHI; CHEN, TUN-LU

    2008-01-01

    We report one case with chronic postoperative endophthalmitis caused by Roseomonas species. Roseomonas spp. induced chronic endophthalmitis, which might result in misdiagnosis and delayed treatment and causes ocular damage and severe visual loss. This report is the first one related to a case with postoperative endophthalmitis secondary to Roseomonas infection.

  7. Chronic postoperative Roseomonas endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Jen; Lai, Chi-Chun; Kuo, Ya-Hui; Wu, Wei-Chi; Chen, Tun-Lu

    2009-01-01

    We report one case with chronic postoperative endophthalmitis caused by Roseomonas species. Roseomonas spp. induced chronic endophthalmitis, which might result in misdiagnosis and delayed treatment and causes ocular damage and severe visual loss. This report is the first one related to a case with postoperative endophthalmitis secondary to Roseomonas infection.

  8. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  9. The Chronic Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Iben M; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the results of a Fairclough-inspired critical discourse analysis aiming to clarify how chronically ill patients are presented in contemporary Danish chronic care policies. Drawing on Fairclough’s three-dimensional framework for analyzing discourse, and using Dean’s concepts...... of governmentality as an interpretative lens, we analyzed and explained six policies published by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority between 2005 and 2013. The analysis revealed that discourses within the policy vision of chronic care consider chronically ill patients’ active role, lifestyle, and health...... behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who are already...

  10. Chronic gastritis - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbanova, Mariya; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main aetiologic factor for chronic gastritis worldwide. The degree of inflammation and the evolution of this form of chronic gastritis can vary largely depending on bacterial virulence factors, host susceptibility factors and environmental conditions. Autoimmune gastritis is another cause of chronic inflammation in the stomach, which can occur in all age groups. This disease presents typically with vitamin B12 deficiency and pernicious anaemia. The presence of anti-parietal cell antibodies is highly specific for the diagnosis. The role of H. pylori as a trigger for autoimmune gastritis remains uncertain. Other rare conditions for chronic gastritis are chronic inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease or on the background of lymphocytic or collagenous gastroenteropathies.

  11. Chronic granulomatous disease associated with chronic glomerulonephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frifelt, J J; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Valerius, Niels Henrik

    1985-01-01

    A boy with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) developed glomerulonephritis at the age of 12 years. The glomerulonephritis progressed to terminal uraemia at age 15 when maintenance haemodialysis was started. The clinical course was complicated by pulmonary aspergillosis and Pseudomonas septicaemia...... from which he eventually died. The glomerulonephritis was of unknown origin, and a possible relationship between CGD and glomerulonephritis is discussed....

  12. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... their treatment is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  13. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... body, including the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  14. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carlos AC; Gimenez, Andréa; Kuranishi, Lilian; Storrer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HSP) is a common interstitial lung disease resulting from inhalation of a large variety of antigens by susceptible individuals. The disease is best classified as acute and chronic. Chronic HSP can be fibrosing or not. Fibrotic HSP has a large differential diagnosis and has a worse prognosis. The most common etiologies for HSP are reviewed. Diagnostic criteria are proposed for both chronic forms based on exposure, lung auscultation, lung function tests, HRCT findings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and biopsies. Treatment options are limited, but lung transplantation results in greater survival in comparison to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Randomized trials with new antifibrotic agents are necessary. PMID:27703382

  15. [An autopsy case of atypical Friedreich's ataxia with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, T; Aoki, M; Hasegawa, T; Shiga, Y; Hayashi, T; Higuchi, J; Abe, K; Tanno, T; Konno, H; Itoyama, Y

    2001-07-01

    We report a 58-year-old man with slowly progressive muscle atrophy and weakness in the four extremities, accompanying cerebellar ataxia and sensory impairment of all modalities. He was a product of consanguineous marriage. His neurological manifestations began in childhood. He was admitted to our hospital because of marked abdominal distension and pretibial edema with hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia. Neuroimaging studies showed marked atrophy of the cerebellum and spinal cord. Nerve conduction studies presented with slowing and sural nerve biopsy revealed demyelination with onion-bulbs. Abdominal distension was interpreted to be caused by chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIIP), leading to protein-losing gastroenteropathy and hypalbuminemia caused by the CIIP. He died of DIC by myelodysplasic syndrome and DIC, two years later. Postmortem study demonstrated with severe loss of anterior horn cells and gliosis in the spinal cord. The Clarke's column was also affected. There was symmetrical degeneration in the dorsal column and corticospinal tracts. The cerebellum showed atrophy of molecular layer, prominent loss of Purkinje's cells and sparse granular cell layer, but no obvious change in the dentate nucleus. Neuronal loss in the dorsal root ganglia was remarkable. There were no alternations in the cerebral cortex, striatum, thalamus, subthalamic nucleus, and pontine nucleus, except for mild changes in substantia nigra and inferior olivary nucleus. This case was clinically suspected either of variant of Friedreich's ataxia or an early onset ataxia associated with hypoalbuminemia (EOAHA), although marked autonomic dysfunction was atypical. But the postmortem study, demonstrated with marked neuronal loss in anterior horn cells and cerebellan cortex and rather suggested an independent category of this case.

  16. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  18. Chronic sinusitis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and cartilage and lined with a mucous membrane. Sinusitis occurs when the membranes becomes inflamed and painful, ... a result of a blocked sinus opening. Chronic sinusitis is often caused by inflammation and blockage due ...

  19. Chronic Condition Data Warehouse

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Chronic Condition Data Warehouse (CCW) provides researchers with Medicare and Medicaid beneficiary, claims, and assessment data linked by beneficiary across...

  20. Zabofloxacin for chronic bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, B; Szabo, D

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of lower respiratory tract infection poses as an ongoing challenge among respiratory tract diseases. Bacterial infections are causes of acute exacerbations in chronic bronchitis and indications for antibacterial therapy. Several antibiotics were applied to treat bacterial infections in chronic bronchitis, among them fluoroquinolones are considered potent, broad-spectrum agents with excellent tissue penetration. This monograph focuses on zabofloxacin, a novel fluoroquinolone agent recently approved and launched in South Korea, and summarizes the drug's antibacterial efficacy, pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity. Recent advances concerning fluoroquinolones in chronic bronchitis will be discussed, along with a comparison between zabofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Zabofloxacin has proved to be noninferior to moxifloxacin against major community-acquired Gram-positive and Gram-negative respiratory tract pathogens and found to be well tolerated in both oral and parenteral administrations. These features can make it a potential antimicrobial agent in therapy of chronic bronchitis and other lower respiratory tract infections.

  1. Living with Chronic Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics » Bronchitis » Living With Chronic Bronchitis Explore Bronchitis What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics ...

  2. Chronic Critical Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the patient’s situation and on the hospital and city. Do Chronically Critically Ill Patients Regain the Ability ... as the patient. You may feel stress, worry, sadness, or fatigue. Some families worry about financial burdens. ...

  3. Chronic Conditions Dashboard

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Chronic Conditions Dashboard presents statistical views of information on the prevalence, utilization and Medicare spending for Medicare beneficiaries with...

  4. Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... way to treat some chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Platelet apheresis Platelet apheresis is a treatment that uses a special machine ... using interferon alfa or pegylated interferon alpha . Platelet apheresis . A clinical trial of a new treatment. Check ...

  5. Chronic penile strangulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Roberto I

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic penile strangulation is exceedingly rare with only 5 cases previously reported. We report an additional case of progressive penile lymphedema due to chronic intermittent strangulation caused by a rubber band applied to the penile base for 6 years. A 49-year-old man presented incapacity to exteriorize the glans penis. For erotic purposes, he had been using a rubber-enlarging band placed in the penile base for 6 years. With chronic use, he noticed that his penis swelled. Physical examination revealed lymphedema of the penis, phimosis and a stricture in the penile base. The patient was submitted to circumcision and the lymphedema remained stable 10 months postoperatively. Chronic penile incarceration usually causes penile lymphedema and urinary disturbance. Treatment consists of removal of foreign devices and surgical treatment of lymphedema.

  6. Chronic Illness & Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is present. For More Information Share Chronic Illness & Mental Health Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... For more information, see the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) booklet on Depression at http://www.nimh. ...

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and oxygen therapy Right-sided heart failure or cor pulmonale (heart swelling and heart failure due to chronic ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 44. Read More Cor pulmonale Dilated cardiomyopathy Heart failure - overview Lung disease Patient ...

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CKD treated? Kidney-friendly diet for CKD What causes chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Anyone can get CKD. Some people are ... and high blood pressure are the most common causes of CKD. If you have diabetes or high blood pressure, ...

  9. Sleep and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Sleep About Us About Sleep Key Sleep Disorders Sleep ... Sheets Data & Statistics Projects and Partners Resources Events Sleep and Chronic Disease Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  10. Chronic Conditions PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Chronic Conditions PUFs are aggregated files in which each record is a profile or cell defined by the characteristics of Medicare beneficiaries. A profile is...

  11. Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Said, Gérard; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinative polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired polyneuropathy presumably of immunological origin. It is characterized by a progressive or a relapsing course with predominant motor deficit. The diagnosis rests on the association of non-length-dependent predominantly motor ...

  12. Chronic dysimmune neuropathies: Beyond chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadilkar Satish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of chronic dysimmune neuropathies has widened well beyond chronic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP. Pure motor (multifocal motor neuropathy, sensorimotor with asymmetrical involvement (multifocal acquired demylinating sensory and motor neuropathy, exclusively distal sensory (distal acquired demyelinating sensory neuropathy and very proximal sensory (chronic immune sensory polyradiculopathy constitute the variants of CIDP. Correct diagnosis of these entities is of importance in terms of initiation of appropriate therapy as well as prognostication of these patients. The rates of detection of immune-mediated neuropathies with monoclonal cell proliferation (monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, multiple myeloma, etc. have been facilitated as better diagnostic tools such as serum immunofixation electrophoresis are being used more often. Immune neuropathies associated with malignancies and systemic vasculitic disorders are being defined further and treated early with better understanding of the disease processes. As this field of dysimmune neuropathies will evolve in the future, some of the curious aspects of the clinical presentations and response patterns to different immunosuppressants or immunomodulators will be further elucidated. This review also discusses representative case studies.

  13. Tolerance and chronic rejection.

    OpenAIRE

    Womer, K. L.; Lee, R S; Madsen, J. C.; Sayegh, M H

    2001-01-01

    The most common cause of chronic allograft loss is an incompletely understood clinicopathological entity called chronic rejection (CR). Recent reports suggest an improvement in long-term renal allograft survival, although it is not clear from these data whether a true reduction of biopsy-proven CR has occurred. Although newer immunosuppressive medications have greatly reduced the incidence of acute rejection (AR) in the early post-transplantation period, the ideal therapy for both AR and CR w...

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008430 Effect of gas exchange at maximal intensity on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. WANG Haoyan(王浩彦), et al. Dept Respir Dis, Beijing Friendship Hosp, Capital Med Sci Univ, Beijing 100050. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2008;31(6):414-416. Objective To investigate the effect of gas exchange at maximal intensity on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  15. Experimental chronic periodontitis morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis of periodontium tissue in a model of chronic periodontitis was studied. Adult Wistar rats wereused in a model; chronic periodontitis was developed through mastication-related loading decrease. Histological assessmentof periodontium tissue was conducted at Days 7, 14, 21 and 30. It was demonstrated that dystrophic tissue changes prevailover the inflammatory one in this particular experimental model. The structural elements of periodontium were involved intothe pathologic process ...

  16. Understanding chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Matthew; Burch, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The key principles of chronic heart failure and the development of clinical management strategies are described. The physiological changes in chronic heart failure and the clinical management of children with heart failure are considered, but the treatment of heart failure related to congenital heart disease or the intensive care management of heart failure are not mentioned as both topics require consideration in their own right. A greater understanding of the maladaptive responses to chroni...

  17. Treatment of Chronic Cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Resha S; Ebersole, Barbara; Jamal, Nausheen

    2017-01-01

    Objective Chronic cough remains a challenging condition, especially in cases where it persists despite comprehensive medical management. For these particular patients, there appears to be an emerging role for behavior modification therapy. We report a series of patients with refractory chronic cough to assess if there is any benefit of adding behavioral therapy to their treatment regimen. Study Design A case series with planned chart review of patients treated for chronic cough. Setting The review was performed with an outpatient electronic health record system at a tertiary care center. Subjects and Methods The charts of all patients treated for chronic cough by a single laryngologist over a 30-month period were analyzed. Patients' response to treatment and rate of cough improvement were assessed for those with refractory chronic cough who underwent behavior modification therapy. Results Thirty-eight patients with chronic cough were initially treated empirically for the most common causes of cough, of which 32% experienced improvement. Nineteen patients who did not significantly improve with medical management underwent behavior modification therapy with a speech-language pathologist. Of these patients, 84% experienced resolution or marked improvement of their symptoms. Conclusion Behavioral therapy may be underutilized in practice and could lead to improvement of otherwise recalcitrant cough.

  18. Chronic prostatitis: Current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Vaidyanathan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Chronic prostatitis (CP is a common condition. It causes significant suffering to the patients and constitutes a sizeable workload for the urologists. The purpose of this review is to describe the currently accepted concepts regarding the aspects of CP. Materials and Methods: Relevant papers on the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, evaluation and management of CP were identified through a search of MEDLINE using text terms "prostatitis", "chronic prostatitis" and "chronic pelvic pain syndrome". The list of articles thus obtained was supplemented by manual search of bibliographies of the identified articles and also by exploring the MEDLINE option "Related Articles". Results: The salient points of the relevant articles on each aspect of CP have been summarized in the form of a non-systematic narrative review. Conclusion: Chronic prostatitis is caused by a variety of infective and non-infective factors and is characterized by a rather long remitting and relapsing clinical course. The diagnosis is based on symptoms comprising pain and nonspecific urinary and/or ejaculatory disturbances and microbiological tests to localize bacteria and/or leucocytes in segmented urinary tract specimens. The contemporary classification was proposed by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes Digestive Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK. National Institutes of Health - Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI is the patient evaluation tool used extensively in clinical practice and research. Management should be individualized, multimodal and of an appropriate duration.

  19. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  20. Management of chronic paronychia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Relhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic paronychia is an inflammatory disorder of the nail folds of a toe or finger presenting as redness, tenderness, and swelling. It is recalcitrant dermatoses seen commonly in housewives and housemaids. It is a multifactorial inflammatory reaction of the proximal nail fold to irritants and allergens. Repeated bouts of inflammation lead to fibrosis of proximal nail fold with poor generation of cuticle, which in turn exposes the nail further to irritants and allergens. Thus, general preventive measures form cornerstone of the therapy. Though previously anti-fungals were the mainstay of therapy, topical steroid creams have been found to be more effective in the treatment of chronic paronychia. In recalcitrant cases, surgical treatment may be resorted to, which includes en bloc excision of the proximal nail fold or an eponychial marsupialization, with or without nail plate removal. Newer therapies and surgical modalities are being employed in the management of chronic paronychia. In this overview, we review recent epidemiological studies, present current thinking on the pathophysiology leading to chronic paronychia, discuss the challenges chronic paronychia presents, and recommend a commonsense approach to management.

  1. Chronic daily headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayyaz Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Daily Headache is a descriptive term that includes disorders with headaches on more days than not and affects 4% of the general population. The condition has a debilitating effect on individuals and society through direct cost to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. To successfully manage chronic daily headache syndromes it is important to exclude secondary causes with comprehensive history and relevant investigations; identify risk factors that predict its development and recognise its sub-types to appropriately manage the condition. Chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and medication overuse headache accounts for the vast majority of chronic daily headaches. The scope of this article is to review the primary headache disorders. Secondary headaches are not discussed except medication overuse headache that often accompanies primary headache disorders. The article critically reviews the literature on the current understanding of daily headache disorders focusing in particular on recent developments in the treatment of frequent headaches.

  2. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira CA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlos AC Pereira,1 Andréa Gimenez,2 Lilian Kuranishi,2 Karin Storrer 2 1Interstitial Lung Diseases Program, 2Pulmonology Postgraduate, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HSP is a common interstitial lung disease resulting from inhalation of a large variety of antigens by susceptible individuals. The disease is best classified as acute and chronic. Chronic HSP can be fibrosing or not. Fibrotic HSP has a large differential diagnosis and has a worse prognosis. The most common etiologies for HSP are reviewed. Diagnostic criteria are proposed for both chronic forms based on exposure, lung auscultation, lung function tests, HRCT findings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and biopsies. Treatment options are limited, but lung transplantation results in greater survival in comparison to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Randomized trials with new antifibrotic agents are necessary. Keywords: interstitial lung diseases, extrinsic allergic alveolitis, diffuse lung disease, lung immune response, HRCT, farmers lung

  3. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management.

  4. Omalizumab for chronic urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivyanskiy, Ilya; Sand, Carsten; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2012-01-01

    urticaria. We present a case series of 19 patients with chronic urticaria treated in a university department with omalizumab and give an overview of the existing literature comprising an additional 59 cases as well as a total of 139 patients enrolled in two randomized controlled trials comparing omalizumab...... with placebo. The collective evidence points to omalizumab as a safe and effective treatment option for patients with chronic urticaria who do not sufficiently respond to standard therapy as recommended by existing guidelines.......Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that blocks the high-affinity Fc receptor of IgE. Omalizumab has been approved for the treatment of moderate to severe asthma; however, there is currently more and more data showing promising results in the management also of chronic...

  5. [Histaminergic angioedema and chronic urticaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacard, Florence; Nosbaum, Audrey; Bensaid, Benoit; Nicolas, Jean-François; Augey, Frédéric; Goujon, Catherine; Bérard, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Most angioedemas are histaminergic and correspond to deep urticarial swelling. Recurrent histaminergic angioedema led to the diagnosis of chronic urticaria, even when there are no superficial associated hives. Chronic urticaria is a benign disease, and autoimmune in 40 % of cases. The occurrence of angioedema in chronic urticaria is not a sign of severity. The occurrence of angioedema in chronic urticaria is associated with a longer duration of urticarial disease. NSAIDs and/or systemic corticotherapy are classic triggers of angioedema in chronic urticaria. In the absence of clinical endpoints, there is no need to make further assessment in chronic urticaria good responders to antihistamines.

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    COPD - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive lung disease - adults - discharge; Chronic bronchitis - adults - discharge; Emphysema - adults - discharge; Bronchitis - ...

  7. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Penny

    2012-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis used to be considered uncommon in dogs, but recent pathological and clinical studies have confirmed that it is in fact a common and clinically significant disease. Clinical signs can vary from low-grade recurrent gastrointestinal signs to acute exacerbations that are indistinguishable from classical acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a significant cause of chronic pain in dogs, which must not be underestimated. It also results in progressive impairment of endocrine and exocrine function and the eventual development of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or both in some affected dogs at end stage. The etiology is unknown in most cases. Chronic pancreatitis shows an increased prevalence in certain breeds, and recent work in English Cocker Spaniels suggests it is part of a polysystemic immune-mediated disease in this breed. The histological and clinical appearance is different in different breeds, suggesting that etiologies may also be different. Diagnosis is challenging because the sensitivities of the available noninvasive tests are relatively low. However, with an increased index of suspicion, clinicians will recognize more cases that will allow them to institute supportive treatment to improve the quality of life of the patient.

  8. Acetaminophen for Chronic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ennis, Zandra Nymand; Dideriksen, Dorthe; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke;

    2016-01-01

    strategies for acetaminophen use in chronic pain in both Embase and PubMed, 1,551 hits were obtained. Following cross-reference searches of both trials and 38 reviews, seven studies comparing acetaminophen in continuous dosing regimens of more than two weeks with placebo were included. The review...

  9. Refractory chronic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martelletti, Paolo; Katsarava, Zaza; Lampl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the clinical definition of refractory Chronic Migraine (rCM) is still far to be concluded. The importance to create a clinical framing of these rCM patients resides in the complete disability they show, in the high risk of serious adverse events from acute and preventative drugs...

  10. Diagnosing chronic rhinosinusitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, B; Thilsing, T; Baelum, J;

    2013-01-01

    The European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EP3OS) incorporates symptomatic and endo- scopic criteria in the clinical diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), while in epidemiological studies the definition is based on symptoms only. The aim of this study was to evaluate the...

  11. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedman, Jan; van Weissenbruch, Ranny

    2005-01-01

    We report what is, to our best knowledge, the first case of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) in which the frontal and sphenoid bones were involved. Characterized by a prolonged and fluctuating course of osteomyelitis at different sites, CRMO is self-limited, although sequelae can oc

  12. CHRONIC PROBLEM FAMILIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    STONE, EDWARD

    THE REPORT POINTS OUT THAT, IN GENERAL, CHRONIC PROBLEM PARENTS GREW UP IN ENVIRONMENTS OF EMOTIONAL IMPOVERISHMENT, INCONSISTENCY, CONFUSION, AND DISORDER, OFTEN WITH DEPRIVATION OF FOOD, CLOTHING, AND SHELTER. THESE PARENTS CATEGORIZE PEOPLE AS THOSE WHO GIVE AND THOSE WHO TAKE. THEY BLAME THEIR PROBLEMS ON EXTERNAL CIRCUMSTANCES NOT UNDER THEIR…

  13. Chronic blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Michael W

    2012-10-01

    Chronic blood pressure is maintained within very narrow limits around an average value. However, the multitude of physiologic processes that participate in blood pressure control present a bewildering array of possibilities to explain how such tight control of arterial pressure is achieved. Guyton and Coleman and colleagues addressed this challenge by creating a mathematical model that integrated the short- and long-term control systems for overall regulation of the circulation. The hub is the renal-body fluid feedback control system, which links cardiac function and vascular resistance and capacitance with fluid volume homeostasis as the foundation for chronic blood pressure control. The cornerstone of that system is renal sodium excretory capability, which is defined by the direct effect of blood pressure on urinary sodium excretion, that is, "pressure natriuresis." Steady-state blood pressure is the pressure at which pressure natriuresis balances sodium intake over time; therefore, renal sodium excretory capability is the set point for chronic blood pressure. However, this often is misinterpreted as dismissing, or minimizing, the importance of nonrenal mechanisms in chronic blood pressure control. This article explains the renal basis for the blood pressure set point by focusing on the absolute dependence of our survival on the maintenance of sodium balance. Two principal threats to sodium balance are discussed: (1) a change in sodium intake or renal excretory capability and (2) a change in blood pressure. In both instances, circulatory homeostasis is maintained because the sodium balance blood pressure set point is reached.

  14. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the feet and ankles Causes & Risk FactorsWhat causes CKD?The most common causes of CKD are high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. ... caused by CKD.How else is CKD treated?Chronic kidney disease can cause other problems. Talk with your doctor about how ...

  15. EBV CHRONIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eligio Pizzigallo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The infection from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV or virus of infectious mononucleosis, together with other herpesviruses’ infections, represents a prototype of persistent viral infections characterized by the property of the latency. Although the reactivations of the latent infection are associated with the resumption of the viral replication and eventually with the “shedding”, it is still not clear if this virus can determine chronic infectious diseases, more or less evolutive. These diseases could include some pathological conditions actually defined as “idiopathic”and characterized by the “viral persistence” as the more credible pathogenetic factor. Among the so-called idiopathic syndromes, the “chronic fatigue syndrome” (CFS aroused a great interest around the eighties of the last century when, just for its relationship with EBV, it was called “chronic mononucleosis” or “chronic EBV infection”. Today CFS, as defined in 1994 by the CDC of Atlanta (USA, really represents a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a chronic course, where reactivation and remission phases alternate, and by a good prognosis. The etiopathogenetic role of EBV is demonstrated only in a well-examined subgroup of patients, while in most of the remaining cases this role should be played by other infectious agents - able to remain in a latent or persistent way in the host – or even by not infectious agents (toxic, neuroendocrine, methabolic, etc.. However, the pathogenetic substrate of the different etiologic forms seems to be the same, much probably represented by the oxidative damage due to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines as a response to the triggering event (infectious or not infectious. Anyway, recently the scientists turned their’s attention to the genetic predisposition of the subjects affected by the syndrome, so that in the last years the genetic studies, together with those of molecular biology, received a great impulse

  16. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) . This recommendation ...

  17. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and abnormal sensations. CIDP is closely related to Guillain-Barre syndrome and it is considered the chronic counterpart ... and abnormal sensations. CIDP is closely related to Guillain-Barre syndrome and it is considered the chronic counterpart ...

  18. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page Primary Symptoms Other Symptoms What's ... a doctor distinguish CFS from other illnesses. Primary Symptoms As the name chronic fatigue syndrome suggests , fatigue ...

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vijayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec to FVC (forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure, hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity, bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia, stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

  20. Defining and Measuring Chronic Conditions

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-05-20

    This podcast is an interview with Dr. Anand Parekh, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, and Dr. Samuel Posner, Preventing Chronic Disease Editor in Chief, about the definition and burden of multiple chronic conditions in the United States.  Created: 5/20/2013 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/20/2013.

  1. Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase Treatment options for people ... a stem cell donor with matching tissue type. Chronic phase The standard treatment for chronic phase CML ...

  2. Inhibition of agmatine on the acquisition and expression of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weixiaoli; Suruibin; Lijin; Xiaowenbin

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Many studies suggest that the mesolimbic dopamine system is a major neural substrate for the rewarding effect produced by morphine. Morphine cause an increase in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens through indirect mechanisms that is related to its psychological dependence. However, many other neurotransmitters and their receptor systems,

  3. Morphine induces expression of platelet-derived growth factor in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: implication for vascular permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiu Wen

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy, complications of HIV-1 infection with concurrent drug abuse are an emerging problem. Morphine, often abused by HIV-infected patients, is known to accelerate neuroinflammation associated with HIV-1 infection. Detailed molecular mechanisms of morphine action however, remain poorly understood. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, primarily due to its potent mitogenic and permeability effects. Whether morphine exposure results in enhanced vascular permeability in brain endothelial cells, likely via induction of PDGF, remains to be established. In the present study, we demonstrated morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, an effect that was abrogated by the opioid receptor antagonist-naltrexone. Pharmacological blockade (cell signaling and loss-of-function (Egr-1 approaches demonstrated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, PI3K/Akt and the downstream transcription factor Egr-1 respectively, in morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB. Functional significance of increased PDGF-BB manifested as increased breach of the endothelial barrier as evidenced by decreased expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in an in vitro model system. Understanding the regulation of PDGF expression may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for intervention of morphine-mediated neuroinflammation.

  4. Effects of pre-treatment with amantadine on morphine induced antinociception during second phase formalin responses in rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijdelaar, D.G.; Rijn, C.M. van; Vinken, P.; Meert, T.F.

    2005-01-01

    The clinically available NMDA-receptor antagonist drug, amantadine, has been shown to result in morphine sparing effects in humans after surgery. However, no data are available to describe the exact form of interaction. The present study aims to profile the possible effects of amantadine (0, 12.5, 2

  5. Effects of pre-treatment with amantadine on morphine induced antinociception during second phase formalin responses in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijdelaar, D.G.; Rijn, C.M. van; Vinken, P.; Meert, T.F.

    2005-01-01

    The clinically available NMDA-receptor antagonist drug, amantadine, has been shown to result in morphine sparing effects in humans after surgery. However, no data are available to describe the exact form of interaction. The present study aims to profile the possible effects of amantadine (0, 12.5, 2

  6. Toll-like receptor 4 mutant and null mice retain morphine-induced tolerance, hyperalgesia, and physical dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Alexandra Mattioli

    Full Text Available The innate immune system modulates opioid-induced effects within the central nervous system and one target that has received considerable attention is the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. Here, we examined the contribution of TLR4 in the development of morphine tolerance, hyperalgesia, and physical dependence in two inbred mouse strains: C3H/HeJ mice which have a dominant negative point mutation in the Tlr4 gene rendering the receptor non-functional, and B10ScNJ mice which are TLR4 null mutants. We found that neither acute antinociceptive response to a single dose of morphine, nor the development of analgesic tolerance to repeated morphine treatment, was affected by TLR4 genotype. Likewise, opioid induced hyperalgesia and opioid physical dependence (assessed by naloxone precipitated withdrawal were not altered in TLR4 mutant or null mice. We also examined the behavioural consequence of two stereoisomers of naloxone: (- naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, and (+ naloxone, a purported antagonist of TLR4. Both stereoisomers of naloxone suppressed opioid induced hyperalgesia in wild-type control, TLR4 mutant, and TLR4 null mice. Collectively, our data suggest that TLR4 is not required for opioid-induced analgesic tolerance, hyperalgesia, or physical dependence.

  7. Potentiation of acute morphine-induced analgesia measured by a thermal test in bone cancer-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Sara; Llames, Sara; Hidalgo, Agustín; Baamonde, Ana; Menéndez, Luis

    2012-06-01

    Agonists of μ-opioid receptors are currently used in the management of cancer pain. However, several data suggest that the analgesic effect of morphine can diminish during the development of experimental tumors. By using a thermal test, we have studied whether the analgesic effect evoked by morphine is altered in mice bearing two painful bone tumors. The analgesic effect evoked by systemic morphine remained unaltered after the intratibial inoculation of B16-F10 melanoma cells and was potentiated after the inoculation of NCTC 2472 osteosarcoma cells. Although the number of spinal μ-opioid receptors measured by western blot studies was not augmented in osteosarcoma-bearing mice, the analgesia evoked by intrathecal (i.t.) morphine was also enhanced. The analgesic response produced by the spinal administration of the Gi/o protein activator mastoparan was amplified, whereas the analgesic response evoked by the i.t. administration of the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin remained unaltered. The efficacy of the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q to antagonize the analgesic effect produced by a maximal dose of morphine was also increased in osteosarcoma-bearing mice. Our results seem to indicate that the analgesic effect of morphine on thermal nociception can be enhanced in response to the development of particular bone tumors in mice, being this potentiation probably related to a greater efficacy of the transduction system driven by Gi/o proteins and GIRK channels.

  8. Corticosteroid effects on morphine-induced antinociception as a function of two types of corticosteroid receptors in brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratka, A; Veldhuis, H D; De Kloet, E R

    1988-01-01

    The antinociceptive effect of parenterally and intracerebroventricularly injected morphine and beta-endorphin in adrenalectomized rats and in adrenalectomized rats treated with adrenal steroids was examined employing the hot-plate method. (1) Adrenalectomy sensitized the rats to an analgesic effect

  9. Stress sensitivity and resilience in the chronic mild stress rat model of depression; an in situ hybridization study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, A; Jayatissa, M N; Mørk, A

    2008-01-01

    used in situ hybridization to elucidate the molecular mechanisms, which may be involved in the development of anhedonia during CMS. In the CA3 of the ventral hippocampus, we found upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA in the CMS resilient group indicating protective role of BDNF...... to CMS and found the latter to be more valid as rats probably easier adapt to restraint stress. Finally, we used the conditioned place preference model to demonstrate a clear tendency towards a distinct morphine induced behavioral difference between CMS resilient and CMS sensitive animals. Udgivelsesdato...

  10. [Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franques, J; Azulay, J-P; Pouget, J; Attarian, S

    2010-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a demyelinating chronic neuropathy of immune origin whose diagnosis is based upon clinical, biological and electrophysiological data; previously critical to the diagnosis the nerve biopsy is now restricted to the rare situations where accurate diagnosis cannot be reached using these data alone. CIDP are mainly idiopathic, but a few associated diseases must be sought for as they require specific attention. Such associated diseases must particularly be discussed when the manifestations are severe or resistant to immunomodulating or immunosuppressive agents. Indeed, idiopathic CIDP are usually responsive to these treatments. The effectiveness of these treatments is limited by the importance of the secondary axonal loss. The dependence or the resistance may sometimes justify the association of several immunomodulating treatments. A single randomized controlled trial support the use of cytotoxic drugs and none with rituximab.

  11. Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Lee, Yong Seok [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome is a rare clinical condition in which impaired intestinal peristalsis causes recurrent symptoms of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical occlusion. This syndrome may involve variable segments of small or large bowel, and may be associated with urinary bladder retention. This study included 6 children(3 boys and 3 girls) of chronic intestinal obstruction. Four were symptomatic at birth and two were of the ages of one month and one year. All had abdominal distension and deflection difficulty. Five had urinary bladder distension. Despite parenteral nutrition and surgical intervention(ileostomy or colostomy), bowel obstruction persisted and four patients expired from sepses within one year. All had gaseous distension of small and large bowel on abdominal films. In small bowel series, consistent findings were variable degree of dilatation, decreased peristalsis(prolonged transit time) and microcolon or microrectum. This disease entity must be differentiated from congenital megacolon, ileal atresia and megacystis syndrome.

  12. Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen-Ranberg, Nina Christine; Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Bergholt, Bo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (bCSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition frequently associated with the need for retreatment. The reason for the high rate of retreatment has not been thoroughly investigated. Thus, the authors focused on determining which independent predictors...... are associated with the retreatment of bCSDH with a focus on surgical laterality. METHODS In a national database of CSDHs (Danish Chronic Subdural Hematoma Study) the authors retrospectively identified all bCSDHs treated in the 4 Danish neurosurgical departments over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2012....... Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the relationship between retreatment of bCSDH and clinical, radiological, and surgical variables. RESULTS Two hundred ninety-one patients with bCSDH were identified, and 264 of them underwent unilateral (136 patients) or bilateral (128 patients...

  13. Chronic pneumonitis of infancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Katsumi; Kamata, Noriko; Okazaki, Eiwa [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, 3-18-22 Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677 (Japan); Moriyama, Sachiko; Funata, Nobuaki [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, 3-18-22 Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677 (Japan); Takita, Junko; Yamada, Hideo; Takayama, Naohide [Department of Pediatrics, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, 3-18-22 Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677 (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Chronic pneumonitis of infancy (CPI) is a very rare lung disease in infants and young children. We report a 33-day-old infant with CPI, focusing on the radiologic aspects of the disease. Chest radiographs showed variable and non-specific appearances including ground-glass shadowing, consolidation, volume loss, and hyperinflation. Dense alveolar opacities progressed as CPI advanced. The radiologic features of our case reflected pathologic changes. (orig.)

  14. Renal failure (chronic)

    OpenAIRE

    Clase, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is characterised by a gradual and sustained decline in renal clearance or glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Continued progression of renal failure will lead to renal function too low to sustain healthy life. In developed countries, such people will be offered renal replacement therapy in the form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Requirement for dialysis or transplantation is termed end-stage renal disease (ESRD).Diabetes, glomerulonephritis, hypertension, pyelone...

  15. Chronic Stress and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    to the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor agonist HU-210 following chronic stress. European Journal of Pharmacology, 499(3), 291-295. Holscher, C. (1999...learning and memory, has the highest concentration of GC receptors in the brain and is involved in the stress response. Extensive research has... receptor levels than stressed male rodents (Konkle, 2003; Figueiredo, 2002; Handa, 1994). Males and females react to stress differently, so two models

  16. EBV CHRONIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Racciatti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The infection from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV or virus of infectious mononucleosis, together with other herpesviruses’ infections, represents a prototype of persistent viral infections characterized by the property of the latency. Although the reactivations of the latent infection are associated with the resumption of the viral replication and eventually with the “shedding”, it is still not clear if this virus can determine chronic infectious diseases, more or less evolutive. These diseases could include some pathological conditions actually defined as “idiopathic”and characterized by the “viral persistence” as the more credible pathogenetic factor. Among the so-called idiopathic syndromes, the “chronic fatigue syndrome” (CFS aroused a great interest around the eighties of the last century when, just for its relationship with EBV, it was called “chronic mononucleosis” or “chronic EBV infection”.

    Today CFS, as defined in 1994 by the CDC of Atlanta (USA, really represents a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a chronic course, where reactivation and remission phases alternate, and by a good prognosis

  17. Chronic arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alan H

    2002-03-10

    Symptomatic arsenic poisoning is not often seen in occupational exposure settings. Attempted homicide and deliberate long-term poisoning have resulted in chronic toxicity. Skin pigmentation changes, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, gastrointestinal symptoms, anemia, and liver disease are common. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension with bleeding esophageal varices, splenomegaly, and hypersplenism may occur. A metallic taste, gastrointestinal disturbances, and Mee's lines may be seen. Bone marrow depression is common. 'Blackfoot disease' has been associated with arsenic-contaminated drinking water in Taiwan; Raynaud's phenomenon and acrocyanosis also may occur. Large numbers of persons in areas of India, Pakistan, and several other countries have been chronically poisoned from naturally occurring arsenic in ground water. Toxic delirium and encephalopathy can be present. CCA-treated wood (chromated copper arsenate) is not a health risk unless burned in fireplaces or woodstoves. Peripheral neuropathy may also occur. Workplace exposure or chronic ingestion of arsenic-contaminated water or arsenical medications is associated with development of skin, lung, and other cancers. Treatment may incklude the use of chelating agents such as dimercaprol (BAL), dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), and dimercaptopanesulfonic acid (DMPS).

  18. Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Nedim Yuceturk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic prostatitis is a chronic syndrome that effects men with a wide range of age. The etiology, natural history and appropriate therapy models are still unclear. According to the classification of National Institutes of Health; 4 types of prostatitis were defined; acute bacterial prostatitis (category I, chronic bacterial prostatitis (category II, chronic nonbacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (category III and asymptomatic prostatitis (category IV.Since microorganisms can only be isolated from a small percent of patients, empiric treatment is given to the most of the men. Multidisciplinary approach to the patients with suspected chronic prostatitis will help clinicians to play an active role in the treatment and prevent unnecessary medical therapies. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 691-702

  19. Chronic radiation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akleyev, Alexander V. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation). Clinical Dept.

    2014-04-01

    Comprehensive analysis of chronic radiation syndrome, covering epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathoanatomy, diagnosis and treatment. Based on observations in a unique sample of exposed residents of the Techa riverside villages in the Urals. Casts new light on the condition. Of value for all practitioners and researchers with an interest in chronic radiation syndrome. This book covers all aspects of chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) based on observations in a unique sample of residents of the Techa riverside villages in the southern Urals who were exposed to radioactive contamination in the 1950s owing to releases of liquid radioactive wastes from Mayak Production Association, which produced plutonium for weapons. In total, 940 cases of CRS were diagnosed in this population and these patients were subjected to detailed analysis. The opening chapters address the definition and classification of CRS, epidemiology and pathogenesis, covering molecular and cellular mechanisms, radioadaptation, and the role of tissue reactions. The pathoanatomy of CRS during the development and recovery stages is discussed for all organ systems. Clinical manifestations of CRS at the different stages are then described in detail and the dynamics of hematopoietic changes are thoroughly examined. In the following chapters, principles of diagnosis (including assessment of the exposure doses to critical organs) and differential diagnosis from a wide range of other conditions are discussed and current and potential treatment options, described. The medical and social rehabilitation of persons with CRS is also covered. This book, which casts new light on the condition, will be of value for all practitioners and researchers with an interest in CRS.

  20. Approaching chronic cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Vijo; Tiew, Pei Yee; How, Choon How

    2016-02-01

    Chronic cough is one of the most common reasons for referral to a respiratory physician. Although fatal complications are rare, it may cause considerable distress in the patient's daily life. Western and local data shows that in patients with a normal chest radiograph, the most common causes are postnasal drip syndrome, postinfectious cough, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and cough variant asthma. Less common causes are the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, smoker's cough and nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis. A detailed history-taking and physical examination will provide a diagnosis in most patients, even at the primary care level. Some cases may need further investigations or specialist referral for diagnosis.

  1. Chronic cough in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Rigoberto; Bahna, Sami L

    2014-08-01

    Cough is probably the most common cause of seeking medical care in pediatric practice. Most acute cough is caused by infection and usually resolves within less than 4 weeks. If it lasts longer, it is considered chronic and deserves investigation to identify the underlying cause, which can be almost any of a wide variety of illnesses of the respiratory tract and certain extrathoracic conditions. This review provides an optimal approach for diagnosis through a skillful history taking, physical examination, and selection of appropriate tests.

  2. The Chronic Poverty Report 2005

    OpenAIRE

    The Chronic Poverty Research Centre, CPRC

    2005-01-01

    The report examines what chronic poverty is and why it matters, who the chronically poor are, where they live, what causes poverty to be persistent and what should be done about it. It argues that approaches to development policy must acknowledge the agency of the chronically poor themselves in overcoming their poverty. But they also need real commitment, matched by actions and resources, to support their efforts to attain their rights and overcome the obstacles that trap them in poverty.

  3. Treatment Strategies for Chronic Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Lord

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic somatic pain, including pain referred to the head, neck, shoulder girdle and upper limb from somatic structures, is addressed. Levels of evidence for the various treatments that have been prescribed for chronic whiplash associated disorders are considered. The challenge to find a treatment strategy for chronic pain after whiplash that completely relieves the condition and prevents its sequelae is reviewed.

  4. Late and chronic Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donta, Sam T

    2002-03-01

    This article reviews the late and chronic manifestations of Lyme disease. Special attention is given to the chronic manifestations of the disease, detailing its pathogenesis, clinical spectrum, and laboratory criteria for the diagnosis. Based on experimental evidence and experience, approaches to the successful treatment of the late and chronic disease are outlined. Much additional work is needed to improve the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of the disease, its diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Chronic avulsive injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, L.F.; Helms, C.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Bisset, G.S. III [Dept. of Radiology, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)]|[Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Squire, D.L. [Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    1999-03-01

    Children and adolescents are prone to avulsive injuries related to a combination of their propensity for great strength, ability to sustain extreme levels of activity, and immature growing apophyses. Appropriate interpretation of imaging studies showing chronic avulsive injuries is essential so that the irregularity and periostitis that can be associated with chronic avulsions is not misinterpreted as probable malignancy. This article reviews the chronic avulsive injuries of childhood. (orig.) With 12 figs., 8 refs.

  6. Understanding Biofilms in Chronic Sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Schwartz, Joseph S; Palmer, James N

    2016-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a burdensome disease that has substantial individual and societal impact. Although great advances in medical and surgical therapies have been made, some patients continue to have recalcitrant infections. Microbial biofilms have been implicated as a cause of recalcitrant chronic sinusitis, and recent studies have tried to better understand the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis as it relates to microbial biofilms. Here, we provide an overview of biofilms in chronic sinusitis with emphasis on pathogenesis, treatment, and future directions. In addition, recent evidence is presented, elucidating the role of bitter taste receptors as a possible key factor leading to biofilm formation.

  7. Diagnostic dilemmas in chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubi, E; Grattan, C; Zuberbier, T

    2015-06-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI)/Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2) LEN)/European Dermatology Forum (EDF)/World Allergy Organization (WAO) recently published updated recommendations for the classification, diagnosis and management of chronic urticaria (CU). This article discusses several cases of CU that provide examples of how the recommendations in the guidelines can be implemented in the diagnosis of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) (also called chronic idiopathic urticaria [CIU]), chronic inducible urticaria (CINDU) or CU with comorbidities.

  8. Chronic diseases and mental disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, P.F.M.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Peters, L.; Rijken, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve a better understanding of the relationship between chronic medical illness and mental distress. Therefore, the association between chronic medical illness and mental distress was analysed, taking into account the modifying effects of generic disease characteristi

  9. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ... function as well as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs ...

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... What you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  11. Obinutuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    Obinutuzumab is the second next-generation monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody (after ofatumumab) to enter clinical practice in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Its superiority in association with chlorambucil as compared with chlorambucil alone has led to its approval as a first-line treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, for patients who are not candidates for a more intensive treatment.

  12. [Histopathologic study of chronic sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayoff, M; Parache, R M; Bodelet, B; Gazel, P

    1983-01-01

    The conventional histopathology of the sinus is a criterium for the therapeutic indication, since it is possible to distinguish between granulomatous chronic sinusitis, chronic sinusitis with oedema and nasal polyposis. Each one of these clinical pictures has his own etiology and requires a specific therapeutic approach.

  13. [Chronic pyelonephritis in polycystic kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, V; Penkova, S; Monov, A

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of chronic pyelonephritis are studied in 37 patients out of a total of 53 patients with proved renal polycystosis. A group of 71 patients with chronic pyelonephritis selected at random are used as a control group. The frequency of chronic pyelonephritis among the patients with renal polycystosis is 69.8%. The difference between the mean age of the patients with renal polycystosis and chronic pyelonephritis and the patients with renal polycystosis without chronic pyelonephritis is 8.6 years. A significant difference is established between these two groups of patients concerning the frequency of symptomatic hypertension--89.2% for the patients with renal polycystosis and chronic pyelonephritis and 45% for the patients with uncomplicated renal polycystosis. A similar difference is established also for the renal failure--respectively 64.9% and 37.5%. The frequency of hypertension and chronic renal failure is lower in the control group of patients. 59% of the patients with renal polycystosis and chronic pyelonephritis have significant bacteriuria, E. coli and Proteus being the most frequently isolated bacteria but Pseudomonas shows the highest drug resistance. The isolated bacteria are most sensitive to nitroxoline and aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  14. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... term that is used to include chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or a combination of both conditions. Asthma is also a disease where it is difficult ... with COPD to also have some degree of asthma. What is chronic ... back to their original size. In emphysema, the walls of some of the alveoli have ...

  15. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reductio...

  16. Refractory chronic cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Edvinsson, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cluster headache (CCH) often resists to prophylactic pharmaceutical treatments resulting in patients' life damage. In this rare but pragmatic situation escalation to invasive management is needed but framing criteria are lacking. We aimed to reach a consensus for refractory CCH definition...... for clinical and research use. The preparation of the final consensus followed three stages. Internal between authors, a larger between all European Headache Federation members and finally an international one among all investigators that have published clinical studies on cluster headache the last five years....... Eighty-five investigators reached by email. Proposed criteria were in the format of the International Classification of Headache Disorders III-beta (description, criteria, notes, comments and references). Following this evaluation eight drafts were prepared before the final. Twenty-four (28...

  17. [Chronic occupational metallic mercurialism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Marcília de Araújo Medrado

    2003-02-01

    This is a review on current knowledge of chronic occupational mercurialism syndrome. Major scientific studies and reviews on clinical manifestation and physiopathology of mercury poisoning were evaluated. The search was complemented using Medline and Lilacs data. Erethism or neuropsychological syndrome, characterized by irritability, personality change, loss of self-confidence, depression, delirium, insomnia, apathy, loss of memory, headaches, general pain, and tremors, is seen after exposure to metallic mercury. Hypertension, renal disturbances, allergies and immunological conditions are also common. Mercury is found in many different work processes: industries, gold mining, and dentistry. As prevention measures are not often adopted there is an increasing risk of mercury poisoning. The disease has been under diagnosed even though 16 clinical forms of mercury poisoning are described by Brazilian regulations. Clinical diagnosis is important, especially because abnormalities in the central nervous, renal and immunological systems can be detected using current medical technology, helping to develop the knowledge and control measures for mercurialism.

  18. Chronic hypophosphatemic osteopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koppers, B.; Schmid, L.; Hofmann, E.; Sauer, E.

    1980-07-01

    The process of chronic hypophosphatemic vitamine D-resistant rickets is described by observation of two cases. With the male patient - our first case - the disease was sporadic and had not been recognized for a long time. In his early adulthood it manifested itself as Umbauzonen (pseudofractures) in the larger context of active osteomalacia. It was possible to observe the pseudofractures before and while the patient was medicamentously treated. High doses of vitamine D 3 and dosage of phosphate mitigated the complaints although with respect to the radiological, scintigraphical, humoral and histological findings there was only slow improvement or no improvement at all. The patient's daughter is affected by the disease as well. In her case the pathological signs of her bones became better when treated with vitamine D 3.

  19. Chronic endometritis and infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jong; Kim, You Shin; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chronic endometritis (CE) is a condition involving the breakdown of the peaceful co-existence between microorganisms and the host immune system in the endometrium. A majority of CE cases produce no noticeable signs or mild symptoms, and the prevalence rate of CE has been found to be approximately 10%. Gynecologists and pathologists often do not focus much clinical attention on CE due to the time-consuming microscopic examinations necessary to diagnose CE, its mild clinical manifestations, and the benign nature of the disease. However, the relationship between CE and infertility-related conditions such as repeated implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage has recently emerged as an area of inquiry. In this study, we reviewed the literature on the pathophysiology of CE and how it may be associated with infertility, as well as the literature regarding the diagnosis and treatment of CE. In addition, we discuss the value of hysteroscopic procedures in the diagnosis and treatment of CE. PMID:28090456

  20. Mozart's chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, M E

    1993-11-01

    No commemoration of the bicentennial of Mozart's death would be complete without some consideration of that premature yet predictable demise. Mozart's premonitions of death are well known and apparently played a role in the composition of the K.626 Requiem and perhaps other works. His death has traditionally been ascribed to infectious causes, chiefly rheumatic fever or post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, exacerbated by intemperance and chronic penury. Pathology has been difficult because of his supposed burial in a pauper's grave, the location and contents of which were later supposedly lost. Mozart's burial place in St. Mark's Cemetery in Vienna was known and, in the parlance of the day, "reorganized" a decade later, as the occupants of plots were disinterred to make room for the more recently decreased. A skull believed to the Mozart's was saved by the successor of the gravedigger who had supervised Mozart's burial, and then passed into the collections of the anatomist Josef Hyrtl, the municipality of Salzburg, and the Mozarteum museum (Salzburg). Forensic reconstruction of soft tissues related to this skull reveals substantial concordance with Mozart's portraits. The skull suggests premature closure of the metopic suture, which has been suggested on the basis of his physiognomy. A left temporal fracture and concomitant erosions raise the question of chronic subdural hematoma, which would be consistent with several falls in 1789 and 1790 and could have caused the weakness, headaches, and fainting he experienced in 1790 and 1791. Aggressive bloodletting to treat suspected rheumatic fever could have decompensated such a lesion to produce his death on December 5, 1791.

  1. [Conservative therapy of chronic sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Michael; Reiss, Gilfe

    2012-01-01

    The chronic rhinosinusitis is defined as chronic inflammation of the nose and nasal sinuses, with or without nasal polyps. Patients suffering from chronic rhinosinusitis report about nasal obstruction and secretion, olfactory impairment, head and facial pain. These symptoms cause also considerable impact on quality of life. Therefore, an adequate rhinological diagnostics as well as therapies are essential. This paper reviews the pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapy of chronic rhinosinusitis. First choice of therapy should be topical glucocorticoids. The application of glucocorticoids causes anti-inflammatory and certain curative effects. Hypertonic salt solutions improve nasal symptoms. Long-term therapy with oral macrolides might improve median to severe symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps. An additional therapy with antihistamines is possible in patients with an allergy. Adaptive desensitization in patients suffering from analgesic-intolerance associating among other with nasal polyps is currently the single causal therapy. Therefore, frequency of endonasal revision surgery is reduced after desensitization.

  2. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-01-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease.

  3. Microbial Biofilms and Chronic Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Amin; Wright, J. Barry; Schultz, Gregory; Burrell, Robert; Nadworny, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Background is provided on biofilms, including their formation, tolerance mechanisms, structure, and morphology within the context of chronic wounds. The features of biofilms in chronic wounds are discussed in detail, as is the impact of biofilm on wound chronicity. Difficulties associated with the use of standard susceptibility tests (minimum inhibitory concentrations or MICs) to determine appropriate treatment regimens for, or develop new treatments for use in, chronic wounds are discussed, with alternate test methods specific to biofilms being recommended. Animal models appropriate for evaluating biofilm treatments are also described. Current and potential future therapies for treatment of biofilm-containing chronic wounds, including probiotic therapy, virulence attenuation, biofilm phenotype expression attenuation, immune response suppression, and aggressive debridement combined with antimicrobial dressings, are described. PMID:28272369

  4. Adjusting to Chronic Health Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Vicki S; Zajdel, Melissa

    2017-01-03

    Research on adjustment to chronic disease is critical in today's world, in which people are living longer lives, but lives are increasingly likely to be characterized by one or more chronic illnesses. Chronic illnesses may deteriorate, enter remission, or fluctuate, but their defining characteristic is that they persist. In this review, we first examine the effects of chronic disease on one's sense of self. Then we review categories of factors that influence how one adjusts to chronic illness, with particular emphasis on the impact of these factors on functional status and psychosocial adjustment. We begin with contextual factors, including demographic variables such as sex and race, as well as illness dimensions such as stigma and illness identity. We then examine a set of dispositional factors that influence chronic illness adjustment, organizing these into resilience and vulnerability factors. Resilience factors include cognitive adaptation indicators, personality variables, and benefit-finding. Vulnerability factors include a pessimistic attributional style, negative gender-related traits, and rumination. We then turn to social environmental variables, including both supportive and unsupportive interactions. Finally, we review chronic illness adjustment within the context of dyadic coping. We conclude by examining potential interactions among these classes of variables and outlining a set of directions for future research.

  5. Common Questions About Chronic Prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, James D; Garrett, W Allan; McCurry, Tyler K; Teichman, Joel M H

    2016-02-15

    Chronic prostatitis is relatively common, with a lifetime prevalence of 1.8% to 8.2%. Risk factors include conditions that facilitate introduction of bacteria into the urethra and prostate (which also predispose the patient to urinary tract infections) and conditions that can lead to chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic prostatitis must be differentiated from other causes of chronic pelvic pain, such as interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and pelvic floor dysfunction; prostate and bladder cancers; benign prostatic hyperplasia; urolithiasis; and other causes of dysuria, urinary frequency, and nocturia. The National Institutes of Health divides prostatitis into four syndromes: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP), chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNP)/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis. CBP and CNP/CPPS both lead to pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. CBP presents as recurrent urinary tract infections with the same organism identified on repeated cultures; it responds to a prolonged course of an antibiotic that adequately penetrates the prostate, if the urine culture suggests sensitivity. If four to six weeks of antibiotic therapy is effective but symptoms recur, another course may be prescribed, perhaps in combination with alpha blockers or nonopioid analgesics. CNP/CPPS, accounting for more than 90% of chronic prostatitis cases, presents as prostatic pain lasting at least three months without consistent culture results. Weak evidence supports the use of alpha blockers, pain medications, and a four- to six-week course of antibiotics for the treatment of CNP/CPPS. Patients may also be referred to a psychologist experienced in managing chronic pain. Experts on this condition recommend a combination of treatments tailored to the patient's phenotypic presentation. Urology referral should be considered when appropriate treatment is ineffective. Additional treatments include pelvic

  6. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field.

  7. Multimodal Treatment of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Rebecca; Stacey, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with chronic pain receive multimodal treatment. There is scant literature to guide us, but when approaching combination pharmacotherapy, the practitioner and patient must weigh the benefits with the side effects; many medications have modest effect yet carry significant side effects that can be additive. Chronic pain often leads to depression, anxiety, and deconditioning, which are targets for treatment. Structured interdisciplinary programs are beneficial but costly. Interventions have their place in the treatment of chronic pain and should be a part of a multidisciplinary treatment plan. Further research is needed to validate many common combination treatments.

  8. [Chronic ataxia in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erazo Torricelli, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ataxias are an heterogeneous group of disorders that affect the child at different ages. Thus, the congenital forms, generally non progressive are observed from first months of life and are expressed by hypotonia and motor delay long before the ataxia became evident. The cerebral magnetic resonance images (MRI) may be diagnostic in some pictures like Joubert syndrome. The group of progressive hereditary ataxias, usually begin after the infant period. The clinical signs are gait instability and ocular apraxia that can be associated with oculocutaneous telangiectasias (ataxia-telangiesctasia) or with sensory neuropathy (Friedreich ataxia). In this review are briefly described congenital ataxias and in more detailed form the progressive hereditary ataxias autosomal recessive, autosomal dominants and mitochondrials. The importance of genetic study is emphasized, because it is the key to obtain the diagnosis in the majority of these diseases. Although now there are no treatments for the majority of progressive hereditary ataxias, some they have like Refsum disease, vitamine E deficiency, Coenzyme Q10 deficiency and others, thus the diagnosis in these cases is even more important. At present the diagnosis of childhood hereditary ataxia not yet treatable is fundamental to obtain suitable handling, determine a precise outcome and to give to the family an opportune genetic counseling.

  9. [Chronic pain in geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennes, B

    2001-06-01

    Pain is frequent in communicative or no-communicative, ambulatory, institutionalized or hospitalized veterans. It is associated with severe comorbidity so much more than chronic pain could be neglected and expressed of atypical manner or masked by the absence of classical symptoms in particular in case of dementia or of sensory disorders. Pain detection by clinic examination or by pain assessment's methods and adequate approach by pharmacological and non pharmacological therapies are essential for correct pain management. On pharmacological plan, the strategy of the O.M.S. landings is applicable owing to a more particular attention to secondary effects and drugs interactions. AINS must be manipulated with prudence. There are no reasons to exclude opioides from the therapeutic arsenal but with a reduction of the starting doses, a regular adaptation and a very attentive survey. In drugs of landing 2, tramadol reveals itself as efficient and better tolerated as the codeine and dextropropoxyphene has to be to avoid. The obtaining of a satisfactory result depends on a regular assessment of the pain in a context of polydisciplinar approach (physicians, nurses, paramedicals, other care givers).

  10. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, F; Eckardt, A; Kessler, S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a detailed description of the so-called "chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis" (CRMO). The clinical, radiological and histopathological results of an analysis of 29 cases (15 children/adolescents and 14 adults) are presented and correlated to current data from the literature. We could delinate the following points: 1. CRMO is a systemic aseptic inflammation of the bone marrow (Osteitis), it can occur polytopically and association with pustulous dermatologic symptoms is possible. 2. It is not a rare disease 3. Osteomyelitis is probably "reactive" and a plasma-cell sclerotic process with ist own characteristic histologic three-phase course. 4. We could observe 5 specific types of localization which can be documented by X-ray or bone scan. 5. Accompanying arthritis os often present, especially "sympathetic coxitis". 6. The use of drugs in treatment of CRMO (i.e. azithromycin, calcitonin, and bisphosphonates) is discussed. In conclusion we want to point out, that 1. 99mTC bone scan should always be performed when there is suspicion for CRMO to reveal the pattern of affection, 2. the rheumatologist and dermatologist should be contacted, 3. operation is normally not necessary for treatment of the mostly self-limitin disease, and 4. the term "SAPHO syndrome" should be avoided, further differentiation of the diagnosis is necessary.

  11. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, Marion R; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V

    2013-01-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory bone disease occurring primarily in children and adolescents. Episodes of systemic inflammation occur due to immune dysregulation without autoantibodies, pathogens or antigen-specific T cells. CRMO is characterised by the insidious onset of pain with swelling and tenderness over the affected bones. Clavicular involvement was the classical description; however, the metaphyses and epiphyses of long bones are frequently affected. Lesions may occur in any bone, including vertebrae. Characteristic imaging includes bone oedema, lytic areas, periosteal reaction and soft tissue reaction. Biopsies from affected areas display polymorphonuclear leucocytes with osteoclasts and necrosis in the early stages. Subsequently, lymphocytes and plasma cells predominate followed by fibrosis and signs of reactive new bone forming around the inflammation. Diagnosis is facilitated by the use of STIR MRI scanning, potentially obviating the need for biopsy and unnecessary long-term antibiotics due to incorrect diagnosis. Treatment options include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and bisphosphonates. Biologics have been tried in resistant cases with promising initial results. Gene identification has not proved easy although research in this area continues. Early descriptions of the disease suggested a benign course; however, longer-term follow up shows that it can cause significant morbidity and longer-term disability. Although it has always been thought of as very rare, the prevalence is likely to be vastly underestimated due to poor recognition of the disease.

  12. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipps, Thomas J.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Wu, Catherine J.; Croce, Carlo M.; Packham, Graham; Wierda, William G.; O’Brien, Susan; Gribben, John; Rai, Kanti

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a malignancy of CD5+ B cells that is characterized by the accumulation of small, mature-appearing lymphocytes in the blood, marrow and lymphoid tissues. Signalling via surface immunoglobulin, which constitutes the major part of the B cell receptor, and several genetic alterations play a part in CLL pathogenesis, in addition to interactions between CLL cells and other cell types, such as stromal cells, T cells and nurse-like cells in the lymph nodes. The clinical progression of CLL is heterogeneous and ranges from patients who require treatment soon after diagnosis to others who do not require therapy for many years, if at all. Several factors, including the immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region gene (IGHV) mutational status, genomic changes, patient age and the presence of comorbidities, should be considered when defining the optimal management strategies, which include chemotherapy, chemoimmunotherapy and/or drugs targeting B cell receptor signalling or inhibitors of apoptosis, such as BCL-2. Research on the biology of CLL has profoundly enhanced our ability to identify patients who are at higher risk for disease progression and our capacity to treat patients with drugs that selectively target distinctive phenotypic or physiological features of CLL. How these and other advances have shaped our current understanding and treatment of patients with CLL is the subject of this Primer. PMID:28102226

  13. Data-driven model comparing the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions on chronic neural recordings in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Karlo A.; Schroeder, Karen E.; Patel, Paras R.; Irwin, Zachary T.; Thompson, David E.; Bentley, J. Nicole; Lempka, Scott F.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Patil, Parag G.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. We characterized electrode stability over twelve weeks of impedance and neural recording data from four chronically-implanted Utah arrays in two rhesus macaques, and investigated the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions at the electrode recording site on signal quality using a computational model. Approach. A finite-element model of a Utah array microelectrode in neural tissue was coupled with a multi-compartmental model of a neuron to quantify the effects of encapsulation thickness, encapsulation resistivity, and interface resistivity on electrode impedance and waveform amplitude. The coupled model was then reconciled with the in vivo data. Histology was obtained seventeen weeks post-implantation to measure gliosis. Main results. From week 1-3, mean impedance and amplitude increased at rates of 115.8 kΩ/week and 23.1 μV/week, respectively. This initial ramp up in impedance and amplitude was observed across all arrays, and is consistent with biofouling (increasing interface resistivity) and edema clearing (increasing tissue resistivity), respectively, in the model. Beyond week 3, the trends leveled out. Histology showed that thin scars formed around the electrodes. In the model, scarring could not match the in vivo data. However, a thin interface layer at the electrode tip could. Despite having a large effect on impedance, interface resistivity did not have a noticeable effect on amplitude. Significance. This study suggests that scarring does not cause an electrical problem with regard to signal quality since it does not appear to be the main contributor to increasing impedance or significantly affect amplitude unless it displaces neurons. This, in turn, suggests that neural signals can be obtained reliably despite scarring as long as the recording site has sufficiently low impedance after accumulating a thin layer of biofouling. Therefore, advancements in microelectrode technology may be expedited by focusing on improvements to the

  14. Pregnancy and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, John M; Lindheimer, Marshall D

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the association of chronic renal disease and pregnancy. Included are discussions of guidelines for counseling pregnant women with underlying chronic renal disease who are considering conceiving as well as management of those already pregnant. Specifically highlighted are recent studies that question the validity of using estimated glomerular filtration rate and other formulae and questions of whether we should strive to replace the classic counseling approaches based primarily on serum creatinine levels with guidelines based on chronic kidney disease classification. The article concludes with a review as well as a critique of recent research on the prevalence of preeclampsia in women with underlying chronic renal disease, as well as if women with preeclampsia and underlying kidney disease have accelerated courses toward end-stage renal disease.

  15. Nitazoxanide for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, Kristiana; Gluud, Christian; Grevstad, Berit

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C infection is a disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis C virus. The estimated number of chronically infected people with hepatitis C virus worldwide is about 150 million people. Every year, another three to four million people acquire the infection. Chronic hepatitis C......) and ribavirin was the approved standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C. In 2011, first-generation direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have been licensed, for use in combination with peginterferon and ribavirin for treating hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection. Nitazoxanide is another antiviral drug with broad...... antiviral activity and may have potential as an effective alternative, or an addition to standard treatment for the treatment of the hepatitis C virus. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of nitazoxanide in people with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane...

  16. Chronic Conditions among Medicare Beneficiaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data used in the chronic condition reports are based upon CMS administrative enrollment and claims data for Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in the...

  17. Treatment of chronic inflammatory neuropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Eftimov

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the efficacy of existing and alternative treatments in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and explores predictors of treatment response in patients with CIDP treated with corticosteroids. The efficacy of intra

  18. Chronic diseases in elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Wraae, Kristian; Gudex, Claire

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: prevalence estimates for chronic diseases and associated risk factors are needed for priority setting and disease prevention strategies. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the self-reported and clinical prevalence of common chronic disorders in elderly men. STUDY......-reported data on risk factors and disease prevalence were compared with data from hospital medical records. RESULTS: physical inactivity, smoking and excessive alcohol intake were reported by 27, 22 and 17% of the study population, respectively. Except for diabetes, all the chronic diseases investigated......: the study showed a high prevalence of detrimental life style factors including smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and physical inactivity in elderly Danish men. Except for diabetes and respiratory disease, chronic diseases were underreported and in particular erectile dysfunction and osteoporosis were...

  19. Tai chi and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Philip W H

    2012-01-01

    In the last 2 decades, a growing body of research aimed at investigating the health benefits of Tai Chi in various chronic health conditions has been recognized in the literature. This article reviewed the history, the philosophy, and the evidence for the role of Tai Chi in a few selected chronic pain conditions. The ancient health art of Tai Chi contributes to chronic pain management in 3 major areas: adaptive exercise, mind-body interaction, and meditation. Trials examining the health benefit of Tai Chi in chronic pain conditions are mostly low quality. Only 5 pain conditions were reviewed: osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, low back pain, and headache. Of these, Tai Chi seems to be an effective intervention in osteoarthritis, low back pain, and fibromyalgia. The limitations of the Tai Chi study design and suggestions for the direction of future research are also discussed.

  20. Trulance Approved for Chronic Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_163171.html Trulance Approved for Chronic Constipation Drug designed to stimulate upper gastrointestinal tract To ... U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat persistent constipation of unknown (idiopathic) cause in adults. Some 42 ...

  1. The Ubiquity of Chronic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Claudia; Fleischer, Soraya; Rui, Taniele

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of five different books dealing with some aspect of what might be termed a "chronic illness" - Alzheimer's disease, lupus, addiction, erectile dysfunction, and leprosy. The array of different subjects examined in these books points to the negotiable limits of this hugely open category. What exactly constitutes an "illness"? Why not use a less biomedical term instead: "disturbance", "problem", or simply "condition"? And how are we to understand "chronic" - simply as the flipside of "acute" or "curable"?

  2. Occupational chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Oyvind; Würtz, Else Toft; Aasen, Tor Børvig

    2014-01-01

    Occupational-attributable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presents a substantial health challenge. Focusing on spirometric criteria for airflow obstruction, this review of occupational COPD includes both population-wide and industry-specific exposures.......Occupational-attributable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presents a substantial health challenge. Focusing on spirometric criteria for airflow obstruction, this review of occupational COPD includes both population-wide and industry-specific exposures....

  3. Neurovascular Unit in Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Beatrice Mihaela; Bramanti, Placido; Osculati, Francesco; Flonta, Maria-Luisa; Radu, Mihai; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain is a debilitating condition with major socioeconomic impact, whose neurobiological basis is still not clear. An involvement of the neurovascular unit (NVU) has been recently proposed. In particular, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB), two NVU key players, may be affected during the development of chronic pain; in particular, transient permeabilization of the barrier is suggested by several inflammatory- and nerve-injury-based pain models, and we argue that the clarification of molecular BBB/BSCB permeabilization events will shed new light in understanding chronic pain mechanisms. Possible biases in experiments supporting this theory and its translational potentials are discussed. Moving beyond an exclusive focus on the role of the endothelium, we propose that our understanding of the mechanisms subserving chronic pain will benefit from the extension of research efforts to the NVU as a whole. In this view, the available evidence on the interaction between analgesic drugs and the NVU is here reviewed. Chronic pain comorbidities, such as neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, are also discussed in view of NVU changes, together with innovative pharmacological solutions targeting NVU components in chronic pain treatment. PMID:23840097

  4. Chronic Constipation: Current Treatment Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Wing Cheong Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic constipation is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder that affects patients of all ages. In 2007, a consensus group of 10 Canadian gastroenterologists developed a set of recommendations pertaining to the management of chronic constipation and constipation-dominant irritable bowel syndrome. Since then, tegaserod has been withdrawn from the Canadian market. A new, highly selective serotonin receptor subtype 4 agonist, prucalopride, has been examined in several large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrating its efficacy and safety in the management of patients with chronic constipation. Additional studies evaluating the use of stimulant laxatives, polyethylene glycol and probiotics in the management of chronic constipation have also been published. The present review summarizes the previous recommendations and new evidence supporting different treatment modalities – namely, diet and lifestyle, bulking agents, stool softeners, osmotic and stimulant laxatives, prucalopride and probiotics in the management of chronic constipation. A brief summary of lubiprostone and linaclotide is also presented. The quality of evidence is presented by adopting the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Finally, a management pyramid for patients with chronic constipation is proposed based on the quality of evidence, impact of each modality on constipation and on general health, and their availabilities in Canada.

  5. Chronic Cough in Otorhinolaryngologic Routine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palheta Neto, Francisco Xavier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The chronic cough is sometimes manifested as an imprecise symptom, but of great importance for both the diagnosis and the prognosis. In an otorhinolaryngologic approach, several illnesses that can occur with it can be numbered, including 2 of the 3 main causes of chronic cough. Objective: To identify the main otorhinolaryngologic diseases showing the chronic cough as one of their manifestations. Method: A literature's revision was performed in several scientific articles, specialized books and consultation in Birene and Scielo databases. Literature's revision: cough production in the upper airways is usually associated with an inflammatory reaction by stimulating sensitive receptors of these areas or by mechanic stimulus. The main cause of the chronic cough in the otorhinolaryngology day-to-day is the post-nasal drip, gathering together by itself 02 of the most common diseases: rhinitis and sinusitis. Laryngitis as a result of gastroesophageal reflux (GER stands out in the index of chronic cough etiology, but it is not as severe as GER . Neoplasias are also somewhat frequent causes of cough, and the difficulty in diagnosing the cough cause is common in this disease group. Motility disorder, laryngeal irritation persistence, parasitic disease and injuries by inhalation of toxic products were also found as a cause of cough for longer than 03 months. Conclusion:Chronic cough is a frequent and important finding in otorhinolaryngology and cannot be underestimated, and a careful anamnesis is the best way to determine the etiology and perform a correct treatment for the patient's disease.

  6. Guideline of Chronic Urticaria Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Lauren M; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2016-09-01

    Urticaria is a relatively common condition that if chronic can persist for weeks, months or years and affect quality of life significantly. The etiology is often difficult to determine, especially as it becomes chronic. Many cases of chronic urticaria are thought to be autoimmune, although there is no consensus that testing for autoimmunity alters the diagnostic or management strategies or outcomes. Many times, urticaria is easily managed with antihistamines and/or short courses of oral corticosteroids, but too often control is insufficient and additional therapies must be added. For years, immune modulating medications, such as cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil, have been used in cases refractory to antihistamines and oral corticosteroids, although the evidence supporting their efficacy and safety has been limited. Omalizumab was recently approved for the treatment of chronic urticaria unresponsive to H1-antagonists. This IgG anti-IgE monoclonal antibody has been well demonstrated to safely and effectively control chronic urticaria at least partially in approximately 2/3 of cases. However, the mechanism of action and duration of treatment for omalizumab is still unclear. It is hoped that as the pathobiology of chronic urticaria becomes better defined, future therapies that target specific mechanistic pathways will be developed that continue to improve the management of these often challenging patients.

  7. Neurovascular Unit in Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Mihaela Radu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a debilitating condition with major socioeconomic impact, whose neurobiological basis is still not clear. An involvement of the neurovascular unit (NVU has been recently proposed. In particular, the blood-brain barrier (BBB and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB, two NVU key players, may be affected during the development of chronic pain; in particular, transient permeabilization of the barrier is suggested by several inflammatory- and nerve-injury-based pain models, and we argue that the clarification of molecular BBB/BSCB permeabilization events will shed new light in understanding chronic pain mechanisms. Possible biases in experiments supporting this theory and its translational potentials are discussed. Moving beyond an exclusive focus on the role of the endothelium, we propose that our understanding of the mechanisms subserving chronic pain will benefit from the extension of research efforts to the NVU as a whole. In this view, the available evidence on the interaction between analgesic drugs and the NVU is here reviewed. Chronic pain comorbidities, such as neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, are also discussed in view of NVU changes, together with innovative pharmacological solutions targeting NVU components in chronic pain treatment.

  8. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bergh, Peter Y K; Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2013-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common autoimmune neuropathy. The diagnosis depends on the clinical presentation with a progressive or relapsing course over at least 2 months and electrophysiological evidence of primary demyelination. Whereas typical CIDP is quite easily recognizable because virtually no other neuropathies present with both distal and proximal motor and sensory deficit, atypical CIDP, focal and multifocal variants in particular, may represent a difficult diagnostic challenge. CIDP very likely is an underdiagnosed condition as suggested also by a positive correlation between prevalence rates and sensitivity of electrophysiological criteria. Since no 'gold standard' diagnostic marker exists, electrophysiological criteria have been optimized to be at the same time as sensitive and as specific as possible. Additional supportive laboratory features, such as increased spinal fluid protein, MRI abnormalities of nerve segments, and in selected cases nerve biopsy lead to the correct diagnosis in the large majority of the cases. Objective clinical improvement following immune therapy is also a useful parameter to confirm the diagnosis. The pathogenesis and pathophysiology of CIDP remain poorly understood, but the available evidence for an inflammatory origin is quite convincing. Steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange (PE) have been proven to be effective treatments. IVIG usually leads to rapid improvement, which is useful in severely disabled patients. Repeat treatment over regular time intervals for many years is often necessary. The effect of steroids is slower and the side-effect profile may be problematic, but they may induce disease remission more frequently than IVIG. An important and as of yet uncompletely resolved issue is the evaluation of long-term outcome to determine whether the disease is still active and responsive to treatment.

  9. Chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome: shifting boundaries and attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, A R

    1998-09-28

    The subjective symptom of "fatigue" is one of the most widespread in the general population and is a major source of healthcare utilization. Prolonged fatigue is often associated with neuropsychological and musculoskeletal symptoms that form the basis of several syndromal diagnoses including chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and neurasthenia, and is clearly not simply the result of a lack of force generation from the muscle. Current epidemiologic research in this area relies predominantly on self-report data to document the prevalence and associations of chronic fatigue. Of necessity, this subjective data source gives rise to uncertain diagnostic boundaries and consequent divergent epidemiologic, clinical, and pathophysiologic research findings. This review will highlight the impact of the case definition and ascertainment methods on the varying prevalence estimates of chronic fatigue syndrome and patterns of reported psychological comorbidty. It will also evaluate the evidence for a true postinfective fatigue syndrome.

  10. Management of chronic refractory cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Peter G; Vertigan, Anne E

    2015-12-14

    Chronic refractory cough (CRC) is defined as a cough that persists despite guideline based treatment. It is seen in 20-46% of patients presenting to specialist cough clinics and it has a substantial impact on quality of life and healthcare utilization. Several terms have been used to describe this condition, including the recently introduced term cough hypersensitivity syndrome. Key symptoms include a dry irritated cough localized around the laryngeal region. Symptoms are not restricted to cough and can include globus, dyspnea, and dysphonia. Chronic refractory cough has factors in common with laryngeal hypersensitivity syndromes and chronic pain syndromes, and these similarities help to shed light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Its pathophysiology is complex and includes cough reflex sensitivity, central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Chronic refractory cough often occurs after a viral infection. The diagnosis is made once the main diseases that cause chronic cough have been excluded (or treated) and cough remains refractory to medical treatment. Several treatments have been developed over the past decade. These include speech pathology interventions using techniques adapted from the treatment of hyperfunctional voice disorders, as well as the use of centrally acting neuromodulators such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Potential new treatments in development also show promise.

  11. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  12. [Chronic polyradiculoneuritis and its frontiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, J M; Tabaraud, F; Magy, L; Macian, F

    2002-12-01

    The Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathies (CIDP) constitute a syndrome whose incidence is difficult to evaluate, and is probably underestimated. In the course of this presentation, we deliberately restricted discussion to issues raised in recent years concerning the extent of this syndrome. We discuss diagnostic criteria, especially electrophysiological ones. As the criteria proposed by the ad hoc committee of the American Academy of Neurology in 1991 have been questioned due to lack of sensitivity, new ones have been proposed recently. We briefly discuss the different types of chronic dysimmune demyelinating neuropathy: not only the CIDP, but also the Lewis and Sumner syndrome or multifocal inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and the multiple conduction block neuropathies. At last, we point out the consistent finding of axonal involvement in the course of a chronic demyelinating neuropathy; over time, it can become pre-dominant, which may make diagnosis difficult by suggesting a chronic axonal neuropathy that may be assumed to be primary. Consideration of these points may help clinicians recognize more chronic dysimmune neuropathies, for which immunosuppressive therapy has been found to be effective.

  13. Aminoadamantanes for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamers, Mieke H; Broekman, Mark; Drenth, Joost Ph

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Around 3% of the world's population (approximately 160 million people) are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus. The proportion of infected people who develop clinical symptoms varies between 5% and 40%. Combination therapy with pegylated interferon-alpha plus ribavirin...... response in genotype 1 infected patients to at least 70%. There is therefore an unmet need for drugs that can achieve a higher proportion of sustained virological response. Aminoadamantanes are antiviral drugs used for treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial...... and harmful effects of aminoadamantanes for patients with chronic hepatitis C infection by conducting a systematic review with meta-analyses of randomised clinical trials, as well as trial sequential analyses. SEARCH METHODS: We conducted electronic searches of the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled...

  14. [Neurosurgical treatment of chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, D; Blond, S; Mertens, P; Lanteri-Minet, M

    2015-02-01

    Neurosurgical treatment of pain used two kind of techniques: 1) Lesional techniques interrupt the transmission of nociceptive neural input by lesionning the nociceptive pathways (drezotomy, cordotomy, tractotomy…). They are indicated to treat morphine-resistant cancer pain and few cases of selected neuropathic pain. 2) Neuromodulation techniques try to decrease pain by reinforcing inhibitory and/or to limit activatory mechanisms. Chronic electrical stimulation of the nervous system (peripheral nerve stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, motor cortex stimulation…) is used to treat chronic neuropathic pain. Intrathecal infusion of analgesics (morphine, ziconotide…), using implantable pumps, allows to increase their efficacy and to reduce their side effects. These techniques can improve, sometimes dramatically, selected patients with severe and chronic pain, refractory to all other treatments. The quality of the analgesic outcome depends on the relevance of the indications.

  15. Peripheral neuromodulation in chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, F; De Boni, A

    2012-05-01

    Patients with chronic migraines are often refractory to medical treatment. Therefore, they might need other strategies to modulate their pain, according to their level of disability. Neuromodulation can be achieved with several tools: meditation, biofeedback, physical therapy, drugs and electric neurostimulation (ENS). ENS can be applied to the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), either invasively (cortical or deep brain) or non-invasively [cranial electrotherapy stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation]. Among chronic primary headaches, cluster headaches are most often treated either through deep brain stimulation or occipital nerve stimulation because there is a high level of disability related to this condition. ENS, employed through several modalities such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, interferential currents and pulsed radiofrequency, has been applied to the peripheral nervous system at several sites. We briefly review the indications for the use of peripheral ENS at the site of the occipital nerves for the treatment of chronic migraine.

  16. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...... food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids...

  17. Chronic renal disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramin, Susan M; Vidaeff, Alex C; Yeomans, Edward R; Gilstrap, Larry C

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the impact of varying degrees of renal insufficiency on pregnancy outcome in women with chronic renal disease. Our search of the literature did not reveal any randomized clinical trials or meta-analyses. The available information is derived from opinion, reviews, retrospective series, and limited observational series. It appears that chronic renal disease in pregnancy is uncommon, occurring in 0.03-0.12% of all pregnancies from two U.S. population-based and registry studies. Maternal complications associated with chronic renal disease include preeclampsia, worsening renal function, preterm delivery, anemia, chronic hypertension, and cesarean delivery. The live birth rate in women with chronic renal disease ranges between 64% and 98% depending on the severity of renal insufficiency and presence of hypertension. Significant proteinuria may be an indicator of underlying renal insufficiency. Management of pregnant women with underlying renal disease should ideally entail a multidisciplinary approach at a tertiary center and include a maternal-fetal medicine specialist and a nephrologist. Such women should receive counseling regarding the pregnancy outcomes in association with maternal chronic renal disease and the effect of pregnancy on renal function, especially within the ensuing 5 years postpartum. These women will require frequent visits and monitoring of renal function during pregnancy. Women whose renal disease is further complicated by hypertension should be counseled regarding the increased risk of adverse outcome and need for blood pressure control. Some antihypertensives, especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, should be avoided during pregnancy, if possible, because of the potential for both teratogenic (hypocalvaria) and fetal effects (renal failure, oliguria, and demise).

  18. Prevention Of Chronic Renal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejzi Alushi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is easier to prevent a disease than to cure it. This postulate is a foundation stone of the contemporary medicine, furthermore its mission. The Chronic Kidney Diseases (CKD, amongst them the Chronic Pyelonephrites (CP and the mass kidney reduction  take an important  place in human pathologies in general, and in particular in renal ones. The Chronic Pyelonephrites  are chronic renal pathologies, which on one side are of various causes and on the other side are multi systemic. At the same time they tend, earlier or later, depending on their course, to bring the patient towards the Chronic Kidney Insufficiency  in stage of uremia, consequently in need of substitution therapies e.g. dialysis, peritoneum dialysis or transplant. It is worthy to emphasize that from the prevention and correct cure of CP make profit the patients, the family, the state and in the last analyses  the entire society, because in that way the budget expense destined for the fore going substitution cures, dialysis, peritoneum dialysis or transplant, is considerably  reduced. The same should be mentioned  in relation to the CP and the mass kidney reduction, speaking about our country, which are still at the first place as the very cause of Chronic Kidney  Insufficiencies (CRI, later on advancing toward uremia and terminal uremia along with its grave consequences. In general  the very foundation of the CP is on  the  infections of urinary roads, in particular on the complicated ones, among them it should be mentioned-congenital kidney anomalies, renal calculosis  so much present in our country, and pathologies of segment or vesical-ureteral reflux, and rarely the pathologies of prostate.

  19. Management of chronic visceral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne E; Farmer, Adam D; Olesen, Søren S

    2016-01-01

    ' symptoms, adopting an empathic approach and taking time to educate patients. To optimize treatment and outcomes in chronic visceral pain we need to move away from approaches exclusively based on dealing with peripheral nociceptive input toward more holistic strategies, taking into account alterations......Despite marked differences in underlying pathophysiology, the current management of visceral pain largely follows the guidelines derived from the somatic pain literature. The effective management of patients with chronic visceral pain should be multifaceted, including both pharmacological...... in central pain processing....

  20. Bendamustine Plus Alemtuzumab for Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  1. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with

  2. Electroacupuncture treatment of chronic insomniacs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Jing-wen; WANG Chu-huai; LIAO Xin-xue; YAN Ying-shuo; HU Yue-hua; RAO Zhong-dong; WEN Ming; ZENG Xiao-xiang; LAI Xin-sheng

    2009-01-01

    Background Due to the quick rhythm of life and work pressure, more and more people suffer from sleep quality problems. In this study, we investigated the effect of electroacupuncture on sleep quality of chronic insomniacs and the safety of electroacupuncture therapy.Methods Four courses of electroacupuncture treatment were applied to 47 patients. With pre-treatment and post-treatment self-control statistical method, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) scores were used for evaluating sleep quality. Polysomnogram was used for detecting insomniacs' changes in sleep architecture. The safety of electroacupuncture was evaluated by monitoring the self-designed adverse events and side effects during treatment and post-treatment.Results Electroacupuncture considerably improved insomniacs' sleep quality and social function during the daytime.Electroacupuncture had certain repairing effect on the disruption in sleep architecture. At the same time,electroacupuncture prolonged slow wave sleep (SWS) time and relatively rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) time.There was no hangover, addiction or decrements in vigilance during the daytime (incidence rate was 0). However,insomnia rebound rate was about 23% within one month.Conclusions These results suggest that electroacupuncture has beneficial effect on sleep quality improvement in the patients with chronic insomnia, which may be associated with repairing sleep architecture, reconstructing sleep continuity,as well as prolonging SWS time and REM sleep time. Electroacupuncture treatment for chronic insomnia is safe.Therefore, electroacupuncture therapy could be a promising avenue of treatment for chronic insomnia.

  3. [Chronic prostatitis and Bechterew's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlicek, J; Svec, V

    1977-11-01

    A group of patients between 35 and 65 years old with chronic prostatitis were examined for the presence of Becherew's disease. In this connection the New York and Roman criterions for morbus Bechterew were applied. There were found one ankyosing spondylarthritis, one ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint, and 11 times a tentative sacroileitis were stated. Altogether the proved and tentative findings were only 3.68 per cent of all examinations. In our countries the morbus Bechterew is found in 0,21 per cent of the normal population. So the protion of the Bechterew's disease in patients with chronic prostatitis is indeed a little higher than average, but not so frequent as often pretended in recent times. After a second series 58 patients being treated because of Bechterew's disease of different stages and different terms were examined for the possibility of a simultaneously elapsing chronic prostatitis. A chronic prostatitis was found in 38 per cent of these patients which correspondents to the incidence published in literature for the medium-age manhood. Nobody of the test persons had complaints on the part of the urologenital tract.

  4. Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; O'Brien, Susan M

    2004-04-01

    Treatment options for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia have changed over the past two decades. This article reviews the experience accumulated with the use of alkylating agents alone and in combination; purine analogues alone and in combination and monoclonal antibodies such as rituximab, and alemtuzumab alone and in combination. The results obtained with different treatment strategies are summarized, compared, and reviewed.

  5. [Operative treatment of chronic pleuritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzhyĭ, I D; Hres'ko, I Ia; Chumak, S O; Elastal, R Z

    2008-09-01

    Basing on the literature data and own experience, grounded on results of follow-up on 2000 patients, suffering an acute pleuritis and performance of more than 200 operative interventions--pleurectomy, the clinic-radiological classification of chronic pleuritis, mostly answering the practical health care necessities, was proposed by the authors.

  6. Chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis: management challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charakorn N

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Natamon Charakorn, Kornkiat Snidvongs Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand Abstract: Chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis is a spectrum of inflammatory diseases in isolated sphenoid sinus which may persist over a period of 12 weeks. It is a different entity from other types of rhinosinusitis because clinical presentations include headache, visual loss or diplopia, and patients may or may not have nasal obstruction or nasal discharge. Nasal endoscopic examination is useful, and computed tomography is mandatory. The disease requires comprehensive knowledge and appropriate imaging technique for diagnosis. To treat patients with chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis, surgical treatment with endoscopic transnasal sphenoidotomy is often required. As there are no recent updated reviews of chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis, in this article, we review the anatomy of the sphenoid sinus and its clinical relationship with the clinical signs and symptoms of the disease, the imaging findings of each diagnosis and the comprehensive surgical techniques. Keywords: sphenoid sinus, sphenoid sinusitis, chronic, rhinosinusitis, fungal rhinosinusitis, mucocele

  7. Management of chronic hand eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepgen, Thomas L.; Agner, Tove; Aberer, Werner; Berth-Jones, John; Cambazard, Frederic; Elsner, Peter; McFadden, John; Coenraads, Pieter Jan

    2007-01-01

    Hand eczema (HE) is one of the most frequent skin diseases and has often a chronically relapsing course with a poor prognosis resulting in a high social and economic impact for the individual and the society. In this article, we highlight the results of an expert workshop on the 'management of sever

  8. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  9. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  10. Lymphocyte 'homing' and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Motohiro

    2015-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is a response to prolonged exposure to injurious stimuli that harm and destroy tissues and promote lymphocyte infiltration into inflamed sites. Following progressive accumulation of lymphocytes, the histology of inflamed tissue begins to resemble that of peripheral lymphoid organs, which can be referred to as lymphoid neogenesis or formation of tertiary lymphoid tissues. Lymphocyte recruitment to inflamed tissues is also reminiscent of lymphocyte homing to peripheral lymphoid organs. In the latter, under physiological conditions, homing receptors expressed on lymphocytes adhere to vascular addressin expressed on high endothelial venules (HEVs), initiating a lymphocyte migration process composed of sequential adhesive interactions. Intriguingly, in chronic inflammation, HEV-like vessels are induced de novo, despite the fact that the inflamed site is not originally lymphoid tissue, and these vessels contribute to lymphocyte recruitment in a manner similar to physiological lymphocyte homing. In this review, we first describe physiological lymphocyte homing mechanisms focusing on vascular addressins. We then describe HEV-like vessel-mediated pathogenesis seen in various chronic inflammatory disorders such as Helicobacter pylori gastritis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), autoimmune pancreatitis and sclerosing sialadenitis, as well as chronic inflammatory cell neoplasm MALT lymphoma, with reference to our work and that of others.

  11. Hyperglycemia, tumorigenesis, and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Chun; Yang, Wei-Chung Vivian

    2016-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is the most prominent sign that characterizes diabetes. Hyperglycemia favors malignant cell growth by providing energy to cancer cells. Clinical studies also showed an increased risk of diabetes being associated with different types of cancers. In addition, poorly regulated glucose metabolism in diabetic patients is often found with increased levels of chronic inflammatory markers, e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and emerging evidence has highlighted activation of the immune response in the progression and development of cancer cells. Therefore, uncontrolled proinflammatory responses could conceivably create a chronic inflammatory state, promoting a tumor-favorable microenvironment and potentially triggering immune overactivation and cancer growth. To further understand how hyperglycemia contributes to immune overactivation, the tumor microenvironment and the development of chronic inflammation-associated tumors may provide insights into tumor biology and immunology. This paper provides a brief introduction to hyperglycemia-associated diseases, followed by a comprehensive overview of the current findings of regulatory molecular mechanisms of glycosylation on proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix under hyperglycemic conditions. Then, the authors discuss the role of hyperglycemia in tumorigenesis (particularly in prostate, liver, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers), as well as the contribution of hyperglycemia to chronic inflammation. The authors end with a brief discussion on the future perspectives of hyperglycemia/tumorigenesis and potential applications of alternative/effective therapeutic strategies for hyperglycemia-associated cancers.

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure Small Text Medium Text Large Text Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure YESTERDAY One third of diabetic ...

  13. Pregabalin for Pain Treatment in Chronic Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren Schou; Bowense, S; Wilder-Smith, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Intractable pain usually dominates the clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Slowing of electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythmicity has been associated with abnormal cortical pain processing in other chronic pain disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectral distribution...

  14. Helping a Child Manage a Chronic Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160011.html Helping a Child Manage a Chronic Illness Feeling they have control over their ... News) -- Children and teens who feel confident handling a chronic illness on their own appear better able ...

  15. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Gulf War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Gulf War Veterans Gulf War ... and be at least 10 percent disabling. About Chronic Fatigue Syndrome CFS is an unexplained, severe and ...

  16. Chronic Condition Public Use File (PUF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Chronic Conditions Public Use Files (PUF) with information from Medicare claims. The CMS Chronic Conditions PUF is an aggregated file in...

  17. Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Chronic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Peter; Petersen, Marian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This randomized controlled clinical trial investigated the effects of mindfulness meditation on chronic pain. DESIGN: A total of 109 patients with nonspecific chronic pain were randomized to either a standardized mindfulness meditation program (mindfulness-based stress reduction [MBSR...

  18. Communication About Chronic Critical Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith E.; Mercado, Alice F.; Camhi, Sharon L.; Tandon, Nidhi; Wallenstein, Sylvan; August, Gary I.; Morrison, R. Sean

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite poor outcomes, life-sustaining treatments including mechanical ventilation are continued for a large and growing population of patients with chronic critical illness. This may be owing in part to a lack of understanding resulting from inadequate communication between clinicians and patients and families. Our objective was to investigate the informational needs of patients with chronic critical illness and their families and the extent to which these needs are met. Methods In this prospective observational study conducted at 5 adult intensive care units in a large, university-affiliated hospital in New York, New York, 100 patients with chronic critical illness (within 3–7 days of elective tracheotomy for prolonged mechanical ventilation) or surrogates for incapacitated patients were surveyed using an 18-item questionnaire addressing communication about chronic critical illness. Main outcome measures included ratings of importance and reports of whether information was received about questionnaire items. Results Among 125 consecutive, eligible patients, 100 (80%) were enrolled; questionnaire respondents included 2 patients and 98 surrogates. For all items, more than 78% of respondents rated the information as important for decision making (>98% for 16 of 18 items). Respondents reported receiving no information for a mean (SD) of 9.0 (3.3) of 18 items, with 95% of respondents reporting not receiving information for approximately one-quarter of the items. Of the subjects rating the item as important, 77 of 96 (80%) and 69 of 74 (93%) reported receiving no information about expected functional status at hospital discharge and prognosis for 1-year survival, respectively. Conclusions Many patients and their families may lack important information for decision making about continuation of treatment in the chronic phase of critical illness. Strategies for effective communication in this clinical context should be investigated and implemented. PMID

  19. Chinese medicinal herbs for chronic hepatitis B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J; McIntosh, H; Lin, Haili

    2001-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B is a serious health problem worldwide. Chinese medicinal herbs are widely used for treatment of chronic hepatitis B in China and many clinical trials have been conducted. This systematic review is to assess the efficacy and safety of Chinese medicinal herbs for chronic hepatitis...

  20. Shared genetic factors underlie chronic pain syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Zavos, Helena M. S.; Lachance, Genevieve; Hammond, Christopher J.; Williams, Frances M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain syndromes (CPS) are highly prevalent in the general population, and increasingly the evidence points to a common etiological pathway. Using a large cohort of twins (n = 8564) characterized for chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain (CWP), chronic pelvic pain (PP), migraine (MIG), dry e

  1. Chronic pain management: nonpharmacological therapies for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ku-Lang; Fillingim, Roger; Hurley, Robert W; Schmidt, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    Nonpharmacologic therapies have become a vital part of managing chronic pain (CP). Although these can be used as stand-alone therapies, nonpharmacologic treatments often are used to augment and complement pharmacologic treatments (ie, multimodal therapy). Nonpharmacologic approaches can be classified as behavioral, cognitive, integrative, and physical therapies. Core principles in developing a treatment plan are explaining the nature of the CP condition, setting appropriate goals, and developing a comprehensive treatment approach and plan for adherence. Clinicians should become familiar with these interventions so that they can offer patients flexibility in the pain management approach. Effective noninvasive treatment modalities for CP include behavioral therapy for short-term pain relief; cognitive behavioral therapy for reducing long-term pain and disability; hypnosis as adjunctive therapy; guided imagery, diaphragmatic breathing, and muscle relaxation, especially for cancer-related pain; mindfulness-based stress reduction for patients with chronic low back pain; acupuncture for multiple pain conditions; combination manipulation, manual therapy, endurance exercise, stretching, and strengthening for chronic neck pain; animal-assisted therapy; and S-adenosyl-L-methionine for joint pain. Guidelines for use of these treatment modalities are based on expert panel recommendations in combination with data from randomized controlled trials.

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Zografos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship.

  3. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  4. Prevalence of maternal chronic diseases during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølving, Line Riis; Nielsen, Jan; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2016-01-01

    chronic diseases were chronic lung diseases/asthma (1.73%), thyroid disorders (1.50%) and anxiety and personality disorders (1.33%). Taking increasing maternal age at birth into account, the relative risk for women to have a chronic disease from 2009 to 2013 was 4.14 (95% CI 4.05-4.22), compared...... pregnancy. We aimed to analyze the prevalence of chronic diseases during pregnancy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This register-based cohort study included all women giving birth in Denmark between 1989 and 2013 based on data from Danish health registers. Maternal chronic diseases included 23 disease categories...

  5. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... and neurohumoral dysregulation found in cirrhosis. Recent studies have shown that the ET system is highly activated in most cirrhotic patients. Circulating ET-1 and ET-3 levels have a positive relation to the severity of the disease and fluid retention, with the highest values recorded in patients with functional....... In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...

  6. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation....... In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...... and neurohumoral dysregulation found in cirrhosis. Recent studies have shown that the ET system is highly activated in most cirrhotic patients. Circulating ET-1 and ET-3 levels have a positive relation to the severity of the disease and fluid retention, with the highest values recorded in patients with functional...

  7. Vouchers for chronic disease care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jennifer J; Segal, Leonie

    2008-08-01

    This paper explores the economic implications of vouchers for chronic disease management with respect to achieving objectives of equity and efficiency. Vouchers as a payment policy instrument for health care services have a set of properties that suggest they may address both demand-side and supply-side issues, and contribute to equity and efficiency. They provide a means whereby health care services can be targeted at selected groups, enabling consumer choice of provider, and encouraging competition in the supply of health services. This analysis suggests that, when structured appropriately, vouchers can support consumers to choose services that will meet their health care needs and encourage competition among providers. Although they may not be appropriate across the entire health care system, there are features of vouchers that make them a potentially attractive option, especially for the management of chronic disease.

  8. Chronic folliculitis in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasinghe S

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic folliculitis (CF is a chronic infection of hair follicles leading to atrophy and loss of the affected hairs. This study was done on 51 patients with CF presenting at the Dermatology Clinic at General Hospital Matara, Sri Lanka, to identify specific clinical features and aetiological factors, and to study histopathology. Pus cultures were done on 25 cases. Biopsies were done on 6 patients. CF was commoner in males (59%; 76% were under 34 years, and 39% had occupational exposure to possible irritants. Thirty five precent admitted of scrubbing legs with rough objects. Ichthyosis vulgaris was evident in 47%. All pus cultures revealed Staphylococcus aureus. Clinical features and histopathological features were similar to those described by Harman (1968. Rough scrubbing, ichthyosis and occupational exposure to irritants may be aetiologically relevant.

  9. Clinicomicrobiological study of chronic paronychia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guha P

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 261 digits affected in 100 patients of chronic paronychia were studied for clinical features. The bacteriological and mycological flora have been examined in 25 cases of the above 100 cases which were most severely affected. Aerobic bacteria were found in all cases. Staphylococcus aureus was seen in 60 percent. Klebsiella in 16 percent, Escherichia coli in 12 percent, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 12 percent, Proteus mirabillis in 8 percent, Staphylococcus epidermidis in 4 percent and Streptococcus viridans in 4 percent. Culture for fungus revealed Candida albicans in 64 percent and other species such as C. krusei, C. stellatoides, C. viswanathi, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis were present in 1 case each. No fungus was detected in 4 cases(16percent. The present investigation was designed to compare the bacterial and mycotic flora of the nail folds of patients of chronic paronychia with that of western countries.

  10. Management of chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Tendons transmit force between muscles and bones and, when stretched, store elastic energy that contributes to movement.(1) The tendinous portion of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles merge to form the Achilles tendon, which is the largest and strongest in the body, but one of the most frequently injured.(2,3) Conservative management options for chronic Achilles tendinopathy include eccentric (lengthening) exercises, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), topical nitroglycerin, low level laser therapy, orthoses, splints or injections (e.g. corticosteroids, hyperosmolar dextrose, polidocanol, platelet-rich plasma), while a minority of patients require surgery (using open, percutaneous or endoscopic methods).(4-8) Here we assess the management options for patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (lasting over 6 weeks).

  11. Lithium clearance in chronic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1989-01-01

    1. Lithium clearance measurements were made in 72 patients with chronic nephropathy of different aetiology and moderate to severely reduced renal function. 2. Lithium clearance was strictly correlated with glomerular filtration rate, and there was no suggestion of distal tubular reabsorption...... clearance data were independent of whether renal disease was of primarily glomerular or tubular origin and, further, were not influenced by long-term conventional antihypertensive treatment. 6. It is concluded that, even with a reduced kidney function, the data are compatible with the suggestion...... that lithium clearance may be a measure of the delivery of sodium and water from the renal proximal tubule. With this assumption it was found that adjustment of the sodium excretion in chronic nephropathy initially takes place in the distal parts of the nephron (loop of Henle, distal tubule and collecting duct...

  12. [Pharmacological treatment of chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willimann, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    The pharmacological treatment of chronic pain differs from acute pain management. In chronic non-cancer pain patients pharmacological treatment is only one element of an interdisciplinary approach. Not pain reduction only but gain in physical and social functioning is mandatory for continuation of therapy. The developpement of a strategy is the most important and difficult step toward an individual and sustained pharmacological pain treatment. Simple practical guidelines can help to find an individual therapeutic straight. Outcome parameters have to be determined. Check-ups for discontinuation of the therapy have to be done periodically. Exact documentation of effect and side effects prevents ungrateful and potential dangerous treatments. The WHO ladder remains the cornerstone of pharmacological pain treatment. Further analgesics as antidepressants and anticonvulsants are important in treatment of neuropathic or mixed pain states. Special considerations have to be done in opioid treatment of non-cancer pain regarding the lack of evidence in long term outcome and possible side effects and risks.

  13. Management of chronic visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Anne E; Farmer, Adam D; Olesen, Søren S; Aziz, Qasim; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-10-01

    Despite marked differences in underlying pathophysiology, the current management of visceral pain largely follows the guidelines derived from the somatic pain literature. The effective management of patients with chronic visceral pain should be multifaceted, including both pharmacological and psychological interventions, thereby providing a mechanism-orientated approach to treatment. Patients can frequently become disenfranchised, and subsequently disengaged, with healthcare providers leading to repeated consultations. Thus, a key aspect of management is to break this cycle by validating patients' symptoms, adopting an empathic approach and taking time to educate patients. To optimize treatment and outcomes in chronic visceral pain we need to move away from approaches exclusively based on dealing with peripheral nociceptive input toward more holistic strategies, taking into account alterations in central pain processing.

  14. Chronic radiation enteritis and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gwilym James; Brooke, Rachael; De Silva, Aminda Niroshan

    2013-07-01

    Radiation enteritis is defined as the loss of absorptive capacity of the intestine following irradiation, which is most commonly seen after radiotherapy for pelvic and abdominal malignancies. It is divided into acute and chronic forms and usually presents with diarrhea and malabsorption. Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE). We reviewed the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of CRE and CRE with malnutrition in this article. Functional short bowel syndrome as a cause of malnutrition in CRE is also considered. The diagnostic work-up includes serum markers, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging and the exclusion of alternative diagnoses such as recurrent malignancy. Management options of CRE include dietary manipulation, anti-motility agents, electrolyte correction, probiotics, parenteral nutrition, surgical resection and small bowel transplantation. Treatment may also be required for coexisting conditions including vitamin B12 deficiency, bile acid malabsorption and depression.

  15. Lithium clearance in chronic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1989-01-01

    1. Lithium clearance measurements were made in 72 patients with chronic nephropathy of different aetiology and moderate to severely reduced renal function. 2. Lithium clearance was strictly correlated with glomerular filtration rate, and there was no suggestion of distal tubular reabsorption...... of lithium or influence of osmotic diuresis. 3. Fractional reabsorption of lithium was reduced in most patients with glomerular filtration rates below 25 ml/min. 4. Calculated fractional distal reabsorption of sodium was reduced in most patients with glomerular filtration rates below 50 ml/min. 5. Lithium...... that lithium clearance may be a measure of the delivery of sodium and water from the renal proximal tubule. With this assumption it was found that adjustment of the sodium excretion in chronic nephropathy initially takes place in the distal parts of the nephron (loop of Henle, distal tubule and collecting duct...

  16. Nitric oxide and chronic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Grisham

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to play an important role in modulating the inflammatory response by virtue of its ability to affect bloodflow, leukocyte function and cell viability. The objective of this study was to assess the role that NO may play in mediating the mucosal injury and inflammation in a model of chronic granulomatous colitis using two pharmacologically different inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Chronic granulomatous colitis with liver and spleen inflammation was induced in female Lewis rats via the subserosal (intramural injection of peptidoglycan/polysaccharide (PG/PS derived from group A streptococci. Chronic NOS inhibition by oral administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (15 µmol/kg/day or amino-guanidine (AG (15 µmol/ kg/day was found to attenuate the PG/PS-induced increases in macroscopic colonic inflammation scores and colonic myeloperoxidase activity. Only AG -- not L-NAME – attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in colon dry weight. Both L-NAME and AG significantly attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in spleen weight whereas neither was effective at significantly attenuating the PG/PS-induced increases in liver weight. Although both L-NAME and AG inhibited NO production in vivo, as measured by decreases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels, only AG produced significantly lower values (38±3 versus 83±8 µM, respectively, P<0.05. Finally, L-NAME, but not AG, administration significantly increased mean arterial pressure from 83 mmHg in colitic animals to 105 mmHg in the PG/PS+ L-NAME-treated animals (P<0.05. It is concluded that NO may play an important role in mediating some of the pathophysiology associated with this model of chronic granulomatous colitis.

  17. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT CHRONIC INSOMNIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A Dian Puspitha Candra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is defined as difficulty to start sleeping, maintain it, or low quality sleeping, if the condition persist for more than one month, it is called chronic insomnia. Diagnosis is made through anamnesa and sleep wake diaries, aktigraphy, polisomnography. Pharmachologycally drugs that have been used to treat insomnia are benzodiazepin reseptor agonis, antihistamine, antidepressant. Non pharmacological ways include behavioural intervention for insomnia, give significant result in decreasing sleep latency, reducing awakness duration during the night and improving total sleeping time.

  18. Tackling chronic migraine: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carod-Artal FJ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Javier Carod-Artal Neurology Department, Raigmore Hospital, Inverness, UK; Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: In the last decade, several diagnostic criteria and definitions have been proposed for chronic migraine (CM. The third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders–3 beta, published in 2013, has revised CM diagnostic criteria. CM is defined as “headache occurring on 15 or more days per month for more than 3 months, which has the features of migraine headache on at least 8 days per month.” Patients who meet the criteria for CM and for medication-overuse headache should be given both diagnoses. Worldwide, CM prevalence ranges 1%–3%, and its incidence has been estimated to be 2.5% per year. CM is associated with disability and poor quality of life. Modifiable risk factors include (among others: migraine progression (defined as an increase in frequency and severity of migraine attacks; medication and caffeine overuse; obesity; stressful life events; and snoring. CM patients have a significantly higher frequency of some comorbid conditions, including chronic pain, psychiatric disorders, respiratory illness, and some vascular risk factors. Management includes identification and control of comorbidities and risk factors that predispose to CM; treatment and prevention for medication overuse; early treatment for migraine attacks; and an adequate preventive therapy for CM. Several randomized controlled clinical trials have shown the efficacy of topiramate, amitriptyline, onabotulinumtoxinA, and cognitive-behavioral therapy in CM. Keywords: chronic daily headache, chronic migraine, epidemiology, medication overuse headache, risk factors, treatment

  19. Biomarkers in chronic adult hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitchen Neil D

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Awareness of the importance of chronic adult hydrocephalus has been raised again with the recent emergence of epidemiological studies. It is estimated that between 5 and 10% of patients suffering from dementia might, in fact, have chronic hydrocephalus. Although, surgical diversion of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF represents the only known procedure able to treat the symptoms of this condition, the selection of surgical patients has always been problematic. In the last 40 years, we have become wiser in using appropriate diagnostic tests for the selection of these patients; however, the area of biological markers has so far been overlooked in this condition, in contrast to that for other neurodegenerative disorders and dementias. Biomarkers are biological substances that may be used to indicate either the onset or the presence, and the progression of a clinical condition, being closely linked to its pathophysiology. In such a setting they might assist in the more appropriate selection of patients for shunt surgery. In this article, we have reviewed research carried out in the last 25 years regarding the identification of serum and CSF biomarkers for chronic hydrocephalus, discussed the potential for each one, and finally discussed the limitations for use, as well as future directions and possibilities in this field. It is concluded that tumour-necrosis factor, tau protein, lactate, sulfatide and neurofilament triple protein are the most promising CSF markers for chronic hydrocephalus. At present however, none of these meet the criteria required to justify a change clinical practice. In the future, collaborative multi-centre projects will be needed to obtain more substantial data that overcome the problems that arise from small individual and uncoordinated studies.

  20. Chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis: management challenge

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Natamon Charakorn, Kornkiat Snidvongs Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand Abstract: Chronic sphenoid rhinosinusitis is a spectrum of inflammatory diseases in isolated sphenoid sinus which may persist over a period of 12 weeks. It is a different entity from other types of rhinosinusitis because clinical presentations include headache, visual loss or diplop...

  1. Uveitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J J

    1990-01-01

    About 20% of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis develop uveitis which is frequently bilateral. Risk factors for uveitis are: female gender, pauciarticular onset of arthritis, presence of circulating antinuclear antibodies, and the antigens HLA-DW5 and HLA-DPw2. The visual prognosis in patients with uveitis is good in 25% and fair in 50%. The remaining 25% develop cataract and/or glaucoma. The management of glaucoma is unsatisfactory, but the results of cataract surgery by lensectomy are good.

  2. Conversations with chronic schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R

    1979-02-01

    An account is given of some of the topics discussed during a small informal weekly open group meeting of chronic schizophrenic patients, based on occasional notes compiled over eleven years. The main feature of the patients' condition as displayed was poverty--clinical, social, behavioural, material and financial--and certain features suggested an organic aetiology. Reasons are given for considering that the patients' condition was predominantly caused by schizophrenia rather than by institutionalism.

  3. Comprehensive management of chronic pain in haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, G; Tachdjian, R; Baumann, K; Panopoulos, G

    2014-03-01

    Chronic pain, most often due to haemophilic arthropathy, is a pervasive problem in persons with haemophilia (PWH) that adversely impacts function and quality of life. PWH with inhibitors and older PWH may be especially vulnerable to progressive arthropathy and resulting chronic pain. The development of chronic pain from acute pain involves a complex interplay of biological and psychosocial factors that may all contribute to the perpetuation of chronic pain and the outcome of therapy. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, an individualized, multimodal approach to chronic pain management is proposed, as it is in individuals without haemophilia who have chronic pain. Pharmacological treatment is central to the management of chronic pain and must be modified based on pain intensity, ongoing response to therapy and the risk for adverse events. Non-pharmacological interventions, including physiotherapy, complementary treatments and surgical (e.g. orthopaedic) or other invasive procedures, may be integral to chronic pain management in this population. Ongoing psychosocial assessment is critical to identify those factors that may be contributing to the perpetuation of chronic pain or acting as barriers to effective management. Additional study is needed to identify optimal pharmacological treatments for chronic pain in PWH based on the unique pathophysiology of haemophilic arthropathy and on risk profile. Systematic determination of the particular psychosocial factors impacting the experience and management of chronic pain in PWH would likewise add value to the treatment of this pervasive problem.

  4. Chronic Daily Headache - A Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Daily Headache (CDH generally refers to frequent headache occuring more than 15 days/month for over three months. Such headaches may be primary or secondary - the latter referring to headaches related to identifiable intra and extracranial vascular or other pathologies or systemic illnesses. The primary type may be subclassified as short and long lasting ones, depending upon whether the headache spells are more or less than four hours in duration. The present review would deal with the four major types of long lasting primary CDH which include Chronic migraine (CM, Chronic tension type headache (CTTH, New daily persistent headache (NDPH and Hemicrania continua (HC. The first part of the article would focus on the clinical pattern recognising features of these types. The relationship of medication overuse to CM would be critically evaluated. In the second part, the status of CDH in the recently proposed classification of headache disorders by the International Headache Society would be briefly evaluated. In the next section the clinical Profile or CDH in Indian patients would be highlighted based on available published data. Lastly, the pathophysiology of this vexing condition would be discussed specially in relation to CM and postulating on how it may evolve from episodic migraine.

  5. Meditation's impact on chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Ramita

    2003-01-01

    Meditation is becoming widely popular as an adjunct to conventional medical therapies. This article reviews the literature regarding the experience of chronic illness, theories about meditation, and clinical effects of this self-care practice. Eastern theories of meditation include Buddhist psychology. The word Buddha means the awakened one, and Buddhist meditators have been called the first scientists, alluding to more than 2500 years of precise, detailed observation of inner experience. The knowledge that comprises Buddhist psychology was derived inductively from the historical figure's (Prince Siddhartha Gautama) diligent self-inquiry. Western theories of meditation include Jungian, Benson's relaxation response, and transpersonal psychology. Clinical effects of meditation impact a broad spectrum of physical and psychological symptoms and syndromes, including reduced anxiety, pain, and depression, enhanced mood and self-esteem, and decreased stress. Meditation has been studied in populations with fibromyalgia, cancer, hypertension, and psoriasis. While earlier studies were small and lacked experimental controls, the quality and quantity of valid research is growing. Meditation practice can positively influence the experience of chronic illness and can serve as a primary, secondary, and/or tertiary prevention strategy. Health professionals demonstrate commitment to holistic practice by asking patients about use of meditation, and can encourage this self-care activity. Simple techniques for mindfulness can be taught in the clinical setting. Living mindfully with chronic illness is a fruitful area for research, and it can be predicted that evidence will grow to support the role of consciousness in the human experience of disease.

  6. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-04-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  7. Superoxide dismutases in chronic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švagelj, Dražen; Terzić, Velimir; Dovhanj, Jasna; Švagelj, Marija; Cvrković, Mirta; Švagelj, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Human gastric diseases have shown significant changes in the activity and expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms. The aim of this study was to detect Mn-SOD activity and expression in the tissue of gastric mucosa, primarily in chronic gastritis (immunohistochemical Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis, without other pathohistological changes) and to evaluate their possible connection with pathohistological diagnosis. We examined 51 consecutive outpatients undergoing endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Patients were classified based on their histopathological examinations and divided into three groups: 51 patients (archive samples between 2004-2009) with chronic immunohistochemical Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis (mononuclear cells infiltration were graded as absent, moderate, severe) divided into three groups. Severity of gastritis was graded according to the updated Sydney system. Gastric tissue samples were used to determine the expression of Mn-SOD with anti-Mn-SOD Ab immunohistochemically. The Mn-SOD expression was more frequently present in specimens with severe and moderate inflammation of gastric mucosa than in those with normal mucosa. In patients with normal histological finding, positive immunoreactivity of Mn-SOD was not found. Our results determine the changes in Mn-SOD expression occurring in the normal gastric mucosa that had undergone changes in the intensity of chronic inflammatory infiltrates in the lamina propria.

  8. THROMBOENDARTERECTOMY FOR CHRONIC PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Ren; Pi-xiong Su; Chao-ji Zhang; Song Gu; Heng Zhang; Chen Wang

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the improving reliability and safety of thromboendarterectomy and perioperative management for chronic pulmonary thromboembolism. Methods The clinical data of 12 cases with chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, who underwent thromboendarterec tomy assisted by low flow or circulation arrest with deep hypothermia, were reviewed retrospectively. Results Pulmonary artery pressure decreased 20 to 40 mmHg immediately after surgical procedures in 9 cases. The postoperative pulmonary edema at various degrees happened in 12 cases, among them, 1 died of severe lung infection and pulmonary re-embolism at 19 days postoperation. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography and angiography of 11 cases indicated that the original obstruction of pulmonary artery disappeared. During the follow-up period of 2 months to 5 years, the clinical symptoms and activity was improved. Conclusion Thromboendarterectomy is an effective treatment for chronic pulmonary thromboembolism. The outcome of the surgical procedure needs to be further investigated and followed up regularly according to an evaluative system, because it might be influenced by multiple factors.

  9. Ultrasonography in chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka E-mail: jadranka.buturovic@mf.uni-lj.si; Visnar-Perovic, Alenka

    2003-05-01

    Many chronic renal diseases lead to the final common state of decrease in renal size, parenchymal atrophy, sclerosis and fibrosis. The ultrasound image show a smaller kidney, thinning of the parenchyma and its hyperechogenicity (reflecting sclerosis and fibrosis). The frequency of renal cysts increases with the progression of the disease. Ultrasound generally does not allow for the exact diagnosis of an underlying chronic disease (renal biopsy is usually required), but it can help to determine an irreversible disease, assess prognosis and avoid unnecessary diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. The main exception in which the ultrasound image does not show a smaller kidney with parenchymal atrophy is diabetic nephropathy, the leading cause of chronic and end-stage renal failure in developed countries in recent years. In this case, both renal size and parenchymal thickness are preserved until end-stage renal failure. Doppler study of intrarenal vessels can provide additional information about microvascular and parenchymal lesions, which is helpful in deciding for or against therapeutic intervention and timely planning for optimal renal replacement therapy option.

  10. [Nutrition and chronic renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayúcar Ruiz de Galarreta, A; Cordero Lorenzana, M L; Martínez-Puga y López, E; Gómez Seijo, A; Escudero Alvarez, E

    2000-01-01

    The causes of malnutrition in chronic terminal kidney failure are reviewed in the situation both before and after dialysis, as are the malnutrition rates in both circumstances and their treatment. Malnutrition has a high prevalence in terminal kidney patients, partly as a result of the therapeutic restriction on calories and proteins, but also due to the metabolic reactions typical of the disease and to anorexia. In patients subjected to dialytical methods, certain other mechanisms are added. In addition to malnutrition, there are alterations in the metabolism of calcium, phosphorus and potassium, as well as lipids, thus limiting nutritional therapy's ability to restore the nutritional status to normal. An awareness of energy expenditure in chronic terminal kidney failure and the consequences of malnutrition have led to new challenges in nutritional therapy, both in the dose and quality of the proteins, with a debate raging over the advantages of ketoanalogues, and also in the methods for providing nutrients. The ideal nutritional method for repletion is oral administration, but this can be enhanced with artificial support such as oral supplements, parenteral nutrition during dialysis or such alternatives as enteral nutrition at home in the case of chronic kidney problems in children, using percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), in order to nourish the patients and minimize growth disorders.

  11. Gut microbiome and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Hans C; Eng, Charis; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of the human microbiome continues to reveal new and previously unrealized associations between microbial dysbiosis and disease. Novel approaches to bacterial identification using culture-independent methods allow practitioners to discern the presence of alterations in the taxa and diversity of the microbiome and identify correlations with disease processes. While some of these diseases that have been extensively studied are well-defined in their etiology and treatment methods (colorectal cancer), others have provided much more significant challenges in both diagnosis and treatment. One such condition, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), has several etiological and potentiating contributions from infection, inflammation, central nervous system (CNS) changes, stress, and central sensitization-all factors that play important roles in the crosstalk between the human body and its microbiome. No singular cause of CP/CPPS has been identified and it is most likely a syndrome with multifactorial causes. This heterogeneity and ambiguity are sources of significant frustration for patients and providers alike. Despite multiple attempts, treatment of chronic prostatitis with monotherapy has seen limited success, which is thought to be due to its heterogeneous nature. Phenotypic approaches to both classify the disease and direct treatment for CP/CPPS have proven beneficial in these patients, but questions still remain regarding etiology. Newer microbiome research has found correlations between symptom scores and disease severity and the degree of dysbiosis in urine and gut (stool) microbiomes in these patients as compared to un-afflicted controls. These findings present potential new diagnostic and therapeutic targets in CP/CPPS patients.

  12. Physical Activity and Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ran; Chomistek, Andrea K.; Dimitrakoff, Jordan D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Willett, Walter C.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wu, Kana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a prevalent urologic disorder among men, but its etiology is still poorly understood. Our objective was to examine the relationship between physical activity and incidence of CP/CPPS in a large cohort of male health professionals. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study among men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study followed from 1986 to 2008. The study population included 20,918 men who completed all CP/CPPS questions on the 2008 questionnaire. Leisure-time physical activity, including type and intensity of activity, was measured by questionnaire in 1986. A National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index pain score was calculated based on the responses on the 2008 questionnaire. Participants with pain scores ≥ 8 were considered CP/CPPS cases (n=689). Results Higher leisure-time physical activity was associated with lower risk of CP/CPPS. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) comparing >35.0 to ≤3.5 MET-h/wk of physical activity was 0.72 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56, 0.92, p for trend <0.001). Observed inverse associations between physical activity and CP/CPPS were similar for both moderate- and vigorous-intensity activities. Sedentary behavior, measured as time spent watching television, was not associated with risk of CP/CPPS (p for trend 0.64). Conclusions Findings from this study, the first large scale and most comprehensive study to date on this association, suggest that higher levels of leisure-time physical activity may lower risk of CP/CPPS in middle-aged and older men. PMID:25116086

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is chronically activated in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Raghuwansh P; Garg, Sushil K; Dixit, Ajay K; Dudeja, Vikas; Dawra, Rajinder K; Saluja, Ashok K

    2014-10-03

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has now been recognized as a pathogenic event in many chronic diseases. However, ER stress has not been studied in CP, although pancreatic acinar cells seem to be especially vulnerable to ER dysfunction because of their dependence on high ER volume and functionality. Here, we aim to investigate ER stress in CP, study its pathogenesis in relation to trypsinogen activation (widely regarded as the key event of pancreatitis), and explore its mechanism, time course, and downstream consequences during pancreatic injury. CP was induced in mice by repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on caerulein hyperstimulation. ER stress leads to activation of unfolded protein response components that were measured in CP and AP. We show sustained up-regulation of unfolded protein response components ATF4, CHOP, GRP78, and XBP1 in CP. Overexpression of GRP78 and ATF4 in human CP confirmed the experimental findings. We used novel trypsinogen-7 knock-out mice (T(-/-)), which lack intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, to clarify the relationship of ER stress to intra-acinar trypsinogen activation in pancreatic injury. Comparable activation of ER stress was seen in wild type and T(-/-) mice. Induction of ER stress occurred through pathologic calcium signaling very early in the course of pancreatic injury. Our results establish that ER stress is chronically activated in CP and is induced early in pancreatic injury through pathologic calcium signaling independent of trypsinogen activation. ER stress may be an important pathogenic mechanism in pancreatitis that needs to be explored in future studies.

  14. 慢性亚致死性缺氧对未成熟脑结构和发育的影响%Chronic sublethal hypoxia: challenge to premature brain in structual and neurological development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    平莉莉; 蒋泽栋

    2010-01-01

    With the advance of modern neonatal management, the increase of survival of infants born with ELBW has resulted in collateral increase in incidence of infants with serious chronic lung disease, typically brnchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Long-term sensory, motor and cognitive impairments are common outcomes in survivals with moderate and severe BPD and may persist during school years and adolescence. Increasing evidence suggest that BPD exerts a significant effect on brain growth and development and may be associated with chronic sublethal hypoxia which compond the risk of extended brain injury and NS complications such as cerebral palsy. Animal studies have demonstrated progressive gliosis and cerebral ventriculomegaly, injured subcortical white matter and corpus callosum, dysynchrony synaptic development and disrupted neurotransmitssion in the hypoxia newborn brain. In this literature we built upon the review of neurogical and congnitive outcome in preterm infants with BPD and structural, functional and neurochemical alterations in ainimals following clinical and experimental hypoxia respectively, which may underlie the primary or potential mle for chronic sublethal hypoxia on premature brain development.%现代新生儿学的发展促使极低体质量早产儿的存活率显著提高,同时严重慢性肺部疾病患儿增多,特别是支气管肺发育不良(BPD).中重度BPD患儿多数有远期感觉、运动和认知缺陷.有些功能缺陷可能发展至学龄期或成年甚至持续终生.越来越多的临床数据表明BPD显著影响新生儿脑生长和发育,其病程中伴随的慢性亚致死性缺氧是引起极低体质量早产儿远期脑损伤和脑瘫等神经系统并发症的重要因素之一.动物研究发现慢性缺氧导致新生鼠脑皮层下和胼胝体白质损伤、进行性脑室扩大和胶质增生,突触发育前后失衡及神经递质传导障碍,从而可能显著影响感觉、运动及认知等脑功能发育.

  15. Chronic pelvic pain: comorbidity between chronic musculoskeletal pain and vulvodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Biasi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pelvic pain (CPP is a common condition that has a major impact on the quality of life of both men and women. Male CPP is usually attributable to well-defined urogenital conditions (most frequently infectious/non infectious prostatic diseases or musculoskeletal or bowel diseases, whereas the features of female CPP are much more complex and are of particular clinical and epidemiological importance. It is a multifactorial syndrome that can be due to diseases of the urogenital, gastrointestinal, or musculoskeletal systems, or to neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders. It is not always easy to identify its predominant pathogenesis, although it often occurs as a central sensitization syndrome triggered by an initial stimulus which is no longer detectable and only manifests itself clinically through pain. In this respect, there are some very interesting relationships between vulvodynia and fibromyalgic syndrome, as identified in a preliminary study of women with chronic musculoskeletal pain in which it was demonstrated that vulvar pain plays an important role, although it is often overlooked and undiagnosed.

  16. Nonpharmacologic Management of Chronic Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maness, David L; Khan, Muneeza

    2015-12-15

    Insomnia affects 10% to 30% of the population with a total cost of $92.5 to $107.5 billion annually. Short-term, chronic, and other types of insomnia are the three major categories according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd ed. The criteria for diagnosis are difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or early awakening despite the opportunity for sleep; symptoms must be associated with impaired daytime functioning and occur at least three times per week for at least one month. Factors associated with the onset of insomnia include a personal or family history of insomnia, easy arousability, poor self-reported health, and chronic pain. Insomnia is more common in women, especially following menopause and during late pregnancy, and in older adults. A comprehensive sleep history can confirm the diagnosis. Psychiatric and medical problems, medication use, and substance abuse should be ruled out as contributing factors. Treatment of comorbid conditions alone may not resolve insomnia. Patients with movement disorders (e.g., restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder), circadian rhythm disorders, or breathing disorders (e.g., obstructive sleep apnea) must be identified and treated appropriately. Chronic insomnia is associated with cognitive difficulties, anxiety and depression, poor work performance, decreased quality of life, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Insomnia can be treated with nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies. Nonpharmacologic therapies include sleep hygiene, cognitive behavior therapy, relaxation therapy, multicomponent therapy, and paradoxical intention. Referral to a sleep specialist may be considered for refractory cases.

  17. Managing acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipworth, James R A; Shankar, Arjun; Pereira, Stephen P

    2010-10-01

    Pancreatitis may be acute or chronic. Although both can be caused by similar aetiologies, they tend to follow distinct natural histories. Around 80% of acute pancreatitis (AP) diagnoses occur secondary to gallstone disease and alcohol misuse. AP is commonly associated with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain radiating to the back that is usually severe enough to warrant the patient seeking urgent medical attention. Onset of pain may be related to a recent alcohol binge or rich, fatty meal. The patient may appear unwell, be tachycardic and have exquisite tenderness in the upper abdomen. Overall, 10-25% of AP episodes are classified as severe, leading to an associated mortality rate of 7.5%. Disease severity is best predicted from a number of clinical scoring systems which can be applied at diagnosis in association with repeated clinical assessment, measurement of acute inflammatory markers, and CT. All patients with suspected AP should be referred urgently. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) follows continued, repetitive or sustained injury to the pancreas and 70% of diagnoses occur secondary to alcohol abuse. The characteristic presenting feature of CP is insidious progression of chronic, severe, upper abdominal pain, radiating to the back, caused by a combination of progressive pancreatic destruction, inflammation and duct obstruction. Signs and symptoms include weight loss and steatorrhoea and later on diabetes. CP patients may also present with recurrent episodes mimicking AP, both symptomatically and metabolically. Diagnosis of CP should be based on symptom profile, imaging and assessment of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. CT should be the first-line imaging investigation.

  18. Chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP have recently emerged as a novel eliciting factor for chronic urticaria (CU. The possible association between HP and CU has enormous potential, as eradicating HP could cure CU. Aims and Objectives: We conducted a study to assess the prevalence of HP infection and effect of bacterium eradication on skin lesions in patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU. Settings and Design: Four hundred sixty patients of CU attending the allergy clinic, SMS hospital, Jaipur during the period February 6, 2004, to February 6, 2006, were screened for possible eliciting factors. Patients with CIU were enrolled and others were excluded. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight patients of CIU and similar number of age and sex matched controls, attending the allergy clinic, SMS Hospital, Jaipur were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent endoscopy with antral biopsy for urease and histopathology to identify HP-associated gastritis. Infected patients were given HP eradication therapy. Eradication of bacterium was confirmed by fecal antigen assay. Subjective response to treatment was judged using chronic urticaria quality-of-life questionnaire (CU-Q 2 oL while objective response to treatment was judged by need for ′rescue medication′ (antihistaminics. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi square and paired′t′ test for their level of significance. Results: HP associated gastritis was present in 48 (70.58% patients, out of which 39 (81.25% patients responded to eradication therapy. Ten (50.00% patients without HP associated gastritis showed response to symptomatic therapy. Overall 49 (72.05% patients responded and 19 (27.94% showed no response. The value of χ2 was 28.571 (P = 0.003, which showed significant association between presence of HP and response to eradication regimen. Conclusion: The response of HP eradication therapy in infected patients of CIU is significant. HP should be included in diagnostic

  19. Treatment of refractory chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aayushi Mehta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic spontaneous urticaria is a distressing disease encountered frequently in clinical practice. The current mainstay of therapy is the use of second-generation, non-sedating antihistamines. However, in patients who do not respond satisfactorily to these agents, a variety of other drugs are used. This article examines the available literature for frequently used agents including systemic corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, dapsone, sulfasalazine, hydroxychloroquine, H2 antagonists, methotrexate, cyclosporine A, omalizumab, autologous serum therapy, and mycophenolate mofetil, with an additional focus on publications in Indian literature.

  20. Perspectives on "chronic Lyme disease".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Phillip J

    2008-07-01

    There is much controversy about the treatment of Lyme disease with respect to 2 poorly defined entities: "chronic Lyme disease" and "posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome." In the absence of direct evidence that these conditions are the result of a persistent infection, some mistakenly advocate extended antibiotic therapy (>/=6 months), which can do great harm and has resulted in at least 1 death. The purpose of this brief report is to review what is known from clinical research about these conditions to assist both practicing physicians and lawmakers in making sound and safe decisions with respect to treatment.

  1. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  2. Myeloperoxidase in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusudhana Rao, A.; Anand, Usha; Anand, C. V.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence implicate a role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is a well accepted fact that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk for CVD. MPO is a pro-oxidant enzyme which could be involved in the increased susceptibility of these patients to CVD. Hence, the levels of plasma MPO was determined in healthy controls as well as in patients with CKD [stratified with the level of their kidney failure as CKD...

  3. Chronic Venous Disease under pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Reeder, Suzan

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 we provide a general introduction of this thesis. Chronic venous disease (CVD) is a common medical condition that affects 2-64% of the worldwide population and leads to leg ulcers in 1% of the Western population. Venous leg ulceration (VLU) has an unfavorable prognosis with regard to non-healing and recurrence rates. Annually 6% of the total healthcare costs are spent on the treatment of venous diseases. CVD results from ambulatory venous hypertension and is the conse...

  4. Neuropsychological functioning in chronic Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westervelt, Holly James; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    Lyme disease is currently the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. The disease is multisystemic, and chronic disease, in particular, may be associated with neuropsychological deficits. However, to date, only a few empirical studies exist, which examine the neuropsychological sequelae associated with chronic Lyme disease. A review of the literature shows that the deficits observed in adults with chronic Lyme disease are generally consistent with the deficits that can be seen in processes with primarily frontal systems involvement. These observations are generally consistent with neuroradiologic findings. The clinical presentation in chronic Lyme disease and the nature of the neuropsychological deficits are discussed, as are several central issues in understanding neuropsychological functioning in chronic Lyme disease, such as the impact of chronic illness, response to treatment, and the relationship between neuropsychological performance and depression, fatigue, and neurological indicators of disease.

  5. New Directions in Chronic Disease Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Sung Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions.

  6. Acute morphine activates satellite glial cells and up-regulates IL-1β in dorsal root ganglia in mice via matrix metalloprotease-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Temugin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of spinal cord glial cells such as microglia and astrocytes has been shown to regulate chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance and hyperalgesia, due to spinal up-regulation of the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β. Matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9 has been implicated in IL-1β activation in neuropathic pain. However, it is unclear whether acute opioid treatment can activate glial cells in the peripheral nervous system. We examined acute morphine-induced activation of satellite glial cells (SGCs and up-regulation of IL-1β in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs, and further investigated the involvement of MMP-9 in these opioid-induced peripheral changes. Results Subcutaneous morphine injection (10 mg/kg induced robust peripheral glial responses, as evidenced by increased GFAP expression in DRGs but not in spinal cords. The acute morphine-induced GFAP expression is transient, peaking at 2 h and declining after 3 h. Acute morphine treatment also increased IL-1β immunoreactivity in SGCs and IL-1β activation in DRGs. MMP-9 and GFAP are expressed in DRG neurons and SGCs, respectively. Confocal analysis revealed a close proximity of MMP-9 and GFAP immunostaining. Importantly, morphine-induced DRG up-regulation of GFAP expression and IL-1β activation was abolished after Mmp9 deletion or naloxone pre-treatment. Finally, intrathecal injections of IL-1β-selective siRNA not only reduced DRG IL-1β expression but also prolonged acute morphine-induced analgesia. Conclusions Acute morphine induces opioid receptors- and MMP-9-dependent up-regulation of GFAP expression and IL-1β activation in SGCs of DRGs. MMP-9 could mask and shorten morphine analgesia via peripheral neuron-glial interactions. Targeting peripheral glial activation might prolong acute opioid analgesia.

  7. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, Alberto; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreatitis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis. There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation, hereditary a...

  8. Eccentric Strengthening for Chronic Lateral Epicondylosis

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Dennis Y.; Schultz, Brian J.; Schaal, Bob; Graham, Scott T.; Kim, Byung Sung

    2011-01-01

    Background: Effective treatments for chronic lateral epicondylosis have not been studied adequately. Eccentric overload exercises have been used with success for other chronic tendinopathy, mainly Achilles and patellar. Hypothesis/Purpose: To compare a wrist extensor eccentric strengthening exercise program with a wrist extensor stretching/modality program for the treatment of chronic lateral epicondylosis. The authors hypothesized that the eccentric strengthening program would produce more f...

  9. [Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases in cats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghermai, A K

    1989-01-01

    The aetiology of chronic idiopathic intestinal inflammation is unknown. It is characterized by a diffuse infiltration with inflammatory cells into the intestinal mucosa and sometimes submucosa. Cats with chronic intermittent vomiting and diarrhoea, later on accompanied by anorexia and weight loss, are presented. Definitive diagnosis can be obtained by intestinal biopsy only. An immune pathogenesis is suspected, which is supported by the fact, that chronic inflammatory bowel disease responds to steroid therapy.

  10. Chronic pain after inguinal hernia repair

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    : BACKGROUND: Chronic post herniorrhaphy groin pain is defined as pain lasting > 6 months after surgery, which is one of the most important complication occurring after inguinal hernia repair, occurs with greater frequency than previously thought. Chronic groin pain is one of the most significant complications following inguinal hernia repair, and majority of chronic pain has been attributed to ilioinguinal nerve entrapment. Various other factors are involved in development of...

  11. HBV Vaccination in Chronic Renal Failure Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mir-davood Omrani; Mohammad Hassan Khadem Ansari

    2006-01-01

    HBV infection in chronic renal failure (CRF) becomes chronic in 30 to 60% compared with less than 10% in nonuremic patients. Immunological dysfunction in patients on hemodialysis may be related to imbalanced cytokine systems, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-|α|) and interleukin (IL) 6,1 by retention of renal metabolite in uremia and chronic inflammation and have a poor immunological reaction to T-cell-dependent antigens, like hepatitis B vaccination. Immunocompromised patients who are unre...

  12. Multiple chronic conditions and life expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DuGoff, Eva H; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Buttorff, Christine

    2014-01-01

    condition. A 67-year-old individual with no chronic conditions will live on average 22.6 additional years. A 67-year-old individual with 5 chronic conditions and ≥10 chronic conditions will live 7.7 fewer years and 17.6 fewer years, respectively. The average marginal decline in life expectancy is 1.8 years...... and increasing numbers of comorbid conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Social Security and Medicare actuaries should account for the growing number of beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions when determining population projections and trust fund solvency....

  13. Oriental Medical Treatment of chronic Acalculous Cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic acalculous cholecystitis gets possession of about 12 to 13 percent of patients with chronic cholecystitis. Pathologically it is characterised by chronic inflammation and thickening of the gallbladder wall but doesn't come across stones. Clinical symptoms are vague and include abdominal discomfort and distension, nausea, flatulence and intolerance of fatty foods. A patient on chronic acalculous cholecystitis diagnosed from his clinical symtoms and abdominal ultrasonogram was treated by Geonbihwan, acupuncture and herbal acupuncture. Satisfactory symptomatic improvement was achieved and findings of abdominal ultrasonogram came also normal.

  14. Susceptibility to chronic inflammation: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasef, Noha Ahmed; Mehta, Sunali; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2017-03-01

    Chronic inflammation is defined by the persistence of inflammatory processes beyond their physiological function, resulting in tissue destruction. Chronic inflammation is implicated in the progression of many chronic diseases and plays a central role in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease. As such, this review aims to collate some of the latest research in relation to genetic and environmental susceptibilities to chronic inflammation. In the genetic section, we discuss some of the updates in cytokine research and current treatments that are being developed. We also discuss newly identified canonical and non-canonical genes associated with chronic inflammation. In the environmental section, we highlight some of the latest updates and evidence in relation to the role that infection, diet and stress play in promoting inflammation. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the latest research to build on our current understanding of chronic inflammation. It highlights the complexity associated with chronic inflammation, as well as provides insights into potential new targets for therapies that could be used to treat chronic inflammation and consequently prevent disease progression.

  15. Vitamin D deficiency in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Masoud; Tavakol, Marzieh; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Gharagozlou, Mohammad; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Tavakol, Zahra; Momenzadeh, Kaveh; Nabavi, Mohammad; Dabbaghzade, Abbas; Mosallanejad, Asieh; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-04-01

    Chronic urticaria is the most common skin diseases, characterized by chronic cutaneous lesions which severely debilitates patients in several aspects of their everyday life. Vitamin D is known to exert several actions in the immune system and to influence function and differentiation of mast cells, central role players in the pathogenesis of chronic idiopathic urticaria. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between vitamin D levels and susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria. One hundred and fourteen patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria were recruited in this study along with one hundred and eighty seven sex-matched and age-matched healthy volunteers as the control group. For each patient, urticaria activity score was calculated and autologous serum skin test was done. Vitamin D metabolic statue was measured in serum as 25 hydroxyvitamin D using enzyme immunoassay method. Patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria significantly showed lower levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria. There was a significant positive correlation between vitamin D levels and urticaria activity score. This study showed that patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria had reduced levels of vitamin D, while vitamin D deficiency could increase susceptibility to chronic idiopathic urticaria.

  16. Neurodegenerative Properties of Chronic Pain: Cognitive Decline in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, M.L.A.; Postma, S.A.E.; Souren, P.M.; Arns, M.W.; Gordon, E.; Vissers, K.C.P.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Rijn, C.M. van; Goor, H. van

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain has been associated with impaired cognitive function. We examined cognitive performance in patients with severe chronic pancreatitis pain. We explored the following factors for their contribution to observed cognitive deficits: pain duration, comorbidity (depression, sleep disturbance),

  17. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-09-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T{sub 50} Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  18. Nutrition in chronic critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingleton, S K

    2001-03-01

    Nutritional management of patients with respiratory failure can be a model of nutritional management in chronically critically ill patients. This model requires recognition of the differing metabolic states of starvation and hypermetabolism. Starvation can result in malnutrition, with adverse effect on respiratory muscle strength, ventilatory drive, and immune defense mechanisms. General nutritional goals include preservation of lean body mass by providing adequate energy and positive nitrogen balance. General nutritional prescriptions for both states include a substrate mix of 20% protein, 60% to 70% carbohydrates, and 20% to 30% fat. Positive nitrogen balance is difficult to attain in hypermetabolic patients and energy requirements are increased compared with starved patients. Enteral nutrition should be the mode of initial nutrient delivery unless the gastrointestinal tract is nonfunctional. Monitoring of nutritional support is essential. Complications of nutritional support are multiple. Nutritional hypercapnia is an important complication in a chronically critically ill patient. Outcomes of selected long-term acute patients are poor, with only 8% of patients fully functional 1 year after discharge. Appropriate nutritional therapy is one aspect of management of these patients that has the possibility of optimizing function and survival.

  19. Chronic Metabolic Acidosis Destroys Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Melamed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One primary reason for the current epidemic of digestive disorders might be chronic metabolic acidosis, which is extremely common in the modern population. Chronic metabolic acidosis primarily affects two alkaline digestive glands, the liver, and the pancreas, which produce alkaline bile and pancreatic juice with a large amount of bicarbonate. Even small acidic alterations in the bile and pancreatic juice pH can lead to serious biochemical/biomechanical changes. The pancreatic digestive enzymes require an alkaline milieu for proper function, and lowering the pH disables their activity. It can be the primary cause of indigestion. Acidification of the pancreatic juice decreases its antimicrobial activity, which can lead to intestinal dysbiosis. Lowering the pH of the pancreatic juice can cause premature activation of the proteases inside the pancreas with the potential development of pancreatitis.The acidification of bile causes precipitation of the bile acids, which irritate the entire biliary system and create bile stone formation. Aggressive mixture of the acidic bile and the pancreatic juice can cause erratic contractions of the duodenum’s walls and subsequent bile reflux into the stomach and the esophagus. Normal exocrine pancreatic function is the core of proper digestion. Currently, there is no effective and safe treatment for enhancing the exocrine pancreatic function. Restoring normal acid-base homeostasis can be a useful toolfor pathophysiological therapeutic approaches for various gastrointestinal disorders. There is strong research and practical evidence that restoring the HCO3 - capacity in the blood can improve digestion.

  20. Glucocorticoids, chronic stress, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallman, Mary F; Pecoraro, Norman C; La Fleur, Susanne E; Warne, James P; Ginsberg, Abigail B; Akana, Susan F; Laugero, Kevin C; Houshyar, Hani; Strack, Alison M; Bhatnagar, Seema; Bell, Mary E

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids either inhibit or sensitize stress-induced activity in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, depending on time after their administration, the concentration of the steroids, and whether there is a concurrent stressor input. When there are high glucocorticoids together with a chronic stressor, the steroids act in brain in a feed-forward fashion to recruit a stress-response network that biases ongoing autonomic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral outflow as well as responses to novel stressors. We review evidence for the role of glucocorticoids in activating the central stress-response network, and for mediation of this network by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). We briefly review the effects of CRF and its receptor antagonists on motor outflows in rodents, and examine the effects of glucocorticoids and CRF on monoaminergic neurons in brain. Corticosteroids stimulate behaviors that are mediated by dopaminergic mesolimbic "reward" pathways, and increase palatable feeding in rats. Moreover, in the absence of corticosteroids, the typical deficits in adrenalectomized rats are normalized by providing sucrose solutions to drink, suggesting that there is, in addition to the feed-forward action of glucocorticoids on brain, also a feedback action that is based on metabolic well being. Finally, we briefly discuss the problems with this network that normally serves to aid in responses to chronic stress, in our current overindulged, and underexercised society.

  1. Muscle histochemistry in chronic alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Ferraz

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-two chronic acoholic patients were assessed by neurologic examination and muscle biopsy. The patients manifested proximal muscular weakness to a variable extent. One case presented as an acute bout of myopathy, according to the Manual Muscle Test, MMT. The most prominent histologic feature observed was muscle atrophy (95.3% better evidenced through the ATPase stain with the predominance of type II A fibers (71.4%. Lack of the mosaic pattern (type grouping seen in 76% of the cases and an important mitochondrial proliferation with intrasarcoplasmatic lipid accumulation in 63% of the patients. In case of acute presentation of muscle weakness the. pathological substrate is quite different, i.e. presence of myositis mainly interstitial characterized by lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate and several spots of necrosis like Zencker degeneration. Based on histologic criteria, our data suggest that: the main determinant of muscle weakness seen in chronic alcoholic patients is neurogenic in origin (alcoholic polineuropathy; the direct toxic action of ethanol under the skeletal muscle is closely related to the mitochondrial metabolism; the so-called acute alcoholic myopathy has probably viral etiology.

  2. Differential cannabinoid receptor expression during reactive gliosis: a possible implication for a nonpsychotropic neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Daniele; Steardo, Antonio; D'Amico, Alessandra; Scuderi, Caterina; Cipriano, Mariateresa; Esposito, Giuseppe; Iuvone, Teresa

    2009-03-31

    Activated microglia and astrocytes produce a large number of inflammatory and neurotoxic substances in various brain pathologies, above all during neurodegenerative disorders. In the search for new neuroprotective compounds, interest has turned to marijuana derivatives, since in several in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies, they have shown a great ability to control neuroinflammation. Despite the emerging evidence regarding pharmacological activities of cannabinoids, their effective introduction into clinical therapy still remains controversial and strongly limited by their unavoidable psychotropicity. Since the psychotropic effect of cannabinoids is generally linked to the activation of the CB1 receptor on neurons, the aim of our review is to clarify the function of the two cannabinoid receptors on glial cells and the differential role played by them, highlighting the emerging evidence of a CB2-mediated control of neuroinflammation that could liberate cannabinoids from the slavery of their central side effects. Despite the emerging evidence regarding pharmacological activities of cannabinoids, however their effective introduction in the clinical therapy remains still controversial and strongly limited by their unavoidable psychotropicity. Since the psychotropic effect of cannabinoids is generally linked to the activation of CB1 receptor on neurons, aim of our review is to clarify the functioning of the two cannabinoid receptors on glial cells and the differential role played by them, highlighting the emerging evidence of a CB2-mediated control of neuro-inflammation that could liberate cannabinoids from the slavery of the central side effects.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    abstract A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long‐term impact of reactive g...

  4. Neonatal Nicotine Exposure Leads to Hypothalamic Gliosis in Adult Overweight Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes-Rapozo, V; Moura, E G; Manhães, A C; Pinheiro, C R; Carvalho, J C; Barradas, P C; de Oliveira, E; Lisboa, P C

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes and microglia, the immune competent cells of central nercous system, can be activated in response to metabolic signals such as obesity and hyperleptinaemia. In rats, maternal exposure to nicotine during lactation leads to central obesity, hyperleptinaemia, leptin resistance and alterations in hypothalamic neuropeptides in the offspring during adulthood. In the present study, we studied the activation of astrocytes and microglia, as well as the pattern of inflammatory mediators, in adult offspring of this experimental model. On postnatal day 2 (P2), osmotic minipumps releasing nicotine (NIC) (-6 mg/kg/day) or saline for 14 days were s.c. implanted in dams. Male offspring were killed on P180 and hypothalamic immunohistochemistry, retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (WAT) polymerase chain reaction analysis and multiplex analysis for plasma inflammatory mediators were carried out. At P180, NIC astrocyte cell number was higher in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) (medial: +82%; lateral: +110%), in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) (+144%) and in the lateral hypothalamus (+121%). NIC glial fibrillary acidic protein fibre density was higher in the lateral ARC (+178%) and in the PVN (+183%). Interleukin-6 was not affected in the hypothalamus. NIC monocyte chemotactic protein 1 was only higher in the periventricular nucleus (+287%). NIC microglia (iba-1-positive) cell number was higher (+68%) only in the PVN, as was the chemokine (C-X3-C motif) receptor 1 density (+93%). NIC interleukin-10 was lower in the WAT (-58%) and plasma (-50%). Thus, offspring of mothers exposed to nicotine during lactation present hypothalamic astrogliosis at adulthood and microgliosis in the PVN.

  5. The effects of fruit essential oil of the Pimpinella anisum on acquisition and expression of morphine induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraei, Hedayat; Ghoshooni, Hassan; Hossein Salimi, Sayed; Mohseni Astani, Abutaleb; Shafaghi, Bijan; Falahi, Mansoor; Kamalnegad, Mohammad

    2002-04-01

    The problem of drug dependence still remains unresolved. In the present study the effects of an essential oil of Pimpinella anisum (Umbeliferae) on the expression and acquisition of conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by morphine in mice were investigated. Subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of morphine (2-5 mg/kg) produced place preference in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of the essential oil of P. anisum (0.125-0.5 ml/kg) induced conditioned place aversion (CPA). The mice which have received the essential oil of the P. anisum (0.125-0.5 ml/kg, i.p.) as well as the oil with morphine (5 mg/kg, s.c.) reduced the morphine effect. Administration of the essential oil of P. anisum (0.125-0.5 ml/kg, i.p.) on the test day did not show any effect on morphine action. It appeared that pre-administration with bicuculline (GABA(A) receptor antagonist) (1.5 mg/kg, i.p., 20 min before essential oil) diminished the effect of the essential oil of the P. anisum on morphine which induced CPP, but this result was not found for the GABA(B) receptor antagonist, CGP35348 (200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p., 10 min before essential oil). In conclusion, it appeared that the essential oil of the P. anisum may reduce the morphine effects via a GABAergic mechanism.

  6. Decreased AMPA GluR2, but not GluR3, mRNA expression in rat amygdala and dorsal hippocampus following morphine-induced behavioural sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Bahrololoumi Shapourabadi, Mina; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Hashemi Bozchlou, Saeed; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Sahebgharani, Mousa

    2008-11-01

    1. Repeated administration of psychostimulants and micro-opioid receptor agonists elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioural responses, a phenomenon termed behavioural sensitization. These changes in behaviour may reflect plastic changes requiring regulation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole proprionic acid (AMPA) receptor function. 2. In the present study, rats were treated for 7 days with saline or morphine (10 mg/kg). After a washout period of either 24 h or 7 days, locomotion, oral stereotypy and state-dependent memory in a passive avoidance test were measured in the presence or absence of 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione disodium salt (CNQX; 3 mg/kg), an AMPA receptor antagonist. In order to evaluate the mechanism underlying the behavioural responses, quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate mRNA expression of the AMPA receptor subunits GluR2 and GluR3 in the striatum, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and amygdala of animals treated repeatedly with morphine. 3. The results indicate that repeated morphine treatment followed by 7 days (but not 24 h) washout produces behavioural sensitization, as determined by locomotion, oral stereotypy and state-dependent memory. Blockade of AMPA receptors with CNQX on the test day did not alter these behavioural responses. In addition, repeated morphine treatment followed by 7 days (but not 24 h) washout decreased GluR2 mRNA expression in both the amygdala (by 50%) and hippocampus (by 35%). Repeated morphine treatment did not alter GluR3 mRNA expression in any brain area assessed. 4. These data imply that AMPA receptors are involved in the development (but not expression) phase of behavioural sensitization. The decreases in GluR2 mRNA expression in the amygdala and hippocampus may result in the formation of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, which are believed to play an important role in behavioural sensitization.

  7. Nicotine restores morphine-induced memory deficit through the D1 and D2 dopamine receptor mechanisms in the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizbeigi, Ronak; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Babapour, Vahab; Rezayof, Ameneh; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2011-08-01

    Involvement of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) with interaction between morphine and nicotine on inhibitory avoidance (IA) memory was investigated. A step-through type of inhibitory avoidance tasks was used to assess memory in male Wistar rats. The results showed that subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of morphine (7.5 mg/kg) after training decreased retrieval of IA memory in the animals when tested 24 h later. Pre-test administration of the same dose of morphine significantly reversed the deficiency in retrieval. The results also showed that pre-test administration of nicotine (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg, s.c.) by itself mimicked the effect of pre-test morphine, and lower doses of nicotine (0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg) also improved the effect of a low dose of morphine (2.5 mg/kg) on retrieval of IA memory. Pre-test intra-NAc administration of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH 23390 (0.001 and 0.01 µg/rat), and the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, sulpiride (0.5 and 1 µg/rat) caused no significant effects on IA memory by themselves, but both prevented reinstatement of the retrieval of IA memory by the effective dose of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg). It can be concluded that the dopaminergic mechanism(s) in the NAc is a crosslink for the effect of morphine and nicotine on reinstatement of retrieval of IA memory impaired by post-training administration of morphine.

  8. Preventive and therapeutic effects of penehyclidine hydrochloride on morphine-induced increased bladder pressure, urinary bladder sphincter pressure and histological damage in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wei-dong; WANG Wei-wei; CUI Xiao-guang; PAN Peng; ZHANG Bing; LI Wen-zhi

    2012-01-01

    Background Morphine has become the preferred drug for analgesia.However,analgesic doses of morphine can result in urinary retention,which is an intractable problem in clinical practice.Though bladder catheterization is one available therapeutic option,data supporting the technique's effectiveness are controversial.As a novel anti-cholinergic medicine developed in China,penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) exhibits greater selectivity for M3/M1 receptors than M2 receptors.Therefore,this study aimed to determine the efficacy of PHC in treating urinary retention.Methods Thirty-two healthy male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided in four groups (n=8 each) as follows:control group (C group),PHC low-dose group (PL group,0.01 mg/kg of PHC intramuscularly),PHC middle-dose group (PM group,0.02 mg/kg of PHC intramuscularly),and PHC high-dose group (PH group,0.05 mg/kg of PHC intramuscularly).All rabbits were injected intravenously with morphine (1 mg/kg) to induce urinary retention and different doses of PHC were injected intramuscularly in the PL,PM and PH groups.In the C group,1 ml saline was administered instead of PHC.The bladder pressure and the bladder sphincter pressure were recorded at different time points.The plasma concentration of PHC was measured at different time points with high performance liquid chromatography.Arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were recorded at different time points.Results Bladder pressure and urinary bladder sphincter pressure rose significantly from 30 minutes after morphine administration until the end of the experiment.PHC markedly attenuated the elevations in pressure induced by morphine.Morphometric analysis also revealed histological damage,erythrocytes and ruptures of the microcirculation in regions of the submucosa and smooth muscle.Morphometric damage was ameliorated with PHC but not with saline.Hemodynamic data (mean arterial pressure (MAP) and HR) did not differ between groups over the observation period.Conclusions This study demonstrated that intravenous morphine significantly increased bladder pressure and urinary bladder sphincter pressure and induced histological damage in the bladder and urinary bladder sphincter.Importantly,preliminary data showed that PHC could decrease the extent of these changes.

  9. Orexin A-mediated AKT signaling in the dentate gyrus contributes to the acquisition, expression and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sui-Jun; Cui, Yu; Huang, Zhen-Zhen; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Jin-Xiang; Xin, Wen-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a critical brain region contributing to learning and memory, is involved in the addiction and relapse to abused drugs. Emerging studies also suggest the role of orexin signaling in the rewarding behavior induced by repeated exposure to opiates. In the present study, we investigated the dynamic adaptation of orexin signaling in the DG and its functional significance in the acquisition, expression, maintenance of and relapse to rewarding behavior induced by morphine. Repeated place conditioning with morphine significantly increased the orexin A content released from the lateral hypothalamic area projecting neurons into the DG. Local infusions of orexin A into the DG sensitized the acquisition of and relapse to the conditioned place preference induced by morphine. The application of the orexin receptor type 1 (OXR1) antagonist SB334867 significantly abolished the acquisition, expression and maintenance of the conditioned place preference induced by repeated exposure to morphine. Furthermore, the significant increase of the phosphorylation of AKT in the DG was associated with preference for the morphine-paired chamber in rats, which was reversed by the local administration of an OXR1 antagonist. Thus, these findings suggested that the dynamic upregulation of orexin A signaling, via the AKT pathway in the DG, may promote the acquisition and maintenance of opioid-induced craving behaviors and may increase sensitivity to the rewarding effect of subsequent opioids.

  10. Chronic lead intoxication; Chronische Bleiintoxikation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieseler, B.; Leng, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hygiene; Lenz, S.; Schultz, C. [Klinikum Remscheid GmbH, Remscheid (Germany); Wilhelm, M. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hygiene, Sozial- und Umweltmedizin

    1999-02-01

    The case of a female 68 years old patient is described. Here, a chronic lead intoxication was diagnosed after a two year old medical history with increasing attacks of colic-like abdominal pain often described as life-threatening. After repeated hospitalizations and intensive search for the cause of the symptoms, porphyria and anemia was found to be a sign of a chronic lead poisoning. The blood lead concentrations were always about a level of 600 {mu}g/L. The source of exposure could not be found by now. Neither home inspection nor environmental investigations have shown a recent source of lead intake by the patient. However, a possible occupational source of lead exposure at a blast furnace was established by anamnesis for 1952 to 1962. Thus, osteoporosis induced lead mobilisation was suspected. Noticeable are the results of the six abdominal survey radiographies taken during hospitalization within one year; three radiographies were taken following clinical admission and three before discharge of the patient. In comparison, the course shows a chronic relapsing alimentary supply from metallic particles of unknown genesis. The patient was treated with the sodium salt of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propansulfonic acid (DMPS, Dimaval{sup TM}). She was free of complain afterwards. Following therapy, the blood lead concentrations fell under a level of 400 {mu}m/L, but after several weeks the lead level raised up to the original level of 600 {mu}g/L. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird eine 68jaehrige Patientin vorgestellt, bei der nach fast zweijaehriger Krankengeschichte, die gekennzeichnet war durch rezidivierende, teils als lebensbedrohlich geschilderte Bauchkoliken, eine chronische Bleiintoxikation diagnostiziert wurde. Erst nach wiederholten stationaeren Krankenhausaufenthalten mit intensiver Suche nach der Krankheitsursache wurden das Krankheitsbild und die Laborwerte durch Zusatzuntersuchungen ergaenzt, so dass sich in der festgestellten Porphyrie und Anaemie die Diagnose der

  11. PLGA-Curcumin Attenuates Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia and Inhibits Spinal CaMKIIα.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Hu

    Full Text Available Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH is one of the major problems associated with prolonged use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. Effective treatment for OIH is lacking. In this study, we examined the efficacy and preliminary mechanism of curcumin in attenuating OIH. We employed a newly developed PLGA-curcumin nanoformulation (PLGA-curcumin in order to improve the solubility of curcumin, which has been a major obstacle in properly characterizing curcumin's mechanism of action and efficacy. We found that curcumin administered intrathecally or orally significantly attenuated hyperalgesia in mice with morphine-induced OIH. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effects of curcumin on OIH correlated with the suppression of chronic morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the superficial laminae of the spinal dorsal horn. These data suggest that PLGA-curcumin may reverse OIH possibly by inhibiting CaMKIIα and its downstream signaling.

  12. PLGA-Curcumin Attenuates Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia and Inhibits Spinal CaMKIIα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Fang; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Tian, Xuebi; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zaijie Jim

    2016-01-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is one of the major problems associated with prolonged use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. Effective treatment for OIH is lacking. In this study, we examined the efficacy and preliminary mechanism of curcumin in attenuating OIH. We employed a newly developed PLGA-curcumin nanoformulation (PLGA-curcumin) in order to improve the solubility of curcumin, which has been a major obstacle in properly characterizing curcumin's mechanism of action and efficacy. We found that curcumin administered intrathecally or orally significantly attenuated hyperalgesia in mice with morphine-induced OIH. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effects of curcumin on OIH correlated with the suppression of chronic morphine-induced CaMKIIα activation in the superficial laminae of the spinal dorsal horn. These data suggest that PLGA-curcumin may reverse OIH possibly by inhibiting CaMKIIα and its downstream signaling.

  13. Ribavirin monotherapy for chronic hepatitis C infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Jesper; Gluud, Lise L; Gluud, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Adding ribavirin to interferon improves treatment response for patients with chronic hepatitis C, but the effects of ribavirin monotherapy are unclear. We conducted a systematic review to assess the benefits and harms of ribavirin monotherapy for patients with chronic hepatitis C....

  14. Benzodiazepine pathways in the chronically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hulten, Rolf; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Bakker, Albert; Leufkens, Hubert G.

    1999-01-01

    The association between patterns of use of benzodiazepines and chronic somatic morbidity was examined by applying the Chronic Disease Score (CDS). In the only pharmacy in a Dutch community, 6921 patients with data available covering a 10-year period (1983-1992) were included. In 1992, two-thirds of

  15. Syndrome Analysis: Chronic Alcoholism in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendorf, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Provides outline narrative of most possible outcomes of regular heavy alcohol use, regular alcohol abuse, or chronic alcoholism. A systems analysis approach is used to expose conditions that may result when a human organism is subjected to excessive and chronic alcohol consumption. Such an approach illustrates the detrimental effects which alcohol…

  16. Chronic bronchitis in an elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Parner, Jan; Prescott, Eva

    2003-01-01

    in order to describe the prevalence and prognostic implications of chronic bronchitis in individuals 65 years or older we analysed data from The Copenhagen City Heart Study.......in order to describe the prevalence and prognostic implications of chronic bronchitis in individuals 65 years or older we analysed data from The Copenhagen City Heart Study....

  17. [Computed tomographic semiotics of chronic subdural hematomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El'-Kadi, Kh A; Likhterman, L B; Kornichenko, V N

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of the results of investigation of 72 patients with verified chronic subdural hematomas (CSH) has revealed their CT dense characteristics, the peculiarities of their structure compared with the time of their formation, the patients' age, the clinical stage of disease, and operative findings. Direct and indirect CT signs of uni- and bilateral hemispherical chronic subdural hematomas were described.

  18. Comorbidity of chronic diseases in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Velden, J. van der; Lisdonk, E. van de; Eijk, J.T.M. van; Weel, C. van

    1993-01-01

    With the increasing number of elderly people in The Netherlands the prevalence of chronic diseases will rise in the next decades. It is recognized in general practice that many older patients suffer from more than one chronic disease (comorbidity). The aim of this study is to describe the extent of

  19. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength measurem

  20. Urea synthesis in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamberg, Ole; Sonne, J; Larsen, S

    2001-01-01

    Up-regulation of urea synthesis by amino acids and dietary protein intake may be impaired in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) due to the reduced glucagon secretion. Conversely, urea synthesis may be increased as a result of the chronic inflammation. The aims of the study were to determine...

  1. Chronic diseases among older cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckx, L.D.; Akker, M.A. van der; Metsemakers, J.M.; Knottnerus, A.K.; Schellevis, F.G.; Buntinx, F.B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: With the growing number of older cancer patients, the burden of chronic diseases among older cancer patients will become increasingly important. Chronic diseases often interfere with treatment decisions and prognosis for cancer patients. However, little is known about the occurrence of

  2. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  3. Reported barriers to evaluation in chronic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knai, Cécile; Nolte, Ellen; Brunn, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The growing movement of innovative approaches to chronic disease management in Europe has not been matched by a corresponding effort to evaluate them. This paper discusses challenges to evaluation of chronic disease management as reported by experts in six European countries....

  4. Pharmacological management of pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esch, A.A.J.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Goor, H. van; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Pain is the major presenting symptom of chronic pancreatitis. Patients with chronic pancreatitis experience substantial impairments in health-related quality of life. Pain may be considered as the most important factor affecting the quality of life. The pathogenesis of pancreatic pain is poorly unde

  5. Chronic autoimmune urticaria : Where we stand ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well-recognized that 30-40% of chronic idiopathic urticaria is autoimmune in nature. Chronic autoimmune urticaria is caused by anti-FcåRI and less frequently, by anti-IgE autoantibodies that lead to mast cell and basophil activation, thereby giving rise to the release of histamine and other proinflammatory mediators. Activation of the classical complement pathway and formation of C5a are important in dermal mast cell activation. C5a is also a neutrophil and eosinophil chemoattractant. Chronic autoimmune urticaria has been found to be associated with autoimmune thyroid disease. The autologous serum skin test is used as a screening test for chronic autoimmune urticaria and has a sensitivity and specificity of about 70 and 80%, respectively. The current gold standard diagnostic test is the basophil histamine release assay. The treatment of chronic autoimmune urticaria, as in chronic idiopathic urticaria, is with H1 antihistamines. Oral corticosteroids may be used during acute flares. Refractory cases have been shown to respond to cyclosporine and other immunomodulators. The prevalence of chronic autoimmune urticaria in Singapore is similar to that reported in Western countries at about 42%. The presence of thyroid autoimmunity appears to be higher than reported, with 22.5% of patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria here, exhibiting presence of thyroid autoantibodies.

  6. Evaluation of telomerase expression in chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Human telomerase is a multi subunit ribonucleoprotein enzyme concerned with telomeric lengthening and homeostasis in man. This enzyme has been found to be elevated in inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and silica injury lung. Since chronic periodontitis is also an inflammatory condition where immune cells and cytokines mediate tissue destruction, we set out to evaluate telomerase in gingival tissue samples from healthy subjects and chronic periodontitis patients by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Materials and Methods : Gingival biopsies were obtained from eight healthy subjects and eight chronic periodontitis patients. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR was carried out to evaluate telomerase gene expression in the samples. Results : None of the healthy gingival tissue samples expressed the telomerase gene while all the chronic periodontitis samples expressed it. The severe chronic periodontitis samples expressed the gene more intensely than the moderate chronic periodontitis samples. Conclusion : Various mechanisms have been explained to account for telomerase elevation in chronic periodontitis .This study helps us understand the role of telomerase in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. It could be concluded that telomerase could be used as a marker to assess the severity of inflammation in chronic periodontitis.

  7. Future perspectives: pathogenesis of chronic muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland

    2007-06-01

    Chronic painful muscle conditions include non-inflammatory and inflammatory illnesses. This review is focused on chronic non-inflammatory pain conditions such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FM), and will not discuss metabolic, genetic or inflammatory muscle diseases such as McArdle's disease, muscular dystrophy, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, or inclusion body myositis.

  8. Osteoporosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Schwarz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence.......The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence....

  9. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in two siblings.

    OpenAIRE

    Gabreëls-Festen, A A; Hageman, A T; Gabreëls, F J; Joosten, E M; Renier, W.O.; Weemaes, C M; ter Laak, H J

    1986-01-01

    A familial occurrence of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is reported. The diagnostic problems in distinguishing the progressive form of this disease in childhood from hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy types I and III are discussed. Criteria for a definite diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy are proposed.

  10. Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy following Renal Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Younger, D. S.; Stuart Orsher

    2013-01-01

    The clinical, laboratory, and treatment findings of a patient with chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy (CADP) in association with renal transplantation are described. Like the present case, many such patients have been described under the rubric of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP).

  11. Ministry to the Chronically Ill Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinetta, Pat Deasy; Collins, Denis E.

    1993-01-01

    Reports growth in the number of chronically ill children attending Catholic schools. Describes the separate roles of home, school, and hospital in children's long-term care. Urges educators to obtain necessary information on children's attendance, peer interaction, education, and medical compliance. Reviews issues specific to chronically ill…

  12. Counseling Adult Clients Experiencing Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Stephanie T.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pain affects 35% to 57% of the adult population in the United States and results in billions of dollars spent annually in direct health-care costs and lost productivity. Extensive research confirms the considerable role psychological factors play in the experience and expression of chronic pain. The author discusses implications for…

  13. Etiological approach to chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Shankar D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 1769, William Cullen introduced the word "urticaria" (transient edematous papules, plaque with itching. Urticaria affects 15-25% of people at least once in their life time. It is a clinical reaction pattern triggered by many factors causing the liberation of vasoactive substances such as histamine, prostaglandins and kinins. Urticaria is classified according to its duration into acute (< 6 weeks duration and chronic (>6 weeks duration. Various clinical investigations may be initiated to diagnosis the cause. Aims: To evaluate the types of chronic urticaria with reference to etiology from history and investigations . Materials and Methods: A total of 150 patients with chronic urticaria of more than six weeks were studied. Autologous serum skin test (ASST was performed after physical urticarias were excluded. Standard batteries of tests were performed after ASST in all patients; and other specific investigations were done where necessary. Skin prick test was done in idiopathic urticaria. Results: The study sample consisted of 62 male and 88 female patients with a mean age of 21-40 years. About 50% of patients showed an ASST positive reaction, 3.9% were positive for antinuclear antibody (ANA, IgE titer was elevated in 37%, H. pylori antibodies was positive in 26.7%. Thyroid antibodies were positive in 6.2%. Giardia and entamoeba histolytica was reported in 3.3% on routine stool examination and on urinalysis 8% had elevated WBC counts; 12% showed para nasal sinusitis, with maxillary sinusitis of 7.3%. Random blood sugar was high in 5.3%. Four patients had ASOM, two had positive KOH mount for dermatophytes, abdominal USG showed cholecystitis in two patients. Recurrent tonsillitis was noted in two patients. Urticaria following intake of NSAIDs was observed in four patients and with oral contraceptive pills in one patient. Contact urticaria to condom (latex was seen in one patient. Cholinergic (4.7% and dermographic (4.7% urticaria were

  14. Lenalidomide and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pilar González-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory drug used in multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndrome and most recently it has shown to be effective in the treatment of various lymphoproliferative disorders such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism of action of lenalidomide varies depending on the pathology, and in the case of CLL, it appears to primarily act by restoring the damaged mechanisms of tumour immunosurveillance. This review discusses the potential mechanism of action and efficacy of lenalidomide, alone or in combination, in treatment of CLL and its toxic effects such as tumor lysis syndrome (TLS and tumor flare reaction (TFR, that make its management different from other hematologic malignancies.

  15. Chronic Lyme disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Adriana

    2008-06-01

    Studies have shown that most patients diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease either have no objective evidence of previous or current infection with Borrelia burgdorferi or are patients who should be classified as having post-Lyme disease syndrome, which is defined as continuing or relapsing nonspecific symptoms (such as fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and cognitive complaints) in a patient previously treated for Lyme disease. Despite extensive study, there is currently no clear evidence that post-Lyme disease syndrome is caused by persistent infection with B burgdorferi. Four randomized placebo-controlled studies have shown that antibiotic therapy offers no sustained benefit to patients who have post-Lyme disease syndrome. These studies also showed a substantial placebo effect and a significant risk of treatment-related adverse events. Further research to elucidate the mechanisms underlying persistent symptoms after Lyme disease and controlled trials of new approaches to the treatment and management of these patients are needed.

  16. Endoscopic treatment of chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of chronic pancreatitis has been exclusively surgical for a long time. Recently, endoscopic therapy has become widely used as a primary therapeutic option.Initially performed for drainage of pancreatic cysts and pseudocysts, endoscopic treatments were adapted to biliary and pancreatic ducts stenosis. Pancreatic sphincterotomy which allows access to pancreatic ducts was firstly reported. Secondly, endoscopic methods of stenting, dilatation, and stones extraction of the bile ducts were applied to pancreatic ducts. Nevertheless,new improvements were necessary: failures of pancreatic stone extraction justified the development of extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy; dilatation of pancreatic stenosis was improved by forage with a new device; moreover endosonography allowed guidance for celiac block, gastro-cystostomy, duodeno-cystostomy and pancreatico-gastrostomy. Although endoscopic treatments are more and more frequently accepted,indications are still debated.

  17. Looking after chronically ill dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stine B.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Sandøe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    thus face similar challenges when caring for their animals. This qualitative study uncovers impacts on an owner's life, when attending to the care of an aged or chronically ill dog and reflects on the differing roles of caregivers with animal and human patients. Twelve dog owners were selected for in......-depth interviews based on the dogs' diagnoses, and the choice of treatments and care expected to affect the owner's life. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed qualitatively. The dog owners reported several changes in their lives due to their dog's condition: practicalities like extra care, changes...... in use of the home, and restrictions relating to work, social life, and finances. These were time-consuming, tough, and annoying, but could often be dealt with through planning and prioritizing. Changes in the human–dog relationship and activities caused sadness and frustration, which in turn led...

  18. Management of chronic Giardia infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Angel A; Hanevik, Kurt; Almirall, Pedro; Cimerman, Sérgio; Alfonso, Maydel

    2014-09-01

    Advances in our understanding of chronic giardiasis (CG) may improve our care of patients in this stage of the disease. This review proposes a new concept of CG and highlights the recent advances in our understanding and management of this condition. According to this review, management requires, initially, an accurate diagnosis, which may exclude several conditions that can mimic CG. Optimal treatment requires a tailored approach which includes the recognition of the known modifiable causes of this health condition, assessment of symptoms and potential complications, their treatment utilizing, if necessary, a multidisciplinary team, and an ongoing monitoring for the effect of therapy - weighing the efficacy of individual drugs - all of these together may lead to a successful treatment of CG.

  19. Chronic pain and invasive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Rocco

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The chronic pain “three-step” OMS ladder is likely to be revised, in order to introduce a “fourth step” including clinical indications for the invasive analgesic procedures. The number of patients who undergo such procedures is likely to increase, as well as modern oncology and palliative medicine development. Most of invasive approaches include central (spinal neuromodulation and peripheral (gangliar neurolysis, percutaneous vertebral reduction techniques, as well as pharmacological (opioids and adiuvants, chemical (alcohol and physical (electrical stimulation, thermic neurolysis means. Rarely effective as unique therapies, invasive procedures have to be accurately patient-selected and considered supplementary to conservative approaches, in order to minimize the adverse events deriving from a long term opioid therapy. In the near future, the development of both pain science and biomedical technology will probably be accompanied by the improvement of the knowledge regarding the recourse to invasive analgesic procedures.

  20. Metformin in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James

    2014-01-01

    reduction, including weight loss, which are beneficial to patients. The risk of death and cardiovascular disease is reduced by about a third in non-CKD patients. Since metformin intoxication undoubtedly causes LA, and metformin is renally excreted, inappropriate dosage of metformin will increase the risk......Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological...... of LA. It is suggested that introduction of metformin therapy to more advanced stages of CKD may bring therapeutic benefits that outweigh the possible risks....

  1. Pain management in chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cathia Gachago; Peter V Draganov

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a major clinical problem in patients with chronic pancreatitis.The cause of pain is usually multifactorial with a complex interplay of factors contributing to a varying degree to the pain in an individual patient and,therefore,a rigid standardized approach for pain control tends to lead to suboptimal results.Pain management usually proceeds in a stepwise approach beginning with general lifestyle recommendations,low fat diet,alcohol and smoking cessation are encouraged.Analgesics alone are needed in almost all patients.Maneuvers aimed at suppression of pancreatic secretion are routinely tried.Patients with ongoing symptoms may be candidates for more invasive options such as endoscopic therapy,and resective or drainage surgery.The role of pain modifying agents (antidepressants,gabapentin,peregabalin),celiac plexus block,antioxidants,octreotide and total pancreatectomy with islet cell auto transplantation remains to be determined.

  2. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Hartleb; Krzysztof Gutkowski

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI),defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL,occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis.Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state,reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones.The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia,hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis.Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development,natriuresis,urine osmolality,response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion,and rarely on renal biopsy.Chronic glomeruIonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients.AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease,therefore,such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation.Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension,and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections,nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions,excessive diuresis,gastrointestinal hemorrhage,diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents.Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy.The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion,which is effective in about 50% of patients.The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt,renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support.

  3. Chronic constipation in hemiplegic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of bowel dysfunction in hemiplegic patients, and its relationship with the site of neurological lesion, physical immobilization and pharmacotherapy.METHODS: Ninety consecutive hemiplegic patients and 81 consecutive orthopedic patients were investigated during physical motor rehabilitation in the same period, in the same center and on the same diet. All subjects were interviewed ≥ 3 mo after injury using a questionnaire inquiring about bowel habits before injury and at the time of the interview. Patients' mobility was evaluated by the Adapted Patient Evaluation Conference System. Drugs considered for the analysis were nitrates, angiogenic converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors,calcium antagonists, anticoagulants, antithrombotics,antidepressants, anti-epileptics.RESULTS: Mobility scores were similar in the two groups. De novo constipation (OR = 5.36) was a frequent outcome of the neurological accident.Hemiplegics showed an increased risk of straining at stool (OR: 4.33), reduced call to evacuate (OR: 4.13),sensation of incomplete evacuation (OR: 3.69), use of laxatives (OR: 3.75). Logistic regression model showed that constipation was significantly and independently associated with hemiplegia. A positive association was found between constipation and use of nitrates and antithrombotics in both groups. Constipation was not related to the site of brain injury.CONCLUSION: Chronic constipation is a possible outcome of cerebrovascular accidents occurring in 30% of neurologically stabilized hemiplegic patients.Its onset after a cerebrovascular accident appears to be independent from the injured brain hemisphere,and unrelated to physical inactivity. Pharmacological treatment with nitrates and antithrombotics may represent an independent risk factor for developing chronic constipation.

  4. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-08-26

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity.

  5. Models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Markus M; Gorelick, Fred S

    2013-06-01

    Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis have been created to examine mechanisms of pathogenesis, test therapeutic interventions, and study the influence of inflammation on the development of pancreatic cancer. In vitro models can be used to study early stage, short-term processes that involve acinar cell responses. Rodent models reproducibly develop mild or severe disease. One of the most commonly used pancreatitis models is created by administration of supraphysiologic concentrations of caerulein, an ortholog of cholecystokinin. Induction of chronic pancreatitis with factors thought to have a role in human disease, such as combinations of lipopolysaccharide and chronic ethanol feeding, might be relevant to human disease. Models of autoimmune chronic pancreatitis have also been developed. Most models, particularly of chronic pancreatitis, require further characterization to determine which features of human disease they include.

  6. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Mariani; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreaUtis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis.There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane con ductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation,hereditary and obstructive pancreatitis seem an acute disease that progress to chronic pancreatitis,likely as a consequence of the activation and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells that produce and activate collagen and therefore fibrosis.From the diagnostic point of view,in patients with acute recurrent pancreatitis Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) seems the more reliable technique for an accurate evaluation and follow-up of some ductal and parenchymal abnormalities suspected for early chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Chronic migraine--classification, characteristics and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Dodick, David W; Goadsby, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    According to the revised 2nd Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, primary headaches can be categorized as chronic or episodic; chronic migraine is defined as headaches in the absence of medication overuse, occurring on =15 days per month for =3 months, of which...... headaches on =8 days must fulfill the criteria for migraine without aura. Prevalence and incidence data for chronic migraine are still uncertain, owing to the heterogeneous definitions used to identify the condition in population-based studies over the past two decades. Chronic migraine is severely...... disabling and difficult to manage, as affected patients experience substantially more-frequent headaches, comorbid pain and affective disorders, and fewer pain-free intervals, than do those with episodic migraine. Data on the treatment of chronic migraine are scarce because most migraine-prevention trials...

  8. Imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile D. Balaban

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system, which leads to chronic pain, loss of endocrine and exocrine functions. Clinically, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency becomes apparent only after 90% of the parenchima has been lost. Despite the simple definition, diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains a challenge, especially for early stage disease. Because pancreatic function tests can be normal until late stages and have significant limitations, there is an incresing interest in the role of imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. In this article we review the utility and accuracy of different imaging methods in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, focusing on the role of advanced imaging (magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound.

  9. Evidence based practice of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Garg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The patients with chronic pain are increasingly reporting to the physicians for its management. Chronic pain are associated with head, neck and shoulder pain, spinal pain, pain in the joints and extremities, complex regional pain syndrome and phantom pain. The chronic pain is being managed worldwide. The different specialty of medicine is producing a lot of evidence through the published literature but the same is not being published in the field of chronic pain management. Though some evidence is being reported as to different aspects of pain management from different parts of the world but same is lacking from Indian subcontinent. This is in contrast to much done clinical work in this field as well. We present here the available evidence in relation to chronic pain management.

  10. [Association between chronic pain and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Fernández, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The comorbidity integrated by chronic pain and depression is very common. The somatoform depressive symptoms appear often as diferent types of pain. Amon them premenstrual pain and fibromialgia are some of the most important clinical pictures. Chronic pain leads to depression as a consequence of these three kinds of factors: biomedical, psychosocial (passive attitude, disability) and pharmacological agents. Copping and acceptance of chronic pain is associated with lower pain intensity, less depression and less psychosocial disability. The appropriate use of analgesics in the management of chronic pain demands individualization. Several antidepressants have possitive effects on pain syndrom. Depression is underrecognized ad undertreated above all in patients with chronic pain. In order screening the depression seven ways are described here: personal and family history, type of the personality, clinic and evolutive aspects of somatoform symptom, search of other depressive symptoms and positive therapeutic effect determinated by an antidepressant.

  11. Chronic Constipation: a Review of Current Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbahi, Hani; Cash, Brooks D

    2015-12-01

    Chronic constipation is a common health condition representing a substantial proportion of primary care visits and referrals to specialist providers. Chronic constipation can have a significant negative effect on health-related quality of life and has been associated with psychological distress in severely affected patients. It has the potential to cause patients to curtail work, school, and social activities. While different pathophysiological mechanisms have been implicated in the development of chronic constipation, in some instances, the causes of chronic constipation are not easily determined. Expenditures for the evaluation and management of chronic constipation represent a significant burden on patients and payers, and it is important for clinicians to have a clear understanding of the different pathophysiological mechanisms associated with constipation, understand the different testing modalities and treatments that are available including their appropriateness and limitations, and tailor that knowledge to the management of individual patients.

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online catalog. Alternate Language URL Españ​ol Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Basics Page Content Chronic Kidney Disease: ... My Lifestyle CKD: Tracking My Test Results Chronic Kidney Disease: The Basics You've been told that ...

  13. Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian/ ... times more likely to be diagnosed with chronic liver disease in 2006. American Samoans were 8 times ...

  14. Review of occupational therapy for people with chronic pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, Katie

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pain is a significant health-care problem. This review aims to critically analyse occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain and identify significant factors influencing the future development of occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain.

  15. Prolonged chronic phase in chronic myelogenous leukemia after homoharringtonine therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-feng; DENG Zhi-kui; XUAN Heng-bao; ZHU Jia-bin; DING Bang-he; LIU Xiao-ning; CHEN Bao-an

    2009-01-01

    Background Homoharringtonine (HH'r) is effective in treating late stage chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), but little is known about long term maintenance during complete cytogenetic response. Long term efficacy and toxicity profiles of low dose HHT were evaluated in this study.Methods One hundred and six patients with CML received 1.5 mg/m2 of HHT alone by continuous daily infusion for seven to nine days every four weeks. Of 79 patients in the control group, 31 were treated with interferon α (IFN-α) and 48 with hydroxycarbamide. For 17 patients who failed to achieve cytogenetic response within 12 months' treatment of IFN-α, HHT was administered. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to detect the BCR-ABL mRNA expression in 36 Philadelphia positive CML patients enrolled after 2007. Haematological and cytogenetic responses were evaluated in all patients at the 12th month of follow-up. Long term efficacy was assessed in a follow-up with a median time of 54 months (12 months-98 months).Results After 12 months of therapy, cytogenetic response rate of the HHT, IFN-α and hydroxycarbamide groups were 39/106, 14/31 and 3/48, and corresponding molecular cytogenetic response rates 6/18, 3/8 and 0. Of the 17 patients who received HHT as salvage treatment, 6 achieved cytogenetic response (3 major). At the 48 months' follow-up, cytogenetic response was maintained in 32/39 patients treated with HHT. Patients who had cytogenetic response in HHT group or treated with IFN-α also showed longer median chronic durations, which were 45 months (12 months-98 months) and 49 months (12 months-92 months) respectively, indicating a longer survival time.Conclusions Low dose HHT alone showed considerable short term and long term efficacy in the treatment of late stage CML. It may also be a good choice for patients who have failed imatinib, IFN-α treatment or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or cannot afford these treatments.

  16. Review series: chronic cough: behaviour modification therapies for chronic cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigan, A E; Theodoros, D G; Gibson, P G; Winkworth, A L

    2007-01-01

    Chronic cough (CC) can be refractory to medical treatment and newer strategies are required for these patients. Behaviour modification therapies are a potential approach for management of cough that does not respond to medical management. Behaviour modification therapy for CC involves an individually tailored programme teaching individuals to increase control over cough symptoms and includes education, specific strategies to suppress the cough, vocal hygiene training and psychoeducational counselling. Several case series have described speech pathology treatment for CC and a recent randomized control trial has demonstrated a significant improvement in symptoms. Possible mechanisms for this improvement include reduced cough reflex sensitivity, increased voluntary control of the cough and reduced stimulation of cough receptors. Respiratory retraining used by physiotherapists may also have potential for use in CC. The validity of psychological therapeutic approaches to CC rests on concepts of CC as a disorder with a psychogenic component, and the ability of cognitive therapies to modify the cough pathway. This work outlines current literature into behavioural management of CC and suggests new directions for practice and research in adults with this condition.

  17. CHRONIC PAIN AFTER INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Chronic post herniorrhaphy groin pain is defined as pain lasting > 6 months after surgery, which is one of the most important complication occurring after inguinal hernia repair, occurs with greater frequency than previously thought. Chronic groin pain is one of the most significant complications following inguinal hernia repair, and majority of chronic pain has been attributed to ilioinguinal nerve entrapment. Various other factors are involved in development of chronic pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients undergoing elective inguinal hernioplasty in Victoria hospital from November2011 to May 2013 were included in the study. A total of 227 patients met the inclusion criteria and were available for follow up at end of six months. A detailed preoperative, intraoperative and post-operative details of cases were recorded according to proforma. The postoperative pain and pain at two, seven days and at end of six months were recorded on a VAS scale. RESULTS: Chronic pain at six month follow up was present in 89 patients constituting 39.4% of all patients undergoing hernia repair. It was seen that 26.9% without preoperative pain developed chronic pain whereas 76.7 % of patients with preoperative pain developed chronic pain. Patients with significant preoperative pain had higher chances of developing chronic pain (p<.0001. Preemptive analgesia failed to show statistical significance in development of chronic pain (p=0.079. Nerve injury were present in 22 of cases it was found that nerve injury significantly affected development of chronic pain (p=0.001.Post-operative infiltration of local anesthesia was practiced in 16.3 % of cases and it was found that local infiltration at incision site significantly reduced incidence of chronic pain (p=0.001.Postoperative complications in the form of hematoma, seroma or infection was present in 8.5 % of cases. It was found that post-operative complication not only increased early post-operative pain

  18. Abnormal tyrosine metabolism in chronic cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Giovanni; Leone, Massimo; Bussone, Gennaro; Fiore, Paola Di; Bolner, Andrea; Aguggia, Marco; Saracco, Maria Gabriella; Perini, Francesco; Giordano, Giuseppe; Gucciardi, Antonina; Leon, Alberta

    2017-02-01

    Objective Episodic cluster headache is characterized by abnormalities in tyrosine metabolism (i.e. elevated levels of dopamine, tyramine, octopamine and synephrine and low levels of noradrenalin in plasma and platelets.) It is unknown, however, if such biochemical anomalies are present and/or constitute a predisposing factor in chronic cluster headache. To test this hypothesis, we measured the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline together with those of elusive amines, such as tyramine, octopamine and synephrine, in plasma of chronic cluster patients and control individuals. Methods Plasma levels of dopamine, noradrenaline and trace amines, including tyramine, octopamine and synephrine, were measured in a group of 23 chronic cluster headache patients (10 chronic cluster ab initio and 13 transformed from episodic cluster), and 16 control participants. Results The plasma levels of dopamine, noradrenaline and tyramine were several times higher in chronic cluster headache patients compared with controls. The levels of octopamine and synephrine were significantly lower in plasma of these patients with respect to control individuals. Conclusions These results suggest that anomalies in tyrosine metabolism play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic cluster headache and constitute a predisposing factor for the transformation of the episodic into a chronic form of this primary headache.

  19. Hostility and Anger in Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Ribeiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The affective component of pain incorporates various emotions, primarily negative in quality. A great emphasis has been traditionally given to the role of depression and anxiety in chronic pain. More recently, the focus has been directed towards hostility and anger, as fundamental components of the emotional experience of chronic pain. Objective: The aim of this article is to present a literature’s review about the association between chronic pain, anger and hostility. Discussion: Patients with several chronic disorders are characterized by high levels of trait anger and hostility. On the other hand, the manner in which angry feelings are typically handled (anger management style, especially the marked tendency to suppress or express angry feelings, is a particularly important determinant of the chronic pain severity. Conclusion: Hostility and anger are involved in the development, maintenance and treatment of chronic pain. Further research is needed to clarify its relationship with chronic pain and to evaluate the effects of anger management on treatment outcomes.

  20. Hostility and Anger in Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Oliveira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The affective component of pain incorporates various emotions, primarily negative in quality. A great emphasis has been traditionally given to the role of depression and anxiety in chronic pain. More recently, the focus has been directed towards hostility and anger, as fundamental components of the emotional experience of chronic pain. Objective: The aim of this article is to present a literature’s review about the association between chronic pain, anger and hostility. Discussion: Patients with several chronic disorders are characterized by high levels of trait anger and hostility. On the other hand, the manner in which angry feelings are typically handled (anger management style, especially the marked tendency to suppress or express angry feelings, is a particularly important determinant of the chronic pain severity. Conclusion: Hostility and anger are involved in the development, maintenance and treatment of chronic pain. Further research is needed to clarify its relationship with chronic pain and to evaluate the effects of anger management on treatment outcomes.

  1. PREVALENCE OF ANATOMIC VARIATIONS IN CHRONIC RHINOSINUSITIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikrishna

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of anatomic variations in patients suffering from chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS and to compare them with normal population. DESIGN: This is a case control study. A prospective s tudy of anatomic variations was done on 100 computed tomography (CT scans of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Prevalence of anatomic variations in control group was assessed by studying 100 CT scans of non- CRS patients. RESULTS: Even though proportion of concha bullosa was more among chronic rhinosinusitis patients compared to normal individual s, it was statistically not significant. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of pa radoxical middle turbinate, retroverted uncinate process, overpneumatized ethmoid bulla and s eptal deviation in chronic rhinosinusitis patients compared to normal individuals. There was s ignificantly lesser proportion of individuals having haller cells and agger nasi cell s in chronic rhinosinusitis compared to normal individuals. CONCLUSION: There is no significant prevalence of anatomic vari ations in osteomeatal unit in patients with chronic rhinosinus itis. The anatomic variations may predispose to pathological changes only if they are bi gger in size. More detailed studies are recommended in this regard as a good knowledge of c omplex anatomy of the paranasal sinuses is essential to understand chronic rhinosinusitis a nd to plan its treatment

  2. Etiologies of chronic liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahmand F

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Liver diseases in children is the result of many different diseases including: metabolic, genetic, infectious, toxic and idiopathic causes. This was a case series study on 133 infants and children with age range 6 month to 12 years old, who presented clinically with manifestation of chronic liver disease and were admitted to Children Hospital Medical Center from year 1999 to 2000. In this study, 32 (24.5 percent patients had autoimmune chronic hepatitis, 15 (11.3 percent Glycogen storage diseases, 12 (9 percent extrahepatic biliary atresia, 11 (8.2 percent willson disease, 10 (7.5 percent cryptogenic cirrhosis, 6 (4.5 percent chronic hepatitis C, 5 (3.8 percen chronic hepatitic B, 5 (3.8 percent galactosemia 3 (2.25 percent congenital hepatic fibrosis, 3 (3.8 percent histiocytosis X, 3 (2.25 percent sclerosing cholangitis, 2 (1.5 percent byler’s disease 2 (1.5 percent primary tuberculosis, 1 (0.75 percent choledocalcyst, 1 (0.75 percent Alagyle syndrome. According to our data, chronic liver disease should be considered in infants and children. In our study, the most common causes are found to be: metabolic and genetic diseases (37.5 percent, chronic autoimmune hepatitis (24 percent and biliary disorders (14 percent, that encompass 86 percent of the patients.

  3. Integration of healthcare rehabilitation in chronic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Frølich

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of care provided to people with chronic conditions does not often fulfil standards of care in Denmark and in other countries. Inadequate organisation of healthcare systems has been identified as one of the most important causes for observed performance inadequacies, and providing integrated healthcare has been identified as an important organisational challenge for healthcare systems. Three entities—Bispebjerg University Hospital, the City of Copenhagen, and the GPs in Copenhagen—collaborated on a quality improvement project focusing on integration and implementation of rehabilitation programmes in four conditions. Description of care practice: Four multidisciplinary rehabilitation intervention programmes, one for each chronic condition: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, type 2 diabetes, chronic heart failure, and falls in elderly people were developed and implemented during the project period. The chronic care model was used as a framework for support of implementing and integration of the four rehabilitation programmes. Conclusion and discussion: The chronic care model provided support for implementing rehabilitation programmes for four chronic conditions in Bispebjerg University Hospital, the City of Copenhagen, and GPs' offices. New management practices were developed, known practices were improved to support integration, and known practices were used for implementation purposes. Several barriers to integrated care were identified.

  4. HIV and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naicker, Saraladevi; Rahmanian, Sadaf; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a frequent complication of HIV infection, occurring in 3.5 - 48.5%, and occurs as a complication of HIV infection, other co-morbid disease and infections and as a consequence of therapy of HIV infection and its complications. The classic involvement of the kidney by HIV infection is HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), occurring typically in young adults of African ancestry with advanced HIV disease in association with APOL1 high-risk variants. HIV-immune complex disease is the second most common diagnosis obtained from biopsies of patients with HIV-CKD. CKD is mediated by factors related to the virus, host genetic predisposition and environmental factors. The host response to HIV infection may influence disease phenotype through activation of cytokine pathways. With the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART), there has been a decline in the incidence of HIVAN, with an increasing prevalence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Several studies have demonstrated the overall improvement in kidney function when initiating ART for HIV CKD. Progression to end stage kidney disease has been reported to be more likely when high grade proteinuria, severely reduced eGFR, hepatitis B and/C co-infection, diabetes mellitus, extensive glomerulosclerosis, and chronic interstitial fibrosis are present. Improved renal survival is associated with use of renin angiotensin system blockers and viral suppression. Many antiretroviral medications are partially or completely eliminated by the kidney and require dose adjustment in CKD. Certain drug classes, such as the protease inhibitors and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, are metabolized by the liver and do not require dose adjustment. HIV-infected patients requiring either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis, who are stable on ART, are achieving survival rates comparable to those of dialysis patients without HIV infection. Kidney transplantation has been performed successfully in HIV

  5. Chronic Pain after Inguinal Hernia Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manangi, Mallikarjuna; Shivashankar, Santhosh; Vijayakumar, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic postherniorrhaphy groin pain is defined as pain lasting >6 months after surgery, which is one of the most important complications occurring after inguinal hernia repair, which occurs with greater frequency than previously thought. Material and Methods. Patients undergoing elective inguinal hernioplasty in Victoria Hospital from November 2011 to May 2013 were included in the study. A total of 227 patients met the inclusion criteria and were available for followup at end of six months. Detailed preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative details of cases were recorded according to proforma. The postoperative pain and pain at days two and seven and at end of six months were recorded on a VAS scale. Results. Chronic pain at six-month followup was present in 89 patients constituting 39.4% of all patients undergoing hernia repair. It was seen that 26.9% without preoperative pain developed chronic pain whereas 76.7% of patients with preoperative pain developed chronic pain. Preemptive analgesia failed to show statistical significance in development of chronic pain (P = 0.079). Nerve injury was present in 22 of cases; it was found that nerve injury significantly affected development of chronic pain (P = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, it was found that development of chronic pain following hernia surgery was dependent upon factors like preoperative pain, type of anesthesia, nerve injury, postoperative local infiltration, postoperative complication, and most importantly the early postoperative pain. Conclusions. In the present study, we found that chronic pain following inguinal hernia repair causes significant morbidity to patients and should not be ignored. Preemptive analgesia and operation under local anesthesia significantly affect pain. Intraoperative identification and preservation of all inguinal nerves are very important. Early diagnosis and management of chronic pain can remove suffering of the patient.

  6. Lung Compliance and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Papandrinopoulou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, namely, pulmonary emphysema and chronic bronchitis, is a chronic inflammatory response of the airways to noxious particles or gases, with resulting pathological and pathophysiological changes in the lung. The main pathophysiological aspects of the disease are airflow obstruction and hyperinflation. The mechanical properties of the respiratory system and its component parts are studied by determining the corresponding volume-pressure (P-V relationships. The consequences of the inflammatory response on the lung structure and function are depicted on the volume-pressure relationships.

  7. New treatment of chronic hepatitis B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E.S.; Weis, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, 350 million people are infected with chronic hepatitis B. Over the last few years, it has been possible to treat chronic hepatitis B. Treatment very often consists of nucleos(t)ide analogs and in a few cases of pegylated alpha-interferon. In 2007, a new nucleoside analog, Telbivudine......, was approved to treat chronic hepatitis B. In phase II and ongoing phase III studies, Telbivudine has proven more effective than the nucleoside analog, Lamivudine, which was very often used up until recently Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11/24...

  8. TNF-Alpha Inhibitors for Chronic Urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Freja Lærke; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2013-01-01

    be effective and relatively safe treatment options in a significant proportion of patients with chronic urticaria who do not respond sufficiently to high-dose antihistamines or in whom standard immunosuppressive drugs are ineffective or associated with unacceptable side effects.......Patients with severe chronic urticaria may not respond to antihistamines, and other systemic treatment options may either be ineffective or associated with unacceptable side effects. We present data on efficacy and safety of adalimumab and etanercept in 20 adult patients with chronic urticaria...

  9. Chronic illness in adolescents: a sociological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, T J

    1983-01-01

    This article relates chronic illness in adolescents to a sociological model of deviance. This is an area of controversy: the views of Freidson, Lorber and Robinson are presented as being representative of the dispute. Four situations are discussed in which the issues of prognosis, responsibility and stigma elicit societal response. The usefulness of a sociological model consists in making vague societal perception and rules explicit. The concept of the chronically ill adolescent as deviant is descriptive and devoid of value judgment. Only through such rigorous assessment is it possible to gain a realistic understanding of the societal role in the life of the chronically ill adolescent.

  10. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    -20% (mild), 20%-30% (moderate) or >30% (severe). Spirometry was performed annually and participants were divided into severity groups according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Data were analysed in a mixed effects regression model with log(airway lumen diameter......Rationale – Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a combination of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, which both may lead to airway obstruction. Under normal circumstances, airway dimensions vary as a function of inspiration level. We aim to study the influence of COPD and emphysema...... in causing airway narrowing, the latter most likely due to loss of elastic recoil of surrounding tissue....

  11. MALONDIALDEHYDE LEVELS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhur

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Periodontitis is a chronic condition leading to the destruction of the periodontium. A case control study was carried out in 30 subjects with chronic periodontitis aged 30 - 65 ye ars (group II and age matched with 30 control subjects (group I. Salivary and serum malondialdehyde, which is a marker of lipid peroxidation, was estimated in the cases and controls. Salivary MDA was elevated (p<0.001 in patients with chronic periodonti tis there was no change in serum MDA levels when compared with normal controls. Increased levels in MDA may be closely associated with periodontal disease and salivary estimation may provide advantage in pathogenesis of the periodontal disease. .

  12. Resolution of chronic hepatitis C following parasitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valerie Byrnes; Sanjiv Chopra; Margaret J Koziel

    2007-01-01

    An inefficient cellular immune response likely leads to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Resolution of chronic HCV infection in the absence of treatment is a rare occurrence. We report the case of a 39-year old white male with a 17-year history of chronic HCV infection, who eradicated HCV following a serious illness due to co-infection with Babesia (babesiosis), Borriela Borgdorferi (Lyme disease) and Ehrlichia (human granulocytic ehrlichiosis). We hypothesize that the cellular immune response mounted by this patient in response to his infection with all three agents but in particular Babesia was sufficient to eradicate HCV.

  13. Chronic pain: cytokines, lymphocytes and chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel, Marcia; Kraychete, Durval Campos; Meyer Nascimento, Roberto Jose

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a debilitating condition and, in most cases, difficult to treat. A prominent example of this is neuropathic pain. Understanding pathophysiological mechanisms of pain and, therefore, making this knowledge into an effective treatment is still a challenge to experts. Pain can now be considered as a neuro-immune disorder, since recent data indicate critical involvement of innate and adaptive immune responses following injury, and this interaction plays an important role in the onset and perpetuation of chronic pain. The aim of this article is to review the relationship between immune system and chronic pain, especially about neuropathic pain, and focusing on cytokines, chemokines and lymphocytes.

  14. Chronic Migraine in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özge, Aynur; Yalin, Osman Özgür

    2016-02-01

    Chronic migraine is defined as having more than 15 headache days in a month, half of these showing migraine features, for at least 3 months. It is a chronic painful syndrome with aspects such as psychiatric comorbid, decreased quality of life, and environmental and intrinsic psychological factors that make face-to-face treatment difficult. Children and adolescent migraine differ from adults as a result of growing brain and evolving disorder. In this paper, we will emphasize the definition, diagnosis, epidemiology, burden of life, and management of chronic migraine in children and adolescent.

  15. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is more common in patients with chronic kidney disease and is associated with higher mortality than in the general population. Blood losses in this patient population can be quite severe at times and it is important to differentiate anemia of chronic diseases from anemia due to GI bleeding. We review the literature on common causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGI in chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. We suggest an approach to diagnosis and management of this problem.

  16. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases.

  17. Biomarkers of chronic alcohol misuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo P

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Philippe Gonzalo,1 Sylvie Radenne,2 Sylvie Gonzalo31Laboratoire de Biochimie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne, France; 2Service d'Hépatologie-Gastroentérologie, Hôpital de la Croix Rousse, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France; 3Laboratoire Biomnis, Lyon, FranceAbstract: Biological markers of chronic alcoholism can be divided into two groups: direct and indirect markers. Direct markers (mainly blood or serum and urine ethanol, ethylglucuronide, ethyl sulfate, and phosphatidylethanol directly track the intake of alcohol and vary in their sensitivity and kinetics of appearance and clearance. Indirect markers (mean corpuscular volume,γ-glutamyl transferase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and carbohydrate-deficient transferrin are biological parameters that are influenced by a steady and significant alcohol intake. We discuss the values of these tests and the relevance of their prescriptions for the clinical evaluation of heavy drinking. We indicate, when known, the pathophysiological mechanism of their elevations. We also discuss the amount and time of alcohol consumption required to give a positive result and the duration of abstinence required for the return to normal values. The forensic use of these biomarkers will not be considered in this review.Keywords: alcoholism, biomarker, CDT, relapse, alcohol-induced liver disease

  18. Chronic heart failure and micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, K K; Clark, A L; Cleland, J G

    2001-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with weight loss, and cachexia is a well-recognized complication. Patients have an increased risk of osteoporosis and lose muscle bulk early in the course of the disease. Basal metabolic rate is increased in HF, but general malnutrition may play a part in the development of cachexia, particularly in an elderly population. There is evidence for a possible role for micronutrient deficiency in HF. Selective deficiency of selenium, calcium and thiamine can directly lead to the HF syndrome. Other nutrients, particularly vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, are antioxidants and may have a protective effect on the vasculature. Vitamins B6, B12 and folate all tend to reduce levels of homocysteine, which is associated with increased oxidative stress. Carnitine, co-enzyme Q10 and creatine supplementation have resulted in improved exercise capacity in patients with HF in some studies. In this article, we review the relation between micronutrients and HF. Chronic HF is characterized by high mortality and morbidity, and research effort has centered on pharmacological management, with the successful introduction of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-adrenergic antagonists into routine practice. There is sufficient evidence to support a large-scale trial of dietary micronutrient supplementation in HF.

  19. Obinutuzumab for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioufol, Catherine; Salles, Gilles

    2014-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a frequent hematological malignancy that is incurable using standard approaches. Two anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb), rituximab and ofatumumab, have been approved for CLL treatment. A new glycoengineered type II humanized anti-CD20 mAb, obinutuzumab (GA101), has been developed and demonstrates increased activity against B-cell malignancies by inducing direct cell death and better antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In a recent randomized Phase III study in patients with newly diagnosed CLL and coexisting conditions, obinutuzumab plus chlorambucil demonstrated significant improvement in progression-free survival and several other outcome parameters, in contrast to rituximab plus chlorambucil. Grade 3-4 infusion-related reactions and neutropenia occurred more frequently in patients who received obinutuzumab compared with those who received rituximab; however, the rate of serious infections was similar. Obinutuzumab represents a promising new option for patients with CLL and must be investigated with other chemotherapy regimens or with new targeted agents.

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease and Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Rebić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial cell layer is responsible for molecular traffic between the blood and surrounding tissue, and endothelial integrity plays a pivotal role in many aspects of vascular function. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the main cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and its incidence and severity increase in direct proportion with kidney function decline. Non-traditional risk factors for CVDs, including endothelial dysfunction (ED, are highly prevalent in this population and play an important role in cardiovascular (CV events. ED is the first step in the development of atherosclerosis and its severity has prognostic value for CV events. Several risk markers have been associated with ED. Reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide plays a central role, linking kidney disease to ED, atherosclerosis, and CV events. Inflammation, loss of residual renal function, and insulin resistance are closely related to ED in CKD. ED may be followed by structural damage and remodelling that can precipitate both bleeding and thrombotic events. The endothelium plays a main role in vascular tone and metabolic pathways. ED is the first, yet potentially reversible step in the development of atherosclerosis and its severity has prognostic value for CV events.

  1. Chronic lead poisoning in horses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, H.D.; Burau, R.G.

    1973-05-01

    Chronic lead poisoning in horses was manifested as anorexia, loss of body weight, muscular weakness, anemia, laryngeal hemiplegia, and, terminally, inhalation pneumonia. Some deaths were sudden and unexplained. The lead content in liver specimens from 10 horses was greater than that considered indicative of lead intoxication; however, the lead content of blood was equivocal. The most conclusive laboratory finding was increased urine lead concentration after chelation therapy. The concentration of lead in a sample of vegetation considered to be representative of what a horse would eat if he was grazing in the area sampled was 325 ppM (oven-dry basis). It was determined that a 450-kg horse grazing grass of this lead content would consume 2.9 Gm of lead daily (6.4 mg/kg of body weight), an amount considered toxic for horses. Leaching lowered the calcium content of the forage but failed to reduce the lead concentration of the plants significantly, thus opening the possibility that winter rains might have influenced the onset of poisoning. Airborne fallout from a nearby lead smelter was proposed as the primary mode of pasture contamination.

  2. Gene Polymorphisms in Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja L. Laine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to conduct a review of the literature for gene polymorphisms associated with chronic periodontitis (CP susceptibility. A comprehensive search of the literature in English was performed using the keywords: periodontitis, periodontal disease, combined with the words genes, mutation, or polymorphism. Candidate gene polymorphism studies with a case-control design and reported genotype frequencies in CP patients were searched and reviewed. There is growing evidence that polymorphisms in the IL1, IL6, IL10, vitamin D receptor, and CD14 genes may be associated with CP in certain populations. However, carriage rates of the rare (-allele of any polymorphism varied considerably among studies and most of the studies appeared under-powered and did not correct for other risk factors. Larger cohorts, well-defined phenotypes, control for other risk factors, and analysis of multiple genes and polymorphisms within the same pathway are needed to get a more comprehensive insight into the contribution of gene polymorphisms in CP.

  3. CPAP in chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic Heart Failure (CHF represents worldwide a clinical condition with increasing prevalence, high social, economical and epidemiological impact. Even if new pharmacological and non-pharmacological approachs have been recently used, mortality remains high in general population and quality of life is poor in these patients. DISCUSSION The association between CHF and sleep disorders is frequent but still undervalued: sleep apnoeas in CHF produce negative effects on cardiovascular system and an aggravation of prognosis. CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is commonly used to treat sleep apnoeas in patients without cardiac involvement and it is also used in first line treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema thanks to its hemodynamic and ventilatory effects. The addition of nightly CPAP to standard aggressive medical therapy in patients with CHF and sleep apnoeas reduces the number of apnoeas, reduces the blood pressure, and the respiratory and cardiac rate, reduces the activation of sympathetic nervous system, the left ventricular volume and the hospitalization rate; besides CPAP increases the left ventricular ejection fraction, amd the oxygenation, it improves quality of life, tolerance to exercise and seems to reduce mortality in patients with a higher apnoeas suppression. CONCLUSIONS These implications suggest to investigate sleep apnoeas in patients with CHF in order to consider a possible treatment with CPAP. Further studies need to be developed to confirm the use of CPAP in patients with CHF without sleep disorders.

  4. Chronic widespread pain in spondyloarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pain associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA can be intense, persistent and disabling. It frequently has a multifactorial, simultaneously central and peripheral origin, and may be due to currently active inflammation, or joint damage and tissue destruction arising from a previous inflammatory condition. Inflammatory pain symptoms can be reduced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but many patients continue to experience moderate pain due to alterations in the mechanisms that regulate central pain, as in the case of the chronic widespread pain (CWP that characterises fibromyalgia (FM. The importance of distinguishing SpA and FM is underlined by the fact that SpA is currently treated with costly drugs such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors, and direct costs are higher in patients with concomitant CWP or FM than in those with FM or SpA alone. Optimal treatment needs to take into account symptoms such as fatigue, mood, sleep, and the overall quality of life, and is based on the use of tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine, rather than adjustments in the dose of anti-TNF agents or disease-modifying drugs.

  5. Probiotics and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppe, Laetitia; Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-11-01

    Probiotics are the focus of a thorough investigation as a natural biotreatment due to their various health-promoting effects and inherent ability to fight specific diseases including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, intestinal microbiota has recently emerged as an important player in the progression and complications of CKD. Because many of the multifactorial physiological functions of probiotics are highly strain specific, preselection of appropriate probiotic strains based on their expression of functional biomarkers is critical. The interest in developing new research initiatives on probiotics in CKD have increased over the last decade with the goal of fully exploring their therapeutic potentials. The efficacy of probiotics to decrease uremic toxin production and to improve renal function has been investigated in in vitro models and in various animal and human CKD studies. However to date, the quality of intervention trials investigating this novel CKD therapy is still lacking. This review outlines potential mechanisms of action and efficacy of probiotics as a new CKD management tool, with a particular emphasis on uremic toxin production and inflammation.

  6. Pathophysiological classification of chronic rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maibach Hilda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent consensus statements demonstrate the breadth of the chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS differential diagnosis. However, the classification and mechanisms of different CRS phenotypes remains problematic. Method Statistical patterns of subjective and objective findings were assessed by retrospective chart review. Results CRS patients were readily divided into those with (50/99 and without (49/99 polyposis. Aspirin sensitivity was limited to 17/50 polyp subjects. They had peripheral blood eosinophilia and small airways obstruction. Allergy skin tests were positive in 71% of the remaining polyp subjects. IgE was Conclusion CRS subjects were retrospectively classified in to 4 categories using the algorithm of (1 polyp vs. nonpolyp disease, (2 aspirin sensitivity in polyposis, and (3 sinus mucosal thickening vs. nasal osteomeatal disease (CT scan extent of disease for nonpolypoid subjects. We propose that the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for polyposis, aspirin sensitivity, humoral immunodeficiency, glandular hypertrophy, eosinophilia and atopy are primary mechanisms underlying these CRS phenotypes. The influence of microbial disease and other factors remain to be examined in this framework. We predict that future clinical studies and treatment decisions will be more logical when these interactive disease mechanisms are used to stratify CRS patients.

  7. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: present status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat, E; Rozman, C

    1995-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the form of leukemia which occurs most frequently in Western countries. Its etiology is unknown, and no relationship with viruses or genes has been demonstrated. Epidemiological data suggest that genetic and ambiental factors might be of some significance. Clinical features of CLL are due to the accumulation of leukemic cells in bone marrow and lymphoid organs as well as the immune disturbances that accompany the disease. The prognosis of patients with CLL varies. Treatment is usually indicated by the risk of the individual patient, which is clearly reflected by the stage of the disease. In the early stage (Binet A, Rai O) it is reasonable to defer therapy until disease progression is observed. By contrast, because their median survival is less than five years, patients with more advanced stages require therapy. For almost 50 years, no major advances in the management of CLL, which has revolved around the use of alkylating agents, have been made. In recent years, the therapeutic approach in patients with CLL has changed as a result of the introduction of combination chemotherapy regimens and, in particular, purine analogues. The latter are already the treatment of choice for patients not responding to standard therapies, and their role as front-line therapy is being investigated. Bone marrow transplants are also being increasingly used. It is to be hoped that in years to come the outcome of patients with CLL will be improved by these advances.

  8. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Saulle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  9. Chronic methylmercurialism in a horse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seawright, A.A.; Roberts, M.C.; Costigan, P.

    1978-02-01

    Chronic methylmercurialism was produced in a horse given 10 g methylmercury chloride over 10 weeks. Neurological signs, particularly proprioceptive disturbances, were apparent by the final week of dosing and became more severe thereafter. An exudative dermatitis, a reluctance to move, weight loss, reduced appetite and dullness were among the earlier clinical signs, and renal changes characterized by a steadily increasing BUN and glucosuria were detected later. Pathological lesions were confined to the kidneys and the nervous system. There was mild neuronal degeneration in the cerebral cortex and in the cerebellar cortex, axonal demyelination in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord and extensive degeneration of ganglion cells in the dorsal root ganglia. The blood organic mercury level, which had plateaued in the second month, increased rapidly in the last weeks of dosing with a sharp rise terminally. This pattern was repeated for the much lower inorganic mercury levels except for a terminal decrease. The proportion of inorganic mercury was five times greater in the dorsal root ganglia than elsewhere in the CNS, although total mercury levels were similar. Highest tissue mercury levels were found in the liver and kidneys, over 50% being in the form of inorganic mercury. As dealkylation of the methylmercury appeared to be more efficient in the dorsal root ganglia and the kidneys, inorganic mercury derived therefrom may have been responsible for some of the clinical and pathological features of this intoxication in the horse. 21 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  10. [Chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, T; Navarrete, J; Celestina, A

    1989-01-01

    Much has been written about gastric mucosae behavior and the occurrence of intestinal metaplasia. The aim of this paper is to learn something more about these matters in peruvian population. We selected 100 patients with endoscopically no localized lesions between 30 to 70 years of age. We took 8 samples of gastric mucosae in each patient which were carefully examined for the presence of inflammatory changes, settle the line type between antral and fundic mucosae and the frequency of intestinal metaplasia finding. The results showed disagreement between endoscopic and histological findings, so we conclude it is better to diagnose chronic gastritis on the basis of histological parameters. The line between antral and fundic mucosae was of the close type one found in 87% of all cases and it advanced proximally with increasing age. Intestinal metaplasia was present in 46% of the whole number of patients and the rate of occurrence increased in 50% over 50 years age. These findings will let us compare future investigations of gastric mucosae behavior with localized benign or malign lesions.

  11. Myeloperoxidase in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhana Rao, A; Anand, Usha; Anand, C V

    2011-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence implicate a role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is a well accepted fact that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk for CVD. MPO is a pro-oxidant enzyme which could be involved in the increased susceptibility of these patients to CVD. Hence, the levels of plasma MPO was determined in healthy controls as well as in patients with CKD [stratified with the level of their kidney failure as CKD stages II-V (end stage renal disease)]. Plasma MPO was assayed by a spectrophotometric method. Serum urea and creatinine were estimated on a clinical chemistry analyzer using standard laboratory procedures. The mean plasma MPO levels were significantly lower with advancing stages of renal failure (P < 0.001). There was a positive correlation between MPO and GFR (r = +0.89, P < 0.001) and a negative correlation with urea (r = -0.85, P < 0.001) and creatinine (r = -0.82, P < 0.001). While an inverse association was observed between plasma MPO and urea in CKD patients, such an association was not observed in control subjects (P = 0.43). In conclusion, the decline in plasma MPO levels may be due to the inhibitory effect of uraemic toxins on the enzyme.

  12. Personality characteristics in chronic and non-chronic allergic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buske-Kirschbaum, A; Ebrecht, M; Kern, S; Gierens, A; Hellhammer, D H

    2008-07-01

    In psycho-allergological research, the potential relevance of personality factors in the maintenance and exacerbation of atopic symptoms is still a matter of debate. The present study aimed to assess personality dimensions in chronic atopic disease, i.e. atopic dermatitis (AD) and in acute manifestation of atopy (seasonal allergic rhinitis, SAR). Further, the association of a potentially atopy-specific personality profile with atopy-relevant biological stress responses should be evaluated. Subjects suffering from AD (n=36), or SAR (n=20) and non-atopic controls (n=37) were investigated. To determine different personality domains, Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Questionnaire for Competence and Control (FKK) and the Questionnaire for Stress Vulnerability (MESA) were administered. To assess the relation between these personality dimensions and biological stress responses, atopics and non-atopic controls were exposed to a standardized laboratory stressor (Trier Social Stress Test, TSST). Endocrine (cortisol, ACTH), immune (total IgE, leukocyte subsets) and physiological (heart rates) measures were recorded before and after the stress test. When compared to healthy controls, AD and SAR patients showed significantly higher trait anxiety (STAI) and stress vulnerability in situations characterized by failure, job overload and social conflicts (MESA). Moreover, AD subjects scored significantly lower in self-competence and self-efficacy (FKK) as well as in recreation ability (MESA). No difference trait anxiety and stress vulnerability could be detected between AD and SAR subjects. Pearson correlational analyses yielded no significant correlation between the different personality domains and the endocrine, physiological and immunological stress responses. However, stress-induced increase in eosinophil number was significantly correlated with the perceived self-competence/self-efficacy in SAR patients.

  13. Substance P and Chronic Pain in Patients with Chronic Inflammation of Connective Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Lisowska

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that substance P (SP is involved in chronic joint inflammation, such as the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The goal of the research was to evaluate the correlation between chronic pain and changes in the SP level in patients with chronic inflammation of the connective tissue.Patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis were enrolled in this study. The relationship between chronic pain intensity and the serum SP concentration was evaluated in these groups of patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.The results showed a positive correlation between the serum SP concentrations and chronic pain intensity.1. The SP serum concentration was significantly different between the groups of patients with OA and RA. 2. There was a positive correlation between the serum SP concentration and chronic pain intensity in OA and RA patients.

  14. Chronic pancreatitis in India: the changing spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Udayakumar, N; Jayanthi, V

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of chronic pancreatitis in India is changing, with increased occurrence in older patients, incidence of milder disease including milder diabetes, increasing longevity, and increasing association with alcoholism and smoking

  15. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Prevention website. www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/index.htm . Updated August 13, 2012. Accessed July 24, 2013. [3] Besarab A, Coyne DW. Iron supplementation to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease. Nature Reviews ...

  16. Multiple Chronic Conditions Among Medicare Beneficiaries...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Individuals with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) present many challenges to the health care system, such as effective coordination of care and cost containment. To...

  17. Genetic influences on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls; Thomsen, Simon F; Vestbo, Jørgen;

    2010-01-01

    Genes that contribute to the risk of developing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) have been identified, but an attempt to accurately quantify the total genetic contribution to COPD has to our knowledge never been conducted....

  18. Chronic pain after childhood groin hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Kehlet, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to the well-described 10% risk of chronic pain affecting daily activities after adult groin hernia repair, chronic pain after childhood groin hernia repair has never been investigated. Studies of other childhood surgery before the age of 3 months suggest a risk of increased...... pain responsiveness later in life, but its potential relationship to chronic pain in adult life is unknown. METHODS: This was a nationwide detailed questionnaire study of chronic groin pain in adults having surgery for a groin hernia repair before the age of 5 years (n = 1075). RESULTS: The response...... the age of 3 months (n = 122) did not report groin pain more often or with higher intensity than other patients did. CONCLUSIONS: Groin pain in adult patients operated on for a groin hernia in childhood is uncommon and usually mild and occurs in relation to physical activity. Operation before the age of 3...

  19. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  20. Forced Use Treatment of Chronic Hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Twelve children (age 1 to 8 years with chronic (>1 year hemiparesis were treated by forced use, or constraint-induced, movement therapy at Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA.