WorldWideScience

Sample records for chronic low-back pain

  1. Low back pain - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause of ...

  2. Low back pain - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over time. If the spaces between the spinal nerves and spinal cord become narrowed, this can lead to spinal ... not improve with medicine and physical therapy include: Spinal surgery, only if you have nerve damage or the cause of your pain does ...

  3. Imaging studies in chronic low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging brings to difficult problems in chronic low back pain incomplete data showing that it will need a lot of time to find therapeutic solutions. Some comparisons are made between tomodensitometry, nuclear magnetic imaging, the disco-scanner, these technologies allow to find small lesions but the problem is complete when it is not possible to find anything with persistent pains. 125 refs

  4. Hypnosis treatment for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Gabriel; Fukui, Tenley; Jensen, Mark P; Thornby, John; Waldman, Karen L

    2010-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a significant healthcare problem, and many individuals with CLBP remain unresponsive to available interventions. Previous research suggests that hypnosis is effective for many chronic pain conditions; however, data to support its efficacy for CLBP are outdated and have been limited primarily to case studies. This pilot study indicated that a brief, 4-session standardized self-hypnosis protocol, combined with psycho-education, significantly and substantially reduced pain intensity and pain interference. Significant session-to-session improvements were also noted on pain ratings and mood states; however, follow-up data suggest that these benefits may not have been maintained across time in this sample. These findings need to be replicated and confirmed in a larger clinical trial, which could also assess the long-term effects of this treatment. PMID:20183738

  5. Prevalence of chronic low back pain: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Dalke Meucci; Anaclaudia Gastal Fassa; Neice Muller Xavier Faria

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate worldwide prevalence of chronic low back pain according to age and sex. METHODS We consulted Medline (PubMed), LILACS and EMBASE electronic databases. The search strategy used the following descriptors and combinations: back pain, prevalence, musculoskeletal diseases, chronic musculoskeletal pain, rheumatic, low back pain, musculoskeletal disorders and chronic low back pain. We selected cross-sectional population-based or cohort studies that assessed chronic low back pai...

  6. Nordic walking and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Hartvigsen, Jan; Puggaard, Lis;

    2006-01-01

    Low Back Pain is a major public health problem all over the western world. Active approaches including exercise in the treatment of low back pain results in better outcomes for patients, but it is not known exactly which types of back exercises are most beneficial or whether general physical...... activity provide similar benefits. Nordic Walking is a popular and fast growing type of exercise in Northern Europe. Initial studies have demonstrated that persons performing Nordic Walking are able to exercise longer and harder compared to normal walking thereby increasing their cardiovascular metabolism...

  7. Emotional Disturbance and Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, Charles P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Patients high in alientation and distrust may be poor compliers. Because only the somatic concern dimension predicted outcome, a single scale that measures this characteristic may be sufficient for effective identification of the potential good v poor responders to conservative treatment of low back pain. (Author)

  8. Prevalence of chronic low back pain: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Dalke Meucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To estimate worldwide prevalence of chronic low back pain according to age and sex.METHODS We consulted Medline (PubMed, LILACS and EMBASE electronic databases. The search strategy used the following descriptors and combinations: back pain, prevalence, musculoskeletal diseases, chronic musculoskeletal pain, rheumatic, low back pain, musculoskeletal disorders and chronic low back pain. We selected cross-sectional population-based or cohort studies that assessed chronic low back pain as an outcome. We also assessed the quality of the selected studies as well as the chronic low back pain prevalence according to age and sex.RESULTS The review included 28 studies. Based on our qualitative evaluation, around one third of the studies had low scores, mainly due to high non-response rates. Chronic low back pain prevalence was 4.2% in individuals aged between 24 and 39 years old and 19.6% in those aged between 20 and 59. Of nine studies with individuals aged 18 and above, six reported chronic low back pain between 3.9% and 10.2% and three, prevalence between 13.1% and 20.3%. In the Brazilian older population, chronic low back pain prevalence was 25.4%.CONCLUSIONS Chronic low back pain prevalence increases linearly from the third decade of life on, until the 60 years of age, being more prevalent in women. Methodological approaches aiming to reduce high heterogeneity in case definitions of chronic low back pain are essential to consistency and comparative analysis between studies. A standard chronic low back pain definition should include the precise description of the anatomical area, pain duration and limitation level.

  9. Chronic Low Back Pain: Toward an Integrated Psychosocial Assessment Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Jenny; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Integrated six dimensions of chronic low back pain (pain intensity, functional disability, attitudes toward pain, pain coping strategies, depression, illness behavior) to provide multidimensional patient profile. Data from 100 patients revealed presence of three distinct patient groups: patients who were in control, patients who were depressed and…

  10. Sex Differences in the Presentation of Chronic Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffer, Christine E.; Cassisi, Jeffrey E.; Ferraresi, Laurette M.; Lofland, Kenneth R.; McCracken, Lance M.

    2002-01-01

    Sex differences in 351 patients with chronic low back pain were examined. Biological, psychological, and psychosocial factors were considered. Sex differences in adaptive functioning were consistent with traditional gender roles. Significant interactions were found for sex and employment status, and sex and marital status. Retired women reported…

  11. OSTEOPAThic Health outcomes In Chronic low back pain: The OSTEOPATHIC Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Licciardone, John C; King, Hollis H.; Hensel, Kendi L.; Williams, Daniel G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) and ultrasound physical therapy (UPT) are commonly used for chronic low back pain. Although there is evidence from a systematic review and meta-analysis that OMT generally reduces low back pain, there are no large clinical trials that specifically assess OMT efficacy in chronic low back pain. Similarly, there is a lack of evidence involving UPT for chronic low back pain. Methods The OSTEOPAThic Health outcomes In Chronic low back pain (OSTEO...

  12. The Continuing and Growing Epidemic of Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Gatchel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of the great prevalence of chronic pain, it is not surprising that there have been a number of influential reports by the Institute of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and the World Health Organization that have documented the medical, social and economic problems caused by it, and the need for better pain-management programs. The present article briefly reviews these reports, and then focuses on three important areas that need to be considered when addressing the continuing and growing epidemic of one of the most prevalent types of chronic pain [chronic low back pain (CLBP]: the biopsychosocial model of chronic pain; the paradigm shift in medicine from a disease model to an illness model of CLBP; and a review of the treatment- and cost-effectiveness of interdisciplinary chronic pain management programs. This overview will serve as an important prelude to other topics related to low back pain included in this Special Issue of Healthcare. Topics covered will range from assessment and treatment approaches, to important psychosocial mediators/moderators such as coping and pain beliefs.

  13. [Diagnostics and minimally invasive therapy for chronic low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschmann, M A; Warzecha, J; Arabmotlagh, M; Mayer, A; V Stechow, D

    2004-12-01

    Chronic low back pain is one of the most frequent causes for seeking medical help in Germany. Many factors play a causal role in its pathogenesis. This is where the dilemma resides in narrowing down the diagnosis and deciding on subsequent therapeutic intervention. There is overall agreement on the concept of when it is expedient to initiate further diagnostic measures. With the exception of clear pathomorphological findings and the presence of cardinal symptoms or warning signs, so-called "red flags", primary back pain should not be subjected to any specific diagnostic tests and therapy during the first 3 months. We present well-established techniques for blockade, discography, and minimally invasive treatment options such as cryotherapy, procedures for thermal ablation, and intradiscal electrotherapy. Vertebroplasty, currently a frequently applied method, is also included in the discussion of minimally invasive treatment for chronic low back pain. PMID:15004745

  14. Balneotherapy for chronic low back pain: a randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesiktas, Nur; Karakas, Sinem; Gun, Kerem; Gun, Nuran; Murat, Sadiye; Uludag, Murat

    2012-10-01

    A large number of treatments were used for patients with chronic low back pain. Frequent episodes have been reported very high. Although balneotherapy was found effective in this disease, there are not well-designed studies. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of balneotherapy versus physical therapy in patients with chronic low back pain. Exercise was added to both treatment programs. Sixty patients with chronic low back pain were randomly divided into two groups. Physical modalities plus exercise were applied to group 1, and group 2 was received balneotherapy plus exercise for ten sessions. The following parameters were measured: visual analogue scale at rest and movement for pain, paracetamol dose, manual muscle test for lumber muscles, modified Schoeber' test, Oswestry disability index, and Short-Form 36 at the beginning and end of the therapies and at the 3 months follow-up. The statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS 10.0 program. Both groups achieved significant improvements within themselves. But balneotherapy groups were improved at back extensor muscle test (P pain. PMID:21960048

  15. Core strength training for patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Through core strength training, patients with chronic low back pain can strengthen their deep trunk muscles. However, independent training remains challenging, despite the existence of numerous core strength training strategies. Currently, no standardized system has been established analyzing and comparing the results of core strength training and typical resistance training. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the results of previous studies to explore the effectiveness ...

  16. Lumbar motion changes in chronic low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Rune M; Hartvigsen, Jan; Boyle, Eleanor;

    2014-01-01

    /SETTING: Secondary analysis of a subset of participants from a randomized clinical trial. PATIENT SAMPLE: 199 study participants with low back pain of more than six weeks' duration who had spinal motion measures obtained before and after the period of intervention. OUTCOME MEASURES: Lumbar region spinal kinematics...... sampled using a six-degree-of-freedom instrumented spatial linkage system. METHODS: Trained therapists collected regional lumbar spinal motion data at baseline and at 12 weeks follow up. The lumbar region spinal motion data were analyzed as a total cohort and relative to treatment modality (high...... half, the motion parameters included in the analysis. The spinal manipulation group changed to a smoother motion pattern (reduced jerk index) while the exercise groups did not. CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence that spinal motion changes can occur in chronic low back pain patients over a 12-week...

  17. DNA methylation of SPARC and chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashwood Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extracellular matrix protein SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, Rich in Cysteine has been linked to degeneration of the intervertebral discs and chronic low back pain (LBP. In humans, SPARC protein expression is decreased as a function of age and disc degeneration. In mice, inactivation of the SPARC gene results in the development of accelerated age-dependent disc degeneration concurrent with age-dependent behavioral signs of chronic LBP. DNA methylation is the covalent modification of DNA by addition of methyl moieties to cytosines in DNA. DNA methylation plays an important role in programming of gene expression, including in the dynamic regulation of changes in gene expression in response to aging and environmental signals. We tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation down-regulates SPARC expression in chronic LBP in pre-clinical models and in patients with chronic LBP. Results Our data shows that aging mice develop anatomical and behavioral signs of disc degeneration and back pain, decreased SPARC expression and increased methylation of the SPARC promoter. In parallel, we show that human subjects with back pain exhibit signs of disc degeneration and increased methylation of the SPARC promoter. Methylation of either the human or mouse SPARC promoter silences its activity in transient transfection assays. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that DNA methylation of a single gene plays a role in chronic pain in humans and animal models. This has important implications for understanding the mechanisms involved in chronic pain and for pain therapy.

  18. Chronic Low-Back Pain and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NCCIH Clinical Digest for health professionals Chronic Low-Back Pain and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science Says ... Guidelines, Scientific Literature, Info for Patients: Chronic Low-Back Pain and Complementary Health Approaches Spinal Manipulation The term ...

  19. Backing up the stories: The psychological and social costs of chronic low-back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Justin; Singh, Samantha B.; Garis, Sally; Diwan, Ashish D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic low-back pain is a widespread condition whose significance is overlooked. Previous studies have analyzed and evaluated the medical costs and physical symptoms of chronic low-back pain; however, few have looked beyond these factors. The purpose of this study was to analyze and evaluate the personal and psychosocial costs of chronic low-back pain. Methods To measure the various costs of chronic low-back pain, a questionnaire was generated using a visual analog scale, the Depr...

  20. Perspectives on physiotherapy guidelines for chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berger

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of chronic low back pain presents a world widedilemma to patients, physiotherapists and clinicians. There is scant evidence for prevention and treatment however it is now acknowledged that the use of  physiotherapy in a multidimensional context has proved the more appropriate model as a vital component of the collaborative approach required for effective pain management. The following article reviews the current literature, evaluates and combines the guidelines that have been proposed from various international studies to provide a practical approach to the management of chronic back pain. This approach recognizes a broad biopsychosocial model of health and the positive role of activity in health and healing with emphasis on function, rather than impairment. Therefore the development of a patient-centred rehabilitative approach has emerged that emphasizes the restoration of normal movement and function with the addition of physical modalities where appropriate. Recent advances in neurophysiology, the modulation of pain and its perception and the fact that biological systems are known to be greatly affected by electrical treatment provide a clearer rationale for the use of physical agents for rehabilitation of patients with pain and relateddisability. The modalities used in conjunction with active exercises include thermal, massage, electrical stimulation, traction, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (Tens, myofascial release, dry needling, mobilization and acupuncture. An algorithm is provided with the intention of developing protocols for breaking the pain cycle in both nociceptive and neuropathic pain states and in reducing inflammation which is a component of both peripheral and central sensitization. Pain rehabilitation is a useful and cost-effective approach to chronic pain management and makes patients’ responsible partners in their own progress. It encourages planning, pacing of activities and activity related

  1. Determining the Optimal Number of Spinal Manipulation Sessions for Chronic Low-Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Number of Spinal Manipulation Sessions for Chronic Low-Back Pain Share: holding_lower_back_pain.jpg © Matthew Lester ... print. Additional Resources Spinal Manipulation for Low-Back Pain Low-Back Pain Information Publication Date: October 16, 2013 Sign ...

  2. Radiofrequency ablation for chronic low back pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Laura E Leggett; Lesley JJ Soril; Diane L Lorenzetti; Tom Noseworthy; Rodney Steadman; Simrandeep Tiwana; Fiona Clement

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), a procedure using heat to interrupt pain signals in spinal nerves, is an emerging treatment option for chronic low back pain. Its clinical efficacy has not yet been established. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of RFA for chronic low back pain associated with lumbar facet joints, sacroiliac joints, discogenic low back pain and the coccyx. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted. Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL and the Cochrane Lib...

  3. Catastrophizing, Functional Disability and Pain Reports in Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that subjective reports of pain severity, pain intensity and functional disability correlate positively with catastrophizing.PATIENTS: Adults with chronic low back pain for six months or longer presenting to a tertiary care Pain Management Unit.METHODS: Catastrophizing was measured with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) in 40 subjects (23 males, 17 females). Functional disability was measured with the Pain Disability Index and pain severity/intensity was q...

  4. Minimally invasive spine surgery in chronic low back pain patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoor, A. B.; Oner, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 85%. The pathophysiology of LBP can be various depending on the underlying problem. Only in about 10% of the patients specific underlying disease processes can be identified. Patients with scoliosis, spondylolisthesis, herniated

  5. Profile of sexuality in Moroccan chronic low back pain patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexual life had an important role in preserving the good quality of life for patients and for their partner. Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP) as other musculoskeletal diseases may affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning. The purpose of this study is to describe the impact of CLBP on the sexual life of patients and to identify the factors that affect their Sexual Quality of Life (SQOL). Methods One hundred CLBP sexually active patients were included. Patients and disease Characteristics were collected. Impact on sexual life (sexual intercourse and SQOL) was also assessed. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to analyze significant determinants associated with the SQOL disturbance. Results Eighty one percent of our patients complained about sexual difficulties related to CLBP. Libido decrease and painful intercourse position were reported respectively in 14.8 and 97.5% of cases. The most pain generating position was supine. Mean of sexual intercourse frequency decrease was at −10.4 ± 4.8 per month. SQOL score mean was at 44.6 ± 17.4%. Men suffered more than women from sexual problems (respectively 90% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). Men had worse SQOL than women (respectively 38.9 ± 17.2 vs. 50.3 ± 15.7%; p = 0.001). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that advanced age (p = 0.009), poor functional status (p = 0.03), male gender (p = 0.03) and sexual intercourse frequency decrease (p = 0.005) were the independent variables associated with the SQOL disturbance. Conclusion Our study suggests that sexuality is profoundly disturbed in CLBP patients; both their sexual intercourse and SQOL were affected. This disturbance seems to be associated with patient and disease characteristics. Sexuality should be taken into account in managing CLBP patients. PMID:23413914

  6. Profile of sexuality in Moroccan chronic low back pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahouq Hanane

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual life had an important role in preserving the good quality of life for patients and for their partner. Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP as other musculoskeletal diseases may affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning. The purpose of this study is to describe the impact of CLBP on the sexual life of patients and to identify the factors that affect their Sexual Quality of Life (SQOL. Methods One hundred CLBP sexually active patients were included. Patients and disease Characteristics were collected. Impact on sexual life (sexual intercourse and SQOL was also assessed. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to analyze significant determinants associated with the SQOL disturbance. Results Eighty one percent of our patients complained about sexual difficulties related to CLBP. Libido decrease and painful intercourse position were reported respectively in 14.8 and 97.5% of cases. The most pain generating position was supine. Mean of sexual intercourse frequency decrease was at −10.4 ± 4.8 per month. SQOL score mean was at 44.6 ± 17.4%. Men suffered more than women from sexual problems (respectively 90% vs. 72%; p = 0.02. Men had worse SQOL than women (respectively 38.9 ± 17.2 vs. 50.3 ± 15.7%; p = 0.001. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that advanced age (p = 0.009, poor functional status (p = 0.03, male gender (p = 0.03 and sexual intercourse frequency decrease (p = 0.005 were the independent variables associated with the SQOL disturbance. Conclusion Our study suggests that sexuality is profoundly disturbed in CLBP patients; both their sexual intercourse and SQOL were affected. This disturbance seems to be associated with patient and disease characteristics. Sexuality should be taken into account in managing CLBP patients.

  7. Mediators of Yoga and Stretching for Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Sherman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although yoga is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for its benefits. In a trial comparing yoga to intensive stretching and self-care, we explored whether physical (hours of back exercise/week, cognitive (fear avoidance, body awareness, and self-efficacy, affective (psychological distress, perceived stress, positive states of mind, and sleep, and physiological factors (cortisol, DHEA mediated the effects of yoga or stretching on back-related dysfunction (Roland-Morris Disability Scale (RDQ. For yoga, 36% of the effect on 12-week RDQ was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 18% by sleep disturbance, 9% by hours of back exercise, and 61% by the best combination of all possible mediators (6 mediators. For stretching, 23% of the effect was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 14% by days of back exercise, and 50% by the best combination of all possible mediators (7 mediators. In open-ended questions, ≥20% of participants noted the following treatment benefits: learning new exercises (both groups, relaxation, increased awareness, and the benefits of breathing (yoga, benefits of regular practice (stretching. Although both self-efficacy and hours of back exercise were the strongest mediators for each intervention, compared to self-care, qualitative data suggest that they may exert their benefits through partially distinct mechanisms.

  8. Biopsychosocial functioning and pain self-efficacy in chronic low back pain patients

    OpenAIRE

    Alex L. Koenig, MS; Amy E. Kupper, MS; Jay R. Skidmore, PhD; Karly M. Murphy, BA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between biopsychosocial functioning and pain severity and to evaluate whether pain self-efficacy (PSE) mediates this relationship. This study used archival data from a multidisciplinary pain management program. Participants were 99 individuals (69% female) with chronic low back pain who completed measures of biological, psychological, and social functioning; pain severity; and PSE at admission. They ranged in age from 18 to 72 yr (mean = 4...

  9. Electronic diary assessment of pain-related fear, attention to pain, and pain intensity in chronic low back pain patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J.; Peters, M.L.; Patijn, J.; Schouten, E.G.; Vlaeyen, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships between pain-related fear, attention to pain, and pain intensity in daily life in patients with chronic low back pain. An experience sampling methodology was used in which electronic diary data were collected by means of palmtop computers from 40 chro

  10. Expectations about recovery from acute non-specific low back pain predict absence from usual work due to chronic low back pain : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallegraeff, J.M.; Krijnen, W.P.; van der Schans, C.P.; de Greef, M.H.G.

    2012-01-01

    Question: Do negative expectations in patients after the onset of acute low back pain increase the odds of absence from usual work due to progression to chronic low back pain? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of prospective inception cohort studies. Participants: Adults with acute or sub

  11. Radiofrequency Ablation for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Leggett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA, a procedure using heat to interrupt pain signals in spinal nerves, is an emerging treatment option for chronic low back pain. Its clinical efficacy has not yet been established.

  12. The Continuing and Growing Epidemic of Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Gatchel, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the great prevalence of chronic pain, it is not surprising that there have been a number of influential reports by the Institute of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and the World Health Organization that have documented the medical, social and economic problems caused by it, and the need for better pain-management programs. The present article briefly reviews these reports, and then focuses on three important areas that need to be considered when addressing the continuing a...

  13. [A comparison of multimodal programmes of patient education in the rehabilitation of chronic low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfeld, M; Küch, D; Greitemann, B; Dibbelt, S; Salewski, C; Franke, G H; Liebenau, A

    2010-04-01

    There is growing evidence for the effectiveness of multimodal intervention concepts for chronic low back pain in the international literature, and accordingly several German rehabilitation programmes for the treatment of chronic low back pain patients have been developed. Focus of this paper is to describe and compare frequently used German multimodal intervention programmes for in- and outpatient rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. Programmes were chosen by searching the most relevant online resources as well as the online pages of Deutsche Rentenversicherung and Zentrum Patientenschulung during September 2008. Keywords guiding the search were: Patientenschulung, Rückenschmerzen, Manual, psychologische multimodale Interventionskonzepte, Rehabilitationsprogramm, psychology, intervention, low back pain, manual and therapy. By this means, six manually supported multimodal rehabilitation programmes for the in- and outpatient therapy of patients with chronic back pain could be identified: Göttinger Rücken-Intensiv-Programm (GRIP), the psychological programme for chronic head- and low back pain, the Münchner Rücken-Intensiv-Programm (MRIP), Back to Balance, Arbeiten und Leben--Back to Balance (ALEBABA) und Rückenfit: Lebenslust statt Krankheitsfrust. These programmes are depicted and compared with regard to their potentials and limitations in supporting the rehabilitation process of patients with chronic low back pain. While comparing the programmes, a number of similarities between them can be detected, as well as pronounced differences, e. g., regarding settings and complexity. In most programmes, lack of appropriate evaluation studies and lack of aftercare turn out to be critical aspects. PMID:20446189

  14. Effective physical treatment for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, C G

    2004-01-01

    It is now feasible to adopt an evidence-based approach when providing physical treatment for patients with chronic LBP. A summary of the efficacy of a range of physical treatments is provided in Table 1. The evidence-based primary care options are exercise, laser, massage, and spinal manipulation; however, the latter three have small or transient effects that limit their value as therapies for chronic LBP. In contrast, exercise produces large reductions in pain and disability, a feature that suggests that exercise should play a major role in the management of chronic LBP. Physical treatments, such as acupuncture, backschool, hydrotherapy, lumbar supports, magnets, TENS, traction, ultrasound, Pilates therapy, Feldenkrais therapy, Alexander technique, and craniosacral therapy are either of unknown value or ineffective and so should not be considered. Outside of primary care, multidisciplinary treatment or functional restoration is effective; however, the high cost probably means that these programs should be reserved for patients who do not respond to cheaper treatment options for chronic LBP. Although there are now effective treatment options for chronic LBP, it needs to be acknowledged that the problem of chronic LBP is far from solved. Though treatments can provide marked improvements in the patient's condition, the available evidence suggests that the typical chronic LBP patient is left with some residual pain and disability. Developing new, more powerful treatments and refining the current group of known effective treatments is the challenge for the future. PMID:15062718

  15. Static and dynamic postural stability in subjects with and without chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Heta Haresh Thakkar; Senthil Kumar E

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study were undertaken to compare the static and dynamic postural stability among chronic low back pain and normal subjects. Most of the studies have been conducted on sports professionals. The present study focuses on recreationally active population, for which the activity levels are comparatively lesser. Methods: Thirty subjects (15 Chronic Low back Pain and 15 Normal subjects) were recruited randomly who's demographic are not varied. The static and dynamic postur...

  16. Comparison between Epidural Block vs. High Intensity Laser Therapy for Controlling Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Badiozaman Radpay; Mahtab Poorzamany Nejat Kermany; Mastneh Dahi-Taleghani

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic low back pain is among a wide spread musculoskeletal conditions that is related to disability with high economy cost. There are several treatment modalities for controlling chronic low back pain (CLBP), among them high intensity laser therapy (HILT) and epidural blocks (EB) use more commonly. This study aimed to evaluate the benefits and hazards of each of these two methods.Materials and Methods: We designed a randomized controlled double blind study during 24 months.101 p...

  17. Effect of Togu-exercise on Lumbar Back Strength of Women with Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Dong-Hyun; Park,

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study analyzed the effect of the Togu exercise program on the lumbar back strength of middle-aged women who did not perform regular exercise, and presents an effective exercise method for middle-aged women with chronic low back pain symptom. [Subjects] The subjects were 16 women with chronic low back pain attending N University, Chungcheong-do, Korea. [Methods] Height, weight, body fat, and body mass index (BMI) were measured using a body composition analyzer (Inbody 720...

  18. Physiotherapy for sleep disturbance in chronic low back pain: a feasibility randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Mechelen Willem; Tully Mark A; Guerin Suzanne; Lonsdale Chris; Kelly Clare; O'Donoghue Grainne; Eadie Jennifer; Hurley Deirdre A; McDonough Suzanne M; Boreham Colin AG; Heneghan Conor; Daly Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Sleep disturbance is becoming increasingly recognised as a clinically important symptom in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP, low back pain >12 weeks), associated with physical inactivity and depression. Current research and international clinical guidelines recommend people with CLBP assume a physically active role in their recovery to prevent chronicity, but the high prevalence of sleep disturbance in this population may be unknowingly limiting their ability to par...

  19. Motor control or graded activity exercises for chronic low back pain? A randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    McAuley James H; Tonkin Lois; Nicholas Michael; Hodges Paul W; Maher Chris G; Latimer Jane; Macedo Luciana G; Stafford Ryan

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic low back pain remains a major health problem in Australia and around the world. Unfortunately the majority of treatments for this condition produce small effects because not all patients respond to each treatment. It appears that only 25–50% of patients respond to exercise. The two most popular types of exercise for low back pain are graded activity and motor control exercises. At present however, there are no guidelines to help clinicians select the best treatment...

  20. Improvement in chronic low back pain in an obese patient with topiramate use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anita; Kulkarni, Archana; Ramanujam, Vendhan; Zheng, Lu; Treacy, Erin

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate efficacy, benefit, and potential use of topiramate in treating obese patients with chronic low back pain. This is a case report from an outpatient academic pain multidisciplinary clinical center. The patient was a 30-year-old morbidly obese (body mass index [BMI]: 61.4 kg/m(2)) female suffering from chronic low back pain. With a known association between obesity and chronic low back pain, and a possible role of topiramate in treating both simultaneously, the patient was started on a therapeutic trial of topiramate. Over a period of a 12-week topiramate therapy, the patient experienced clinically meaningful and significant weight loss as well as improvement in her chronic low back pain and functionality. With more substantial evidence, pain physicians may start considering using topiramate in the multimodal management of obesity-related chronic low back pain based on their thoughtful consideration of the drug's efficacy and side effects and the patient's comorbidities and preferences. PMID:26095484

  1. Does anterior trunk pain predict a different course of recovery in chronic low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagopoulos, John; Hancock, Mark J; Kongsted, Alice; Hush, Julia; Kent, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Patient characteristics associated with the course and severity of low back pain (LBP) and disability have been the focus of extensive research, however, known characteristics do not explain much of the variance in outcomes. The relationship between anterior trunk pain (ATP) and LBP has not been...... explored, though mechanisms for visceral referred pain have been described. Study objectives were: (1) determine prevalence of ATP in chronic LBP patients, (2) determine whether ATP is associated with increased pain and disability in these patients, and (3) evaluate whether ATP predicts the course of pain...... and disability in these patients. In this study, spinal outpatient department patients mapped the distribution of their pain and patients describing pain in their chest, abdomen or groin were classified with ATP. Generalized estimating equations were performed to investigate the relationship between...

  2. Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body in numerous ways, including causing muscle tension. Backpack overload in children : Low back pain unrelated to ... is unusual in pre-teen children. However, a backpack overloaded with schoolbooks and supplies can strain the ...

  3. Predictors of response and adherence to outpatient multimodal rehabilitation in patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Dhondt, Evy; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Cagnie, Barbara; Adnan, Rahmat; Schouppe, Stijn; Van Akeleyen, Jens; Logghe, Tine; Danneels, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: There is a growing need to identify patient pre-treatment characteristics that could predict the responsiveness to specific interventions. Therefore this study aimed to identify predictors of response to outpatient multimodal rehabilitation (favourable versus non-favourable outcome) and predictors of therapeutic adherence (drop-out versus adherence to therapy) in patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: A total of 273 chronic low back patients participated in an e...

  4. Effectiveness of mindfulness meditation (Vipassana) in the management of chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Sangram G

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is challenging to treat with its significant psychological and cognitive behavioural element involved. Mindfulness meditation helps alter the behavioural response in chronic pain situations. Significant body of research in the filed of mindfulness meditation comes from the work of Dr Kabat-Zinn. The current evidence in the field, though not grade one, shows that there is a place for mindfulness meditation in managing chronic pain conditions including CLBP....

  5. Acupuncture for Chronic Non-Specific Low Back Pain: A Case Series Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture in treating chronic non-specific low back pain. Methods: Ten patients with chronic low back pain were selected to receive 9 acupuncture treatments over a three-week period with point selection based on syndrome differentiation in Chinese medicine. The BROM Instrument for assessment of back range of motion; subjective evaluation with Visual Analog Scale of Pain (VASP) ratings, Oswestry Disability ratings, objective measurements including Algometry, and Flexion and Extension ratings to investigate the range of motion were used for comparing the large, medium and small effect sizes of baseline, treatment and follow-up phases. Results: Clinical significance of pain relief was shown in all parameters assessed. A large effect size was detected in VASP, Oswestry and Algometry. A small effect size was demonstrated in Flexion/Extension. Needling over short period time (3 weeks) could relieve the pain, but the muscular-skeletal function measured by BROM persists. To treat patients exclusively by needling for statistical purposes can not be justified, because by merely relieving pain, permanent improvement in function may not be achieved. Conclusion: Acupuncture offers an effective alternative for the clinical management of chronic low back pain, significant improvement in most of the parameters evaluated, but the functional improvement was not as satisfactory as pain relieving. Further study with larger sample size focuses on long-term efficacy and functional improvement for chronic low back pain is recommended.

  6. Generalized deep-tissue hyperalgesia in patients with chronic low-back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Søren; Manniche, Claus; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas;

    2007-01-01

    demonstrated in a group of patients with chronic low-back pain with intervertebral disc herniation. Twelve patients with MRI confirmed lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and 12 age and sex matched controls were included. Subjects were exposed to quantitative nociceptive stimuli to the infraspinatus and...... in the anterior tibialis muscle compared to controls. In conclusion, generalized deep-tissue hyperalgesia was demonstrated in chronic low-back pain patients with radiating pain and MRI confirmed intervertebral disc herniation, suggesting that this central sensitization should also be addressed in the...

  7. Radiofrequency denervation of lumbar facet joints in the treatment of chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Radoš, Ivan; Elezović, Neven

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is the most common pain syndrome and a global health burden. The etiology in most cases is multifactorial and the facet joints can be a source of low back pain. The facet joint is innervated by the medial branch of the dorsal ramus of the spinal nerve. Facet joint disturbances can be responsible for 10% to 50% of all cases of chronic lumbar pain. In the absence of predictive clinical or radiologic findings, nerve blocks are considered to be the best way of diagnosing presumed...

  8. Yoga attitudes in chronic low back pain: Roles of catastrophizing and fear of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Martha A; Thorn, Beverly E

    2015-08-01

    Chronic low back pain is a significant public health problem and, although underused, yoga may be an effective complementary treatment. The current study examined associations of pain catastrophizing and fear of movement with attitudes toward yoga in adults with chronic low back pain. Participants completed three quantitative questionnaires assessing specific constructs: beliefs about yoga, fear of movement, and pain catastrophizing. A semi-structured in-person interview was then conducted to obtain specific pain-related information. Hierarchical regression and mediational analyses were used to test hypotheses. Consistent with the fear-avoidance model of chronic pain, catastrophizing and fear of movement were negatively associated with yoga attitudes. Specifically, fear of movement was a mediator between catastrophizing and attitudes toward yoga. Individuals with higher levels of catastrophizing and fear of movement may be less likely to consider a pain treatment involving physical movement. PMID:26256134

  9. Effectiveness of Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judith A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Evaluated effects of group behavioral therapy including aerobic exercise, behavioral therapy alone, and aerobic exercise alone on pain and physical and psychological disability among mildly disabled chronic low-back-pain patients (n=96). The combined behavioral therapy and exercise group improved significantly more pretreatment to posttreatment…

  10. What is the effect of sensory discrimination training on chronic low back pain? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kälin, Samuel; Rausch-Osthoff, Anne-Kathrin; Bauer, Christoph Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Sensory discrimination training (SDT) for people with chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a novel approach based on theories of the cortical reorganization of the neural system. SDT aims to reverse cortical reorganization, which is observed in chronic pain patients. SDT is still a developing therapeutic approach and its effects have not been systematically reviewed. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate if SDT decreases pain and improves function in people with CLBP. Method...

  11. The Effectiveness of Pilates Exercise in People with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Cherie Wells; Kolt, Gregory S; Paul Marshall; Bridget Hill; Andrea Bialocerkowski

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP) through a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Data Sources A search for RCTs was undertaken using Medical Search Terms and synonyms for “Pilates” and “low back pain” within the maximal date range of 10 databases. Databases included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Cochrane Library; Medline; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; ProQuest: Health ...

  12. Physiotherapy for sleep disturbance in chronic low back pain: a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Deirdre A

    2010-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is becoming increasingly recognised as a clinically important symptom in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP, low back pain >12 weeks), associated with physical inactivity and depression. Current research and international clinical guidelines recommend people with CLBP assume a physically active role in their recovery to prevent chronicity, but the high prevalence of sleep disturbance in this population may be unknowingly limiting their ability to participate in exercise-based rehabilitation programmes and contributing to poor outcomes. There is currently no knowledge concerning the effectiveness of physiotherapy on sleep disturbance in people with chronic low back pain and no evidence of the feasibility of conducting randomized controlled trials that comprehensively evaluate sleep as an outcome measure in this population.

  13. Mindfulness, functioning and catastrophizing after multidisciplinary pain management for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Emma Louise; Atherton, Rachel Jane; Robertson, Noelle; Walsh, David Andrew; Gillett, Raphael

    2012-03-01

    We examined mindfulness in people with chronic low back pain who were attending a multidisciplinary pain management programme. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline (n=116) and after a 3-month cognitive-behaviourally informed multidisciplinary intervention (n=87). Self-reported mindfulness was measured before and after the intervention, and relationships were explored between mindfulness, disability, affect and pain catastrophizing. Mindfulness increased following participation in the intervention, and greater mindfulness was predictive of lower levels of disability, anxiety, depression and catastrophizing, even when pain severity was controlled. Mediator analyses suggested that the relationship between mindfulness and disability was mediated by catastrophizing. It is possible that cognitive-behavioural interventions and processes can affect both catastrophizing and mindfulness. PMID:22240149

  14. Comparison of Efficacy of Neural Therapy and Physical Therapy in Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Atalay, Nilgun Simsir; Sahin, Fusun; ATALAY, Ali; Akkaya, Nuray

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of neural therapy, and physical therapy on level of pain, disability, quality of life, and psychological status in patients with chronic low back pain. Patients admitted to the physical therapy and rehabilitation outpatient clinic with the complaint of low back pain of at least 3 months duration. Group 1 (n=27), physical therapy (PT, hotpack, ultrasound, TENS 15 sessions), group 2 (n=33), neural therapy (NT, 1:1 mixture of 20 mg/mL...

  15. Living with chronic low back pain: a metasynthesis of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Sherrill; Liossi, Christina

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this qualitative metasynthesis is to articulate the knowledge gained from a review of qualitative studies of patients' experiences of chronic low back pain. METHODS Meta-ethnographic methodology guided the review of 33 articles representing 28 studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2012. A systematic comparison of the main themes from each study was conducted and 'synthesised' to create superordinate themes. RESULTS Three overarching interrelated themes were identified: the impact of chronic low back pain on self; relationships with significant others that incorporated two streams - health professionals and the organisation of care and relationships with family and friends; coping with chronic low back pain. Coping strategies were predominantly physical therapies, medication and avoidance behaviours with very few successful strategies reported. Professional and family support, self-efficacy, motivation, work conditions and exercise opportunities influenced pain experiences. Review authors' recommendations included psychological therapies, education, the facilitation of self-management strategies and support groups. DISCUSSION The review substantiates chronic low back pain as complex, dynamic and multidimensional, underpinned by experiences of persistent distressing pain, loss, and lowered self-worth, stigma, depression, premature aging, fear of the future. Future research should address the paucity of longitudinal studies, loss and issues of ethnicity, gender, ageing. PMID:23585633

  16. Biospectral analysis of the bladder channel point in chronic low back pain patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Alberto Espinosa; Nava, Juan José Godina; Segura, Miguel Ángel Rodriguez; Bastida, Albino Villegas

    2012-10-01

    Chronic pain is the main cause of disability in the productive age people and is a public health problem that affects both the patient and society. On the other hand, there isn't any instrument to measure it; this is only estimated using subjective variables. The healthy cells generate a known membrane potential which is part of a network of biologically closed electric circuits still unstudied. It is proposed a biospectral analysis of a bladder channel point as a diagnosis method for chronic low back pain patients. Materials and methods: We employed a study group with chronic low back pain patients and a control group without low back pain patients. The visual analog scale (VAS) to determine the level of pain was applied. Bioelectric variables were measured for 10 seconds and the respective biostatistical analyses were made. Results: Biospectral analysis on frequency domain shows a depression in the 60-300 Hz frequency range proportional to the chronicity of low back pain compared against healthy patients.

  17. Effects of Pilates Exercise Programs in People With Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Patti, A; Bianco, A.; Paoli, A; Messina, G.; Montalto, MA; Bellafiore, M; Battaglia, G.; Iovane, A; A. Palma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Pilates method has recently become a fast-growing popular way of exercise recommended for healthy individuals and those engaged in rehabilitation. Several published studies have examined the effects of Pilates method in people with chronic low back pain (LBP). The objective of this study is to describe and provide an extensive overview of the scientific literature comparing the effectiveness of the Pilates method on pain and disability in patients with chronic nonspecific LBP. Th...

  18. Comparison of Contraction Rates of Abdominal Muscles of Chronic Low Back Pain Patients in Different Postures

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Kang Hoon; Baek, Il-Hun; Goo, Bong-Oh

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the contraction rates of abdominal muscles in relation to the posture of chronic lumbar pain patients and normal subjects. [Subjects] The subjects were 17 chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients and 17 normal people between the ages of 20 and 59. [Methods] Experimental postures included a supine position, a sitting position, and a standing position. Measurements were taken at rest and during abdominal contraction. The measurement at rest was taken during expiration...

  19. The Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Auricular Point Acupressure for Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Chun Lin; Chao Hsing Yeh; Lung-Chang Chien; Morone, Natalia E.; Glick, Ronald M.; Albers, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Auricular point acupressure (APA) is a promising treatment for pain management. Few studies have investigated the physiological mechanisms of APA analgesics. Method. In this pilot randomized clinical trial (RCT), a 4-week APA treatment was used to manage chronic low back pain (CLBP). Sixty-one participants were randomized into a real APA group (n = 32) or a sham APA group (n = 29). Blood samples, pain intensity, and physical function were collected at baseline and after 4 weeks of...

  20. Effects of attention on the control of locomotion in individuals with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kerckhoff Frederick; Pont Menno; Stins John F; Lamoth Claudine JC; Beek Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background People who suffer from low back pain (LBP) exhibit an abnormal gait pattern, characterized by shorter stride length, greater step width, and an impaired thorax-pelvis coordination which may undermine functional walking. As a result, gait in LBP may require stronger cognitive regulation compared to pain free subjects thereby affecting the degree of automaticity of gait control. Conversely, because chronic pain has a strong attentional component, diverting attention away fro...

  1. Biopsychosocial functioning and pain self-efficacy in chronic low back pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex L. Koenig, MS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between biopsychosocial functioning and pain severity and to evaluate whether pain self-efficacy (PSE mediates this relationship. This study used archival data from a multidisciplinary pain management program. Participants were 99 individuals (69% female with chronic low back pain who completed measures of biological, psychological, and social functioning; pain severity; and PSE at admission. They ranged in age from 18 to 72 yr (mean = 42.6, standard deviation = 12.1. Structural equation modeling and bootstrapping techniques were used to test the significance of the mediated model. As we predicted, lower biological functioning (beta = −0.011; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.019 to −0.004, p = 0.002 and social functioning (beta = −0.009; 95% CI = −0.016 to −0.003, p = 0.007 were found to significantly predict higher pain severity, and lower social functioning was found to significantly predict lower PSE (beta = 0.196; 95% CI = −0.130 to 0.273, p = 0.002. PSE did not mediate the relationship between biopsychosocial functioning and pain severity, and psychological functioning did not significantly predict pain severity or PSE. These findings suggest that social functioning is an important factor in predicting outcomes and has a number of treatment implications.

  2. The Efficacy of a Perceptive Rehabilitation on Postural Control in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Teresa; Fusco, Augusto; Iosa, Marco; Grasso, Maria R.; Spadini, Ennio; Paolucci, Stefano; Saraceni, Vincenzo M.; Morone, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain have a worse posture, probably related to poor control of the back muscles and altered perception of the trunk midline. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a perceptive rehabilitation in terms of stability and pain relief in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty patients were…

  3. Randomized controlled trials in industrial low back pain. Part 3. Subacute/chronic pain interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, S J; Watanabe, T K; Radack, K L

    1997-04-01

    The most significant costs attributed to settlement of workplace back injury claims are related to chronic low back pain (LBP). Unfortunately, our knowledge of this fact has not led to a reduction of the considerable costs paid out annually by employers and insurers to deal with the chronic pain syndrome. This article is the third in a series of reviews on randomized controlled trials found in the English language medical literature between 1975 and 1993. Of more than 4,000 LBP citations, 35 studies met-the selection criteria of randomization, reasonable concurrent controls and work return comparisons. This review focuses on the 12 studies utilizing nonsurgical interventions for subacute and chronic LBP, including multidisciplinary pain clinics, exercise, cognitive-behavioral strategies, and others. A 26-point quality system was again used to compare the methodologic rigor of each study. The majority of prospective studies investigating return to work after chronic LBP have methodological limitations; additional research is clearly needed to more confidently answer the question of what interventions improve work capacity in patients with chronic LBP. PMID:9111463

  4. Graded exposure for chronic low back pain in older adults : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leonhardt, Corinna; Kuss, Katrin; Becker, Annette; Basler, Heinz-Dieter; de jong, Jeroen; Flatau, Brigitta; Laekeman, Marjan; Mattenklodt, Peter; Schuler, Matthias; Vlaeyen, Johan; Quint, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Fear-avoidance beliefs in older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) can lead to disability. Graded exposure-based active physical therapy could be an option to enhance physical ability in older patients with CLBP. The purpose of this study was to develop a standardized g

  5. Injection therapy for subacute and chronic low back pain: an updated Cochrane review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, J.B.; Bie, R.A. de; Vet, H.C. de; Hildebrandt, J.; Nelemans, P.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). OBJECTIVE: To determine if injection therapy is more effective than placebo or other treatments for patients with subacute or chronic low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The effectiveness of injection therapy for low ba

  6. Acute and Chronic Low Back Pain: Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D.; Craig, Kenneth D.

    1994-01-01

    Divided 90 chronic low back pain patients into those who demonstrated signs that were congruent or incongruent with underlying anatomical and physiological principles. Low socioeconomic status, compensation claims, use of opiate analgesics, greater disability, catastrophizing cognitions, stronger emotionality, and passive coping were more…

  7. Short-term outcomes of a back school program for chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodselmans, AP; Jaegers, SM; Goeken, LN; Göeken, L.N.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To assess the short-term outcome of a back school program for patients suffering from chronic, nonspecific low back pain (LBP). Design: Quasi-experimental cohort study with a waiting list control group. Setting: Dutch rehabilitation department. Participants: Experimental group (n = 14) pa

  8. Treating co-occurring chronic low back pain & generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Kristina; Peters-Watral, Brenda

    2016-01-16

    The complex, bidirectional correlation between chronic low back pain (CLBP) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), common ailments in primary care, can increase the risk of inadequate treatment. This article will review the relationship between CLBP and GAD and provide optimal management strategies for NPs caring for individuals with this dyad. PMID:26642348

  9. Group Outpatient Physical and Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of behavioral (BT) or physical therapy (PT) for treating chronic low back pain (CLBP), for 13 BT patients and 12 PT patients. Treatments were conducted in a group outpatient setting. Posttreatment results showed general improvement for patients in both groups, but few treatment-specific differences in outcome measures.…

  10. Comparison of Operant Behavioral and Cognitive-Behavioral Group Treatment for Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Judith A.; Clancy, Steve

    1988-01-01

    Assigned chronic low back pain patients to operant behavioral (OB) treatment, cognitive-behavioral (CB) treatment, or waiting-list (WL) condition. Both treatments resulted in decreased physical and psychosocial disability. OB patients' greater improvement leveled off at followup; CB patients continued to improve over the 12 months following…

  11. Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Are Deconditioned and Have An Increased Body Fat Percentage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodselmans, Audy P.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare data on the level of aerobic capacity and body composition of nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients with normative data matched for sex, age and level of sporting activity. The study population consisted of 101 outpatients with nonspecific CLBP who had entered a rehabilitation…

  12. Effect of Tramadol/Acetaminophen on Motivation in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsunaga, Tomoko; Tetsunaga,Tomonori; Tanaka, Masato; Nishida, Keiichiro; Takei, Yoshitaka; Ozaki,Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background. The contribution of apathy, frequently recognized in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases, to chronic low back pain (LBP) remains unclear. Objectives. To investigate levels of apathy and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic LBP treated with tramadol-acetaminophen. Methods. A retrospective case-control study involving 73 patients with chronic LBP (23 male, 50 female; mean age 71 years) treated with tramadol-acetaminophen (n=36) and celecoxib (n=37) was performed. All p...

  13. Effectiveness of mindfulness meditation (Vipassana in the management of chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangram G Patil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (CLBP is challenging to treat with its significant psychological and cognitive behavioural element involved. Mindfulness meditation helps alter the behavioural response in chronic pain situations. Significant body of research in the filed of mindfulness meditation comes from the work of Dr Kabat-Zinn. The current evidence in the field, though not grade one, shows that there is a place for mindfulness meditation in managing chronic pain conditions including CLBP. Further research to test the usefulness of mindfulness in CLBP should involve good quality randomized controlled trials of pure mindfulness based technique in matched subjects.

  14. Psychosocial predictors of health-related quality of life and health service utilisation in people with chronic low back pain.

    OpenAIRE

    Keeley, Philip; Creed, Francis; Tomenson, Barbara; Todd, Chris; Borglin, Gunilla; Dickens, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Psychological and social factors have been shown, separately, to predict outcome in individuals with chronic low back pain. Few previous studies, however, have integrated both psychological and social factors, using prospective study of clinic populations of low back pain patients, to identify which are the most important targets for treatment. One hundred and eight patients with chronic low back pain, newly referred to an orthopaedic outpatient clinic, completed assessments of demographic ch...

  15. Association between catastrophizing and self-rated pain and disability in patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    K. Meyer; Tschopp, A.; Sprott, H; Mannion, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catastrophizing plays an important role in models of pain chronicity, showing a consistent correlation with both pain intensity and disability. It is conceivable that these associations are mediated or confounded by other psychological attributes. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relative influence of catastrophizing and other psychological variables on pain and disability in patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: Seventy-eight patients completed the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Ro...

  16. A related study of the CT imaging of the chronic low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the clinical application of the CT imaging in patients with chronic low back pain. Methods: CT images were retrospectively analyzed in 164 cases of chronic low back pain. All the cases were diagnosed with CT imaging, or confirmed by operation, or proved in follow-up. Results: Intervertebral disc bulging in different level as a result from the degeneration of the disc was found in 148 cases (90.24%) out of 164. Disc protrusion was presented in 129 cases(78.66%). Bony narrowing of the spinal canal was revealed in 33 cases(20.12%). Degenerative lumbar spinal instability yielded in 14 cases (8.5%). Ossification or calcification of posterior longitudinal ligament was seen in 26 cases (15.85%). Thickening of ligamenta flava was shown in the 22 eases (13.41%). Conclusion: Chronic low back pain is mainly caused by the disorders of the intervertebral disc, which has typical CT findings: narrowed spinal canal or lateral recess. Ossification or calcification of posterior longitudinal ligament also plays a role in low back pain. An accurate interpretation of the CT images is essential for the clinical management. (authors)

  17. Paraspinous Lidocaine Injection for Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Marta; Imamura, Satiko Tomikawa; Targino, Rosa Alves; Morales-Quezada, León; Onoda Tomikawa, Luis C.; Onoda Tomikawa, Luis G.; Alfieri, Fabio M.; Filippo, Thais R.; da Rocha, Ivan D.; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Fregni, Felipe; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2016-01-01

    In this large, sham-controlled, randomized trial, we examined the efficacy of the combination of standard treatment and paraspinous lidocaine injection compared with standard therapy alone in subjects with chronic low back pain. There is little research-based evidence for the routine clinical use of paraspinous lidocaine injection for low back pain. A total of 378 subjects with nonspecific chronic low back pain were randomized to 3 groups: paraspinous lidocaine injection, analgesics, and exercises (group 1, LID-INJ); sham paraspinous lidocaine injection, analgesics, and exercises (group 2, SH-INJ); and analgesics and exercises (group 3, STD-TTR). A blinded rater assessed the study outcomes at 3 time points: baseline, after treatment, and after 3 months of follow-up. There were increased frequency of pain responses and better low back functional scores in the LID-INJ group compared with the SH-INJ and STD-TTR groups. These effects remained at the 3-month follow-up but differed between all 3 groups. There were significant changes in pain threshold immediately after treatment, supporting the effects of this intervention in reducing central sensitization. Paraspinous lidocaine injection therapy is not associated with a higher risk of adverse effects compared with conventional treatment and sham injection. Its effects on hyperalgesia might correlate with changes in central sensitization. PMID:26828801

  18. Chronic low back pain patient groups in primary care - A cross sectional cluster analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Viniol, Annika; Jegan, Nikita; Hirsch, Oliver; Leonhardt, Corinna; Brugger, Markus; Strauch, Konstantin; Barth, Juergen; Baum, Erika; Becker, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the heterogeneous nature of chronic low back pain (CLBP), it is necessary to identify patient groups and evaluate treatments within these groups. We aimed to identify groups of patients with CLBP in the primary care setting. Methods We performed a k-means cluster analysis on a large data set (n = 634) of primary care patients with CLBP. Variables of sociodemographic data, pain characteristics, psychological status (i.e., depression, anxiety, somatization), and the patient re...

  19. Yoga as a treatment for chronic low back pain: A systematic review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Douglas G.; Holt, Jacquelyn A.; Sklar, Marisa; Groessl, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic low back pain (CLBP) affects millions of people worldwide, and appears to be increasing in prevalence. It is associated not only with pain, but also with increased disability, psychological symptoms, and reduced quality of life. There are various treatment options for CLBP, but no single therapy stands out as being the most effective. In the past 10 years, yoga interventions have been studied as a CLBP treatment approach. The objective of this paper is to review the current...

  20. Effectiveness of Sling Exercise for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jin-Su; Yang, Seung-Hoon; Koog, Yun-Hyung; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Kim,

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated effects of sling exercise for patients with chronic low back pain. [Methods] We reviewed all relevant papers indexed in PubMed, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Registered Trials. Eligible trials were randomized controlled trials that compared sling exercise with any type of treatment. We extracted data on muscle thickness, muscle activation, pain, and disability, and assessed the methodological quality of the data. Seven studies met our inclusion criteria. [Results]...

  1. Antineuropathic and Antinociceptive Drugs Combination in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Carlo Luca Romanò; Delia Romanò; Marco Lacerenza

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Chronic low back pain (LBP) is often characterized by both nociceptive and neuropathic components. While various monotherapies have been reported of only limited efficacy, combining drugs with different mechanisms of action and targets appears a rational approach. Aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficacy and safety of different combined pharmacological treatments, compared to monotherapy or placebo, for the pharmacological treatment of chronic LBP. Methods. Published p...

  2. LUMBAR LORDOSIS IN ASYMPTOMATICS SUBJECTS AND PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Mousavi, S.J.; MOHAMMAD REZA NOURBAKHSH

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: The relationship between the degree of lumbar lordosis and chronic and purpose low back pain (LBP) has long been speculated, but there is discrepancy in findings of previous researchers. The purpose of this of this study was to drtermin differences between lumbar lordosis in asymptomatic and LBP subjects. Matherials: Lumbar lordosis of 420 patients with chronic LBP and 420 asymptomatic subjects was measured by two examiner. A flexible ruler was used to measure lumbar l...

  3. Daily Practice Clinic of Scientific Evidence in the Physiotherapy Management of Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Constanza Trillos Chacón

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 80 % of adults experience back pain at least once in their life. Back pain is the third leading cause of consultation in the emergency room, the fourth in general practice, the second of disability pension and the first job relocation. Objective: To compare the criteria that guide decision making of a group of physiotherapists in Bogota Colombia for the management of chronic nonspecific low back pain management criteria contained in the guide COST B13 (European Guidelines For The Management Of Chronic Non- specific Low Back Pain, 2004. Material and methods: This was a descriptive study, for which clinical practice guideline COST B13 for the management of chronic nonspecific low back pain through the AGREE tool is selected and a survey was applied to 50 physiotherapists through a convenience sample with to compare the clinical practices that are performed with the recommendations given guidance. Results: 56 % of respondents had some type of training for the management of chronic nonspecific low back pain (DLCI. 94 % of patients with DLCI served range in age from 40 to 59, with female predominance. In 80 % of respondents stated that physiotherapists diagnostic help with counting for the management of patients is the radiological image. 80 % of physiotherapists evaluated variable lumbar pain experienced by the patient and 54 % stance. Other aspects were reported in lower percentage. In the treatment of DLCI, physiotherapists reported use of stretching in 80 % of cases, the superficial thermotherapy in 70 % and isometric muscle strength in 70 %, all with favorable results.Conclusion: There are differences between clinical practice of physiotherapists and guidelines contained in the recommendations of the guide in the cost DLCI B13. Mainly in the processes of physiotherapy assessment of the surveyed population as they are often focused on observation and not always in the rigorous measurement, which makes it difficult to establish

  4. Are chronic low back pain outcomes improved with co-management of concurrent depression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollard Henry

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To discuss the role of depression in chronic lower back pain and comment on appropriate methods of screening and co-management. Data Sources The current scientific literature was investigated using the online web databases CINAHL, Medline/PUBMED, Proquest, Meditext and from manual library searches. Data Extraction Databases were searched from 1980 to the present (2005. Articles were searched with the key words "depression" and "low back pain". Over three hundred articles were sourced and articles were then selected on their relevance to the chronic spinal pain states that present to manual therapy practitioners. Data synthesis Pain is a subjective awareness of peripheral nociceptive stimulation, projected from the thalamus to the cerebral cortex with each individual's pain experience being mediated by his or her psychological state. Thus a psychological component will often be associated with any painful experience. A number of studies suggest (among other things that the incidence of depression predicts chronicity in lower back pain syndromes but that chronic lower back pain does not have the reciprocal action to predict depression. Conclusion The aetiology of chronic pain is multifactorial. There is sufficient evidence in the literature to demonstrate a requirement to draw treatment options from many sources in order to achieve a favourable pain relief outcome. The treatment should be multimodal, including mental and emotional support, counseling and herbal advice. While a strong correlation between depression and chronic low back pain can be demonstrated, an apparent paucity of literature that specifically addresses the patient response to chiropractic treatment and concurrent psychotherapy identifies the need for prospective studies of this nature to be undertaken. It is likely that multimodal/multidisciplinary treatment approaches should be encouraged to deal with these chronic lower back pain syndromes.

  5. Fear of movement/(re)injury and muscular reactivity in chronic low back pain patients : an experimental investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaeyen, Johan W.S.; Seelen, HAM; Peters, Madelon L.; de Jong, Peter; Aretz, E; Beisiegel, E; Weber, WEJ

    1999-01-01

    This experiment was set up to test the hypothesis that confrontation with feared movements would lead to symptom-specific muscular reactivity in chronic low back pain patients who report high fear of movement/(re)injury. Thirty-one chronic low back pain patients were asked to watch a neutral nature

  6. Opioid therapy for chronic low back pain: prescribing considerations for advanced practice registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Maureen Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common, disabling, and costly condition, and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) must carefully evaluate patients before considering long-term opioid therapy as a management strategy. APRNs should refer patients suspected of having a serious condition, or identifiable etiology, for specialist evaluation, as many patients improve with physical therapy, interventional pain management procedures, or surgical intervention. For patients unresponsive to nonopioid treatment, APRNs with an understanding of opioids, and the experience to assess and manage the risks of opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, may consider long-term opioid therapy as part of a multimodal management plan. Such prescribing necessitates careful patient selection; informed consent; prudent opioid dosing and titration; and monitoring for response to treatment, adverse effects, and aberrant drug-taking behavior. Treatment and regulatory guidelines can assist APRNs in providing safe and effective care to patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:25365050

  7. Time to Talk: 5 Things To Know About Chronic Low-Back Pain and Complementary Health Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z 5 Things To Know About Chronic Low-Back Pain and Complementary Health Practices Share: Low-back pain is a very common condition, but often the cause is unknown. Most people have significant acute back pain at least once in their lives. Usually it ...

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF KATIVASTHI AND EXERCISE IN CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN: A RANDOMIZED CONTROL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Panda Ashok Kumar; Debnath Saroj Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is very common and comprises of 2 .21% in US population and 15% in working groups over the age of 30. In this study there were two groups, one was Kativasthi therapy group and another was Exercise therapy group. Both groups were continued for 10 days. Kativasthi is process specially prepared warm medicated oil kept over low back area with Masa churna (Black gram powder) paste boundary over a period of 45 minutes. An open prospective study was conducted to evaluate the ef...

  9. Motor control or graded activity exercises for chronic low back pain? A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAuley James H

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic low back pain remains a major health problem in Australia and around the world. Unfortunately the majority of treatments for this condition produce small effects because not all patients respond to each treatment. It appears that only 25–50% of patients respond to exercise. The two most popular types of exercise for low back pain are graded activity and motor control exercises. At present however, there are no guidelines to help clinicians select the best treatment for a patient. As a result, time and money are wasted on treatments which ultimately fail to help the patient. Methods This paper describes the protocol of a randomised clinical trial comparing the effects of motor control exercises with a graded activity program in the treatment of chronic non specific low back pain. Further analysis will identify clinical features that may predict a patient's response to each treatment. One hundred and seventy two participants will be randomly allocated to receive either a program of motor control exercises or graded activity. Measures of outcome will be obtained at 2, 6 and 12 months after randomisation. The primary outcomes are: pain (average pain intensity over the last week and function (patient-specific functional scale at 2 and 6 months. Potential treatment effect modifiers will be measured at baseline. Discussion This trial will not only evaluate which exercise approach is more effective in general for patients will chronic low back pain, but will also determine which exercise approach is best for an individual patient. Trial registration number ACTRN12607000432415

  10. Low Back Pain And Sexuality

    OpenAIRE

    KURU, Ö.; BEWYER, D.; KUTLU, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction in the patient with chronic low back pain is a frequently misunders¬tood and neglected aspect of this disease classification. Clinical experience and a review of the literature defines three causative factors: primary organic pathology interrupting nor¬mal nervous system function; side effects of medication prescribed for the condition, and psychological factors relating to anxiety over performance and fear of pain during sexual activity. The purpose of this article is to d...

  11. Visually Plastic Art Therapy in Reducing Anxiety of Chronic Low Back Pain Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jurčenko, Aloida

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research is to check if Art therapy reduces anxiety and pain symptoms for chronic low back pain patients. The selection of the research members was made by using structured interview. For the selection of anxiety research – C.D. Spielberg anxiety position-feature self-assessment (STAI from Y-1). For the selection of pain symptom detection was used numerical analog (ranking) scale (NRS). There were patients from 30 to 60 years old, who made the selection, all with M47.2 diagnosi...

  12. Predictive factors for the outcome of multidisciplinary treatments in chronic low back pain at the first multidisciplinary pain center of Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Arai, Young-Chang P.; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Nishihara, Makoto; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Hirakawa, Tomoe; Matsuo, Shingo; Kobayashi, Mami; Haruta, Midori; Kawabata, Yuka; Togo, Hiroki; Noguchi, Taiji; Hase, Toshiyuki; Hatano, Genki; Ushida, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Multidisciplinary treatments are recommended for treatment of chronic low back pain. The aim of this study was to show the associations among multidisciplinary treatment outcomes, pretreatment psychological factors, self-reported pain levels, and history of pain in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 221 chronic low back pain patients were chosen for the study. The pretreatment scores for the 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression ...

  13. Frequency and Interrelations of Risk Factors for Chronic Low Back Pain in a Primary Care Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, François; Fermanian, Jacques; Coriat, Fernand; Mace, Yann; Revel, Michel; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Many risk factors have been identified for chronic low back pain (cLBP), but only one study evaluated their interrelations. We aimed to investigate the frequency of cLBP risk factors and their interrelations in patients consulting their general practitioners (GPs) for cLBP. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive, national survey was performed. 3000 GPs randomly selected were asked to include at least one patient consulting for cLBP. Demographic, clinical characteristics and the p...

  14. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders in sick listed chronic low back pain patients

    OpenAIRE

    Reme, Silje Endresen; Tangen, Tone; Moe, Trygve; Eriksen, Hege Randi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous findings have shown a high degree of comorbid psychopathology in chronic low back pain (CLBP), but less is known about the broad range of comorbid psychiatric disorders. The prevalence is reported to be between 40%-100% depending on methods being used, sample or setting. Aims: To assess the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in a population of CLBP patients, using a psychiatric diagnostic interview. Methods: 565 patients sick listed between 2 and 10 m...

  15. Change in trunk muscle activities with prone bridge exercise in patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Yong-Soo; Park, Seol; Kweon, Mi-Gyong; Park, Ji-Won

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of three different bridge exercises on internal oblique, external oblique, transverse abdominis, and erector spinae activities. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five subjects with chronic low back pain participated in this study. The training outcome was evaluated with three different testing methods: supine bridge exercise, supine bridge on Swiss ball exercise, and prone bridge exercise. The activities of the transverse abdominis, inter...

  16. Osteopathic intervention in chronic non-specific low back pain: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Orrock, Paul J; Myers, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Non Specific Low Back Pain (CNSLBP) is a common, complex and disabling condition that has been present for longer than three months and is not caused by a serious pathology. Osteopaths are health practitioners who commonly diagnose and treat CNSLBP patients using a complex set of interventions that includes manual therapy. The study aimed to complete a Systematic Review of clinical research into osteopathic intervention in CNSLBP using a rigorous assessment of study quality...

  17. Prediction of sickness absence in patients with chronic low back pain: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kuijer, Wietske; Groothoff, Johan W.; Brouwer, Sandra; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To provide evidence of predictors for sickness absence in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP), distinguishing predictors aimed at the decision to report sick (absence threshold) and decision to return to work (return to work threshold). Methods: Medical and psychological databases were searched, as well as citations from relevant reviews. In- and exclusion criteria were applied. Two reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the papers independently. Resu...

  18. Measuring disability in patients with chronic low back pain: the usefulness of different instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Kuijer, Wietske

    2006-01-01

    Measuring disability is an important topic in rehabilitation research in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Due to the major impact of CLBP on functioning in both daily living and work, measuring disability in patients with CLBP is best described in terms of limitations in activities and restrictions in participation in daily living and work. A frequently used measurement instrument in rehabilitation medicine to measure self-reported limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) in...

  19. Evidence informed management of chronic low back pain with cognitive behavioral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gatchel, Robert J.; Rollings, Kathryn H.

    2008-01-01

    The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing amongst available non-surgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited healthcare resources to support interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is of...

  20. Towards an understanding of physical activity in people with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, Derek William

    2013-01-01

    peer-reviewed Physical activity (PA) is well recognised as an essential component of a healthy lifestyle and is commonly recommended as part of a multimodal management approach for people with chronic low back pain (CLBP). However, to date there is limited evidence of how best to promote PA in people with CLBP. Knowledge of the correlates and determinants of PA in this patient group is necessary to facilitate and promote PA in patients??? everyday lives. The main aim of t...

  1. Classification and targeted treatment of patients with Non Specific Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fersum, Kjartan Vibe

    2011-01-01

    Non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) disorders have proven highly resistant to change in spite of enormous resources directed at them. There is lack of evidence for single treatment interventions for patients with NSCLBP despite the substantial amount of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCT) evaluating treatment outcome for this disorder. It has been hypothesised that this vacuum of evidence is caused by the lack of sub-classifying the heterogeneous population of patient...

  2. The use of glucosamine for chronic low back pain: a systematic review of randomised control trials

    OpenAIRE

    Sodha, Reena; Sivanadarajah, Naveethan; Alam, Mahbub

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain whether the use of oral glucosamine influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) thought to be related to spinal osteoarthritis (OA). Design Systematic review of randomised control trials. Searches were performed up to March 2011 on Medline, AMED, CINHAL, Cochrane and EMBASE with subsequent reference screening of retrieved studies. In addition, the grey literature was searched via opensigle. Included studies were required to i...

  3. Evidence informed management of chronic low back pain with functional restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Gatchel, Robert J.; Mayer, Tom G.

    2008-01-01

    The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing amongst available non-surgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited healthcare resources to support interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is of...

  4. Injection therapy and denervation procedures for chronic low-back pain: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Henschke, N.; Kuijpers, T; Rubinstein, S.M.; Middelkoop, van, J.C.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Verhagen, A.; Koes, B W; Tulder, van, R.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    textabstractInjection therapy and denervation procedures are commonly used in the management of chronic low-back pain (LBP) despite uncertainty regarding their effectiveness and safety. To provide an evaluation of the current evidence associated with the use of these procedures, a systematic review was performed. Existing systematic reviews were screened, and the Cochrane Back Review Group trial register was searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) fulfilling the inclusion criteria. S...

  5. Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for chronic low back pain: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kamper, Steven J.; Apeldoorn, A T; Chiarotto, A; Smeets, R.J.E.M.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; J. Guzman; van Tulder, M. W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the long term effects of multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for patients with chronic low back pain. Design Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Electronic searches of Cochrane Back Review Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases up to February 2014, supplemented by hand searching of reference lists and forward citation tracking of included trials. Study selecti...

  6. Treatment satisfaction and dissatisfaction in patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Rofail, Diana

    2010-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. This thesis explores treatment satisfaction and dissatisfaction in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Chapters 1 and 2 provide background on CLBP, and treatment satisfaction and dissatisfaction. Chapter 3 presents study 1, the systematic review which identified research concerning treatment satisfaction and dissatisfaction in patients with CLBP. Findings indicated a need to def...

  7. Predictors of communication preferences in patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Farin E; Gramm L; Schmidt E

    2013-01-01

    Erik Farin, Lukas Gramm, Erika SchmidtUniversity Freiburg, Medical Center, Department of Quality Management and Social Medicine, Freiburg, GermanyBackground: The objective of this exploratory study was to identify patient-related predictors of communication preferences in patients with chronic low back pain for various dimensions of patient-physician communication (patient participation and orientation, effective and open communication, emotionally supportive communication, communication abou...

  8. Outcome of instrumented spinal fusion for chronic low back pain: review of 100 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of instrumented spinal fusion in selected patients with Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP) in our setup. Consecutive first one hundred patients were selected from spine unit database that underwent instrumented spinal fusion for chronic low back pain lasting more than one year, due to degenerative disease of spine. Average age was 42 years. There were 62 males and 38 females. Diagnosis included; spinal stenosis (26%), failed disc surgery (22%), spondylolisthesis (19%), degenerative disc disease (17%), and instability (16%). Operations performed; Pedicle Screw Fixation (PSF) with Postero-lateral Fusion (PLF) in 3% patients. Trans Laminar Facet Screw (TLFS) with PLF in 24% patients. Anterior Lumbar Inter-body Fusion (ALIF) in 9% patients. Posterior Lumbar Inter-body Fusion (PLIF) in 40% patients and Trans-foraminal Lumbar Inter-body Fusion (TLIF) in 24% patients. Average follow up was for 30 months. 86% patients had full spinal fusion. 71% patients were fully satisfied with treatment, 28% were partially satisfied. Post-operatively, on average, visual analogue scale (VAS) showed 48 points significant improvement and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) showed 53 points significant improvement. Instrumented Spinal Fusion is effective in our set up for relieving symptoms and improving functional outcome in selected patients with debilitating Chronic Low Back Pain due to degenerative disease of spine. Single fusion technique is not ideal for all types of patients and surgeon has to be versatile and trained in using different fusion techniques as the situation demands. (author)

  9. Static and dynamic postural stability in subjects with and without chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heta Haresh Thakkar

    2015-09-01

    Methods: Thirty subjects (15 Chronic Low back Pain and 15 Normal subjects were recruited randomly who's demographic are not varied. The static and dynamic postural stability test namely postural sway meter and Star excursion balance test were analyzed. Data were analyzed using test of homogeneity and Independent sample t test. Results: Descriptive statistics reflected homogeneity of the study population. Independent sample t-test was used to compare values for static and dynamic stability between chronic low back pain and Normal subjects. It showed a statistically significant (P<0.05 difference in posterior and left lateral direction with t-value of -2.720 and -1.601 respectively for static stability. On the other hand, dynamic postural stability (SEBT showed significant difference in all direction except on right leg; anteromedial, anterolateral and right and left posterior direction. Conclusions: Chronic low back pain group showed reduction in static and dynamic postural stability as compared to normals'. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(9.000: 2405-2409

  10. Association between chronic low back pain, anxiety and depression in patients at a tertiary care centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the prevalence of anxiety and depression in chronic low back pain population at a tertiary care centre. Methods: The prospective cross-sectional study was conducted using convenience sampling at the Department of Neurosurgery, at Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to June 2010. The prevalence of anxiety and depression in chronic low back pain patients was studied according to specified age and gender groups using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results: Of the 140 patients in the study, 66 (47.14%) were females and 74 (52.85%) were males. The average age of the patients was 43.02+-13.34 years. The average duration of symptoms was 4.29+-3.3 years. Abnormal level of anxiety and depression were found in 77 (55%) and 68 (48.57%) patients respectively. Out of them 54 (38.5%) and 51 (36.4%) were borderline abnormal for anxiety and depression respectively, while 23 (16.4%) and 17 (12.1%) were abnormal for anxiety and depression respectively. Among the males, there were 20 (14.28%) and 23 (16.42%) patients with abnormal levels of the corresponding numbers among the females were 57 (40.71%) and 45 (32.14%). There was a significant association in anxiety (p0.05). Conclusion: Individuals with chronic low back pain were at high risk to experience anxiety and depression. This risk was higher for females. (author)

  11. Physiotherapy for sleep disturbance in chronic low back pain: a feasibility randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mechelen Willem

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep disturbance is becoming increasingly recognised as a clinically important symptom in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP, low back pain >12 weeks, associated with physical inactivity and depression. Current research and international clinical guidelines recommend people with CLBP assume a physically active role in their recovery to prevent chronicity, but the high prevalence of sleep disturbance in this population may be unknowingly limiting their ability to participate in exercise-based rehabilitation programmes and contributing to poor outcomes. There is currently no knowledge concerning the effectiveness of physiotherapy on sleep disturbance in people with chronic low back pain and no evidence of the feasibility of conducting randomized controlled trials that comprehensively evaluate sleep as an outcome measure in this population. Methods/Design This study will evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT, exploring the effects of three forms of physiotherapy (supervised general exercise programme, individualized walking programme and usual physiotherapy, which will serve as the control group on sleep quality in people with chronic low back pain. A presenting sample of 60 consenting patients will be recruited in the physiotherapy department of Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, and randomly allocated to one of the three groups in a concealed manner. The main outcomes will be sleep quality (self-report and objective measurement, and self-reported functional disability, pain, quality of life, fear avoidance, anxiety and depression, physical activity, and patient satisfaction. Outcome will be evaluated at baseline, 3 months and 6 months. Qualitative telephone interviews will be embedded in the research design to obtain feedback from a sample of participants' about their experiences of sleep monitoring, trial participation and interventions, and to inform the design of a fully powered future RCT

  12. Somatosensory nociceptive characteristics differentiate subgroups in people with chronic low back pain: a cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabey, Martin; Slater, Helen; OʼSullivan, Peter; Beales, Darren; Smith, Anne

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the existence of subgroups in a cohort with chronic low back pain (n = 294) based on the results of multimodal sensory testing and profile subgroups on demographic, psychological, lifestyle, and general health factors. Bedside (2-point discrimination, brush, vibration and pinprick perception, temporal summation on repeated monofilament stimulation) and laboratory (mechanical detection threshold, pressure, heat and cold pain thresholds, conditioned pain modulation) sensory testing were examined at wrist and lumbar sites. Data were entered into principal component analysis, and 5 component scores were entered into latent class analysis. Three clusters, with different sensory characteristics, were derived. Cluster 1 (31.9%) was characterised by average to high temperature and pressure pain sensitivity. Cluster 2 (52.0%) was characterised by average to high pressure pain sensitivity. Cluster 3 (16.0%) was characterised by low temperature and pressure pain sensitivity. Temporal summation occurred significantly more frequently in cluster 1. Subgroups were profiled on pain intensity, disability, depression, anxiety, stress, life events, fear avoidance, catastrophizing, perception of the low back region, comorbidities, body mass index, multiple pain sites, sleep, and activity levels. Clusters 1 and 2 had a significantly greater proportion of female participants and higher depression and sleep disturbance scores than cluster 3. The proportion of participants undertaking <300 minutes per week of moderate activity was significantly greater in cluster 1 than in clusters 2 and 3. Low back pain, therefore, does not appear to be homogeneous. Pain mechanisms relating to presentations of each subgroup were postulated. Future research may investigate prognoses and interventions tailored towards these subgroups. PMID:26020225

  13. MRI and low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  14. Differences in the Association between Depression and Opioid Misuse in Chronic Low Back Pain versus Chronic Pain at Other Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Arpana; Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Salas, Joanne; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Fernando, Sheran; Herndon, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain and depression are more likely to develop opioid abuse compared to patients without depression. It is not known if this association differs by pain location. We compared the strength of association between depression and opioid misuse in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) vs. chronic pain of other location (CPOL). Chart abstracted data was obtained from 166 patients seeking care in a family medicine clinic. Depression was measured by the PHQ-9 and opioid misuse was measured using the Current Opioid Misuse Measure. Pain severity and interference questions came from the Brief Pain Inventory. Cross-tabulations were computed to measure the association between depression and opioid misuse stratified on pain location. Exploratory logistic regression modeled the association between depression and opioid misuse after adjusting for pain location and pain severity and interference. Depression was significantly associated with opioid misuse in CPOL but not in CLBP. Regression results indicate pain interference partly accounts for the depression-opioid misuse association. These preliminary results from a small patient sample suggest depression may co-occur with opioid misuse more often in CPOL than in CLBP. Further research is needed to compare this comorbidity in specific pain diagnoses such as arthritis, fibromyalgia and CLBP. PMID:27417622

  15. Differences in the Association between Depression and Opioid Misuse in Chronic Low Back Pain versus Chronic Pain at Other Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpana Jaiswal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic pain and depression are more likely to develop opioid abuse compared to patients without depression. It is not known if this association differs by pain location. We compared the strength of association between depression and opioid misuse in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP vs. chronic pain of other location (CPOL. Chart abstracted data was obtained from 166 patients seeking care in a family medicine clinic. Depression was measured by the PHQ-9 and opioid misuse was measured using the Current Opioid Misuse Measure. Pain severity and interference questions came from the Brief Pain Inventory. Cross-tabulations were computed to measure the association between depression and opioid misuse stratified on pain location. Exploratory logistic regression modeled the association between depression and opioid misuse after adjusting for pain location and pain severity and interference. Depression was significantly associated with opioid misuse in CPOL but not in CLBP. Regression results indicate pain interference partly accounts for the depression–opioid misuse association. These preliminary results from a small patient sample suggest depression may co-occur with opioid misuse more often in CPOL than in CLBP. Further research is needed to compare this comorbidity in specific pain diagnoses such as arthritis, fibromyalgia and CLBP.

  16. Percutaneous lumbar discectomy in treatment of chronic discogenic low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous lumbar discectomy in treating chronic discogenic low back pain. Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed the treatment of 26 patients with chronic discogenic low back pain. All of the cases were treated with PLD under TV monitoring. Results: A follow-up of 26 patients for 3 to 48 months showing no severe complication. Followed-up lasting for 3 to 6 months, 15 cases were evaluated as excellent, 7 as good, 3 as fair and 1 as poor with the excellent and good rates reaching 84.6% by MacNab standard. Followed up from 7 to 12 months, 11 cases were evaluated as excellent, 6 as good, 3 as fair and 2 as poor with total effective rate of 77.2%. 14 cases were followed up for 12 to 48 months, the results revealed excellent in 7 patients, good in 4, fair in 1, and poor in 2, the excellent and good rates reached 78.5%. Conclusions: PLD is an effective and safe procedure in treating discogenic low back pain. (authors)

  17. Primary care physicians' attitudes and beliefs towards chronic low back pain: an Asian study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina W S Sit

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain is a serious global health problem. There is substantial evidence that physicians' attitudes towards and beliefs about chronic low back pain can influence their subsequent management of the condition.(1 to evaluate the attitudes and beliefs towards chronic low back pain among primary care physicians in Asia; (2 to study the cultural differences and other factors that are associated with these attitudes and beliefs.A cross sectional online survey was sent to primary care physicians who are members of the Hong Kong College of Family Physician (HKCFP. The Pain Attitudes and Beliefs Scale for Physiotherapist (PABS-PT was used as the questionnaire to determine the biomedical and biopsychosocial orientation of the participants.The mean Biomedical (BM score was 34.8+/-6.1; the mean biopsychosocial (BPS score was 35.6 (+/- 4.8. Both scores were higher than those of European doctors. Family medicine specialists had a lower biomedical score than General practitioners. Physicians working in the public sector tended to have low BM and low BPS scores; whereas physicians working in private practice tended to have high BM and high BPS scores.The lack of concordance in the pain explanatory models used by private and public sector may have a detrimental effect on patients who are under the care of both parties. The uncertain treatment orientation may have a negative influence on patients' attitudes and beliefs, thus contributing to the tension and, perhaps, even ailing mental state of a person with chronic LBP.

  18. Nursing intervention protocol for adult patients experiencing chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mohamed Taha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a nursing intervention protocol targeting the knowledge and practice of adult patients experiencing low back pain. Design: A quasi-experimental research design. Methods: Pre-post assessment of outcome was used in this study. The study was conducted in the outpatient clinic of the physical therapy department at Zagazig University Hospital and Beni-Suef University Hospital, Egypt. Sample: 40 participants diagnosed with chronic low back pain (lasting for longer than six months. Seven of the 40 dropped out during the follow-up phase for personal or logistical reasons. Tools included sections for demographic characteristics, knowledge and practice assessment; in addition to the Oswestry Disability Index, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results: The application of an instruction protocol intervention for low back pain was effective in improving patient knowledge and practice, with associated amelioration of the severity of pain and disability among them. The effect was still apparent at the three-month follow-up. Conclusion: It is recommended that the study be replicated using a more robust randomized clinical trial design. Nonetheless, the instruction protocol with the designed booklet may be adopted as an element of the care services offered to patients suffering LBP, given the clear positive effects on patient knowledge, which would undoubtedly help them decide on the most preferential management approach.

  19. Influence of comorbidity with depression on interdisciplinary therapy: outcomes in patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haili; Ahrens, Carsten; Rief, Winfried; Schiltenwolf, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Our previous work showed higher tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) compared to healthy controls. However, patients with depression as a comorbidity did not have higher TNF-α levels in comparison to patients without depression. In this study we investigated the influence of depression on therapy outcomes such as TNF-α serum levels, pain intensity and back function in patients with cLBP. Our hypothesis was that patients with both cLB...

  20. Prognostic Factors for Recovery in Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Verkerk, K.; Luijsterburg, P.A.J.; Miedema, H S; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.; Koes, B W

    2011-01-01

    Background. Few data are available on predictors for a favorable outcome in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNLBP). Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess prognostic factors for pain intensity, disability, return to work, quality of life, and global perceived effect in patients with CNLBP at short-term (6 months) and long-term (6 months) follow-up. Data Sources. Relevant studies evaluating the prognosis of CNLBP were searched in PubMed, CINAHL, and EMBASE (through March...

  1. Catastrophizing and internal pain control as mediators of outcome in the multidisciplinary treatment of chronic low back pain.

    OpenAIRE

    Spinhoven, P.; Kuile, M. ter; Kole-Snijders, A.M.J.; Hutten Mansfeld, M.; Ouden, D.J. den; Vlaeyen, J. W. S.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine (a) whether a cognitive-behavioral treatment (differentially) affects pain coping and cognition; and (b) whether changes in pain coping and cognition during treatment mediate treatment outcome. Participants in this randomized clinical trial were 148 patients with chronic low back pain attending a multidisciplinary treatment program consisting of operant-behavioral treatment plus cognitive coping skills training (N = 59) or group discussion (N = 58) ...

  2. Comparison between Epidural Block vs. High Intensity Laser Therapy for Controlling Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badiozaman Radpay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic low back pain is among a wide spread musculoskeletal conditions that is related to disability with high economy cost. There are several treatment modalities for controlling chronic low back pain (CLBP, among them high intensity laser therapy (HILT and epidural blocks (EB use more commonly. This study aimed to evaluate the benefits and hazards of each of these two methods.Materials and Methods: We designed a randomized controlled double blind study during 24 months.101 patients divided in 2 groups (52 in EB and 49 in HILT group. Pain intensity was assessed by using faces pain scales (FPS and LINKERT questionaries' before procedure and during one, four, 12, and 24 weeks after beginning the procedures.Results: There were no differences between two groups in FPS lumber tenderness, straight leg rising test (SLRT, paresthesia, deep tendon reflex (DTR, and imaging changes. Motor problems seem was less in HILT group comparing EB.Conclusion: This study showed both EB and HILT approaches can control the pain intensity and motor activities in CLBP patients. Future studies will clarify the precise importance of each these methods.

  3. Efficacy of acupuncture for chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barlow William E

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic back pain is a major public health problem and the primary reason patients seek acupuncture treatment. Therefore, an objective assessment of acupuncture efficacy is critical for making informed decisions about its appropriate role for patients with this common condition. This study addresses methodological shortcomings that have plagued previous studies evaluating acupuncture for chronic low back pain. Methods and Design A total of 640 participants (160 in each of four arms between the ages of 18 and 70 years of age who have low back pain lasting at least 3 months will be recruited from integrated health care delivery systems in Seattle and Oakland. They will be randomized to one of two forms of Traditional Chinese Medical (TCM acupuncture needling (individualized or standardized, a "control" group (simulated acupuncture, or to continued usual medical care. Ten treatments will be provided over 7 weeks. Study participants and the "Diagnostician" acupuncturists who evaluate participants and propose individualized treatments will be masked to the acupuncture treatment actually assigned each participant. The "Therapist" acupuncturists providing the treatments will not be masked but will have limited verbal interaction with participants. The primary outcomes, standard measures of dysfunction and bothersomeness of low back pain, will be assessed at baseline, and after 8, 26, and 52 weeks by telephone interviewers masked to treatment assignment. General health status, satisfaction with back care, days of back-related disability, and use and costs of healthcare services for back pain will also be measured. The primary analysis comparing outcomes by randomized treatment assignment will be analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline value. For both primary outcome measures, this trial will have 99% power to detect the presence of a minimal clinically significant difference among all four treatment groups and over 80% power for

  4. Intractable Chronic Low-Back Pain Caused by Ligamentopathia Treated Using a Spinous Process Plate (S-plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-ichiro Ohnishi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of intractable chronic low-back pain in a gymnast that was caused by ligamentopathia in the interspinous region of the lumbar vertebrae. Sprained interspinous ligaments are a common mechanical cause of acute low-back pain in athletes. Although conservative therapy is generally effective in such cases, in this case it was not. The patient experienced severe low-back pain during lumbar flexion with tension between the L5/S interspinous ligaments. We performed interspinous fixation by using a spinous process plate system, which has been developed for short in situ fusions, and following which the low-back pain resolved. Conservative therapy for low-back pain caused by ligamentopathia is first-line choice, but interspinous fixation with instrumentation might be recommended in intractable cases with conservative therapy.

  5. Effect of Tramadol/Acetaminophen on Motivation in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Tetsunaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The contribution of apathy, frequently recognized in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases, to chronic low back pain (LBP remains unclear. Objectives. To investigate levels of apathy and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic LBP treated with tramadol-acetaminophen. Methods. A retrospective case-control study involving 73 patients with chronic LBP (23 male, 50 female; mean age 71 years treated with tramadol-acetaminophen (n=36 and celecoxib (n=37 was performed. All patients were assessed using the self-reported questionnaires. A mediation model was constructed using a bootstrapping method to evaluate the mediating effects of pain relief after treatment. Results. A total of 35 (55.6% patients met the criteria for apathy. A four-week treatment regimen in the tramadol group conferred significant improvements in the Apathy scale and numerical rating scale but not in the Rolland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Pain Disability Assessment Scale, or Pain Catastrophizing Scale. The depression component of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was lower in the tramadol group than in the celecoxib group. The mediation analysis found that the impact of tramadol-acetaminophen on the change in apathy was not mediated by the pain relief. Conclusions. Tramadol-acetaminophen was effective at reducing chronic LBP and conferred a prophylactic motivational effect in patients with chronic LBP.

  6. Effect of Tramadol/Acetaminophen on Motivation in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsunaga, Tomoko; Tetsunaga, Tomonori; Tanaka, Masato; Nishida, Keiichiro; Takei, Yoshitaka; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background. The contribution of apathy, frequently recognized in individuals with neurodegenerative diseases, to chronic low back pain (LBP) remains unclear. Objectives. To investigate levels of apathy and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic LBP treated with tramadol-acetaminophen. Methods. A retrospective case-control study involving 73 patients with chronic LBP (23 male, 50 female; mean age 71 years) treated with tramadol-acetaminophen (n = 36) and celecoxib (n = 37) was performed. All patients were assessed using the self-reported questionnaires. A mediation model was constructed using a bootstrapping method to evaluate the mediating effects of pain relief after treatment. Results. A total of 35 (55.6%) patients met the criteria for apathy. A four-week treatment regimen in the tramadol group conferred significant improvements in the Apathy scale and numerical rating scale but not in the Rolland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Pain Disability Assessment Scale, or Pain Catastrophizing Scale. The depression component of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was lower in the tramadol group than in the celecoxib group. The mediation analysis found that the impact of tramadol-acetaminophen on the change in apathy was not mediated by the pain relief. Conclusions. Tramadol-acetaminophen was effective at reducing chronic LBP and conferred a prophylactic motivational effect in patients with chronic LBP.

  7. Ligamentum flavum hypertrophy in asymptomatic and chronic low back pain subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin J Munns

    Full Text Available To examine ligamentum flavum thickness using magnetic resonance (MR images to evaluate its association with low back pain symptoms, age, gender, lumbar level, and disc characteristics.Sixty-three individuals were part of this IRB-approved study: twenty-seven with chronic low back pain, and thirty-six as asymptomatic. All patients underwent MR imaging and computed tomography (CT of the lumbar spine. The MR images at the mid-disc level were captured and enlarged 800% using a bilinear interpolation size conversion algorithm that allowed for enhanced image quality. Ligamentum flavum thickness was assessed using bilateral medial and lateral measurements. Disc height at each level was measured by the least-distance measurement method in three-dimensional models created by CT images taken of the same subject. Analysis of variance and t-tests were carried out to evaluate the relationship between ligamentum flavum thickness and patient variables.Ligamentum flavum thickness was found to significantly increase with older age, lower lumbar level, and chronic low back pain (p < 0.03. No difference in ligamentum flavum thickness was observed between right and left sided measurements, or between male and female subjects. Disc height and both ligamentum flavum thickness measurements showed low to moderate correlations that reached significance (p < 0.01. Additionally, a moderate and significant correlation between disc degeneration grade and ligamentum flavum thickness does exist (p <0.001.By measuring ligamentum flavum thickness on MR images at two different sites and comparing degrees of disc degeneration, we found that ligamentum flavum thickness may be closely related to the pathogenesis of pain processes in the spine.

  8. Reduced thoracolumbar fascia shear strain in human chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konofagou Elisa E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role played by the thoracolumbar fascia in chronic low back pain (LBP is poorly understood. The thoracolumbar fascia is composed of dense connective tissue layers separated by layers of loose connective tissue that normally allow the dense layers to glide past one another during trunk motion. The goal of this study was to quantify shear plane motion within the thoracolumbar fascia using ultrasound elasticity imaging in human subjects with and without chronic low back pain (LBP. Methods We tested 121 human subjects, 50 without LBP and 71 with LBP of greater than 12 months duration. In each subject, an ultrasound cine-recording was acquired on the right and left sides of the back during passive trunk flexion using a motorized articulated table with the hinge point of the table at L4-5 and the ultrasound probe located longitudinally 2 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the L2-3 interspace. Tissue displacement within the thoracolumbar fascia was calculated using cross correlation techniques and shear strain was derived from this displacement data. Additional measures included standard range of motion and physical performance evaluations as well as ultrasound measurement of perimuscular connective tissue thickness and echogenicity. Results Thoracolumbar fascia shear strain was reduced in the LBP group compared with the No-LBP group (56.4% ± 3.1% vs. 70.2% ± 3.6% respectively, p Conclusion Thoracolumbar fascia shear strain was ~20% lower in human subjects with chronic low back pain. This reduction of shear plane motion may be due to abnormal trunk movement patterns and/or intrinsic connective tissue pathology. There appears to be some sex-related differences in thoracolumbar fascia shear strain that may also play a role in altered connective tissue function.

  9. The Comparison of Efficacy of Tricyclic Antidepressant with and without Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs in Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    A.R. Yavarikia

    2007-01-01

    Introduction & Objectives: Low back pain (LBP) is one of common medical problems with several accepted medical modalities such as drugs, physiotherapy, surgery, etc. We studied the efficacy of tricyclic antidepressant (TCA), and tricyclic antidepressant plus non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (TCA + NSAID) in 200 patients with chronic LBP. Materials & Methods: In an experimental clinical trial study on patients with chronic low back pain without organic findings, patients were divided in t...

  10. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercise on functional disability and lumbar lordosis angle in patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Igsoo; Jeon, Chunbae; Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles in patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with chronic low back pain divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (n = 15) and a conservative treatment group (n = 15). [Methods] The lumbar stabilization exercise and conservative treatment groups performed an exercise program and conservative physical treatment, respect...

  11. A pragmatic multi-centred randomised controlled trial of yoga for chronic low back pain: Trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Helen; Tilbrook, Helen; Aplin, John; Chuang, Ling-Hsiang; Hewitt, Catherine; Jayakody, Shalmini; Semlyen, Anna; Soares, Marta O; Torgerson, David; Trewhela, Alison; Watt, Ian; Worthy, Gill

    2010-01-01

    A systematic review revealed three small randomised controlled trials of yoga for low back pain, all of which showed effects on back pain that favoured the yoga group. To build on these studies a larger trial, with longer term follow-up, and a number of different yoga teachers delivering the intervention is required. This study protocol describes the details of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Yoga for chronic Low Back Pain, which is...

  12. Chronic low back pain patients with accompanying leg pain : The relationship between pain extent and pain intensity, disability and health status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Maarten R.; van der Wurff, Peter; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2013-01-01

    Accompanying leg pain is commonly observed in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and is assumed to be an indicator for the disorder severity. However, it is still unknown whether it is possible to estimate a patient's functional status by the extent of leg pain present. In a post rehabilitat

  13. Possibilities of balneotherapy in treatment of subjective symptoms of chronic low back pain (lumbar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batsialou Ioanna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Chronic low back pain is a degenerative rheumatic disease and is characterized by various symptoms and clinical signs. Balneotherapy Balneotherapy represents a therapy by various hot or warm baths in natural mineral waters of specific physical and chemical characteristics. When used externally, they have mechanical, chemical and thermic effects. Balneotherapy of lumbar syndrome includes: individual baths, swimming in the pool, hydrokinesitherapy, underwater massage, underwater extension, mud therapy, mud baths. The therapy should be closely monitored for optimal efficacy and it is necessary to examine: functional status of the lumbosacral region, general functional status (level of activity, lower extremities, pain measurement, use of non-steroid anti-rheumatic and analgesic agents. In order to follow-up the effects of therapy and establish the prognosis it is important to perform: detailed anamnesis, anthropometrics measurements, socio-epidemiological research, clinical examinations. Conclusion Lumbar syndrome is usually caused by a degenerative disease of the spinal column. More than 25% of people under 45 years of age are unable to work due to chronic low back pain. That is why preventive measures, prompt diagnosis and adequate therapy are of utmost importance.

  14. An evidence-based guideline on yoga in reducing pain among adult patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    林德; Lam, Tak

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint and health problem in Hong Kong, particularly among middle-aged individuals. LBP is the main cause of chronic disability which significantly affects the daily life activities of patients. Pain might result in repeated hospital admissions and subsequently increase the burden on health care providers in Hong Kong. LBP has an enormous effect on quality of life and therefore deserves research attention. Growing evidence shows that yoga may help reduce...

  15. Trajectories of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axén, Iben; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain is not a self-limiting problem, but rather a recurrent and sometimes persistent disorder. To understand the course over time, detailed investigation, preferably using repeated measurements over extended periods of time, is needed. New knowledge concerning short-term trajectories...... indicates that the low back pain 'episode' is short lived, at least in the primary care setting, with most patients improving. Nevertheless, in the long term, low back pain often runs a persistent course with around two-thirds of patients estimated to be in pain after 12 months. Some individuals never have...... low back pain, but most have it on and off or persistently. Thus, the low back pain 'condition' is usually a lifelong experience. However, subgroups of patients with different back pain trajectories have been identified and linked to clinical parameters. Further investigation is warranted to...

  16. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) on Decreasing Pain, Depression and Anxiety of Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    M Abdolghadery; M Kafee; A Saberi; S Aryapouran

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Within chronic pains, back pain has the highest percentage. Psychological factors play an important role in the establishment and continuation of physical disability as well as in functional limitation in patients with chronic low back pain. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) on decreasing the pain, depression and anxiety of patients with chronic low back pain. ...

  17. Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and sleeping. Prevention What's the best way to sit? Sit in chairs with straight backs or low-back ... than by twisting at your waist. When driving, sit straight and move the seat forward. This helps ...

  18. Auricular Point Acupressure for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Feasibility Study for 1-Week Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hsing Yeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objective of this one-group, repeated-measures design was to explore the acceptance of auricular point acupressure (APA to reduce chronic low back pain (CLBP and estimate minimum clinically important differences (MCIDs for pain intensity change. Methods. Subjects received 7-day APA treatment. After appropriate acupoints were identified, vaccaria seeds were carefully taped onto each selected auricular point for 7-day. The Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (BPI was used to collect outcome data. Results. A total of 74 subjects participated in the study. Ten subjects dropped out and the retention rate was 87%. Subjects reported a 46% reduction in BPI worst pain, and over 50% reduction in BPI average pain, overall pain severity and pain interference by the end of study, and 62.5% subjects also reported less pain medication use. The MCIDs for the subscale of BPI ranged from .70 to 1.86 points. The percentage improvement of MCIDs from baseline was between 14.5–24.9%. Discussion. APA appears to be highly acceptable to patients with CLBP. A sham group is needed in order to differentiate the true effects of APA from the possible psychological effects of more frequent visits by the auricular therapist and patients’ expectation of the APA treatment.

  19. Predictors of communication preferences in patients with chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farin E

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Erik Farin, Lukas Gramm, Erika SchmidtUniversity Freiburg, Medical Center, Department of Quality Management and Social Medicine, Freiburg, GermanyBackground: The objective of this exploratory study was to identify patient-related predictors of communication preferences in patients with chronic low back pain for various dimensions of patient-physician communication (patient participation and orientation, effective and open communication, emotionally supportive communication, communication about personal circumstances.Methods: Eleven rehabilitation centers from various parts of Germany participated in collection of data between 2009 and 2011. A total of 701 patients with chronic low back pain were surveyed at the start of rehabilitation. The patient questionnaire captured communication preferences, pain impact, pain intensity, and psychologic variables (fear avoidance beliefs, illness coherence, control beliefs, communication self-efficacy, and personality characteristics. The rehabilitation physicians filled out a documentation sheet containing information on diagnosis, inability to work, duration of the illness, and comorbidity at the beginning and end of rehabilitation. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed.Results: On average, effective, open, and patient-centered communication was very important for patients with back pain, emotionally supportive communication was important, and communication about personal circumstances was somewhat important. The variance in communication preferences explained by the predictors studied here was 8%–19%. Older patients showed a lower preference for patient-centered and open communication, but a higher preference for communication about personal circumstances. Patients with psychologic risk factors (eg, fear avoidance beliefs, extroverted patients, and patients with high self-efficacy in patient-physician interaction generally had higher expectations of the physician's communicative behavior

  20. The non-invasive investigation of lumbar disc degeneration in patients with chronic low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The painful degenerate disc is a recognised cause of low back pain. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has now replaced discography in the non-invasive assessment of disk degeneration. However, the prohibitive capital expense of MRI and the small number of MR units in Australia produce limitations in clinical access. In contrast, Computed Tomography (CT) is readily available and is performed in most patients prior to MRI referral. This prospective study was undertaken to determine whether preliminary CT could offer any information about disc degeneration and so reduce the demand on a MRI scanner. 30 consecutive patients were studied all of whom had both CT and MRI examinations. Of a total 107 discs examined by both techniques, MRI was able to identify 37 degenerate discs. Conclusive evidence of degeneration (i.e. the presence of intervertebral gas) was only seen in 3 discs at CT (1 patient). Of the 29 posterior disc bulges found on CT, all were both bulging and degenerate on MRI. Indications for MRI based on the CT findings are recommended. Using these criteria, 13% (4 patients) of this study group could have avoided an expensive and unnecessary MR investigation. A useful algorithm for the investigation and assessment of patients with chronic low back pain is discussed. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Auricular Point Acupressure for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hsing Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT was designed to investigate the feasibility and effects of a 4-week auricular point acupressure (APA for chronic low back pain (CLBP. Methods. Participants were randomized to either true APA (true acupoints with taped seeds on the designated ear points for CLBP or sham APA (sham acupoints with taped seeds but on different locations than those designated for CLBP. The duration of treatment was four weeks. Participants were assessed before treatment, weekly during treatment, and 1 month following treatment. Results. Participants in the true APA group who completed the 4-week APA treatment had a 70% reduction in worst pain intensity, a 75% reduction in overall pain intensity, and a 42% improvement in disability due to back pain from baseline assessment. The reductions of worst pain and overall pain intensity in the true APA group were statistically greater than participants in the sham group (P<0.01 at the completion of a 4-week APA and 1 month followup. Discussion. The preliminary findings of this feasibility study showed a reduction in pain intensity and improvement in physical function suggesting that APA may be a promising treatment for patients with CLBP.

  2. Correlation between Radiologic Sign of Lumbar Lordosis and Functional Status in Patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf, Alireza; Farahangiz, Siamak; Pakniat Jahromi, Bita; Setayeshpour, Nazanin; Naseri, Mahshid; Nasseri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A cross-sectional study. Purpose To describe the correlation between lumbar lordosis angle and functional status of patients with chronic mechanical low back pain (CMLBP). Overview of Literature There are different and conflicting opinions regarding the relationship between the degree of lumbar lordosis and functional status of patients with low back pain. Nonetheless, the severity of lordosis is still one of the routine physical exams considered in rehabilitation clinics. Method...

  3. Changes in Sleep With Auricular Point Acupressure for Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chao Hsing; Suen, Lorna Kwai-Ping; Shen, Juan; Chien, Lung-Chang; Liang, Zhan; Glick, Ronald M; Morone, Natalia E; Chasens, Eileen R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report sleep quality from 4 weeks of auricular point acupressure that was designed for chronic low back pain and determine the relationship between pain intensity and sleep quality. Participants were randomized into the APA group (n = 30) or the sham-APA group (n = 31). At baseline assessment, 87% of the participants reported poor sleep quality. Participants who received APA had decreased daytime disturbance and improved global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores at end of intervention (EOI) and 1-month follow up compared to participants in the sham-APA group. For the APA group, both the sleep duration and wake after sleep onset decreased gradually during the 4-week APA (0.56% and 0.23% daily change, respectively). PMID:26244591

  4. [Health-related quality of life (SF-36) in chronic low back pain and comorbid depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, C; Schiltenwolf, M; Wang, H

    2010-06-01

    The purpose is to clarify if comorbidity of depression reduces health-related quality of life (SF-36) in patients with chronic low back pain (CR) and if those comorbid patients (CR+DE) benefit from multimodal pain treatment. Two groups (CR and CR+DE) each with 29 patients are compared over 6 months on study days 0, 21 (inpatient) and 180 (outpatient). Differences exist only at days 0 and 21, not at day 180, with group CR exhibiting higher SF-36 values in each case. Group CR+DE improves in the inpatient phase and especially in the outpatient phase and therefore over the entire study period more than group CR which increases solely in the inpatient phase. The comorbid group is more severely affected by their illness, but improves very constantly. The outpatient improvement suggests a good long-term prognosis. PMID:20458502

  5. Mind-Body Exercises for Nurses with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhrani-Shani, Pinky; Berry, Donna L; Arcari, Patricia; Langevin, Helene; Wayne, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic low back pain (CLBP) among nurses is a growing health concern. The multimodal nature of mind-body exercises has potential to impact physiological and psychological processes associated with chronic pain, affording possible advantages over conventional unimodal therapies. This paper summarizes the prevalence of and risk factors for CLBP among nurses, reviews the effectiveness in treating pain and disability of mind-body exercises (yoga and tai chi) for CLBP among the general and nursing population, and describes implications. Methods. Articles, published during or prior to 2015, were systematically identified through the PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect databases using the following search terms: nurses, mind-body, integrative, biopsychosocial, yoga, tai chi, back pain, and/or risk factors. Results. Prevalence estimates of CLBP among nurses ranged from 50% to 80%. Associated risk factors for CLBP included lifestyle and physical, psychological, psychosocial, and occupational factors. No published studies were identified that evaluated yoga or tai chi for nurses with CLBP. Studies in the general population suggested that these interventions are effective in reducing pain and disability and may improve factors/processes predictive of CLBP. Conclusion. This review suggests that evaluating the impact of multimodal interventions such as yoga and tai chi for nurses with CLBP warrants investigation. PMID:27446610

  6. Mind-Body Exercises for Nurses with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Evidence-Based Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcari, Patricia; Langevin, Helene; Wayne, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic low back pain (CLBP) among nurses is a growing health concern. The multimodal nature of mind-body exercises has potential to impact physiological and psychological processes associated with chronic pain, affording possible advantages over conventional unimodal therapies. This paper summarizes the prevalence of and risk factors for CLBP among nurses, reviews the effectiveness in treating pain and disability of mind-body exercises (yoga and tai chi) for CLBP among the general and nursing population, and describes implications. Methods. Articles, published during or prior to 2015, were systematically identified through the PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, and ScienceDirect databases using the following search terms: nurses, mind-body, integrative, biopsychosocial, yoga, tai chi, back pain, and/or risk factors. Results. Prevalence estimates of CLBP among nurses ranged from 50% to 80%. Associated risk factors for CLBP included lifestyle and physical, psychological, psychosocial, and occupational factors. No published studies were identified that evaluated yoga or tai chi for nurses with CLBP. Studies in the general population suggested that these interventions are effective in reducing pain and disability and may improve factors/processes predictive of CLBP. Conclusion. This review suggests that evaluating the impact of multimodal interventions such as yoga and tai chi for nurses with CLBP warrants investigation. PMID:27446610

  7. Investigational pharmacology for low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash K Bhandary

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Avinash K Bhandary1 , Gary P Chimes2, Gerard A Malanga3 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3New Jersey Sports Medicine Institute; Overlook Hospital; Mountainside Hospital; Rehabilitation Medicine and Electrodiagnosis, St Michael’s Medical Center; Horizon Healthcare Worker’s Compensation Services, Blue Cross and Blue Shield Worker’s Compensation, Summit, NJ, USAStudy design: Review and reinterpretation of existing literature.Objective: This review article summarizes the anatomy and pathogenesis of disease processes that contribute to low back pain, and discusses key issues in existing therapies for chronic low back pain. The article also explains the scientific rationale for investigational pharmacology and highlights emerging compounds in late development.Results/conclusion: While the diverse and complex nature of chronic low back pain continues to challenge clinicians, a growing understanding of chronic low back pain on a cellular level has refined our approach to managing chronic low back pain with pharmacology. Many emerging therapies with improved safety profiles are currently in the research pipeline and will contribute to a multimodal therapeutic algorithm in the near future. With the heterogeneity of the patient population suffering from chronic low back pain, the clinical challenge will be accurately stratifying the optimal pharmacologic approach for each patient.Keywords: low back pain, investigational, pharmacology, drugs

  8. Effect of Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain on Walking Economy: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Alberito Rodrigo; Ribeiro Bertor, Welds Rodrigo; Briani, Ronaldo Valdir; Zanini, Gabriela Matté; Silva, Lígia Inez; Andrade, Alexandro; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of chronic low back pain (LBP) and walking speed (WS) on metabolic power and cost of transport (CT). Subjects with chronic nonspecific LBP (LBP group [LG]; n = 9) and healthy (control group [CG]; n = 9) were included. The test battery was divided into 3 blocks according to WS as follows: preferred self-selected speed (PS), and lower and higher than the PS. In each block, the volunteers walked 5 min, during which oxygen consumption was measured. Although without differences between groups, the LG had CT lower in slower speeds than in faster speeds. Walking speed affected CT only in the LG, which the group had the greatest walking economy at slower speeds. PMID:26403060

  9. Tapentadol in the management of chronic low back pain: a novel approach to a complex condition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pergolizzi J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Pergolizzi1, Eli Alon2, Ralf Baron3, Cesare Bonezzi4, Jan Dobrogowski5, Rafael Gálvez6, Troels Jensen7, Hans-Georg Kress8, Marco AE Marcus9, Bart Morlion10, Serge Perrot11, Rolf-Detlef Treede121Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Universitätsspital Zurich, Switzerland; 3Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany; 4Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Pavia, Italy; 5Zaklad Badania i Leczenia Bólu, Kraków, Poland; 6Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves, Granada, Spain; 7Aarhus University, Denmark; 8Medical University of Vienna, Austria; 9Maastricht University Medical Center and University of Muenster, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 10University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium; 11Hôpital Dieu, Paris, France; 12Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: Chronic pain affects approximately 1 in 5 people in Europe, and around half of sufferers receive inadequate pain management. The most common location is the lower back. Pharmacological treatment of this condition is challenging because of the range of causative mechanisms and the difficulty of balancing analgesic efficacy and tolerability. An international panel of clinical pain specialists met in September, 2009, to discuss the treatment of chronic low back pain, and to review preclinical and clinical data relating to the new analgesic, tapentadol. A lack of consensus exists on the best treatment for low back pain. The range of regularly prescribed pharmacological agents extends from nonopioids (paracetamol, NSAIDs, and COX-2 inhibitors to opioids, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Pain relief may be compromised, however, by an undetected neuropathic component or intolerable side effects. Treatment is potentially life-long and effective analgesics are urgently needed, with demonstrable long-term safety. Combining separate agents with different mechanisms of action could overcome the limitations of present

  10. Effect of aerobic dance on pain, functional disability and quality of life on patients with chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.A.C. Okafor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is often an indication of pathologicalcondition of the intervertebral discs, vertebral bodies or supporting soft tissuesof the lower vertebral region. Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP presents withenormous consequence on the general performance of the sufferer, exerting ahuge cost on the individual, the family and the society. Dance therapy is arelatively new approach in the management of low back pain. This study wastherefore designed to investigate the effect of dance therapy on pain, functionaldisability and quality of life in patients with chronic low back pain.Thirty subjects diagnosed with non-specific CLBP particpated in the study.They were randomly divided into 2 groups, A and B, each comprising 15 subjects.In addition to conventional physiotherapy programme given to both groups,subjects in Group A also received aerobic dance, which comprised a four stage protocol. The entire treatment routinewas administered in a group session three times weekly consecutively for six weeks. Data as obtained in the copies ofcompleted questionnaires (Roland Morris Diability questionnaires and Nottingham Health Profile questionnaires andother measurements were summarized using mean, standard deviation and frequency tables. Student T-test was used toanalyze the data at 95 % confidence interval.There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.05 between the pre- and post- intervention scores for painintensity, functional disability and quality of life within the groups. There was also a statistically significant difference(p<0.05 in the mean change (pre/post intervention scores between Group A and Group B for pain intensity,functional disability and quality of life. Also the opinions and testimonies given by participants formed part of theevidence-based data.Whereas both conventional physiotherapy and aerobic dance showed significant effects in the pre/post-interventionscores, the aerobic dance group reported more significant effect in all

  11. The Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Auricular Point Acupressure for Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Chun; Yeh, Chao Hsing; Chien, Lung-Chang; Morone, Natalia E; Glick, Ronald M; Albers, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Auricular point acupressure (APA) is a promising treatment for pain management. Few studies have investigated the physiological mechanisms of APA analgesics. Method. In this pilot randomized clinical trial (RCT), a 4-week APA treatment was used to manage chronic low back pain (CLBP). Sixty-one participants were randomized into a real APA group (n = 32) or a sham APA group (n = 29). Blood samples, pain intensity, and physical function were collected at baseline and after 4 weeks of treatment. Results. Subjects in the real APA group reported a 56% reduction of pain intensity and a 26% improvement in physical function. Serum blood samples showed (1) a decrease in IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and calcitonin gene-related peptide [CGRP] and (2) an increase in IL-4. In contrast, subjects in the sham APA group (1) reported a 9% reduction in pain and a 2% improvement in physical function and (2) exhibited minimal changes of inflammatory cytokines and neuropeptides. Statistically significant differences in IL-4 and CGRP expression between the real and sham APA groups were verified. Conclusion. These findings suggest that APA treatment affects pain intensity through modulation of the immune system, as reflected by APA-induced changes in serum inflammatory cytokine and neuropeptide levels. PMID:26170869

  12. Effectiveness of Slump Neural Mobilization Technique for the management of chronic radicular low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of slump neural mobilization technique compared with lumber stabilization exercise (LSE) and shortwave diathermy (SWD) in the physical therapy management of chronic radicular low back pain (CRLBP). Methodology: A sample of 40 patients with CRLBP was selected and randomly placed into two groups A and B. 22 patients were treated with slump neural mobilization technique (SNMT), lumbar stabilization exercise (LSE) and Short wave diathermy (SWD), while 18 patient of group B were treated with LSE and SWD. All the patients were assessed by four point pain scale and Oswestry disability index (ODI) at the baseline and at the completion of three weeks at 5 days per week and 30 minutes single session per day. The data was collected on specially designed Performa and was analyzed by SPSS and paired t test was applied to determine the probability value at 95 % level of significance. Results: Both groups demonstrated significant improvement in pain score and ODI score, although improvement was more significant in group A (p<0.001 for both pain and ODI score) as compared to group B (p=0.003 for pain score and 0.163 for ODI score).table-I-III) Conclusion: It is concluded that SNMTalong LSE and SWD improves pain and function more as compared with LSE and SWD alone during the physical therapy management of CRLBP. (author)

  13. Segmental stabilization and muscular strengthening in chronic low back pain: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Renovato França

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To contrast the efficacy of two exercise programs, segmental stabilization and strengthening of abdominal and trunk muscles, on pain, functional disability, and activation of the transversus abdominis muscle (TrA, in individuals with chronic low back pain. DESIGN: Our sample consisted of 30 individuals, randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: segmental stabilization, where exercises focused on the TrA and lumbar multifidus muscles, and superficial strengthening, where exercises focused on the rectus abdominis, abdominus obliquus internus, abdominus obliquus externus, and erector spinae. Groups were examined to discovere whether the exercises created contrasts regarding pain (visual analogical scale and McGill pain questionnaire, functional disability (Oswestry disability questionnaire, and TrA muscle activation capacity (Pressure Biofeedback Unit = PBU. The program lasted 6 weeks, and 30-minute sessions occurred twice a week. Analysis of variance was used for inter- and intra-group comparisons. The significance level was established at 5%. RESULTS: As compared to baseline, both treatments were effective in relieving pain and improving disability (p<0.001. Those in the segmental stabilization group had significant gains for all variables when compared to the ST group (p<0.001, including TrA activation, where relative gains were 48.3% and -5.1%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Both techniques lessened pain and reduced disability. Segmental stabilization is superior to superficial strengthening for all variables. Superficial strengthening does not improve TrA activation capacity.

  14. The effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherie Wells

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP through a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs.A search for RCTs was undertaken using Medical Search Terms and synonyms for "Pilates" and "low back pain" within the maximal date range of 10 databases. Databases included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Cochrane Library; Medline; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; ProQuest: Health and Medical Complete, Nursing and Allied Health Source, Dissertation and Theses; Scopus; Sport Discus; Web of Science.Two independent reviewers were involved in the selection of evidence. To be included, relevant RCTs needed to be published in the English language. From 152 studies, 14 RCTs were included.Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological quality of RCTs using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. The author(s, year of publication, and details regarding participants, Pilates exercise, comparison treatments, and outcome measures, and findings, were then extracted.The methodological quality of RCTs ranged from "poor" to "excellent". A meta-analysis of RCTs was not undertaken due to the heterogeneity of RCTs. Pilates exercise provided statistically significant improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity between 4 and 15 weeks, but not at 24 weeks. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in improvements in pain and functional ability with Pilates exercise, massage therapy, or other forms of exercise at any time period.Pilates exercise offers greater improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity in the short term. Pilates exercise offers equivalent improvements to massage therapy and other forms of exercise. Future research should explore optimal Pilates exercise designs, and whether some people with CLBP may benefit from Pilates exercise

  15. Persistence of pain in patients with chronic low back pain reported via weekly automated text messages over one year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Krüger Jensen, Rikke; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A previous study has suggested that it is uncommon for patients with chronic bothersome low back pain (LBP), who consult the secondary health care sector, to report at least four consecutive weeks without such bothersome pain in 1 year. It is not yet known, however, how many days of the...... week they experience pain throughout the year. METHOD: The current study analyzed data collected in two randomized clinical studies conducted in 2007-9 on patients with back pain (Study 1 and 2). Study participants were patients with LBP for more than 2 months, one group with MRI-defined Modic changes...... symptoms during 1 year in patients from the secondary care sector with chronic LBP. The results range from bothersome pain each day of the week, every week of the year, to no weeks at all with 7 days of pain. Interestingly, this pattern is near-identical in the two study samples; those with non...

  16. Opioids for low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyo, Richard A; Von Korff, Michael; Duhrkoop, David

    2015-01-01

    Back pain affects most adults, causes disability for some, and is a common reason for seeking healthcare. In the United States, opioid prescription for low back pain has increased, and opioids are now the most commonly prescribed drug class. More than half of regular opioid users report back pain. Rates of opioid prescribing in the US and Canada are two to three times higher than in most European countries. The analgesic efficacy of opioids for acute back pain is inferred from evidence in other acute pain conditions. Opioids do not seem to expedite return to work in injured workers or improve functional outcomes of acute back pain in primary care. For chronic back pain, systematic reviews find scant evidence of efficacy. Randomized controlled trials have high dropout rates, brief duration (four months or less), and highly selected patients. Opioids seem to have short term analgesic efficacy for chronic back pain, but benefits for function are less clear. The magnitude of pain relief across chronic non-cancer pain conditions is about 30%. Given the brevity of randomized controlled trials, the long term effectiveness and safety of opioids are unknown. Loss of long term efficacy could result from drug tolerance and emergence of hyperalgesia. Complications of opioid use include addiction and overdose related mortality, which have risen in parallel with prescription rates. Common short term side effects are constipation, nausea, sedation, and increased risk of falls and fractures. Longer term side effects may include depression and sexual dysfunction. Screening for high risk patients, treatment agreements, and urine testing have not reduced overall rates of opioid prescribing, misuse, or overdose. Newer strategies for reducing risks include more selective prescription of opioids and lower doses; use of prescription monitoring programs; avoidance of co-prescription with sedative hypnotics; and reformulations that make drugs more difficult to snort, smoke, or inject. PMID

  17. Self-management and self-management support on functional ablement in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawi, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    This study examined self-management (SM), self-management support (SMS), and functional ablement in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients and the role of SM in explaining the relationship of SMS to functional ablement. The pervasiveness of CLBP is alarming in today's health care. Although the literature is beginning to explicate the impact of SM and SMS in other chronic illnesses, these are yet to be clarified in CLBP. The adapted chronic care model guided this study. A nonexperimental, cross-sectional, descriptive design with mediation analysis was used. Through convenience sampling, 110 participants were recruited from two pain centers that used similar multimodal pain management practices. Although the findings showed lack of mediation, it was found that SM and SMS were strongly correlated. Furthermore, overall health was found to be a significant covariate to the functional ablement of CLBP patients. This study assists in advancing knowledge and contributing toward understanding SM, SMS, and functional ablement in CLBP. It is important to engage patients and health care providers in SM and SMS. More exploration is necessary to assess the influences of SM and SMS in CLBP outcomes toward improving the complex care of these patients. PMID:24602423

  18. Risk of Chronic Low Back Pain Among Parturients Who Undergo Cesarean Delivery With Neuraxial Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Yuan-Yi; Lo, Yuan; Chen, Yan-Bo; Liu, Chun-Peng; Huang, Wei-Chun; Wen, Chun-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the risk of chronic low back pain (LBP) in parturients undergoing cesarean delivery (CD) with neuraxial anesthesia (NA). LBP is common during pregnancy and also after delivery, but its etiology is poorly understood. Previous studies that investigated the correlation between epidural labor analgesia and chronic low back pain were inconclusive. These studies lacked objective diagnostic criteria for LBP and did not exclude possible confounders. We performed this nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study to explore the relationship between CD with NA and subsequent LBP. From the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), we identified all primiparas who had given birth between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2013. Using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedure codes, we identified the women who had vaginal delivery (VD) and those who had CD. The mode of anesthesia was ascertained by the NHI codes. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of postpartum LBP in women undergoing CD with NA compared with those having VD. The outcome was a diagnosis of LBP according to the first ICD-9-CM diagnosis code. The patients were observed for 3 years after delivery or until diagnosis of postpartum LBP, withdrawal from the NHI system, death, or December 31, 2013. Of the 61,027 primiparas who underwent delivery during the observation period, 40,057 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Of these women, 27,097 (67.6%) received VD, 8662 (21.6%) received CD with spinal anesthesia, and 4298 (10.7%) received CD with epidural anesthesia (EA). Women who received CD with EA were found to have higher risk of LBP than did women who received VD, with the adjusted OR being 1.26 (95% CI: 1.17–1.34). CD with EA might increase the risk of subsequent chronic LBP. PMID:27100449

  19. Effect of General Health Status on Chronicity of Low Back Pain in Industrial Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Dehghan, Faezeh; Ghaffari, Mostafa; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Khansari, Bahareh; Heidari, Bijan; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Norouzi Javidan, Abbas; Emami Razavi, Seyed Hassan

    2016-03-01

    Recognizing patients at a higher risk of developing chronic low back pain (LBP) is important in industrial medicine. This study aimed to assess the power and quality of General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) for prediction of the odds of chronicity of acute LBP. This study was conducted on industrial workers. All subjects with acute LBP who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled. Demographic characteristics, occupational, physical, and mental parameters and the general health status of subjects were evaluated;  they were followed up for developing chronic LBP for one year. Cigarette smoking, high body mass index, job stress, physical load and high GHQ scores were found to be the risk factors for the progression of acute LBP to chronic LBP (P0.05). High GHQ score can be a risk factor for progression of acute LBP to chronic LBP. The GHQ in combination with the Job Content Questionnaire can be used as a quick and simple screening tool for detection of subjects at high risk of chronic LBP when evaluating acute LBP in an occupational setting. PMID:27107527

  20. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT and Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT on Decreasing Pain, Depression and Anxiety of Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abdolghadery

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: The results support the effectiveness of MBCT and CBT in decreasing pain, depression and anxiety. Therefore, taking account of these two therapeutic methods is very important for patients with chronic low back pain.

  1. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Exercise and Physical Activity on Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Rebecca; Bloxham, Saul

    2016-01-01

    Back pain is a major health issue in Western countries and 60%–80% of adults are likely to experience low back pain. This paper explores the impact of back pain on society and the role of physical activity for treatment of non-specific low back pain. A review of the literature was carried out using the databases SPORTDiscuss, Medline and Google Scholar. A general exercise programme that combines muscular strength, flexibility and aerobic fitness is beneficial for rehabilitation of non-specific chronic low back pain. Increasing core muscular strength can assist in supporting the lumbar spine. Improving the flexibility of the muscle-tendons and ligaments in the back increases the range of motion and assists with the patient’s functional movement. Aerobic exercise increases the blood flow and nutrients to the soft tissues in the back, improving the healing process and reducing stiffness that can result in back pain. PMID:27417610

  2. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Exercise and Physical Activity on Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Back pain is a major health issue in Western countries and 60%–80% of adults are likely to experience low back pain. This paper explores the impact of back pain on society and the role of physical activity for treatment of non-specific low back pain. A review of the literature was carried out using the databases SPORTDiscuss, Medline and Google Scholar. A general exercise programme that combines muscular strength, flexibility and aerobic fitness is beneficial for rehabilitation of non-specific chronic low back pain. Increasing core muscular strength can assist in supporting the lumbar spine. Improving the flexibility of the muscle-tendons and ligaments in the back increases the range of motion and assists with the patient’s functional movement. Aerobic exercise increases the blood flow and nutrients to the soft tissues in the back, improving the healing process and reducing stiffness that can result in back pain.

  3. Yoga as a treatment for chronic low back pain: A systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Douglas G.; Holt, Jacquelyn A.; Sklar, Marisa; Groessl, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic low back pain (CLBP) affects millions of people worldwide, and appears to be increasing in prevalence. It is associated not only with pain, but also with increased disability, psychological symptoms, and reduced quality of life. There are various treatment options for CLBP, but no single therapy stands out as being the most effective. In the past 10 years, yoga interventions have been studied as a CLBP treatment approach. The objective of this paper is to review the current literature supporting the efficacy of yoga for CLBP. Methods A literature search through the beginning of 2015 was conducted in Pub Med for randomized control trials addressing treatment of CLBP with yoga. Results In this review we evaluate the use of yoga as a treatment for CLBP. Specifically we evaluate how yoga impacts physical functioning and disability, pain, and associated psychological symptoms. We also evaluate possible mediators of the effect of yoga and the safety of yoga. Discussion With few exceptions, previous studies and the recent randomized control trials (RCTs) indicate that yoga can reduce pain and disability, can be practiced safely, and is well received by participants. Some studies also indicate that yoga may improve psychological symptoms, but these effects are currently not as well established. PMID:27231715

  4. Comparing Physical Therapy Accompanying Exercise with Only Exercise Treatments in Patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Özlem Yılmaz; Pınar Küçük Eroğlu; Fatma Gül Yurdakul; Yeşim Garip Çimen; Filiz Eser; Aslıhan Alhan; Hatice Bodur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Investigating and comparing the effects of exercise and physical therapy accompanying exercise treatments in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials and Methods: Twenty three patients with mechanical type low back existing more than 3 months were included one of the exercise or the physical therapy+exercise groups according to their application sequence. Both of the groups performed lumbar flexion and extension exercises, strengthening of the lumbar and abdominal...

  5. Exercise therapy for chronic low back pain: protocol for an individual participant data meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden Jill A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain (LBP is one of the leading causes of disability and has a major socioeconomic impact. Despite a large amount of research in the field, there remains uncertainty about the best treatment approach for chronic LBP, and identification of relevant patient subgroups is an important goal. Exercise therapy is a commonly used strategy to treat chronic low back pain and is one of several interventions that evidence suggests is moderately effective. In parallel with an update of the 2005 Cochrane review, we will undertake an individual participant data (IPD meta-analysis, which will allow us to standardize analyses across studies and directly derive results, and to examine differential treatment effects across individuals to estimate how patients’ characteristics modify treatment benefit. Methods/design We will use standard systematic review methods advocated by the Cochrane Collaboration to identify relevant trials. We will include trials evaluating exercise therapy compared to any or no other interventions in adult non-specific chronic LBP. Our primary outcomes of interest include pain, functional status, and return-to-work/absenteeism. We will assess potential risk of bias for each study meeting selection criteria, using criteria and methods recommended by the Cochrane BRG. The original individual participant data will be requested from the authors of selected trials having moderate to low risk of bias. We will test original data and compile a master dataset with information about each trial mapped on a pre-specified framework, including reported characteristics of the study sample, exercise therapy characteristics, individual patient characteristics at baseline and all follow-up periods, subgroup and treatment effect modifiers investigated. Our analyses will include descriptive, study-level meta-analysis and meta-regression analyses of the overall treatment effect, and individual-level IPD meta-analyses of treatment

  6. Health literacy and beliefs among a community cohort with and without chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Andrew M; Jordan, Joanne E; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Burnett, Angus F; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Chua, Jason Y Y; Osborne, Richard H; Straker, Leon M

    2010-08-01

    Health literacy, the ability to seek, understand and utilise health information, is important for good health. Suboptimal health literacy has been associated with poorer health outcomes in many chronic conditions although this has not been studied in chronic low back pain (CLBP). We examined the health literacy of individuals with CLBP using a mixed methods approach. One-hundred and seventeen adults, comprising 61 with no history of CLBP and 56 with CLBP (28 with low and high disability, respectively, as determined by a median split in Oswestry scores) participated. Data regarding severity of pain, LBP-related disability, fear avoidance, beliefs about LBP and pain catastrophizing were collected using questionnaires. Health literacy was measured using the Short-form Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA). A sub-sample of 36 participants with CLBP also participated in in-depth interviews to qualitatively explore their beliefs about LBP and experiences in seeking, understanding and using information related to LBP. LBP-related beliefs and behaviours, rather than pain intensity and health literacy skills, were found to be important correlates of disability related to LBP. Individuals with CLBP-high disability had poorer back pain beliefs and increased fear avoidance behaviours relating to physical activity. Health literacy (S-TOFHLA) was not related to LBP beliefs and attitudes. Qualitatively, individuals with CLBP-high disability adopted a more passive coping style and had a pathoanatomic view of their disorder compared to individuals with CLBP-low disability. While all participants with CLBP had adequate health literacy scores (S-TOFHLA), qualitative data highlighted difficulties in seeking, understanding and utilising LBP information. PMID:20603025

  7. Antineuropathic and Antinociceptive Drugs Combination in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Luca Romanò

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Chronic low back pain (LBP is often characterized by both nociceptive and neuropathic components. While various monotherapies have been reported of only limited efficacy, combining drugs with different mechanisms of action and targets appears a rational approach. Aim of this systematic review is to assess the efficacy and safety of different combined pharmacological treatments, compared to monotherapy or placebo, for the pharmacological treatment of chronic LBP. Methods. Published papers, written or abstracted in English from 1990 through 2011, comparing combined pharmacological treatments of chronic LBP to monotherapy or placebo were reviewed. Results. Six articles met the inclusion criteria. Pregabalin combined with celecoxib or opioids was shown to be more effective than either monotherapy. Oxycodone-paracetamol versus previous treatments and tramadol-paracetamol versus placebo were also reported as effective, while morphine-nortriptyline did not show any benefit over any single agent. Conclusions. In spite of theoretical advantages of combined pharmacological treatments of chronic LBP, clinical studies are remarkably few. Available data show that combined therapy, including antinociceptive and antineuropathic agents is more effective than monotherapy, with similar side effects.

  8. A meta-analysis of core stability exercise versus general exercise for chronic low back pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Qiang Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the effects of core stability exercise or general exercise for patients with chronic low back pain (LBP. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Exercise therapy appears to be effective at decreasing pain and improving function for patients with chronic LBP in practice guidelines. Core stability exercise is becoming increasingly popular for LBP. However, it is currently unknown whether core stability exercise produces more beneficial effects than general exercise in patients with chronic LBP. METHODS: Published articles from 1970 to October 2011 were identified using electronic searches. For this meta-analysis, two reviewers independently selected relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs investigating core stability exercise versus general exercise for the treatment of patients with chronic LBP. Data were extracted independently by the same two individuals who selected the studies. RESULTS: From the 28 potentially relevant trials, a total of 5 trials involving 414 participants were included in the current analysis. The pooling revealed that core stability exercise was better than general exercise for reducing pain [mean difference (-1.29; 95% confidence interval (-2.47, -0.11; P = 0.003] and disability [mean difference (-7.14; 95% confidence interval (-11.64, -2.65; P = 0.002] at the time of the short-term follow-up. However, no significant differences were observed between core stability exercise and general exercise in reducing pain at 6 months [mean difference (-0.50; 95% confidence interval (-1.36, 0.36; P = 0.26] and 12 months [mean difference (-0.32; 95% confidence interval (-0.87, 0.23; P = 0.25]. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to general exercise, core stability exercise is more effective in decreasing pain and may improve physical function in patients with chronic LBP in the short term. However, no significant long-term differences in pain severity were observed between patients who engaged in core stability exercise

  9. Comparison of Subjective and Objective Physical Functions in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agwubike EO

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the subjective and objective physical function scores of patients with Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP. Method: A cross- sectional survey design was used. Fifty-one patients with CLBP of mechanical origin were recruited from the physiotherapy out patient clinics of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital and the National Orthopedic Hospital both in Enugu, Nigeria. The box numerical scale, Roland-Morris Questionnaire (RMQ-24 and the Back Performance Scale (BPS were used to assess the present pain intensity, the subjective and objective functional status of the participants respectively. Pearson correlation was used to determine relationships. Multiple Regressions were used to determine the predictors of objective function. Alpha level was set at 0.5. Results: The mean age and Body Mass Index of the participants were 49.04 ± 14.33 years and 26.57 ± 4.29 kg/m2 respectively. The mean Pain Intensity, subjective disability (RMQ and objective disability (BPS scores were 6.33 ± 2.09, 9.76 ± 5.14 and 6.43 ± 2.9 respectively. Stepwise multiple regressions showed that when all the variables were entered only marital status was a significant predictor of objective physical function. Conclusion: There is no significant association between subjective and objective functions in patients with CLBP. However, marital status (married is a significant predictor of objective function in CLBP.

  10. The relationship between pain severity and patient-reported outcomes among patients with chronic low back pain in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery W

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available William Montgomery,1 Jeffrey Vietri,2 Jing Shi,3 Kei Ogawa,4 Sawako Kariyasu,4 Levent Alev,4 Masaya Nakamura5 1Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd., Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Health Outcomes Practice, Kantar Health, Horsham, PA, 3Health Outcomes Practice, Kantar Health, Princeton, NJ, USA; 4Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Kobe, Japan; 5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Objective: The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of pain severity on patient-reported outcomes among individuals diagnosed with chronic low back pain in Japan. Methods: Data were provided by the 2012 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey (N=29,997, a web-based survey of individuals in Japan aged ≥18 years. This analysis included respondents diagnosed with low back pain of ≥3-month duration. Measures included the revised Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Survey Instrument, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale, the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment: General Health questionnaire, and self-reported all-cause health care visits (6 months. Generalized linear models were used to assess the relationship between outcomes and severity of pain in the past week as reported on a numeric rating scale ranging from 0 (no pain to 10 (pain as bad as you can imagine, controlling for length of diagnosis, sociodemographics, and general health characteristics. Results: A total of 290 respondents were included in the analysis; mean age was 56 years, 41% were females, and 56% were employed. Pain severity was 3/10 for the first quartile, 5/10 for the median, and 7/10 for the third quartile of this sample. Increasing severity was associated with lower scores for mental and physical component summaries and Short-Form 6D health utility, higher depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scores, greater absenteeism and presenteeism, greater activity impairment

  11. Low back pain - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fracture of the spinal cord Muscle spasm (very tense muscles) Ruptured or herniated disk Sciatica Spinal stenosis ( ... as ice, mild painkillers, physical therapy, and proper exercises. Most of the time, back pain will get ...

  12. Low back pain - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... narrowing of the spinal canal) Spine curvatures (like scoliosis or kyphosis), which may be inherited and seen ... TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  13. Effects of Pilates exercise programs in people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Antonino; Bianco, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Messina, Giuseppe; Montalto, Maria Alessandra; Bellafiore, Marianna; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Iovane, Angelo; Palma, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Pilates method has recently become a fast-growing popular way of exercise recommended for healthy individuals and those engaged in rehabilitation. Several published studies have examined the effects of Pilates method in people with chronic low back pain (LBP). The objective of this study is to describe and provide an extensive overview of the scientific literature comparing the effectiveness of the Pilates method on pain and disability in patients with chronic nonspecific LBP. The study is based on the data from the following sources: MEDLINE-NLM, MEDLINE-EBSCO, Scopus Elsevier, Cochrane, DOAJ, SciELO, and PLOSONE. Original articles and systematic reviews of adults with chronic nonspecific LBP that evaluated pain and/or disability were included in this study; studies in which the primary treatment was based on Pilates method exercises compared with no treatment, minimal intervention, other types of intervention, or other types of exercises. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) were adopted. The literature search included 7 electronic databases and the reference list of relevant systematic reviews and original articles to July 2014. Two independent investigators conducted the literature search and performed the synthesis as follows: Study Design; Sample (n); Disability measure; Intervention; and Main results. The searches identified a total of 128 articles. From these, 29 were considered eligible and were included in the analysis. The items were stratified as follows: Pilates method versus other kind of exercises (n = 6 trials) and Pilates method versus no treatment group or minimal intervention for short-term pain (n = 9 trials); the therapeutic effect of the Pilates method in randomized cohorts (n = 5); and analysis of reviews (n = 9). We found that there is a dearth of studies that clearly demonstrates the efficacy of a specific Pilates exercise program over another in the treatment of chronic pain. However, the

  14. Yoga for veterans with chronic low back pain: Design and methods of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groessl, Erik J; Schmalzl, Laura; Maiya, Meghan; Liu, Lin; Goodman, Debora; Chang, Douglas G; Wetherell, Julie L; Bormann, Jill E; Atkinson, J Hamp; Baxi, Sunita

    2016-05-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) afflicts millions of people worldwide, with particularly high prevalence in military veterans. Many treatment options exist for CLBP, but most have limited effectiveness and some have significant side effects. In general populations with CLBP, yoga has been shown to improve health outcomes with few side effects. However, yoga has not been adequately studied in military veteran populations. In the current paper we will describe the design and methods of a randomized clinical trial aimed at examining whether yoga can effectively reduce disability and pain in US military veterans with CLBP. A total of 144 US military veterans with CLBP will be randomized to either yoga or a delayed treatment comparison group. The yoga intervention will consist of 2× weekly yoga classes for 12weeks, complemented by regular home practice guided by a manual. The delayed treatment group will receive the same intervention after six months. The primary outcome is the change in back pain-related disability measured with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire at baseline and 12-weeks. Secondary outcomes include pain intensity, pain interference, depression, anxiety, fatigue/energy, quality of life, self-efficacy, sleep quality, and medication usage. Additional process and/or mediational factors will be measured to examine dose response and effect mechanisms. Assessments will be conducted at baseline, 6-weeks, 12-weeks, and 6-months. All randomized participants will be included in intention-to-treat analyses. Study results will provide much needed evidence on the feasibility and effectiveness of yoga as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of CLBP in US military veterans. PMID:27103548

  15. EFFECT OF MYOFASCIAL RELEASE THERAPY ON PAIN RELATED DISABILITY, QUALITY OF SLEEP AND DEPRESSION IN OLDER ADULTS WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. B.Arun, MPT, PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain was experienced by 50% of older adults that has threatened to quality of life. The economic cost of low back pain is more in older adults. Various literatures found that there is strong relationships exist between the low back pain and the psychosocial factors like sleep disturbances, depression, mood sway and chronic illness. Studies has found that depression is one of the commonest psychological problem faced by older adults which relates to other factors like pain, sleep disturbances ect.. Physiotherapy has been shown very effective in the management of chronic low back pain. Various approaches in physiotherapy play a major role in rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. This study estimates to find out the effect of myofascial release therapy on pain related disability, quality of sleep and depression in older adults with chronic low back pain. Study is a single group pre test and post test design. 37 Patients with chronic low back pain were selected from a community setup. Selected subjects were undergone 6 weeks of myofascial release therapy along with moist heat therapy. At the end the outcome measured are pain related disability using pain disability index, Quality of sleep using Insomnia severity index and depression using beck depression inventory. The paired ‘t’ test was used to find out the differences between variables. The result showed that there was a significant improvement in the pre test and post test variables. The beck depression inventory was 21.3 (p<0.05%, and the pain disability index was 24.9 (p<0.05%. The study concludes that the myofascial release therapy is very effective in reducing the pain related disability, quality of sleep and depression on older adults with chronic low back pain.

  16. Effects of complex manual therapy on PTSD, pain, function, and balance of male torture survivors with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Yu, Seong Hun

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify the impact of physiotherapy using complex manual therapy as a part of an integrated treatment for sequelae in the musculoskeletal system of torture survivors. [Subjects] This study reviewed 30 male torture survivors presenting with chronic low back pain. They were randomly selected and divided into two groups: an experimental group and a control group. [Methods] For the experimental group, complex manual therapy was performed twice a week for 8 weeks to improve the physical sequelae of patients. Improvement was measured using the PDS-K for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain examination, the Korean Oswestry Disability Index (KODI) for back function assessment, and the Balance System SD as a dynamic balance test. The total period of the intervention for both groups was 8 weeks. [Results] For the experimental group, PDS-K, VAS, KODI, and the dynamic balance test all showed significant improvements after the intervention, which they did not for the control group. In the comparison of the groups, PDS-K, VAS, KODI, and the dynamic balance test all showed significant differences. [Conclusion] Complex manual therapy for torture survivors with chronic low back pain contributes to functional recovery by reducing back pain. The treatment can be considered to have positive effects on sequelae in the musculoskeletal system of torture survivors as they age. PMID:26504288

  17. Treating non-specific chronic low back pain through the Pilates Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Touche, Roy; Escalante, Karla; Linares, María Teresa

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this study is to review and analyze scientific articles where the Pilates Method was used as treatment for non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP). Articles were searched using the Medline, EMBASE, PEDro, CINAHL, and SPORTDICUS databases. The criteria used for inclusion were randomized controlled trials (RCT) and clinical controlled trials (CCT) published in English where therapeutic treatment was based on the Pilates Method. The analysis was carried out by two independent reviewers using the PEDro and Jadad Scales. Two RCTs and one CCT were selected for a retrospective analysis. The results of the studies analyzed all demonstrate positive effects, such as improved general function and reduction in pain when applying the Pilates Method in treating non-specific CLBP in adults. However, further research is required to determine which specific parameters are to be applied when prescribing exercises based on the Pilates Method with patients suffering from non-specific CLBP. Finally, we believe that more studies must be carried out where the samples are more widespread so as to give a larger representation and more reliable results. PMID:19083695

  18. Vertical heterophoria and postural control in nonspecific chronic low back pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Matheron

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test postural control during quiet standing in nonspecific chronic low back pain (LBP subjects with vertical heterophoria (VH before and after cancellation of VH; also to compare with healthy subjects with, and without VH. Fourteen subjects with LBP took part in this study. The postural performance was measured through the center of pressure displacements with a force platform while the subjects fixated on a target placed at either 40 or 200 cm, before and after VH cancellation with an appropriate prism. Their postural performance was compared to that of 14 healthy subjects with VH and 12 without VH (i.e. vertical orthophoria studied previously in similar conditions. For LBP subjects, cancellation of VH with a prism improved postural performance. With respect to control subjects (with or without VH, the variance of speed of the center of pressure was higher, suggesting more energy was needed to stabilize their posture in quiet upright stance. Similarly to controls, LBP subjects showed higher postural sway when they were looking at a target at a far distance than at a close distance. The most important finding is that LBP subjects with VH can improve their performance after prism-cancellation of their VH. We suggest that VH reflects mild conflict between sensory and motor inputs involved in postural control i.e. a non optimal integration of the various signals. This could affect the performance of postural control and perhaps lead to pain. Nonspecific chronic back pain may results from such prolonged conflict.

  19. Neuromuscular adaptations predict functional disability independently of clinical pain and psychological factors in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Jean-Daniel; Abboud, Jacques; St-Pierre, Charles; Piché, Mathieu; Descarreaux, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain exhibit characteristics such as clinical pain, psychological symptoms and neuromuscular adaptations. The purpose of this study was to determine the independent contribution of clinical pain, psychological factors and neuromuscular adaptations to disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Clinical pain intensity, pain catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs, anxiety, neuromuscular adaptations to chronic pain and neuromuscular responses to experimental pain were assessed in 52 patients with chronic low back pain. Lumbar muscle electromyographic activity was assessed during a flexion-extension task (flexion relaxation phenomenon) to assess both chronic neuromuscular adaptations and neuromuscular responses to experimental pain during the task. Multiple regressions showed that independent predictors of disability included neuromuscular adaptations to chronic pain (β=0.25, p=0.006, sr(2)=0.06), neuromuscular responses to experimental pain (β=-0.24, p=0.011, sr(2)=0.05), clinical pain intensity (β=0.28, p=0.002, sr(2)=0.08) and psychological factors (β=0.58, ppain intensity and psychological factors, and contribute to inter-individual differences in patients' disability. This suggests that disability, in chronic low back pain patients, is determined by a combination of factors, including clinical pain, psychological factors and neuromuscular adaptations. PMID:24837629

  20. The effect of continuous ultrasound on chronic low back pain: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

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    Naghdi Soofia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic non-specific low-back pain (LBP is one of the most common and expensive musculoskeletal disorders in industrialized countries. Similar to other countries in the world, LBP is a common health and socioeconomic problem in Iran. One of the most widely used modalities in the field of physiotherapy for treating LBP is therapeutic ultrasound. Despite its common use, there is still inconclusive evidence to support its effectiveness in this group of patients. This randomised trial will evaluate the effectiveness of continuous ultrasound in addition to exercise therapy in patients with chronic LBP. Methods and design A total of 46 patients, between the ages 18 and 65 years old who have had LBP for more than three months will be recruited from university hospitals. Participants will be randomized to receive continuous ultrasound plus exercise therapy or placebo ultrasound plus exercise therapy. These groups will be treated for 10 sessions during a period of 4 weeks. Primary outcome measures will be functional disability and pain intensity. Lumbar flexion and extension range of motion, as well as changes in electromyography muscle fatigue indices, will be measured as secondary outcomes. All outcome measures will be measured at baseline, after completion of the treatment sessions, and after one month. Discussion The results of this trial will help to provide some evidence regarding the use of continuous ultrasound in chronic LBP patients. This should lead to a more evidence-based approach to clinical decision making regarding the use of ultrasound for LBP. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR2251

  1. Postural deviations from chronic low back pain and correction through exercise therapy

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    Farahpour N

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown that five deficits of the proprioceptive system and poor motor skills are associated with chronic low back pain (CLBP. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. The objectives of this study were to assess the dynamic postural balance behavior of CLBP patients, as well as the effects of a specific exercise therapy for the treatment of CLBP and related postural imbalances. Methods: Sixteen females with CLBP and 30 healthy females all between 20 and 40 years of age, of similar height and weight, voluntarily participated in this study. Patients underwent a three-month therapeutic exercise program. The disability and back pain of the patients were measured using the Oswestry and Quebec questionnaires, respectively. A dynamic stability platform system (Biodex was used to evaluate the postural imbalances in both groups. All measurements of the experimental group were repeated after the therapy. Results: Overall deviation of center of gravity (COG from COBOS in patients and controls were 3 (±0.3 and 1.3 (±0.2, respectively. Thus, postural imbalances were 2.3 times greater in the patients than those of the controls. After the treatment, the disability and pain of the patients were diminished by 53% and 58%, respectively. Furthermore, with the improvement of the patients COG deviation, both groups had similar posture. Conclusions: The postural orientation of CLBP patients was significantly improved by the therapeutic exercise program. The applied exercise therapy significantly reduced both the pain and the disability of the patients. Based on these conclusions, we recommend that postural correction be included in regular therapeutic exercise programs.

  2. Effects of attention on the control of locomotion in individuals with chronic low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoth, Claudine J.C.; Stins, John F.; Pont, Menno; Kerckhoff, Frederick; Beek, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. People who suffer from low back pain (LBP) exhibit an abnormal gait pattern, characterized by shorter stride length, greater step width, and an impaired thorax-pelvis coordination which may undermine functional walking. As a result, gait in LBP may require stronger cognitive regulation c

  3. Role of Self-Efficacy in Rehabilitation Outcome among Chronic Low Back Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmaier, Elizabeth M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined role of self-efficacy beliefs in rehabilitation of 45 low back pain patients participating in 3-week rehabilitation program. Increments in self-efficacy beliefs during program were not associated with improved patient functioning at discharge. However, in support of theorized role of self-efficacy in behavior change, increments in…

  4. Longitudinal associations between physical load and chronic low back pain in the general population: the Doetichem Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostrom, S.H.; Verschuren, M.; Vet, de H.C.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Picavet, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design. Prospective cohort study. Objective. We explored long-term associations between physical load exposure and chronic low back pain (LBP) using data from an ongoing population-based cohort study. Summary of Background Data. Physical load in work or daily life is often studied in relation

  5. Psychological Interventions in the Rehabilitation of Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: Evidence and Recommendations from Systematic Reviews and Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Christina; Mittag, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to summarize evidence and recommendations for psychological interventions in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. We carried out a systematic literature search in several databases and on the websites of professional associations to identify relevant reviews and guidelines. In addition to the…

  6. Pilates versus general exercise effectiveness on pain and functionality in non-specific chronic low back pain subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostagi, Fernanda Queiroz Ribeiro Cerci; Dias, Josilainne Marcelino; Pereira, Ligia Maxwell; Obara, Karen; Mazuquin, Bruno Fles; Silva, Mariana Felipe; Silva, Monica Angelica Cardoso; de Campos, Renata Rosa; Barreto, Maria Simone Tavares; Nogueira, Jéssyca Fernandes; Lima, Tarcísio Brandão; Carregaro, Rodrigo Luiz; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa

    2015-10-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common causes of disability, and the Pilates method has been associated with improvements in symptoms. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the Pilates method, when compared to general exercises, on pain and functionality after eight weeks (16 sessions, 2×/week) and a follow-up of three months, in subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). A randomised controlled trial composed of 22 subjects was proposed. Subjects were allocated into two groups: the Pilates group (PG) (n = 11) and the general exercise group (GEG) (n = 11). The PG protocol was based on the Pilates method and the GEG performed exercises to manage NSCLBP. There were no differences between the groups. When analysed over time, the GEG demonstrated improvements in functionality between baseline and the end of treatment (P = .02; Cohen'sd¯ = 0.34) and baseline and follow-up (P = .04; Cohen'sd¯ = 0.31). There were no differences between the Pilates and general exercises with regard to pain and functionality in NSCLBP subjects but general exercises were better than Pilates for increasing functionality and flexibility. PMID:26592221

  7. Sling exercise for chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Yu-Shan Yue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trials on sling exercise (SE, commonly performed to manage chronic low back pain (LBP, yield conflicting results. This study aimed to review the effects of SE on chronic LBP. METHODS: The randomized controlled trials comparing SE with other treatments or no treatment, published up to August 2013, were identified by electronic searches. Primary outcomes were pain, function, and return to work. The weighted mean difference (WMD and 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated, using a random-effects model. RESULTS: Risk of bias was rated as high in 9 included trials, where some important quality components such as blinding were absent and sample sizes were generally small. We found no clinically relevant differences in pain or function between SE and other forms of exercise, traditional Chinese medical therapy, or in addition to acupuncture. Based on two trials, SE was more effective than thermomagnetic therapy at reducing pain (short-term: WMD -13.90, 95% CI -22.19 to -5.62; long-term: WMD -26.20, 95% CI -31.32 to -21.08 and improving function (short-term: WMD -10.54, 95% CI -14.32 to -6.75; long-term: WMD -25.75, 95% CI -30.79 to -20.71. In one trial we found statistically significant differences between SE and physical agents combined with drug therapy (meloxicam combined with eperisone hydrochloride but of borderline clinical relevance for pain (short-term: WMD -15.00, 95% CI -19.64 to -10.36 and function (short-term: WMD -10.00; 95% CI -13.70 to -6.30. There was substantial heterogeneity among the two trials comparing SE and thermomagnetic therapy; both these trials and the trial comparing SE with physical agents combined with drug therapy had serious methodological limitations. INTERPRETATION: Based on limited evidence from 2 trials, SE was more effective for LBP than thermomagnetic therapy. Clinically relevant differences in effects between SE and other forms of exercise, physical agents combined with drug therapy, traditional

  8. Disrupted TH17/Treg balance in patients with chronic low back pain.

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    Benjamin Luchting

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (CLBP is a leading cause of disability and costs in health care systems worldwide. Despite extensive research, the exact pathogenesis of CLBP, particularly the individual risk of chronification remains unclear. To investigate a possible role of the adaptive immune system in the pathophysiology of CLBP, we analyzed T cell related cytokine profiles, T cell related mRNA expression patterns and the distribution of T cell subsets in 37 patients suffering from nonspecific CLBP before and after multimodal therapy in comparison to 25 healthy controls. Serum patterns of marker cytokines were analyzed by Luminex technology, mRNA expression of cytokines and specific transcription factors was measured by real-time PCR, and distribution of TH1-, TH2-, TH17- and regulatory T cell (Tregs subsets was determined by multicolor flow cytometry. We found that CLBP patients exhibit an increased number of anti-inflammatory Tregs, while pro-inflammatory TH17 cells are decreased, resulting in an altered TH17/Treg ratio. Accordingly, FoxP3 and TGF-β-mRNA expression was elevated, while expression of IL-23 was reduced. Serum cytokine analyses proved to be unsuitable to monitor the adaptive immune response in CLBP patients. We further show that even after successful therapy with lasting reduction of pain, T cell subset patterns remained altered after a follow-up period of 6 months. These findings suggest an involvement of TH17/Treg cells in the pathogenesis of CLBP and emphasize the importance of these cells in the crosstalk of pain and immune response.German Clinical Trial Register: Registration Trial DRKS00005954.

  9. Reliability of lumbar movement dysfunction tests for chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christoph Michael; Heimgartner, Martin; Rast, Fabian Marcel; Ernst, Markus Josef; Oetiker, Sarah; Kool, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Assessment of lumbar movement dysfunction commonly comprises trunk range of motion (ROM), movement or control impairment (MCI), and reposition error (RE). Those assessments are typically based on visual observation. Consequently it is not possible to reliably quantify back movements for intersubject comparisons, or for monitoring changes before and after an intervention. Inertial measurement unit (IMU)-systems could be used to quantify these movement dysfunctions in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of movement dysfunction tests when measured with a novel IMU-system. The reliability of eleven movement dysfunction tests (four ROM, six MCI and one RE tests) were analysed using generalizability-theory and minimal detectable change, measuring 21 chronic low back pain patients in seven trials on two days. Reliability varied across tests and variables. Four ROM and selected MCI tests and variables were identified as reliable. On average, ROM test were more reliable, compared to MCI and RE tests. An attempt should be made to improve the reliability of MCI and RE measures, for example through better standardizations. Subsequently these measures should be studied further for intersubject comparisons and monitoring changes after an intervention. PMID:26980560

  10. Efficacy of the Pilates method for pain and disability in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gisela C. Miyamoto; Leonardo O. P. Costa; Cabral, Cristina M.N.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the available evidence on the efficacy of the Pilates method in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. METHOD: Searches were performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, SciELO, LILACS, CINAHL and CENTRAL in March 2013. Randomized controlled trials that tested the effectiveness of the Pilates method (against a nontreatment group, minimal intervention or other types of interventions) in adults with chronic low back pain were included regardless the la...

  11. Intramuscular or periosteal acupuncture for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain in the neck and low back : Effects on pain, physical and psychological functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson, Ylva

    2008-01-01

    Background: Periosteal acupuncture has shown promising results in the clinic. No studies of effects in patients with chronic pain in the neck and low back are today available. Aims: The main purpose was to compare intramuscular and periosteal acupuncture. The specific aims were to compare three groups of patients suffering from chronic musculoskeletal pain in the neck and/or low back, one with intramuscular acupuncture, one with periosteal acupuncture and a third informa...

  12. Attitudes and beliefs of Brazilian physical therapists about chronic low back pain: a cross-sectional study

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    Maurício O. Magalhães

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To measure the attitudes and beliefs of Brazilian physical therapists about chronic low back pain and to identify the sociodemographic characteristics that are more likely to influence these attitudes and beliefs. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study with 100 Brazilian physical therapists who routinely work with chronic low back pain patients. The attitudes and beliefs were measured by the Pain Attitudes and Beliefs Scale for Physiotherapists (PABS.PT and the Health Care Providers' Pain and Impairment Relationship Scale (HC-PAIRS. Multivariate linear regression models were built to identify sociodemographic characteristics that could be associated with physical therapists' attitudes and beliefs. RESULTS: Mean scores on the biomedical and biopsychosocial factors of PABS.PT were 27.06 (SD 7.19 and 24.34 (SD 6.31, respectively, and the mean score on HC-PAIRS was 45.45 (SD 10.45. The score on PABS.PTbiomedical was associated with gender and years of professional experience. No variable was associated with the score on PABS.PTbiopsychosocial. The score on HC-PAIRS was significantly associated with the number of back pain patients seen by the physical therapist each month. These results indicate that male and less experienced physical therapists tend to follow a biomedical approach to the treatment of chronic low back pain patients, and that the lower the professional experience the stronger the belief in the relationship between pain and disability. CONCLUSIONS: Brazilian physical therapists are uncertain of the factors involved in the development and maintenance of chronic low back pain and about the relationship between pain and disability in these patients.

  13. Fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic low back and lower extremity pain

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    Gozani SN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shai N Gozani NeuroMetrix, Inc., Waltham, MA, USA Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS is effective in treating chronic low back and lower extremity pain. Background: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used for treatment of chronic pain. General-purpose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices are designed for stimulation anywhere on the body and often cannot be used while the user is active or sleeping. FS-TENS devices are designed for placement at a pre-determined location, which enables development of a wearable device for use over extended time periods. Methods: Study participants with chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain self-administered an FS-TENS device for 60 days. Baseline, 30-, and 60-day follow-up data were obtained through an online questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was the patient global impression of change. Pain intensity and interference were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Changes in use of concomitant pain medications were evaluated with a single-item global self-rating. Results: One hundred and thirty participants were enrolled, with 88 completing the 60-day follow-up questionnaire. Most participants (73.9% were 50 years of age or older. At baseline, low back pain was identified by 85.3%, lower extremity pain by 71.6%, and upper extremity pain by 62.5%. Participants reported widespread pain, at baseline, with a mean of 3.4 (standard deviation 1.1 pain sites. At the 60-day follow-up, 80.7% of participants reported that their chronic pain had improved and they were classified as responders. Baseline characteristics did not differentiate non-responders from responders. There were numerical trends toward reduced pain interference with walking ability and sleep, and greater pain relief in responders. There was a large difference in use of concomitant pain medications, with 80

  14. Predictive factors for the outcome of multidisciplinary treatments in chronic low back pain at the first multidisciplinary pain center of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Arai, Young-Chang P; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Nishihara, Makoto; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Hirakawa, Tomoe; Matsuo, Shingo; Kobayashi, Mami; Haruta, Midori; Kawabata, Yuka; Togo, Hiroki; Noguchi, Taiji; Hase, Toshiyuki; Hatano, Genki; Ushida, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] Multidisciplinary treatments are recommended for treatment of chronic low back pain. The aim of this study was to show the associations among multidisciplinary treatment outcomes, pretreatment psychological factors, self-reported pain levels, and history of pain in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 221 chronic low back pain patients were chosen for the study. The pretreatment scores for the 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, Pain Disability Assessment Scale, pain drawings, and history of pain were collected. The patients were divided into two treatment outcome groups a year later: a good outcome group and a poor outcome group. [Results] One-hundred eighteen patients were allocated to the good outcome group. The scores for the Visual Analogue Scale, Pain Disability Assessment Scale, and affective subscale of the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire and number of nonorganic pain drawings in the good outcome group were significantly lower than those in the poor outcome group. Duration of pain in the good outcome group was significantly shorter than in the poor outcome group. [Conclusion] These findings help better predict the efficacy of multidisciplinary treatments in chronic low back pain patients. PMID:26504321

  15. Effectiveness of a Multimodal Therapy for Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain Regarding Pre-Admission Healthcare Utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Borys, Constanze; Lutz, Johannes; Strauss, Bernhard; Altmann, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of an intensive inpatient three-week multimodal therapy. We focused especially on the impact on the multimodal therapy outcome of the pre-admission number of treatment types patients had received and of medical specialist groups patients had consulted. Methods 155 patients with chronic low back pain and indication for multimodal therapy were evaluated with respect to pain intensity, depression, anxiety, well-being, and pre-admiss...

  16. The Comparison of the Efficacy Aerobic Exercises Versus Strengthening, Stretching and Mobilization Exercises in Subacute and Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    KARAN, Ayse

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the efficacy of aerobic exercises versus strengthening, stretching and mobilization exercises in patients with subacute or chronic low back pain. Forty patients were recruited for the study and randomly allocated to two groups. All patients were evaluated at admission, mid-treatment and termination of the program by visual analog scale (VAS), face scale, weekly analgesic intake and Million visual analog scale for pain. They were also scor...

  17. Comparing Physical Therapy Accompanying Exercise with Only Exercise Treatments in Patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

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    Özlem Yılmaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Investigating and comparing the effects of exercise and physical therapy accompanying exercise treatments in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials and Methods: Twenty three patients with mechanical type low back existing more than 3 months were included one of the exercise or the physical therapy+exercise groups according to their application sequence. Both of the groups performed lumbar flexion and extension exercises, strengthening of the lumbar and abdominal muscle exercises and iliopsoas, hamstring and quadriceps stretching exercises two times a day for 14 days. The physical therapy group was given hot pack+therapeutic ultrasound+ interferential current for 10 days additionally. Degree of the low back pain was evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS, range of joint motion was evaluated with hand finger floor distance (HFFD and Modified Schober test, functional status was evaluated with Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale and quality of life was evaluated with Short form-36 (SF-36 before and a month after the treatments. Results: In both groups (exercise group: average age 59 years, 21 females, 2 males; physical therapy group: average age 60 years, 20 females, 3 males pain intensity and HFFD decreased and Modified Schober increased, functionality recovered, pain and physical functions of SF-36 improved after the treatments. SF-36-physical role difficulty also improved in the exercise group. Decrease in pain, increase in HFFD andimproving of the functional status were all significantly more in the physical therapy group. There were no difference between the groups in terms of Modified Schober measurement and changes of the quality of life. Conclusions: Exercises and exercise+physical therapy are both effective in chronic low back pain. Successful results can be taken by addition of the physical therapy in patients who do not benefit sufficiently from exercise therapy. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2015;21: 73-8

  18. Unspecific chronic low back pain – a simple functional classification tested in a case series of patients with spinal deformities

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    Werkmann Mario

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to now, chronic low back pain without radicular symptoms is not classified and attributed in international literature as being "unspecific". For specific bracing of this patient group we use simple physical tests to predict the brace type the patient is most likely to benefit from. Based on these physical tests we have developed a simple functional classification of "unspecific" low back pain in patients with spinal deformities. Methods Between January 2006 and July 2007 we have tested 130 patients (116 females and 14 males with spinal deformities (average age 45 years, ranging from 14 years to 69 and chronic unspecific low back pain (pain for > 24 months along with the indication for brace treatment for chronic unspecific low back pain. Some of the patients had symptoms of spinal claudication (n = 16. The "sagittal realignment test" (SRT was applied, a lumbar hyperextension test, and the "sagittal delordosation test" (SDT. Additionally 3 female patients with spondylolisthesis were tested, including one female with symptoms of spinal claudication and 2 of these patients were 14 years of age and the other 43yrs old at the time of testing. Results 117 Patients reported significant pain release in the SRT and 13 in the SDT (>/= 2 steps in the Roland & Morris VRS. 3 Patients had no significant pain release in both of the tests ( Pain intensity was high (3,29 before performing the physical tests (VRS-scale 0–5 and low (1,37 while performing the physical test for the whole sample of patients. The differences where highly significant in the Wilcoxon test (z = -3,79; p In the 16 patients who did not respond to the SRT in the manual investigation we found hypermobility at L5/S1 or a spondylolisthesis at level L5/S1. In the other patients who responded well to the SRT loss of lumbar lordosis was the main issue, a finding which, according to scientific literature, correlates well with low back pain. The 3 patients who did not

  19. Pregnancy and low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sabino, Jennifer; Grauer, Jonathan N.

    2008-01-01

    Back pain is ubiquitous in today’s society and is particularly common during pregnancy. There are multiple factors contributing to these symptoms during pregnancy including pelvic changes as well as alterations to loading. Potential imaging modalities are limited during pregnancy due to the desire to limit ionizing radiation exposure to the fetus. Treatments are generally conservative, exercise-based interventions and alternative modalities may also be considered. Low back pain associated wit...

  20. Effects of attention on the control of locomotion in individuals with chronic low back pain

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    Kerckhoff Frederick

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People who suffer from low back pain (LBP exhibit an abnormal gait pattern, characterized by shorter stride length, greater step width, and an impaired thorax-pelvis coordination which may undermine functional walking. As a result, gait in LBP may require stronger cognitive regulation compared to pain free subjects thereby affecting the degree of automaticity of gait control. Conversely, because chronic pain has a strong attentional component, diverting attention away from the pain might facilitate a more efficient walking pattern. Methods Twelve individuals with LBP and fourteen controls participated. Subjects walked on a treadmill at comfortable speed, under varying conditions of attentional load: (a no secondary task, (b naming the colors of squares on a screen, (c naming the colors of color words ("color Stroop task", and (d naming the colors of words depicting motor activities. Markers were attached to the thorax, pelvis and feet. Motion was recorded using a three-camera SIMI system with a sample frequency of 100 Hz. To examine the effects of health status and attention on gait, mean and variability of stride parameters were calculated. The coordination between thoracic and pelvic rotations was quantified through the mean and variability of the relative phase between those oscillations. Results LBP sufferers had a lower walking speed, and consequently a smaller stride length and lower mean thorax-pelvis relative phase. Stride length variability was significantly lower in the LBP group but no significant effect of attention was observed. In both groups gait adaptations were found under performance of an attention demanding task, but significantly more so in individuals with LBP as indicated by an interaction effect on relative phase variability. Conclusion Gait in LBP sufferers was characterized by less variable upper body movements. The diminished flexibility in trunk coordination was aggravated under the influence of an

  1. A systematic review on the effectiveness of pharmacological interventions for chronic non-specific low-back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kuijpers, T; van Middelkoop, M.; Rubinstein, S.M.; Ostelo, R.; Verhagen, A.; Koes, B W; van Tulder, M. W

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness of pharmacological interventions [i.e., non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and opioids] for non-specific chronic low-back pain (LBP). Existing Cochrane reviews for the four interventions were screened for studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Then, the literature searches were updated. Only randomized controlled trials on adults (≥18 years) with chronic (≥12 weeks) non-specific L...

  2. A randomized controlled trial of gabapentin for chronic low back pain with and without a radiating component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J Hampton; Slater, Mark A; Capparelli, Edmund V; Patel, Shetal M; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony; Abramson, Ian S; Wallace, Mark S; Funk, Stephen D; Rutledge, Thomas R; Wetherell, Julie L; Matthews, Scott C; Zisook, Sidney; Garfin, Steven R

    2016-07-01

    Gabapentin is prescribed for analgesia in chronic low back pain, yet there are no controlled trials supporting this practice. This randomized, 2-arm, 12-week, parallel group study compared gabapentin (forced titration up to 3600 mg daily) with inert placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline to the last week on treatment measured by the Descriptor Differential Scale; the secondary outcome was disability (Oswestry Disability Index). The intention-to-treat analysis comprised 108 randomized patients with chronic back pain (daily pain for ≥6 months) whose pain did (43%) or did not radiate into the lower extremity. Random effects regression models which did not impute missing scores were used to analyze outcome data. Pain intensity decreased significantly over time (P pain intensity, or at least "Minimal Improvement" on the Physician Clinical Global Impression of Change did not differ significantly between groups. There were no significant differences in analgesia between participants with radiating (n = 46) and nonradiating (n = 62) pain either within or between treatment arms. There was no significant correlation between gabapentin plasma concentration and pain intensity. Gabapentin appears to be ineffective for analgesia in chronic low back pain with or without a radiating component. PMID:26963844

  3. Effectiveness of focused structural massage and relaxation massage for chronic low back pain: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Deyo Richard A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic back pain is a major public health problem and the primary reason patients seek massage treatment. Despite the growing use of massage for chronic low back pain, there have been few studies of its effectiveness. This trial will be the first evaluation of the effectiveness of relaxation massage for chronic back pain and the first large trial of a focused structural form of massage for this condition. Methods and Design A total of 399 participants (133 in each of three arms between the ages of 20 and 65 years of age who have low back pain lasting at least 3 months will be recruited from an integrated health care delivery system. They will be randomized to one of two types of massage ("focused structural massage" or "relaxation massage", or continued usual medical care. Ten massage treatments will be provided over 10 weeks. The primary outcomes, standard measures of dysfunction and bothersomeness of low back pain, will be assessed at baseline and after 10, 26, and 52 weeks by telephone interviewers masked to treatment assignment. General health status, satisfaction with back care, days of back-related disability, perceived stress, and use and costs of healthcare services for back pain will also be measured. Outcomes across assigned treatment groups will be compared using generalized estimating equations, accounting for participant correlation and adjusted for baseline value, age, and sex. For both primary outcome measures, this trial will have at least 85% power to detect the presence of a minimal clinically significant difference among the three treatment groups and 91% power for pairwise comparisons. Secondary analyses will compare the proportions of participants in each group that improve by a clinically meaningful amount. Conclusion Results of this trial will help clarify the value of two types of massage therapy for chronic low back pain. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT 00371384.

  4. Effectiveness of mindfulness meditation on pain and quality of life of patients with chronic low back pain

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    Sudha Banth

    2015-01-01

    Effectiveness of mindfulness meditation on pain and quality of life of patients with chronic low back pain Eighty-eight patients diagnosed as NSCLBP by physician and randomly assigned to experimental (MBSR+ usual medical care and the control group (usual medical care only. The subjects assessed in 3 times frames; before, after and 4 weeks after intervention by Mac Gil pain and standard brief quality of life scales. Data obtained from the final sample analyzed by ANCOVA using SPSS software. Results: The findings showed MBSR was effective in reduction of pain severity and the patients who practiced 8 sessions meditation reported significantly lower pain than patients who only received usual medical care. There was a significant effect of the between subject factor group (F [1, 45] = 16.45, P < 0.001 and (F [1, 45] = 21.51, P < 0.001 for physical quality of life and (F [1, 45] = 13.80, P < 0.001 and (F [1, 45] = 25.07, P < 0.001 mental quality of life respectively. Conclusion: MBSR as a mind-body therapy including body scan, sitting and walking meditation was effective intervention on reduction of pain severity and improvement of physical and mental quality of life of female patients with NSCLBP.

  5. Frequency and interrelations of risk factors for chronic low back pain in a primary care setting.

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    Marie-Martine Lefevre-Colau

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Many risk factors have been identified for chronic low back pain (cLBP, but only one study evaluated their interrelations. We aimed to investigate the frequency of cLBP risk factors and their interrelations in patients consulting their general practitioners (GPs for cLBP. METHODS: A cross-sectional, descriptive, national survey was performed. 3000 GPs randomly selected were asked to include at least one patient consulting for cLBP. Demographic, clinical characteristics and the presence of cLBP risk factors were recorded. The frequency of each cLBP risk factor was calculated and multiple correspondence analysis (MCA was performed to study their interrelations. RESULTS: A total of 2068 GPs (68.9% included at least 1 patient, for 4522 questionnaires analyzed. In the whole sample of patients, the 2 risk factors most commonly observed were history of recurrent LBP (72.1% and initial limitation of activities of daily living (66.4%. For working patients, common professional risk factors were beliefs, that LBP was due to maintaining a specific posture at work (79.0% and frequent heavy lifting at work (65.5%. On MCA, we identified 3 risk-factor dimensions (axes for working and nonworking patients. The main dimension for working patients involved professional risk factors and among these factors, patients' job satisfaction and job recognition largely contribute to this dimension. DISCUSSION: Our results shed in light for the first time the interrelation and the respective contribution of several previously identified cLBP risk factors. They suggest that risk factors representing a "work-related" dimension are the most important cLBP risk factors in the working population.

  6. Frequency and Interrelations of Risk Factors for Chronic Low Back Pain in a Primary Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Fayad, Fouad; Rannou, François; Fermanian, Jacques; Coriat, Fernand; Mace, Yann; Revel, Michel; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Many risk factors have been identified for chronic low back pain (cLBP), but only one study evaluated their interrelations. We aimed to investigate the frequency of cLBP risk factors and their interrelations in patients consulting their general practitioners (GPs) for cLBP. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive, national survey was performed. 3000 GPs randomly selected were asked to include at least one patient consulting for cLBP. Demographic, clinical characteristics and the presence of cLBP risk factors were recorded. The frequency of each cLBP risk factor was calculated and multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) was performed to study their interrelations. Results A total of 2068 GPs (68.9%) included at least 1 patient, for 4522 questionnaires analyzed. In the whole sample of patients, the 2 risk factors most commonly observed were history of recurrent LBP (72.1%) and initial limitation of activities of daily living (66.4%). For working patients, common professional risk factors were beliefs, that LBP was due to maintaining a specific posture at work (79.0%) and frequent heavy lifting at work (65.5%). On MCA, we identified 3 risk-factor dimensions (axes) for working and nonworking patients. The main dimension for working patients involved professional risk factors and among these factors, patients' job satisfaction and job recognition largely contribute to this dimension. Discussion Our results shed in light for the first time the interrelation and the respective contribution of several previously identified cLBP risk factors. They suggest that risk factors representing a “work-related” dimension are the most important cLBP risk factors in the working population. PMID:19287499

  7. Influence of pilates mat and apparatus exercises on pain and balance of businesswomen with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chae-Woo; Hyun, Ju; Kim, Seong Gil

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of mat Pilates and apparatus Pilates on pain and static balance of businesswomen with chronic back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Participants were randomly allocated to Pilates mat exercises (PME) or Pilates apparatus exercise (PAE), and performed the appropriate Pilates exercises 3 days per week for 8 weeks. In order to measure the improvement in the participants' static balance ability as a result of the exercise, the sway length and sway velocity of the subjects were measured before and after the experiment while the subjects stood on a Balance Performance Monitor (BPM) facing the front wall for 30 seconds with their eyes open. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to measure the degree of pain. [Results] The VAS score, sway length, and sway velocity of both groups decreased significantly after the experiment, but the PME group showed a greater decrease than the PAE group. [Conclusion] PME showed greater improvement in pain level and balance compared with PAE in this research. Since the subjects of this study were patients with low back pain, PME is assumed to have been more suitable and effective because it uses body weight to strengthen core muscles rather than heavier apparatuses as in PAE. PMID:24764614

  8. Kinesio Taping® is not better than placebo in reducing pain and disability in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Maurício A. Luz Júnior; Manoel V. Sousa; Neves, Luciana A. F. S.; Aline A. C. Cezar; Costa, Leonardo O. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Kinesio Taping® has been widely used in clinical practice. However, it is unknown whether this type of tape is more effective than placebo taping in patients with chronic lower back pain. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping® in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain against a placebo tape and a control group. Method: This is a 3-arm, randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Sixty patients with chronic non-specific low back pain were r...

  9. The effect of motor control exercise versus placebo in patients with chronic low back pain [ACTRN012605000262606

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    Herbert Robert D

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While one in ten Australians suffer from chronic low back pain this condition remains extremely difficult to treat. Many contemporary treatments are of unknown value. One potentially useful therapy is the use of motor control exercise. This therapy has a biologically plausible effect, is readily available in primary care and it is of modest cost. However, to date, the efficacy of motor control exercise has not been established. Methods This paper describes the protocol for a clinical trial comparing the effects of motor control exercise versus placebo in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain. One hundred and fifty-four participants will be randomly allocated to receive an 8-week program of motor control exercise or placebo (detuned short wave and detuned ultrasound. Measures of outcomes will be obtained at follow-up appointments at 2, 6 and 12 months after randomisation. The primary outcomes are: pain, global perceived effect and patient-generated measure of disability at 2 months and recurrence at 12 months. Discussion This trial will be the first placebo-controlled trial of motor control exercise. The results will inform best practice for treating chronic low back pain and prevent its occurrence.

  10. Emotional processing and its relationship to chronic low back pain: results from a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Jorge E; Wheatley, Laura; Mayall, Clare; Abbey, Hilary

    2013-12-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a common, yet challenging condition for both patients and clinicians. Several studies have demonstrated a strong association between CLBP and psychological factors such as anxiety, fear-avoidance, self-efficacy, catastrophizing and depression. These factors are closely linked with emotional states; however, it is unknown whether CLBP patients process their emotions differently from asymptomatic individuals. The aim of this case-control study was to investigate the relationship between CLBP and emotional processing. A sample of 110 participants comprising of 55 patients with chronic back pain and 55 individuals without a history of CLBP were assessed using the Emotional Processing Scale (EPS-25). The EPS-25 generates an overall score, and also scores pertaining to five individual emotional processing factors--avoidance, suppression, unregulated emotion, impoverished emotional experience and signs of unprocessed emotion. Chronic back pain patients scored significantly higher in the overall EPS-25 score (p chronic back pain. PMID:23756033

  11. Long-term experience with implanted intrathecal drug administration systems for failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain

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    Treharne GJ

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous intrathecal drug delivery has been shown in open studies to improve pain and quality of life in those with intractable back pain who have had spinal surgery. There is limited data on long term effects and and even less for patients with mechanical back pain without prior spinal surgery. Methods We have investigated spinal drug administration systems for patients with failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain by patient questionnaire study of the efficacy of this therapy and a case notes review. Results 36 patients (97% of 37 approached completed questionnaires, 24 with failed back syndrome and 12 with chronic mechanical low back pain. Recalled pre-treatment levels with current post-treatment levels of pain and a range of quality of life measures (recorded on 11-point numerical rating scales were compared. Pain improved significantly in both groups (Wilcoxan signed ranks test, p 0.005, Wilcoxan signed ranks test with Bonferroni correction. Diamorphine was used in all 37 patients, bupivacaine in 32, clonidine in 27 and baclofen in 3. The mean dose of diamorphine increased for the first 2 years but did not change 2–6 years post implant, averaging 4.5 mg/day. Revision surgery was required in 24% of cases, but reduced to 12% in the later years of our experience. Conclusions We conclude that spinal drug administration systems appear to be of benefit in alleviating pain in the failed back syndrome and chronic mechanical low back pain but need to be examined prospectively.

  12. Massage and modality effects on treatment of sub-acute and chronic non specific low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Panahi; Fahimeh Kamali Sarvestani

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) is the second most common medical complaint. It’s estimated that about 70-85% of the population will suffer at least one episode of LBP during their life. The aim of present study was to compare the effects of massage and modality in patient with sub-acute and chronic non-specific LBPMethods: In this clinical trial study 30 women (MeanAge: 33.96±10.93) with sub-acute and chronic non-specific LBP (Mean pain-duration:9.68±3.38 )were included in the study and rand...

  13. Reliability of ultrasound measurement of automatic activity of the abdominal muscle in participants with and without chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Arab, Amir Massoud; Rasouli, Omid; Amiri, Mohsen; Tahan, Nahid

    2013-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US) imaging has been considered as a non-invasive technique to measure thickness and estimate relative abdominal muscle activity. Although some studies have assessed the reliability of US imaging, no study has assessed the reliability of US measurement of automatic activity of abdominal muscles in positions with different levels of stability in participants with chronic low back pain (cLBP). The purpose of this study was to investigate within-day and between-days reliab...

  14. The effect of motor control exercise versus placebo in patients with chronic low back pain [ACTRN012605000262606

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Robert D; Moseley G Lorimer; Refshauge Kathryn M; Hodges Paul W; Latimer Jane; Maher Chris G; Costa Leonardo OP; McAuley James

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background While one in ten Australians suffer from chronic low back pain this condition remains extremely difficult to treat. Many contemporary treatments are of unknown value. One potentially useful therapy is the use of motor control exercise. This therapy has a biologically plausible effect, is readily available in primary care and it is of modest cost. However, to date, the efficacy of motor control exercise has not been established. Methods This paper describes the protocol for...

  15. Are 2 Questions Enough to Screen for Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain?

    OpenAIRE

    Reme, Silje Endresen; Lie, Stein Atle; Eriksen, Hege R

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Objective. To examine the sensitivity of 2 single-item questions compared with 2 longer questionnaires for screening depression and anxiety among patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Summary of Background Data. Psychosocial factors are frequently identified as risk factors for developing CLBP and as predictors for treatment, and questionnaires are often used to screen for this. Shorter instruments may be easier to use in clinical practice settings. ...

  16. Assessment of depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, and quality of life in patients with chronic low back pain in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Ji Hee; Kim, Hyung Dong; Shin, Hyun Ho; Huh, Billy

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain (CLBP) has a significant effect on quality of life and imposes a great economical burden on society. In a number of studies, validated questionnaires had been given to CLBP patients to determine their health-associated quality of life, sleep disturbance, and psychological status. However, such outcome studies had not been performed previously in Korea. Methods We used self-report questionnaires to compare CLBP patients with an age- and sex-matched healthy cont...

  17. Effectiveness of Pilates exercise in treating people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Wells Cherie; Kolt Gregory S; Marshall Paul; Hill Bridget; Bialocerkowski Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Systematic reviews provide clinical practice recommendations that are based on evaluation of primary evidence. When systematic reviews with the same aims have different conclusions, it is difficult to ascertain which review reported the most credible and robust findings. Methods This study examined five systematic reviews that have investigated the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain. A four-stage process was used to interpret findings of...

  18. Fear and difficulty perceived when visualizing therapeutic exercise in patients with chronic low back pain: A cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Fernández, Marcos; Lerma-Lara, Sergio; Ferrer-Peña, Raúl; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Paris-Alemany, Alba; Beltrán-Alacreu, Héctor; La Touche, Roy

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the perceived level of difficulty and fear of movement among patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) compared with asymptomatic subjects when they visualized motor control therapeutic exercises (MCTEs) commonly used in physiotherapy. Our secondary objective was to analyse the correlation between fear of MCTEs and other psychological and disability variables. Thirty patients with CLBP comprised the treatment group, and 30 asymptomatic subjects comp...

  19. A rehabilitation approach to chronic low back pain disability: Pristop pri zmanjšani zmožnosti zaradi kronične bolečine:

    OpenAIRE

    Aidinoff, Elena; Bluvshtein, Vadim; Catz, Amiram

    2014-01-01

    When low back pain (LBP) permanently interferes with daily activities or employment, patients experience chronic low back pain disability (CLBPD). This is a syndrome that in addition to chronic pain includes depression, anxiety, and difficulties in domestic and social life, in the performance of daily tasks, and in integration at work. In contrast to other types of treatment tried for chronic LBP, the rehabilitation approach to CLBPD considers primarily the disability. According to the princi...

  20. Effect of yogic colon cleansing (Laghu Sankhaprakshalana Kriya) on pain, spinal flexibility, disability and state anxiety in chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Richa Vivek Haldavnekar; Padmini Tekur; Raghuram Nagarathna; Hongasandra Ramarao Nagendra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that Integrated Yoga reduces pain, disability, anxiety and depression and increases spinal flexibility and quality-of-life in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the effect of two yoga practices namely laghu shankha prakshalana (LSP) kriya, a yogic colon cleansing technique and back pain specific asanas (Back pain special technique [BST]) on pain, disability, spinal flexibility and state anxiety in pat...

  1. The Comparison of Efficacy of Tricyclic Antidepressant with and without Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs in Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Yavarikia

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objectives: Low back pain (LBP is one of common medical problems with several accepted medical modalities such as drugs, physiotherapy, surgery, etc. We studied the efficacy of tricyclic antidepressant (TCA, and tricyclic antidepressant plus non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (TCA + NSAID in 200 patients with chronic LBP. Materials & Methods: In an experimental clinical trial study on patients with chronic low back pain without organic findings, patients were divided in two groups of 100 cases. At certain times the response to treatment protocols were collected and compared using VAS system. Patient’s data including age, sex, smoking and response to treatment were recorded and analyzed using chi-square, t-tests, ANOVA and SPSS software. Results: 83 (41.5% of patients were males and 117 (58.5% were females. The age range was 21 to 75 (mean age 43.1 14.1y there was no meaning full statistical difference in demographic characteristics such as age, sex (respectively p=0.66, p=0.78 the ultimate pain was less (p0.05.Conclusion: TCA prescription is an efficient method of treatment of low back pain with or with out NSAIDS. But using NSAID+TCA will be almost more powerful and efficient method in the long term period.

  2. Treatment of chronic low back pain in patients with spinal deformities using a sagittal re-alignment brace

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    Weiss Hans-Rudolf

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For adult scoliosis patients with chronic low back pain bracing is initially indicated before spinal surgery is considered. Until recently there has been a lack of research into the effect upon pain reductions in the mid and long-term. Promising results have been documented in short-term studies for the application of a sagittal re-alignment brace in patients with spinal deformities and along with pain; however mid-term and long-term results are not yet available. The purpose of this study is to investigate the mid-term effects of this brace with respect to pain control. Materials and methods 67 patients (58 females and 9 males with chronic low back pain (> 24 months and the diagnosis of scoliosis or hyperkyphosis were treated with a sagittal re-alignment brace (physio-logic brace™ between January 2006 and July 2007. The indication for this kind of brace treatment was derived from a positive sagittal re-alignment test (SRT and the exclusion of successful conservative treatment during the last 24 months. The aim of this type of conservative intervention was to avoid surgery for chronic low back pain. Results The average pain intensity was measured on the Roland and Morris VRS (5 steps before treatment. This was 3.3 (t1, at the time of brace adjustment it was 2.7 (t2 and after at an average observation time of 18 months it was 2.0 (t3. The differences were highly significant in the Wilcoxon test. Discussion Short-term measurements showed that a significant pain reduction is possible in chronic postural low back pain using a sagittal re-alignment brace inducing lumbar re-lordosation. In a preliminary report at adjustment (t2, highly significant improvements of pain intensity have also been demonstrated. At 6 months of treatment however, no improvement was measured. The improvement of the mid-term effects (18 months found in this study compared to the preliminary report may be due to the changed approach to compliance: whilst

  3. Reduction of chronic non-specific low back pain: A randomised controlled clinical trial on acupuncture and baclofen

    OpenAIRE

    Rastqar Ali; Manaheji Homa; Zaringhalam Jalal; Zaringhalam Maryam

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic non-specific low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent (80%) and multi-dimensional illness. This study aims to test whether acupuncture, baclofen, or combined treatment with acupuncture and baclofen alleviates symptoms of non-specific chronic LBP in men. Methods Eight-four (84) men aged 50-60 years with non-specific chronic LBP were randomly assigned to four groups: the baclofen group received only baclofen (30 mg/day); the acupuncture group received only acupuncture at s...

  4. Efficacy of Manual Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy in Chronic Low Back Pain Due to Lumbar Spondylosis. A Pilot Study

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    Arti Sharma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this work was to compare the efficacy of Maitland mobilization and conventional physical therapy on pain response, range of motion (ROM and functional ability in patients with chronic low back pain due to lumbar spondylosis. Methods: A total sample of 30 subjects (40–70 years of age with complaints of slow insidious onset of low back pain (LBP, with or without radiation not less than three months duration and decrease ROM were randomly assigned to: group-I, Maitland mobilization and lumbar stabilization exercises; group-II conventional physical therapy (traction, strengthening, stretching exercises. and outcomes were assessed for dependent variables. Results: There is statically a significant difference between pre and post measurement readings with time (p = 0.00 and between groups (p < 0.05 with respect to pain and function, but, with respect to ROM readings, showed statistical significance with time (p = 0.00 and no significance between groups (p > 0.05, indicating manual therapy group-I is improving faster and better than conventional physical therapy group-II. Conclusion: Our results showed that manual therapy interventions are more effective in managing low back pain, and function and range of motion of the lumbar spine than conventional physical therapy treatment.

  5. [Possible changes in energy-minimizer mechanisms of locomotion due to chronic low back pain - a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Alberito Rodrigo; Andrade, Alexandro; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    One goal of the locomotion is to move the body in the space at the most economical way possible. However, little is known about the mechanical and energetic aspects of locomotion that are affected by low back pain. And in case of occurring some damage, little is known about how the mechanical and energetic characteristics of the locomotion are manifested in functional activities, especially with respect to the energy-minimizer mechanisms during locomotion. This study aimed: a) to describe the main energy-minimizer mechanisms of locomotion; b) to check if there are signs of damage on the mechanical and energetic characteristics of the locomotion due to chronic low back pain (CLBP) which may endanger the energy-minimizer mechanisms. This study is characterized as a narrative literature review. The main theory that explains the minimization of energy expenditure during the locomotion is the inverted pendulum mechanism, by which the energy-minimizer mechanism converts kinetic energy into potential energy of the center of mass and vice-versa during the step. This mechanism is strongly influenced by spatio-temporal gait (locomotion) parameters such as step length and preferred walking speed, which, in turn, may be severely altered in patients with chronic low back pain. However, much remains to be understood about the effects of chronic low back pain on the individual's ability to practice an economic locomotion, because functional impairment may compromise the mechanical and energetic characteristics of this type of gait, making it more costly. Thus, there are indications that such changes may compromise the functional energy-minimizer mechanisms. PMID:25440708

  6. The effectiveness of acupuncture in treating chronic non-specific low back pain: a systematic review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchinson Amanda J P; Ball Simon; Andrews Jeremy C H; Jones Gareth G

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Low back pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder defined as pain and soreness, muscle tension, or stiffness in the lumbosacral area of the spine which does not have a specific cause. Low back pain results in high health costs and incapacity to work causing an economic burden to society. The optimal management of non-specific low back pain appears to be undecided. Recently published guidelines support the use of acupuncture for treating non-specific low back pain and it h...

  7. A randomized, controlled trial of spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis in chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain [ISRCTN 16558617

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McManus Carla D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis may contribute to between 5% to 60% of the poor surgical outcomes following decompressive surgery. Correlations have been reported between epidural scarring and radicular pain, poor surgical outcomes, and a lack of any form of surgical treatment. The use of spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis in recent years in the management of chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain has been described. Methods A prospective, randomized, double-blind trial was conducted to determine the outcome of spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis to reduce pain and improve function and psychological status in patients with chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain. A total of 83 patients were evaluated, with 33 patients in Group I and 50 patients in Group II. Group I served as the control, with endoscopy into the sacral level without adhesiolysis, followed by injection of local anesthetic and steroid. Group II received spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis, followed by injection of local anesthetic and steroid. Results Among the 50 patients in the treatment group receiving spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis, significant improvement without adverse effects was shown in 80% at 3 months, 56% at 6 months, and 48% at 12 months. The control group showed improvement in 33% of the patients at one month and none thereafter. Based on the definition that less than 6 months of relief is considered short-term and longer than 6 months of relief is considered long-term, a significant number of patients obtained long-term relief with improvement in pain, functional status, and psychological status. Conclusion Spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis with targeted delivery of local anesthetic and steroid is an effective treatment in a significant number of patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain without major adverse effects.

  8. The Relationship between Pain Beliefs and Physical and Mental Health Outcome Measures in Chronic Low Back Pain: Direct and Indirect Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Andrew; Sheffield, David

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain remains a major health problem with huge societal cost. Biomedical models fail to explain the disability seen in response to reported back pain and therefore patients' beliefs, cognitions and related behaviours have become a focus for both research and practice. This study used the Pain Beliefs Questionnaire and had two aims: To examine the extent to which pain beliefs are related to disability, anxiety and depression; and to assess whether those relationships are mediated by pain self-efficacy and locus of control. In a sample of 341 chronic low back pain patients, organic and psychological pain beliefs were related to disability, anxiety and depression. However, organic pain beliefs were more strongly related to disability and depression than psychological pain beliefs. Regression analyses revealed that these relationships were in part independent of pain self-efficacy and locus of control. Further, mediation analyses revealed indirect pathways involving self-efficacy and, to a lesser extent chance locus of control, between organic pain beliefs, on the one hand, and disability, anxiety and depression, on the other. In contrast, psychological pain beliefs were only directly related to disability, anxiety and depression. Although longitudinal data are needed to corroborate our findings, this study illustrates the importance of beliefs about the nature of pain and beliefs in one's ability to cope with pain in determining both physical and mental health outcomes in chronic low back pain patients. PMID:27548244

  9. Efficacy of adding the kinesio taping method to guideline-endorsed conventional physiotherapy in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Added, Marco Aurélio Nemitalla; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; de Freitas, Diego Galace; Salomão, Evelyn Cassia; Monteiro, Renan Lima; Costa, Lucíola da Cunha Menezes

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic nonspecific low back pain is a significant health condition with high prevalence worldwide and it is associated with enormous costs to society. Clinical practice guidelines show that many interventions are available to treat patients with chronic low back pain, but the vast majority of these interventions have a modest effect in reducing pain and disability. An intervention that has been widespread in recent years is the use of elastic bandages called Kinesio Taping. Althou...

  10. Low Back Pain: Current Surgical Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Baliga, Santosh; Treon, Katrina; Craig, Niall John Angus

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a worldwide phenomenon. The UK studies place LBP as the largest single cause of absence from work; up to 80% of the population will experience LBP at least once in their lifetime. Most individuals do not seek medical care and are not disabled by their pain once it is managed by nonoperative measures. However, around 10% of patients go on to develop chronic pain. This review outlines the basics of the traditional approach to spinal surgery for chronic LBP secondary to os...

  11. A Rare Cause of Chronic Low Back Pain: Paravertebral Hydatid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Atar

    2016-05-01

                A 48-year-old man was admitted to our outpatient clinic with low back and right leg pain for 1 year. Lumbar spinal movements were painful and the pain radiated to his right posterolateral thigh. There was no weakness and numbness in both lower limbs but he had difficulty in load transfer during walking and therefore had ambulation difficulty. Tendon reflexes, and muscle strength examinations were normal. There was a slightly swelling at the right lumbar paravertebral region of spine by palpation. Routine blood tests were normal. Lumbar magnetic resonance examination (MRI was requested for clear evaluation of lower back structures. In MRI, we found a 8 × 5 cm multicystic mass at the level of L3–S3 located at the right paravertebral muscle. After this diagnosis, the patient began receiving albendazol.  Total cyst resection was performed and the histopathological examination confirmed hydatic cyst. 

  12. [An overview of conservative treatment for low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjidić, Zoja

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain is the most frequent musculoskeletal complaint worldwide and leading cause of chronic disability. In this review we discuss knowledge about the role of management of non-invasive, conservative therapy for the nonspecific low back pain. Initial therapy includes modification of activity, pharmacological analgesic therapy and education of patients. In patients with sub acute or chronic low back pain, multimodal and interdisciplinary treatment approach is necessary with personalized and individual healthcare combined with different modality of therapy. PMID:22232958

  13. The patient-physician relationship in patients with chronic low back pain as a predictor of outcomes after rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, Erik; Gramm, Lukas; Schmidt, Erika

    2013-06-01

    For patients with chronic diseases, especially those with chronic low back pain, the patient-physician relationship is significant for treatment adherence. In a sample of N = 688 low back pain patients, we examined the hypothesis that aspects of the patient-physician relationship (e.g. satisfaction with care, trust in the physician, patient participation) have a significant association with outcomes (pain, disability, quality of life, pain-related psychological impairment) after a multimodal treatment program (rehabilitation) after adjusting for a number of sociodemographic, medical, and psychological factors. Results show that the patient-physician relationship is significantly associated with the outcome. In the medium term (6 months after rehabilitation), the effect of the patient-physician relationship is clearer than in the short term (end of rehabilitation). In addition, risk factors for less improvement are female gender, higher age, low income, comorbidity, low treatment motivation, fear avoidance beliefs, and external locus of control. Future studies should examine the causal paths between the relationship variables and the outcome variables. PMID:22476813

  14. Effectiveness of mat Pilates or equipment-based Pilates in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    da Luz Maurício Antônio; Costa Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Fuhro Fernanda Ferreira; Manzoni Ana Carolina Taccolini; de Oliveira Naiane Teixeira Bastos; Cabral Cristina Maria Nunes

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic low back pain is an expensive and difficult condition to treat. One of the interventions widely used by physiotherapists in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain is exercise therapy based upon the Pilates principles. Pilates exercises can be performed with or without specific equipment. These two types of Pilates exercises have never been compared on a high-quality randomised controlled trial. Methods/design This randomised controlled trial with a bli...

  15. Tactile thresholds are preserved yet complex sensory function is impaired over the lumbar spine of chronic non-specific low back pain patients. A preliminary investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Wand, BM; Di Pietro, FS; George, PJ; O'Connell, NE

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate impairments in sensory function in chronic non-specific low back pain patients and the relationship between any impairment and the clinical features of the condition. Design: A cross-sectional case-control study. Setting: Laboratory based study. Participants: Nineteen chronic non-specific low back pain patients and nineteen healthy controls. Main Outcome measures: Tactile threshold, two point discrimination distance and accuracy at a task involving recognizing lett...

  16. Low back pain and comorbidity in women

    OpenAIRE

    Popov, A. A.; N. V. Ismozerova

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To assess association of low back pain (LBP) in women with hypertension (H), coronary heart disease (CHD), chronic heart failure (CHF), vascular incidents, carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, osteoarthritis (OA), osteoporosis (OP), digestive tract diseases, depression and anxiety. Material and methods. 1194 women aged 28 to 64 years (median 51 years |48;55] ) visited an outpatient department were included in the cross-sectional study. Diagnosis was done according to latest nation...

  17. The identification of spinal pathology in chronic low back pain using single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings were investigated in 80 consecutive patients (aged 18-70 years, median 44) referred to a rheumatology outpatient clinic with low back pain persisting for more than 3 months. Lesions of the lumbar spine were demonstrated in 60% of patients using SPECT but in only 35% with planar imaging. Fifty-one per cent of all lesions were only detected by SPECT, and lesions visualized on SPECT could be precisely localized to the vertebral body, or different parts of the posterior elements. Fifty per cent of lesions involved the facetal joints of which almost 60% were identified on SPECT alone. X-rays of the lumbar spine, with posterior oblique views, failed to demonstrate abnormalities corresponding to almost all SPECT posterior element lesions although it identified abnormalities corresponding to over 60% of anterior SPECT lesions. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 30 patients with a SPECT lesion and sites of facetal joint activity corresponded to facetal osteoarthritis in 82%. (author)

  18. Effects of Pain Acceptance and Pain Control Strategies on Physical Impairment in Individuals with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vowles, Kevin E.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Gross, Richard T.; McDaniel, Michael L.; Mouse, Angela; Bates, Mick; Gallimore, Paula; McCall, Cindy

    2007-01-01

    Psychosocial treatments for chronic pain are effective. There is a need, however, to understand the processes involved in determining how these treatments contribute to behavior change. Control and acceptance strategies represent two potentially important processes involved in treatment, although they differ significantly in approach. Results from…

  19. EFFECTS OF STABILIZATION EXERCISE USING A BALL ON MUTIFIDUS CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SinHo Chung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises using balls to the effects of general lumbar stabilization exercises with respect to changes in the cross section of the multifidus (MF, weight bearing, pain, and functional disorders in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain. Twelve patients participated in either a 8 week (3 days per week stabilization exercise program using balls and control group (n = 12. The computer tomography (CT was used to analyze MF cross-sectional areas (CSA and Tetrax balancing scale was used to analyze left and right weight bearing differences. Both groups had significant changes in the CSA of the MF by segment after training (p < 0.05 and the experimental group showed greater increases at the L4 (F = 9.854, p = 0.005 and L5 (F = 39. 266, p = 0.000. Both groups showed significant decreases in weight bearing, from 9.25% to 5.83% in the experimental group and from 9.33% to 4.25% in the control group (p < 0.05, but did not differ significantly between the two groups. These results suggests that stabilization exercises using ball can increases in the CSA of the MF segments, improvement in weight bearing, pain relief, and recovery from functional disorders, and the increases in the CSA of the MF of the L4 and L5 segments for patients with low back pain

  20. A longitudinal study of patients' experiences of chronic low back pain using interpretative phenomenological analysis: changes and consistencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelgrove, Sherrill; Edwards, Steve; Liossi, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This paper present data from the second and third rounds of a three-phase longitudinal research project exploring the 'lived experiences' of patients with chronic low-back pain (CLBP) in the United Kingdom. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants 1 and 2 years after the first interviews and after attendance at a medically staffed chronic pain clinic. The transcribed accounts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis and results compared with the data from time one. A main challenge for participants was managing constant unchanging pain experiences and loss across all areas of their lives. Some participants held consistent biomedical understandings of CLBP, continued to focus on the physicality of their pain and adopt a narrow range of behavioural-focused coping strategies and maintained a strong loss orientation. It is proposed that these elements demonstrated embodied experiences and contributed to comprehensive enmeshment of self and pain with little re-establishment of any behavioural activity. In comparison, participants who had experienced pain relief due to physical treatments showed increased use of mind-body strategies, a future orientation and were considered to be less enmeshed in their experiences. These changes were discussed in relation to the relationship between pain remission and illness beliefs. PMID:22149060

  1. [Cryotherapy for low-back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Z H

    1992-11-01

    In animal experiment, cryotherapy was used in 1997 adult patients with acute or chronic low-back pain of various causes. The posterior ramus of certain lumbar nerve was frozen to -140 degrees, -180 degrees C. Through a specially made freezing needle punctured into the place, 1902 patients were treated for 1 time and the rest 2 or 3 times. 1742 patients (87.2%) got immediate relief and resumed pain-free movement right after cryotherapy. After a period of 2.5 years on the average (range 0.5 to 4.5 years) 409 patients returned for re-examination. 371 of them got complete relief and resumed normal work, 15 experienced discomfort after exercise, 13 still had some degree of pain, 4 suffered from recurrence of low-back pain and 6 failed to response to the treatment. However, neither paresthesia over the related skin area nor muscular atrophy and paralysis of the corresponding muscles were found in any case. In brief, in dealing with low-back pain, cryotherapy is a simple, effective method. PMID:1535584

  2. Cognition and emotional decision-making in chronic low back pain: an ERPs study during Iowa gambling task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eTamburin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports documented abnormalities in cognitive functions and decision-making (DM in patients with chronic pain, but these changes are not consistent across studies. Reasons for these discordant findings might include the presence of confounders, variability in chronic pain conditions, and the use of different cognitive tests. The present study was aimed to add evidence in this field, by exploring the cognitive profile of a specific type of chronic pain, i.e.: chronic low back pain (cLBP.Twenty four cLBP patients and 24 healthy controls underwent a neuropsychological battery and we focused on emotional DM abilities by means of Iowa gambling task (IGT. During IGT, behavioral responses and the electroencephalogram (EEG were recorded in 12 patients and 12 controls. Event-related potentials (ERPs were averaged offline from EEG epochs locked to the feedback presentation (4000 ms duration, from 2000 ms before to 2000 ms after the feedback onset separately for wins and losses and the feedback-related negativity (FRN and P300 peak-to-peak amplitudes were calculated. Among cognitive measures, cLBP patients scored lower than controls in the modified card sorting test (MCST and the score in this test was significantly influenced by pain duration and intensity. Behavioural IGT results documented worse performance and the absence of a learning process during the test in cLBP patients compared to controls, with no effect of pain characteristics. ERPs findings documented abnormal feedback processing in patients during IGT.cLBP patients showed poor performance in the MCST and the IGT. Abnormal feedback processing may be secondary to impingement of chronic pain in brain areas involved in DM or suggest the presence of a predisposing factor related to pain chronification. These abnormalities might contribute to the impairment in the work and family settings that often cLBP patients report.

  3. Pain Perception and Stabilometric Parameters in People With Chronic Low Back Pain After a Pilates Exercise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Antonino; Bianco, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Messina, Giuseppe; Montalto, Maria Alessandra; Bellafiore, Marianna; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Iovane, Angelo; Palma, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Various exercise interventions, such as Pilates exercises and traditional physical therapy methods, are employed to decrease low back pain (LBP). Nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) is distinct from LBP, however, as the distribution of pain is restricted to the region between the costal margin and the inferior gluteal. The aim of our randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of a program of Pilates exercises on pain perception and stabilometric parameters in patients with NSLBP. Thirty-eight participants were randomly allocated, using a 1:1 scheme, to either the experimental group (EG) or control group (CG). The EG completed a 14-week program of Pilates exercises, performed thrice per week under the supervision of an exercise specialist, while the CG was managed with a social program only. Measures of posturography and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for pain perception were obtained at baseline (T0) and after the 14 weeks of intervention (T1). Posturography measures improved for patients in the EG, with both eyes open and eyes closed (P Pilates exercise program yielded improvements in pain and posturography outcomes. Our study also confirms the applicability of posturography in evaluating postural instability in patients with NSLBP. Due to our relatively small study group, future studies would be necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:26765419

  4. Reduction of chronic non-specific low back pain: A randomised controlled clinical trial on acupuncture and baclofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastqar Ali

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic non-specific low back pain (LBP is a prevalent (80% and multi-dimensional illness. This study aims to test whether acupuncture, baclofen, or combined treatment with acupuncture and baclofen alleviates symptoms of non-specific chronic LBP in men. Methods Eight-four (84 men aged 50-60 years with non-specific chronic LBP were randomly assigned to four groups: the baclofen group received only baclofen (30 mg/day; the acupuncture group received only acupuncture at selected acupoints; the acupuncture + baclofen group received combined treatment with acupuncture and baclofen treatments; and the control group received no pain reduction treatment. After five weeks of treatment, visual analogue scale (VAS and self-reported pain disability with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ were conducted for outcome measures. Results After treatment, the baclofen, acupuncture and acupuncture + baclofen groups all had lower VAS and RDQ scores. Significantly higher reduction and improvement in VAS and RDQ scores were found in the acupuncture and acupuncture + baclofen groups compared to the baclofen group. Conclusion The present study indicates that the combined treatment of acupuncture and baclofen is more effective than baclofen treatment alone to reduce pain in patients with non-specific chronic LBP. Trial registration number ACTRN12609000698279

  5. Assessment of Effectiveness of Percutaneous Adhesiolysis in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain Secondary to Lumbar Central Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmaiah Manchikanti, Kimberly A. Cash, Carla D. McManus, Vidyasagar Pampati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic persistent low back and lower extremity pain secondary to central spinal stenosis is common and disabling. Lumbar surgical interventions with decompression or fusion are most commonly performed to manage severe spinal stenosis. However, epidural injections are also frequently performed in managing central spinal stenosis. After failure of epidural steroid injections, the next sequential step is percutaneous adhesiolysis and hypertonic saline neurolysis with a targeted delivery. The literature on the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis in managing central spinal stenosis after failure of epidural injections has not been widely studied.Study Design: A prospective evaluation.Setting: An interventional pain management practice, a specialty referral center, a private practice setting in the United States.Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain with lumbar central spinal stenosis.Methods: Seventy patients were recruited. The initial phase of the study was randomized, double-blind with a comparison of percutaneous adhesiolysis with caudal epidural injections. The 25 patients from the adhesiolysis group continued with follow-up, along with 45 additional patients, leading to a total of 70 patients. All patients received percutaneous adhesiolysis and appropriate placement of the Racz catheter, followed by an injection of 5 mL of 2% preservative-free lidocaine with subsequent monitoring in the recovery room. In the recovery room, each patient also received 6 mL of 10% hypertonic sodium chloride solution, and 6 mg of non-particulate betamethasone, followed by an injection of 1 mL of sodium chloride solution and removal of the catheter.Outcomes Assessment: Multiple outcome measures were utilized including the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, the Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI, employment status, and opioid intake with assessment at 3, 6

  6. [Physiotherapy and rehabilitation for low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Stefan; Oesch, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Low back pain (LBP) continues to be a major health problem causing personal suffering and enormous socioeconomic costs. Evidence suggests that more than 85 % of individuals with LBP suffer from non-specific low back pain. Physiotherapy for non-specific LBP includes educational, physical, manual and movement therapy measures. In the acute phase, it is very important to prevent chronicity by identifying barriers for a full recovery and a quick return to everyday activities. If there is a chronicity of symptoms, the treatment must focus on improvement of the general physical activity despite the pain and promote participation in the social and work context. These aims are more important than pain relief. Therefore in the acute phase educational and activity-promoting measures are the primary treatment options. In the sub-acute and chronic phase a multidimensional treatment approach including exercise therapy with the aim of improving function, including return to work, should be applied. By now, there is scientific evidence that physiotherapy can reduce pain and disability due to LBP, and that return to usual activities including work can be achieved. PMID:23985153

  7. A STUDY TO ANALYSE THE EFFICACY OF MODIFIED PILATES BASED EXERCISES AND THERAPEUTIC EXERCISES IN INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC NON SPECIFIC LOW BACK PAIN: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.Albert Anand,

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic low back pain is an expensive and difficult condition to treat. Low back pain is the most common musculoskeletal symptoms seen in 85 % of individuals in their life time. One of the interventions widely used by physiotherapists in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain (CNLBP is exercise therapy based upon the Pilates principles. Objective: The purpose of the study was to find out the effect of Modified Pilates based exercises for patients with Chronic Non Specific Low Back Pain. Design: A randomized controlled trial, pre test-post test design Setting: The study was conducted in Out Patient Department of physiotherapy, K.G Hospital, Coimbatore, India. Patients: Fifty– two physically active subjects between 18 – 60 years old with Chronic Non specific Low Specific Pain of more than 12 weeks’ duration were randomly assigned into 2 groups. Interventions: Group A subjects underwent a Modified specific Pilates based exercises with Flexibility Exercises & Group B Subjects underwent a Therapeutic Exercises with Flexibility Exercises were conducted over of 8 weeks. Measurements: Back specific Functional Status outcome were measured with the Oswestry Disability Index and pain intensity were measured with Visual analogue scale. Conclusion: The study concluded that the Modified specific Pilates based exercises helps in reducing the pain, improve the back specific function, improve general health, personal Care, Social Life and flexibility in individuals with non specific chronic low back pain than the therapeutic exercise group.

  8. Back pain and low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients with back pain there is only a poor correlation between clinical and radiological symptoms. Therefore the interpretation of radiological findings is only possible with respect to the natural history of the disease. Indication for radiological examination is given for early diagnosis and treatment of malinformation of the spine; diagnosis and treatment of functional disturbances of the spine with back- and low back pain and diagnosis and treatment of diseases which affect the stability of the vertebrae. (orig.)

  9. Stress is dominant in patients with depression and chronic low back pain. A qualitative study of psychotherapeutic interventions for patients with non-specific low back pain of 3–12 months’ duration

    OpenAIRE

    Ellegaard Hanne; Pedersen Birthe D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is continuing uncertainty in back pain research as to which treatment is best suited to patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP). In this study, Gestalt therapy and the shock trauma method Somatic Experiencing® (SE) were used as interventions in parallel with the usual cross-disciplinary approach. The aim was to investigate how these treatments influence a patient’s capacity to cope with CLBP when it is coupled with depression. Methods In this qualitat...

  10. Effectiveness of Pilates exercise in treating people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells Cherie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic reviews provide clinical practice recommendations that are based on evaluation of primary evidence. When systematic reviews with the same aims have different conclusions, it is difficult to ascertain which review reported the most credible and robust findings. Methods This study examined five systematic reviews that have investigated the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain. A four-stage process was used to interpret findings of the reviews. This process included comparison of research questions, included primary studies, and the level and quality of evidence of systematic reviews. Two independent reviewers assessed the level of evidence and the methodological quality of systematic reviews, using the National Health and Medical Research Council hierarchy of evidence, and the Revised Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews respectively. Any disagreements were resolved by a third researcher. Results A high level of consensus was achieved between the reviewers. Conflicting findings were reported by the five systematic reviews regarding the effectiveness of Pilates in reducing pain and disability in people with chronic low back pain. Authors of the systematic reviews included primary studies that did not match their questions in relation to treatment or population characteristics. A total of ten primary studies were identified across five systematic reviews. Only two of the primary studies were included in all of the reviews due to different inclusion criteria relating to publication date and status, definition of Pilates, and methodological quality. The level of evidence of reviews was low due to the methodological design of the primary studies. The methodological quality of reviews varied. Those which conducted a meta-analysis obtained higher scores. Conclusion There is inconclusive evidence that Pilates is effective in reducing pain and disability in people with chronic low back

  11. Nature and Determinants of the Course of Chronic Low Back Pain Over a 12-Month Period: A Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Christopher G.; Latimer, Jane; McAuley, James H.; Hodges, Paul W.; Rogers, W. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that low back pain (LBP) is a condition with an unpredictable pattern of exacerbation, remission, and recurrence. However, there is an incomplete understanding of the course of LBP and the determinants of the course. Objective The purposes of this study were: (1) to identify clusters of LBP patients with similar fluctuating pain patterns over time and (2) to investigate whether demographic and clinical characteristics can distinguish these clusters. Design This study was a secondary analysis of data extracted from a randomized controlled trial. Methods Pain scores were collected from 155 participants with chronic nonspecific LBP. Pain intensity was measured monthly over a 1-year period by mobile phone short message service. Cluster analysis was used to identify participants with similar fluctuating patterns of pain based on the pain measures collected over a year, and t tests were used to evaluate if the clusters differed in terms of baseline characteristics. Results The cluster analysis revealed the presence of 3 main clusters. Pain was of fluctuating nature within 2 of the clusters. Out of the 155 participants, 21 (13.5%) had fluctuating pain. Baseline disability (measured with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire) and treatment groups (from the initial randomized controlled trial) were significantly different in the clusters of patients with fluctuating pain when compared with the cluster of patients without fluctuating pain. Limitations A limitation of this study was the fact that participants were undergoing treatment that may have been responsible for the rather positive prognosis observed. Conclusions A small number of patients with fluctuating patterns of pain over time were identified. This number could increase if individuals with episodic pain are included in this fluctuating group. PMID:24072729

  12. Steadiness of Spinal Regions during Single-Leg Standing in Older Adults with and without Chronic Low Back Pain.

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    Yi-Liang Kuo

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to compare the steadiness index of spinal regions during single-leg standing in older adults with and without chronic low back pain (LBP and to correlate measurements of steadiness index with the performance of clinical balance tests. Thirteen community-dwelling older adults (aged 55 years or above with chronic LBP and 13 age- and gender-matched asymptomatic volunteers participated in this study. Data collection was conducted in a university research laboratory. Measurements were steadiness index of spinal regions (trunk, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, and pelvis during single-leg standing including relative holding time (RHT and relative standstill time (RST, and clinical balance tests (timed up and go test and 5-repetition sit to stand test. The LBP group had a statistically significantly smaller RHT than the control group, regardless of one leg stance on the painful or non-painful sides. The RSTs on the painful side leg in the LBP group were not statistically significantly different from the average RSTs of both legs in the control group; however, the RSTs on the non-painful side leg in the LBP group were statistically significantly smaller than those in the control group for the trunk, thoracic spine, and lumbar spine. No statistically significant intra-group differences were found in the RHTs and RSTs between the painful and non-painful side legs in the LBP group. Measurements of clinical balance tests also showed insignificant weak to moderate correlations with steadiness index. In conclusion, older adults with chronic LBP demonstrated decreased spinal steadiness not only in the symptomatic lumbar spine but also in the other spinal regions within the kinetic chain of the spine. When treating older adults with chronic LBP, clinicians may also need to examine their balance performance and spinal steadiness during balance challenging tests.

  13. Quality of life under oxycodone/naloxone, oxycodone, or morphine treatment for chronic low back pain in routine clinical practice

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    Ueberall MA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Ueberall,1 Alice Eberhardt,2 Gerhard HH Mueller-Schwefe3 1Institute for Neurological Sciences, Nuernberg, Germany; 2Mundipharma GmbH, Limburg, Germany; 3Interdisciplinary Center for Pain and Palliative Care Medicine, Goeppingen, Germany Objective: To compare the quality of life of patients with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain under treatment with the WHO-step III opioids oxycodone/naloxone, oxycodone, or morphine in routine clinical practice. Study design: Prospective, 12-week, randomized, open-label, blinded end-point study in 88 medical centers in Germany. Patients and methods: A total of 901 patients requiring around-the-clock pain treatment with a WHO-step III opioid were randomized to either morphine, oxycodone, or oxycodone/naloxone (1:1:1. Changes from baseline to week 12 in quality of life were assessed using different validated tools (EuroQoL-5 Dimensions [EQ-5D], Short Form 12 [SF-12], quality of life impairment by pain inventory [QLIP]. Results: EQ-5D weighted index scores significantly improved over the 12-week treatment period under all three opioids (P<0.001 with significantly greater improvements under oxycodone/naloxone (65.2% vs 49.6% for oxycodone and 48.2% for morphine, P<0.001. The proportion of patients without EQ-5D complaints was also significantly higher under oxycodone/naloxone (P<0.001. Although quality of life ratings with the QLIP inventory showed significant improvements in all the three treatment arms, improvements were significantly higher under oxycodone/naloxone than under oxycodone and morphine (P<0.001: 90.7% of all oxycodone/naloxone patients achieved ≥30% improvements in quality of life, 72.8% had ≥50%, and 33.2% ≥70% improvements. Similarly, both physical and mental SF-12 component scores showed significantly greater improvements under oxycodone/naloxone with both scores close to the German population norm after 12 weeks. Conclusion: Treatment with morphine, oxycodone, or oxycodone

  14. The psychometric properties of the Roland Morris disability questionnaire for patients with chronic mechanical low back pain

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    H. Buchanan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Functional status measures are currently not widelyused in South Africa to facilitate clinical decision-making or document treatment outcomes for patients with low back pain (LBP. This study investigated the internal consistency and clinical utility of a back-specific functional status measure, the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ, and determined its ability to confirm the need for spinal fusion surgery. Method: Aretrospective, descriptive design was used with 42 patients with chronic mechanical low back pain who consulted a private Orthopaedic surgeon in Cape Town over a one year  period. All patients completed the RMDQ prior to their consultation. On completion of the medical examination, a rating for surgery was determined for each patient. The completed questionnaires were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS. Results: The mean RMDQ score was 8.6 (N=42; median=9.0; range=2-21. Cronbach’s alpha showed a high internal consistency between items (.92. A categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA identified two distinct dimensions in the RMDQ. Item reduction improved the internal consistency and thus the construct validity of the RMDQ. There was a low correlation between the surgeon’s rating for surgery and RMDQ scores (r=.40; P<.01. Conclusion: The RMDQ shows some good psychometric properties but some adjustments could improve it. The RMDQ cannot be used to predict the need for spinal fusion surgery.

  15. Effect of exhalation exercise on trunk muscle activity and oswestry disability index of patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of exhalation exercises on trunk muscle activity and Oswestry Disability Index by inducing trunk muscle activity through increasing intra-abdominal pressure and activating muscles, contributing to spinal stability. [Subjects and Methods] This intervention program included 20 male patients with chronic low back pain. A total of 10 subjects each were randomly assigned to an exhalation exercise group as the experimental group and a spinal stabilization exercise group as the control group. [Results] There were significant differences in the activities of the rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, external oblique abdominal, and erector spinae muscles as well as in the Oswestry Disability Index within the experimental group. There were meaningful differences in the activities of the rectus abdominis, external oblique abdominal, and erector spinae muscles and in the Oswestry Disability Index within the control group. In addition, there was a meaningful intergroup difference in transverse abdominis muscle activity alone and in the Oswestry Disability Index. [Conclusion] The breathing exercise effectively increased muscle activity by training gross and fine motor muscles in the trunk. Moreover, it was verified as a very important element for strengthening body stability because it both released and prevented low back pain. PMID:27390406

  16. The effectiveness of acupuncture in treating chronic non-specific low back pain: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutchinson Amanda J P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low back pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder defined as pain and soreness, muscle tension, or stiffness in the lumbosacral area of the spine which does not have a specific cause. Low back pain results in high health costs and incapacity to work causing an economic burden to society. The optimal management of non-specific low back pain appears to be undecided. Recently published guidelines support the use of acupuncture for treating non-specific low back pain and it has become a popular alternative treatment modality for patients with low back pain. Methods A comprehensive systematic literature search was conducted through Medline using Ovid and Medical Subject Headings for randomized controlled trials published in the last 10 years. The outcomes scored were subjective pain scores and functional outcome scores. Results Eighty two randomized studies were identified, of which 7 met our inclusion criteria. Three studies found a significant difference in pain scores when comparing acupuncture, or sham acupuncture, with conventional therapy or no care. Two studies demonstrated a significant difference between acupuncture treatment and no treatment or routine care at 8 weeks and 3 months. Three studies demonstrated no significant difference between acupuncture and minimal/sham acupuncture with no difference in pain relief or function over 6 to 12 months. Conclusions This review provides some evidence to support acupuncture as more effective than no treatment, but no conclusions can be drawn about its effectiveness over other treatment modalities as the evidence is conflicting.

  17. Efficacy of the Pilates method for pain and disability in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela C. Miyamoto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the available evidence on the efficacy of the Pilates method in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. METHOD: Searches were performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, SciELO, LILACS, CINAHL and CENTRAL in March 2013. Randomized controlled trials that tested the effectiveness of the Pilates method (against a nontreatment group, minimal intervention or other types of interventions in adults with chronic low back pain were included regardless the language of publication. The outcome data were extracted from the eligible studies and were combined using a meta-analysis approach. RESULTS: The searches identified a total of 1,545 articles. From these, eight trials were considered eligible, and seven trials were combined in the meta-analysis. The comparison groups were as follows: Pilates versus other types of exercises (n=2 trials, and Pilates versus no treatment group or minimal intervention (n=4 trials for short term pain; Pilates versus minimal intervention for short-term disability (n=4.We determined that Pilates was not better than other types of exercises for reducing pain intensity. However, Pilates was better than a minimal intervention for reducing short-term pain and disability (pain: pooled mean difference=1.6 points; 95% CI 1.4 to 1.8; disability: pooled mean difference=5.2 points; 95% CI 4.3 to 6.1. CONCLUSIONS: Pilates was better than a minimal intervention for reducing pain and disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Pilates was not better than other types of exercise for short-term pain reduction.

  18. A Controlled and Retrospective Study of 144 Chronic Low Back Pain Patients to Evaluate the Effectiveness of an Intensive Functional Restoration Program in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Caby

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: A controlled and retrospective study of 144 chronic low back pain patients to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive functional restoration program in France. Objective: Evaluating the efficiency of an intensive, dynamic and multidisciplinary functional restoration program in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP, during 6 and 12 months follow up. Summary of background data: Chronic low back pain disease has a multifactor nature, involving physical, psychological professional and social factors. A functional restoration program (FRP has been included in a multidisciplinary training program which provides an efficient therapeutic solution. However, the effectiveness of an FRP has not been yet established. Methods: 144 subjects (71 males, 73 females with chronic low back pain were included in a functional restoration program. The FRP includes physiotherapy and occupational therapy interventions together with psychological counselling. Patients participated as in- or outpatients 6 h per day, 5 days a week over 5 weeks. Pain intensity, trunk flexibility, trunk strength, lifting ability, quality of life and return to work were recorded before, immediately after, and at 6 months and 12 months after the treatment period. Results: All outcome measures were significantly higher just after the FRP (144 patients and at 6 and 12 months (from available data in 31 subjects compared to pre-treatment values. This FRP for chronic low back pain maintained its benefits whatever the patient’s activities. Conclusions: The effects reflected on all outcome measures, both on short and long term follow-up. The multidisciplinary FRP for chronic low back pain patients durably stopped the de-conditioning syndrome and involved new life-style habits for the patient, daily pain management and a return to work.

  19. Comparison of yoga versus stretching for chronic low back pain: protocol for the Yoga Exercise Self-care (YES trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawkes Rene J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back pain, one of the most prevalent conditions afflicting American adults, is the leading reason for using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies. Yoga is an increasingly popular "mind-body" CAM therapy often used for relieving back pain and several small studies have found yoga effective for this condition. This study will assess whether yoga is effective for treating chronic low back pain compared with self care and exercise and will explore the mechanisms responsible for any observed benefits. Methods/Design A total of 210 participants with low back pain lasting at least 3 months will be recruited from primary care clinics of a large healthcare system based in Seattle. They will be randomized in a 2:2:1 ratio to receive 12 weekly yoga classes, 12 weekly conventional therapeutic exercise classes of comparable physical exertion, or a self-care book. Interviewers masked to participants' treatment group will assess outcomes at baseline and 6, 12 and 26 weeks after randomization. Primary outcomes will be back-related dysfunction and symptom bothersomeness. In addition, data will be collected on physical measurements (e.g., flexion at baseline and 12 weeks and saliva samples will be obtained at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Information will be collected on specific physical, psychological, and physiological factors to allow exploration of possible mechanisms of action through which yoga could relieve back pain and dysfunction. The effectiveness of yoga will be assessed using analysis of covariance (using general estimating equations - GEE within an intention-to-treat context. If yoga is found effective, further analyses will explore whether yoga's benefits are attributable to physical, psychological and/or physiological factors. Conclusions This study will provide the clearest evidence to date about the value of yoga as a therapeutic option for treating chronic back pain, and if the results are positive, will help

  20. Massage and modality effects on treatment of sub-acute and chronic non specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Panahi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain (LBP is the second most common medical complaint. It’s estimated that about 70-85% of the population will suffer at least one episode of LBP during their life. The aim of present study was to compare the effects of massage and modality in patient with sub-acute and chronic non-specific LBPMethods: In this clinical trial study 30 women (MeanAge: 33.96±10.93 with sub-acute and chronic non-specific LBP (Mean pain-duration:9.68±3.38 were included in the study and randomized into two equal groups; massage and modality. Patients in both group underwent 10 sessions treatment period. Pain (numerical-pain-scale,NRS, functional disability index (oswestry-disability-index,ODI and lumbar-flexion(modified-schober-testwere recorded before and immediately after treatment period. Data was analyzed using paired t-test and independent sample t-test.Results: Significant improvement showed in both groups separately in pain-intensity, disability level, and flexion after treatment (P<0.001. Statically significant improvement was seen in massage group in comparison to modality group for NRS & ODI after treatment (PNRS=0.015, PODI=0.013. There was a not significant change in point of lumber flexion between two groupsConclusion: The results showed that both massage and modality had beneficial effects on the improvement of pain, functional disability and lumbar flexion in patients with non-specific LBP. It seems that massage is better than modality for non-specific LBP in a short period of time.

  1. A systematic review on the effectiveness of pharmacological interventions for chronic non-specific low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, T; van Middelkoop, M; Rubinstein, S M; Ostelo, R; Verhagen, A; Koes, B W; van Tulder, M W

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness of pharmacological interventions [i.e., non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), muscle relaxants, antidepressants, and opioids] for non-specific chronic low-back pain (LBP). Existing Cochrane reviews for the four interventions were screened for studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Then, the literature searches were updated. Only randomized controlled trials on adults (≥18 years) with chronic (≥12 weeks) non-specific LBP and evaluation of at least one of the main clinically relevant outcome measures (pain, functional status, perceived recovery, or return to work) were included. The GRADE approach was used to determine the quality of evidence. A total of 17 randomized controlled trials was included: NSAIDs (n = 4), antidepressants (n = 5), and opioids (n = 8). No studies were found for muscle relaxants; 14 studies had a low risk of bias. The studies only reported effects on the short term (after stopping their medication. However, both types of medication show more adverse effects than placebo. There seems to be no difference in effect between antidepressants and placebo in patients with non-specific chronic LBP. PMID:20680369

  2. Analgesic efficacy of cerebral and peripheral electrical stimulation in chronic nonspecific low back pain: a randomized, double-blind, factorial clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hazime, Fuad Ahmad; de Freitas, Diego Galace; Monteiro, Renan Lima; Maretto, Rafaela Lasso; Carvalho, Nilza Aparecida de Almeida; Hasue, Renata Hydee; João, Silvia Maria Amado

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic non-specific low back pain is a major socioeconomic public health issue worldwide and, despite the volume of research in the area, it is still a difficult-to-treat condition. The conservative analgesic therapy usually comprises a variety of pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies, such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. The neuromatrix pain model and the new findings on the process of chronicity of pain point to a higher effectiveness of treatments t...

  3. Pain Expectancies, Pain, and Functional Self-Efficacy Expectancies as Determinants of Disability in Patients with Chronic Low Back Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Jeffrey M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Tested the predictive power of self-efficacy expectations of physical capabilities, expectations of pain, and expectations of reinjury on physical function in chronic back pain patients. Before assessment of function, patients rated their abilities to perform essential job tasks--functional self-efficacy (FSE)--and the likelihood working would…

  4. Effects of proprioceptive exercises on pain and function in chronic neck- and low back pain rehabilitation: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    McCaskey, Michael A.; Schuster-Amft, Corina; Wirth, Brigitte; Suica, Zorica; de Bruin, Eling D

    2014-01-01

    Background Proprioceptive training (PrT) is popularly applied as preventive or rehabilitative exercise method in various sports and rehabilitation settings. Its effect on pain and function is only poorly evaluated. The aim of this systematic review was to summarise and analyse the existing data on the effects of PrT on pain alleviation and functional restoration in patients with chronic (≥3 months) neck- or back pain. Methods Relevant electronic databases were searched from their respective i...

  5. [Long-term effects of a cognitive-behavioral intervention on pain coping among inpatient orthopedic rehabilitation of chronic low back pain and depressive symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Petra; Gemp, Stephan; Mohr, Beate; Schulze, Julian; Tlach, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    Beneficial effects on psychological measures in orthopedic inpatient rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and co-exist-ing depressive symptoms have been shown only for multidisciplinary approaches that incorporate psychotherapeutic interventions. Aim of this study was to verify these findings for pain coping outcomes (pain-related psychological disability, pain-related coping). Short-, mid-, and long-term effects of a standard pain management program that was either solely provided or combined with a supplemental cognitive-behavioral depression management were examined in a consecutive sample of n=84. Patients in both groups showed long-term beneficial effects in pain coping measures. Thus, the standard rehabilitation revealed specific and long-term effects on pain coping. However, further evidence suggests that diagnosis-specific psychotherapeutic treatment elements are required to improve psychological symptoms. PMID:24838435

  6. Effectiveness of a Multimodal Therapy for Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain Regarding Pre-Admission Healthcare Utilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Borys

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of an intensive inpatient three-week multimodal therapy. We focused especially on the impact on the multimodal therapy outcome of the pre-admission number of treatment types patients had received and of medical specialist groups patients had consulted.155 patients with chronic low back pain and indication for multimodal therapy were evaluated with respect to pain intensity, depression, anxiety, well-being, and pre-admission health care utilization. In our controlled clinical trial we compared N = 66 patients on the waiting list with N = 89 patients who received immediate treatment. The waiting list patients likewise attended multimodal therapy after the waiting period. Longitudinal post-treatment data for both were collected at three- and twelve-month follow-ups. The impact of pre-admission health care utilization on multimodal therapy outcome (post was analysed by structural equation model.Compared to the control group, multimodal therapy patients' pain intensity and psychological variables were significantly reduced. Longitudinal effects with respect to pre-measures were significant at three-month follow-up for pain intensity (ES = -0.48, well-being (ES = 0.78, anxiety (ES = -0.33, and depression (ES = -0.30. Effect sizes at twelve-month follow-up were small for anxiety (ES = -0.22, and moderate for general well-being (ES = 0.61. Structural equation model revealed that a higher number of pre-admission treatment types was associated with poorer post-treatment outcomes in pain intensity, well-being, and depression.Multimodal therapy proved to be effective with regard to improvements in pain intensity, depression, anxiety, and well-being. The association between treatment effect and number of pre-admission pain treatment types suggests that patients would benefit more from attending multimodal therapy in an earlier stage of health care.

  7. Antibiotic treatment in patients with chronic low back pain and vertebral bone edema (Modic type 1 changes): a double-blind randomized clinical controlled trial of efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, H. B.; Sørensen, Joan S.; Berit Schiott, Christensen;

    2013-01-01

    vertebrae adjacent to the previous herniation. Patients were randomized to either 100 days of antibiotic treatment (Bioclavid) or placebo and were blindly evaluated at baseline, end of treatment and at 1-year follow-up. OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome, disease-specific disability, lumbar pain. Secondary...... months) and Modic type 1 changes (bone edema). METHODS: The study was a double-blind RCT with 162 patients whose only known illness was chronic LBP of greater than 6 months duration occurring after a previous disc herniation and who also had bone edema demonstrated as Modic type 1 changes in the......PURPOSE: Modic type 1 changes/bone edema in the vertebrae are present in 6 % of the general population and 35-40 % of the low back pain population. It is strongly associated with low back pain. The aim was to test the efficacy of antibiotic treatment in patients with chronic low back pain (>6...

  8. Radiofrequency-Induced Intradiscal Nucleoplasty Chronic Low Back Pain Secondary To Lumbar Disc Herniation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, DW; Loh, ESY; Kueh, CC; Poi, JH; Francis, T.; Koh, KC; Wazir, NN; Singh, H

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We set out to assess the efficacy of radiofrequency-induced intradiscal nucleoplasty in reducing pain in symptomatic patients with MRI-defined lumbar disc herniation and their satisfaction with the procedure. We compared the patients’ pain intensity and severity of disability scores before and after undergoing the procedure in a retrospective questionnaire. These patients reported statistically significant reduction of pain intensity and disability level after the procedure. We concl...

  9. Active treatment programs for patients with chronic low back pain: a prospective, randomized, observer-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendix, A F; Bendix, T; Ostenfeld, S; Bush, E; Andersen

    1995-01-01

    Several new studies have indicated that an active approach to patients with chronic disabling low back pain (LBP) seems effective. Some of these studies emphasize the importance of dealing with the patient's total situation in comprehensive multidisciplinary programs--the bio-psycho-social model. However, these programs are expensive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rehabilitation outcome from three different active programs in terms of: (1) return-to-work rate, (2) days of sick leave, (3) health-care contacts, (4) pain and disability scores, and (5) staying physically active. The subjects included 132 patients randomized to the study, of whom 123 started one of the treatment programs. They had all had at least 6 months of chronic LBP. The patients were randomized into one of three programs: group 1--a full-time, intensive 3-week multidisciplinary program, including active physical and ergonomic training and psychological pain management, followed by 1 day weekly for the subsequent 3 weeks; group 2--active physical training, twice a week for 6 weeks, for a total of 24h; group 3--psychological pain management combined with active physical training, twice a week for 6 weeks, also for a total of 24h. The results presented here are based on data collected 4 months following treatment, which shows an 86% response rate. The initial examination and the follow-up evaluation were performed by a blinded observer. The results show that 4 months after treatment, the intensive multidisciplinary program is superior to the less intensive programs in terms of return-to-work rate, health-care contacts, pain and disability scores, and staying physically active.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7552649

  10. Rehabilitation of Low Back Pain in Golfers

    OpenAIRE

    Finn, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Context: Low back injuries are the most common injury in golf. Best practice guidelines for rehabilitation and prevention of these injuries are helpful for health care professionals and all golfers. Objective: To establish a best practice clinical model for low back pain in golfers from diagnosis through treatment and rehabilitation to return to golf. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database and Google Scholar were searched from 1993 to 2012 with the following keywords: golf and low back inj...

  11. Cost-effectiveness of minimal interventional procedures for chronic mechanical low back pain: design of four randomised controlled trials with an economic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maas Esther T

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minimal interventional procedures are frequently applied in patients with mechanical low back pain which is defined as pain presumably resulting from single sources: facet, disc, sacroiliac joint or a combination of these. Usually, these minimal interventional procedures are an integral part of a multidisciplinary pain programme. A recent systematic review issued by the Dutch Health Insurance Council showed that the effectiveness of these procedures for the total group of patients with chronic low back pain is yet unclear and cost-effectiveness unknown. The aim of the study is to evaluate whether a multidisciplinary pain programme with minimal interventional procedures is cost-effective compared to the multidisciplinary pain programme alone for patients with chronic mechanical low back pain who did not respond to conservative primary care and were referred to a pain clinic. Methods All patients with chronic low back pain who are referred to one of the 13 participating pain clinics will be asked to participate in an observational study. Patients with a suspected diagnosis of facet, disc or sacroiliac joint problems will receive a diagnostic block to confirm this diagnosis. If confirmed, they will be asked to participate in a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT. For each single source a separate RCT will be conducted. Patients with a combination of facet, disc or sacroiliac joint problems will be invited for participation in a RCT as well. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective will be performed alongside these four RCTs. Patients will complete questionnaires at baseline, 3 and 6 weeks, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after start of the treatment. Costs will be collected using self-completed cost questionnaires. Discussion No trials are yet available which have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of minimal interventional procedures in patients with chronic mechanical low back pain, which emphasizes the importance of this study

  12. Efficacy of dynamic muscular stabilization techniques (DMST) over conventional techniques in rehabilitation of chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suraj; Sharma, Vijai P; Negi, Mahendra P S

    2009-12-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common health problems. Although it is multifactorial, its treatment varies considerably, including medication, physical therapy modalities, and exercise therapy, and each have several interventions. Despite their effectiveness, their head-to-head comparisons are limited. This study was aimed at 1 such comparison. A total of 30 hockey players, 18 to 28 years of age, with subacute or chronic LBP were randomly assigned equally in 2 groups. One group was treated with conventional treatment--a combination of 2 electrotherapies (ultrasound and short-wave diathermy) and 1 exercise therapy (lumbar strengthening exercises)--and the other group was treated with dynamic muscular stabilization techniques (DMST), an active approach of stabilizing training. The results showed that both the treatments are effective in the management of LBP, but DMST was found to be more effective than conventional treatment. The walking, stand ups, climbing, and pain improved 4.7, 2.0, 1.4, and 2.1 times, respectively, more with DMST than with conventional treatment. With time (days), walking, stand ups, climbing, and pain improved (correlation) significantly (p coefficients) were also significantly (p coefficient approximately 1). No major adverse effects were recorded in any of the patients in either group. This study concluded that for early recovery, DMST is more suitable than conventional treatment. PMID:19858754

  13. Association of depression with sleep quality might be greater than that of pain intensity among outpatients with chronic low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin-Yu; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hung, Ching-I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose No study to date has compared the associations of pain intensity, depression, and anxiety with insomnia among outpatients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). This study aimed to investigate this issue. Patients and methods A total of 225 outpatients with CLBP were enrolled from a general orthopedics clinic. The Insomnia Severity Index was used to evaluate sleep quality. Major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision, Axis I Disorders. Two psychometric scales were used to evaluate depression and anxiety. The Visual Analog Scale was employed to assess pain intensity. Multiple linear regressions were performed to determine the association of insomnia with pain intensity, depression, and anxiety. Results Among the 225 subjects, 58 (25.8%) had clinical insomnia; 83 (36.9%) had severe low back pain; 49 (21.8%) had MDD, including 21 (9.3%) with a current major depressive episode (MDE); and 52 (23.1%) had anxiety disorders. More than half (56.9%) of the subjects with CLBP and clinical insomnia had MDD and/or anxiety disorders. Subjects with a current MDE or anxiety disorders had greater severities of pain and insomnia as compared with subjects without these conditions. After controlling for demographic variables, MDE was more strongly associated with insomnia than severe low back pain; moreover, the severity of depression had a greater association with insomnia than pain intensity. Conclusion The association of depression with insomnia was not inferior to that of pain intensity with insomnia. Among patients with CLBP and insomnia, integration of depression and anxiety treatment into treatment of pain might help to improve sleep quality. PMID:27563244

  14. Patients' interpretations of a counselling intervention for low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Sanne; Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Gonge, Birgitte Krøis;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain often becomes a chronic condition and causes physical, psychological, social, and occupational impairment. Despite huge allocations of resources into the healthcare system and the labour market for treating and preventing low back pain, problems related to low back pain...... the intervention. If participants managed to change their health behaviour, it assisted them in transforming from being passive victims of pain into becoming active and in control. Participants who did not feel that they were sufficiently able to adhere to the treatment plan felt increasingly stigmatised, because...

  15. Kinesio Taping® is not better than placebo in reducing pain and disability in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício A. Luz Júnior

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kinesio Taping® has been widely used in clinical practice. However, it is unknown whether this type of tape is more effective than placebo taping in patients with chronic lower back pain. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping® in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain against a placebo tape and a control group. Method: This is a 3-arm, randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Sixty patients with chronic non-specific low back pain were randomized into one of the three groups: Kinesio Taping® group (n=20, Micropore® (placebo group (n=20 and control group (n=20. Patients allocated to both the Kinesio Taping® group and the placebo group used the different types of tape for a period of 48 hours. The control group did not receive any intervention. The outcomes measured were pain intensity (measured by an 11-point numerical rating scale and disability (measured by the 24-item Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. A blinded assessor measured the outcomes at baseline, 48 hours and 7 days after randomization. Results: After 48 hours, there was a statistically significant difference between the Kinesio Taping® group versus the control group (mean between-group difference = -3.1 points, 95% CI=-5.2 to -1.1, p=0.003, but no difference when compared to the placebo group (mean between-group difference= 1.9 points, 95% CI=-0.2 to 3.9, p=0.08. For the other outcomes no differences were observed. Conclusions: The Kinesio Taping® is not better than placebo (Micropore® in patients with chronic low back pain.

  16. Influence of Pilates Mat and Apparatus Exercises on Pain and Balance of Businesswomen with Chronic Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chae-Woo; Hyun, Ju; Kim, Seong Gil

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of mat Pilates and apparatus Pilates on pain and static balance of businesswomen with chronic back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Participants were randomly allocated to Pilates mat exercises (PME) or Pilates apparatus exercise (PAE), and performed the appropriate Pilates exercises 3 days per week for 8 weeks. In order to measure the improvement in the participants’ static balance ability as a result of the exercise, the sway leng...

  17. Quality of life under oxycodone/naloxone, oxycodone, or morphine treatment for chronic low back pain in routine clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberall, Michael A; Eberhardt, Alice; Mueller-Schwefe, Gerhard HH

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the quality of life of patients with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain under treatment with the WHO-step III opioids oxycodone/naloxone, oxycodone, or morphine in routine clinical practice. Study design Prospective, 12-week, randomized, open-label, blinded end-point study in 88 medical centers in Germany. Patients and methods A total of 901 patients requiring around-the-clock pain treatment with a WHO-step III opioid were randomized to either morphine, oxycodone, or oxycodone/naloxone (1:1:1). Changes from baseline to week 12 in quality of life were assessed using different validated tools (EuroQoL-5 Dimensions [EQ-5D], Short Form 12 [SF-12], quality of life impairment by pain inventory [QLIP]). Results EQ-5D weighted index scores significantly improved over the 12-week treatment period under all three opioids (P<0.001) with significantly greater improvements under oxycodone/naloxone (65.2% vs 49.6% for oxycodone and 48.2% for morphine, P<0.001). The proportion of patients without EQ-5D complaints was also significantly higher under oxycodone/naloxone (P<0.001). Although quality of life ratings with the QLIP inventory showed significant improvements in all the three treatment arms, improvements were significantly higher under oxycodone/naloxone than under oxycodone and morphine (P<0.001): 90.7% of all oxycodone/naloxone patients achieved ≥30% improvements in quality of life, 72.8% had ≥50%, and 33.2% ≥70% improvements. Similarly, both physical and mental SF-12 component scores showed significantly greater improvements under oxycodone/naloxone with both scores close to the German population norm after 12 weeks. Conclusion Treatment with morphine, oxycodone, or oxycodone/naloxone under routine daily practice conditions significantly improved state of health and quality of life of patients with moderate-to-severe low back pain over a 12-week treatment period. Comparison between the treatment groups showed significantly greater

  18. Mechanical therapy for low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, Donald Grant

    2012-09-01

    Physical therapy and manual medicine for low back pain encompass many different treatment modalities. There is a vast variety of techniques that physical therapists commonly use in the treatment of low back pain. Some of the therapies include, but are certainly not limited to, education, exercise, lumbar traction, manual manipulation, application of heat, cryotherapy, and ultrasonography. Many of these approaches are discussed specifically in this article. PMID:22958560

  19. General and Specific Self-efficacy Reports of Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: Are They Related to Performances in a Functional Capacity Evaluation?

    OpenAIRE

    Reneman, Michiel F.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Groothoff, Johan W; Brouwer, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship of general and specific self-efficacy (SE) beliefs with functional capacity evaluation (FCE) performances in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain (CLBP), while controlling for influence of gender, age, and self-reported pain intensity, self-esteem, disability, psychosocial distress and health status. Methods Included were 92 patients with CLBP referred to an outpatient university based multidisciplinary pain ...

  20. Psychopathology predicts the outcome of medial branch blocks with corticosteroid for chronic axial low back or cervical pain: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Tipirneni Naveen; Pham Loc; Jamison Robert N; Wasan Ajay D; Nedeljkovic Srdjan S; Katz Jeffrey N

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Comorbid psychopathology is an important predictor of poor outcome for many types of treatments for back or neck pain. But it is unknown if this applies to the results of medial branch blocks (MBBs) for chronic low back or neck pain, which involves injecting the medial branch of the dorsal ramus nerves that innervate the facet joints. The objective of this study was to determine whether high levels of psychopathology are predictive of pain relief after MBB injections in th...

  1. A systematic review on the effectiveness of physical and rehabilitation interventions for chronic non-specific low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Middelkoop (Marienke); S.M. Rubinstein (Sidney); T. Kuijpers (Ton); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); R.W.J.G. Ostelo (Raymond); B.W. Koes (Bart); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow back pain (LBP) is a common and disabling disorder in western society. The management of LBP comprises a range of different intervention strategies including surgery, drug therapy, and non-medical interventions. The objective of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of

  2. Rehabilitation of Low Back Pain in Golfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Context: Low back injuries are the most common injury in golf. Best practice guidelines for rehabilitation and prevention of these injuries are helpful for health care professionals and all golfers. Objective: To establish a best practice clinical model for low back pain in golfers from diagnosis through treatment and rehabilitation to return to golf. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database and Google Scholar were searched from 1993 to 2012 with the following keywords: golf and low back injury, low back injury, golf and low back pain, golf injury prevention, golf modern swing, muscles in golf swing, low back rehabilitation, diaphragm, and core stability. All studies addressed in some manner the rehabilitation, prevention, or return to sport from low back injury, preferably in direct relation to golf, as well as muscle firing patterns used during the golf swing. Results: Best practice for rehabilitation and prevention of low back injury in golf appears to be through a multidisciplinary approach. Conclusion: Movement patterns, muscle imbalances, and type of swing utilized all have a direct effect on the forces applied to the spine during the golf swing and need to be assessed to prevent or rehabilitate injury. Understanding the golf swing and how the body works during the swing is necessary. PMID:24459546

  3. Supervised and non-supervised Nordic walking in the treatment of chronic low back pain: a single blind randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Morsø, Lars; Bendix, Tom;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Active approaches including both specific and unspecific exercise are probably the most widely recommended treatment for patients with chronic low back pain but it is not known exactly which types of exercise provide the most benefit. Nordic Walking - power walking using ski poles - is...

  4. Percutaneous Nucleoplasty Using Coblation Technique for the Treatment of Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: 5-year Follow-up Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Jiang Ren; Xiu-Mei Liu; Sui-Yong Du; Tian-Sheng Sun; Zhi-Cheng Zhang; Fang Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:This study evaluated the efficacy of percutaneous nucleoplasty using coblation technique for the treatment of chronic nonspecific low back pain (LBP),after 5 years of follow-up.Methods:From September 2004 to November 2006,172 patients underwent percutaneous nucleoplasty for chronic LBP in our department.Forty-one of these patients were followed up for a mean period of 67 months.Nucleoplasty was performed at L3/4 in 1 patient;L4/5 in 25 patients;L5/S1 in 2 patients;L3/4 and L4/5 in 2 patients;L4/5 and L5/S1 in 7 patients;and L3/4,L4/5,and L5/S1 in 4 patients.Patients were assessed preoperatively and at 1 week,1 year,3 years,and 5 years postoperatively.Pain was graded using a 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the percentage reduction in pain score was calculated at each postoperative time point.The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to assess disability-related to lumbar spine degeneration,and patient satisfaction was assessed using the modified MacNab criteria.Results:There were significant differences among the preoperative,1-week postoperative,and 3-year postoperative VAS and ODI scores,but not between the 3-and 5-year postoperative scores.There were no significant differences in age,sex,or preoperative symptoms between patients with effective and ineffective treatment,but there were significant differences in the number of levels treated,Pfirrmann grade of intervertebral disc degeneration,and provocative discography findings between these two groups.Excellent or good patient satisfaction was achieved in 87.9% of patients after 1 week,72.4% after 1 year,67.7% after 3 years,and 63.4% at the last follow-up.Conclusions:Although previously published short-and medium-term outcomes after percutaneous nucleoplasty appeared to be satisfactory,our long-term follow-up results show a significant decline in patient satisfaction over time.Percutaneous nucleoplasty is a safe and simple technique,with therapeutic effectiveness for the treatment of

  5. Neurophysiologic effects of spinal manipulation in patients with chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walkowski Stevan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is growing evidence for the efficacy of SM to treat LBP, little is known on the mechanisms and physiologic effects of these treatments. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine whether SM alters the amplitude of the motor evoked potential (MEP or the short-latency stretch reflex of the erector spinae muscles, and whether these physiologic responses depend on whether SM causes an audible joint sound. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation to elicit MEPs and electromechanical tapping to elicit short-latency stretch reflexes in 10 patients with chronic LBP and 10 asymptomatic controls. Neurophysiologic outcomes were measured before and after SM. Changes in MEP and stretch reflex amplitude were examined based on patient grouping (LBP vs. controls, and whether SM caused an audible joint sound. Results SM did not alter the erector spinae MEP amplitude in patients with LBP (0.80 ± 0.33 vs. 0.80 ± 0.30 μV or in asymptomatic controls (0.56 ± 0.09 vs. 0.57 ± 0.06 μV. Similarly, SM did not alter the erector spinae stretch reflex amplitude in patients with LBP (0.66 ± 0.12 vs. 0.66 ± 0.15 μV or in asymptomatic controls (0.60 ± 0.09 vs. 0.55 ± 0.08 μV. Interestingly, study participants exhibiting an audible response exhibited a 20% decrease in the stretch reflex (p Conclusions These findings suggest that a single SM treatment does not systematically alter corticospinal or stretch reflex excitability of the erector spinae muscles (when assessed ~ 10-minutes following SM; however, they do indicate that the stretch reflex is attenuated when SM causes an audible response. This finding provides insight into the mechanisms of SM, and suggests that SM that produces an audible response may mechanistically act to decrease the sensitivity of the muscle spindles and/or the various segmental sites of the Ia reflex pathway.

  6. Fear and difficulty perceived when visualizing therapeutic exercise in patients with chronic low back pain: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fernández, Marcos; Lerma-Lara, Sergio; Ferrer-Peña, Raúl; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Paris-Alemany, Alba; Beltrán-Alacreu, Héctor; La Touche, Roy

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the perceived level of difficulty and fear of movement among patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) compared with asymptomatic subjects when they visualized motor control therapeutic exercises (MCTEs) commonly used in physiotherapy. Our secondary objective was to analyse the correlation between fear of MCTEs and other psychological and disability variables. Thirty patients with CLBP comprised the treatment group, and 30 asymptomatic subjects comprised the control group. The procedure consisted of showing photographs and videos of seven MCTEs and having the participants rate their perceived difficulty and fear. Participants then answered a series of psychological self-report measures. Differences were found between groups in perceived difficulty of the MCTEs shown in videos (F=21.06, Pcatastrophizing and self-efficacy (38% and 34% of the variance, respectively). In conclusion, patients with CLBP experience greater perceived level of difficulty and fear of movement when visualizing MCTEs than asymptomatic subjects. Psychological factors and disability were correlated with perceived difficulty and fear when videos and photographs of exercises were shown. PMID:26730386

  7. Coping with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindig, L. E.; Mrvos, S. R.

    Guidelines are offered for the prevention and relief of lower back pain. The structure of the spine is described, and the functions and composition of spinal disks are explained. A list is included of common causes of abnormalities of the spinal column, and injuries which may cause the fracture of the vertebrae are described. Factors causing low…

  8. Do abnormal serum lipid levels increase the risk of chronic low back pain? The Nord-Trondelag Health Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Heuch

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional studies suggest associations between abnormal lipid levels and prevalence of low back pain (LBP, but it is not known if there is any causal relationship.The objective was to determine, in a population-based prospective cohort study, whether there is any relation between levels of total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol and triglycerides and the probability of experiencing subsequent chronic (LBP, both among individuals with and without LBP at baseline.Information was collected in the community-based HUNT 2 (1995-1997 and HUNT 3 (2006-2008 surveys of an entire Norwegian county. Participants were 10,151 women and 8731 men aged 30-69 years, not affected by chronic LBP at baseline, and 3902 women and 2666 men with LBP at baseline. Eleven years later the participants indicated whether they currently suffered from chronic LBP.Among women without LBP at baseline, HDL cholesterol levels were inversely associated and triglyceride levels positively associated with the risk of chronic LBP at end of follow-up in analyses adjusted for age only. Adjustment for the baseline factors education, work status, physical activity, smoking, blood pressure and in particular BMI largely removed these associations (RR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.85-1.07 per mmol/l of HDL cholesterol; RR: 1.16, 95% CI: 0.94-1.42 per unit of lg(triglycerides. Total cholesterol levels showed no associations. In women with LBP at baseline and men without LBP at baseline weaker relationships were observed. In men with LBP at baseline, an inverse association with HDL cholesterol remained after complete adjustment (RR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.72-0.95 per mmol/l.Crude associations between lipid levels and risk of subsequent LBP in individuals without current LBP are mainly caused by confounding with body mass. However, an association with low HDL levels may still remain in men who are already affected and possibly experience a higher pain intensity.

  9. Managing low back pain second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 26 chapters. Some of the titles are: Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine; Diagnostic techniques; The site and nature of the lesion; The anatomy of the lumbosacral spine; The perception of pain; Differential diagnosis of low back pain; and A comprehensive outline of treatment

  10. How to prevent low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burton, A.K.; Balague, F.; Cardon, G.; Eriksen, H.R.; Henrotin, Y.; Lahad, A.; Leclerc, A.; Muller, G.; Beek, van der A.J.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the European Guidelines for Prevention in Low Back Pain, which consider the evidence in respect of the general population, workers and children. There is limited scope for preventing the incidence (first-time onset) of back pain and, overall, there is limited robust evidence

  11. Lumbar Disc Screening Using Back Pain Questionnaires: Oswestry Low Back Pain Score, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale, and Acute Low Back Pain Screening Questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Yeon; Oh, Chang Hyun; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, Hyung Chun; Park, Chong Oon

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness of back pain questionnaires for lumbar disc screening among Korean young males. Methods We carried out a survey for lumbar disc screening through back pain questionnaires among the volunteers with or without back pain. Three types of back pain questionnaire (Oswestry Low Back Pain Score, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale, and Acute Low Back Pain Screeing Questionnaire) were randomly assigned to the examinees. The authors reviewed lumbar imaging studies (simple ...

  12. Health literacy and patient empowerment: separating con-joined twins in the context of chronic low back pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Linda Camerini

    Full Text Available While health literacy has been widely considered key to patient empowerment, an alternative approach separates both concepts and distinguishes between different types of patients according to their levels of health literacy and empowerment. These types are deemed to vary in their health-related actions and outcomes. In this study, we examine the relationship between health literacy and patient empowerment and compare socio-demographic characteristics, health-related activities, and health outcomes in four types of patients suffering from chronic low back pain (cLBP.In a cross-sectional study, 273 cLBP patients from four Swiss cantons (Vaud, Geneva, Fribourg, Ticino and Lombardy (Italy were invited by their healthcare providers to complete a self-administered paper-and-pencil questionnaire which assessed patients' health literacy, empowerment, involvement in the medical encounter, medication non-adherence, and perceived pain and functionality as a measure of health outcomes.Health literacy and patient empowerment were not significantly correlated with each other, r(271 = .09, p > .05, allowing to differentiate between four types of patients based on their levels of health literacy and patient empowerment. Subsequent chi-square tests and analyses of variances revealed significant differences among patients that could, however, only be attributed to health literacy, as in the case of age and educational attainment, or patient empowerment, as in the case of patients' involvement in the medical encounter. No significant differences were evident for gender, medication non-adherence, and health outcomes.The study provides empirical evidence for the need to consider health literacy and patient empowerment as independent concepts in the context of cLBP but calls for further studies to be able to conclude on how the two concepts interact and determine health-related activities and outcomes.

  13. The effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for nonspecific chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, ZeYu; Ma, Jun; Chen, Jing; Shen, Bin; Pei, Fuxing; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent decades, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been widely used to relieve pain caused by different musculoskeletal disorders. Though widely used, its reported therapeutic outcomes are varied and conflicting. Results similarly conflict regarding its usage in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). This study investigated the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for the treatment of NSCLBP by a systematic literature search with meta-analyses on selecte...

  14. A systematic review on the effectiveness of physical and rehabilitation interventions for chronic non-specific low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Rubinstein, Sidney; Kuijpers, Ton; Verhagen, Arianne; Ostelo, Raymond; Koes, Bart; van Tulder, Maurits

    2010-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common and disabling disorder in western society. The management of LBP comprises a range of different intervention strategies including surgery, drug therapy, and non-medical interventions. The objective of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of physical and rehabilitation interventions (i.e. exercise therapy, back school, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), low level laser therapy, education, massage, behavioural treatment, traction, ...

  15. Study protocol: Transition from localized low back pain to chronic widespread pain in general practice: Identification of risk factors, preventive factors and key elements for treatment – A cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Viniol Annika; Jegan Nikita; Leonhardt Corinna; Strauch Konstantin; Brugger Markus; Barth Jürgen; Baum Erika; Becker Annette

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic localized pain syndromes, especially chronic low back pain (CLBP), are common reasons for consultation in general practice. In some cases chronic localized pain syndromes can appear in combination with chronic widespread pain (CWP). Numerous studies have shown a strong association between CWP and several physical and psychological factors. These studies are population-based cross-sectional and do not allow for assessing chronology. There are very few prospective st...

  16. Pedometer-Based Internet-Mediated Intervention For Adults With Chronic Low Back Pain: Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Krein, Sarah L.; Kadri, Reema; Hughes, Maria; Kerr, Eve A.; Piette, John D; Holleman, Rob; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Richardson, Caroline R

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic pain, especially back pain, is a prevalent condition that is associated with disability, poor health status, anxiety and depression, decreased quality of life, and increased health services use and costs. Current evidence suggests that exercise is an effective strategy for managing chronic pain. However, there are few clinical programs that use generally available tools and a relatively low-cost approach to help patients with chronic back pain initiate and maintain an exerc...

  17. Low back pain and comorbidity in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Popov

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess association of low back pain (LBP in women with hypertension (H, coronary heart disease (CHD, chronic heart failure (CHF, vascular incidents, carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, osteoarthritis (OA, osteoporosis (OP, digestive tract diseases, depression and anxiety. Material and methods. 1194 women aged 28 to 64 years (median 51 years |48;55] visited an outpatient department were included in the cross-sectional study. Diagnosis was done according to latest national guidelines. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (Cl were calculated. Results. 671 cases of LBP were revealed, 523 women did not have back pain. Age and menopausal status did not differ between these groups. LBP group had significantly higher body mass, waist and hips circumferences and more severe menopausal symptoms. LBP was associated with higher frequency of H (OR 1,40; Cl 1,10-1,79, CHD (OR 2,03; Cl 1,373,03, CHF (OR 1,74; Cl 1,35-2,25, OA (OR 2,43; Cl 1,91-3,09, chronic cholecystitis (OR 1,87; Cl 1,46-2,39, depression (OR 1,83; Cl 1,42-2,36 and anxiety (OR 1,69; Cl 1, 33-2,14. No association of LBP with OP was found. Conclusion. LBP is a marker of increased risk of socially important diseases. Pts visited the doctor due to LBP need timely diagnosis and management of comorbidity.

  18. For Low-Back Pain, Yoga More Effective Than Self-Care But Not Stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... U V W X Y Z For Low-Back Pain, Yoga More Effective Than Self-Care But Not ... improving function and reducing symptoms of chronic low-back pain, according to a study. Results from previous smaller ...

  19. External Validation of a Referral Rule for Axial Spondyloarthritis in Primary Care Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke van Hoeven

    Full Text Available To validate and optimize a referral rule to identify primary care patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP suspected for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA.Cross-sectional study with data from 19 Dutch primary care practices for development and 38 for validation.Primary care patients aged 18-45 years with CLBP existing more than three months and onset of back pain started before the age of 45 years.The number of axSpA patients according to the ASAS criteria.The referral rule (CaFaSpA referral rule was developed using 364 CLBP patients from 19 primary care practices and contains four easy to use variables; inflammatory back pain, good response to nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drugs, family history of spondyloarthritis and a back pain duration longer than five years. This referral rule is positive when at least two variables are present. Validation of the CaFaSpA rule was accomplished in 579 primary care CLBP patients from 38 practices from other areas. Performance of the referral rule was assessed by c-statistic and calibration plot. To fit the final referral rule the development and validation datasets were pooled leading to a total study population of 943 primary care participants.The referral rule was validated in 579 patients (41% male, mean age 36 (sd7.0. The percentage of identified axSpA patients was 16% (n=95. External validation resulted in satisfactory calibration and reasonable discriminative ability (c-statistics 0.70 [95% CI, 0.64-0.75]. In the pooled dataset sensitivity and specificity of the referral rule were 75% and 58%.The CaFaSpA referral rule for axSpA consists of four easy to use predictors for primary care physicians and has a good predictive value in this validation study. The referral rule has the potential to be a screening tool for primary care by identifying CLBP patients suspected for axSpA.

  20. Low Level Laser Therapy And Exercise Therapy In Treatment Of Chronic Low Back Pain: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrdad R; Esmaeili Javid G; Hasan Zadeh H; Sotoodeh Manesh A; Ghasemi M

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to compare low-level laser therapy (LLLT) + exercise therapy with LLLT alone and exercise therapy alone, and to determine whether laser therapy is a useful treatment modality for chronic low back pain (LBP). Materials and Methods: This study was a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. Patients with chronic LBP for at least 12 weeks were included. Visual analogue scale (VAS), Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODQ), Schober tes...

  1. The Effect of Fatigue and Instability on Postural Control Parameters in Standing Posture in Healthy Adults and Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hosein Kahlaee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aims at analyzing the effect of fatigue and instability on postural control parameters in both healthy people and patients with the chronic nonspecific low-back pain.Materials and Methods: In this non-experimental case-control study, oscillations of center of pressure were statistically analyzed in 16 healthy people and 15 patients with the chronic nonspecific low back pain. The analysis was conducted through two stages: before and after fatigue and under both stable and unstable surfaces. Results: Under the pre-fatigue, stable condition, there was not any difference between the two groups. Both fatigue and unstable surface changed our variables (sway area, range, velocity, frequency and total power of the signal. All the changes in variables were significant in the low-back pain group; while changes in the healthy group only covered the time-domain variables. The effect of instability was higher than that of fatigue. Conclusion: The postural control system for patients with low-back pain before fatigue and under stable condition, revealed sufficient competence to provide postural stability and its function cannot be differentiated from that in healthy people. Meanwhile, different mechanisms were used by these patients to confront stability challenging factors and further neural activity was required to counteract such factors.

  2. Modifiable Risk Factors in Patients With Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemory, Scott T; Pfefferle, Kiel J; Gradisar, Ian M

    2016-05-01

    Low back pain is one of the most common reasons for physician visits in the United States and is a chief complaint frequently seen by orthopedic surgeons. Patients with chronic low back pain can experience recurring debilitating pain and disability, decreasing their quality of life. A commercially available software platform, Explorys (Explorys, Inc, Cleveland, Ohio), was used to mine a pooled electronic health care database consisting of the medical records of more than 26 million patients. According to the available medical history data, 1.2 million patients had a diagnosis of low back pain (4.54%). The information was used to determine the incidence of low back pain in patients with a history of nicotine dependence, obesity (body mass index, >30 kg/m(2)), depressive disorders, and alcohol abuse. Relative risk was then calculated for the defined modifiable risk factors. Patients with nicotine dependence, obesity, depressive disorders, and alcohol abuse had a relative risk of 4.489, 6.007, 5.511, and 3.326 for low back pain, respectively, compared with patients without the defined risk factor. A statistically significant difference was found in the incidence of low back pain between all 4 groups with the risk factors evaluated and the general population (Prisk factors for low back pain, physicians can monitor at-risk patients and focus on prevention and control of debilitating disease. These approaches can decrease the number of patients with isolated low back pain who are seen by orthopedic surgeons. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e413-e416.]. PMID:27064774

  3. MRI of paraspinal muscles in lumbar degenerative kyphosis patients and control patients with chronic low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To compare lumbar musculature in lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) patients and chronic low-back pain (CLBP) patients. Materials and methods: The study group comprised LDK patients (54 women, aged 44-74 years, mean 60 years) and a control group with CLBP (54 women, aged 45-73 years, mean 60 years). The cross-sectional areas (CSA) of psoas, erector spinae, multifidus, and disc, were measured at the L4-L5 level using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Lumbar muscularity was expressed as three ratios: the ratio between CSA of psoas, erector spinae, multifidus and CSA of disc (PS:disc, ES:disc, MF:disc). Multifidus and erector spinae atrophy were evaluated at the L3-L4 level and the degree of fatty atrophy was estimated using three grades: mild, moderate, and severe. The shapes of thoracolumbar fascia were analysed at the L5-S1 level and were classified as flat or convex. Results: Lumbar muscularity was found to be significantly smaller (p < 0.001) in LDK patients (PS:disc = 0.79, SD 0.22; ES:disc = 1.36, SD 0.49; MF:disc = 0.55, SD 0.21) than the control group patients (PS:disc = 0.98, SD 0.23; ES:disc = 1.71, SD 0.46; MF:disc = 0.86, SD 0.30). Patients with LDK had a higher proportion of fat deposits in the multifidus and erector spinae muscle (p < 0.001), and the thoracolumbar fascia at the L5-S1 level was more commonly flat (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Evaluation of paraspinal musculature should be considered when assessing MRI images of the lumbar spine. Measurement of the CSA, visual grading of fatty atrophy and the assessment of the fascia may help physician and radiologist reach a more confident diagnosis for the patients with clinically suspicious LDK

  4. Multi-segment analysis of spinal kinematics during sit-to-stand in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Guillaume; Redhead, Lucy; Legrand, Thomas; Jolles, Brigitte M; Favre, Julien

    2016-07-01

    While alterations in spinal kinematics have been frequently reported in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP), a better characterization of the kinematics during functional activities is needed to improve our understanding and therapeutic solutions for this condition. Recent studies on healthy subjects showed the value of analyzing the spine during sit-to-stand transition (STST) using multi-segment models, suggesting that additional knowledge could be gained by conducting similar assessments in CLBP patients. The objectives of this study were to characterize three dimensional kinematics at the lower lumbar (LLS), upper lumbar (ULS), lower thoracic (LTS) and upper thoracic (UTS) joints during STST, and to test the hypothesis that CLBP patients perform this movement with smaller angle and angular velocity compared to asymptomatic controls. Ten CLBP patients (with minimal to moderate disability) and 11 asymptomatic controls with comparable demographics (52% male, 37.4±5.6 years old, 22.5±2.8kg/m(2)) were tested using a three-dimensional camera-based system following previously proposed protocols. Characteristic patterns of movement were identified at the LLS, ULS and UTS joints in the sagittal plane only. Significant differences in the form of smaller sagittal-plane angle and smaller angular velocity in the patient group compared to the control group were observed at these three joints. This indicated a more rigid spine in the patient group and suggested that CLBP rehabilitation could potentially be enhanced by targeting movement deficits in functional activities. The results further recommended the analysis of STST kinematics using a pelvis-lumbar-thoracic model including lower and upper lumbar and thoracic segments. PMID:27262182

  5. MRI of paraspinal muscles in lumbar degenerative kyphosis patients and control patients with chronic low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, C.H. [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Poongnap-dong, Songpa-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, M.J. [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Poongnap-dong, Songpa-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: mjshin@amc.seoul.kr; Kim, S.M. [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Poongnap-dong, Songpa-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.H. [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Poongnap-dong, Songpa-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C.-S. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Poongnap-dong, Songpa-Ku, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    Aim: To compare lumbar musculature in lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) patients and chronic low-back pain (CLBP) patients. Materials and methods: The study group comprised LDK patients (54 women, aged 44-74 years, mean 60 years) and a control group with CLBP (54 women, aged 45-73 years, mean 60 years). The cross-sectional areas (CSA) of psoas, erector spinae, multifidus, and disc, were measured at the L4-L5 level using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Lumbar muscularity was expressed as three ratios: the ratio between CSA of psoas, erector spinae, multifidus and CSA of disc (PS:disc, ES:disc, MF:disc). Multifidus and erector spinae atrophy were evaluated at the L3-L4 level and the degree of fatty atrophy was estimated using three grades: mild, moderate, and severe. The shapes of thoracolumbar fascia were analysed at the L5-S1 level and were classified as flat or convex. Results: Lumbar muscularity was found to be significantly smaller (p < 0.001) in LDK patients (PS:disc = 0.79, SD 0.22; ES:disc = 1.36, SD 0.49; MF:disc = 0.55, SD 0.21) than the control group patients (PS:disc = 0.98, SD 0.23; ES:disc = 1.71, SD 0.46; MF:disc = 0.86, SD 0.30). Patients with LDK had a higher proportion of fat deposits in the multifidus and erector spinae muscle (p < 0.001), and the thoracolumbar fascia at the L5-S1 level was more commonly flat (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Evaluation of paraspinal musculature should be considered when assessing MRI images of the lumbar spine. Measurement of the CSA, visual grading of fatty atrophy and the assessment of the fascia may help physician and radiologist reach a more confident diagnosis for the patients with clinically suspicious LDK.

  6. Prevalence and social burden of active chronic low back pain in the adult Portuguese population: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Nélia; Rodrigues, Ana; Eusébio, Mónica; Ramiro, Sofia; Machado, Pedro; Canhão, Helena; Branco, Jaime C

    2016-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of active chronic low back pain (CLBP) in the adult Portuguese population; to compare the active CLBP population with the population without CLBP; and to explore factors associated with active CLBP. The present study was conducted under the scope of EpiReumaPt a population-based study. Active CLBP was self-reported and considered if present on the day of the interview and for ≥90 days. Prevalence estimates were calculated. Association of active CLBP with quality of life, functional ability and healthcare consumption were evaluated. Factors associated with active CLBP were identified through logistic regression. Among 10.661 EpiReumaPt subjects, 1487 self-reported active CLBP. The prevalence of active CLBP was 10.4 % (95 % CI 9.6; 11.9 %). After adjustment, active CLBP subjects had a higher likelihood for anxiety symptoms (OR 2.77), early retirement due to disease (OR 1.88) and more physician visits (β = 2.65). Factors significantly and independently associated with the presence of active CLBP were: female gender (OR 1.34), overweight/obesity (OR 1.27), presence of self-reported rheumatic musculoskeletal disease (RMD) (OR 2.93), anxiety symptoms (OR 2.67), age (OR 1.02) and higher number of self-reported comorbidities (OR 1.12). Active CLBP is highly prevalent in the Portuguese population and is associated with disability and with a high consumption of healthcare resources. Female gender, older age, anxiety symptoms, overweight/obesity, the presence of other RMD and the number of comorbidities were independently associated with the presence of active CLBP. These factors should be taken into account when new cohort prospective studies will be developed. PMID:26661091

  7. An economic analysis of usual care and acupuncture collaborative treatment on chronic low back pain: A Markov model decision analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Taejin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The collaborative treatment of acupuncture in addition to routine care as an approach for the management of low back pain (LBP is receiving increasing recognition from both public and professional arenas. In 2010, the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Family Affairs (MOHW of South Korea approved the practice of doctors and Oriental medical doctors (acupuncture qualified working together in the same facility and offering collaborative treatment at the same time for the same disease. However, there is little more than anecdotal evidence on the health and economic implications of this current practice. Therefore, the objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness and costs of acupuncture in addition to routine care in the treatment of chronic LBP patients in South Korea. Methods The Markov model was developed to synthesise evidence on both costs and outcomes for patients with chronic LBP. We conducted the base case analysis, univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses, and also performed the value of information analysis for future researches. Model parameters were sourced from systematic review of both alternatives, simple bibliographic reviews of relevant articles published in English or Korean, and statistical analyses of the 2005 and 2007 Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey (KNHNS data. The analyses were based on the societal perspective over a five year time horizon using a 5% discount rate. Results In the base case, collaborative treatment resulted in better outcomes, but at a relatively high cost. Overall, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of a collaborative practice was 3,421,394 KRW (Korean rate Won per QALY (Quality adjusted life year (2,895.80 USD per QALY. Univariate sensitivity analysis of indirect non-medical costs did not affect the preference order of the strategies. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis revealed that if the threshold was over 3,260,000 KRW per QALY (2,759.20 USD per QALY

  8. Changing beliefs for changing movement and pain: Classification-based cognitive functional therapy (CB-CFT) for chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziat Filho, N

    2016-02-01

    This case report presents the effect of classification-based cognitive functional therapy in a patient with chronic disabling low back pain. The patient was assessed using a multidimensional biopsychosocial classification system and was classified as having flexion pattern of movement impairment disorder. Management of this patient was to change her belief that bending over and sitting would cause damage to her disc, combined with active exercises for graded exposure to lumbar flexion to restore normal movement. Three months after the first appointment, the treatment resulted in reduced pain, the mitigation of fear avoidance beliefs and the remediation of functional disability. The patient returned to work and was walking for one hour a day on a treadmill. The cognitive intervention to change the patient's negative beliefs related to the biomedical model was important to make the graded exercises and the lifestyle changes possible. PMID:25920336

  9. Amount of health care and self-care following a randomized clinical trial comparing flexion-distraction with exercise program for chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keenum Michael

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical trials have assessed the percentage of participants who utilized further health care after a period of conservative care for low back pain, however no chiropractic clinical trial has determined the total amount of care during this time and any differences based on assigned treatment group. The objective of this clinical trial follow-up was to assess if there was a difference in the total number of office visits for low back pain over one year after a four week clinical trial of either a form of physical therapy (Exercise Program or a form of chiropractic care (Flexion Distraction for chronic low back pain. Methods In this randomized clinical trial follow up study, 195 participants were followed for one year after a four-week period of either a form of chiropractic care (FD or a form of physical therapy (EP. Weekly structured telephone interview questions regarded visitation of various health care practitioners and the practice of self-care for low back pain. Results Participants in the physical therapy group demonstrated on average significantly more visits to any health care provider and to a general practitioner during the year after trial care (p Conclusion During a one-year follow-up, participants previously randomized to physical therapy attended significantly more health care visits than those participants who received chiropractic care.

  10. Effectiveness of mat Pilates or equipment-based Pilates in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a protocol of a randomised controlled trial

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    da Luz Maurício Antônio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic low back pain is an expensive and difficult condition to treat. One of the interventions widely used by physiotherapists in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain is exercise therapy based upon the Pilates principles. Pilates exercises can be performed with or without specific equipment. These two types of Pilates exercises have never been compared on a high-quality randomised controlled trial. Methods/design This randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor will evaluate eighty six patients of both genders with chronic low back pain, aged between 18 and 60 years, from one Brazilian private physiotherapy clinic. The patients will be randomly allocated into two groups: Mat Group will perform the exercises on the ground while the Equipment-based Group will perform the Pilates method exercises on the following equipment: Cadillac, Reformer, Ladder Barrel, and Step Chair. The general and specific disability of the patient, kinesiophobia, pain intensity and global perceived effect will be evaluated by a blinded assessor before randomisation and at six weeks and six months after randomisation. In addition, the expectation of the participants and their confidence with the treatment will be evaluated before randomisation and after the first treatment session, respectively. Discussion This will be the first study aiming to compare the effectiveness of Mat and Equipment-based Pilates exercises in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. The results may help health-care professionals in clinical decision-making and could potentially reduce the treatment costs of this condition. Trial registration Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials RBR-7tyg5j

  11. Low Back Pain in a Tennis Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracker, Mark; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A group of physicians meet to discuss a case in which a middle-aged tennis player suffers from low back pain. The diagnosis, treatment and management of the case are discussed. The article is one in an occasional series. (JL)

  12. Expectation of recovery from low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Vach, Werner; Axø, Marie; Bech, Rasmus Nørgaard; Hestbæk, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. A prospective cohort study conducted in general practice (GP) and chiropractic practice (CP).Objectives. To explore which patient characteristics were associated with recovery expectations in low back pain (LBP) patients, whether expectations predicted 3-month outcome, and to what...

  13. Long-term return to work after a functional restoration program for chronic low-back pain patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Cécile; Kernéis, Solen; Rozenberg, Sylvie; Fautrel, Bruno; Bourgeois, Pierre; Foltz, Violaine

    2010-07-01

    Low-back pain is a major health and socio economic problem. Functional restoration programs (FRP) have been developed to promote the socio-professional reintegration of patients with important work absenteeism. The aim of this study was to determine the long-term effectiveness of FRP in a group of 105 chronic low-back pain patients and to determine the predictive factors of return to work. One hundred-and-five chronic LBP patients with over 1 month of work absenteeism were included in a FRP. Pain, professional status, quality of life, functional disability, psychological impact, and fear and avoidance beliefs were evaluated at baseline, after 1 year and at the end of follow-up. Main effectiveness criterion was return to work. Fifty-five percent of the patients returned to work after mean follow-up time of 3.5 years, compared with 9% of the patients at work at baseline. Quality of life, functional disability, psychological factors, and fear and avoidance beliefs were all significantly improved. Three predictive factors were found: younger age at the onset of low-back pain, practice of sports, and shorter duration of sick leave at baseline. FRP show positive results in terms of return to work for chronic LBP patients with prolonged work absenteeism. Efforts should be made to propose such programs at an earlier stage of the disease. PMID:20224867

  14. Bee venom acupuncture for the treatment of chronic low back pain: study protocol for a randomized, double-blinded, sham-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Byung-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic non-specific low back pain is the most common medical problem for which patients seek complementary and alternative medical treatment, including bee venom acupuncture. However, the effectiveness and safety of such treatments have not been fully established by randomized clinical trials. The aim of this study is to determine whether bee venom acupuncture is effective for improving pain intensity, functional status and quality of life of patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. Methods/design This study is a randomized, double-blinded, sham-controlled clinical trial with two parallel arms. Fifty-four patients between 18 and 65 years of age with non-radicular chronic low back pain experiencing low back pain lasting for at least the previous three months and ≥4 points on a 10-cm visual analog scale for bothersomeness at the time of screening will be included in the study. Participants will be randomly allocated into the real or sham bee venom acupuncture groups and treated by the same protocol to minimize non-specific and placebo effects. Patients, assessors, acupuncturists and researchers who prepare the real or sham bee venom acupuncture experiments will be blinded to group allocation. All procedures, including the bee venom acupuncture increment protocol administered into predefined acupoints, are designed by a process of consensus with experts and previous researchers according to the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture. Bothersomeness measured using a visual analogue scale will be the primary outcome. Back pain-related dysfunction, pain, quality of life, depressive symptoms and adverse experiences will be measured using the visual analogue scale for pain intensity, the Oswestry Disability Index, the EuroQol 5-Dimension, and the Beck’s Depression Inventory. These measures will be recorded at baseline and 1, 2, 3, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Discussion The results from this study

  15. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy on pain of patients with low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Banth, Sudha; Maryam Didehdar ARDEBiL

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic low back pain is a major health problem and has high comorbidity with psychological related disorders. As there is no consensus about the effectiveness of psychotherapy methods for chronic pain, so our target in this study was to assess the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as a psychological intervention on pain of female patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). Methods: 88 patients suffering from NSCLBP were randomly assigned ...

  16. Efficacy of classification-based cognitive functional therapy in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Vibe Fersum, K; O’Sullivan, P; Skouen, JS; Smith, A; Kvåle, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non-specific chronic low back pain disorders have been proven resistant to change, and there is still a lack of clear evidence for one specific treatment intervention being superior to another. Methods: This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the efficacy of a behavioural approach to management, classification-based cognitive functional therapy, compared with traditional manual therapy and exercise. Linear mixed models were used to estimate the group differences in t...

  17. Design considerations of a randomized clinical trial on a cognitive behavioural intervention using communication and information technologies for managing chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Domenech, Julio; Baños Rivera, Rosa María; Peñalver, Lourdes; García Palacios, Azucena; Herrero Camarano, Rocío; Herrero, Rocío; Ezzedine, Aida; Martínez Díaz, Mónica; Ballester, Javier; Horta, Jaime; Botella Arbona, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological treatments have been successful in treating chronic low back pain (CLBP). However, the effect sizes are still modest and there is room for improvement. A way to progress is by enhancing treatment adherence and self-management using information and communication technologies (ICTs). Therefore, the objective of this study was to design a trial investigating the short- and long-term efficacy of cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) for CLBP using or not ICTs. A secondary...

  18. Within-team Patterns of Communication and Referral in Multimodal Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain Patients by an Integrative Care Team

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Bonnie B.; Eisenberg, David M.; Buring, Julie E.; Liang, Catherine L; Osypiuk, Kamila; Levy, Donald B.; Wayne, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a highly prevalent and costly public health problem with few treatment options that provide consistent and greater than modest benefits. Treatment of CLBP is shifting from unimodal to multimodal and multidisciplinary approaches, including biopsychosocially-based complementary and integrative care. Multidisciplinary approaches require unique levels of communication and coordination amongst clinicians; however, to date few studies have eva...

  19. The Effect of the Neurac Sling Exercise on Postural Balance Adjustment and Muscular Response Patterns in Chronic Low Back Pain Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji Hae; Kim, Young Eok; Bae, Sea Hyun; Kim, Kyung Yoon

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of the Neurac sling exercise on postural balance adjustment and muscular response patterns in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen CLBP patients participated in this study. They were randomly and equally assigned to group I, whose members received ordinary physical therapy (40 minutes per time, four times per week), and group II, whose members performed a lumbar stabilization exercise using the Neurac sling aft...

  20. Chronic low back pain is associated with reduced vertebral bone mineral measures in community-dwelling adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briggs Andrew M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic low back pain (CLBP experienced in middle-age may have important implications for vertebral bone health, although this issue has not been investigated as a primary aim previously. This study investigated the associations between CLBP and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA-derived vertebral bone mineral measures acquired from postero-anterior and lateral-projections, among community-dwelling, middle-aged adults. Methods Twenty-nine adults with CLBP (11 male, 18 female and 42 adults with no history of LBP in the preceding year (17 male, 25 female were evaluated. Self-reported demographic and clinical data were collected via questionnaires. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD was measured in the lumbar spine by DXA. Apparent volumetric (ap.v BMD in the lumbar spine was also calculated. Multiple linear regression models were used to examine associations between study group (CLBP and control and vertebral DXA variables by gender, adjusting for height, mass and age. Results There was no difference between groups by gender in anthropometrics or clinical characteristics. In the CLBP group, the mean (SD duration of CLBP was 13.3 (10.4 years in males and 11.6 (9.9 years in females, with Oswestry Disability Index scores of 16.2 (8.7% and 15.4 (9.1%, respectively. Males with CLBP had significantly lower adjusted lateral-projection aBMD and lateral-projection ap.vBMD than controls at L3 with mean differences (standard error of 0.09 (0.04 g/cm2 (p = 0.03 and 0.02 (0.01 g/cm3 (p = 0.04. These multivariate models accounted for 55% and 53% of the variance in lateral-projection L3 aBMD and lateral-projection L3 ap.vBMD. Conclusions CLBP in males is associated with some lumbar vertebral BMD measures, raising important questions about the mechanism and potential clinical impact of this association.

  1. The natural course of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemeunier, Nadège; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Gagey, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Most patients in the secondary care sector consulting for low back pain (LBP) seem to have a more or less constant course of pain during the ensuing year. Fewer patients with LBP in the primary care sector report continual pain over a one-year period. However, not much is known about the long......-term course of LBP in the general population. A systematic critical literature review was undertaken in order to study the natural course of LBP over time in the general population....

  2. Do medical student attitudes towards patients with chronic low back pain improve during training? a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Hayley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care professionals with positive attitudes towards the functional abilities of patients with low back pain are more likely to encourage activity and avoidance of rest as per recommended guidelines. This study investigated whether medical student training fosters positive attitudes towards patients with back pain and their ability to function. Methods First (n = 202 and final (n = 146 year medical students at the University of Glasgow completed the Health Care Professionals' Pain and Impairment Relationship Scale (HC-PAIRS questionnaire. This measures attitudes of clinicians towards the functional ability of patients with back pain. A group of first (n = 62 and final year (n = 61 business students acted as non-health care controls. Attitudes were compared using two-way ANOVA with year of study and discipline of degree as independent variables. Results Both year of study [F(1,465 = 39.5, p Conclusions Undergraduate medical training promotes positive attitudes towards the functional ability of patients with back pain, suggesting that students may be more likely to develop an evidence-based approach to this patient group after qualification. Some adjustments to training may be warranted to encourage a more positive shift in attitudes.

  3. Effectiveness of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic low back pain: Design, method and protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luedtke Kerstin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrical stimulation of central nervous system areas with surgically implanted stimulators has been shown to result in pain relief. To avoid the risks and side effects of surgery, transcranial direct current stimulation is an option to electrically stimulate the motor cortex through the skull. Previous research has shown that transcranial direct current stimulation relieves pain in patients with fibromyalgia, chronic neuropathic pain and chronic pelvic pain. Evidence indicates that the method is pain free, safe and inexpensive. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial has been designed to evaluate the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation over the motor cortex for pain reduction in patients with chronic low back pain. It will also investigate whether transcranial direct current stimulation as a prior treatment enhances the symptom reduction achieved by a cognitive-behavioural group intervention. Participants will be randomised to receive a series of 5 days of transcranial direct current stimulation (2 mA, 20 mins or 20 mins of sham stimulation; followed by a cognitive-behavioural group programme. The primary outcome parameters will measure pain (Visual Analog Scale and disability (Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcome parameters will include the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, the Funktionsfragebogen Hannover (perceived function, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, bothersomeness and Health Related Quality of Life (SF 36, as well as Patient-Perceived Satisfactory Improvement. Assessments will take place immediately prior to the first application of transcranial direct current stimulation or sham, after 5 consecutive days of stimulation, immediately after the cognitive-behavioural group programme and at 4 weeks, 12 weeks and 24 weeks follow-up. Discussion This trial will help to determine, whether transcranial direct current stimulation is an effective treatment for patients with chronic low back

  4. Lombalgia ocupacional Occupational low back pain

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    Milton Helfenstein Junior

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A lombalgia ocupacional apresenta etiologia multifatorial, elevada prevalência e incidência. Caracterizada por quadro de dor de variada duração e intensidade, a dor lombar pode levar à incapacidade laborativa e à invalidez. A lombalgia acarreta sofrimento aos trabalhadores, custos às empresas, aos sistemas previdenciário e assistencial de saúde. Os autores, pela relevância do tema, elaboraram este artigo de revisão bibliográfica dando ênfase ao embasamento teorico-conceitual e à experiência de especialistas.The occupational low back pain presents multifactorial aetiology, important prevalence and incidence. Characterized by pain of varying duration and intensity, low back pain may lead to disability. Low back pain causes suffering to workers, implies costs to companies, to the social security and health assistance system. Because of the theme's relevance, the authors have elaborated this review of literature with emphasis on a theoretical and conceptual basis, as well as experience of experts.

  5. A case of severe low back pain after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodin, Annica

    2014-06-01

    The etiology of chronic back pain is often unknown but can include failed spinal surgery. Pain can often be of mixed type and it is important to evaluate pain mechanisms. Comorbid factors often contribute to pain chronicity. Multimodal treatment, including opioid rotation where indicated, may offer a successful management approach. Other rehabilitative procedures such as physiotherapy, exercise therapy, and good sleep hygiene may have a profound impact on patient quality of life. Spinal cord stimulation may be an effective option for some patients with failed spinal surgery syndrome. A case of severe low back pain after surgery in a 45-year-old man is presented to illustrate this. PMID:24801975

  6. Stress is dominant in patients with depression and chronic low back pain. A qualitative study of psychotherapeutic interventions for patients with non-specific low back pain of 3–12 months’ duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellegaard Hanne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is continuing uncertainty in back pain research as to which treatment is best suited to patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP. In this study, Gestalt therapy and the shock trauma method Somatic Experiencing® (SE were used as interventions in parallel with the usual cross-disciplinary approach. The aim was to investigate how these treatments influence a patient’s capacity to cope with CLBP when it is coupled with depression. Methods In this qualitative explorative study, a phenomenological–hermeneutic framework was adopted. Patients were recruited on the basis of following criteria: A moderate depression score of 23–30 according to the Beck Depression Inventory Scale and a pain score of 7–10 (Box scale from 0–10 and attendance at five- six psychotherapeutic sessions. Six patients participated in the study. The data was comprised of written field notes from each session, which were subsequently analysed and interpreted at three levels: naive reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation and discussion. Results Three areas of focus emerged: the significance of previous experiences, restrictions in everyday life and restoration of inner resources during the therapy period. The study revealed a diversity of psychological stressors that related to loss and sorrow, being let down, violations, traumatic events and reduced functioning, which led to displays of distress, powerlessness, reduced self-worth, anxiety and discomfort. Overall, the sum of the stressors together with pain and depression were shown to trigger stress symptoms. Stress was down-played in the psychotherapeutic treatment and inner resources were re-established, which manifested as increased relaxation, presence, self-worth, sense of responsibility and happiness. This, in turn, assisted the patients to better manage their CLBP. Conclusions CLBP is a stress factor in itself but when coupled with depression, they can be

  7. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered postural control has been observed in low back pain (LBP) patients. They seem to be more dependent on vision when standing. The objective of the study was to determine concurrent and predictive validity of measures of postural stability in LBP patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS...... LBP patients were evaluated. The correlations between CoP measurements and pain, fear of pain, and physical function were poor. There were no significant differences in CoP measurements between patients with no change or deterioration and patients with improvement in pain and back-specific function......: Centre of Pressure (CoP) measurements were tested against pain, fear of pain, and physical function. Velocity, anterior-posterior displacement, and the Romberg Ratio obtained on a portable force platform were used as measures of postural stability. RESULTS: Baseline and 12-week follow-up results of 97...

  8. Low back pain and degenerative disc disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jandrić Slavica; Antić Branislav

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Various clinical conditions can cause low back pain, and in most cases it is of a degenerative origin. Degenerative disc disease is a common condition which affects young to middle-aged men and women equally. Changes in the mechanical properties of the disc lead to degenerative arthritis in the intervertebral joints, osteophytes, and narrowing the intervertebral foramen or the spinal canal. Pathophysiology. Degenerative cascade, described by Kirkaldy-Willis, is the widely accept...

  9. Making Better Lives: Patient-Focused Care for Low Back Pain (LBP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    Chronic Low Back Pain; Hip Ostearthritis; Myofascial Pain Syndrome; Fibromyalgia; Depression; Maladaptive Coping; Lumbar Spinal Stenosis; Insomnia; Sacroiliac Joint Pain; Lateral Hip and Thigh Pain; Anxiety; Dementia; Recent Leg Length Discrepancy

  10. Development and Application of a Newly Designed Massage Instrument for Deep Cross-Friction Massage in Chronic Non-Specific Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Yong-Soon; Yu, Ki-Pi; Lee, Kwang Jae; Kwak, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Jong Yun

    2012-01-01

    Objective To introduce a newly designed massage instrument, the Hand Grip T-bar (HT-bar) and use it to relieve chronic non-specific low back pain (nLBP) through deep cross-friction massage (roptrotherapy). Method 22 subjects (9 males and 13 females, aged 51.6±6.7) with chronic nLBP were allocated randomly to a Roptrotherapy group (n=12) and a Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) group (n=10). The Roptrotherapy group received deep cross-friction massage with the HT-bar, which was...

  11. The relationship between pain severity and patient-reported outcomes among patients with chronic low back pain in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery W; Vietri J; Shi J; Ogawa K; Kariyasu S; Alev L; Nakamura M

    2016-01-01

    William Montgomery,1 Jeffrey Vietri,2 Jing Shi,3 Kei Ogawa,4 Sawako Kariyasu,4 Levent Alev,4 Masaya Nakamura5 1Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd., Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Health Outcomes Practice, Kantar Health, Horsham, PA, 3Health Outcomes Practice, Kantar Health, Princeton, NJ, USA; 4Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Kobe, Japan; 5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Objective: The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of pain severity on patient-report...

  12. Validation of the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the Gesture Behavior Test for patients with non-specific chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Furtado

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a Brazilian version of the gesture behavior test (GBT for patients with chronic low back pain. METHODS: Translation of GBT into Portuguese was performed by a rheumatologist fluent in the language of origin (French and skilled in the validation of questionnaires. This translated version was back-translated into French by a native-speaking teacher of the language. The two translators then created a final consensual version in Portuguese. Cultural adaptation was carried out by two rheumatologists, one educated patient and the native-speaking French teacher. Thirty patients with chronic low back pain and fifteen healthcare professionals involved in the education of patients with low back pain through back schools (gold-standard were evaluated. Reproducibility was initially tested by two observers (inter-observer; the procedures were also videotaped for later evaluation by one of the observers (intra-observer. For construct validation, we compared patients' scores against the scores of the healthcare professionals. RESULTS: Modifications were made to the GBT for cultural reasons. The Spearman's correlation coefficient and the intra-class coefficient, which was employed to measure reproducibility, ranged between 0.87 and 0.99 and 0.94 to 0.99, respectively (p < 0.01. With regard to validation, the Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference (p < 0.01 between the averages for healthcare professionals (26.60; SD 2.79 and patients (16.30; SD 6.39. There was a positive correlation between the GBT score and the score on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (r= 0.47. CONCLUSIONS: The Brazilian version of the GBT proved to be a reproducible and valid instrument. In addition, according to the questionnaire results, more disabled patients exhibited more protective gesture behavior related to low-back.

  13. Low back pain and degenerative disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandrić Slavica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Various clinical conditions can cause low back pain, and in most cases it is of a degenerative origin. Degenerative disc disease is a common condition which affects young to middle-aged men and women equally. Changes in the mechanical properties of the disc lead to degenerative arthritis in the intervertebral joints, osteophytes, and narrowing the intervertebral foramen or the spinal canal. Pathophysiology. Degenerative cascade, described by Kirkaldy-Willis, is the widely accepted pathophysiologic model describing the degenerative process as it affects the lumbar spine in 3 phases. Diagnosis. There are two forms of low back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease: a lumbalgia and b lumbar radiculopathy. Limitation of movement, problems with balance, pain, loss of reflexes in the extremities, muscle weakness, loss of sensation or other signs of neurological damage can be found on physical examination. For accurate diagnosis, it is often necessary to combine clinical examination and sophisticated technology. Treatment. Coservative treatment consists of rest, physical therapy, pharmacological therapy and injection therapy. Physical rehabilitation with active patient participation is a key approach to treatment of patients with discogenic pain. Physical therapy, occupational therapy and kinesitherapy are important for improving muscle strength, endurance, and flexibility. Disc surgery is performed if surgical intervention is required. .

  14. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorenberg M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Miguel Gorenberg,1,2 Kobi Schwartz31Department of Nuclear Medicine, B'nai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, Israel; 2The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; 3Department of Physical Therapy, B'nai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study.Keywords: myofascial, noninvasive, electrical, impedance

  15. Supervised and non-supervised Nordic walking in the treatment of chronic low back pain: a single blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendix Tom

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active approaches including both specific and unspecific exercise are probably the most widely recommended treatment for patients with chronic low back pain but it is not known exactly which types of exercise provide the most benefit. Nordic Walking - power walking using ski poles - is a popular and fast growing type of exercise in Northern Europe that has been shown to improve cardiovascular metabolism. Until now, no studies have been performed to investigate whether Nordic Walking has beneficial effects in relation to back pain. Methods A total of 151 patients with low back and/or leg pain of greater than eight weeks duration were recruited from a hospital based outpatient back pain clinic. Patients continuing to have pain greater than three on the 11-point numeric rating scale after a multidisciplinary intervention were included. Fifteen patients were unable to complete the baseline evaluation and 136 patients were randomized to receive A Nordic walking supervised by a specially trained instructor twice a week for eight weeks B One-hour instruction in Nordic walking by a specially trained instructor followed by advice to perform Nordic walking at home as much as they liked for eight weeks or C Individual oral information consisting of advice to remain active and about maintaining the daily function level that they had achieved during their stay at the backcenter. Primary outcome measures were pain and disability using the Low Back Pain Rating Scale, and functional limitation further assessed using the Patient Specific Function Scale. Furthermore, information on time off work, use of medication, and concurrent treatment for their low back pain was collected. Objective measurements of physical activity levels for the supervised and unsupervised Nordic walking groups were performed using accelerometers. Data were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. Results No mean differences were found between the three groups in

  16. Research methods for subgrouping low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Keating, Jennifer L; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    important distinctions in their treatment needs or prognoses. Due to a proliferation of research methods and variability in how subgrouping results are interpreted, it is timely to open discussion regarding a conceptual framework for the research designs and statistical methods available for subgrouping...... studies (a method framework). The aims of this debate article are: (1) to present a method framework to inform the design and evaluation of subgrouping research in low back pain, (2) to describe method options when investigating prognostic effects or subgroup treatment effects, and (3) to discuss...... the strengths and limitations of research methods suitable for the hypothesis-setting phase of subgroup studies....

  17. Low Back Pain in Port Machinery Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOVENZI, M.; PINTO, I.; STACCHINI, N.

    2002-05-01

    The occurrence of several types of low back pain (LBP) was investigated by a standardized questionnaire in a group of 219 port machinery operators exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV) and postural load and in a control group of 85 maintenance workers employed at the same transport company. The group of port machinery operators included 85 straddle carrier drivers, 88 fork-lift truck drivers, and 46 crane operators. The vector sum of the frequency-weighted r.m.s. acceleration of vibration measured on the seatpan of port vehicles and machines averaged 0·90 m/s2 for fork-lift trucks, 0·48 m/s2 for straddle carriers, 0·53 m/s2 for mobile cranes, and 0·22 m/s2 for overhead cranes. The 12-month prevalence of low back symptoms (LBP, sciatic pain, treated LBP, sick leave due to LBP) was significantly greater in the fork-lift truck drivers than in the controls and the other two groups of port machinery operators. After adjusting for potential confounders, the prevalence of low back symptoms was found to increase with the increase of WBV exposure expressed as duration of exposure (driving years), equivalent vibration magnitude (m/s2), or cumulative vibration exposure (yr m2/s4). An excess risk for lumbar disc herniation was observed in the port machinery operators with prolonged driving experience. In both the controls and the port machinery operators, low back complaints were strongly associated with perceived postural load assessed in terms of frequency and/or duration of awkward postures at work. Multivariate analysis showed that vibration exposure and postural load were independent predictors of LBP. Even though the cross-sectional design of the present study does not permit firm conclusions on the relationship between WBV exposure and low back disorders, the findings of this investigation provide additional epidemiological evidence that seated WBV exposure combined with non-neutral trunk postures, as while driving, is associated with an increased risk of long

  18. Self-reported moderate-to-vigorous leisure time physical activity predicts less pain and disability over 12 months in chronic and persistent low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, R Z; Ferreira, P H; Kongsted, Alice;

    2014-01-01

    Physical deconditioning in combination with societal and emotional factors has been hypothesized to compromise complete recovery from low back pain (LBP). However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies designed to specifically investigate physical activity as an independent prognostic factor. W...

  19. Work-related risk factors for low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogendoorn, W.E.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis work-related risk factors for low back pain are investigated. Low back pain is one of the most common work-related health problems. It has a considerable impact on sickness absence and work disability. Originally, the focus of most occupational research on low back pain was directed towards physical factors. Recently, however, the study of psychosocial work characteristics has also become an important aspect of epidemiological studies on low back pain in occupational settings. ...

  20. Comparing Once- versus Twice-Weekly Yoga Classes for Chronic Low Back Pain in Predominantly Low Income Minorities: A Randomized Dosing Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Saper

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies have demonstrated that once-weekly yoga classes are effective for chronic low back pain (cLBP in white adults with high socioeconomic status. The comparative effectiveness of twice-weekly classes and generalizability to racially diverse low income populations are unknown. Methods. We conducted a 12-week randomized, parallel-group, dosing trial for 95 adults recruited from an urban safety-net hospital and five community health centers comparing once-weekly (n=49 versus twice-weekly (n=46 standardized yoga classes supplemented by home practice. Primary outcomes were change from baseline to 12 weeks in pain (11-point scale and back-related function (23-point modified Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Results. 82% of participants were nonwhite; 77% had annual household incomes <$40,000. The sample’s baseline mean pain intensity [6.9 (SD 1.6] and function [13.7 (SD 5.0] reflected moderate to severe back pain and impairment. Pain and back-related function improved within both groups (P<0.001. However, there were no differences between once-weekly and twice-weekly groups for pain reduction [-2.1 (95% CI -2.9, -1.3 versus −2.4 (95% CI -3.1, -1.8, P=0.62] or back-related function [-5.1 (95% CI -7.0, -3.2 versus −4.9 (95% CI -6.5, -3.3, P=0.83]. Conclusions. Twelve weeks of once-weekly or twice-weekly yoga classes were similarly effective for predominantly low income minority adults with moderate to severe chronic low back pain. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01761617.

  1. Physiotherapy in early phase of low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markku Paatelma

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Markku PaatelmaDepartment of Education, Auron – OMT Center, Helsinki, FinlandAbstract: Low back pain (LBP is a substantial health problem and has subsequently attracted a considerable amount of research both in the early and chronic phases. Chronic, nonspecific LBP indicates limited effectiveness from most commonly applied interventions and approaches, but it seems to be opposite in the early phase. Intervention is more effective than advice on staying active in acute LBP, leading to more rapid improvement in function, mood, quality of life, and general health. We compared physiotherapy (PT that involved 3–7 treatment sessions based on subclassification in early phase LBP (acute and subacute LBP lasting <3 months to one session of PT that advised staying active, in 134 LBP patients. Low back and leg pain, disability, and days of sick-leave were evaluated. After 12 months, all groups had only minimal pain and disability. In the advice-only group, those patients who had radiating pain had less improvement compared with other groups, and increasing days of sick-leave because of LBP after 12 months. Compared with the advice-only group, orthopedic manual therapy and McKenzie methods seemed to be slightly more effective than one session of assessment in pain and disability.Keywords: OMT, advice, low back pain 

  2. [Low back pain during pregnancy. Multidisciplinary approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Padilla, D; Gallo-Padilla, C; Gallo-Vallejo, F J; Gallo-Vallejo, J L

    2016-09-01

    After explaining that low back pain is considered the most common pregnancy complication, its pathogenesis, risk factors and the clinical characteristics of the very painful symptoms of this condition are described. As for its approach, it is stressed that it must be multidisciplinary, introducing very important preventive measures, including proper postural hygiene. For its treatment, the methods may be based on non-surgical or pharmacological interventions of a conservative non-invasive nature. Thus, physiotherapy, osteopathic manipulation, multimodal intervention (exercise and education), exercises performed in water environment, acupuncture, etc., have proven to be effective. Finally, it is emphasised that given the significant impact on their quality of life, different health professionals must be proactive and treat the lumbar disease in pregnant women. PMID:26239672

  3. Attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicine in chronic pain syndromes: a questionnaire-based comparison between primary headache and low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czaja Eva

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM is widely used and popular among patients with primary headache or low back pain (LBP. Aim of the study was to analyze attitudes of headache and LBP patients towards the use of CAM. Methods Two questionnaire-based surveys were applied comparing 432 primary headache and 194 LBP patients. Results In total, 84.75% of all patients reported use of CAM; with significantly more LBP patients. The most frequently-used CAM therapies in headache were acupuncture (71.4%, massages (56.4%, and thermotherapy (29.2%, in LBP thermotherapy (77.4%, massages (62.7%, and acupuncture (51.4%. The most frequent attitudes towards CAM use in headache vs. LBP: "leave nothing undone" (62.5% vs. 52.1%; p = 0.006, "take action against the disease" (56.8% vs. 43.2%; p = 0.006. Nearly all patients with previous experience with CAM currently use CAM in both conditions (93.6% in headache; 100% in LBP. However, the majority of the patients had no previous experience. Conclusion Understanding motivations for CAM treatment is important, because attitudes derive from wishes for non-pharmacological treatment, to be more involved in treatment and avoid side effects. Despite higher age and more permanent pain in LBP, both groups show high use of CAM with only little specific difference in preferred methods and attitudes towards CAM use. This may reflect deficits and unfulfilled goals in conventional treatment. Maybe CAM can decrease the gap between patients' expectations about pain therapy and treatment reality, considering that both conditions are often chronic diseases, causing high burdens for daily life.

  4. Kinesio Taping to generate skin convolutions is not better than sham taping for people with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia do Carmo Silva Parreira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Question: For people with chronic low back pain, does Kinesio Taping, applied according to the treatment manual to create skin convolutions, reduce pain and disability more than a simple application without convolutions? Design: Randomised trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and blinded assessment of some outcomes. Participants: 148 participants with chronic non-specific low back pain. Intervention: Experimental group participants received eight sessions (over four weeks of Kinesio Taping applied according to the Kinesio Taping Method treatment manual (ie, 10 to 15% tension applied in flexion to create skin convolutions in neutral. Control group participants received eight sessions (over four weeks of Kinesio Taping with no tension, creating no convolutions. Outcome measures: The primary outcome measures were pain intensity and disability after the four-week intervention. Secondary outcomes were pain intensity and disability 12 weeks after randomisation, and global perceived effect at both four and 12 weeks after randomisation. Results: Applying Kinesio Tape to create convolutions in the skin did not significantly change its effect on pain (MD–0.4 points, 95% CI–1.3 to 0.4 or disability (MD–0.3 points, 95% CI–1.9 to 1.3 at four weeks. There was a small difference in favour of the experimental group for the secondary outcome of global perceived effect (MD 1.4 points, 95% CI 0.3 to 2.5 at four weeks. No significant between-group differences were observed for the other secondary outcomes. Conclusion: Kinesio Taping applied with stretch to generate convolutions in the skin was no more effective than simple application of the tape without tension for the outcomes measured. These results challenge the proposed mechanism of action of this therapy. Trial registration: Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials, RBR-7ggfkv. [Parreira PCS, Costa LCM, Takahashi R, Hespanhol Junior LC, da Luz Junior MA, da Silva TM, Costa LOP

  5. Chronic low back pain and insomnia : understanding the experience and attributions made by out-patients about sleeplessness, pain and their interaction

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, Paul Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Systematic Review: Chronic pain and insomnia are highly comorbid, and evidence suggests a reciprocal relationship between these. CBT-I has been shown to improve sleep in those with chronic pain, therefore the potential of improved sleep leading to improvements in pain symptoms is a possibility. This led to the question: Does CBT-I improve pain symptoms in those with chronic pain and insomnia? A systematic review of the literature was conducted resulting in eight papers regardin...

  6. BREATHING PATTERNS IN PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka P. Ostwal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low Back pain is common clinical condition encountered in a day to day Physiotherapy practice. Very few authors has so far documented changes in breathing patterns in low back pain while performing certain motor control tests. Purpose: The aim of the study was to observe the breathing pattern in individuals with low back pain (LBP both at rest and during motor control tasks. Material and Method: 150 patients with LBP participated in this study and they were subcategorized further in acute, sub-acute and chronic low back pain patients. The breathing pattern was evaluated at rest (standing and supine position during both relaxed breathing and deep breathing and while performing clinical motor control tasks, i.e. bent knee fall out, knee lift abdominal test and active straight leg raise. Breathing patterns in patients with LBP were assessed by therapist both visually and via palpation and observational findings were noted. Costo-diaphragmatic breathing was considered as normal breathing pattern. Result: Observational findings of this study demonstrates altered breathing pattern in patients with LBP during motor control tasks. Conclusion: At rest, no significant differences were observed in breathing patterns of LBP patients, whereas around 71% patients revealed abnormal breathing pattern during motor control tests.

  7. Low back pain misdiagnosis or missed diagnosis: Core principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monie, A P; Fazey, P J; Singer, K P

    2016-04-01

    Consensus guidelines for the management of low back pain recommend that the clinician use contemporary best practice for assessment and treatment, consider biopsychosocial factors and, if chronic, use a multimodal and multi-disciplinary approach. Where guidelines are not followed and basic assessment is inadequate the diagnosis may be compromised and the sequelae of errors compounded. Factors such as a lack of knowledge or recognition of the common structure specific pain referral patterns, poor clinical reasoning, inappropriate referral and predilection for popular management approaches also contribute to mis-diagnosis and mis-management. This report describes two cases of chronic low back pain with lengthy histories of multiple failed interventions to highlight the consequences of focussing on a singular approach to the exclusion of evidence based pathways and the resulting risk of a missed diagnosis. The eventual management to mitigate these problems is reported with the aid of low back pain outcome measures, computer-aided combined movement examination, disability and pain questionnaires and health quality of life surveys. PMID:26521215

  8. Epidural injections with or without steroids in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hai Meng, Qi Fei, Bingqiang Wang, Yong Yang, Dong Li, Jinjun Li, Nan Su Department of Orthopedics, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Epidural injections of anesthetic with or without steroids are widely used for treating lumbar spinal stenosis, a common cause of chronic low back pain, but there is a lack of rigorous data comparing the effectiveness of epidural injections of anesthetic with and without steroids. This meta-analysis presents a current, comprehensive picture of how epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids compare with those using local anesthetic alone.Methods: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from their inception through February 5, 2015. Weight mean difference, risk ratio, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A random effects model or fixed effects model was used to pool the estimates, according to the heterogeneity between the included studies.Results: We included 13 randomized controlled trials, involving 1,465 patients. Significant pain relief (≥50% was demonstrated in 53.7% of patients administered with epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids (group 1 and in 56.4% of those administered with local anesthetic alone (group 2. Patients showed a reduction in numeric rating scale pain score of 3.7 and 3.6 in the two groups, respectively. Significant functional improvement was achieved in 65.2% of patients in group 1 and 63.1% of patients in group 2, with Oswestry Disability Index reductions of 13.8 and 14.5 points, respectively. The overall number of injections per year was 3.2±1.3 and 3.4±1.2 with average total relief per year of 29.3±19.7 and 33.8±19.3 weeks, respectively. The opioid intakes decreased from baseline by 12.4 and 7.8 mg, respectively. Among the outcomes listed, only total relief time differed significantly between the two groups.Conclusion: Both epidural injections with

  9. Active rehabilitation for chronic low back pain: Cognitive-behavioral, physical, or both? First direct post-treatment results from a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN22714229

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Heijden Geert JMG

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of non-specific chronic low back pain is often based on three different models regarding the development and maintenance of pain and especially functional limitations: the deconditioning model, the cognitive behavioral model and the biopsychosocial model. There is evidence that rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain is more effective than no treatment, but information is lacking about the differential effectiveness of different kinds of rehabilitation. A direct comparison of a physical, a cognitive-behavioral treatment and a combination of both has never been carried out so far. Methods The effectiveness of active physical, cognitive-behavioral and combined treatment for chronic non-specific low back pain compared with a waiting list control group was determined by performing a randomized controlled trial in three rehabilitation centers. Two hundred and twenty three patients were randomized, using concealed block randomization to one of the following treatments, which they attended three times a week for 10 weeks: Active Physical Treatment (APT, Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment (CBT, Combined Treatment of APT and CBT (CT, or Waiting List (WL. The outcome variables were self-reported functional limitations, patient's main complaints, pain, mood, self-rated treatment effectiveness, treatment satisfaction and physical performance including walking, standing up, reaching forward, stair climbing and lifting. Assessments were carried out by blinded research assistants at baseline and immediately post-treatment. The data were analyzed using the intention-to-treat principle. Results For 212 patients, data were available for analysis. After treatment, significant reductions were observed in functional limitations, patient's main complaints and pain intensity for all three active treatments compared to the WL. Also, the self-rated treatment effectiveness and satisfaction appeared to be higher in the three

  10. Low back pain and everyday activities : the influence of axial rotation on low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.L.J.M. van Deursen (Leo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractLow back pain (LBP) is a major problem in the industrialized world. The aetiology of LBP is multicausal: heavy physical workload, sedentary work, whole body vibration, smoking, as well as minimal influence over work conditions, poor social relations and psychological factors all play a d

  11. Management of patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debarle, Michel; Aigron, Rémi; Depernet, Laure;

    2014-01-01

    strategies were identified for each scenario. Appropriateness of the chosen management strategy was assessed using predetermined "best practice" for each scenario. Consensus was arbitrarily defined as "moderate" when 50- 69% of respondents agreed on the same management choice for a scenario, and "excellent......" when 70% or more provided the same answer. RESULTS: Excellent consensus was achieved for only one scenario, and moderate consensus for two scenarios. For five of the nine scenarios, the most common answers were in agreement with the "best practice" management strategies. Consensus between the French......BACKGROUND: Little is known about the level of consensus within the French chiropractic profession regarding management of clinical issues. A previous Swedish study showed that chiropractors agreed relatively well on the management strategy for nine low back pain scenarios. We wished to investigate...

  12. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jensen, Lone Donbæk;

    2011-01-01

    (Romberg Ratio) might be of clinical interest. This study aimed to assess postural balance in LBP patients by analyzing intra-session reliability of CoP parameters on a portable force platform, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether CoP parameters and OLST measure......Low back pain (LBP) patients have poorer postural control compared to healthy controls, and the importance of assessing and addressing balance is a matter of debate. In the clinic, balance is often tested by means of the one leg stand test (OLST) while research often employs center of pressure (Co......P) on a force platform. Portable force platforms might be of clinical relevance, but their reliability for LBP patients in a clinical setting has not been demonstrated. As LBP patients are more dependent on vision compared to healthy controls, the ratio of tests performed with eyes open and eyes closed...

  13. Low back pain following a fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael J

    2013-08-01

    The patient was a 29-year-old man who presented to an emergency department with a chief complaint of low back pain. Symptom onset occurred 3 weeks earlier, following a fall off a roof. The physician ordered radiographs of the thoracic and lumbar spines, which were interpreted as normal. After receiving the results of the radiographs, the physician referred the patient to a physical therapist working in the emergency department. Because of the strong suspicion for a fracture and because radiographs are not considered to be sensitive to some of the bony changes associated with fractures,1 computed tomography imaging of the thoracic and lumbar spines was ordered. The computed tomography imaging revealed multilevel, small end-plate compression defects, most marked at T12-L1, with mild anterior wedging and retropulsion of a small bone fragment at L1. PMID:23902792

  14. MRI in patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Krüger; Manniche, Claus; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    MRI in LBP patients: good or bad? Background: The routine use of radiology is presently discouraged in patients with low back pain (LBP). MRI provides clinicians and patients with detailed knowledge of the spinal structures and has no known physical side effects. It is possible that detailed...... "old" group was 5 vs. 3 for the "new" group (p<0.03). Group exercise was a part of the treatment for 21% from the "old" group vs. 35% from the "new" group (p<0.03). There was no difference between the two approaches in relation to referral to primary care or back surgery. Conclusion: In our clinic, the...... to: 1) duration of treatment, 2) number of contacts with clinicians and participation in group exercise, and 3) admission to primary care or another hospital department.   Design: Retrospective inspection of patient files. Method: Files were retrieved from consecutive patients from the "old" and "new...

  15. Low Back Pain in Primary Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, Lise; Munck, Anders; Hartvigsen, Lisbeth;

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Baseline description of a multicenter cohort study. Objective. To describe patients with low back pain (LBP) in both chiropractic and general practice in Denmark. Background. To optimize standards of care in the primary healthcare sector, detailed knowledge of the patient populations...... in different settings is needed. In Denmark, most LBP-patients access primary healthcare through chiropractic or general practice. Methods. Chiropractors and general practitioners recruited adult patients seeking care for LBP. Extensive baseline questionnaires were obtained and descriptive analyses presented...... separately for general and chiropractic practice patients, Mann-Whitney rank sum test and Pearson's chi-square test, were used to test for differences between the two populations. Results. Questionnaires were returned from 934 patients in chiropractic practice and 319 patients from general practice. Four out...

  16. Individuals with chronic low back pain have greater difficulty in engaging in positive lifestyle behaviours than those without back pain: An assessment of health literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnett Angus F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the large volume of research dedicated to understanding chronic low back pain (CLBP, patient outcomes remain modest while healthcare costs continue to rise, creating a major public health burden. Health literacy - the ability to seek, understand and utilise health information - has been identified as an important factor in the course of other chronic conditions and may be important in the aetiology of CLBP. Many of the currently available health literacy measurement tools are limited since they measure narrow aspects of health literacy. The Health Literacy Measurement Scale (HeLMS was developed recently to measure broader elements of health literacy. The aim of this study was to measure broad elements of health literacy among individuals with CLBP and without LBP using the HeLMS. Methods Thirty-six community-dwelling adults with CLBP and 44 with no history of LBP responded to the HeLMS. Individuals were recruited as part of a larger community-based spinal health study in Western Australia. Scores for the eight domains of the HeLMS as well as individual item responses were compared between the groups. Results HeLMS scores were similar between individuals with and without CLBP for seven of the eight health literacy domains (p > 0.05. However, compared to individuals with no history of LBP, those with CLBP had a significantly lower score in the domain 'Patient attitudes towards their health' (mean difference [95% CI]: 0.46 [0.11-0.82] and significantly lower scores for each of the individual items within this domain (p d = 0.47-0.65. Conclusions Although no differences were identified in HeLMS scores between the groups for seven of the health literacy domains, adults with CLBP reported greater difficulty in engaging in general positive health behaviours. This aspect of health literacy suggests that self-management support initiatives may benefit individuals with CLBP.

  17. Kinesio Taping Does Not Provide Additional Benefits in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain Who Receive Exercise and Manual Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Added, Marco Aurélio Nemitalla; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; de Freitas, Diego Galace; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Monteiro, Renan Lima; Salomão, Evelyn Cassia; de Medeiros, Flávia Cordeiro; Costa, Lucíola da Cunha Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Background Many clinical practice guidelines endorse both manual therapy and exercise as effective treatment options for patients with low back pain. To optimize the effects of the treatments recommended by the guidelines, a new intervention known as Kinesio Taping is being widely used in these patients. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain when added to a physical therapy program consisting of exercise and manual therapy. Methods One hundred forty-eight patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain were randomly allocated to receive 10 (twice weekly) sessions of physical therapy, consisting of exercise and manual therapy, or the same treatment with the addition of Kinesio Taping applied to the lower back. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and disability (5 weeks after randomization) and the secondary outcomes were pain intensity, disability (3 months and 6 months after randomization), global perceived effect, and satisfaction with care (5 weeks after treatment). Data were collected by a blinded assessor. Results No between-group differences were observed in the primary outcomes of pain intensity (mean difference, -0.01 points; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.88, 0.85) or disability (mean difference, 1.14 points; 95% CI: -0.85, 3.13) at 5 weeks' follow-up. In addition, no between-group differences were observed for any of the other outcomes evaluated, except for disability 6 months after randomization (mean difference, 2.01 points; 95% CI: 0.03, 4.00) in favor of the control group. Conclusion Patients who received a physical therapy program consisting of exercise and manual therapy did not get additional benefit from the use of Kinesio Taping. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Prospectively registered May 28, 2013 at www.ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01866332). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):506-513. Epub 6 Jun 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016

  18. The course of low back pain from adolescence to adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbaek, Lise; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Manniche, Claus

    2006-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study with 8-year follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To describe the evolution of low back pain from adolescence into adulthood. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: High prevalence rates of low back pain among children and adolescents have been demonstrated in several studies, and it has been...... theorized that low back pain in childhood may have important consequences for future low back pain. It is important to understand the nature of such a link if effective preventive programs are to be established. METHODS: Almost 10,000 Danish twins born between 1972 and 1982 were surveyed by means of postal...... questionnaires in 1994 and again in 2002. The questionnaires dealt with various aspects of general health, including the prevalence of low back pain, classified according to number of days affected (0, 1-7, 8-30, >30). RESULTS: Low back pain in adolescence was found to be a significant risk factor for low back...

  19. Reliability and validity of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) in evaluations of chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Scheman, Judith; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the reliability and concurrent validity of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-2-Restructured Form (2-RF) (Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011) scores in a sample of 811 chronic low back pain patients (346 males, 529 females) beginning treatment in a short-term interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation program. We calculated internal consistency coefficients, mean-item correlations, and SEM for all substantive scales, as well as zero-order correlations with collateral medical record information and self-report testing. Results indicated reliability and validity for most of the MMPI-2-RF substantive scales. Implications of these findings and limitations of this study are discussed. PMID:25436662

  20. Effectiveness of a Web-Based Tailored Interactive Health Communication Application for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes or Chronic Low Back Pain: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wolff, Alessa; Kriston, Levente; Härter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and chronic low back pain is rising. Patient empowerment is a key strategy in the management of chronic diseases. Patient empowerment can be fostered by Web-based interactive health communication applications (IHCAs) that combine health information with decision support, social support, and/or behavioral change support. Tailoring the content and tone of IHCAs to the needs of individual patients might improve their effectiveness. Objective The main objective was to test the effectiveness of a Web-based, tailored, fully automated IHCA for patients with type 2 diabetes or chronic low back pain against a standard website with identical content without tailoring (control condition) on patients’ knowledge and empowerment. Methods We performed a blinded randomized trial with a parallel design. In the intervention group, the content was delivered in dialogue form, tailored to relevant patient characteristics. In the control group, the sections of the text were presented in a content tree without any tailoring. Participants were recruited online and offline and were blinded to their group assignments. Measurements were taken at baseline (t0), directly after the first visit (t1), and at 3-month follow-up (t2). The primary hypothesis was that the tailored IHCA would have larger effects on knowledge and patient empowerment (primary outcomes) than the control website. The secondary outcomes were decisional conflict and preparation for decision making. All measurements were conducted by online self-report questionnaires. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and available cases (AC) analyses were performed for all outcomes. Results A total of 561 users agreed to participate in the study. Of these, 179 (31.9%) had type 2 diabetes and 382 (68.1%) had chronic low back pain. Usage was significantly higher in the tailored system (mean 51.2 minutes) than in the control system (mean 37.6 minutes; Ppersons who use IHCAs. There

  1. Pain Perception and Stabilometric Parameters in People With Chronic Low Back Pain After a Pilates Exercise Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Antonino; Bianco, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Messina, Giuseppe; Montalto, Maria Alessandra; Bellafiore, Marianna; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Iovane, Angelo; Palma, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Various exercise interventions, such as Pilates exercises and traditional physical therapy methods, are employed to decrease low back pain (LBP). Nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) is distinct from LBP, however, as the distribution of pain is restricted to the region between the costal margin and the inferior gluteal. The aim of our randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of a program of Pilates exercises on pain perception and stabilometric parameters in patients with NSLBP.Thirty-eight participants were randomly allocated, using a 1:1 scheme, to either the experimental group (EG) or control group (CG). The EG completed a 14-week program of Pilates exercises, performed thrice per week under the supervision of an exercise specialist, while the CG was managed with a social program only. Measures of posturography and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for pain perception were obtained at baseline (T0) and after the 14 weeks of intervention (T)1.Posturography measures improved for patients in the EG, with both eyes open and eyes closed (P Pilates exercise program yielded improvements in pain and posturography outcomes. Our study also confirms the applicability of posturography in evaluating postural instability in patients with NSLBP. Due to our relatively small study group, future studies would be necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:26765419

  2. Utility of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging in evaluation of chronic low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abnormal morphologic findings in imaging were thought to explain the etiology of low back pain (LBP). However, it is now known that variety of morphologic abnormalities is noted even in asymptomatic individuals. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) could be used to differentiate incidental findings from clinically significant findings. This study was performed to define the SPECT/CT patterns in patients with LBP and to correlate these with clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Thirty adult patients with LBP of duration 3 months or more were prospectively evaluated in this study. Patients with known or suspected malignancy, trauma or infectious processes were excluded. A detailed history of sensory and motor symptoms and neurologic examination was performed. All the patients were subjected to MRI and bone scintigraphy with hybrid SPECT/CT of the lumbo-sacral spine within 1 month of each other. The patients were classified into those with and without neurologic symptoms, activity limitation. The findings of clinical examination and imaging were compared. MRI and SPECT/CT findings were also compared. Thirty patients (18 men and 12 women; mean age 38 years; range 17-64 years) were eligible for the study. Clinically, 14 of 30 (46%) had neurologic signs and or symptoms. Six of the 30 patients (20%) had positive straight leg raising test (SLRT). Twenty-two of the 30 patients (73%) had SPECT abnormality. Most frequent SPECT/CT abnormality was tracer uptake in the anterior part of vertebral body with osteophytes/sclerotic changes. Significant positive agreement was noted between this finding and MRI evidence of degenerative disc disease. Only 13% of patients had more than one abnormality in SPECT. All 30 patients had MRI abnormalities. The most frequent abnormality was degenerative disc disease and facet joint arthropathy. MRI showed single intervertebral disc abnormality in 36% of the patients and more than one

  3. Tratamiento multidisciplinar para el dolor lumbar crónico: Programa de musicoterapia Multimodal treatmaent of chronic low back pain: A music therapy program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alonso-Cardaño

    2008-05-01

    . Objective. To examine the influence of a musictherapy program on chronic low back pain patients related to coping strategies. Material an method. 14 patients from the Pain Unit in the San Pedro Hospital of Logroño were included in a music-therapy program during six weeks with a dignosis of chronic low back pain. Subjects were weekly visited by a music therapist, 60 min per sesión. All the patients answered a questionnarie to evalúate the used coping strategies to pain (CAD, in the first and the end visits. In adittion, a severity pain scale (VAS was answered twice in each interventional session. Results. The pain coping strategy more frecuently used was information seeking. All strategies shown better results at the end of the program, but only two of them had significant results: information seeking, catarsis, and distraction. Conclusión. The music-therapy program increased the more active pain coping estrategies that are possitively associated to a better degree of adjustment of the patient with chronic low back pain.

  4. Psychological Evaluation of Acute Low Back Pain in Hospital Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Lamontagne, Yves; Bousquet, Pierre; Elie, Robert; Courtois, Monique

    1983-01-01

    Personality, anxiety and depression were assessed in 62 hospital workers divided in three experimental groups: those with acute organic low back pain, those with acute functional low back pain, and asymptomatic control subjects. Results showed no statistical differences between groups in the evaluation of personality. Asymptomatic subjects had significantly lower scores for trait anxiety and depression than did patients suffering from low back pain. Patients with pain of organic origin were a...

  5. [Episacral lipoma: a treatable cause of low back pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Hatice Rana; Nacır, Barış; Özeri, Zuhal; Karagöz, Aynur

    2013-01-01

    Episacral lipoma is a small, tender subcutaneous nodule primarily occurring over the posterior iliac crest. Episacral lipoma is a significant and treatable cause of acute and chronic low back pain. Episacral lipoma occurs as a result of tears in the thoracodorsal fascia and subsequent herniation of a portion of the underlying dorsal fat pad through the tear. This clinical entity is common, and recognition is simple. The presence of a painful nodule with disappearance of pain after injection with anaesthetic, is diagnostic. Medication and physical therapy may not be effective. Local injection of the nodule with a solution of anaesthetic and steroid is effective in treating the episacral lipoma. Here we describe 2 patients with painful nodules over the posterior iliac crest. One patient complained of severe lower back pain radiating to the left lower extremity and this patient subsequently underwent disc operation. The other patient had been treated for greater trochanteric pain syndrome. In both patients, symptoms appeared to be relieved by local injection of anaesthetic and steroid. Episacral lipoma should be considered during diagnostic workup and in differential diagnosis of acute and chronic low back pain. PMID:23720083

  6. Could low grade bacterial infection contribute to low back pain? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Urquhart, Donna M; Zheng, Yiliang; Allen C Cheng; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.; Chan, Patrick; Liew, Susan; Hussain, Sultana Monira; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, there has been both immense interest and controversy regarding a randomised, controlled trial which showed antibiotics to be effective in the treatment of chronic low back pain (disc herniation with Modic Type 1 change). While this research has the potential to result in a paradigm shift in the treatment of low back pain, several questions remain unanswered. This systematic review aims to address these questions by examining the role of bacteria in low back pain and the r...

  7. An investigation of the reproducibility of ultrasound measures of abdominal muscle activation in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Maher, Chris G.; Latimer, Jane; Hodges, Paul W.; Shirley, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) measures are used by clinicians and researchers to evaluate improvements in activity of the abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain. Studies evaluating the reproducibility of these US measures provide some information; however, little is known about the reproducibility of these US measures over time in patients with low back pain. The objectives of this study were to estimate the reproducibility of ultrasound measurements of automatic activation of the lateral abdomin...

  8. Short-term effect on pain and function of neurophysiological education and sensorimotor retraining compared to usual physiotherapy in patients with chronic or recurrent non-specific low back pain, a pilot randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Wälti, Philipp; Kool, Jan; Luomajoki, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) is a major health problem. Identification of subgroups and appropriate treatment regimen was proposed as a key priority by the Cochrane Back Review Group. We developed a multimodal treatment (MMT) for patients with moderate to severe disability and medium risk of poor outcome. MMT includes a) neurophysiological education on the perception of pain to decrease self-limitation due to catastrophizing believes about the nature of NSCLBP, b) se...

  9. Assessment of psychosocial risk factors for the development of non-specific chronic disabling low back pain in Japanese workers—findings from the Japan Epidemiological Research of Occupation-related Back Pain (JOB) study

    OpenAIRE

    Matsudaira, Ko; KAWAGUCHI, Mika; Isomura, Tatsuya; INUZUKA, Kyoko; KOGA, Tadashi; Miyoshi, Kota; KONISHI, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the associations between psychosocial factors and the development of chronic disabling low back pain (LBP) in Japanese workers. A 1 yr prospective cohort of the Japan Epidemiological Research of Occupation-related Back Pain (JOB) study was used. The participants were office workers, nurses, sales/marketing personnel, and manufacturing engineers. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed twice: at baseline and 1 yr after baseline. The outcome of interest was the developm...

  10. Psychopathology predicts the outcome of medial branch blocks with corticosteroid for chronic axial low back or cervical pain: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tipirneni Naveen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comorbid psychopathology is an important predictor of poor outcome for many types of treatments for back or neck pain. But it is unknown if this applies to the results of medial branch blocks (MBBs for chronic low back or neck pain, which involves injecting the medial branch of the dorsal ramus nerves that innervate the facet joints. The objective of this study was to determine whether high levels of psychopathology are predictive of pain relief after MBB injections in the lumbar or cervical spine. Methods This was a prospective cohort study. Consecutive patients in a pain medicine practice undergoing MBBs of the lumbar or cervical facets with corticosteroids were recruited to participate. Subjects were selected for a MBB based on operationalized selection criteria and the procedure was performed in a standardized manner. Subjects completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS just prior to the procedure and at one-month follow up. Scores on the HADS classified the subjects into three groups based on psychiatric symptoms, which formed the primary predictor variable: Low, Moderate, or High levels of psychopathology. The primary outcome measure was the percent improvement in average daily pain rating one-month following an injection. Analysis of variance and chi-square were used to analyze the analgesia and functional rating differences between groups, and to perform a responder analysis. Results Eighty six (86 subjects completed the study. The Low psychopathology group (n = 37 reported a mean of 23% improvement in pain at one-month while the High psychopathology group (n = 29 reported a mean worsening of -5.8% in pain (p Low group had at least 30% improvement in pain versus 10% in the High group (p Conclusion Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with diminished pain relief after a MBB injection performed with steroid at one-month follow-up. These findings illustrate the importance

  11. Low Back Pain - Management Perspective Of A commonly Encountered Problem

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    Parharaj S S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Low Back pain is a very common symptom affecting the general population, incurring a huge annual societal cost. In spite of this, it remains very commonly misdiagnosed and maltreated. The majority of benign chronic low back pain patients suffer from a combination of myofascial frozen back syndrome with or without an overly of psychosocioeconomic factors. Neural compression causes are less frequent. A though evaluation of the patient to select the most rational therapeutic approach is necessary. In majority of the patients, a well planned out rehabilitation programme is useful. Surgery is indicated in a minority with neural compression or spinal instability, motivation is essential as rehabilitation and surgery have a high failure rate in inadequately motivated patients with psychosocioeconomic dysfunction.

  12. The Back 2 Activity Trial: education and advice versus education and advice plus a structured walking programme for chronic low back pain

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    Bradbury Ian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current evidence supports the use of exercise-based treatment for chronic low back pain that encourages the patient to assume an active role in their recovery. Walking has been shown it to be an acceptable type of exercise with a low risk of injury. However, it is not known whether structured physical activity programmes are any more effective than giving advice to remain active. Methods/Design The proposed study will test the feasibility of using a pedometer-driven walking programme, as an adjunct to a standard education and advice session in participants with chronic low back pain. Fifty adult participants will be recruited via a number of different sources. Baseline outcome measures including self reported function; objective physical activity levels; fear-avoidance beliefs and health-related quality of life will be recorded. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated under strict, double blind conditions to one of two treatments groups. Participants in group A will receive a single education and advice session with a physiotherapist based on the content of the 'Back Book'. Participants in group B will receive the same education and advice session. In addition, they will also receive a graded pedometer-driven walking programme prescribed by the physiotherapist. Follow up outcomes will be recorded by the same researcher, who will remain blinded to group allocation, at eight weeks and six months post randomisation. A qualitative exploration of participants' perception of walking will also be examined by use of focus groups at the end of the intervention. As a feasibility study, treatment effects will be represented by point estimates and confidence intervals. The assessment of participant satisfaction will be tabulated, as will adherence levels and any recorded difficulties or adverse events experienced by the participants or therapists. This information will be used to modify the planned interventions to be used in a

  13. Risk of Chronic Low Back Pain Among Parturients Who Undergo Cesarean Delivery With Neuraxial Anesthesia: A Nationwide Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Yuan-Yi; Lo, Yuan; Chen, Yan-Bo; Liu, Chun-Peng; Huang, Wei-Chun; Wen, Chun-Hsien

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the risk of chronic low back pain (LBP) in parturients undergoing cesarean delivery (CD) with neuraxial anesthesia (NA).LBP is common during pregnancy and also after delivery, but its etiology is poorly understood. Previous studies that investigated the correlation between epidural labor analgesia and chronic low back pain were inconclusive. These studies lacked objective diagnostic criteria for LBP and did not exclude possible confounders. We performed this nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study to explore the relationship between CD with NA and subsequent LBP.From the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), we identified all primiparas who had given birth between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2013. Using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedure codes, we identified the women who had vaginal delivery (VD) and those who had CD. The mode of anesthesia was ascertained by the NHI codes. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the odds of postpartum LBP in women undergoing CD with NA compared with those having VD. The outcome was a diagnosis of LBP according to the first ICD-9-CM diagnosis code. The patients were observed for 3 years after delivery or until diagnosis of postpartum LBP, withdrawal from the NHI system, death, or December 31, 2013.Of the 61,027 primiparas who underwent delivery during the observation period, 40,057 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Of these women, 27,097 (67.6%) received VD, 8662 (21.6%) received CD with spinal anesthesia, and 4298 (10.7%) received CD with epidural anesthesia (EA). Women who received CD with EA were found to have higher risk of LBP than did women who received VD, with the adjusted OR being 1.26 (95% CI: 1.17-1.34).CD with EA might increase the risk of subsequent chronic LBP. PMID:27100449

  14. Disc degeneration and chronic low back pain: an association which becomes nonsignificant when endplate changes and disc contour are taken into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to assess the association between severe disc degeneration (DD) and low back pain (LBP). A case-control study was conducted with 304 subjects, aged 35-50, recruited in routine clinical practice across six hospitals; 240 cases (chronic LBP patients with a median pain duration of 46 months) and 64 controls (asymptomatic subjects without any lifetime history of significant LBP). The following variables were assessed once, using previously validated methods: gender, age, body mass index (BMI), lifetime smoking exposure, degree of physical activity, severity of LBP, disability, and findings on magnetic resonance (MRI) (disc degeneration, Modic changes (MC), disc protrusion/hernia, annular tears, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis). Radiologists who interpreted MRI were blinded to the subjects' characteristics. A multivariate logistic regression model assessed the association between severe DD and chronic LBP, adjusting for gender, age, BMI, physical activity, MC, disc protrusion/hernia, and spinal stenosis. Severe DD at ≥1 level was found in 46.9 % of the controls and 65.8 % of the cases. Crude odds ratio (95 % CI), for suffering chronic LBP when having severe DD, was 2.06 (1.05; 4.06). After adjusting for ''MC'' and ''disc protrusion/hernia,'' it was 1.81 (0.81; 4.05). The association between severe DD and LBP ceases to be significant when adjusted for MC and disc protrusion/hernia. These results do not support that DD as a major cause of chronic LBP. (orig.)

  15. Potential Risk Factors of Persistent Low Back Pain Developing from Mild Low Back Pain in Urban Japanese Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Ko Matsudaira; Hiroaki Konishi; Kota Miyoshi; Tatsuya Isomura; Kyoko Inuzuka

    2014-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Two-year, prospective cohort data from the Japan epidemiological research of occupation-related back pain study in urban settings were used for this analysis. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between aggravated low back pain and psychosocial factors among Japanese workers with mild low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Although psychosocial factors are strongly indicated as yellow flags of low back pain (LBP) leading to disability, the association between aggravated LB...

  16. BREATHING PATTERNS IN PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka P. Ostwal; Wani S K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low Back pain is common clinical condition encountered in a day to day Physiotherapy practice. Very few authors has so far documented changes in breathing patterns in low back pain while performing certain motor control tests. Purpose: The aim of the study was to observe the breathing pattern in individuals with low back pain (LBP) both at rest and during motor control tasks. Material and Method: 150 patients with LBP participated in this study and they were subcategorized ...

  17. Do MRI findings identify patients with chronic low back pain and Modic changes who respond best to rest or exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke K; Kent, Peter; Hancock, Mark

    2015-01-01

    conservative treatment while participating in the trial. Five baseline MRI findings were investigated as effect modifiers: Modic changes Type 1 (any size), large Modic changes (any type), large Modic changes Type 1, severe disc degeneration and large disc herniation. The outcome measure was change in low back...... rest than from exercise. The interactions for severe disc degeneration (0.74 (-1.40 to 2.88)) and large disc herniation (-0.92 (3.15 to 1.31)) were less than the 1.0-point threshold for clinical importance. As expected, because of the lack of statistical power, no interaction term for any of the MRI...

  18. Cross sectional study of low back pain among merchant seafarers at a medical centre in Singapore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nair, Ravindran; Jensen, Olaf Chresten; Gómez Muñiz, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Background: Low back pain [LBP] either acute or chronic is the most common musculoskeletal complaint seen in a clinic. Majority of them are involved with manual handling of heavy objects. Objectives: To explore prevalence characteristics of low back pain syndrome among seafarers from merchant shi...

  19. Differences in pain perception, health-related quality of life, disability, mood, and sleep between Brazilian and Spanish people with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiana P. Rodrigues-De-Souza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Cultural and social factors play an important role in the development and persistence of Low Back Pain (LBP. Nevertheless, there are few studies investigating differences in LBP features between countries. Objective To determine differences in pain perception between individuals with LBP living in Brazil and Spain. Method Thirty Spanish individuals and 30 age- and sex-comparable Brazilian individuals with LBP were recruited from the Public Health Services of both countries. The Numerical Pain Rating Scale and the pain rating index (PRI, the number of words chosen (NWC, and the present pain index (PPI extracted from the McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain. The Oswestry Disability Index, the Short Form-36, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index were also applied. Differences between countries and the correlation between demographic and clinical variables in each country were assessed with parametric and the nonparametric tests. Results A significant Country by Gender interaction was found for the PRI total score (P=0.038, but not for intensity of pain, disability, PPI, or NWC, in which Spanish women exhibited greater pain ratio than Spanish men (P=0.014, and no gender differences were identified in Brazilians. The Spanish group showed a consistent pattern of correlations for clinical data. Within Brazilian patients, fewer correlations were found and all of the coefficients were lower than those in the Spanish group. Conclusion The pain perception in patients with LBP is different depending on the country. Within Spanish patients, LBP is considered a more global entity affecting multidimensional contexts.

  20. Combination treatment for acute non-specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Barulin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal pain syndromes come to the forefront in the structure of referral rates for medical advice and considerably reduce quality of life in this category of patients. The paper considers the role of an edematous component in the development and chronization of pain. Occurring edema gives rise to local hemo- and lymphodynamic disorders, dysregulated vascular tone, activated thrombogenesis, and increased vascular permeability, eventually leading to the excessive irritation of nociceptors, the enhancement of a pain component, and the progression of tissue swelling.Objective: to study the efficacy of L-lysine escinate in the combination treatment of acute non-specific low back pain.Patients and methods. Sixty-two patients aged 21 to 53 patients (mean age 36.4±0.9 years with acute low back pain were examined. L-lysine escinate having venotonic and anti-inflammatory activities was chosen as an agent to correct edema syndrome. The results of clinical, neurological, and manual muscular testing and assessment of the biomechanics of the vertebral column, obtained using the original soft package “Visual optic analysis” developed by the authors, were analyzed. All the patients were found to have acute non-specific low back pain or radiculopathy (entrapment syndrome and considerable changes in the biomechanics of the vertebral column. The patients were treated in accordance with the standards of medical care for spinal pain. L-lysine escinate was additionally incorporated as an antiedema drug into the therapeuticcomplex of the patients in the study group.Results and discussion. The study patient group demonstrated a more pronounced trend towards reductions in pain syndrome and local muscle edema. It was noted that L-lysine escinate was effective in treating both acute pain syndromes and exacerbations of chronic low back pain and that additional non-drug programs should be included in order to correct an impaired motor stereotype.

  1. Effect of a single session of ear acupuncture on pain intensity and postural control in individuals with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

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    Andrea Ushinohama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background Ear Acupuncture (EA is a form of acupuncture in which needles are applied to the external ear and has been used in multiple painful conditions. Low back pain (LBP is highly prevalent in active individuals and causes high economic burden to health systems worldwide. LBP affects the person’s ability to keep balance, especially in challenging conditions. Objective The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a single session of EA on pain intensity and body sway during postural tasks. Method Eighty adults with LBP and pain intensity equal to or greater than 4 (0-10 scale were randomly allocated (1:1 to EA group (EAG or placebo group (PG. Initially, the level of pain intensity was assessed. Next, participants stood still on a force plate either with feet in parallel or in semi-tandem and with eyes open or closed. Then, the EAG was treated with EA for 20 min and the PG was treated with detuned ultrasound. After the treatment, pain intensity was assessed again and the postural test was repeated. Pain intensity was the primary outcome and center of pressure sway area and speed were the secondary outcomes measured. Results Results revealed that pain intensity decreased in both groups after treatment, but decreased more in the EAG. For postural control, no effect of treatment and no interaction between treatment and postural condition on body sway were found. Conclusion Those findings indicate that EA is better than placebo to reduce pain, but neither treatment has any effect on postural control.

  2. Occupational low back pain in nursing workers: massage versus pain

    OpenAIRE

    Talita Pavarini Borges; Leonice Fumiko Sato Kurebayashi; Maria Júlia Paes da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of massage for decreasing occupational low back pain in workers of a Nursing team in an Emergency Room. Method: A randomized controlled trial, using a socio-demographic/morbidity questionnaire and a Pain Numeric Scale. Forty-five subjects were randomly allocated for intervention (G1 – Massage by acupressure), placebo group (G2 – application of Garlium Arseneid Laser 904nm turned off) and control (G3 – no intervention). Results: The main triggering factor, as ...

  3. Effectiveness and gastrointestinal tolerability during conversion and titration with once-daily OROS® hydromorphone extended release in opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale ME

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Martin E Hale,1 Srinivas R Nalamachu,2 Arif Khan,3 Michael Kutch4,* 1Gold Coast Research, LLC, Weston, FL, USA; 2International Clinical Research Institute, Overland Park, KS, USA; 3MedNorthwest Clinical Research Center, Bellevue, WA, USA; Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 4Applied Clinical Intelligence, LLC, Bala Cynwyd, PA, USA *Affiliation at the time this work was completed. Michael Kutch is currently affiliated with Cytel Inc, Chesterbrook, PA, USA Purpose: To describe the efficacy and safety of hydromorphone extended-release tablets (OROS hydromorphone ER during dose conversion and titration. Patients and methods: A total of 459 opioid-tolerant adults with chronic moderate to severe low back pain participated in an open-label, 2- to 4-week conversion/titration phase of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal trial, conducted at 70 centers in the United States. Patients were converted to once-daily OROS hydromorphone ER at 75% of the equianalgesic dose of their prior total daily opioid dose (5:1 conversion ratio, and titrated as frequently as every 3 days to a maximum dose of 64 mg/day. The primary outcome measure was change in pain intensity numeric rating scale; additional assessments included the Patient Global Assessment and the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire scores. Safety assessments were performed at each visit and consisted of recording and monitoring all adverse events (AEs and serious AEs. Results: Mean (standard deviation final daily dose of OROS hydromorphone ER was 37.5 (17.8 mg. Mean (standard error of the mean [SEM] numeric rating scale scores decreased from 6.6 (0.1 at screening to 4.3 (0.1 at the final titration visit (mean [SEM] change, -2.3 [0.1], representing a 34.8% reduction. Mean (SEM change in Patient Global Assessment was -0.6 (0.1, and mean change (SEM in the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire was -2.8 (0.3. Patients achieving a stable dose showed greater improvement

  4. Fear-avoidance beliefs and pain avoidance in low back pain--translating research into clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainville, James; Smeets, Rob J E M; Bendix, Tom; Tveito, Torill H; Poiraudeau, Serge; Indahl, Aage J

    2011-01-01

    For patients with low back pain, fear-avoidance beliefs (FABs) represent cognitions and emotions that underpin concerns and fears about the potential for physical activities to produce pain and further harm to the spine. Excessive FABs result in heightened disability and are an obstacle for...... recovery from acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain....

  5. Occupational low back pain in nursing workers: massage versus pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Pavarini Borges

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the efficacy of massage for decreasing occupational low back pain in workers of a Nursing team in an Emergency Room. Method: A randomized controlled trial, using a socio-demographic/morbidity questionnaire and a Pain Numeric Scale. Forty-five subjects were randomly allocated for intervention (G1 – Massage by acupressure, placebo group (G2 – application of Garlium Arseneid Laser 904nm turned off and control (G3 – no intervention. Results: The main triggering factor, as well as the worsening of pain, was the patient manipulation, both with a prevalence of 34.9%. The main treatment for low back pain before this research was the use of medication, with a prevalence of 44.2%. In accordance with a variance analysis, only G1 presented a significant statistical difference, with a better result after 12 sessions. Massage presented an enormous effect (d = 4.59, corresponding to 86% of reduction in the pain level. Conclusion: Massage was effective to decrease occupational low back pain of those Nursing workers.

  6. E-learning module on chronic low back pain in older adults: evidence of effect on medical student objective structured clinical examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Debra K; Morone, Natalia E; Spallek, Heiko; Karp, Jordan F; Schneider, Michael; Washburn, Carol; Dziabiak, Michael P; Hennon, John G; Elnicki, D Michael

    2014-06-01

    The Institute of Medicine has highlighted the urgent need to close undergraduate and graduate educational gaps in treating pain. Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the most common pain conditions, and older adults are particularly vulnerable to potential morbidities associated with misinformed treatment. An e-learning case-based interactive module was developed at the University of Pittsburgh Center of Excellence in Pain Education, one of 12 National Institutes of Health-designated centers, to teach students important principles for evaluating and managing CLBP in older adults. A team of six experts in education, information technology, pain management, and geriatrics developed the module. Teaching focused on common errors, interactivity, and expert modeling and feedback. The module mimicked a patient encounter using a standardized patient (the older adult with CLBP) and a pain expert (the patient provider). Twenty-eight medical students were not exposed to the module (Group 1) and 27 were exposed (Group 2). Their clinical skills in evaluating CLBP were assessed using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Mean scores were 62.0 ± 8.6 for Group 1 and 79.5 ± 10.4 for Group 2 (P Group 1 students (60.7%) and 26 of 27 Group 2 students (96.3%) passed. The CLBP OSCE was one of 10 OSCE stations in which students were tested at the end of a Combined Ambulatory Medicine and Pediatrics Clerkship. There were no between-group differences in performance on eight of the other nine OSCE stations. This module significantly improved medical student clinical skills in evaluating CLBP. Additional research is needed to ascertain the effect of e-learning modules on more-advanced learners and on improving the care of older adults with CLBP. PMID:24833496

  7. Is Chronic Low Back Pain Associated with the Prevalence of Coronary Heart Disease when Genetic Susceptibility Is Considered? A Co-Twin Control Study of Spanish Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Matt; Ordoñana, Juan R.; Hartvigsen, Jan; Ferreira, Manuela L.; Refshauge, Kathryn M.; Sánchez-Romera, Juan F.; Pinheiro, Marina B.; Simpson, Stephen J.; Hopper, John L.; Ferreira, Paulo H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the chronic low back pain and coronary heart disease relationship, after adjusting for relevant confounders, including genetics. Methods In a cross-sectional design, 2148 twins were recruited from the Murcia Twin Registry, Spain. The exposure was chronic LBP and the outcomes were myocardial infarction and other coronary heart diseases—lifetime and in the last 2 years–based on standardized health-related questionnaires. First, logistic regression analysis investigated associations of the total sample followed by a matched co-twin control analyses, with all complete twin pairs discordant for chronic LBP utilised, separated for zygosity—dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) pairs, which adjusted for shared familial factors, including genetics. Results Chronic LBP pain is associated with lifetime myocardial infarction [odds ratio (OR) = 2.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.35–5.36], other coronary heart diseases over a lifetime (OR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.69–3.93) and in the last two years (OR = 2.19, 95% CI: 1.33–3.60), while there was a borderline association with myocardial infarction in the last 2 years (OR = 2.64, 95% CI: 0.98–7.12). Although the magnitude of the association remained or increased in the co-twin control analyses, none reached statistical significance. Conclusion Chronic LBP is associated with a higher prevalence of myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease. It is possible that this association remains even when controlling for genetics and early shared environment, although this should be investigated with larger samples of twins discordant for LBP. PMID:27171210

  8. Low Level Laser Therapy And Exercise Therapy In Treatment Of Chronic Low Back Pain: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad R

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to compare low-level laser therapy (LLLT + exercise therapy with LLLT alone and exercise therapy alone, and to determine whether laser therapy is a useful treatment modality for chronic low back pain (LBP. Materials and Methods: This study was a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. Patients with chronic LBP for at least 12 weeks were included. Visual analogue scale (VAS, Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODQ, Schober test, flexion, extension and lateral bending were used to evaluate back pain, disability score and lumbar range of motion. Irradiation was performed with GaAlAs (=810 nm, power density=226 mW/cm2 laser, two times a week, over a period of 6 weeks. Subjects were evaluated before the first treatment, at week 6 and 12 follow-up. Results: The reduction in pain related to motion was significantly greater in the exercise + LLLT group compared with the exercise alone group (P = 0.004 but was not significant, compared with LLLT alone (P = 0.982. Disability score in LLLT + exercise therapy reduced more than the other two groups, and the difference with exercise alone group was significant (p = 0.03. Comparison of reduction of disability between LLLT alone and exercise therapy alone was not statistically significant. Improvement of lumbar range of motion in patients treated with LLLT + exercise therapy was better than the other two groups significantly, especially by Schober test and Flexion and lateral bending. Conclusion: This study clearly shows that LLLT alone and especially LLLT combined with exercise can lead to better improvement in chronic LBP.

  9. Low back pain in young athletes. A practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J; Tanner, S

    1991-12-01

    Lumbar spine pain accounts for 5 to 8% of athletic injuries. Although back pain is not the most common injury, it is one of the most challenging for the sports physician to diagnose and treat. Factors predisposing the young athlete to back injury include the growth spurt, abrupt increases in training intensity or frequency, improper technique, unsuitable sports equipment, and leg-length inequality. Poor strength of the back extensor and abdominal musculature, and inflexibility of the lumbar spine, hamstrings and hip flexor muscles may contribute to chronic low back pain. Excessive lifting and twisting may produce sprains and strains, the most common cause of low back pain in adolescents. Blows to the spine may create contusions or fractures. Fractures in adolescents from severe trauma include compression fracture, comminuted fracture, fracture of the growth plate at the vertebral end plate, lumbar transverse process fracture, and a fracture of the spinous process. Athletes who participate in sports involving repeated and forceful hyperextension of the spine may suffer from lumbar facet syndrome, spondylolysis, or spondylolisthesis. The large sacroiliac joint is also prone to irritation. The signs and symptoms of disc herniation in adolescents may be more subtle than in adults. Disorders simulating athletic injury include tumours and inflammatory connective tissue disease. Often, however, a specific diagnosis cannot be made in the young athlete with a low back injury due to the lack of pain localisation and the anatomic complexity of the lumbar spine. A thorough history and physical examination are usually more productive in determining a diagnosis and guiding treatment than imaging techniques. Diagnostic tests may be considered, though, for the adolescent athlete whose back pain is severe, was caused by acute trauma, or fails to improve with conservative therapy after several weeks. Radiographs, bone scanning, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging may

  10. Mindfulness-based stress reduction for low back pain. A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer Holger; Haller Heidemarie; Lauche Romy; Dobos Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is frequently used for pain conditions. While systematic reviews on MBSR for chronic pain have been conducted, there are no reviews for specific pain conditions. Therefore a systematic review of the effectiveness of MBSR in low back pain was performed. Methods MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CAMBASE, and PsycInfo were screened through November 2011. The search strategy combined keywords for MBSR with keywords for low back pa...

  11. Disc degeneration and chronic low back pain: an association which becomes nonsignificant when endplate changes and disc contour are taken into account

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, Francisco M. [Fundacion Kovacs, Departamento Cientifico, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Fundacion Kovacs, Spanish Back Pain Research Network, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Arana, Estanislao [Fundacion Kovacs, Spanish Back Pain Research Network, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Fundacion Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia, Servicio de Radiologia, Valencia (Spain); Royuela, Ana [CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain); Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Unidad de Bioestadistica Clinica, IRYCIS, Madrid (Spain); Estremera, Ana; Amengual, Guillermo; Sarasibar, Helena; Martinez, Carmen [Fundacion Kovacs, Spanish Back Pain Research Network, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hospital Son Llatzer, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Asenjo, Beatriz [Fundacion Kovacs, Spanish Back Pain Research Network, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hospital Carlos Haya, Malaga (Spain); Galarraga, Isabel [Fundacion Kovacs, Spanish Back Pain Research Network, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Hospital de Manacor, Manacor, Mallorca (Spain); Alonso, Ana [Fundacion Kovacs, Spanish Back Pain Research Network, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain); Casillas, Carlos [Fundacion Kovacs, Spanish Back Pain Research Network, Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Instituto de Traumatologia Union de Mutuas, Castellon (Spain); Muriel, Alfonso; Abraira, Victor [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Unidad de Bioestadistica Clinica, IRYCIS, Madrid (Spain); CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the association between severe disc degeneration (DD) and low back pain (LBP). A case-control study was conducted with 304 subjects, aged 35-50, recruited in routine clinical practice across six hospitals; 240 cases (chronic LBP patients with a median pain duration of 46 months) and 64 controls (asymptomatic subjects without any lifetime history of significant LBP). The following variables were assessed once, using previously validated methods: gender, age, body mass index (BMI), lifetime smoking exposure, degree of physical activity, severity of LBP, disability, and findings on magnetic resonance (MRI) (disc degeneration, Modic changes (MC), disc protrusion/hernia, annular tears, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis). Radiologists who interpreted MRI were blinded to the subjects' characteristics. A multivariate logistic regression model assessed the association between severe DD and chronic LBP, adjusting for gender, age, BMI, physical activity, MC, disc protrusion/hernia, and spinal stenosis. Severe DD at ≥1 level was found in 46.9 % of the controls and 65.8 % of the cases. Crude odds ratio (95 % CI), for suffering chronic LBP when having severe DD, was 2.06 (1.05; 4.06). After adjusting for ''MC'' and ''disc protrusion/hernia,'' it was 1.81 (0.81; 4.05). The association between severe DD and LBP ceases to be significant when adjusted for MC and disc protrusion/hernia. These results do not support that DD as a major cause of chronic LBP. (orig.)

  12. The Effects of the Nintendo Wii Exercise Program on Chronic Work-related Low Back Pain in Industrial Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Ji-Hyuk; Lee, Sang-Heon; Ko, Dae-Sik

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a Nintendo Wii exercise program on chronic work-related LBP compared with stability exercise. [Methods] Twenty-four workers participated in this study. All of the participants were diagnosed with chronic LBP by a physician. Participants were randomly assigned to three groups: a control group (CG), lumbar stabilization exercise group (LSE), and Nintendo Wii exercise group (NWE). Participants were treated 3 times a week for 8...

  13. A systematic review on the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine for chronic non-specific low-back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinstein, Sidney; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Kuijpers, Ton; Ostelo, Raymond; Verhagen, Arianne; de Boer, Michiel; Koes, Bart; van Tulder, Maurits

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this systematic review was to assess the effects of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), acupuncture and herbal medicine for chronic non-specific LBP. A comprehensive search was conducted by an experienced librarian from the Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG) in multiple databases up to December 22, 2008. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adults with chronic non-specific LBP, which evaluated at least one clinically relevant, patient-centred outcome measure were in...

  14. A systematic review on the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine for chronic non-specific low-back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinstein, Sidney M.; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Kuijpers, Ton; Ostelo, Raymond; Verhagen, Arianne P; de Boer, Michiel R; Koes, Bart W.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the effects of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), acupuncture and herbal medicine for chronic non-specific LBP. A comprehensive search was conducted by an experienced librarian from the Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG) in multiple databases up to December 22, 2008. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adults with chronic non-specific LBP, which evaluated at least one clinically relevant, patient-centred outcome measure were included. Two ...

  15. Lumbar CT findings of patients with low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low back pain is probably the second most common disease entity to upper respiratory infection in developed country. We were missing at least 50% of the pathologic conditions by using conventional diagnostic modalities in low back pain. They did tell us nothing or little about facet abnormalities, lateral recesses, vertebral canal and soft tissue surrounding lumbar spines. High resolutional CT has been the biggest turning point in the diagnosis and management of low back pain. CT make a contribution to reducing the morbidity and probably the cost of evaluating patients with low back pain, and to increasing diagnostic accuracy. We observed 100 cases of lumbar CT using TCT 80A scanner for the evaluation of low back pain during the period from Apr. 1985 to Sept. 1985 at Chung-Ang University Hospital. Lumbar CT scan reveals high-positive findings (98%) in low back pain patients. Common low back disorders in CT are disc bulging (53%), herniated nucleus pulposus (32%), degenerative arthritis in posterior facet joints (27%), spinal stenosis (20%) and postoperative spines (15%). Uncommon low back disorders in CT are compression fracture of vertebral bodies, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis, tropism, transitional vertebra, Scheueman's disease, limbic fracture, transverse process or articular process fracture, sacroiliac joint subluxation, conjoined nerve root and meningocele.

  16. Lumbar CT findings of patients with low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Kyun Sang [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-04-15

    Low back pain is probably the second most common disease entity to upper respiratory infection in developed country. We were missing at least 50% of the pathologic conditions by using conventional diagnostic modalities in low back pain. They did tell us nothing or little about facet abnormalities, lateral recesses, vertebral canal and soft tissue surrounding lumbar spines. High resolutional CT has been the biggest turning point in the diagnosis and management of low back pain. CT make a contribution to reducing the morbidity and probably the cost of evaluating patients with low back pain, and to increasing diagnostic accuracy. We observed 100 cases of lumbar CT using TCT 80A scanner for the evaluation of low back pain during the period from Apr. 1985 to Sept. 1985 at Chung-Ang University Hospital. Lumbar CT scan reveals high-positive findings (98%) in low back pain patients. Common low back disorders in CT are disc bulging (53%), herniated nucleus pulposus (32%), degenerative arthritis in posterior facet joints (27%), spinal stenosis (20%) and postoperative spines (15%). Uncommon low back disorders in CT are compression fracture of vertebral bodies, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis, tropism, transitional vertebra, Scheueman's disease, limbic fracture, transverse process or articular process fracture, sacroiliac joint subluxation, conjoined nerve root and meningocele.

  17. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment: Part VII: Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramoweth, Adam D; Renqvist, Jenna G; Germain, Anne; Buysse, Daniel J; Gentili, Angela; Kochersberger, Gary; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE : To present the seventh in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. This article focuses on insomnia and presents a treatment algorithm for managing insomnia in older adults, along with a representative clinical case. METHODS : A modified Delphi process was used to develop the algorithm and supportive materials. A multidisciplinary expert panel representing expertise in health psychology and sleep medicine developed the algorithm and supporting documents that were subsequently refined through an iterative process of input from a primary care provider panel. RESULTS : We present an illustrative clinical case and an algorithm to help guide the care of older adults with insomnia, an important contributor to CLBP and disability. Multicomponent cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) and similar treatments (e.g., brief behavioral treatment for insomnia [BBTI]) are the recommended first-line treatment. Medications should be considered only if BBTI/CBTI is suboptimal or not effective and should be prescribed at the lowest effective dose for short periods of time (older adults and should be routinely evaluated and treated because it is an important contributor to pain and disability. The algorithm presented was structured to assist primary care providers in planning treatment for older adults with CLBP and insomnia. PMID:27173512

  18. Investigation of sleep disturbance in chronic low back pain: an age- and gender-matched case-control study over a 7-night period.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    van de Water, Alexander T M

    2011-12-01

    Sleep disturbance is frequently reported by people with chronic low back pain (>12 weeks; CLBP), but few studies have comprehensively investigated sleep in this population. This study investigated differences in subjectively and objectively measured sleep patterns of people with CLBP, and compared this to age- and gender matched controls. Thirty-two consenting participants (n = 16 with CLBP, n = 16 matched controls), aged 24-65 years (43.8% male) underwent an interview regarding sleep influencing variables, completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Insomnia Severity Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Diary, SF36-v2, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Oswestry Disability Index, Numerical Pain Rating Scales, and underwent seven consecutive nights of actigraphic measurement in the home environment. Compared to controls, people with CLBP had, on self-report measures, significantly poorer sleep quality [Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (range 0-21) mean (SD) 10.9 (4.2)], clinical insomnia [Insomnia Severity Index mean (range 0-28) 13.7 (7.6)], lower sleep efficiency, longer sleep onset latency, more time awake after sleep onset, and more awakenings during sleep (p < 0.05). However, no significant differences between groups were found on objective actigraphy (p > 0.05). The findings provide some evidence to support self-reported sleep assessment as an outcome measure in CLBP research, while further research is needed to determine the validity of objective sleep measurement in this population.

  19. Longer-term clinical and economic benefits of offering acupuncture to patients with chronic low back pain assessed as suitable for primary care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K J; Fitter, M; Brazier, J; MacPherson, H; Campbell, M; Nicholl, J P; Roman, M

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents the research protocol for a pragmatic study of the benefits of providing an acupuncture service to patients in primary care with chronic low back pain. The proposal was written in response to a call for bids from the NHS Executive's centrally funded research programme for Health Technology Assessment (HTA). The research question posed was 'Does acupuncture have long-term effectiveness in the management of pain in primary care?' The present study was designed as a collaboration between an interdisciplinary team drawn from health services researchers at the University of Sheffield, acupuncture researchers from the Foundation for Traditional Chinese Medicine in York, and practitioners from general practice and acupuncture in York. The proposal presented here was submitted in response to an invitation from the Commissioning Board following a successful outline bid. It is reproduced here, largely as submitted in January 1998, using the headings under which information was requested. We also present an appendix describing methodological alterations made to the design in response the Commissioning Board's comments on the proposal. We present it in this format to give an idea of the evolution of the design and the process by which the research proposal was shaped. The final working protocol comprises a combination of these two elements. PMID:10444912

  20. Narrowing of lumbar spinal canal predicts chronic low back pain more accurately than intervertebral disc degeneration: a magnetic resonance imaging study in young Finnish male conscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visuri, Tuomo; Ulaska, Jaana; Eskelin, Marja; Pulkkinen, Pekka

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this magnetic resonance imaging study was to evaluate the role of degenerative changes, developmental spinal stenosis, and compression of spinal nerve roots in chronic low back (CLBP) and radicular pain in Finnish conscripts. The degree of degeneration, protrusion, and herniation of the intervertebral discs and stenosis of the nerve root canals was evaluated, and the midsagittal diameter and cross-sectional area of the lumbar vertebrae canal were measured in 108 conscripts with CLBP and 90 asymptomatic controls. The midsagittal diameters at L1-L4 levels were significantly smaller in the patients with CLBP than in the controls. Moreover, degeneration of the L4/5 disc and protrusion or herniation of the L5/S1 disc and stenosis of the nerve root canals at level L5/S1 were more frequent among the CLBP patients. Multifactorial analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging findings provided a total explanatory rate of only 33%. Narrowing of the vertebral canal in the anteroposterior direction was more likely to produce CLBP and radiating pain than intervertebral disc degeneration or narrowing of the intervertebral nerve root canals. PMID:16450819

  1. Core Muscle Activity during TRX Suspension Exercises with and without Kinesiology Taping in Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: Implications for Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effects of kinesiology taping (KT and different TRX suspension workouts on the amplitude of electromyographic (EMG activity in the core muscles among people with chronic low back pain (LBP. Each participant (total n=21 was exposed to two KT conditions: no taping and taping, while performing four TRX suspension exercises: (1 hamstring curl, (2 hip abduction in plank, (3 chest press, and (4 45-degree row. Right transversus abdominis/internal oblique (TrAIO, rectus abdominis (RA, external oblique (EO, and superficial lumbar multifidus (LMF activity was recorded with surface EMG and expressed as a percentage of the EMG amplitude recorded during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the respective muscles. Hip abduction in plank increased TrAIO, RA, and LMF EMG amplitude compared with other TRX positions (P0.05. Hip abduction in plank most effectively activated abdominal muscles, whereas the hamstring curl most effectively activated the paraspinal muscles. Applying KT conferred no immediate benefits in improving the core muscle activation during TRX training in adults with chronic LBP.

  2. Prognosis of acute low back pain: design of a prospective inception cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    York John

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical guidelines generally portray acute low back pain as a benign and self-limiting condition. However, evidence about the clinical course of acute low back pain is contradictory and the risk of subsequently developing chronic low back pain remains uncertain. There are few high quality prognosis studies and none that have measured pain, disability and return to work over a 12 month period. This study aims to provide the first estimates of the one year prognosis of acute low back pain (pain of less than 2 weeks duration in patients consulting primary care practitioners. A secondary aim is to identify factors that are associated with the prognosis of low back pain. Methods/Design The study is a prospective inception cohort study. Consecutive patients consulting general medical practitioners, physiotherapists and chiropractors in the Sydney metropolitan region will complete a baseline questionnaire regarding their back pain. Subsequently these patients will be followed up by telephone 6 weeks, 3 months and 12 months after the initial consultation. Patients will be considered to have recovered from the episode of back pain if they have no pain and no limitation of activity, and have returned to pre-injury work status. Life tables will be generated to determine the one year prognosis of acute low back pain. Prognostic factors will be assessed using Cox regression. Discussion This study will provide the first estimates of the one year prognosis of acute low back pain in a representative sample of primary care patients.

  3. Auricular Point Acupressure to Manage Chronic Low Back Pain in Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hsing Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT pilot study was designed to (1 assess the feasibility and tolerability of an easily administered, auricular point acupressure (APA intervention and (2 provide an initial assessment of effect size as compared to a sham treatment. Thirty-seven subjects were randomized to receive either the real or sham APA treatment. All participants were treated once a week for 4 weeks. Self-report measures were obtained at baseline, weekly during treatment, at end-of-intervention (EOI, and at a 1-month follow-up. A dropout rate of 26% in the real APA group and 50% in the sham group was observed. The reduction in worst pain from baseline to EOI was 41% for the real and 5% for the sham group with a Cohen’s effect size of 1.22 P<0.00. Disability scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ decreased in the real group by 29% and were unchanged in the sham group (+3% P<0.00. Given the high dropout rate, results must be interpreted with caution; nevertheless, our results suggest that APA may provide an inexpensive and effective complementary approach for the management of back pain in older adults, and further study is warranted.

  4. Multidisciplinary outpatient care program for patients with chronic low back pain: design of a randomized controlled trial and cost-effectiveness study [ISRCTN28478651

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anema Johannes R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic low back pain (LBP is a major public and occupational health problem, which is associated with very high costs. Although medical costs for chronic LBP are high, most costs are related to productivity losses due to sick leave. In general, the prognosis for return to work (RTW is good but a minority of patients will be absent long-term from work. Research shows that work related problems are associated with an increase in seeking medical care and sick leave. Usual medical care of patients is however, not specifically aimed at RTW. The objective is to present the design of a randomized controlled trial, i.e. the BRIDGE-study, evaluating the effectiveness in improving RTW and cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary outpatient care program situated in both primary and outpatient care setting compared with usual clinical medical care for patients with chronic LBP. Methods/Design The design is a randomized controlled trial with an economic evaluation alongside. The study population consists of patients with chronic LBP who are completely or partially sick listed and visit an outpatient clinic of one of the participating hospitals in Amsterdam (the Netherlands. Two interventions will be compared. 1. a multidisciplinary outpatient care program consisting of a workplace intervention based on participatory ergonomics, and a graded activity program using cognitive behavioural principles. 2. usual care provided by the medical specialist, the occupational physician, the patient's general practitioner and allied health professionals. The primary outcome measure is sick leave duration until full RTW. Sick leave duration is measured monthly by self-report during one year. Data on sick leave during one-year follow-up are also requested form the employers. Secondary outcome measures are pain intensity, functional status, pain coping, patient satisfaction and quality of life. Outcome measures are assessed before randomization and 3, 6

  5. Rehabilitation of the athlete with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standaert, Christopher J; Herring, Stanley A; Pratt, Todd W

    2004-02-01

    The rehabilitation of athletes with low back pain should be considered an essential component of their care. Comprehensive rehabilitation begins at the time of acute injury and encompasses the period of acute care through sport-specific training and return to competition. Rehabilitation of athletes with spinal pain should include a thorough psychosocial evaluation to identify potential barriers to clinical improvement. For athletes with low back pain, establishing effective core stability is central to optimizing the functional performance of the athlete. PMID:14728912

  6. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Klekot, Dominika; Zimny, Anna; Czapiga, Bogdan; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. Case Report: The authors describe a case of...

  7. Development and validation of a questionnaire assessing volitional competencies to enhance the performance of physical activities in chronic low back pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duplan Bernard

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Motivation has long been emphasized as the most important determinant of action. However, there is a substantial gap between people's goals and their attainment. Patients may be motivated and yet unable to take action if their volitional competencies are insufficient. One of the important tasks of volition is goal-maintenance. Research has stressed the importance of a volitional tool, the implementation intentions. Implementation intentions indicate where, when, and how the action leading to the goal will be performed. Forming implementation intentions favours the execution of goal-directed efforts, and reinforces the relationship between intentions and behaviours. Results from various studies clearly suggest that volitional competencies and implementation intentions could play a role in low back pain (LBP patients. However, there is at present no questionnaire allowing assessing the capacity of implementation intentions of physical activities in LBP patients. Methods/Design This study will develop such a questionnaire, using a 3-step approach. A first qualitative step to build categories and generate items; 30 patients suffering chronic LBP will be invited to participate in semi-structured interviews; verbatim and derived items will then be submitted to a panel of experts, using a Delphi method; a second quantitative step to examine the properties of items, and determine the factorial structure of the questionnaire; 100 patients suffering chronic LBP will be recruited to respond to this phase; and third, preliminary psychometric analyses (item-scale correlations, construct validity, reliability; 180 chronic LBP patients will be recruited for this phase of the study. The relationships between implementation intentions and variables affecting physical activity on chronic LBP patients, i.e. pain, physical capacities, fear-avoidance beliefs, kinesiophobia, work status, and level of physical activity will be considered

  8. Low back pain across the life course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunn, Kate M; Hestbæk, Lise; Cassidy, J David

    2013-01-01

    Back pain episodes are traditionally regarded as individual events, but this model is currently being challenged in favour of treating back pain as a long-term or lifelong condition. Back pain can be present throughout life, from childhood to older age, and evidence is mounting that pain experience...... is maintained over long periods: for example, people with pain continue to have it on and off for years, and people without pain do not suddenly develop long-term pain. A number of factors predict back pain presence in epidemiological studies, and these are often present, and predictive, at different...... life stages. There are also factors present at particular life stages, such as childhood or adolescence, which predict back pain in adulthood. However, there are little published data on long-term pain patterns or predictors over the life course. Such studies could improve our understanding of the...

  9. Evaluation of influence of stretching therapy and ergonomic factors on postural control in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Gawda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction and objectives. [/b]The vertical orientation of the body in the upright standing position is maintained by keeping the body’s centre of gravity (COG upright, above the base of support, by a dynamic interplay of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory control systems. The objectives of this study were: to compare the postural control strategy between people with and without low back pain (LBP, to estimate the influence of the stretching therapy on the postural control strategy, and to discover the relationship between the restriction of spine mobility and occurrence of some ergonomic factors. [b]Materials and methods.[/b] The study consisted of 32 patients with LBP and 25 healthy controls. Postural characteristics of the subjects were measured with the use of a computerized force platform. The software programme filters and measures COG sway velocity in different conditions. Additional measurements and tests were conducted in patients after stretching therapy. Based on survey research, all individuals were selected and evaluated from the aspect of ergonomics. [b]Results[/b]. The results of the COG sway velocity vary under the testing conditions. From the aspect of ergonomic attitude and influence of the rehabilitation, results varied in the groups. [b]Conclusions[/b]. Ergonomic factors are often accompanied by the appearance of LBP. The restrictions within the musculoskeletal system cause disorders in muscle synergies, which is expressed by an increase in the angular velocity of the COG. In patients with chronic back pain syndrome, selected stretching therapy techniques improves the range of motion of the spine and reduces pain.

  10. The effect of continuous ultrasound on chronic non-specific low back pain: a single blind placebo-controlled randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebadi Safoora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders around the world including Iran. One of the most widely used modalities in the field of physiotherapy is therapeutic ultrasound (US. Despite its common use, there is still inconclusive evidence to support its effectiveness in patients with NSCLBP. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of continuous US compared with placebo US additional to exercise therapy for patients with NSCLBP. Methods In this single blind placebo controlled study, 50 patients with NSCLBP were randomized into two treatment groups: 1 continuous US (1 MHz &1.5 W/cm2 plus exercise 2 placebo US plus exercise. Patients received treatments for 4 weeks, 10 treatment sessions, 3 times per week, every other day. Treatment effects were assessed in terms of primary outcome measures: 1 functional disability, measured by Functional Rating Index, and 2 global pain, measured by a visual analog scale. Secondary outcome measures were lumbar flexion and extension range of motion (ROM, endurance time and rate of decline in median frequency of electromyography spectrum during a Biering Sorensen test. All outcome variables were measured before, after treatment, and after one-month follow-up. An intention to treat analysis was performed. Main effects of Time and Group as well as their interaction effect on outcome measures were investigated using repeated measure ANOVA. Results Analysis showed that both groups had improved regarding function (FRI and global pain (VAS (P .05. Improvement in function and lumbar ROM as well as endurance time were significantly greater in the group receiving continuous US (P Conclusions The study showed that adding continuous US to a semi supervised exercise program significantly improved function, lumbar ROM and endurance time. Further studies including a third group of only exercise and no US can establish the possible effects of

  11. Clinical examination findings as prognostic factors in low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Kongsted, Alice; Hestbaek, Lise

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a strong tradition of performing a clinical examination of low back pain (LBP) patients and this is generally recommended in guidelines. However, establishing a pathoanatomic diagnosis does not seem possible in most LBP patients and clinical tests may potentially be more...... relevant as prognostic factors. The aim of this review of the literature was to systematically assess the association between low-tech clinical tests commonly used in adult patients with acute, recurrent or chronic LBP and short- and long-term outcome. METHODS: MEDLINE, Embase, and MANTIS were searched...... from inception to June 2012. Prospective clinical studies of adult patients with LBP with or without leg pain and/or signs of nerve root involvement or spinal stenosis, receiving non-surgical or no treatment, which investigated the association between low-tech clinical tests and outcome were included...

  12. A surface electromyography based objective method to identify patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain, presenting a flexion related movement control impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Benedicte; Stevens, Veerle; Perneel, Christiaan; Van Tiggelen, Damien; Neyens, Ellen; Duvigneaud, Nathalie; Moerman, Luc; Danneels, Lieven

    2014-12-01

    Movement control impairments (MCI) are often present in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (NS-CLBP). Therefore, movement control exercises are widely used to rehabilitate patients. However, the objective assessment remains difficult. The purpose of this study was to develop a statistical model, based on logistic regression analysis, to differentiate patients with NS-CLBP presenting a flexion-related MCI from healthy subjects. This model is based on trunk muscle activation patterns measured by surface electromyography (sEMG), during movement control exercises. Sixty-three healthy male subjects and 36 male patients with a flexion-related MCI participated in this study. Muscle activity of the internal obliques, the external obliques, the lumbar multifidus and the thoracic part of the iliocostalis was registered. Ratios of deep stabilizing to superficial torque producing muscle activity were calculated to examine trunk muscle recruitment patterns during 6 different exercises. Logistic regression analyses were performed (1) to define the ratios and exercises that were most discriminating between patients and non-patients, (2) to make a predictive model. K-Fold cross-validation was used to assess the performance of the predictive model. This study demonstrated that sEMG trunk muscle recruitment patterns during movement control tests, allows differentiating NSCLBP patients with a flexion-related MCI from healthy subjects. PMID:25304196

  13. Determining the reliability of a custom built seated stadiometry set-up for measuring spinal height in participants with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, James; Bruce-Low, Stewart; Smith, Dave; Jessop, David; Osborne, Neil

    2016-03-01

    Indirect measurement of disc hydration can be obtained through measures of spinal height using stadiometry. However, specialised stadiometers for this are often custom-built and expensive. Generic wall-mounted stadiometers alternatively are common in clinics and laboratories. This study examined the reliability of a custom set-up utilising a wall-mounted stadiometer for measurement of spinal height using custom built wall mounted postural rods. Twelve participants with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP; females n = 5, males n = 7) underwent measurement of spinal height on three separate consecutive days at the same time of day where 10 measurements were taken at 20 s intervals. Comparisons were made using repeated measures analysis of variance for 'trial' and 'gender'. There were no significant effects by trial or interaction effects of trial x gender. Intra-individual absolute standard error of measurement (SEM) was calculated for spinal height using the first of the 10 measures, the average of 10 measures, the total shrinkage, and the rate of shrinkage across the 10 measures examined as the slope of the curve when a linear regression was fitted. SEMs were 3.1 mm, 2.8 mm, 2.6 mm and 0.212, respectively. Absence of significant differences between trials and the reported SEMs suggests this custom set-up for measuring spinal height changes is suitable use as an outcome measure in either research or clinical practice in participants with CLBP. PMID:26493099

  14. Study protocol: Transition from localized low back pain to chronic widespread pain in general practice: Identification of risk factors, preventive factors and key elements for treatment – A cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viniol Annika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic localized pain syndromes, especially chronic low back pain (CLBP, are common reasons for consultation in general practice. In some cases chronic localized pain syndromes can appear in combination with chronic widespread pain (CWP. Numerous studies have shown a strong association between CWP and several physical and psychological factors. These studies are population-based cross-sectional and do not allow for assessing chronology. There are very few prospective studies that explore the predictors for the onset of CWP, where the main focus is identifying risk factors for the CWP incidence. Until now there have been no studies focusing on preventive factors keeping patients from developing CWP. Our aim is to perform a cross sectional study on the epidemiology of CLBP and CWP in general practice and to look for distinctive features regarding resources like resilience, self-efficacy and coping strategies. A subsequent cohort study is designed to identify the risk and protective factors of pain generalization (development of CWP in primary care for CLBP patients. Methods/Design Fifty-nine general practitioners recruit consecutively, during a 5 month period, all patients who are consulting their family doctor because of chronic low back pain (where the pain is lasted for 3 months. Patients are asked to fill out a questionnaire on pain anamnesis, pain-perception, co-morbidities, therapy course, medication, socio demographic data and psychosomatic symptoms. We assess resilience, coping resources, stress management and self-efficacy as potential protective factors for pain generalization. Furthermore, we raise risk factors for pain generalization like anxiety, depression, trauma and critical life events. During a twelve months follow up period a cohort of CLBP patients without CWP will be screened on a regular basis (3 monthly for pain generalization (outcome: incident CWP. Discussion This cohort study will be the largest

  15. Meningoradiculitis due to borreliosis presenting as low back pain only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a child with Borrelia burgdorferi meningoradiculitis. This entity, also known as Bannwarth syndrome, is rare and its presentation with low back pain only is even more unusual. The MRI findings can suggest the diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Does going to an amusement park alleviate low back pain? A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakakibara T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Toshihiko Sakakibara, Zhuo Wang, Yuichi KasaiDepartment of Spinal Surgery and Medical Engineering, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu City, Mie Prefecture, JapanBackground: Low back pain is often called nonspecific pain. In this type of low back pain, various emotions and stress are known to strongly affect pain perception. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the degree of low back pain changes in people with chronic mild low back pain when they are inside and outside of an amusement park where people are supposed to have physical and psychological enjoyment.Methods: The subjects were 23 volunteers (13 males and 10 females aged 18 to 46 years old with a mean age of 24.0 years who had chronic low back pain. Visual analog scale (VAS scores of low back pain and salivary amylase levels (kIU/L of all subjects were measured at five time points: immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park; 10 minutes, 1 hour (immediately after boarding the roller coaster, and 3 hours (immediately after exiting the haunted house after arriving at the amusement park; and immediately before getting off the bus returning from the park.Results: The three VAS values in the amusement park (10 minutes, 1 hour, and 3 hours after arriving at the amusement park measured were significantly lower (P < 0.05 when compared with the other two values measured immediately after getting on the bus heading for the amusement park and immediately before getting off the return bus. In salivary amylase levels, there were no statistically significant differences among the values measured at the five time points.Conclusion: Low back pain was significantly alleviated when the subjects were in the amusement park, which demonstrated that enjoyable activities, though temporarily, alleviated their low back pain.Keywords: low back pain, emotion, salivary alpha-amylase activity, enjoyment activities, psychological stress

  17. Sacral insufficiency fractures: an unsuspected cause of low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, B; Shah, N; Brown, H; Gordon, T E; Tanqueray, A B; Mellor, J A

    1998-07-01

    We describe 10 cases of sacral fractures diagnosed within the rheumatology department at Southend Hospital over the last 5 yr. All presented with sudden-onset low back pain. The majority were elderly, frail, with chronic inflammatory disease (six with rheumatoid arthritis, one with polymyalgia rheumatica, one with vasculitis) and had received steroids. Diagnosis was delayed by the inability of plain radiographs to show these fractures and was ultimately demonstrated by technetium scintigraphy/computed tomography scan. We feel that this diagnosis should be considered in elderly patients with rheumatoid arthritis or other risk factors for osteoporosis who present with low back pain and sacral tenderness. Further clues may be parasymphyseal tenderness (suggesting associated pubic ramus fracture), elevated alkaline phosphatase and plain radiograph showing pubic ramus fractures or parasymphyseal sclerosis. Patients with this complication generally have a poor prognosis and two of our patients have died. Seven required in-patient stay (mean 20 days; range 14-41). The mortality, morbidity and costs incurred in management may be comparable to those of femoral neck fractures. PMID:9714359

  18. Trunk fatigue profile and low back pain in tennis players

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, José Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Mestrado em Ciências da Fisioterapia Introduction The trunk plays an important role in tennis strokes. Its asymmetric muscle activation, coupled with the high repeatability of the sport, places tennis players at risk for injuries such as low back pain. Objectives This study aimed to present a trunk fatigue profile in tennis players and verify its association with low back pain (LBP). Material and Methods 35 tennis players completed an isometric trunk endurance protocol co...

  19. Lumbar internal disc derangement in patients with chronic low back pain: diagnostic value of the MR imaging findings as compared with provoked discography as the standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of the MR imaging findings with provoked discography used as the standard for painful lumbar disc derangement. Two hundred patients (412 discs), (age rang: 21-77 year), with chronic low back pain underwent MRI and provoked discography. We evaluated the MRI T2-WI findings such as disc degeneration, high-Intensity zones and endplate abnormalities. Subsequently, provocative discography was independently performed with using MR imaging, and a painful disc was defined when moderate to severe and concordant pain was provoked. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the MRI findings with using provoked discography as the standard. 400 discs showed abnormal findings such as disc degeneration, HIZ and endplate abnormalities on the T2-WI images. 12 discs showed normal finding. HIZ or endplate abnormalities were always combined with disc degeneration. The prevalence of each findings were disc degeneration (400 discs: 97.1%), HIZ (111 discs: 26.9%), type I endplate abnormalities (34 discs: 8.3%), type II endplate abnormalities (75 discs: 18.2%), the combined findings of HIZ and type I endplate abnormalities (2 discs: 0.5%) and the combined findings of HIZ and type II endplate abnormalities (7 discs: 1.7%). The disc degeneration showed high sensitivity (99.5%) and low specificity (5.0%), so only the NPV (91.7%) was significant, and not the PPV (47.8%). Each findings of HIZ (sensitivity, 36.5%, specificity, 81.4%; PPV, 63.18%; NPV, 59.5%), type I endplate abnormalities (11.0%, 94.1%, 61.8% and 54.8%, respectively), type II endplate abnormalities (19.8%, 83.2%, 50.7% and 54.3%, respectively), the combined findings of HIZ and type I endplate abnormalities (0.5%, 99.6%, 50.0% and 53.4%, respectively) and the combined findings of HIZ and type II endplate abnormalities (26.0%, 99.1%, 71.4% and 53.8%, respectively) show high specificity, but low

  20. Lumbar internal disc derangement in patients with chronic low back pain: diagnostic value of the MR imaging findings as compared with provoked discography as the standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyeon Seon; Park, Jee Young; Lee, Sang Ho; Ahn, Yong [Wooridul spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Yeun [Puchon Daesung Hospital, Puchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of the MR imaging findings with provoked discography used as the standard for painful lumbar disc derangement. Two hundred patients (412 discs), (age rang: 21-77 year), with chronic low back pain underwent MRI and provoked discography. We evaluated the MRI T2-WI findings such as disc degeneration, high-Intensity zones and endplate abnormalities. Subsequently, provocative discography was independently performed with using MR imaging, and a painful disc was defined when moderate to severe and concordant pain was provoked. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the MRI findings with using provoked discography as the standard. 400 discs showed abnormal findings such as disc degeneration, HIZ and endplate abnormalities on the T2-WI images. 12 discs showed normal finding. HIZ or endplate abnormalities were always combined with disc degeneration. The prevalence of each findings were disc degeneration (400 discs: 97.1%), HIZ (111 discs: 26.9%), type I endplate abnormalities (34 discs: 8.3%), type II endplate abnormalities (75 discs: 18.2%), the combined findings of HIZ and type I endplate abnormalities (2 discs: 0.5%) and the combined findings of HIZ and type II endplate abnormalities (7 discs: 1.7%). The disc degeneration showed high sensitivity (99.5%) and low specificity (5.0%), so only the NPV (91.7%) was significant, and not the PPV (47.8%). Each findings of HIZ (sensitivity, 36.5%, specificity, 81.4%; PPV, 63.18%; NPV, 59.5%), type I endplate abnormalities (11.0%, 94.1%, 61.8% and 54.8%, respectively), type II endplate abnormalities (19.8%, 83.2%, 50.7% and 54.3%, respectively), the combined findings of HIZ and type I endplate abnormalities (0.5%, 99.6%, 50.0% and 53.4%, respectively) and the combined findings of HIZ and type II endplate abnormalities (26.0%, 99.1%, 71.4% and 53.8%, respectively) show high specificity, but low

  1. Incomplete reporting of baseline characteristics in clinical trials: an analysis of randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews involving patients with chronic low back pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M Wertli

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reporting of relevant prognostic information in a sample of randomized controlled trials (RCTs that investigated treatments for patients with chronic low back pain (LBP. We also analysed how researchers conducting the meta-analyses and systematic reviews addressed the reporting of relevant prognostic information in RCTs. METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Database to identify systematic reviews that investigated non-surgical treatments for patients with chronic LBP. The reported prognostic information was then extracted from the RCTs included in the reviews. We used a purpose-defined score to assess the quantity of information reported in the RCTs. We also determined how the authors of systematic reviews addressed the question of comparability of patient populations between RCTs. RESULTS: Six systematic reviews met our inclusion criteria, and we analysed 84 RCTs. Based on the scores, the reporting of important prognostic variables was incomplete in almost half of the 84 RCTs. Information regarding patients' general health, social support, and work-related conditions was rarely reported. Almost half of the studies included in one of the meta-analyses provided insufficient information that did not allow us to determine whether patients in the primary trials were comparable. CONCLUSIONS: Missing prognostic information potentially threatens the external validity (i.e. the generalizability or applicability not only of primary studies but also of systematic reviews that investigate treatments for LBP. A detailed description of baseline patient characteristics that includes prognostic information is needed in all RCTs to ensure that clinicians can determine the applicability of the study or review results to their patients.

  2. Long-term effects of interprofessional biopsychosocial rehabilitation for adults with chronic non-specific low back pain: a multicentre, quasi-experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Semrau

    Full Text Available Improvement of the long-term effectiveness of multidisciplinary ortho-paedic rehabilitation (MOR in the management of chronic non-specific low back pain (CLBP remains a central issue for health care in Germany. We developed an interprofessional and interdisciplinary, biopsychosocial rehabilitation concept named "PASTOR" to promote self-management in adults with CLBP and compared its effectiveness with the current model of MOR.A multicentre quasi-experimental study with three measurement time points was implemented. 680 adults aged 18 to 65 with CLBP were assed for eligibil-ity in three inpatient rehabilitation centres in Germany. At first the effects of the MOR, with a total extent of 48 hours (control group, were assessed. Thereafter, PASTOR was implemented and evaluated in the same centres (intervention group. It consisted of six interprofessional modules, which were provided on 12 days in fixed groups, with a total extent of 48 hours. Participants were assessed with self-report measures at baseline, discharge, and 12 months for functional ability (primary outcome using the Hannover Functional Ability Questionnaire (FFbH-R and vari-ous secondary outcomes (e.g. pain, health status, physical activity, pain coping, pain-related cognitions.In total 536 participants were consecutively assigned to PASTOR (n=266 or MOR (n=270. At 12 months, complete data of 368 participants was available. The adjusted between-group difference in the FFbH-R at 12 months was 6.58 (95% CI 3.38 to 9.78 using complete data and 3.56 (95% CI 0.45 to 6.67 using available da-ta, corresponding to significant small-to-medium effect sizes of d=0.42 (p<0.001 and d=0.10 (p=0.025 in favour of PASTOR. Further improvements in secondary out-comes were also observed in favour of PASTOR.The interprofessional and interdisciplinary, biopsychosocial rehabilita-tion program PASTOR shows some improvements of the long-term effectiveness of inpatient rehabilitation in the management of adults

  3. Does an online psychological intervention improve self-efficacy and disability in people also receiving Multimodal Manual Therapy for chronic low back pain compared to Multimodal Manual Therapy alone? Design of a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Petrozzi, M. John; Leaver, Andrew; Jones, Mairwen K.; Ferreira, Paulo H; Rubinstein, Sidney M.; Mackey, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Various interventions are available for the treatment of chronic low back pain (LBP), including Manual Therapy and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the addition of an internet-based CBT program leads to better outcomes in patients who are treated with multimodal manual therapy for chronic LBP. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial comparing a combined intervention, consisting of internet-based CBT utilising MoodGYM plus mu...

  4. Fear-avoidance beliefs and pain avoidance in low back pain--translating research into clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainville, James; Smeets, Rob J E M; Bendix, Tom; Tveito, Torill H; Poiraudeau, Serge; Indahl, Aage J

    2011-01-01

    For patients with low back pain, fear-avoidance beliefs (FABs) represent cognitions and emotions that underpin concerns and fears about the potential for physical activities to produce pain and further harm to the spine. Excessive FABs result in heightened disability and are an obstacle for recov...... recovery from acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain.......For patients with low back pain, fear-avoidance beliefs (FABs) represent cognitions and emotions that underpin concerns and fears about the potential for physical activities to produce pain and further harm to the spine. Excessive FABs result in heightened disability and are an obstacle for...

  5. Mindfulness-based stress reduction for low back pain. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cramer Holger

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR is frequently used for pain conditions. While systematic reviews on MBSR for chronic pain have been conducted, there are no reviews for specific pain conditions. Therefore a systematic review of the effectiveness of MBSR in low back pain was performed. Methods MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CAMBASE, and PsycInfo were screened through November 2011. The search strategy combined keywords for MBSR with keywords for low back pain. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing MBSR to control conditions in patients with low back pain were included. Two authors independently assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Clinical importance of group differences was assessed for the main outcome measures pain intensity and back-specific disability. Results Three RCTs with a total of 117 chronic low back pain patients were included. One RCT on failed back surgery syndrome reported significant and clinically important short-term improvements in pain intensity and disability for MBSR compared to no treatment. Two RCTs on older adults (age ≥ 65 years with chronic specific or non-specific low back pain reported no short-term or long-term improvements in pain or disability for MBSR compared to no treatment or health education. Two RCTs reported larger short-term improvements of pain acceptance for MBSR compared to no treatment. Conclusion This review found inconclusive evidence of effectiveness of MBSR in improving pain intensity or disability in chronic low back pain patients. However, there is limited evidence that MBSR can improve pain acceptance. Further RCTs with larger sample sizes, adequate control interventions, and longer follow-ups are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

  6. Low back pain in cycling: does it matter how you sit?

    OpenAIRE

    Van Hoof, Wannes; Volkaerts, Koen; O'Sullivan, Kieran; Malfait, Bart; Verschueren, Sabine; Dankaerts, Wim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low Back Pain (LBP) is a common problem among cyclists, although studies investigating LBP during cycling are scarce. Most studies have focused on LBP and geometric bike-related variables. Until now no cycling field studies have investigated the relationship between maladaptive lumbar kinematics and LBP during cycling. OBJECTIVE: To examine lower lumbar kinematics in cyclists with and without non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). DESIGN: Cross-sectional cycling field study....

  7. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. The authors describe a case of a 53-year-old woman who was repeatedly hospitalized during a five-month period because of an acute, severe low back pain, with sphincter dysfunction, partially resembling sciatic symptoms. Physical examinations revealed also focal tenderness in the area of the lumbar spine. Inflammatory markers (ESR – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP – C-reactive protein) were elevated. Conservative analgetic treatment brought only partial and temporary relief of the pain and symptoms. The final accurate diagnosis of isolated septic facet joint arthritis at the level of L5/S1 was established after several months from the onset of the first symptoms, after performing various imaging examinations, including bone scintigraphy as well as CT and MRI of the lumbosacral spine. The patient fully recovered after antibiotic therapy and surgery, which was proven in several follow-up examinations showing no relevant pathology of the lumbar spine. The authors broadly describe the etiology and clinical symptoms of the septic facet joint arthritis as well as the significant role of imaging methods, especially MRI, in diagnostic process. The authors also discuss currently available treatment options, both conservative and surgical. The diagnostic procedure of septic facet joint arthritis requires several steps to be taken. Establishing a correct diagnosis may be difficult, that is why it is important to remember about rare causes of low back pain and to perform detailed physical examination, laboratory tests and choose appropriate

  8. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klekot, Dominika; Zimny, Anna; Czapiga, Bogdan; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. Case Report: The authors describe a case of a 53-year-old woman who was repeatedly hospitalized during a five-month period because of an acute, severe low back pain, with sphincter dysfunction, partially resembling sciatic symptoms. Physical examinations revealed also focal tenderness in the area of the lumbar spine. Inflammatory markers (ESR – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP – C-reactive protein) were elevated. Conservative analgetic treatment brought only partial and temporary relief of the pain and symptoms. The final accurate diagnosis of isolated septic facet joint arthritis at the level of L5/S1 was established after several months from the onset of the first symptoms, after performing various imaging examinations, including bone scintigraphy as well as CT and MRI of the lumbosacral spine. The patient fully recovered after antibiotic therapy and surgery, which was proven in several follow-up examinations showing no relevant pathology of the lumbar spine. The authors broadly describe the etiology and clinical symptoms of the septic facet joint arthritis as well as the significant role of imaging methods, especially MRI, in diagnostic process. The authors also discuss currently available treatment options, both conservative and surgical. Conclusions: The diagnostic procedure of septic facet joint arthritis requires several steps to be taken. Establishing a correct diagnosis may be difficult, that is why it is important to remember about rare causes of low back pain and to perform detailed physical

  9. Physiotherapy informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (PACT): protocol for a randomised controlled trial of PACT versus usual physiotherapy care for adults with chronic low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Emma; Galea Holmes, Melissa; Wileman, Vari; McCracken, Lance; Moss-Morris, Rona; Pallet, John; Sanders, Duncan; Barcellona, Massimo; Critchley, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a common condition and source of significant suffering, disability and healthcare costs. Current physiotherapy treatment is moderately effective. Combining theory-based psychological methods with physiotherapy could improve outcomes for people with CLBP. The primary aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the efficacy of Physiotherapy informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (PACT) on functioning in patients with CLBP. Methods and analysis The PACT trial is a two-armed, parallel-group, multicentre RCT to assess the efficacy of PACT in comparison with usual physiotherapy care (UC). 240 patients referred to physiotherapy with CLBP will be recruited from three National Health Service (NHS) hospitals trusts. Inclusion criteria are: age ≥18 years, CLBP ≥12-week duration, scoring ≥3 points on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and adequate understanding of spoken and written English to participate. Patients will be randomised to PACT or UC (120 per arm stratified by centre) by an independent randomisation service and followed up at 3 and 12 months post randomisation. The sample size of 240 will provide adequate power to detect a standardised mean difference of 0.40 in the primary outcome (RMDQ; 5% significance, 80% power) assuming attrition of 20%. Analysis will be by intention to treat conducted by the trial statistician, blind to treatment group, following a prespecified analysis plan. Estimates of treatment effect at the follow-up assessments will use an intention-to-treat framework, implemented using a linear mixed-effects model. Ethics and dissemination This trial has full ethical approval (14/SC/0277). It will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The results will enable clinicians, patients and health service managers to make informed decisions regarding the efficacy of PACT for patients with CLBP. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  10. The intra- and inter-observer reliability of a novel protocol for two-point discrimination in individuals with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenbrusthoff, K; Ryan, C G; Grüneberg, C; Wolf, U; Krenz, D; Atkinson, G; Martin, D J

    2016-07-01

    Two-point discrimination is measured as an indicator of cortical reorganisation in musculoskeletal medicine. Nevertheless, data are lacking for the reliability of this measure in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). We aimed to quantify the intra- and inter-observer reliability of a novel protocol for measuring two-point discrimination in these patients. 35 participants (12 males, 23 females, mean age 52, SD 15 years) with NSCLBP were recruited. Three clinicians made 14 consecutive measurements of two-point discrimination with callipers. One of these clinicians repeated the assessment protocol within 7 d. During each measurement, the calliper width was widened in 5 mm increments until participants could consistently identify two points. Intra- and inter-observer agreement was quantified using mean difference, within-subject SD and limits of agreement (LOA). After using the first measurement for familiarisation, the mean of measurements 2-5 within an assessment resulted in the optimum compromise between clinic time constraints and acceptable intra-observer reliability; the within-subjects SD being 7.5 mm (LOA: 20.8 mm). Inter-observer reliability was generally poorer; requiring the mean of measurements 2-9 within an assessment for a similar within-subjects SD of 8.6 mm (LOA: 23.7 mm). It was estimated that these within-subjects SDs were small enough for a clinically-important change to be detected with a feasible sample size in future studies. The intra-observer reliability of our assessment protocol is acceptable for detecting a clinically relevant difference in two-point discrimination for future research purposes. Nevertheless, individual patient measurement variability is relatively high, especially between different clinicians. PMID:27321473

  11. Effectiveness of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic low back pain: Design, method and protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Luedtke Kerstin; Rushton Alison; Wright Christine; Juergens Tim P; Mueller Gerd; May Arne

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Electrical stimulation of central nervous system areas with surgically implanted stimulators has been shown to result in pain relief. To avoid the risks and side effects of surgery, transcranial direct current stimulation is an option to electrically stimulate the motor cortex through the skull. Previous research has shown that transcranial direct current stimulation relieves pain in patients with fibromyalgia, chronic neuropathic pain and chronic pelvic pain. Evidence ind...

  12. Neuroscience education in addition to trigger point dry needling for the management of patients with mechanical chronic low back pain: A preliminary clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez-García, Mario; de-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana I; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Palacios-Ceña, Maria; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the short-term effects of trigger point dry needling (TrP-DN) alone or combined with neuroscience education on pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical low back pain (LBP). Twelve patients with LBP were randomly assigned to receive either TrP-DN (TrP-DN) or TrP-DN plus neuroscience education (TrP-DN + EDU). Pain intensity (Numerical Pain Rating Scale, 0-10), disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire-RMQ-, Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index-ODI), kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia-TSK), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, transverse process of L3 vertebra, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle were collected at baseline and 1-week after the intervention. Patients treated with TrP-DN + EDU experienced a significantly greater reduction of kinesiophobia (P = 0.008) and greater increases in PPT over the transverse process of L3 (P = 0.049) than those patients treated only with TrP-DN. Both groups experienced similar decreases in pain, ODI and RMQ, and similar increases in PPT over the C5/C6 joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior after the intervention (all, P > 0.05). The results suggest that TrP-DN was effective for improving pain, disability, kinesiophobia and widespread pressure sensitivity in patients with mechanical LBP at short-term. The inclusion of a neuroscience educational program resulted in a greater improvement in kinesiophobia. PMID:26118519

  13. Dor, cinesiofobia e qualidade de Vida em pacientes com lombalgia crônica e depressão Pain, kinesiophobia and quality of life in chronic low back pain and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Sarmento Antunes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever características de dor, cinesiofobia e qualidade de vida em pacientes com lombalgia crônica associada a depressão. MÉTODOS: Estudo de delineamento transversal em que foram incluídos 193 indivíduos com lombalgia crônica. A presença de depressão foi determinada pelo Inventário de Depressão de Beck, a partir de ponto de corte validado pela Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. A intensidade e a qualidade da dor nos grupos com e sem depressão foram avaliadas pelo Questionário McGill. A Escala Tampa para Cinesiofobia foi aplicada para avaliar medo do movimento. Com relação à qualidade de vida, utilizou-se o Medical Outcomes Study 36. O nível de significância estatístico estabelecido foi pOBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of pain, kinesiophobia and quality of life in patients with chronic low back pain and depression. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in which 193 individuals with chronic low back pain were included. The presence of depression was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory, using a cutoff validated by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The intensity and quality of pain in the groups with and without depression were assessed by the McGill Questionnaire. The Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia was applied to assess fear of movement. With respect to quality of life, the Medical Outcomes Study 36 was used. The statistical significance level was set at p <0.05. RESULTS: The prevalence of depression was 32.1%. The group with depression had worse scores in relation to pain, kinesiophobia and quality of life (physical functioning, rolephysical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health. CONCLUSION: Patients with low back pain and depression had higher pain intensity, greater fear of movement and poorer quality of life. Level of Evidence III, Cross-sectional.

  14. An integrated care program to prevent work disability due to chronic low back pain: a process evaluation within a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Mechelen Willem

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decade, a considerable amount of research has been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of innovative low back pain (LBP interventions. Although some interventions proved to be effective, they are not always applied in daily practice. To successfully implement an innovative program it is important to identify barriers and facilitators in order to change practice routine. Because usual care is not directly aimed at return to work (RTW, we evaluated an integrated care program, combining a patient-directed and a workplace-directed intervention provided by a multidisciplinary team, including a clinical occupational physician to reduce occupational disability in chronic LBP patients. The aims of this study were to describe the feasibility of the implementation of the integrated care program, to assess the satisfaction and expectations of the involved stakeholders and to describe the needs for improvement of the program. Methods Eligible for this study were patients who had been on sick leave due to chronic LBP. Data were collected from the patients, their supervisors and the involved health care professionals, by means of questionnaires and structured charts, during 3-month follow-up. Implementation, satisfaction and expectations were investigated. Results Of the 40 patients who were eligible to participate in the integrated care program, 37 patients, their supervisors and the health care professionals actually participated in the intervention. Adherence to the integrated care program was in accordance with the protocol, and the patients, their supervisors and the health care professionals were (very satisfied with the program. The role of the clinical occupational physician was of additional value in the RTW process. Time-investment was the only barrier for implementation reported by the multidisciplinary team. Conclusion The implementation of this program will not be influenced by any flaws in its application

  15. Low back pain post partum - A case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-23

    Sacral stress fracture is an unusual source of low back pain and can be easily confused with a number of other clinical conditions seen in physiotherapy clinics. The purpose of this case report is to describe the case of a patient presenting with low back pain post partum illustrating pertinent aspects of differential diagnosis and issues of management. A 31 year old female presented complaining of low back pain since the birth of her second child 11 months earlier. Subjective and objective examination led the Therapist to consider a diagnosis of sacral stress fracture. This diagnosis was confirmed by MRI. Three months after presenting to physiotherapy the patient was pain free and had returned to all aspects of her daily life without any difficulties. Clinicians must be aware of the less common pathologies in any hypotheses development. A careful history and physical examination and broad hypotheses generation will ensure that patients are accurately diagnosed and receive appropriate and effective treatments.

  16. Medial branch neurotomy in low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency medial branch dorsal ramus neurotomy in patients with facet joint syndrome. From January 2008 to April 2010, 92 patients with facet joint syndrome diagnosed by strict inclusion criteria and controlled diagnostic blocks undergone medial branch neurotomy. We did not exclude patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Electrodes (20G) with 5-mm active tip were placed under fluoroscopy guide parallel to medial branch. Patients were followed up by physical examination and by Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index at 1, 6, and 12 months. In all cases, pain improvement was statistically significant and so quality of life. Three non-FBSS patients had to undergo a second neurotomy because of non-satisfactory pain decrease. Complications were reported in no case. Medial branch radiofrequency neurotomy has confirmed its well-established effectiveness in pain and quality of life improvement as long as strict inclusion criteria be fulfilled and nerve ablation be accomplished by parallel electrode positioning. This statement can be extended also to FBSS patients. (orig.)

  17. Medial branch neurotomy in low back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masala, Salvatore; Mammucari, Matteo; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Rome (Italy); Nano, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Rome (Italy); University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Marcia, Stefano [S. Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Cagliari (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of pulsed radiofrequency medial branch dorsal ramus neurotomy in patients with facet joint syndrome. From January 2008 to April 2010, 92 patients with facet joint syndrome diagnosed by strict inclusion criteria and controlled diagnostic blocks undergone medial branch neurotomy. We did not exclude patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Electrodes (20G) with 5-mm active tip were placed under fluoroscopy guide parallel to medial branch. Patients were followed up by physical examination and by Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index at 1, 6, and 12 months. In all cases, pain improvement was statistically significant and so quality of life. Three non-FBSS patients had to undergo a second neurotomy because of non-satisfactory pain decrease. Complications were reported in no case. Medial branch radiofrequency neurotomy has confirmed its well-established effectiveness in pain and quality of life improvement as long as strict inclusion criteria be fulfilled and nerve ablation be accomplished by parallel electrode positioning. This statement can be extended also to FBSS patients. (orig.)

  18. Minimally Invasive Microendoscopic Resection of the Transverse Process for Treatment of Low Back Pain with Bertolotti’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Takata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bertolotti’s syndrome is characterized by anomalous enlargement of the transverse process of the most caudal lumbar segment, causing chronic and persistent low back pain or sciatica. We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with left sciatic pain and low back pain due to a recurrent lumbar disc herniation at L4-5 with Bertolotti’s syndrome. Selective L5 nerve root block and local injection of lidocaine into the articulation between the transverse process and sacral ala temporarily relieved the left sciatic pain and low back pain, respectively. To confirm the effect of local injection on low back pain, we gave a second local injection, which once again relieved the low back pain. Microendoscopic resection of the pseudoarticulation region and discectomy successfully relieved all symptoms. This report illustrates the effectiveness of minimally invasive resection of the transverse process for the treatment of low back pain with Bertolotti’s syndrome.

  19. Differences across health care systems in outcome and cost-utility of surgical and conservative treatment of chronic low back pain: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barz Thomas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little evidence on differences across health care systems in choice and outcome of the treatment of chronic low back pain (CLBP with spinal surgery and conservative treatment as the main options. At least six randomised controlled trials comparing these two options have been performed; they show conflicting results without clear-cut evidence for superior effectiveness of any of the evaluated interventions and could not address whether treatment effect varied across patient subgroups. Cost-utility analyses display inconsistent results when comparing surgical and conservative treatment of CLBP. Due to its higher feasibility, we chose to conduct a prospective observational cohort study. Methods This study aims to examine if 1. Differences across health care systems result in different treatment outcomes of surgical and conservative treatment of CLBP 2. Patient characteristics (work-related, psychological factors, etc. and co-interventions (physiotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, return-to-work programs, etc. modify the outcome of treatment for CLBP 3. Cost-utility in terms of quality-adjusted life years differs between surgical and conservative treatment of CLBP. This study will recruit 1000 patients from orthopaedic spine units, rehabilitation centres, and pain clinics in Switzerland and New Zealand. Effectiveness will be measured by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI at baseline and after six months. The change in ODI will be the primary endpoint of this study. Multiple linear regression models will be used, with the change in ODI from baseline to six months as the dependent variable and the type of health care system, type of treatment, patient characteristics, and co-interventions as independent variables. Interactions will be incorporated between type of treatment and different co-interventions and patient characteristics. Cost-utility will be measured with an index based on EQol-5D in combination with cost

  20. What is an acceptable outcome of treatment before it begins? Methodological considerations and implications for patients with chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Manniche, Claus; Korsholm, Lars; Grunnet-Nilsson, Niels; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Understanding changes in patient-reported outcomes is indispensable for interpretation of results from clinical studies. As a consequence the term "minimal clinically important difference" (MCID) was coined in the late 1980s to ease classification of patients into improved, not changed or...... deteriorated. Several methodological categories have been developed determining the MCID, however, all are subject to weaknesses or biases reducing the validity of the reported MCID. The objective of this study was to determine the reproducibility and validity of a novel method for estimating low back pain......), Bournemouth questionnaire (BQ) and numeric pain rating scale (NRS(pain)) were filled in at baseline. The modified questionnaires determined what the patient considered an acceptable post-treatment outcome which allowed us to calculate the MCID(pre). Concurrent comparisons between the MCID(pre), instrument...

  1. What is adolescent low back pain? Current definitions used to define the adolescent with low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Milanese

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Steven Milanese, Karen Grimmer-SomersCentre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South AustraliaAbstract: Adolescent low back pain (ALBP is a common form of adolescent morbidity which remains poorly understood. When attempting a meta-analysis of observational studies into ALBP, in an effort to better understand associated risk factors, it is important that the studies involved are homogenic, particularly in terms of the dependent and independent variables. Our preliminary reading highlighted the potential for lack of homogeneity in descriptors used for ALBP. This review identified 39 studies of ALBP prevalence which fulfilled the inclusion criteria, ie, English language, involving adolescents (aged 10 to 19 years, pain localized to lumbar region, and not involving specific subgroups such as athletes and dancers. Descriptions for ALBP used in the literature were categorized into three categories: general ALBP, chronic/recurrent ALBP, and severe/disabling ALBP. Whilst the comparison of period prevalence rates for each category suggest that the three represent different forms of ALBP, it remains unclear whether they represented different stages on a continuum, or represent separate entities. The optimal period prevalence for ALBP recollection depends on the category of ALBP. For general ALBP the optimal period prevalence appears to be up to 12 months, with average lifetime prevalence rates similar to 1-year prevalence rates, suggesting an influence of memory decay on pain recall.Keywords: lumbar pain, teenager, adolescent

  2. [Physiotherapy in low back pain--indications and limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, D

    2001-12-01

    These times of changing paradigms raise the question of the indications for and limits of physical therapy in back pain management. At present, several national and international guidelines for the care of chronic back pain are available. Unfortunately, the guidelines are often inconsistent concerning physiotherapy. An encompassing framework for an effective, efficient, and appropriate physiotherapy treatment needs to be developed. Within the German national health system, the "Arzneimittelkommission" [2] issued guidelines for low back pain. These guidelines endeavour to distinguish between disease related specific back pain and non specific back pain of a more functional or mechanical origin. Furthermore, the "Bundesausschuss der Arzte und Krankenkassen" in Germany dispatched guidelines (Heilmittelrichtlinien) for the prescription of "Heilmittel" (remedies other than drugs) on October 16th, 2000. These guidelines seek to appropriately refer, assign and limit the physiotherapy treatment of back pain according to a set indications catalogue. On an international basis, the World Health Organisation (WHO) [21] offers well established guidelines for the "International Classification of Functioning and Disability", 2nd version (ICIDH-2). These guidelines describe the progressive health dysfunction over three major levels: 1) body functions and structures, 2) activities of an individual, and 3) participation of an individual in social and other essential aspects of life. National and international scientific studies support the use of ICIDH-2-categories and suggest that different back pain management is required at different levels of dysfunction. For example, there is a trend to prescribe increasingly active types of treatment instead of passive ones for increasing levels of dysfunction [54]. Multimodal treatment programs [17, 29], which include physical activity, training and psychological programs as well as training of activities of daily living (ADL) ("workhardening

  3. Manipulation does not add to the effect of extension exercises in chronic low-back pain (LBP). A randomized, controlled, double blind study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J.; Laetgaard, J.; Lindecrona, A.L.; Qvistgaard, E.; Bliddal, H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Both exercises and manipulation are recommended as basic therapy in back diseases, while a possible synergistic effect of these treatments have not been clarified. This study was conducted to test a possible further effect of manipulation as adjunct to extension exercises for unspecific...... by a visual analogue scale. RESULTS: Pain in both back and leg decreased without differences between groups. Segmental binding of the low-back was associated with persisting clinical symptoms at four weeks. CONCLUSION: No additional effect was demonstrated of manipulation, when extension exercises...

  4. Low pressure pain thresholds are associated with, but does not predispose for, low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Søren; Kjær, Per; Nielsen, Thomas Graven;

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain is often associated with hyperalgesia in cross-sectional studies. In the present study, a random cohort of 40-year-old individuals (n = 264) from the general population was assessed for low back pain (LBP) status and pressure pain threshold (PPT), with follow-up assessment 4 and 8......-lasting LBP, those with a low PPT at baseline (lower 10% percentile) had no increased risk of developing LBP (p > 0.05). The findings indicate that PPT decreases as a consequence of long-lasting pain, whereas a low PPT seems not to constitute a separate risk factor for the development of LBP....

  5. Effects of gender and cognitive-behavioral management of depressive symptoms on rehabilitation outcome among inpatient orthopedic patients with chronic low back pain: a 1 year longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Hampel, Petra; Graef, Thomas; Krohn-Grimberghe, Bernhard; Tlach, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Psychological factors have been found to be of major importance for the transition from acute to chronic low back pain (CLBP). Although some evidence has been provided that depressive symptoms occur secondarily to CLBP, psychological treatment modules that specifically address depressive symptoms are not yet included in German inpatient rehabilitation programs. In this study, a standard rehabilitation program for patients with CLBP and depressive symptoms was compared to a standard rehabilita...

  6. The treatment of fear of movement/ (re)injury in chronic low back pain: further evidence on the effectiveness of exposure in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Vlaeyen, Johannes; de Jong, Jeroen; Geilen, Mario; Heuts, Peter H. T. G.; Breukelen, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Several cognitive-behavioral factors contribute to the persistence of pain disability in patients with chronic back pain. Fear-avoidance beliefs and fear of movement/(re)injury in particular have been shown to be strong predictors of physical performance and pain disability. Patients reporting substantial pain-related fear might benefit from exposure in vivo to a set of individually tailored, fear-eliciting, and hierarchically ordered physical movements rather than m...

  7. A systematic review of the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain, back and low back pain in people with spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Michailidou, C; Marston, L; Desouza, LH; Sutherland, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review and summarise the prevalence of chronic back pain (CBP), chronic low back pain (CLBP) and chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMSKP) in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and evaluate how pain is assessed. Method: A systematic literature review between 1990 and 2012 in English language journals. Twelve databases were searched including CINAHL, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed and Science direct. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: ...

  8. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy on pain of patients with low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha BANTH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic low back pain is a major health problem and has high comorbidity with psychological related disorders. As there is no consensus about the effectiveness of psychotherapy methods for chronic pain, so our target in this study was to assess the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT as a psychological intervention on pain of female patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP. Methods: 88 patients suffering from NSCLBP were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups, CBT (CBT+ usual medical care and usual medical care, respectively. The subjects were referred from physiotherapy centres of Ardebil (northwest of Iran, assessed at three time frames; before, after and four weeks after intervention by pain Mac Gil Pain questionnaire. Data obtained from the final sample (N=48 analysed by SPSS software. Results: The results of ANCOVA revealed that subjects in the CBT group in comparison to control group indicated significant improvements in pain. Effect sizes were .72 and .78 for post test 1 and post test 2 of evaluation respectively. Conclusion: CBT as a psychotherapy including cognitive restructuring, relaxation and daily home works was effective on physical on several pain senses of female Iranian patients with NSCLBP

  9. Prevalência de dor lombar crônica na população da cidade de Salvador Chronic low back pain prevalence in the population of the city of Salvador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Costa Guerra Barreto Almeida

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A dor lombar crônica atinge níveis epidêmicos na população geral e informações sobre o perfil das pessoas atingidas podem ajudar a direcionar investimentos para seu controle. OBJETIVO: Estimar a prevalência de dor lombar crônica na população e identificar fatores associados. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com base em inquérito populacional, desenvolvido em setores censitários da cidade de Salvador classificados por nível socioeconômico. Foram entrevistados 2.297 indivíduos em que se avaliou a presença de dor lombar através do mapa corporal. A análise exploratória dos fatores associados foi realizada pela regressão logística. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de dor lombar crônica na população foi de 14,7%, com maior freqüência entre ex-fumantes (19,7%, pessoas com circunferência da cintura acima da normalidade (16,8% e com escolaridade baixa (17,4% em relação com as demais categorias. Fatores como atividade física, classe social, consumo excessivo de álcool, raça, sexo e ocupação na época da entrevista não estiveram associados à dor lombar. Na análise de regressão múltipla, estado civil solteiro associou-se negativamente com dor lombar crônica, enquanto associações positivas e estatisticamente significantes foram observadas entre o tabagismo atual ou no passado e a dor lombar (OR 1,47; IC95%; 1,11-1,96; p INTRODUCTION: Chronic low back pain has epidemic levels in the general population and profiling the individuals affected may help directing investments to control the problem. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of chronic low back pain in the population and to identify associated factors. METHODS: Transversal study based on a population survey carried out in the sectors classified by the census in the city of Salvador according to socio-economic level. 2,297 individuals were interviewed in whom low back pain was evaluated through a bodily map. Exploratory analysis of associated factors was

  10. Efficacy and tolerability of a hydrocodone extended-release tablet formulated with abuse-deterrence technology for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in patients with osteoarthritis or low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale ME

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Martin E Hale,1 Charles Laudadio,2 Ronghua Yang,2 Arvind Narayana,2 Richard Malamut2 1Gold Coast Research, LLC, Plantation, FL, 2Teva Branded Pharmaceutical Products R & D, Inc., Frazer, PA, USA Abstract: This double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the efficacy and safety of hydrocodone extended release (ER developed with abuse-deterrence technology to provide sustained pain relief and limit effects of alcohol and tablet manipulation on drug release. Eligible patients with chronic moderate-to-severe low back or osteoarthritis pain were titrated to an analgesic dose of hydrocodone ER (15–90 mg and randomized to placebo or hydrocodone ER every 12 hours. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline to week 12 in weekly average pain intensity (API; 0=no pain, 10=worst pain imaginable. Secondary measures included percentage of patients with >33% and >50% increases from baseline in weekly API, change from baseline in weekly worst pain intensity, supplemental opioid usage, aberrant drug-use behaviors, and adverse events. Overall, 294 patients were randomized and received ≥1 dose of placebo (n=148 or hydrocodone ER (n=146. Weekly API did not differ significantly between hydrocodone ER and placebo at week 12 (P=0.134; although, in post hoc analyses, the change in weekly API was significantly lower with hydrocodone ER when excluding the lowest dose (15 mg; least squares mean, –0.20 vs 0.40; P=0.032. Significantly more patients had .33% and .50% increase in weekly API with placebo (P<0.05, and mean weekly worst pain intensity was significantly lower with hydrocodone ER at week 12 (P=0.026. Supplemental medication usage was higher with placebo (86% than hydrocodone ER (79%. Incidence of aberrant drug-use behaviors was low, and adverse events were similar between groups. This study did not meet the primary endpoint, although results support the effectiveness of this hydrocodone ER formulation in managing chronic low back or

  11. Prevalence and Pharmacologic Treatment of Patients with Low Back Pain Treated at Kosovo Energetic Corporation

    OpenAIRE

    Ibraimi, Zana; Murtezani, Ardiana; Haxhiu, Bekim; Mustafa, Aziz; Martinaj, Merita

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint among the general population with a subgroup developing chronic and disabling symptoms generating large societal costs. Recurrences and functional limitations can be minimized with appropriate conservative management, including medications, physical therapy modalities, exercise and patient education. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of low back complaints in industrial workers, to investigate...

  12. Meningoradiculitis due to borreliosis presenting as low back pain only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Crevits, I.; Baert, A.L. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Casteels-Van Daele, M. [Department of Paediatrics, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-02-01

    We report a child with Borrelia burgdorferi meningoradiculitis. This entity, also known as Bannwarth syndrome, is rare and its presentation with low back pain only is even more unusual. The MRI findings can suggest the diagnosis. (orig.) With 1 fig., 3 refs.

  13. Does magnetic resonance imaging predict future low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffens, D; Hancock, M J; Maher, C G;

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to identify pathology responsible for low back pain (LBP). However, the importance of findings on MRI remains controversial. We aimed to systematically review whether MRI findings of the lumbar spine predict future LBP in different samples with and...

  14. Core Strength: Implications for Fitness and Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, Wendell; Pariser, Gina

    2002-01-01

    Presents information to promote understanding of the concept of core strength and stability, explain why this concept is important to spine health, and evaluate trunk training activities with respect to their contribution to core strength and stability, noting implications for physical fitness and low back pain. The paper reviews the anatomy and…

  15. Psychosocial Factors and Low Back Pain among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Catherine; Kassab, Osama; Gilkey, David; Linnel, Sheri; Morris, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors evaluated psychosocial factors of stress and their effects on the prevalence of low back pain (LBP) among a population of college students in a major university in Colorado. Methods: This was a nested cross-sectional study of 973 respondents who completed the National College Health Assessment survey. The…

  16. A clinician's approach to acute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, D G

    1997-01-27

    Two important goals in treating acute low back pain are to return the patient to regular activity as quickly as possible and to do so in a manner that is cost-effective. By following a logical treatment protocol, the clinician is often able to provide the treatment necessary to provide the patient with relief. Referral to an orthopedist or neurosurgeon may be appropriate in only a minority of cases. Thus, after the initial history and physical examination, ruling out (or in) conditions that require urgent or emergent care is essential. These conditions include cauda equina syndrome, circulatory collapse due to expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm, and tumor, infection, and other underlying disorders as a cause of low back pain. Patients without these conditions can be started on conservative therapy-without radiographic or laboratory tests-regardless of the specific diagnosis. Conservative therapy consists of passage of time, controlled physical activity, physical modalities (e.g., cryotherapy or thermotherapy), local injections, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and muscle relaxants. Because low back pain is so common, even the small proportion of patients who do not improve after 6 weeks of conservative therapy represents a sizable number. The location and radiation of pain are used as initial guides to classifying these patients into four groups: those with localized pain, sciatica, anterior thigh pain, or posterior thigh pain. Each follows a different diagnostic path, which will be described herein. PMID:9217555

  17. Psychological aspects of acute low back pain in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Gilchrist, Iain C.

    1983-01-01

    A prospective controlled study of acute low back pain in general practice was carried out. The presence of psychiatric illness was measured by use of the general health questionnaire (GHQ), by clinical assessment, and personality factors by use of the Eysenck personality inventory (EPI). It was found that overall the amount of psychiatric illness did not differ between patients with back pain and their controls at the time of presentation, although there was a higher prevalence of previous ps...

  18. Weekly and Twice-Weekly Yoga Classes Offer Similar Low-Back Pain Relief in Low-Income Minority Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Twice-Weekly Yoga Classes Offer Similar Low-Back Pain Relief in Low-Income Minority Populations Share: yoga_ ... minority and low-income populations with chronic low-back pain. Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine, Boston ...

  19. Harpgophytum procumbens for osteoarthritis and low back pain: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrubasik Sigrun

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of Harpagophytum procumbens preparations in the treatment of various forms of musculoskeletal pain. Methods Several databases and other sources were searched to identify randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized controlled trials, and controlled clinical trials testing Harpagophytum preparations in adults suffering from pain due to osteoarthritis or low back pain. Results Given the clinical heterogeneity and insufficient data for statistical pooling, trials were described in a narrative way, taking into consideration methodological quality scores. Twelve trials were included with six investigating osteoarthritis (two were identical trials, four low back pain, and three mixed-pain conditions. Conclusions There is limited evidence for an ethanolic Harpagophytum extract containing less than Harpagophytum powder at 60 mg harpagoside in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the spine, hip and knee; (2 the use of an aqueous Harpagophytum extract at a daily dose of 100 mg harpagoside in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic non-specific low back pain; and (3 the use of an aqueous extract of Harpagophytum procumbens at 60 mg harpagoside being non-inferior to 12.5 mg rofecoxib per day for chronic non-specific low-back pain (NSLBP in the short term. Strong evidence exists for the use of an aqueous Harpagophytum extract at a daily dose equivalent of 50 mg harpagoside in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic NSLBP.

  20. Patterns of health care utilization for low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart WF

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Walter F Stewart,1 Xiaowei Yan,1 Joseph A Boscarino,1 Daniel D Maeng,1 Jack Mardekian,2 Robert J Sanchez,3 Michael R Von Korff41Geisinger Center for Health Research, 2Pfizer, Inc., 3Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 4Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to determine if primary care patients with low back pain (LBP cluster into definable care utilization subgroups that can be explained by patient and provider characteristics.Materials and methods: Adult primary care patients with an incident LBP encounter were identified from Geisinger Clinic electronic health records over 5 years. Two-thirds of the cohort had only one to two encounters. Principal component analysis was applied to the data from the remaining one-third on use of ambulatory, inpatient, emergency department, and surgery care and use of magnetic resonance imaging, injections, and opioids in 12 months following the incident encounter. Groups were compared on demographics, health behaviors, chronic and symptomatic disease burden, and a measure of physician efficiency.Results: Six factors with eigenvalues >1.5 explained 71% of the utilization variance. Patient subgroups were defined as: 1–2 LBP encounters; 2+ surgeries; one surgery; specialty care without primary care; 3+ opioid prescriptions; laboratory dominant care; and others. The surgery and 3+ opioid subgroups, while accounting for only 10.4% of the cohort, had used disproportionately more magnetic resonance imaging, emergency department, inpatient, and injectable resources. The specialty care subgroup was characterized by heavy use of inpatient care and the lowest use of injectables. Anxiety disorder and depression were not more prevalent among the surgery patients than in the others. Surgery patients had features in common with specialty care patients, but were older, had higher prevalence of Fibromyalgia, and were associated primary care physicians with worse efficiency

  1. Pregnancy Related Low Back and Pelvic Pain: a surgical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zwienen, C.M.A.

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMore than half of all pregnant women experience low back and/or pelvic pain of whom one-third has severe complaints. In most cases the pelvic pain disap­pears within a few months after delivery, either spontaneously or after con­servative treatment. In a minority of patients the pain persists even after a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program and may cause severe disability. Some patients may even be wheelchair bound or bedridden. After failure of all con­servative treatment, s...

  2. Segmental stabilizing exercises and low back pain: What is the evidence?

    OpenAIRE

    Rackwitz, Berid; Bie, Rob de; Limm, Heribert; Garnier, Katharina von; Ewert, Thomas; Stucki, Gerold

    2006-01-01

    Study design: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of segmental stabilizing exercises for acute, subacute and chronic low back pain with regard to pain, recurrence of pain, disability and return to work. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, PEDro and article reference lists were searched from 1988 onward. Randomized controlled trials with segmental stabilizing exercises for adult low ...

  3. Low Back Pain in 17 Countries, a Rasch Analysis of the ICF Core Set for Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Cecilie; Bautz-Holter, Erik; Cieza, Alarcos

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that a worldwide measurement tool may be developed based on the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for chronic conditions. The aim of the present study was to explore the possibility of constructing a cross-cultural measurement of functioning for patients with low back pain…

  4. A bio-psycho-social exercise program (RÜCKGEWINN for chronic low back pain in rehabilitation aftercare - Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeifer Klaus

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is strong, internationally confirmed evidence for the short-term effectiveness of multimodal interdisciplinary specific treatment programs for chronic back pain. However, the verification of long-term sustainability of achieved effects is missing so far. For long-term improvement of pain and functional ability high intervention intensity or high volume seems to be necessary (> 100 therapy hours. Especially in chronic back pain rehabilitation, purposefully refined aftercare treatments offer the possibility to intensify positive effects or to increase their sustainability. However, quality assured goal-conscious specific aftercare programs for the rehabilitation of chronic back pain are absent. Methods/Design This study aims to examine the efficacy of a specially developed bio-psycho-social chronic back pain specific aftercare intervention (RÜCKGEWINN in comparison to the current usual aftercare (IRENA and a control group that is given an educational booklet addressing pain-conditioned functional ability and back pain episodes. Overall rehabilitation effects as well as predictors for compliance to the aftercare programs are analysed. Therefore, a multicenter prospective 3-armed randomised controlled trial is conducted. 456 participants will be consecutively enrolled in inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation and assigned to either one of the three study arms. Outcomes are measured before and after rehabilitation. Aftercare programs are assessed at ten month follow up after dismissal form rehabilitation. Discussion Special methodological and logistic challenges are to be mastered in this trial, which accrue from the interconnection of aftercare interventions to their residential district and the fact that the proportion of patients who take part in aftercare programs is low. The usability of the aftercare program is based on the transference into the routine care and is also reinforced by developed manuals with structured

  5. Randomized controlled trials in industrial low back pain relating to return to work. Part 2. Discogenic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, S J; Radack, K L; O'Brien, D R

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine the efficacy of treatments for discogenic low back pain (LBP) by examining all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of discogenic LBP published in the English language literature between 1975 and 1993 with "return to work" (RTW) as the end point. From more than 4,000 LBP citations, nearly 600 articles were initially reviewed; 35 studies met our selection criteria. Twenty-two studies were discussed in Part 1 (Acute Interventions) or will be discussed in Part 3 (Chronic Interventions). In this review, of 13 RCTs assessing interventions for LBP with sciatica, 9 were appropriate for their focus on, and radiologic confirmation of, discogenic LBP. The treatments assessed included chemonucleolysis, surgical discectomy, and epidural steroid injection. A 26-point system to assess the quality of methodologic rigor was used for each article. Our literature survey found a need for additional studies comparing surgery, conservative care, epidural steroids, traction, and other approaches to determine their individual effects for RTW after discogenic disease. PMID:8931535

  6. Deployment-related risk factors of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Marott, Jacob Louis; Gyntelberg, Finn;

    2014-01-01

    Where much is known about the consequences of spinal and low back pain (LBP) during military deployments, there is lesser knowledge of risk factors for LBP among the deployed forces. The objective of this study was to identify deployment-related exposures associated with LBP. The study was a ques...... their subordinates and involve medical personnel, especially deployed physiotherapists, by giving advice to soldiers of different military occupational specialties on how to optimize ergonomics at work....

  7. Patterns of health care utilization for low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart WF; Yan X; Boscarino JA; Maeng DD; Mardekian J; Sanchez RJ; Von Korff MR

    2015-01-01

    Walter F Stewart,1 Xiaowei Yan,1 Joseph A Boscarino,1 Daniel D Maeng,1 Jack Mardekian,2 Robert J Sanchez,3 Michael R Von Korff41Geisinger Center for Health Research, 2Pfizer, Inc., 3Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 4Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to determine if primary care patients with low back pain (LBP) cluster into definable care utilization subgroups that can be explained by patient and provider characteristics.Materials and m...

  8. Risk factors for low back pain in nurses

    OpenAIRE

    MA. Mohseni-Bandpei; M. Fakhri; M. Ahmad-Shirvani; M. Bagheri-Nesami; A. Khalilian

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly work-related conditions and nursing profession has one of the highest rates of back injuries (more than 50%) among all occupations. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for back injuries in nursing personnel. Materials and methods : Following ethical approval, 1226 nurses were randomly recruited from 13 hospitals in North of Iran. Different questionnaires were designe...

  9. Subclassification of low back pain: a cross-country comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Billis, Evdokia V.; McCarthy, Christopher J.; Oldham, Jacqueline A

    2007-01-01

    Various health professionals have attempted to classify low back pain (LBP) subgroups and have developed several LBP classification systems. Knowing that culture has an effect on LBP symptomatology, assessment findings and clinical decision making, the aim of this review is to perform a cross-country comparative review amongst the published classification systems, addressing each country’s similarities and differences as well as exploring whether cultural factors have been incorporated into t...

  10. Low back pain among female nurses in Yemen

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled Ghilan; Abdulla Al-Taiar; Nuha Al Yousfi; Rania Al Zubaidi; Iman Awadh; Zaher Al-Obeyed

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of Low Back Pain (LBP) among female nursing staff and explore the potential risk factors associated with LBP. Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on randomly selected female nurses using payroll as a sampling frame in all public hospitals in Sana'a City, Yemen. Data was collected through face-to-face interview using a structured, pre-coded questionnaire that was available in Arabic and English. Weight and height...

  11. Managing Low Back Pain in the Primary Care Setting: The Know-Do Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ann Scott

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To ascertain knowledge gaps in the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic low back pain (LBP in the primary care setting to prepare a scoping survey for identifying knowledge gaps in LBP management among Alberta’s primary care practitioners, and to identify potential barriers to implementing a multidisciplinary LBP guideline.

  12. Evidence-based classification of low back pain in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Lemeunier, Nadège; Wedderkopp, Niels; Kjær, Per

    2013-01-01

    It was previously assumed that low back pain (LBP) is a disorder that can be classified as acute, subacute and chronic. Lately, the opinion seems to have veered towards a concept of it being a more recurrent or cyclic condition. Interestingly, a recent review of the literature indicated that LBP in...

  13. Patterns of Low Back Pain in children/adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Per; Wedderkopp, Niels; Korsholm, Lars;

    as having had reported pain in the lower back within the past month. The prevalence estimates and the various patterns of LBP reporting over time are presented as percentages. Results: Of the 771 children sampled, 62%, 57%, and 58% participated in the three back surveys. The three prevalence......Background: It is generally acknowledged that low back pain (LBP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, not many studies have looked at the way LBP tracks over age and how common it is until early adulthood. Purposes: The purposes of this presentation are to show the prevalence...

  14. Experiences of Rehabilitation Professionals with the Implementation of a Back School for Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Stefan; Faller, Hermann; Pfeifer, Klaus; Meng, Karin

    2016-01-01

    A standardized curriculum back school (CBS) has been recommended for further dissemination in medical rehabilitation in Germany. However, implementation of self-management education programs into practice is challenging. In low back pain care, individual factors of professionals could be decisive regarding implementation fidelity. The study aim was to explore attitudes and experiences of professionals who conducted the back school. Qualitative interviews were led with 45 rehabilitation professionals. The data were examined using thematic analysis. Three central themes were identified: (a) "back school as a common thread," (b) "theory versus practice," and (c) "participation and patient-centeredness." The CBS and its manual were frequently described positively because they provide structure. However, specified time was mentioned critically and there were heterogeneous perceptions regarding flexibility in conducting the CBS. Theory and practice in the CBS were discussed concerning amount, distribution, and conjunction. Participation and patient-centeredness were mainly mentioned in terms of amount and heterogeneity of participation as well as the demand for competences of professionals. Factors were detected that may either positively or negatively influence the implementation fidelity of self-management education programs. The results are explorative and provide potential explanatory mechanisms for behavior and acceptance of rehabilitation professionals regarding the implementation of biopsychosocial back schools. PMID:27446615

  15. Long-term effects of a cognitive-behavioral training program for the management of depressive symptoms among patients in orthopedic inpatient rehabilitation of chronic low back pain: a 2-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Tlach, Lisa; Hampel, Petra

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the 2-year outcome of a cognitive-behavioral training program for the management of depressive symptoms for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and co-existing depressive symptoms compared with the standard rehabilitation. Therefore, a quasi-experimental 3 × 2 × 5 (treatment condition × gender × time) repeated measures design with five assessment points (pre-treatment, post-treatment, 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up) was employed among N ...

  16. A walking programme and a supervised exercise class versus usual physiotherapy for chronic low back pain: a single-blinded randomised controlled trial. (The Supervised Walking In comparison to Fitness Training for Back Pain (SWIFT) Trial).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Deirdre A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a persistent disabling condition with rising significant healthcare, social and economic costs. Current research supports the use of exercise-based treatment approaches that encourage people with CLBP to assume a physically active role in their recovery. While international clinical guidelines and systematic reviews for CLBP support supervised group exercise as an attractive first-line option for treating large numbers of CLBP patients at low cost, barriers to their delivery include space and time restrictions in healthcare settings and poor patient attendance. The European Clinical Guidelines have identified the need for research in the use of brief\\/minimal contact self-activation interventions that encourage participation in physical activity for CLBP. Walking may be an ideally suited form of individualized exercise prescription as it is easy to do, requires no special skills or facilities, and is achievable by virtually all ages with little risk of injury, but its effectiveness for LBP is unproven. METHODS AND DESIGN: This study will be an assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial that will investigate the difference in clinical effectiveness and costs of an individualized walking programme and a supervised general exercise programme compared to usual physiotherapy, which will act as the control group, in people with chronic low back pain. A sample of 246 patients will be recruited in Dublin, Ireland through acute general hospital outpatient physiotherapy departments that provide treatment for people with CLBP. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three groups in a concealed manner. The main outcomes will be functional disability, pain, quality of life, fear avoidance, back beliefs, physical activity, satisfaction and costs, which will be evaluated at baseline, and 3, 6 and 12 months [follow-up by pre-paid postage]. Qualitative telephone interviews and focus groups will be embedded in the research

  17. A walking programme and a supervised exercise class versus usual physiotherapy for chronic low back pain: a single-blinded randomised controlled trial. (The Supervised Walking In comparison to Fitness Training for Back Pain (SWIFT Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly Leslie

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic low back pain (CLBP is a persistent disabling condition with rising significant healthcare, social and economic costs. Current research supports the use of exercise-based treatment approaches that encourage people with CLBP to assume a physically active role in their recovery. While international clinical guidelines and systematic reviews for CLBP support supervised group exercise as an attractive first-line option for treating large numbers of CLBP patients at low cost, barriers to their delivery include space and time restrictions in healthcare settings and poor patient attendance. The European Clinical Guidelines have identified the need for research in the use of brief/minimal contact self-activation interventions that encourage participation in physical activity for CLBP. Walking may be an ideally suited form of individualized exercise prescription as it is easy to do, requires no special skills or facilities, and is achievable by virtually all ages with little risk of injury, but its effectiveness for LBP is unproven. Methods and design This study will be an assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial that will investigate the difference in clinical effectiveness and costs of an individualized walking programme and a supervised general exercise programme compared to usual physiotherapy, which will act as the control group, in people with chronic low back pain. A sample of 246 patients will be recruited in Dublin, Ireland through acute general hospital outpatient physiotherapy departments that provide treatment for people with CLBP. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three groups in a concealed manner. The main outcomes will be functional disability, pain, quality of life, fear avoidance, back beliefs, physical activity, satisfaction and costs, which will be evaluated at baseline, and 3, 6 and 12 months [follow-up by pre-paid postage]. Qualitative telephone interviews and focus groups will be

  18. What is adolescent low back pain? Current definitions used to define the adolescent with low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Milanese, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Steven Milanese, Karen Grimmer-SomersCentre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South AustraliaAbstract: Adolescent low back pain (ALBP) is a common form of adolescent morbidity which remains poorly understood. When attempting a meta-analysis of observational studies into ALBP, in an effort to better understand associated risk factors, it is important that the studies involved are homogenic, particularly in terms of the dependent and independent variables. Our...

  19. The effect of low back exercise on the pain condition of sedentary women who Suffering from low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Arıkan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 15 sedentary women were taken to study with the aim of to determine the effect of four week exercise at the middle aged women suffering from low back pain (age 27,933±3,104, height 163,266±5,573, body weight 59,466±9,905, BMI 21,933±3,127. Participants was informed about low back health and given exercise program. Exercises were put in to practice twice a day for four weeks. Exercise were started five times repeat in first week, ten times in second and it continued fifteen times in third and fourth weeks. Before and the after the exercise program Oswestry Each scale was applied to participants. First and the last tests were compared repeated t test, and the results were evaluated at the level of p<0,05. Decreasing the pain was determined after exercise program of ache, personal caring, heaving, walking, sitting, sleeping, wandering, sexual and social life. In conclusion the exercise program which was applied by the participants, were reduced their low back pain.

  20. Evaluation and implementation of graded in vivo exposure for chronic low back pain in a German outpatient setting: a study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Riecke, Jenny; Holzapfel, Sebastian; Rief, Winfried; Glombiewski, Julia Anna

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study is to introduce an adapted protocol of in vivo exposure for fear avoidant back pain patients and its implementation in the German health care system without multidisciplinary teams. Case studies demonstrated promising effects but three preceding randomized controlled trials (RCTs) could not support the former results. More empirical support is necessary to further substantiate the effectiveness of in vivo exposure. Methods A total of 108 chronic low...

  1. Assessing a risk tailored intervention to prevent disabling low back pain - protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Marnitz Ulf; Lindena Gabriele; Fahland Ruth; Pfingsten Michael; Chenot Jean-François; Schmidt Carsten; Pfeifer Klaus; Kohlmann Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although most patients with low back pain (LBP) recover within a few weeks a significant proportion has recurrent episodes or will develop chronic low back pain. Several mainly psychosocial risk factors for developing chronic LBP have been identified. However, effects of preventive interventions aiming at behavioural risk factors and unfavourable cognitions have yielded inconsistent results. Risk tailored interventions may provide a cost efficient and effective means to ta...

  2. Investigation of High-Sensitivity C-reactive Protein and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate in Low Back Pain Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chan Hong; Lee, Sang Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain can be a manifestation of lumbar degenerative disease, herniation of intervertebral discs, arthritis, or lumbar stenosis. When nerve roots are compromised, low back pain, with or without lower extremity involvement, may occur. Local inflammatory processes play an important role in patients with acute lumbosciatic pain. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) measu...

  3. The association of comorbidities, utilization and costs for patients identified with low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Ritzwoller Debra P; Crounse Laurie; Shetterly Susan; Rublee Dale

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Existing studies have examined the high prevalence of LBP along with the high treatment costs of patients with low back pain (LBP). Various factors have been shown to be correlated or predictive of chronic or episodic LBP including the characteristics of the initial episode, pain, comorbid conditions, psychosocial issues, and opiate use. This study replicates and extends earlier studies by examining the association of patient characteristics including baseline comorbiditie...

  4. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Low Back Pain and CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section CAM Low Back Pain and CAM Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of ... from CAM treatment for conditions such as low back pain. Photo courtesy of Glenn Scimonelli "Oh, my aching ...

  5. Recurrent acute low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidural calcification is a rare cause of back pain, and spontaneous epidural calcification has not been reported previously. We describe a patient with acute low back pain and signs of lumbar nerve root compression due to epidural calcification, as demonstrated by CT-scan and MRI. Radiological signs of spondylodiscitis led to a search for an infectious cause, which was negative, and her symptoms responded rapidly to NSAID treatment alone. Her symptoms recurred 18 months later, and further imaging studies again revealed epidural calcification, but with a changed distribution. Her symptoms were relieved once more by NSAID treatment alone. We propose that epidural calcification secondary to aseptic spondylodiscitis is the main cause of acute back pain in this patient. A possible mechanism may be the pro-inflammatory effects of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within the epidural space. (orig.)

  6. Management of patients with acute nonspecific low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Isaikin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an observation of a female patient with acute non-specific low back pain (LBP. It gives current recommendations for the treatment of acute LBP and evaluates the clinical efficiency of these methods. The management of patients with acute nonspecific LBP encompasses: 1 correct information about the nature and prognosis of the disease; 2 recommendations for daily activities; 3 a short-term rational therapy with paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, and/or myorelaxants. The role of NSAIDs, ketorol in particular, in treating patients with acute nonspecific LBP is discussed.

  7. EFECTS OF PILATES ON LOW BACK PAIN AND URINE CATECHOLAMINE

    OpenAIRE

    MOHAMED AMIN ZEADA

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose. The popularity of the Pilates method created by Joseph H. Pilates in the early 1920s has increased worldwide in the last decade, confirming the fact that Pilates is much more than a fitness fad. According to a survey conducted by American Sports Data Inc, more than 10.5 million Americans participated in a Pilate's class in 2004. The aim of this study was to determine effectiveness of Pilate's protocol in decreasing of low back pain and urine catecholamine levels. Methods. T...

  8. Generic Preference-based Measures for Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Finch, Aureliano Paolo; Melina DRITSAKI; Jommi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. Systematic review. Objective. This systematic review examines validity and responsiveness of three generic preference-based measures in patients with low back pain (LBP). Summary of Background Data. LBP is a very common incapacitating disease with a significant impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Health state utility values can be derived from various preference-based HRQoL instruments, and among them the most widely ones are EuroQol 5 dimensions (EQ-5D), Short For...

  9. Low back pain prevention for nursing students: a kettlebell intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Peltoniemi, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to educate and provide information to promote nursing students to take action in Low Back Pain (LBP) prevention. LBP is a high risk in nursing and prevention measures are recommended prior to starting the work. LBP is a debilitating musculoskeletal condition which affects all parts of the world. Prevention measures are many and this thesis aims to promote the Kettlebell training as one of them. The Kettlebell is a cast-iron ball with a handle. It has become incre...

  10. Low Back Pain and Related Factors Among Iranian Office Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rezaee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Low Back Pain (LBP is likely the most common medical disorder among work population. In this survey, prevalence of LBP and pain severity and the association of them with occupational and non-occupational risk factors were specified among office workers in Baqiyatallah University Of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran in 2006 In this way the point prevalence of LBP and pain severity among office workers, role of some personal and occupational factors, and self-reported pain severity were assessed. The instruments used included direct interview, a body discomfort assessment tool that consisted of a 10-centimeter color Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and a questionnaire. Face to face, interview was done for measuring of weight and height of subjects. Of 1580 volunteers, 1436 persons were participated. About 80% (79.8% of respondents were male. Mean age of responders was 35.08 years. More than 60% had at least one episode of LBP during their working life and 45.0% of pain sufferers' first attack was during their employment. Lifetime prevalence of LBP was 92.1% and this result for last 12 months was 37.3%. Increased age up to 40 years, increased weight, sitting work style more than 4 hours, computer use more than 5 hours a day also past history of LBP had a positive association with increased like hood of occurrence of LBP. LBP had a high prevalence in office workers. This study might help to estimate low back problems in office workers and emphasize healthy lifestyle, ergonomic measurement and control, good posture and holding educational programs.

  11. Mechanisms of low back pain: a guide for diagnosis and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, Massimo; Montella, Silvana; Salici, Fabiana; Valente, Adriana; Marchesini, Maurizio; Compagnone, Christian; Baciarello, Marco; Manferdini, Maria Elena; Fanelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a chronic pain syndrome in the lower back region, lasting for at least 3 months. CLBP represents the second leading cause of disability worldwide being a major welfare and economic problem. The prevalence of CLBP in adults has increased more than 100% in the last decade and continues to increase dramatically in the aging population, affecting both men and women in all ethnic groups, with a significant impact on functional capacity and occupational activities. It can also be influenced by psychological factors, such as stress, depression and/or anxiety. Given this complexity, the diagnostic evaluation of patients with CLBP can be very challenging and requires complex clinical decision-making. Answering the question “what is the pain generator” among the several structures potentially involved in CLBP is a key factor in the management of these patients, since a mis-diagnosis can generate therapeutical mistakes. Traditionally, the notion that the etiology of 80% to 90% of LBP cases is unknown has been mistaken perpetuated across decades. In most cases, low back pain can be attributed to specific pain generator, with its own characteristics and with different therapeutical opportunity. Here we discuss about radicular pain, facet Joint pain, sacro-iliac pain, pain related to lumbar stenosis, discogenic pain. Our article aims to offer to the clinicians a simple guidance to identify pain generators in a safer and faster way, relying a correct diagnosis and further therapeutical approach.

  12. Interventional radiological therapy of benign low back pain syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal affections belong to the most widespread sources of back pain. Beside medical history and clinical examination, the radiological investigation plays an important rote in the clinical workup especially with the modern Cross sectional imaging methods such as computed and magnetic resonance tomography. After exclusion of a malignant disease usually a conservative therapeutic approach is the first line treatment option. If the conservative treatment approach falls a minimalinvasive image guided diagnostic or therapeutic infiltration may be considered. Thereby the interventional radiologist should be a member of the team which decides the clinical strategy. This article describes epidemiology and pathophysiology, common pre-interventional diagnostic strategies, drugs, indications, possible complications and the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic minimally invasive image guided techniques in low back pain. In this context facet joint blockade, periradicular and peridural therapy as well as sacroiliac joint blockades are discussed

  13. Prediction of low back pain with two expert systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Murat; Gulbandilar, Eyyup; Cimbiz, Ali

    2012-06-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the common problems encountered in medical applications. This paper proposes two expert systems (artificial neural network and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system) for the assessment of the LBP level objectively. The skin resistance and visual analog scale (VAS) values have been accepted as the input variables for the developed systems. The results showed that the expert systems behave very similar to real data and that use of the expert systems can be used to successfully diagnose the back pain intensity. The suggested systems were found to be advantageous approaches in addition to existing unbiased approaches. So far as the authors are aware, this is the first attempt of using the two expert systems achieving very good performance in a real application. In light of some of the limitations of this study, we also identify and discuss several areas that need continued investigation. PMID:20978929

  14. POSSIBILITIES OF LOCAL THERAPY FOR LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Chugunov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is one of the most common pain syndromes caused by musculoarticular pathology. Analgesics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, myorelaxants, and non-drug therapies are used to treat patients with LBP. The sufficient efficiency of this type of therapy is strongly supported by the results of clinical trials; its fundamentals have been embodied in a number of regional and international guidelines for the management of patients with LBP. Alongside the sufficient efficacy of NSAIDs, their use, their long-term use in particular, is associated with a wide range of adverse reactions. The increased efficiency of treatment in patients with LBP is frequently achieved by the application of topical dosage forms. Whether the new Russian drug Nanoplast forte may be used to treat patients with LBP is considered.

  15. Low back pain in military recruits in relation to social background and previous low back pain. A cross-sectional and prospective observational survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, L.; Larsen, K.; Weidich, F.;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditionally, studies on the etiology of low back pain have been carried out in adult populations. However, since low back pain often appears early in life, more research on young populations is needed. This study focuses on the importance of social background factors and previous low...... back pain in the development of low back pain in military recruits. METHODS: During a three-month period, Danish military recruits with different social backgrounds live and work under the same conditions. Thus, there is an opportunity to investigate the influence of social background on the...... higher education increased the risk of low back pain during service (OR: 1.9;1.2-3.0, for the highest educated group), but not of the consequences (leg pain and exemption from duty), whereas high IQ decreased the risk of these consequences (odds ratios as low as 0.2;0.1-0.8 for exemption from duty in the...

  16. The influence of catastrophizing on treatment outcome in patients with non-specific low back pain: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Wertli, Maria M; Burgstaller, Jakob M.; Weiser, Sherri; Steurer, Johann; Kofmehl, Reto; Held, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Systematic reviewObjective. The aim of the current study was to assess the effect of catastrophizing on treatment efficacy and outcome in patients treated for low back pain.Summary of Background Data. Psychological factors including catastrophizing thoughts are believed to increase the risk for chronic low back pain. The influence of catastrophizing is debated.Methods. In September 2012 the following databases were searched: BIOSIS, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Embase, OTSeeker, Pe...

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of acute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casazza, Brian A

    2012-02-15

    Acute low back pain is one of the most common reasons for adults to see a family physician. Although most patients recover quickly with minimal treatment, proper evaluation is imperative to identify rare cases of serious underlying pathology. Certain red flags should prompt aggressive treatment or referral to a spine specialist, whereas others are less concerning. Serious red flags include significant trauma related to age (i.e., injury related to a fall from a height or motor vehicle crash in a young patient, or from a minor fall or heavy lifting in a patient with osteoporosis or possible osteoporosis), major or progressive motor or sensory deficit, new-onset bowel or bladder incontinence or urinary retention, loss of anal sphincter tone, saddle anesthesia, history of cancer metastatic to bone, and suspected spinal infection. Without clinical signs of serious pathology, diagnostic imaging and laboratory testing often are not required. Although there are numerous treatments for nonspecific acute low back pain, most have little evidence of benefit. Patient education and medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and muscle relaxants are beneficial. Bed rest should be avoided if possible. Exercises directed by a physical therapist, such as the McKenzie method and spine stabilization exercises, may decrease recurrent pain and need for health care services. Spinal manipulation and chiropractic techniques are no more effective than established medical treatments, and adding them to established treatments does not improve outcomes. No substantial benefit has been shown with oral steroids, acupuncture, massage, traction, lumbar supports, or regular exercise programs. PMID:22335313

  18. Low back pain in military recruits in relation to social background and previous low back pain. A cross-sectional and prospective observational survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidick Flemming

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditionally, studies on the etiology of low back pain have been carried out in adult populations. However, since low back pain often appears early in life, more research on young populations is needed. This study focuses on the importance of social background factors and previous low back pain in the development of low back pain in military recruits. Methods During a three-month period, Danish military recruits with different social backgrounds live and work under the same conditions. Thus, there is an opportunity to investigate the influence of social background on the development of low back pain, when persons are removed from their usual environment and submitted to a number of new stressors. In addition, the importance of the recruits' previous low back pain history in relation to low back pain during military service was studied. This was done by means of questionnaires to 1,711 recruits before and after this three-month period. Results Sedentary occupation was negatively associated with long-lasting low back pain (>30 days during the past year at baseline with an odds ratios of 0.55 (95% CI: 0.33–0.90. This effect vanished during service. Having parents with higher education increased the risk of low back pain during service (OR: 1.9;1.2–3.0, for the highest educated group, but not of the consequences (leg pain and exemption from duty, whereas high IQ decreased the risk of these consequences (odds ratios as low as 0.2;0.1–0.8 for exemption from duty in the group with highest IQ. Long-lasting low back pain prior to service increased the risk of long-lasting low back pain (OR: 4.8;2.1–10.8, leg pain (OR: 3.3;1.3–8.3 and exemption from duty during service (OR: 5.9;2.4–14.8. Conclusion Sedentary occupation is negatively associated with low back pain at baseline. This protective effect disappears, when the person becomes physically active. For predicting trouble related to the low back during service, the

  19. Cooperative pain education and self-management (COPES): study design and protocol of a randomized non-inferiority trial of an interactive voice response-based self-management intervention for chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Heapy, Alicia A.; Higgins, Diana M.; LaChappelle, Kathryn M.; Kirlin, Joseph; Goulet, Joseph L.; Czlapinski, Rebecca A.; Buta, Eugenia; Piette, John D; Krein, Sarah L.; Richardson, Caroline R; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine report “Relieving Pain in America” recommends the promotion of patient self-management of pain for all people with pain. Given the high prevalence of chronic pain in the US, new strategies are needed to enhance access to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and other evidence-based treatments designed to facilitate self-management of chronic pain conditions. Although CBT is efficacious, many patients have limited or no access to CBT. Technology-assisted deli...

  20. Does the diagnosis influence the outcome in a multimodal outpatient pain management program for low back pain and sciatica? A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artner, Juraj; Kurz, Stephan; Cakir, Balkan; Reichel, Heiko; Lattig, Friederike

    2012-01-01

    The literature describes multimodal pain-management programs as successful therapy options in the conservative treatment of chronic low back pain. Yet, the intensity and inclusion criteria of such programs remain debatable. In many studies, the pain originating from spinal structures is described as nonspecific low back pain - a diffuse diagnosis without serious implications. The purpose of this study is to compare the short-term outcomes between patients suffering from sciatica due to a discus intervertebralis herniation and those suffering from low back pain caused by facet joint disease after 3 weeks of treatment in an intense multimodal outpatient program in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the university hospital. PMID:22888258